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Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith

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Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

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Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith y

Family

Table of Contents

Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith / y

Family

The Greater er Nanaimo and Ladysmith Early Years Partnershipss are pleased to present the ninth edition of the Greater er Nanaimo Ladysmith Family. The magazine is a collaborative effort of both communities who have come together to create an awareness of the importance of the early years. It is with great appreciation that the Partnerships acknowledge the funding and support provided by Success by Six, Children First and the Nanaimo Bulletin/Black Press. A total of 40,000 copies of the Greater Nanaimo & Ladysmith family magazine will be distributed in Ladysmith and Nanaimo through the Ladysmith Chronicle and Nanaimo News Bulletin. Copies are also available at health units, libraries, participating businesses and family agencies. The views expressed by the advertisers do not necessarily represent the opinions of the editorial committee of this magazine.

4 Investing in early childhood 5 Active children 6 Ask your pediatrician 7 Your child at play 8 Good dental habits start early 9 I love when we talk 10 My child says the most amazing things 11-13 Drop-in Activity calendars 14 Early Years Resources 15 Delight in your child 16-1 Happy toddlers at the table 18-1 Triple P provides simple strategies 21 Dads do make a difference 22 Lentil soup with beef and barley Cover and inside photography by

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Investing in early childhood can change community BY SHELLEY ANDERSON Just over four years ago a group of people from varied community agencies in Nanaimo and Ladysmith gathered together to brainstorm ideas as how to create awareness about the importance of the early years and develop a means to communicate all of the terrific activities and resources available for young children and families in our community. The result is the magazine that you are reading. As we go to print for our 9th edition of the Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family magazine we continue our commitment to support parents and communities in creating healthy, nurturing environments for our youngest children, so that by the age of 6 they are physically, socially and emotionally ready to succeed in school. During the past four years the Early Childhood Development Initiatives Success by 6 and Children First along with community partners, Greater Nanaimo Early Years Partnership, Ladysmith Early Years Partnership School District 68, Vancouver Island Health Authority, Vancouver Island Regional Library and The Ministry of Children and Family Development as well as service providers to numerous to mention have collaborated to educate the community and specifically busi-

ness on the importance of the Early Years. The message?... 90% of the brain develops by age 5, and that the right experience at the right time is crucial to a child’s successful development. Research indicates that children’s early experiences have far reaching and life-long effects on the development of their brains and behaviours. Today as I write this message the importance of the Early Years is once again being highlighted on a Province wide level throughout the media. The powerhouse partnership of The Vancouver Board of Trade and the Justice Institute of British Columbia recently hosted a press conference that highlights a landmark report making economic case for early childhood investment: Pay now or pay more later. The report released in early September underscores what our community has been saying for years, Investing in early childhood development, particularly before the age of five, will save governments and society millions of dollars. In the report, Kids ‘N Crime: Economic Aspects of the Development and Prevention of Criminality among Children and Youth, the business organization takes an economic approach to the benefits of positive early childhood intervention, resulting in

The place to go when your family needs a helping hand! www.nanaimocdc.com 1135 Nelson St. Nanaimo, BC V9S 2K4 Ph: (250) 753-0251 Fax: (250) 753-5614

School District 68 Elizabeth Pennell, School District 68 Early Years Coordinator epennell@sd68.bc.ca Children First Amber Bruner, facilitator, Ladysmith and Nanaimo

Winter Skating Lessons

Services Provided:

Preschool - 30 mths. - 4 years SPACES AVAILABLE

Success By 6 Shelley Anderson, Central Island Early Years Coordinator – Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Parksville, Oceanside, Port Alberni, West Coast/Ucluelet shelleyanderson@shaw.ca successby6bc.ca

Nanaimo Skating Club

Nanaimo

Early Intervention program (0-6 years) • Speech/Language/Physio/Occupational Therapy • Infant Development/Family Development Program School Aged Therapy (OT/PT) Supported Child Development/Family Support Assessment for Complex Development & Behavioural Conditions

enhanced productivity, GDP growth, reduced crime and a drastically decreased financial burden on health, justice and social programs needed throughout adult life. As you flip through the pages of the Family magazine it is our hope that you will find activities, connections and group seminars and articles that resonate with you as the parent or caregiver of a young child. Please email - we welcome your feedback. Healthy children are the foundation for a healthy community. Investing in childhood beginnings can change our community forever.

At Cliff MacNabb, Beban Park

Weekly Programs Running from Sept 20-Dec 17th and Jan 4– Mar 9th

Canskate & Prepower (Learn to Skate Program)

(Skating Skills for Hockey)

Monday and/or Wednesday 5:15-6:00pm Only Sanctioned Club in Nanaimo

Accepting OnGoing Registration. Pro rated fees available

-Skaters progress at own pace in a fun environment -Class ratio of 1:10 students. -Professional National certified coaches with over 25yrs of national & international experience.

For information on this program or programs for more experienced skaters, please call Carrie at 250-668-4758 or visit our website {www.nananimoskatingclub.com}


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

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Active children Gone are the days when children were sent out the door to play in the early morning and told to make sure they were home before it got dark. Children are seldom seen playing on the streets anymore and when they are, people are suspicious that they are up to no good. The 2010 Active Healthy Kids Canada report card paints a grim picture of the lifestyle led by many children in our communities. Less than half the Canadian children under five are getting regular physical activity as part of a daily routine. Only 12% of Canadian children and youth are meeting Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines. This gives us an “F” grade in physical activity. Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines recommend that children age one to five get 2 hours of physical activity each day. Children and youth need 90 minutes per day and adults should aim for 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Research shows that lifestyle patterns before the age of five can predict obesity and level of health in later childhood and through the adult years. Children today are spending more time in front of the television or computer screen than ever before. Kids spent roughly 6 hours each

weekday on screen time and 7 hours on the weekend days. This is equivalent to an adult’s work week spent sitting still with no physical activity. According to the Active Healthy Kids Canada report card, we get an “F” grade on screen time too. Too much screen time is associated with negative psychological effects like lower academic achievement, less sleep, more aggressive behav-

ior in both words and action and engaging in high risk behavior at a younger age. For healthy development, it is recommended that children under age two should have no exposure to computer or television screens. Exposing infants and toddlers to high levels of colour, movement and sound can affect health and development. For now, the recommendation is to avoid all screen time until age two and after two, parents need to select less than one to two hours of quality TV or video exposure per day for all children. If the television and computer are only in use for one or two hours of the day, this frees up most of the day for outdoor play. Children need to spend time in the yard or playground in unstructured activity every day. For children under five, playing freely with other children is critical for healthy development. This kind of play builds social skills, imagination and selfesteem. Active chores around the house also contribute to skill building and physical activity. Teach children to vacuum, rake leaves, carry firewood, help in the garden and use their bodies in activities that promote physical health. Eileen Bennewith, RD, Community Nutritionist.t

BENNY’S BUDDIES KIDS CLUB FREE drop-in program every Tuesday 9:30 am - 10:30 am near the Food Court. In partnership with PacificCARE Child Care Resource & Referral.

PLAY HARBOUR Visit our children’s play area located near Toys R Us! V

SHOP N’ STROLL S F FREE fitness class that takes your baby along for the ride every W Wednesday 9:30 am - 10:30 am. Meet in Centre Court near the Water C Clock. Register at www.shopnstroll.ca

Island living. Island style.

250.390.2721 www.woodgrovecentre.com


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CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

Ask a pediatrician I am worried that my child is overweight. What can I do? Dr. Wilma Arruda says: Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in Canada. Evidence links certain risk factors in children with heart disease. It is important to achieve a healthy active lifestyle in childhood. Over the past 20 years the number of children that are overweight has increased from 5-6% to an astonishing 30-40%. At this rate of increase it is estimated that obesity will reach epidemic proportions within the next 10 years. This trend is of particular concern because obesity in childhood and adolescence has been associated with increased risks of high blood pressure, type II diabetes, high blood cholesterol and early atherosclerosis (narrowing of the arteries) as well as increased risk of adult obesity. This rapid rate of increase in the number of overweight and obese children is associated with: Eating too much - easy availability of non-nutritious foods (junk food); Eating the wrong foods – increased intake of high fat/calorie foods along with a decrease in fruit and vegetable intake;

Sedentary lifestyle - not getting enough exercise. What can you do? ◆ Be a model for healthy eating and physical activity for your child. ◆ Cook healthy meals at home using Canada’s Food Guide as a guide. ◆ Encourage sit down meals together as a family without distractions such as TV. ◆ Prepare one meal for ALL family members and resist making a separate meal for someone

who “doesn’t like that”. ◆ Reduce the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol in the diet. ◆ Increase the amount of vegetables and fruit in the diet – a healthy plate of food is half salad/vegetables, one quarter starch (potatoes, rice, etc), and one quarter protein (meat/poultry/fish/soy). ◆ Limit portions of food and second helpings. Provide portions that are appropriate for the age of the child. ◆ Limit eating out, especially fast food. ◆ Eat when hungry – avoid snacks before mealtimes. ◆ Avoid high calorie snacks as treats or rewards. ◆ Breast feed infants. ◆ Play with your kids; ◆ Walk or bike instead of drive; ◆ Increase the number of family outings that involve walking, hiking, cycling, swimming, or other recreational activities; ◆ Limit screen time (TV watching, playing video games and computer use). Very young children should spend less than 1 hour/day on these activities. By Dr. Wilma Arruda, Community Pediatrician, Nanaimo.

North Nanaimo Early Learning Centre

Se S errvvvic ice es Pro rovi viided de ed • Daayccar are • Be B fo fore fore e aand nd n d Aft fter e Sch er ho oo ol Ca C re ( if (F ifth th Strreet) eet) ee • Ki K nd nder ercaare • Pr P es esch hoo o l • Paarent re ent n /Chi h ld hi d Mot othe h r Go he G os ose e • Paare rent ntt & Chi h ld d Dro r pp In • Fa Fami mily Sup uppo p rtt Pro po ogr gram am ms • Tr Trip i le P • Yo Yout uth th Pr Prog rog ogra r mm ra min ing g • Ev Even en nin ng Pr Prog o raam mss

Provides interactive skill building in a pre-school type setting. Circle time, phonics, outdoor play etc.

Sign up today and get your children Kindergarten-ready! Lic# Kmon7mdsfk

250-390-0701 nanaimoearlylearning.com

Contact Information 20 Fifth St. Nanaimo, BC V9R 1M7 Phone: 250-754-3215 Fax: 250-754-4771 Email: reception@bgccvi.com Website: www.bgccvi.com


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

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Your child at play Watch your little one at play. Sure she’s having fun, but take a closer look and you’ll find there’s more to this picture than meets the eye. Through play, your child develops the foundations she’ll need to succeed in life, from problem solving and social skills to basic literacy, math and science. Playing with blocks is how she learns about shapes and measurements. Playing with other children is an important part of social and emotional development and learning to negotiate and to share. Playing in a sand table, or sand at the beach, she will learn about math and balance and structure. Problem solving skills are necessary for social and academic success, and children develop most of their early problem solving abilities through play. Toys like jack-in the box help him learn about cause-and effect relationships. More open ended objects like empty boxes, bowls, and stacking cups provide opportunities for him to explore size and volume and to manipulate objects in different ways. Children at play make predictions, such as whether or not one object will fit inside another, then they test those predictions as they learn to make sense of

the world. Pretend play also helps develop important reading skills. When your child pretends that a round block is a bottle and he is going to drink from it, that’s a symbol of something, and once he understands symbols, then he can start to understand that letters stand for a word and that a printed word stands for something he understands. Give your child rich and varied experiences with verbal language through talking,

singing ,and reading together. Don’t forget that books can be wonderful play objects, cultivating a love of reading and literacy awareness from infancy. Read to your children daily, but give them books to play with too. Children learn about books long before they can read them. Encourage your child to read to her dolls or stuffed animals. Unstructured play is also very valuable. It is really where your child learns to explore, to imagine, and to get along with other children. When it comes to play, let your child take the lead. You always want to supervise your young child, but you also really want to let her create her own games. Give her a lot of options, then allow her to make her own choices. When you join in your child’s play, let her take the lead. Children develop healthy self-esteem when parents respect their imaginary play and allow them to be in charge for a change. You’ll gain valuable insight into how he thinks, how he feels, and what interests him. And by entering his world on his terms, you’ll nurture a strong parent-child bond that will last a lifetime. Sandy Weeks, Ladysmith Supported Child Development Program.

CAMPBELL RIVER — — CHILLIWACK — — COMOX VALLEY — DELTA — — KAMLOOPS — — KELOWNA —

AFFIRMEZ

— LANGLEY —

— MISSION —

— NANAIMO — — NELSON — —

VOTRE FIERTÉ FRANCOPHONE : INSCRIVEZ VOTRE ENFANT DANS UNE ÉCOLE DU CSF !

D

epuis sa création en 1995, le CSF offre des programmes et des services

NORTH VANCOUVER — éducatifs valorisant le plein épanouissement et l’identité culturelle des — PEMBERTON — apprenantes et apprenants francophones de la province. Un partenaire dans — PENTICTON — — PORT ALBERNI — — PORT COQUITLAM — — POWELL RIVER — — PRINCE GEORGE —

www.csf.bc.ca —

le développement de la collectivité francophone de la C.-B., le Conseil compte aujourd’hui plus de 4 500 élèves, 38 écoles et dessert une centaine de communautés réparties dans l’ensemble de la province.

ÉCOLE OCÉANE 250-714-0761 | 1951 Estevan Road | M/K-7 http://oceane.csf.bc.ca LE CONSEIL SCOLAIRE FRANCOPHONE DE LA COLOMBIE-BRITANNIQUE (SD No 93) 180-10200 Shellbridge Way, Richmond, (C.-B.) V6X 2W7 | (604) 214-2600 or/ou 1-888-715-2200 | info@csf.bc.ca


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CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

Good dental habits start early Good dental health is an important part of a child’s overall health. Research shows us that dental decay is a preventable disease, yet tooth decay for young children is the number one reason for hospital day surgery in our province. As parents and caregivers we have a responsibility, to our children, to ensure that they have good dental health. Taking care of your child’s teeth is not always an easy task. It can be very rewarding if you succeed in your children never having to experience dental decay. What are some of the things we can do to prevent early decay? Care for yourself! Dental decay is caused by bacteria. Children are not born with a high level of decay causing bacteria in their mouths. If, as parents, our own mouths are not healthy we may be spreading the cavity-causing bacteria to our children by something as simple as kissing our child good night on the lips. Bacteria can also be spread by licking a soother to clean it, sharing toothbrushes or tasting or chewing our children’s food. Begin cleaning as soon as the first tooth erupts. Clean teeth twice daily with a small, soft toothbrush and a tiny smear of fluoride toothpaste. Graduate to a pea-sized drop of toothpaste around age 3. Parents should clean

their child’s teeth until at least age six. Children are able to brush themselves, with parent supervision, when they can tie their shoe laces and write (not print) their name. Hold baby while feeding. If bottle feeding,

When it comes to your

avoid propping the bottle or putting baby to bed with a bottle. Avoid putting sweetened liquid in a bottle. A bottle should only contain formula, breast milk, plain milk or water. If you are breastfeeding through the night brush more

CHILD’S VISION

What could be more

IMPORTANT? It is important for your child to have a complete eye exam by age 3, before kindergarten and annually thereafter.

Watch for CLUES that may indicate problems: • An eye that turns in or out • Frowning or excessive eye rubbing

Call us to book your child’s first exam and to learn more about the signs to watch for...

Dr. Stanley Eng 9 am to 5 ppm M-S

FAMILY VISION CARE Optometrist O.D., F.A.A.O

203-477 Wallace St. Nanaimo ##7-7070 Market St. Port Hardy

250-754-6011 250-949-6282

Did you know that vision is responsible for over 80 percent of what we learn?


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

often as breast milk can also cause decay. Some babies suck on the bottle/sip cup to soothe themselves. There are other ways to provide comfort to a young child. These including cuddling or rocking the baby, rubbing their back while holding them, singing or reading a story Start giving baby sips from a cup around six months. Children should be drinking well from a cup by 12 months of age. Sippy cups should only contain water or milk. Frequent use of juice, even if diluted, can increase the risk of dental decay. Lift the Lip! Check teeth monthly for early signs of tooth decay, such as whitish lines or brown areas along the gum line. Check behind the front teeth where tooth decay often starts in very young children. Visit the Dentist by age one. Tooth decay can occur shortly after baby’s teeth first appear. The dentist will check the teeth, review feeding and comforting habits and give tips on how to brush your child’s teeth. For more information on healthy dental habits for young children please contact your community Dental Hygienist at 250-739-5845 – local 57562

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

I Love When We Talk A DVD for parents Thank you so much to the families and friends who helped us create this DVD. Thank you to our supporters and funders whose generosity took the DVD from idea to reality. Thank you to Leah Tremain whose creativity and professional eye made the DVD something beautiful as well as useful. The idea for a DVD showing families talking with young children was born in a conversation in the spring of 2008. Using Leah Tremain’s previous two DVDs as a model, a small group of local people (Leah Tremain, Elizabeth Pennell, Sandy Weeks, Barbara Pollard, and Lynne Patrick) shaped the original idea into its present format. The DVD follows two key themes: the importance of having conversations with young children and the value of story, particularly oral story, in influencing children’s language development. The hope was that through the DVD, families would be

encouraged to engage with their children in meaningful conversations, would realize the wisdom of building a child’s vocabulary, and would understand the power as well as the delight within the simple act of story telling. An additional key intention was to honor the languages and oral story telling tradition within First Nations and other cultures. We hope that families will see themselves in this DVD. We hope that they will glimpse the powerful impact that everyday conversations and story can have on the development of their child’s communication skills. We hope they will see that strong communication skills begin at birth and go beyond talking to literacy, learning and leadership. Families or agencies within School District 68 Nanaimo & Ladysmith can access this DVD free of charge at local libraries or StrongStart Centre, local Health Units or at Princess Royal Family Centre.

GYMNASTICS! THE MOTHER OF ALL SPORTS! Fitness for Life Cinderella Vancouver Opera Production November 27th, Saturday @ 1 pm

The Big g Sneeze z Axis Theatre January 30th, Saturday @ 1 pm

Old Thomas & the Little Fairyy A Bougé de La Production April 3rd Sunday @ 2:30 pm Tickets $16* Single tickets to this show should be purchased from The Port Theatre 250.754.8550

3p pack subscription p

Register g Now for Fall! PRESCHOOL - RECREATIONAL & COMPETITIVE “A Ask us about our Birthd day Party Packages!”

Child Subscription $36, Adult Subscription: $39 Family subscription $120, Single tickets $14.* All shows are performed at the VIU Theatre Bldg 310, except Old Thomas & the Little fairy which will be presented at the Port Theatre at 2:30 pm

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1911 Wilfert Road NANAIMO Where Your Children Come First!

Call to register

250-756-9102

FOUNDATION FOR AN ACTIVE LIFE


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

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EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTRE

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– Spaces Available – North Nanaimo

250-756-9777 Nanaimo’s Integrated Childcare Centre • • • • •

2 ½ to 5 years Daycare 2 1/2 hr & 4 1/2 hr. Preschool Children with Support Needs Offering Summer Programs SPACES STILL AVAILABLE

AMBER McLEOD Early Childhood Education Special Needs Educator 17 Years Experience

250-753-9440 444 LAMBERT AVE.

LICENSE CVIH-5NVRY6

Support our children, support Success by 6!

Leonard Krog M.L.A. (Nanaimo) New Democrat Official Opposition 4-77 Victoria Crescent Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 5B9 Telephone: 250-714-0630 leonard.krog.mla@leg.bc.ca

www.leonardkrog-mla.ca

DID WE MISS YOU? h

imo/Ladysmit

Greater Nana

Family

T ensure your ad is published in To o our next issue, please give us a ccall 250-753-3707

w www.nanaimobulletin.com 7777 Poplar Street

My child says the most amazing things radio to listen to the weather report for the day. We were planning a picnic. He came back saying it was going to snow for heaven’s sake! Snow in August!? When I questioned him about what exactly the weatherman said, he replied: “Well he said: ‘isolated showers’ and that means snow.”. My son was 4 years old then. I thought he was very clever. Although intelligent, my son grew up to have a significant learning disability. When he was four, I knew nothing about how to help him learn. I knew nothing about how language skills in young children affect their learning, their thinking, their memory, their social skills, their play and even their success in school. I wish I had known more, so that I could have helped him sooner. Here is what I know now: ◆ Even before they can talk, babies are listening and communicating. They learn how to use their voice and body to gain attention. They are encouraged when adults respond quickly and warmly to their efforts. ◆ Children who have adults that talk to them about interesting things have more words and sentences than children that don’t engage in frequent talking with adults. ◆ Children who have toys that are interesting and age appropriate learn how to focus and are stimulated to be curious, an important part of learning. However, too many toys can be confusing. Play is important for learning. ◆ Children who have interesting books to share with adults learn more words. Talking about the pictures or reading the story over and over builds word knowledge. Allowing your child to participate in the story is even more effective. ◆ Children have more ideas, experiences and topics to talk about when grownups take them on outings and do things with them. ◆ Children who are allowed to plan and help carry out specific activities have more opportunity to learn the language that goes with organizing tasks and objects. ◆ Parents have a huge impact on children’s ability to talk and listen. Talking and listening skills are learned from important adult models and from play with other children. Young children learn language through many conversations not through videos or television. ◆ Children who have challenging behaviours may be telling us that they don’t know how to use language to get what they need. ◆ You can play listening games that are fun and that teach children the joy of listening! ◆ Rhyming shows that a young child is beginning to listen to the sounds within words not only the meaning of words. Rhyming books, nonsense rhymes, nursery rhymes, songs and finger plays are ways to teach children the fun of rhyming. Rhyming is one of the earliest steps towards reading and spelling. Children are truly word wizards as they learn to communicate. Make sure your little word wizard is able to get his message across to others effectively. If you are uneasy about your child’s communication skills, call your local Health Unit to speak with a Speech Pathologist. In Nanaimo/Ladysmith call: 740-6827 Lynne Patrick MSLP, S-LP(C), Speech Language Pathologist, Nanaimo Health Unit


FREE OR LOW COST

Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

(free or low-cost)

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

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Ladysmith Primary StrongStart Centre (Birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am – 12:00 noon Ladysmith Primary School 250-740-3516 Ladysmith Family and Friends (LaFF) Family Resource Program 9:30 am – 12:00 noon (drop in) Aggie Hall, Ladysmith 250-210-0870

Ladysmith Primary StrongStart Centre (Birth - 5 yrs) 9:30 am - 12 noon Ladysmith Primary School 250-740-3516 Ladysmith Family and Friends (LaFF) Family Resource Program 9:30 am – 12:00 noon (drop in) Aggie Hall, Ladysmith 250-210-0870 LaFF’s Family Frolics Drop-in Gym Time (children walking - 6 yrs) Suggested donation $1/family 5:45 pm - 6:45 pm Ladysmith Community Centre 250-245-6424 Triple P Positive Parenting Program* 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm Ladysmith Resources Centre Family House 250-245-3079 Infant Immunizations by appointment (Vancouver Island Health Authority) 1:15 pm - 3:30 pm Ladysmith Community Health Centre 250-755-3342 to book an appointment

Ladysmith Primary StrongStart (Birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am – 12:00 noon Ladysmith Primary School 250-740-3516 Ladysmith Family and Friends (LaFF) Family Resource Program 9:30 am – 12:00 noon (drop in) Aggie Hall, Ladysmith 250-210-0870 Born Healthy Pre-natal Program 10:30 am - 1:30 pm Ladysmith Resources Centre Family House 250-245-3079 Storytime (Birth - 17 mos.) Drop-In 11:15 am - 11:45 am Ladysmith Library 250-245-2322 Preschool Storytime (3 - 5 yrs)* 10:15 am - 10:45 am Ladysmith Library 250-245-2322 Cedar Family Play-time/Parent and Tot Drop-In 9:00 am - 11:30 am Cedar Heritage Centre 250-2100 LaFF’s Family Frolics Drop-in Gym Time (walking - 6 yrs) Suggested donation $1. 6:30 - 8:00 pm Aggie Hall, Ladysmith 250-210-0870

Ladysmith Primary StrongStart Centre (Birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am - 12 noon Ladysmith Primary School 250-740-3516 Ladysmith Family and Friends (LaFF) Family Resource Program 9:30 am to 12 noon drop-in Aggie Hall, Ladysmith 250-210-0870 Parent Child Mother Goose (newborn to 15 mos) 12:45 - 1:45 pm Ladysmith Resource Centre Family House 250-245-3079 Parent Child Mother Goose (16 - 30 mos) 9:45 - 10:45 am Ladysmith Resource Centre Family House 250-245-3079 Infant Immunizations by appointment (Vancouver Island Health Authority) 1:15 pm - 3:30 pm Ladysmith Community Health Centre 250-755-3342 to book an appointment

Ladysmith Primary StrongStart Centre (Birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am – 12:00 noon Ladysmith Primary School 250-740-3516 Ladysmith Family and Friends (LaFF) Family Resource Program 9:30 am – 12:00 noon (drop in) Aggie Hall, Ladysmith 250-210-0870 Public Health Nurse Drop In (Vancouver Island Health Authority) 1:30 am - 3:30 pm Ladysmith Community Health Centre 250-755-3388

Ladysmith Dads’ Group (Drop-in breakfast for Dads & their children) 10:00 am - 12:00 noon Ladysmith Resources Centre Family House 250-245-3079

*Items marked with an asterisk (*) require pre-registration. Please telephone first to confirm times and locations for all events.

* Parent Child Mother Goose® Program. This group experience for parents and their babies and young children, children focuses on the pleasure and power of using rhymes, songs and stories together. * Prenatal Classes are offered at the Ladysmith Resource Centre. Please call 250-245-3079 for information and to register. Prenatal classes are also offered in Nanaimo through VIHA. Please call 250-755-3380 to register.


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

FREE OR LOW COST

12

(free or low-cost)

8:45 am – 11:45 am Fairview Community School 250-740-3516 McGirr Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am McGirr Elementary School 250-740-3516 Rutherford Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am Rutherford Elementary School 250-740-3516 Georgia Ave. Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am – 12 noon Georgia Ave. Community School 250-740-3516 Cooking With the Good Food Box* (One Monday per month) 9:30 am – 11:30 am Princess Royal Family Centre 250-753-7470 Healthy Fair and Immunization Clinic (fourth Friday of every month starting October 2010) 9:30 am – 2:30 pm Hope House Gabriola Island 250-247-8730 Family Place (Parent & Tot Drop-in) 9:30 am – 11:30 am Lantzville Boys & Girls Club 250-390-4001 Woodbank Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 10:00 am - 1:00 pm Woodbank Primary School 250-740-3516 Bayview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am - 12:00 noon Bayview Elementary School 250-740-3516 Healthy Beginnings (Pre-natal - 12 mo.) 10:00 am - 11:30 am Princess Royal Family Centre 250-739-5845 Creating Healthy Families 11:00 am - 1:00 pm Tillicum Lelum Health Centre 250-753-6578 Quarterway Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 12:30 pm – 3:30 pm Quarterway Elementary School 250-740-3516 Bellies to Babies and Beyond* (Pregnant women & parents of infants) 10:00 am - 12:30 pm Princess Royal Family Centre (childminding available) 250-740-3516 Prenatal Yoga Drop-in 6:30 - 7:45 pm Nanaimo mother & Baby Society 250-754-5090

Fairview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am Fairview Community School 250-740-3516 McGirr Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am McGirr Elementary School 250-740-3516 Rutherford Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am - 11:45 am Rutherford Elementary School 250-740-3516 Georgia Ave. Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am - 12:00 pm Georgia Ave. Community School 250-740-3516 Drop-in Play Group (birth - 5 yrs) 9:30 am - 10:30 am Woodgrove Centre (near food court) 250-756-2022 Woodbank Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 10:00 am – 1:00 pm Woodbank Primary School 250-740-3516 Bayview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am - 12:00 noon Bayview Elementary School 250-740-3516 Healthy Beginnings (6 - 12 mos) 10:00 am - 11:30 am Nanaimo Health Centre 250-755-3342 Child Development Centre Community Playgroup (birth - 4 yrs) 10:00 am - 11:30 am Chase River Boys and Girls Club 250-753-0251 ext. 259 Parent Child Mother Goose 10:15 am - 11:45 am Hope House Gabriola Island 250-247-8730 Building Better Babies Pre-natal Class and Drop-in 10:30 am - 12:00 noon Tillicum Lelum Health Centre 250-753-6578 Babytime (birth - 17 mo)* 11:15 am - 11:45 am Harbourfront Library 250-753-1154 Quarterway Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 12:30 pm - 3:30 pm Quarterway Elementary School 250-740-3516 Healthy Beginnings (Pre-natal - 6 mo.) 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Nanaimo Health Centre 250-755-3342 Postnatal Yoga 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm Nanaimo Mother & Baby Society 250-754-5090 Prenatal Yoga 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm Nanaimo Mother & Baby Society 250-754-5090 Evening Familytime* 6:30 pm - 7:00 pm Wellington Library 250-758-5544

*Items marked with an asterisk (*) require pre-registration. Please telephone first to confirm times and locations of drop-in events or to register for those requiring pre-registration. Schedule may change during summer months.

Fairview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am Fairview Community School 250-740-3516 McGirr Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am McGirr Elementary School 250-740-3516 Rutherford Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am - 11:45 am Rutherford Elementary School 250-740-3516 Georgia Ave. Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am – 12:00 pm Georgia Ave. Community School 250-740-3516 Woodbank Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 10:00 am - 1:00 pm Woodbank Primary School 250-740-3516 Bayview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am – 12 noon Bayview Elementary School 250-740-3516 Mom and Baby Drop-in 10:30 am - 12:30 pm Nanaimo Mother & Baby Society 250-754-5090 Kinder-gym 1:00 - 2:30 pm Cedar Heritage Centre 1644 McMillan Rd. 250-722-2100 Parent Child Mother Goose (12 - 24 mos)* 9:30 - 10:30 am Nanaimo Aquatic Centre 250-756-5200 Family Place (Parent & Tot Drop-in) 9:30 am – 11:30 am Lantzville Boys and Girls Club 250-390-4001 Parent Child Mother Goose (6-12 mos)* 10 - 11:00 am Chase River Country Grocer (Community Room) 250-756-5200 Rug Huggers (Parent & Tot Drop-in) 10:00 am – 11:45 am Hope House Gabriola Island 250-247-8730 La Leche League Meeting (Breastfeeding support) 10:00 am – 12:00 noon every 2nd Wed. Call for location 250-754-5853 (Bridget) Moms, Dads & Babies Drop-in 10:30 am – 12:00 noon Tillicum Lelum Health Centre 250-753-6578 Parent Child Mother Goose (6 - 12 mos)* 11:00 am – 12:00 noon Nanaimo Aquatic Centre 250-756-5200 Pre-natal Lunch Bunch 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm Princess Royal Family Centre (Childminding Available) 250-739-5845 Quarterway Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 12:30 pm – 3:30 pm Quarterway Elementary School 250-740-3516 Parent Support Circles 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Bowen Park Complex 1-877-468-9658


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

13

SATURDAYS Fairview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 – 11:45 am Fairview Community School 250-740-3516 McGirr Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 – 11:45 am McGirr Elementary School 250-740-3516 Rutherford Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 – 11:45 am Rutherford Elementary School 250-740-3516 Georgia Ave. Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9 am – 12 noon Georgia Ave. Community School 250-740-3516 Woodbank Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 10:00 am - 1:00 pm Woodbank Primary School 250-740-3516 Bayview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am - 12:00 noon Bayview Elementary School 250-740-3516 Healthy Beginnings (Pre-natal - 6 mo) 10:00 am - 11:30 am Nanaimo Health Centre 250-755-3342 Storytime* (3 - 5 years) 10:15 am - 10:45 am Harbourfront Library 250-753-1154 Building Better Babies for Pregnant and New Moms (babies aged birth - 6 mos) 10:30 am - 12:00 noon Tillicum Lelum Health Centre 250-753-6578 Babytime* (0 - 17 mo) 11:15 am - 11:45 am Wellington Library 250-758-5544 Cooking With the Good Food Box (One Thursday per month) 12:00 pm - 2 pm Nanaimo Food Share Centre 250-753-7470 Quarterway Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 12:30 - 3:30 PM Quarterway Elementary School 250-740-3516 Connections: Young Parents Support Group 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm Princess Royal Family Centre (Childminding starts at 12:45 pm) 250-739-5845 Healthy Beginnings (6 - 12 mos) 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Nanaimo Health Centre 250-755-3342 Parent Child Mother Goose (6 - 24 mos)* 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm Little Ferns Early Learning Centre 250-756-5200 Dads Make a Difference 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Princess Royal Family Centre 250-716-1551

Fairview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am Fairview Community School 250-740-3516 McGirr Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am McGirr Elementary School 250-740-3516 Rutherford Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 8:45 am – 11:45 am Rutherford Elementary School 250-740-3516 Georgia Ave. Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9 am – 12 pm Georgia Ave. Community School 250-740-3516 Building Better Babies Home Visits and Drop-in 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Tillicum Lelum Health Centre 250-753-6578 Central Vancouver Island Multicultural Society Woman’s Group 9:30 am – 12:00 pm Multicultural Society 250-753-6911 Parent Child Mother Goose (12 - 24 mos)* 10:15 am – 11:15 am Oliver Woods Community Centre 250-756-5200 Family Place (Parent & Tot Drop-in) 9:30 am – 11:30 am Lantzville Boys and Girls Club 250-390-4001 Woodbank Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 10:00 am - 1:00 pm Woodbank Primary School 250-740-3516 Bayview Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 9:00 am - 12:00 noon Bayview Elementary School 250-740-3516 Child Development Centre Time Together Parent and Tot Drop-in 10:00 am – 11:30 am Brechin United Church 250-753-0251 ext. 248 Storytime (3 - 5 yrs)* 10:15 am - 10:45 am Oliver Woods Community Centre 250-756-5200 Parent Child Mother Goose (6 - 12 mos)* 11:30 am - 12:30 pm Oliver Woods Community Centre 250-756-5200 Cooking Out of the Box (One Friday per month) 11:00 am - 1:00 pm Nanaimo Women’s Centre 250-753-0633 Quarterway Strong Start (birth - 5 yrs) 12:30 pm – 3:30 pm Quarterway Elementary School 250-740-3516 Toddlertime (18 - 36 mo)* 1:15 pm – 1:45 pm Wellington Library 250-758-5544

Toddlertime (18 - 35 mos) 10:15 - 10:45 am Harbourfront Library 250-753-1154 Morning Familytime 10:30 - 11:00 am Wellington Library 250-758-5544

* Parent Child Mother Goose® Program. This group experience for parents and their babies and young children, focuses on the pleasure and power of using rhymes, songs and stories together. * Prenatal Classes. Free classes are offered at the Nanaimo Health Centre (VIHA) throughout the year. Please call 250-7553308 for information and to register. * Please also check with Nanaimo Parks, Recreation & Culture for additional recreational programs for parents and preschoolers. 250-756-5200


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Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Early Years Resources Pregnancy g y and Earlyy Years Support pp Birthright Crisis Pregnancy Centre of Nanaimo Hope House – (Gabriola Island) Ladysmith Resources Centre Association Ladysmith Community Health Centre Maternal Health Program - Intertribal Health Services Nanaimo Mother and Baby Centre Nanaimo Health Centre Nanaimo/Ladysmith Nursing Intake Line Nanoose First Nations Headstart Program Options for Sexual Health Princess Royal Family Centre Snuneymuxw First Nations Health Centre Chemainus First Nation Health Centre Tillicum Lelum Health Centre

Child Care 1.800.550.4900 250.716.1633 250.247.8730 250-245-3079 250.739-5778 250-753-3990 250-754-5090 250-755-3342 250.755.3388 250-390-0003 250-753-9511 250-739.5845 250-740-2337 250-245-8551 250-753-6578

Breast Feeding g Support pp Hope House – (Gabriola Island) Ladysmith Community Health Centre - Switchboard Nanaimo Health Centre La Leche League Breastfeeding Support Nanaimo Mother and Baby Centre Princess Royal Family Centre Tillicum Lelum Health Centre

250-247-8730 250- 739-5777 250-755-3342 250–7545853 250- 754-5090 250.739.5845 250-753-6578

Food and Nutrition Good Food Box – Ladysmith 250-245-3079 Dial-A-Dietitian 1-800-667-3438 Ladysmith Food Bank 250-245-3079 Loaves and Fishes Community Food Bank 250-754-8347 Meals on Wheels 250- 753-1300 or 250- 245-2307 Nanaimo Community Kitchens Society 250-753-7470 Nanaimo Community Gardens Society 250-816-4769 Nutritionist – Princess Royal Family Centre 250-739–5845 250-753-9393 Nanaimo Food Share Society 250-754-2621 Salvation Army Meal Program / Community Services Tillicum Lelum Health Centre 250-753-6578 7-10 Club – The Family Soup Kitchen 250- 714-0917 Health BC Nurse Helpline BC Poison Control Child and Youth Mental Health Ladysmith Community Health Centre Nanaimo Health Centre Nanaimo Regional General Hospital Nanoose First Nation Head Start Program Princess Royal Family Centre Snuneymuxw First Nations Health Centre Chemainus First Nation Health Centre Tillicum Lelum Health Centre

811 1-800-567-8911 250-741-3600 250-739-5778 250-755-3342 250-754-2141 250-390-0003 250.739.5845 250-740-2337 250-245-8551 250-753-6578

Earlyy Learning g and Literacy y Early Years Program, School District #68/ Strong Start Centres 250- 740-3516 • Bayview Strong Start • Georgia Avenue Strong Start • Fairview Strong Start • Quarterway Strong Start • Ladysmith Primary Strong Start • McGirr Strong Start • Rutherford Strong Start • Woodbank Strong Start Ladysmith Resources Centre Association 250-245-3079 Literacy Nanaimo 250-754-8988 Parent and Child Mother Goose Programs 250- 756–2022 ext. 32 • Nanaimo 250-247-8730 • Gabriola Speech and Language Pathology/Nanaimo Health Centre 250-740-6827 Tillicum Lelum Health Centre 250-753-6578 Vancouver Island Regional Libraries: • Gabriola Island Library 250-247-7878 • Ladysmith Library 250-245-2322 • Nanaimo Harbourfront Library 250-753-1154 • Nanaimo Wellington Library 250-758-5544

Boys and Girls Club of Central Vancouver Island • Chase River • Forest Park • Ladysmith • Lantzville • 5th St. Child Care Subsidy Program Community Care Facility Licensing PacificCARE Child Care Resource and Referral Supported Child Development – Nanaimo (Child Development Centre) Supported Child Development – Ladysmith Vancouver Island University Early Childhood Education and Care

250-753-2464 250-751-8937 250-245-8921 250-390-4001 250-754-3215 1-888-338-6622 250-739-5800 250-756-2022 250-753-0251 250-245-3466 250-740-6248

Familyy Support pp Autism Society of BC Big Brothers and Big Sisters Central Vancouver Island Multicultural Society Foster Parent Support Services Society Hope House – Gabriola Island Kwumut Lelum Child and Family Services LAFF (Ladysmith Association of Family and Friends) Ladysmith Resources Centre Association Ministry of Children and Family Development Nanaimo and Area Resource Services for Families Nanaimo Child Development Centre Nanaimo Family Justice Access Centre Nanaimo Family Life Association Nanaimo Family Resource Programs Nanaimo Men’s Resource Centre Nanaimo Women’s Centre Nanaimo Youth Services Parent Support Services of BC People for a Healthy Community (Gabriola) SOAR Mentoring Program for women – Intertribal Health Authority Tillicum Lelum Health Centre

250-714-0801 250-756-2447 250-753-6911 250-390-9686 250-247-8730 250-246-3336 250-210-0870 250-245-3079 250-741-5444 250-754-2773 250-753-0251 250-741-5447 250-754-3331 250-753-2177 250-716-1551 250-753-0633 250-754-1989 1-877–468–9658 250-247-7311 250-753-3990 250-753-6578

Recreation Beban Park Recreation Centre Bowen Park Complex Ladysmith Community Centre Nanaimo Aquatic Centre Nanaimo Ice Centre

250-756-5200 250-756-5200 250-245-6424 250-756-5200 250-756-5200

Specialized p Support pp Programs g and Services Autism Society of B.C. BC Safe School Centre Crisis Centre Haven Society and Transition House Help Line for Children Kids Help Phone Nanaimo Child Development Centre Nanaimo Community Hospice Society Rainbows Children’s Grief and Loss Support Group - Nanaimo Tillicum Lelum Health Centre

250-714-0801 1-888-224-7233 250-754-4447 250-754-0764 250-310-1234 1-800-668-6868 250-753-0251 250-758-8857 250-751-7888 250-753-6578

Communityy Earlyy Years Initiatives/Partnerships / p Greater Nanaimo Early Years Partnership Ladysmith Early Years Partnership Success By Six® Initiative

250-756-2022 250-245-8183 250-616-5820


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

15

Delight in your child “If you can give your son or daughter only one gift, let it be enthusiasm.” (Bruce Barton) What are the things that delight you about your children? It may seem like a simple question, but it is very important, as children need the adults in their lives to take delight in their existence. I first heard this idea – about the link between delight and the attachment between parents and children – from Vancouver psychologist, Gordon Neufeld. In his book, Hold on to Your Kids, Neufeld notes that researchers have placed “emotional warmth, enjoyment and delight at the top of the list as effective activators of attachment. If we have a twinkle in our eye and some warmth in our voice, we invite connection that most children will not turn down. When we give children signs that they matter to us, most children will want to hold on to the knowledge that they are special to us

and are appreciated in our life.” (p. 222). As a parent it is reassuring and encouraging to know that by showing our children that they bring us joy, we are doing one of the most important things we can do as parents. Where it gets hard sometimes, is in sustaining those feelings of delight and enthusiasm through the harder days we all face as parents. There are days (and weeks) when it is really hard to

get in touch with those feelings. We all have times where we feel tired, frustrated and discouraged. However, if you believe that it is important to take delight in your children, it becomes okay to make different choices about the priorities in your life. Maybe it is more important to spend time having fun with your family than vacuuming the living room. Perhaps it is worth it to leave the lawn for another day if you get to spend the day exploring the beach with your seven year old. My hope is that my children will remember those moments and won’t care about the dust and clutter on the coffee tables. Another option is to find ways to make the chores we need to do a fun family event. My husband is great at getting the kids out in the garden and we all delight in turning the compost to find worms – we spent hours doing that this summer and I loved the conversations we had about worm

poop, rot, and dirt. (Composting is a miracle – take all that kitchen waste and make soil!) It is also really neat that the kids are way less squeamish than I ever was about bugs. It is easy to forget that children love to learn, contribute and be included – and as parents, seeing this can be another source of delight. Finally, remembering the importance of delight makes it okay to be honest with yourself about the things that you just don’t enjoy. Sometimes I think we force ourselves to do things our kids like “for their sake”. And that is fine. But it is also okay to let your children know that it is not something you enjoy and try to find something that you can all be enthusiastic about. Find things about your kids that bring you joy and let them see it in your eyes, because each child needs someone who thinks they are absolutely wonderful. Hanna Scrivens

Your Source For Active Living In The Early Years!

250-245-6424 www.ladysmith.ca

Expecting a Baby? Attend our BABY SHOWER January 16th, 2011 • Beban Park Phone for your INVITE 250-756-9794

Just had a Baby?

L

Dad’s and Babes Group and much more!

Phone for your FREE package 250-756-9794 For more information about our programs, please contact the ECD Team at our Health Centre:

250-753-6578


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Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

Tube ‘n’ Tunnel

Indoor Hamster Village for Kids ages 2-12

Happy Birthday! “WIN A QUAD!”

One Free Draw Ticket for birthday person and each of their guests when you have an “Awesome” or “Deluxe” birthday party at Cyber City.

Studio Special

$

$

2.99 or 2 for 5.00 - ALL DAY PASS Complimentary coffee for parent or guardian www.CyberCityAdventures.com 250-755-1828 1815 Bowen Rd., Nanaimo

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95

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Photo of your child with their favorite family pet. Price includes • 20 minute session • Online viewing • 8 X 10 downloadable print

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Classes • Books • Charts • Fibres • Fabrics • Supplies

The Tangled Threads

Youth Embroiderers Group Who: ALL the very creative girls and boys aged 9-17 who are interested in learning about and developing skills in the needle arts. Where: NDSS, Room 146, Home Economics Lounge When: 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month, September to June Time: 4-6 p.m. Fee: $50.00 (includes E.A.C. membership!)

#4, 70 Church Street, Nanaimo 250-591-6873 www.thestitchersmuse.com

MENTION THIS AD AND RECEIVE 10% DISCOUNT

Happy toddlers at the table The most common laments that I hear from parents almost daily is,” I can’t get my child to eat.” Other ones include “my child is a picky or fussy eater” and “how do I get food into my child.” The Golden Rule for feeding Children is as follows: ◆ The Parents Decide: What is offered to eat and when it is offered. ◆ The Child Decides: Whether to eat and how much to eat. As long as both of you are responsible for your own jobs, there will be harmony at the table. The Child’s Responsibility Parents need to put nutritious foods in front of their child at reasonable time intervals. They are not allowed to say how much the child will eat or whether that child eats at all. After the nutritious food is put on the table in a small reasonable quantity, parents should step aside because their work is done. As parents, we want to nurture our children. We want the food on the plate to be in the child, and we will go to any length to accomplish that task. Unfortunately, some of our tactics are not nurturing or kind. How do we know how hungry that child is? How do we know how much they need to eat? We are their parents, but only the child knows whether or not they are hungry and how much food it will take to remedy the problem. Rewarding children who eat well or who finish their plate teaches them that they are only good if they ignore their natural hunger cues. In time, they will not be able to tell whether they are hungry or not and will only eat to please themselves or others. This can lead to obesity or abnormal eating practices. Telling a child who doesn’t finish or eat well that they will be punished makes mealtime an unhappy time. They do not feel safe at the table because if they can not finish what is put in front of them they will be in trouble. For these children, food becomes something to fear or dislike. Again they have an unhealthy relationship with their food. Parents spend too much time worrying about things that are the child’s responsibility. Let the child decide what to eat and whether to eat at all. Often, the most content eaters are the children from large families. I tell parents that if they had six children, a child’s eating would not be an issue because they would not have time to notice what the child was eating. After the food is served, pretend that you do not care whether they eat or not and focus on something other than food. The Parent’s Responsibility Since the parent cannot interfere with the child’s responsibility, the reverse is also true. It is the parent who decides what is served and when it is served. Many families let the child take over this role and chaos reigns at the dinner table. I hear from parents, “my child only eats macaroni and wieners”. When I ask if they are given only those two foods, the parents reply that at least they are eating something. Actually, the child might as well be eating nothing at all because a steady diet of macaroni and wieners is keeping the child full but certainly not meeting their nutritional needs. Catering to a child is the first step to creating a monster at the table. As the parent, your job is to provide healthy nutritious food. It is not the child’s responsibility to decide what that food will be. When you cater


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

to the desires of your child, they will see how far they can go in getting you to prepare what they want. Every day they will eat fewer foods just to see if you can come up with something they like. Eventually, they will not like anything

and the child is becoming less well nourished with each passing day. The issue is no longer about food, it is about who is in charge. You are unhappy because your child will not eat and the child is unhappy because there are no

routines in place. Content children have limits and a predictable routine. As the parent, prepare one healthy, nutritious meal and serve it to your family. The child will then only have one choice to make. Their choice is whether to eat the food or not. If they do not eat it in a reasonable period of time, assume that they are not hungry and take the plate away. Dinner is over. If your child does not eat over several days, look at what the child is eating or drinking throughout the day. Children who drink too many bottles or cups of milk or juice are not hungry at mealtimes. Children who have unlimited snacks or free run of the kitchen will nibble throughout the day and come to the table full. Allow plenty of time for active play in the afternoon and offer only water as a beverage between meals. When we focus too much on how a child eats and what they eat, we give food too much importance in life. It is only food. Sit together as a family and enjoy a variety of healthy foods and talk about things that make you happy. Eileen Bennewith, RD, Community Nutritionist. t

Moving to a new location January 2011!

Kool Toys & Teaching Tools

Educational toys to help your child get the best start!

208 Wallace Street, Nanaimo

250-716-1777

Full and Half Day Openings Available Discover why Four Seasons Montessori can better prepare your child socially, personally and intellectually for a changing world

www.koolandchild.com DougRoutley,MLA Nanaimo~NorthCowichan

 CommunityOffice Box269 5241stAvenue Ladysmith,BCV9G1A2 Phone250.245.9375 Fax250.245.8164 douglas.routley.mla@leg.bc.ca www.dougroutley.ca

17

Lett us iinspire your child. L Consider these benefits:

• A caring and individualized program that fits your child’s unique talents • Spanish and Music Enrichment • ECE and Montessori trained teachers • Ultimate environment for your child’s developing mind • Affordable tuition - Subsidy accepted

Tel: 250-758-8979 4960 Hammond Bay Road fourseasonsmontessori@shaw.ca www.fourseasonsmontessori.com License: KMON7SEPFX

New location in Nanoose

2402 Nanoose Bay Rd. 250-468-1722 Nanoose License: KMON-7QNLYH


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Triple P provides simple strategies for behaviour problems The Triple P Positive Parenting Program provides parents with simple strategies to help solve current behaviour problems & prevent future problems before they arise. Triple P is not just a Vancouver Island Program but is being used in 14 countries around the world to help parents become more confident in their own parenting skills and give them the ability to balance work and family without constant stress and worry. For more information about Triple P providers in your area, visit our website at www.triplepvip.ca. credit to the Building Connections Team, U.S. Triple P System Population Trial * Want Happier Children? Focus on the Positive Parents need to be aware of how their children see themselves and be ready with ways to help their children feel good about themselves and their accomplishments. Here are some ideas for promoting a positive self-image in children: *Pay attention and notice things your child does well. * Focus positive attention in the efforts a child makes to do well. While the result may not be what was hoped for (for example, a poor test grade), did the child put forth good effort? * Talk about things your child does well. * Encourage your child to set goals for the next time they face a similar talk or situation. * Let your child express how they feel and listen carefully.

good at everything *Encourage your child to continue to try. *Encourage realistic thinking. *Be optimistic. Parents can set a good example for their children by showing them how they solve problems or challenges. Encourage family meetings to calmly discuss problems and work out solutions. Teach children problem solving steps

such as: *Clearly stating the problem *Trying out the solution *Brainstorming solutions *Talking about how and whether the solution worked. This can help children become more independent at problem solving and can apply to many different areas of life.

Triple P Parenting Group This 8 week course for parents of children 2-12 and 11-14 years of age will provide education in Triple P basics. In the group, parents will learn effective parenting strategies, how to promote their child’s development, how to manage common child behavior challenges and some principles to help deal with almost any situation that might arise. Please call 250 755-6265 to register for the free 8 week group seminars Group dates for parents of 2-12 year olds Level 4 Level 4 Level 4 Level 4

– Sept 28 to Nov 23 – Sept 30 to Nov 25 – Oct 14 to Dec 9 – Oct 4 to Nov 29

6:30 -8:00 pm 12:30-2:30pm 9:30-11:30 am 6:30-8:30pm

location TBA Child Development Centre Nanaimo Princess Royal Family Centre Nanaimo Family Life Association

Group dates for parents of 11-14 year olds TEEN GROUP If children fall into a trap of speaking or thinking negatively about themselves, here are some ideas you might wish to try: *Talk about mistakes or challenges that you face to help them understand that no one is

Level 4 Oct 13 to Dec 8

6:30 -8:00 pm

location TBA


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

19

Triple P POSITIVE PARENTING SEMINAR SERIES, For Parents of 2-12 year olds Seminar 1 - The Power of Positive Parenting Children of all ages need a safe, secure and loving environment to do well. Positive Parenting is an effective approach to raising children that is positive. It involves creating a family environment that is loving, supportive and predictable. Come hear some suggestions about how to use positive parenting in raising your children. Seminar 2 - Raising Confident, Competent Children The values, skills and behaviors to encourage in children are the choice of every individual parent. However, some core skills are important for everyone. Children are more likely to be confident, succeed at school and get on well with others when they develop certain life skills. These life skills include being respectful and considerate, communicating well with others, thinking positively and having healthy self-esteem, being a good problem solver, and becoming independent. Come hear some ideas on how to help children learn these important life skills and become confident and competent individuals. Seminar 3- Raising Resilient Children One of the most important tasks of parenthood is helping children learn to deal with their emotions. All children experience periods of stress in their lives and need the emotional skills to deal with it. Children’s ability to cope with their feelings is important to their longterm happiness. Come hear about the six keys skills to help children build emotional resilience.

rdAwa ning ! Winmusic ’ Kids

POSITIVE PARENTING SEMINAR SERIES Attend any seminar or the entire series Seminar 1 – Monday Sept. 13, 6:30-8:00pm

Grant Avenue Health Unit

Seminar 1 – Tuesday Sept. 14, 6:30-8:00pm

Ladysmith Health Center

Seminar 1 – Tuesday Sept. 21, 10-11:30am

Princess Royal Family Centre

Seminar 2 – Tuesday Oct. 12 , 6:30-8:00pm

Ladysmith Health Center

Seminar 2 – Monday Oct.18, 6:30-8:00pm

Grant Avenue Health Unit

Seminar 2 – Tuesday Oct. 19 , 10-11:30 am

Princess Royal Family Centre

Seminar 3 – Monday Nov. 15, 6:30-8:00pm

Grant Avenue Health Unit

Seminar 3 – Tuesday Nov. 9, 6:30-8:00pm

Ladysmith Health Center

Seminar 3 – Tuesday Nov. 16, 10-11:30 am

Princess Royal Family Centre

Please call 250 755-6265 to register for seminars

Nanaimo Na N anaim an i mo C Co Conservatory onservato o nsserv n rvator ry y of of M Music ussic u

Suzuki cello, flute, piano and violin for ages 3 and up

“A smash hit with kids.” -Vancouver Sun

New album w Available now In stores And online www.thekerplunks.com

SignupNOWfor MusicLessons! Over 30 Years of Professional Music Instruction in a wide variety of instruments

Kindermusik for babies and toddlers and more music for everyone!

2507544611 www.ncmusic.ca tollfree18667544611

NCM receives funding from the Province of British Columbia and the City of Nanaimo


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Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

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ASPENGROVE SCHOOL JR Kindergarten - Grade 12 Lantzville, BC

Ph: 250-390-2201 www.aspengroveschool.ca

NEW COURSE! “SAVE THAT CHILD”

A 4.5 hour course geared toward new parents and grandparents. The class focuses on basic first aid and accident prevention. Parents are welcome to bring their little ones to the class as well.

2250 LABIEUX RD NANAIMO p. 1-250-729-8889 f. 1-250-729-8911 w. sja.ca/bc

ars because the first 6 nye t are so importa www.successby6bc.ca

singeaofrlty,en ng si

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of

United Way Central and Northern Vancouver Island d Supporter u o

Donate now to the 2010 campaign to support our children (250) 729-7400 9-7400 204-229 204-2290 90 Bo Bowe Bowen wenn RRd. we d www.uwcnvi.ca

ars because the first 6 nye t are so importa www.successby6bc.ca


Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

21

Dads do make a difference While mothers have traditionally been the primary caregivers in many families, fathers have an extremely important role to play. Working together both parents provide complimentary influences and inspire children toward balanced and healthy growth. Although society readily acknowledges the nurturing and protective care mothers provide, we often undervalue the unique contributions fathers can make. Both fathers and mothers have an equal capacity to be loving and capable parents. This may mean that at times mom may need to struggle with her protective instincts, let go and allow dad to take full charge of some situations. This will help him to learn on the job, and build confidence in his abilities, the same process that all moms go through. Both mom and dad need to know how to best provide ongoing support for their partners. Here are some important facts that demonstrate how “Dad’s make a difference� Research has shown that toddlers securely bonded with dad are better to handle strange situations, are more resilient, have higher development of mental and motor skills,

relate more maturely to strangers and more independent. Boys with involved fathers are at less risk for developing violent anti-social or otherwise aggressive behaviours and are 80 percent less likely to go to jail. Girls show more competencies in mathematics, and later in life are better able to develop healthy relationships with men. They are 50 per cent less likely to become teenage mothers. The parenting guidance which fathers contribute to both boys and girls encourages their ability to take risks, enables them to tolerate stress, increases problem solving skills and builds resilience. A healthy ability to compete is fostered and experimentation in play is encouraged, especially in discovery and variety. Children with involved fathers are less likely to fail a grade, have poor attendance at school, have difficulty paying attention or be argumentative and confrontational. They are more likely to show respect for themselves and authority, have less difficulty socializing, and are more likely to finish school. They tend to have higher grade point averages, and perform a year above their expected age level. See page 22

THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF LEARNING Give your child a solid foundation in learning and life by focusing on physical, social, emotional and intellectual development.


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From page 21 In their emotional development they are less likely to choose deviant peers, and express less symptoms such as ; disruptive behaviour, anxiety and depression, lying, sadness, emotional distress and suicide. In general they experience more overall life satisfaction. They display greater cognitive control, apply self initiative and self direction in life, and feel more self confident and independent The key to achieving this potential is balanced, shared, and involved parenting. It is important to note that in the case of divorce and separation father involvement is still essential. Dads ask, “I have so little time with my family, how do I make the most of that time?” Simple acts on a consistent basis build permanent bonds. In this sense quality is more important than quantity. Babies love massage, discovery, touch, movement and sound. Toddlers like to pretend, explore, to help and work. That means lots of opportunity for dads to play and to model work. Find an activity that is fun for you, too. Consider taking a parenting course, or join a parent support group. When both partners are confident that they have the skills needed and feel mutually encouraged and supported by the community they are in the ideal position to address this great work in progress, providing their children with “Roots and Wings” not “Loot and Things”! Article excerpt courtesy of Michael Beechey – for more information contact the Nanaimo Men’s Resource centre at 250-716-1551.

Lentil Soup with Beef and Barley Serves 12 ½ lb ground beef (0.3 kg) 1 large onion, chopped 1-3 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1cup split lentils, washed ¼ cup barley 8 cups beef, or vegetable stock, or bouillon 2 stalks celery, diced 2 large carrots, diced 1-28 oz c a n d i c e d t o m a t o e s (796mL) 1 bay leaf ½ tsp thyme ½ tsp basil pepper

CALL KOLBIE

250-754-2499 Established 1989

License 1313013

How to make: In a large pot, brown beef lightly with onion and garlic. Drain off fat. Add lentils, barley, vegetables, beef stock, and seasoning. Bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer, covered until lentils and barley are nearly tender, about 30-40 minutes. Add pepper to taste. Note: Any other vegetables you have on hand may be added: turnips, potatoes, cabbage, cubed squash, etc. If you don’t like lentils use red lentils as they cook quickly and “dissolve” so you don’t see the individual lentil pieces. Submitted by Nanaimo Community Kitchens Check out www.NanaimoCommunityKitchens.org to find their latest cookbook called “You Can Cook” which has almost 200 pages of tips and recipes for simple cooking and good nutrition.


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CHILDREN FIRST / SUCCESS BY 6

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Greater Nanaimo/Ladysmith Family

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Success By 6  

Family Fall/Winter 2010 Helping all children succeed for life

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