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GOLD

WINNER

2019

BEST SPECIAL PUBLICATION IN B.C.

PEARL THE GEM OF THE SALISH SEA

O C T/ N O V 2 0 1 9

INSIDE › › › ›

PEOPLE HOMES LIFESTYLES T R AV E L


FINE CLOTHIERS SINCE 1862

1221 Government St. 250.383.7177 1210 Newport Ave. 250.592.2821 2449 Beacon Ave. 778.426.4446

Mon- Sat 10:00-5:30 Sun 11-4 Mon- Sat 10-5 Mon- Sat 10-5:30

wandjwilson.com


Comfort Air Chair The evolution of motion Weight-balanced mechanism responds to your every move.

1802 GOVERNMENT ST. | 250.386.3841 | SAGERS.CA | MON-SAT 9:30-5:30


GOLD

WINNE

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2019

BEST SPECIAL PUBLICA TION IN B.C.

PEARL THE G EM OF THE S ALIS

H SEA

O C T/ N

OV 20 19

GOLD

WINNER

2019

CONTENTS

BEST SPECIAL PUBLICATION IN B.C. INSID

E

› PEO PLE › HOM ES › LIFE STYL ES › T R AV EL

OCT/NOV

8 Editor’s Letter 10 It’s the Bee’s Knees 14 Magnificence & Tranquility 18 Green With Envy 24 Fiery Fall Story 28 A Stitch in Time 31 History: Sidney Island 34 Dinosaurs Ruled! 37 Paws on the Peninsula 38 Meet our Advertisers

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on our cover Model Kelly Phillips at the Sidney Volunteer Fire Department with lieutenant Darrin Blinko and firefighter Steven Bibb.

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Styling by Shai Thompson Photo by Lia Crowe

GROUP PUBLISHER Penny Sakamoto 250.480.3204

PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Denton Lia Crowe

PUBLISHER + ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Dale Naftel publisher@ peninsulanewsreview.com 250.656.1151 ext.6

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lily Chan

EDITOR Susan Lundy lundys@shaw.ca ASSOCIATE EDITOR Lia Crowe

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PEARL CREATIVE & DESIGN Lorianne Koch CREATIVE SERVICES Michelle Gjerde Tammy Robinson DISTRIBUTION Marilou Pasion marilou@blackpress.ca 604.542.7411

PEARL OCT/NOV 2019

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ADVERTISING Dale Naftel publisher@ peninsulanewsreview.com 250.656.1151 ext.6 Wendy Coleman wendy.coleman@ peninsulanewsreview.com 250.656.1151 ext.4

PEARL magazine is published six times a year by Black Press. The points of view or opinions expressed herein are those

Vicki Clark vicki.clark@blackpress.ca 250.588.2424

of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher of Pearl. The contents of Pearl magazine are protected by copyright,

prohibited without written

103-9830 Second Street, Sidney, British Columbia PH 250.656.1151

consent of the publisher.

www.peninsulanewsreview.com

including the designed advertising. Reproduction is


523 Fisgard Street 250-590-6637 @moeshomevic www.moeshome.ca


PEARL

CONTRIBUTORS o c d o R ery Draperies and Upholst

LIA CROWE Born and raised in Victoria, Lia spent the first decade of her career working in the international fashion industry and now has more than 10 years’ experience working on the editorial side of lifestyle magazines.

DON DENTON Don is the Photo Supervisor for Black Press, Greater Victoria. He contributes photographs to magazines such as Boulevard, Tweed, Monday and Pearl.

JANICE JEFFERSON

Janice is an interior designer who creates well-functioning spaces with a mix of playfulness and refinement.

Window Treatments - Decorating - Bedding

250-656-4642

RodcoInteriors@shaw.ca rodcointeriors.com

Simply Cremations & Funeral Services

Integrity - Dignity - Respect Simply Cremations

DARCY NYBO

Darcy is a freelance writer, a multiple award-winning author, book editor and publisher, and a writing instructor. Words are her passion and she hopes to use them to tell other peoples’ stories.

HANS TAMMEMAGI

Hans’ writing includes travel, environment and Indigenous culture. He has penned 10 books and writes for numerous newspapers and magazines in Canada and internationally.

& Funeral Services

Entrust your loved one to our professionals where your needs and wishes are fulfilled, without guilt, pressure, or the burden of high costs.

SHAI THOMPSON

Shai brings over 20 years of experience as a leader in sales training and fashion and personal style development. She and her style team work their magic at House of Lily Koi in Sidney.

Call us to discuss Pre-Planning options Basic cremation $1360 + GST Services include: • Transfer & sheltering • Cremation container & urn • Cremation process • Registration & documentation Memorial Society Members welcome We honour all pre-arranged cremation & funeral contracts

24-hour phone: 250-656-5555 Online at: victoriasimplycremations.com 102 - 2360 Beacon Avenue Sidney (in the garden court)

In your time of need we keep it Simple 6

PEARL OCT/NOV 2019

250-657-2000 | elizabethmaymp.ca 9711 4th St., Sidney BC V8L 2Y8


Long-term Care resident Ruth, 101

Still playful With your gift we will get better at getting older Age and a change in circumstances

Your donation to Long-term Care will help

have not diminished Ruth’s keen sense

finish the Memory Garden, purchase

of humour. Until recently she lived

therapy tools like the Magic Table &

independently and misses pottering in

Google Bike, upgrade beds & bedside

her patio garden and chatting with

tables and fund much needed renovations

neighbours. Help us keep residents like

to the dining area.

Ruth comfortable, active, engaged and supported during their time at the Saanich Peninsula Hospital.

your community, your health 250-652-7531 sphf.ca

Together we can provide the surroundings and activities our residents deserve. Please give today.


PHOTO BY LIA CROWE

EDITOR’S LETTER SUSAN LUNDY

A time for the talented

A

mid fall’s glorious colours, weather that’s crisp but still infused with warmth, and schedules wonderfully diminished from the chaos of summer, comes an annual tradition: that of the fall fair. This is a time when the crafty shine. The artistry of quilters hangs like beaming beacons of talent on the walls; hand-woven baskets arise in astounding, interwoven shapes and colours; weavers spin deft demonstrations; piemakers, woodworkers, wine and beer crafters all emerge from their studios, kitchens, basements and workshops to proudly display the results of all this know-how and skill. In the gardening section, bouquets of flowers bloom in little glass jars as testament to the prowess of wily gardeners who have somehow outwitted deer, rabbits, weeds and lack of rainfall to present these glorious vessels of colour. It’s all a little confounding for those of us who struggle to thread a needle or grow a tomato. Both my daughters are artists and even as children they thrived at the fall fair, amassing ribbons and trophies while I eyed my pantry, wondering if I could make a packaged cake appear homemade. Although my husband is a talented musician and (sigh) able to paint a lovely watercolour, we’re at the same level when it comes to gardening, baking, woodworking, etc. That would be the basement level. Our gardening efforts have literally gone to the deer and so we now console ourselves by enjoying the

four-legged flower-eaters as they wander around our acreage, shredding the foliage but generally looking cute. We have a towering cherry tree in the backyard that produces rich red cherries — if you can get to them before the birds and other critters. This year we watched mid-day as a tribe of raccoons drunkenly made their way from branch to branch stuffing their cheeks with cherries. They were too adorable — a big fat mother and five babies — to shoo away.

IT’S ALL A LITTLE CONFOUNDING FOR THOSE OF US WHO STRUGGLE TO THREAD A NEEDLE OR GROW A TOMATO. Later we saw a deer standing on her hind legs to get at cherries on the lower branches and a rabbit at the base of the tree nibbling on anything left behind. There would be no bowl of cherries with our names neatly attached at the fall fair. We also have a gorgeous grapevine that has, over the years, been our most successful gardening attempt (really, the only successful one), producing clusters of creamy purple champagne grapes. This year, we sampled a few — “So close! We’ll pick them tomorrow”

— and the very next day, the entire crop was wiped clean. There would be no grapes at the fair either. But things did look a little different this year on the talent landscape, since a woodworking friend has taught my husband a few tricks of the trade. It’s quite charming to see Bruce rolling out the table saw, router, hammer and nails, trying to contain his glee with feigned nonchalance. Our home needed trim in various places and he was the man to do it, eagerly setting the saw whirring with his new-found skill and then hammering, drilling … and proudly dragging me around the property to show the results of his handiwork. So as we drove to the fair this year, I mused, “If only there was a ‘trim’ section, you almost certainly would have won a ribbon — maybe even a trophy!” I found this funnier than he did. Despite having to wade through the tidal wave of talent at a fall fair, I do enjoy the chance to reconnect with friends, listen to homegrown music and munch a fall fair food staple like roasted corn on the cob. Oh. And the pigs. I LOVE the pigs. In this edition of Pearl, enjoy the crafty talent of needleworker extraordinaire, Thea Dueck; revel in the flavours of Country Bee Honey Farm; discover the history of Sidney Island, tour a spectacular home, feast your eyes on local fashions and take a trip to see the dinosaurs in Drumheller. As for me, I’ll be eyeing the upcoming holiday season. Perhaps I can hand-craft a few ornaments for the tree. (Ha.) P

Susan Lundy has been writing stories since she was six years old. She has a degree in creative writing from the University of Victoria, and after working for many years as an award-winning journalist, is now a magazine editor, author and freelance writer.

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PEARL OCT/NOV 2019


Lilaberry...

Snuggle Up... in warm Fall colours… 2474 Beacon Avenue, Sidney 250.656.3232 • Lilaberry@shaw.ca Home Décor, Gift Boutique & Fashion


PEARL INSIDER [ food + drink]

“WE WANT TO CREATE A LOVELY SPACE THAT GETS PEOPLE BACK TO NATURE — A PLACE TO STOP AND SMELL THE FLOWERS!”

IT’S THE BEE’S KNEES Country Bee Honey Farm is abuzz WO R D S : H A N S TA M M E M AG I

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PEARL OCT/NOV 2019

PHOTOS: DON DENTON


RPM

W

est Saanich Road, lined by tall Douglas firs and dotted with farm stands bursting with eggs, garlic and flowers, is one of the prettiest drives on Vancouver Island. Country Bee Honey Farm is my favourite stop for a coffee, and perhaps a cinnamon roll, especially in the morning when I can sit on the front porch basking in the warmth of golden sunshine. Owned and operated by Jason and Lindsay Dault, the store and coffee shop are just a small part of this 11-acre farm enterprise. And central to everything is a tiny creature: the honey bee. Lindsay, a fit-looking woman with, appropriately, a bee and three hexagonal honeycombs tattooed on her wrist, explained, “We keep 80 hives but only 16 are on our property. The rest are spread around Saanich, so we get honeys with different flavours.” She led me into the store, an open area with coffee tables and wooden shelves laden with a plethora of bee-related items, such as beeswax, a variety of candles, propolis, bee pollen, royal jelly, honey pots, bee books, honey-based health products and seeds for bee-friendly gardens. An intoxicating fresh country aroma of beeswax and flowers hung in the air. Lindsay led the way to a shelf loaded with about 20 different kinds of honey, all from the Peninsula. I sampled Blueberry Honey and Buckwheat Honey, but my favourite was the Whiskey Infused Honey. Delicious! I felt a small surge of energy pulse through me, which wasn’t surprising, for honey is renowned for its health benefits and used in treating coughs and sore throats, healing wounds and improving skin health. Jason, who moved to British Columbia from Ontario more than two decades ago, has always been fascinated by bees.

MASONRY

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OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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Above, Lindsay and Jason Dault walk through a flower garden on the grounds of their Country Bee Honey Farm store and cafe. At right: goats at the “zoo” area.

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PEARL OCT/NOV 2019


A UNIQUE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE RICH AGED GARLIC MEETS SWEET BALSAMIC IN THIS FASCINATING JELLY

Lindsay, originally from Brentwood Bay, was working in Vancouver when the couple met. They formed a strong team and, sharing a love of bees, set up a couple of hives. In 2009 they started Urban Bee Supplies in Ladner, near Vancouver, and Lindsay, after acquiring a Master Beekeeper certification, began teaching courses on beekeeping. In 2015, they had an epiphany. They decided to get out of the big city and the stress of corporate life, move to a quieter existence and return to Lindsay’s roots. They purchased the farm, moved to Saanich, and started Urban Bee Honey Farm on the present location. They had made a sound decision, and the business slowly built and expanded. In 2019, West Coast Seeds purchased their Urban Bee Supplies in Ladner. The two businesses continue to cooperate and work closely together, and Lindsay still teaches bee courses in the Ladner shop. However, the move required the renaming of the Saanich enterprise to Country Bee Honey Farm. Lindsay led me on a tour. On the north side of the shop sits a pollinator garden full of colourful flowers like lavender and California orange poppies to attract bees, which buzzed around us. Next on the tour came a large wooden animal enclosure where I was nuzzled by three Nigerian goats and two baby doll sheep. All miniatures and perfect for children — but I loved them too! A separate space contained peacocks, ducks, chickens and pheasants. “This area is meant as a little zoo, especially for younger people,” said Lindsay. “We also grow turkeys for Thanksgiving and Christmas.” We strolled to the back of the farm to the beehives, which were surrounded by many beds of pollinator flowers. The sight was breathtaking, as was the smell of fresh flowers. Lindsay often brings tours to this spot, where people then put on white bee suits and look in the hives. On the way back to the shop, Lindsay pointed to a large field of young evergreen trees. “We planted 900 of these in 2016. They’ll be ready for us to start offering U-Cut Christmas trees in two to three years. Jason and I plan to put up Christmas decorations and lights, and bring people here in what would otherwise be an off-season. We also keep 11 pigs and supply farm-fresh, chemical-free pork and poultry.” They have recently invested with friends in a small cowherd and in the near future will market beef, sausages, salamis and more. “We’ve installed beautiful walking gardens, animal pens for the kids and picnic tables for visitors to sit and enjoy a coffee and honey treat,” said Lindsay. “We want to create a lovely space that gets people back to nature — a place to stop and smell the flowers!” I was impressed by the energy and drive of Lindsay and Jason and their ambitious plans. Was it caused by the honey? One thing was for sure: they have built a honey of a place. P

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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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PEARL INSIDER [ home design]

MAGNIFICIENCE + TRANQUILITY Texada Terrace home has it all — right down to the details WORDS: DARCY NYBO

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PEARL OCT/NOV 2019

EXTERIOR PHOTOS: DON DENTON


Quick Facts: Bedrooms: 5 Bathrooms 5 Square feet: 5,440 / 5,010 finished Garage: triple-car garage Fireplaces: 2 Amenities: media room, hot tub, double-sided fireplace, backyard pond and waterfall, wine cellar, heat pump.

C

athy and Joel Rosenberg were looking to downsize. Then they saw this 5,000-square-foot Texada Terrace home in North Saanich and fell in love. It’s easy to see why. This Frank Lloyd Wright influenced house, with its impressive exterior stone columns, feels inviting even before stepping inside. The interior boasts an expansive great room with a patio that overlooks the ocean, a quiet breakfast room, gourmet kitchen, dining room, family room, bedroom/office and laundry room — and that’s just on the main floor. There are three bedrooms, each with an en suite upstairs, and a media room, kitchen, craft room, wine cellar and guest bedroom on the lower floor. “The attention to detail is amazing,” said Joel. “The quality and uniqueness of this home is such that you’d be hard pressed to find another house like it. The person who built it was a red seal carpenter, so there’s an incredible amount of detail in everything. When we bought the house in 2012, it was five years old and looked brand new.” From the exotic wood finishes of cabinets and staircases to dovetailed finishing on the door frames and pergolastyled divider in the master suite, this home has a subtle Asian influence with wide open spaces. “We had one concern,” added Joel. “It is really close to the airport and we worried about noise. But all the jets take off and land three kilometres away, so we don’t hear them. We might hear the smaller, single-engine planes but they aren’t very loud.” There are a few things the Rosenberg’s didn’t discover until they moved in. “I didn’t realize that we had a click plate for the built in vac until we’d lived here for two years,” said Joel, before walking over to a kitchen wall. “And see that up there?” He points to a nicely finished small mahogany panel. “We thought it was decorative. Cathy went up there and discovered it’s actually a storage compartment.” And there’s no lack of storage space in this home with a secondary kitchen on the lower level, as well as full-height storage room. “We have plenty of space to put everything,” said Cathy. Asked which part of their home they love the most, both found it difficult to name one particular spot. The house and the yard are equally charming, they agreed. OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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PEARL OCT/NOV 2019


Friendly dental care that WILL keep you smiling Friendly dental care that WILL keep you smiling

Creating Beautiful smiles Creating Beautiful smiles “I do love the main level,” said Cathy. “I was in a wheelchair a while ago and it was so easy to navigate the entire main floor. I could get around the kitchen, the family room, the spare room and I had access to the back deck. It’s also an easy house to keep clean. The floors are bamboo throughout, except for the kitchen and bathrooms, which are tile. The treads on the stairs are bamboo and the fascia boards are all mahogany.” The kitchen is one of the most beloved rooms in the house and it’s easy to see why with its raised bar on the island, lots of cupboards, hidden dishwasher and high-end appliances. “I love the kitchen in the morning,” said Cathy. “You can sit at the island bar and watch the sun come up. There’s always a view of the ocean when I’m cooking or cleaning. And it’s great for entertaining. The other night we had about 30 people here and there was lots of space.” Joel gravitates towards the yard when he wants to relax. “Our backyard is expansive with six distinct areas. We have a secluded area for the hot tub, the pond and waterfall area, a lounging area, a fountain/flower/hummingbird area, a meditation area and a forested path to the forest canopy area with fire pit and ocean view. You just pick an area that suits your mood and relax.” When he’s not in the yard Joel loves the great room. “The big, expansive windows and the ocean view are so relaxing. Basically I love all the areas we can relax in,” he laughs, “and we have lots of them! I also love the media room, also known as my man cave.

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213-2506 Beacon avenue, sidney | 250.656.4848

http://www.landmarkdental.ca

OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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It’s soundproof and when you sit down there you can ignore the rest of the world.” He adds: “The house is way over-built. There’s a double foundation and great windows. Even when it’s really windy you can’t hear the wind.” The couple also loves the upstairs master suite. “I love the space and openness of it,” said Cathy. “There’s lots of room in the master bath and there’s plenty of privacy with the Japaneseinspired rice paper shoji screen. I love that I can lay in bed and look out the window to the ocean.” She adds: “You can lie here and hear the sounds of llamas and the sheep and the neighbourhood rooster. That, plus the views of Sidney, Sidney Spit, Saturna and San Juan islands, as well as Mount Baker. It makes being up here even more enjoyable.” The living room, kitchen and master bedroom have unique peaked ceilings with whitewashed birch panels framed by crossbeams. In the great room, the ceiling rises from 10 to 14 feet and in the kitchen, it goes from nine to over 12 feet. The master bedroom ceiling is close to 13 feet high at the peak, while the ceiling off the main entrance soars to the highest point at 18 feet. “They call it a Japanese-inspired, cathedral-style ceiling,” said Joel. Upon closer inspection, details of the handiwork in the house are revealed, especially in the use of wood, which has been worked to show off the exotic grains. For example, the cabinetry is magnificent, made with coconut palm, African mahogany and sapele. The front door has been lovingly finished with over 60 coats on it. The range hood has beautiful grain and your eye is drawn to its subtle changes in colour. This truly is a house that beckons its owners and guests to come in, relax and enjoy the ambiance of a well-built, well-loved home. P 18

PEARL OCT/NOV 2019


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THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A MORE PERFECT TIME TO BUY!

hot tubs & swim spas

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FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY! FREE Bellagio or Vegas Package BELLAGIO PACKAGE MSLP $2,498

VEGAS PACKAGE MSLP $2,747

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This package includes three of our Swim Spa’s most popular options: • 24 inch Exercise Bar • Northern Lights • Bellagio Waterfall Jets - Jets that operate in a sequential patter creating an attractive water feature.

They also illuminate the Bellagio jets, a feature that is also included in the package.


PEARL INSIDER [ home design]

Very Good Chair in Olive Blu Dot Chester Fields $249

Ruth Dining Chair Moe’s Furniture Call for pricing Warren Chair in Green CB2 $549

Green WITH

Squeeze in a few extra guests with these luscious options for around your table.

Envy

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Fifties Dining Chair Callipers at StudioYdesign $480

Merrit Dining Chair Hudson’s Bay $289 RÖnninge Chair IKEA $99

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PEARL OCT/NOV 2019

Avenue Chair Muse and Merchant $129


in the heart of Brentwood Bay 101 - 7111 West Saanich Road • 250-652-1235 Mon-Fri 9 - 9 • Sat 9 - 6 • Sun 11 - 5 • Closed Holidays

in the heart of Brentwood Bay 101 - 7111 West Saanich Road • 250-652-1235 Mon-Fri 9 - 9 • Sat 9 - 6 • Sun 11 - 5 • Closed Holidays

2513B Beacon Ave, Sidney | 250.656.4413 women’s & men’s clothing | footwear | accessories

OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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PEARL INSIDER [ fashion] fashion]

FIERY FALL STORY Keeping calm and gearing up! STYLING BY: SHAI THOMPSON PHOTOS BY: LIA CROWE

Black floral wrap dress ($121) by Salt Water Luxe from Moden; gold hoop earrings ($13) from House of Lily Koi.

Animal print scarf by Shalimar ($69) and zigzag “Juane" knit by FRNCH ($135) both from Moden; camelcoloured alpaca wool outerwear by MaxMara ($198), caramel knee-high boots by MIz Mooz ($128) and camel leather gloves with zipper ($48), all from House of Lily Koi; leopard skirt by Gilmore ($84) from Waterlily Shoes; brown leather cross-body by I Medici ($269) from W&J Wilson.


Seamless black slip ($95) by Firma Energy Wear, sterling earrings ($58), black lace scarf ($48), sterling cuff ($128), all from House of Lily Koi.

Plaid jacket by Soaked ($139) from Moden; robin’s egg blue classic knit sweater by Saint James ($351) from Baden Baden; brown tweed hat by Builtmore ($28) from House of Lily Koi.

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Ivory Oats cashmere sweater by Debra Hayburn ($493) from Barbara’s Boutique; fabric crossbody bag ($89.75) from Lilaberry; plaid, three-quarter length, pleated skirt by Press ($89) and deflector glasses by Quay Australia ($70), both from Moden; white booties by Wonders ($250) from Waterlily Shoes.

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PEARL OCT/NOV 2019


Tumeric wool coat by Herluf ($395) from Baden Baden; beige knit butterfly hat ($15) from House of Lily Koi; leopard sweater by Press ($115) from Moden; geo pattern pant by Bianca ($189) from W&J Wilson; gray/green leather boots by taos ($238) from Waterlily Shoes.

Hair and makeup by Jen Clark Model Kelly Phillips Photographed at Sidney Volunteer Fire Department. A huge thank you to: Fire Chief Brett Mikkelsen Captain Aaron Kary Lieutenant Darrin Blinko Firefighter Steven Bibb OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL 27


PEARL INSIDER [ lifestyles]

A Stitch in Time Thea Dueck and the world of needlework samplers WO R D S : H A N S TA M M E M AG I PHOTO: DON DENTON

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PEARL OCT/NOV 2019


Thea is a giant in this universe of needlework with an enormous following. One of the top designers in Canada, she works with four employees and supplies sampler kits and supplies to enthusiasts all over the world.

Get Hooked on Fifth.

O

ne of life’s little pleasures is being initiated to something new. Last week, I felt a frisson of excitement as I entered the very-new-to-me world of needle art. North Saanich’s Thea Dueck introduced me to a specialized form of needlework or stitching that produces beautiful art called samplers. Okay, I’m male and this activity, which requires considerable patience and talent using needle and coloured thread, is practised primarily by females. But I was drawn in, fascinated. This form of needlework has a large, dedicated and ardent — almost fanatical — group of followers spread across the world. There are YouTube videos, Facebook and Instagram pages, specialized craft stores, online chat groups where designs and tips are shared, and much more. Thea is a giant in this universe of needlework with an enormous following. One of the top designers in Canada, she works with four employees and supplies sampler kits and supplies to enthusiasts all over the world, although the bulk of her customers live in the United States. Her firm, Victoria Sampler, offers about 350 unique designs made by Thea, a package of the necessary threads and explanatory instructions. Most importantly, the kit includes detailed charts and instructions showing how to stitch the scene. To my unpracticed eye, a chart looks like a complex array of hieroglyphics laid out on graph paper. Thea’s home is decorated with numerous framed “samplers.” A sampler, I discovered, is needleworker jargon for a piece of cloth on which a scene is stitched, often including a poem or saying. I was impressed by the variety of natural landscapes, animals such as dogs and sheep, and people in various activities, as well as by the harmony of the design patterns. Thea’s samplers were also inspirational and thoughtful, reflecting her warm, friendly and intelligent personality. I was drawn to a vertical sampler in a brown frame that reads: Sweet gentle eyes, a cold wet nose and silken velvet ears a heart as big as all outdoors best friends throughout the years I LOVE MY DOG Six smiling dogs of different breeds sit near the top of the sampler with geometric designs and scenes of dogs playing with people interspersed among the lines of text and special stitches. What a

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wonderful sampler for anyone who cherishes their dog. Three-dimensional art is also possible. Embroidered pin cushions and pillows, for example, are common items. Thea makes “gingerbread” houses for Christmas décor with cloth walls that are decorated with stitched seasonal scenes. Looking closer, I saw that stitching with coloured threads, also called f loss, onto cloth to form patterns, scenes and script is painstakingly intricate work. “It takes about 20 hours over a few weeks to stitch one like this,” Thea said, showing a framed sampler about 20-by-12 inches with an Easter scene. “Most stitchers follow a design. More difficult and time consuming, is designing a sampler, and then transferring the scene onto a chart.” This is done using graph paper or a special computer program. A significant part of Thea’s time is devoted to interacting with the needlework community. Fortunately, she has a very friendly, outgoing personality. Furthermore, she is computer-savvy and adept with social media. She has a website, a Facebook page and is constantly making YouTube and instructional videos. Thea also runs a chat room and recently started the online Victoria Sampler Academy with the goal of teaching advanced stitches (beyond the popular cross stitch). The annual VS Retreat where attendees stitch together with Thea is always sold out months in advance.

Born in Holland, Thea was introduced to stitching by her mother and grandmother. Moving to Victoria at age nine, she enjoyed music and art and was naturally creative. In 1988, at age 40, she discovered she had a knack for not only doing needlework but also for the painstaking job of drawing charts so others could make similar samplers. “I do more than just stitching; I look for meaning and try to place immense detail in a small space.” She started Lampost Designs to sell her kits, which focused on Victoria tourism; for example, a typical sampler featured the BC Legislative buildings. The Victoria Sampler company was born in 1993. Thea began to travel and teach more frequently and went to a few trade shows in the US. “It was a wonderful time of discovery, learning the business and learning new stitches,” she enthused. I was impressed that she had the skill and drive to transform her hobby into a paying business, since nothing beats earning a living from doing what you love. Fortunately, Thea’s partner, Richard, provided unstinting support and knowledge in marketing and business. Now an international business connected to the world through the internet, Victoria Sampler operates from her home on the Peninsula. Thea lives upstairs and downstairs are offices, storage rooms, video setups and more. What a wonderful world I’d discovered. Thea and her creative, efficient and successful business, I thought, were a perfect subject for a sampler. P

Fall is a great time to plant trees, shrubs and bulbs!

the 30th

Warm weather and all that rain make for perfect planting!

The nursery is full of colourful possibilities. Come and see for yourself!

80+ Juried Artisans

Glorious Food

Live Music

Hourly Draws

Mary Winspear Centre 2243 Beacon Ave., Sidney BC Saturday 10-5 | Sunday 10-4 $5 Admission | Children Under 12 Free www.firstandlastchance.ca

1370 Wain Road, N. Saanich, BC 250-656-0384

W W W. R U S S E L L N U R S E R Y. C O M 30

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Sponsored By:

Helping Others:


PEARL INSIDER [ history]

SIDNEY ISLAND:

A local treasure with a fascinating history

W O R D S : I VA N WAT S O N

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mere 25-minute boat ride from Sidney’s waterfront pier, enchanting Sidney Island might as well be a world away. Boasting a mild, almost Mediterranean-like climate, dense forests and expansive sandy beaches, the 2,000-acre island, and the spectacular Sidney Spit sandbar on its north end, attract thousands of visitors every year to discover its unique charms. Beneath the surface lies diverse layers of history from Indigenous peoples to British adventurers, and many fascinating chapters that encompass brick-and-tile manufacturing, summertime shooting parties, sheep farming and modern tourism. For generations by those “in the know,” Sidney Island has long been a local treasure and national gem. Coast Salish legend tells the story of the island’s creation. Once a rapacious giant mink named Mutcha roamed freely in the area, pillaging all the clams, crabs and fish, and destroying the bird eggs. Worried locals appealed to the spirit god Swaneset for help. Swaneset confronted Mutcha and warned there would be consequences to his greed. When those warnings were ignored, Swaneset transformed Mutcha into the island as punishment. His belly and back became beaches, while his tail became the sandspit. Named Sallas Island by Hudson Bay Company officers, Sidney Island’s present name dates to 1859, when Royal Navy Captain Richards of the HMS Pumper renamed it after the young son of his friend, Captain William Franklyn. The more Anglo-Saxon name was part of company efforts to promote British settlement on the island. By 1860, the Hudson Bay Company was selling land on the island for six shillings per acre. An auction in Victoria held in May attracted a large crowd. One man in OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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Beneath the surface lies diverse layers of history from Indigenous peoples to British adventurers, and many fascinating chapters that encompass brick-and-tile manufacturing, summertime shooting parties, sheep farming and modern tourism. the audience disrupted the proceedings, shouting that he would not give six pence, let alone six shillings for a lot on the remote, mostly uninhabited and wild island. Prospective settlers also feared conflict with local Indigenous peoples. Only one or two lots were sold and the auction ended early. In the 1860s, ownership of the island passed to Vancouver Island’s first Attorney General, George Hunter Cary, who used it as a private playground, and invited friends, family and the well-to-do of Victoria for hunting and shooting. One regular visitor was businessman George L. Courtney, freight and passenger agent for the Canadian Pacific Railway in Victoria, who enjoyed visiting the island for hunting expeditions. In 1902, he purchased the island outright for $25,000. He cleared dense forested areas and used the wood for railway ties, imported pheasants from China as game birds, and invited his friends from the well-known Butchart, Todd and Wilson families to attend lavish summer shooting parties.

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In 1905, Courtney was enjoying a family picnic on the island when he noticed rich clay deposits near a watering hole. Intrigued, he sent a sample for analysis in Toronto. The report back indicated it was suitable for brick-making. Seeking to benefit from a construction boom in the province, Courtney set up the Sidney Island Brick and Tile Company in 1906. At first, clay was dug by hand — a back-breaking and arduous task — but later, steam-powered shovels were used to keep up with demand. Clay was deposited by cable-drawn hoppers into a pug mill machine that softened the raw material, making it more pliable. Cutting and shaping came next and the moulded bricks were left to dry in heated tunnels or on racks before being baked at extremely high temperatures at an onsite kiln. The island’s forests were extensively logged to fuel the kiln’s fires and power steam-engine diggers. For a few years, business thrived and production increased, hitting a high point before the First World War when the company employed over 70 workers and produced over 55,000 bricks and tiles per year. Bricks were transported to Vancouver by tugboat and sold for $8 per thousand. Sidney Island bricks and tiles were used in the construction of the Empress Hotel in Victoria and the Hotel Vancouver on the mainland. In the following years, concrete and wood became more popular as building materials and the increased competition from rival brickworks cut into profits. With mounting troubles, Courtney was forced to sell the island, initially retaining ownership of the brickwork lands. A consortium of businessmen from Victoria purchased most of the island for use as a game reserve, encouraging hunting, fishing and shooting, among other leisure activities. The First World War further compounded business problems. Production at the factory quickly declined to a minimum and by the early 1920s operations ceased entirely when the company went


Experience bankrupt due to unpaid taxes. Government plans to provide work to veterans by repurposing the factory for broomstick manufacture went nowhere. It is estimated that during the lifespan of the business, over 33 million bricks were produced from over 38,000 cubic metres of clay removed from island pits. In about a decade, Courtney had made — and lost — a fortune. Today, thousands of bright red and orange bricks still dominate much of the island’s shoreline and considerable evidence of the area’s manufacturing history can be found throughout the area. Visitors can consult interpretative signage that clearly marks the location of the old factory, kiln, pits and various out-buildings and warehouses. The former clay pits are visible at the surface, having forever altered the island’s landscape. Today, they serve a valuable purpose as large pools that collect drinking water for local wildlife, including a sizeable population of fallow deer. Wildlife is abundant and in addition to the fallow and black-tailed deer, the island is home to bald eagles, hawks, owls, great blue herons, otters, mink, humming birds, ducks, geese and diverse marine life in its surrounding waters. The island has 17 miles of shoreline, mostly sandy beaches. In 1959, the Todd family purchased much of the island amid fears it would be bought by an American syndicate. In the 1960s, sheep farming there made headlines when sheep began to mysteriously disappear, smuggled away by thieves in speedboats in the dead of night. In 1981, Sidney Spit was made into a provincial marine park, adding to the 200 acres of former brickyard property already protected. In 2003, the park was transferred to the federal Gulf Islands national park reserve. Comprising over 400 acres, including the sandy spit and lagoon, the area is now a popular camping and summer excursion spot for day-trippers and boaters. There are 26 walk-in and backcountry campsites, mooring buoys, facilities for camping and picnicking and a dock. During spring and summer, the privately operated Alpine Group ferry shuttles visitors between Sidney Spit and the town of Sidney. The southern part of the island is owned by a private strata corporation with 111 lots, of between one and three acres with beach frontages. Sunsets on Sidney Island are magical. In the fading rays, the vistas of sand-swept beaches, flowing fields, ocean waves, tall trees, eagle wings, driftwood, wildflowers and the faded red bricks which dot the shoreline, intermingle as a collage of pleasant island memories, gently calling on those who once visited, to return again and again. P

International BEST award-winning CANADIAN whisky SINGLE MALT WHISKY

Handcrafted on Vancouver Island CASK ORDERS available with

YOUR OWN PRIVATE LABEL PRIVATE GROUP TASTINGS

shelterpoint.ca OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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FOOTLOOSE

TRAVEL LOG

DINOSAURS RULED! Royal Tyrrell Museum paints a picture of the past WO R D S : H A N S TA M M E M AG I

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fter an hour of driving alongside rolling fields of Alberta grain, the road suddenly zigzags downward into the province’s “Badlands.” The sight is stunning. It’s like entering an exposed wound in the earth, with layers of sediments weathered into hoodoos, ravines and contorted shapes. Nestled at the bottom of the valley, Drumheller emerges, as signalled by an enormous 86-foot-high (26 metres) Tyrannosaurus Rex towering over the town. Dinosaur “footprints” lead through downtown; shops sell dino souvenirs and — instead of pink flamingos — small dinosaurs adorn the lawns. You can even munch on a dinoburger. I’ve arrived in the Dinosaur Capital of the World. Crossing the Red Deer River, I head northwest alongside banks of pancake rocks to the Royal Tyrrell Museum. Opened in 1985, it is the world’s best showcase of dinosaurs. Who would believe that the past was so different from today with these enormous monsters roaming this very land? Set amid the hoodoos, Drumheller’s Royal Tyrrell Museum is the ultimate place to learn about dinosaurs. It has also been very successful in attracting tourists (400,000 visitors per year), as well as helping Drumheller earn its mighty dinosaur reputation. Inside, the museum is like an immense boneyard, but with the bones reconstructed into the dramatic poses and dioramas of the era. With a roar, a ferocious, 40-foot-long Tyrannosaurus Rex battles a Triceratops who stabs with its three deadly horns. The battle is epic and bloody, but the T-rex is the winner. The museum displays numerous scenes like this. My favourite is a saber-toothed tiger

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leaping from a cliff onto a big-tusked woolly mammoth. Although just skeletons are shown in most displays, the sight is powerful and evocative of the conditions millions of years ago. I’m overwhelmed by the variety and size of the dinosaurs, which tower above me, but also by how readily my imagination runs riot. Too frequently, I pictured the bones with flesh and fangs, being chased like characters in the famous movie Jurassic Park. The many children in attendance are captivated. As a young girl pats the skull of an enormous triceratops, a staff member describes the popular program where kids aged five to 13 can stay overnight and sleep next to their favourite dinosaur. Pretty scary, I think, thankful I exceed the age limit. Dr. Don Henderson, Curator of Dinosaurs, leads me behind the scenes and describes how he and his colleagues reconstruct the past. He shows photos of field trips where fossils are carefully extracted from rocks and soil, often under difficult conditions, and then encased in plaster of Paris for protection during transit. In the preparation lab, I get to see how dinosaur bones are removed from the plaster and subsequently assembled. The large

SET AMID THE HOODOOS, DRUMHELLER’S ROYAL TYRRELL MUSEUM IS THE ULTIMATE PLACE TO LEARN ABOUT DINOSAURS.

laboratory has many workbenches, as well as a number of air vacuums and filters to capture the dust created by cutting the plaster. Two storage rooms contain numerous shelves, drawers and pallets laden with bones of every size and shape. Dr. Henderson says, “Only about one per cent of the specimens we have are on display; the rest are archived here. Scientists come from laboratories around the world to study these specimens.” As we continue on, he explains how his own research involves biomechanics, that is, mathematical modelling of how dinosaurs move. I’m impressed. Leaving, I glance into the Cretaceous Garden, lush with ferns, tropical palms and flowering plants, representative of this area some 75 to 66 million years ago when the climate was much warmer and the coastal landscape was covered with forests, swamps and marshes. I can even see a petrified stump and dinosaur footprint. On the north side of the museum, I hike along the Badlands Interpretive Trail that winds through a conglomeration of gulches, buttes and canyons, all eroded from multi-coloured layers of sandstone, mudstone and shale dating back 70 million years. I sit on a rock and imagine dinosaur bones being excavated in the gully beside me. How did dinosaurs evolve to such incredible sizes and shapes, and then disappear? Given that such astonishing changes happened with dinosaurs, I wonder about humankind. How will we evolve and change over the coming eons? If only I could see into the future, as clearly as the Royal Tyrrell Museum provides a picture of the past. P

2019 Featuring over 230 crafters and artisans of Saltspring, BC and Alberta.

December 6th/7th/8th $5.00 for 3 day pass wheelchair accessible meals and refreshments For more information:

www.atouchofsaltspring.com

SAANICH FAIRGROUNDS

Friday, December 6th, 10am - 8pm Saturday, December1 7th, 10am - 5pm 2 Sunday, December3 8th, 10am - 5pm st

nd rd

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PAWS ON

THE PENINSULA

PHOTOGRAPHY DON DENTON

Seen here, left to right, are: Sheeba, a 2.5-year-old Irish Wolfhound cross; Tuuq, a Husky, photographed at Puppy Love Pet Care Centre; Sherman, 8-month-old Black Lab; and Grady, a 7.5-year-old Shih Tzu.

Michele Holmes & Debra Bartlett

A Pet Care Centre

with the best spa in town

Expect the Excepоal

Comfortable, clean & healthy fresh air environment Quality, nutritious foods • Exercise yards up to one quarter acre Feline “Cuddle Time” • K-9 Playschool course Recommended by Veterinarians • Full grooming services

A Full Service Pet Care Facility 250.652.2301 • puppylove.ca • e: info@puppylove.ca WWW.HOLMESREALTY.COM|250.656.0911 MICHELESTEAM@HOLMESREALTY.COM

2918 Lamont Road, Saanichton Just minutes from Victoria Airport and BC Ferries Terminal

Like us on Facebook!

OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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MEET OUR

BRENTWOOD BAY PHARMASAVE

Serving the community of Brentwood Bay for more than 25 years, Joe & Colin are proud to be your neighbourhood pharmacist. Joe enjoys sailing around the islands, Colin enjoys cheering for his beloved Canucks. See ad on page 23.

DEEP COVE MARKET

Rosemary Scott, owner of the Deep Cove Market brings her passion for food and shopping to a unique little destination in the country. See ad on page 13.

SKYVIEW INDUSTRIES

Proudly serving Greater Victoria and the Gulf Islands for over 30 years. Spa sales, supplies & full service. Buy Canadian, and get the best, for less! See ad on page 19.

LILABERRY HOME DÉCOR AND FASHION

Owner, Chris Stephen invites you into her welcoming and fragrant boutique. A pretty plethora of unique finds that are a pleasure to give and to receive. Come and indulge all your senses! See ad on page 9.

FINLAYSON BONET Finlayson Bonet Architecture is a firm with a longstanding reputation of providing quality comprehensive architectural services in the greater Victoria area and across Canada for over 30 years.

The Sidney Lions Food Bank is an emergency food service and we are here to help you and your family in a time of need. See ad on page 7. From: karla@readmedia.ca Date: October 13, 2011 12:42:03 PM PDT To: "Sagers" <store@sagers.ca> Subject: H&L Winter 2011 ad proof for approval

RODCO DRAPERIES & INTERIORS

RODCO Interiors has been serving Victoria BC for over 25 years. A family business owned & operated by Roger and his son Fielding Comartin. Residential, Commercial, Hospitality and Commercial, we do it all! See ad on page 6.

SAGER’S HOME LIVING

Luxury is easy to find when you know where to look, established in 1956, with twelve unique showrooms. Traditional, transitional, and modern furniture styles, with eclectic accents. See ad on page 3.

PUPPY LOVE PET CARE

Puppy Love Pet Care Centre and The Cat’s Meow is a full service animal care facility designed and managed out of a genuine love of animals. Call 250-652-2301 or go to www.puppylove.ca to learn more about our boarding & grooming services. See ad on page 37.

ADVERTISERS

SAANICH PENINSULA LIONS FOOD BANK

Please see attached proof as discussed with Bob. Thanks! :) Karla

EXPEDIA CRUISESHIPCENTERS

Elaine Kirwin and her team at Expedia CruiseShipCenters Sidney, have been selling dream vacations to the residents of the Peninsula since 1997. See ad on page 35.

PEARL

Luxury is easy to find when you know where to look

For the way you live

1802 Government 250-386-3841 1802 GovernmentStreet Street 250-386-3841 Monday-Saturday SundayNOON NOON Monday-Saturday9:30-5:30 9:30-5:30 Sunday to 5to 5

sagers.ca www.sagers.ca

SIMPLY CREMATIONS

Family owned and operated in Sidney since 2008. Licensed funeral director Leslie Duncan keeps it simple in your time of need. See ad on page 6.

ROYAL OAK BURIAL PARK

ELIZABETH MAY

Elizabeth May is the Member of Parliament for Saanich – Gulf Islands. She was first elected in 2011, and re-elected in 2015. She is also an environmentalist, writer, activist, lawyer, and leader of the Green Party of Canada. See ad on page 6.

See ad on page 18.

is the only not-for-profit, community-owned burial park and cremation memorial facility in the Victoria, BC region. This is a unique point of difference for families and individuals planning for the future or coping with the recent loss of a loved one. See ad on page 32.

VIOLA VANDERUYT

For over 30 years we have been helping women achieve peace of mind about their financial future. If you are looking for a second opinion, or have questions, call us for coffee and a chat. See ad on page 11.

RPM MASONRY

FISH ON FIFTH

Casual and friendly as every good fish ‘n chip shop should be! Great staff serving excellent fish for 20 years. Readers Choice Award for Favourite Seafood. See ad on page 29.

RPM Masonry was founded in 1988 by Reto Marti. Restoration of stonework, construction of new masonry projects, creation of outdoor living spaces, or building of Rumford fireplaces. We are available to discuss your projects and offer help and advice in all aspects of the use of natural stone. See ad on page 11.

MOE’S HOME COLLECTION Each piece offers superior craftsmanship combined with attention to detail for a truly unique and stunning piece. From industrial to mid-century modern, whatever your style, we carry pieces that will enhance and embody your desired look. View our collections today! See ad on page 5.

HOLMES REALTY GREENHAWK EQUESTRIAN SPORT

5000 square feet filled with horse equipment, pet supplies, fabulous apparel and footwear. Beautiful new pet-grooming salon to take care of all your four-legged family members! See ad on page 18.

RUSSELL NURSERY

Russell Nursery has been providing great plants and good advice to local gardeners for almost 25 years. We love plants and it shows! See ad on page 30.

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Since 1999, Holmes Realty has become a leader in Victoria real estate and is recognized for operating with the highest ethical standards. Within our team of real estate professionals is an agent who matches each unique client’s profile and needs. An agent who listens. An agent who works hard. An agent who asks the right questions – and can find you the right answers. See ad on page 37.

A TOUCH OF SALTSPRING

A Touch of Salt Spring Craft & Art Show with over 230 crafters and artisans, it is the largest attended arts & crafts show on Vancouver Island. For unique and thoughtful gifts for the holiday season, make a point to come see the show. See ad on page 36.

VICTORIA SADDLERY LTD. Established in 2002, Victoria Saddlery is an independently owned English tack shop serving the Victoria and the Vancouver Island area with top quality products for horse and rider. See ad on page 40.

W&J WILSON W&J Wilson the oldest family owned clothing store in Canada est. 1862! Now run by the sixth generation Scott Thompson. See ad on page 2.


LANDMARK DENTAL

Dr. Donald Neal has been practicing in Sidney for over 25 years and together with his son, Dr. Trevor Neal, they provide personalized dental care at the Landmark Dental Centre. See ad on page 17.

SHELTER POINT

FIRST & LAST CHANCE

LIFESTYLE HEARING

SAANICH PENINSULA HOSPITAL & HEALTHCARE FOUNDATION

remains one of the last seaside farms on the Island. We only use a single grain: barley. We do no blending: all of our grain is grown right here on the farm or purchased from other BC farmers. Pure spring water which comes from a mountain-fed aquifer located directly beneath our land. See ad on page 33.

STYLE COAST CASUALS Ron & Nancy Balske have

Our audiologists are passionate about what they do and truly care about supporting and helping you and the ones you love on your journey towards better hearing. See ad on page 20-21.

over 35 years of Retail Experience and decided to open a shop in Sidney, Nancy’s Home town. They opened Sidney Casuals a little over a year ago and are happy to bringing quality clothing and footware to Sidney. See ad on page 23.

is the perfect place to indulge in an exceptional Christmas shopping experience. Not only will you find unique handcrafted gifts for your loved ones, you will also be supporting our talented west coast artists and artisans. See ad on page 30.

It’s our hospital. And thanks to our donors, we have been raising funds to keep our hospital modern and efficient for over 30 years. See ad on page 7.

Charlie White Theatre 2243 Beacon Avenue, Sidney, BC

November 14th, 15th, 16th 2019 Presented by:

Brentwood’s Music in the Bay & Saanich Peninsula Lions Food Bank Platinum Media Sponsor:

Opportinities to Support this Fundraiser Your Donations:

YOUR SONG SPONSORSHIP DOLLARS GO DIRECTLY TO THE SAANICH PENINSULA LIONS FOOD BANK TO PURCHASE FOOD. WITH HIGHER FUNDING LEVELS, (SEE BELOW) YOU CAN HELP US UNDERWRITE THE COST OF THE SHOW. WE ARE ALSO IN SEARCH OF SILENT AUCTION ITEMS FOR ALL THREE SHOW NIGHTS, TALK TO US – THERE ARE LOTS OF WAYS TO GET INVOLVED.

Presenting Sponsor Platinum Levels: PERFORMERS FEE: $25,000

(includes two tickets, signed commemorative poster and meet the band opportunity)

HOSPITALITY: $5,000

RENTAL OF THEATRE: $5,000 HOTEL ROOMS: $3,000

SILENT AUCTION

The Saanich Peninsula Lions Food Bank is also looking for donations of silent auction items for each evening of the event. This can include gift vouchers, art, new products, gift baskets and other items. | If you have items you’d like to donate please contact Bev Elder at 250-655-0679. Deadline to donate silent auction item is Friday, november 8th, 2019. Event Information contact:

Bev Elder • 250-655.0679 • fdbank@telus.net Leslie Gentile • 250-661.4156 • lesliegentile@gmail.com

The Cariboo Express is a one-of-a-kind variety show with renowned Canadian musicians, created and fronted by Juno award winning musician Barney Bentall. In the past 13 years of presenting the Cariboo Express concerts we have raised $200,000 for the Saanich Peninsula Lions Food Bank. OCT/NOV 2019 PEARL

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Elevate Your Ride

VANCOUVER ISLANDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PREMIER TACK SHOP 2200 Keating Cross Road Saanichton | 250-544-4942

Profile for Black Press Media Group

Magazines - Pearl - Oct/Nov 2019  

i20191002194208617.pdf

Magazines - Pearl - Oct/Nov 2019  

i20191002194208617.pdf