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P E O P L E | C O M M U N I T Y | C U LT U R E

WAVE Summer 2018

SURF'S UP

PATRICK SALAMON MAKES HANDCRAFTED WOODEN SURFBOARDS – WHEN HE'S NOT CATCHING A WAVE HIMSELF

BEE YOURSELF

GORDON CYR'S BLACK CREEK HOME IS A HIVE OF ACTIVITY – LITERALLY

THE TRAILMASTER

DAN CLEMENTS BUILT MANY OF THE TRAILS IN THE SNOWDEN DEMOSTRATION FOREST

CAMPBELL RIVER | DISCOVERY ISLANDS | TRI PORT AREA


! m a e T m Drea

COME MEET THE

We want to extend and invitation to meet our team at Campbell River Honda! The only thing we love more than cars is people! Come on in and see what Honda has to offer! Whether it’s for now, down the road or just to see how much Honda’s have changed over the years! Louis Estey Sales Manager Louis has been with Honda for just over 3 years. He’s thrilled to manage his dream team at the dealership. They train day and night on how best to care for their customers and help everyone get into the vehicle of their dreams!

Jastin Dhaliwal Business Manager

COME JOIN

Jastin has been with Honda for nearly a year now and is already one of the best finance managers in the industry! He works all hours of the day working with and fighting against the banks to get everyone the best approval possible.

THE HONDA FAMILY Kerry Lewis Sales Consultant

Local Business for

Kerry has been working with Honda for over 20 years and his knowledge really shows it. Being the Honda sage of the dealership, any questions from history to new technology, he is your man.

Brandon Viskovich Sales Consultant Brandon has been with us for a year and his passion and dedication towards his customers is unmatched! He is very proficient with his product knowledge but it’s his heart that makes him as successful as he is.

Shaun Corkum Sales Consultant Shaun is our Rookie, he’s very passionate about his new career and wants to provide a great life for his family. He’s excited to work with you and to show you what true customer service looks like!

Our main focus is and always will be to work for the customer and also to make the searching and buying process as fun and informative as possible.

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12 18 8 EDITOR JOCELYN DOLL

PUBLISHER CHRISSIE BOWKER

jocelyn.doll@campbellrivermirror.com A full-time multi-media journalist at the Campbell River Mirror, Doll is excited to work with the team that endeavours to put together a beautiful and impactful magazine.

chrissie.bowker@blackpress.ca Director of Product Development

GRAPHIC DESIGN TAMMY ROBINSON

CREATIVE DIRECTOR ALI RODDAM

tammy.robinson@campbellrivermirror.com An award wining full time graphic designer with the Campbell River Mirror with over 13 years experience.

ali.roddam@blackpress.ca An experienced photographer, writer, and entrepreneur based in Black Creek.

Magazines, Digital and Events for Black Press, North Island.

Wave is produced by:

CONTRIBUTORS ALISA HOWLETT A journalist and communications professional based in Victoria. HANNA PETERSEN Reporter for the North Island Gazette KRISTINE SALZMANN A freelance writer based out of the Lower Mainland TYSON WHITNEY Journalist for the North Island Gazette.

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ADVERTISING SALES GINA COOPER gina.cooperr@campbellrivermirror.com JACQUIE DUNS jacquie.duns@campbellrivermirror.com LISA HARRISON lisa.harrison@blackpress.ca DEREK MOUL derek.moul@campbellrivermirror.com

a division of

Available online: campbellrivermirror.com/eeditions/ PHONE: 1-250-287-9227 MAILING ADDRESS: 104-250 Dogwood Street, Campbell River BC V9W 2X9 Wave magazine is published quarterly by Black Press. The points of view or opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher of Wave. The contents of Wave magazine are protected by copyright, including the designed advertising. Reproduction is prohibited without written consent of the publisher.


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CONTENTS

SUMMER 2018 EDITION  08

12

18

SURF CULTURE

23 Campbell River's surfing scene is enhanced by Patrick Salamon's handcrafted boards

ALEX WITCOMBE

Artist's whimsical driftwood sculptures have transformed from a pleasant passtime into a new livelihood

MOUNTAIN MENTORS

They weren't big on protocol and titles but loosly-affiliated club mentored Campbell River's rock climbing scene

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PORT HARDY FD 50TH

Fifty years of fighting fires, saving property and keeping people safe

POLLINATION FOR THE NATION

40

Jack Springer has seen Campbell River's whale watching industry grow from infancy to a major tourism draw

Gordon Cyr has been raising 44 mason bees since 1997 on his seven-acre hobby farm

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SNOWDEN FOREST TRAILS

One man started it all but the upkeep of mountain bike trails now a community effort

CAMPBELL RIVER WHALE WATCHING

10 QUESTIONS

Vicky Chainey Gagnon on amplifying the coices of local artists, the secret to happiness and other important questions

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FEED YOUR FACE FEED YOUR CRAFTING SURFBOARDS FACE IN HIS GARAGE

PATRICK SALAMON USES RECLAIMED WOOD TO MAKE PIECES OF USEABLE ART BY JOCELYN DOLL PHOTOS BY DAVID MARTIN

“I needed something to keep me going, keep me in that frame of mind before I could take a trip, so I started making surfboards,” Salamon said. Having worked as a carpenter in the past, Salamon had the fundamental skills down and learned the rest by watching Youtube videos and reading books. After that it was trial and error. “I have gone through a fair number

Right now, the boards he makes weigh half as much as the first designs he tried out and, recently, he has been experimenting with inlays as additional personalization in the handmade surfboards.

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In April Salamon was designing the spine and ribs of the board, which is the middle layer, as well as the design for the inlay, on the TRY THE SKINTELLIGENT TRY THE SKINTELLIGENT SYSTEM TODAY computer and his friend was using SYSTEM TODAY WITH FREE WITH A FREE SKIN ASSESSMENT. his laser to cut out the designs. Studio NameSKIN ASSESSMENT “Stuff that would not only take a long time, but it is virtually Address Phone Number impossible to get that detail,” he Business Hours said. Many of Salamon’s clients appreciate that the wood boards www.crmerlenorman.com are more environmentally friendly than the styrofoam boards, and merlenorman.com that (250) 286-0622

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It started when he realized that he couldn’t just travel the world surfing forever and should probably get some sort of post-secondary education. While he learned to be a plumber he needed to still feel connected with surfing.

of them so far, so I have an idea of what works and what doesn’t,” he said with a laugh.

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Patrick Salamon is a plumber who grew up in Saskatchewan and now makes wood surfboards in his garage in Campbell River.


is part of what motivates Salamon. He uses as much reclaimed wood as he can, and if he does pick up some materials at the mill, he usually chooses wood that comes from fallen trees, as the colours are more interesting. He also ensures that the epoxy finish he chooses to use is environmentally friendly. Though Salamon is busy in his 10

W A V E M A G A Z I N E | S UM M E R 2 018

garage making surfboards, or volunteering with Campbell River Search and rescue, or working as a plumber, he heads out to the beach on stormy days to surf.

surfers out at Stories Beach, he was ecstatic and he stopped right away to talk with them.

When he first moved to Campbell River, he didn’t know for sure if he would be able to surf or if he would be driving to Tofino all the time. But when a storm blew in within the first two months and he saw

“They take pride and love the fact they they are going out on the water and it’s storming.”

Surfers from Campbell River are die hards, Salamon said.

Salamon makes two kinds of surfboards, a traditional Hawaiian


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So far Salamon said he has sold four boards, two for decoration and two for surfing. But he is in no big hurry to grow the business too quickly.

Many of the alaias end up on walls as pieces of art, but Salamon is okay with that, in fact one of the first boards he made was for his wedding and it was used as a guest board instead of a guest book.

“I kind of like the feel of I’m the person that builds it, if you buy it and you live on the Island I will hand deliver it to you, just so I can see the expression on your face when you look at it,” he said.

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I put him on the trail and then blew the horn for the fox hunt on social media.

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ARTIST ANYTHING BUT ADRIFT THREE-DIMENSIONAL DRIFTWOOD SCULPTURES EVOKE AWE FROM COLWOOD TO CAMPBELL RIVER BY KRISTINE SALZMANN PHOTOS BY ALI RODDAM

Perched on a log off a main trail through Beaver Lodge Lands, an alert fox has poked its nose upward, looking as though it’s listening closely to the sounds of the forest. Fergus the Fox, as he’s been named, is imbued with character but his movements are frozen in time – he’s a driftwood sculpture created by local artist Alex Witcombe and left out for locals and tourists to enjoy. And enjoy him people do, just as they’ve delighted in coming across Norbert the Alien on Stories Beach, Peabody the Racoon on Rotary

Beach, and McNarly the Beach Ent at Esquimalt Lagoon. The driftwood creations began with Sheila the Dinosaur, which Witcombe made in August 2016, and the enthusiastic response on social media blew him away. He decided to follow up with two driftwood sculptures he contributed to fundraisers: Felix the Eagle for a friend who was undergoing cancer treatment and Lil’ Abe the Humpback Whale to raise money for a new mural in downtown Courtenay (which he painted with local artist Nick Hutton-Jay).

Witcombe soon realized there was a business opportunity in this new artistic endeavour and started Drifted Creations. His first commissioned piece was a new archway and eagle for The Kingfisher Oceanside Resort and Spa in Royston. Since then, he’s also made a mama bear and cubs for the Shelter Point Distillery in Oyster Bay. In the spring, plans were in the works to partner with Campbell River Tourism to create more sculptures for the community’s trails, a project inspired by the fox in the woods. SUMMER 2018 | W A V E M A G A Z I N E

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"It's like a big tourism treasure hunt … with Fergus, I wanted to wind down the year with something really cool for the public,” Witcombe says. “I put him on the trail and then blew the horn for the fox hunt on social media.” The treasure hunt aspect seems to appeal to the public – when people discover his sculptures, they often share photos with him on his Facebook page (which had almost 4,000 followers as of April).

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Vancouver Island is now populated with enough of Witcombe’s creations that he recently created a Google map, pinpointing the areas in which residents and tourists can find them. There’s even a marker in Toronto for

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one titled Big Maple, which the city commissioned Witcombe to create from driftwood that accumulated after flooding last year. When he creates a new creature he often works on site, and the beach literally becomes his studio. (Watch him build Elizabert the Alien at goo. gl/DyZ9ou). Combing the beach for interesting pieces is something that harks back to his childhood on the Saanich Peninsula, where he would look for driftwood “dinosaur bones” in the sand. The artist, who now lives in Oyster River, is also known for his murals, including one on Pier Street at the BC Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences and a new one on the


I was a huge Lego fanatic as a kid

Supporting our community

corner of Shoppers Row and 11th Avenue that was unveiled in November.

pieces, with contributors receiving perks like a Drifted Creations hat or stickers.

Now, however, Witcombe is moving away from murals and focusing on Drifted Creations. He has started creating wall pieces to be displayed indoors, such as a stunning driftwood mural titled Whiskey’s Run that he donated to the Greenways Land Trust.

One of the next markers on the map to pop up will be just outside Victoria. Witcombe has been invited to Colwood’s summer Eats & Beats at the Beach festival, where McNarly the Beach Ent, a protector of birds and small creatures, will soon have a female partner who will serve as a protector of the local flora. And there are sure to be many more to come.

The piece, which featured a bear by a salmon-bearing river, was auctioned off and raised $2,500 for the conservation organization. A Crowdfunder campaign is also in the works and may have launched as of this story’s publication. Witcombe will be raising funds so he can make more public art

“I was a huge Lego fanatic as a kid, so the act of creating a large custom piece out of smaller pieces appeals so much to my creative and inventive side.”

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It’s difficult to avoid “hitting the wall” upon walking into Stonehouse Teas. And that’s a good thing.

pastries that entice many regulars on a daily (and sometimes twice daily) basis.

That’s because Stonehouse Teas owner Christine Lilyholm, encourages visitors to stop at the unique jar wall showcasing 120 different teas from around the world and smell the contents: aromatic tea leaves.

Since becoming the owner, Lilyholm has christened Stonehouse Teas with a new logo and website, while aggressively marketing her teas to wholesale clients from Port Alberni, the Comox Valley, Black Creek, Quadra Island and beyond. She is discovering that many of her former NIC Culinary Arts students are working in these resorts, cafes and restaurants -– a tribute to her first class teaching technique.

“I love it when people soak in the ambiance”, she says. “The best compliment I receive is when my customers tell me they feel right at home.” Lilyholm bought Campbell River’s Stonehouse Teas in 2016 from her long time friend and cafe founder Tanya Stonehouse. And with that, Lilyholm plies her 15-year career teaching culinary arts at North Island College into making this venture even sweeter – by arriving hours early to bake the super popular carrot cake, triple chocolate brownies and gluten free

Building relationships within the community is of paramount importance to Lilyholm. These connections are creating beneficial and unique partnering opportunities. Together with Amber Baran-Tulett, owner of neighbouring studio Ocean Mountain Yoga, they have developed a signature tea blend that reflects the yoga studio’s


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warm, inviting atmosphere. Baran-Tulett confirms that collaborating with Lilyholm “has been amazing” and that “Christine did a perfect job” of creating the ideal tea for her clients. “It was like the icing on the cake for our little community!” Partnering with Baran-Tulett was Lilyholm’s first launch. “It was super fun,” she says of the project, which created the momentum to hop into beer. “I want people to enjoy tea, beyond the hot cup”, she says. Lilyholm’s bubbly personality is infectious as she explains another collaboration: tea beer. Along with brewmaster Darrin Finnerty of Beach Fire Brewing Co. across the street, the two concocted a popular pint by pairing tea blends with Finnerty’s Blond Ale. The Lemon Mango Tango beer, was a small release signature beer that quickly became popular. “It was a big hit”, Finnerty says of his company’s premier tea beer. “It was one of our fastest selling small batch beers. I’m due to do another collaboration with her soon.” Lilyholm also sponsored the Jingle Mingle aperitif for a Campbell

River Chamber of Commerce event featuring her cranberry-apple martini, a blend of concentrated cranapple tea, lime juice, vodka and simple syrup. She is quick to point out that the teahouse does not serve alcohol, however, she encourages creative mixology at home by infusing Stonehouse’s fresh high- quality teas with a spirit of choice. A Stonehouse specialty includes Bubble Tea Happy Hour, a new flavour for every day of the month for half price. And she offers seasonal teas – winter options are detoxifying and immune boosters, while summer is all about green, rooibos and fruity iced teas. For coffee drinkers, Stonehouse Teas serves Aroma Coffee from Quadra Island.

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“I have big plans”, says Lilyholm. “But I always want to retain the intimate atmosphere we have here.” Lilyholm is building her business through community involvement and becoming a familiar brand in 25 restaurants, resorts and pubs. She invites non-tea drinkers to explore her store, to savour her “at home feeling” as soon as you walk in the door.

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MOUNTAIN MENTORS FOUR DECADES ON, A CLUB’S ENTHUSIASM FOR SHARING CLIMBING KNOWLEDGE HASN’T WANED

BY KRISTINE SALZMANN PHOTOS BY ALEX AND DAVE RATSONT

Chris Barner jokes that he should be referred to as the “useless figurehead” when it comes to The Heathens Mountaineering Club, which he started with a group of friends in 1975.

compass and how to cross a stream safely.

He is reluctant to use titles such as “president” or “founder,” even though without him it could be argued that hundreds of people would not have been introduced to the pleasures of rock climbing and would have less respect for their natural environment.

Barner encourages interested people to call him personally – there are no schedules posted on the website, and he prefers not to use email or social media.

Since the late ‘80s the club has offered affordable and accessible mentorship programs and spent countless hours developing Crest Creek in Strathcona Provincial Park for climbing enthusiasts. There was a time when the club kept track of membership and at its peak in 2005 recorded 575 members. Until 2013, club members maintained 50 climbing walls linked by about 10 km of trails and held an annual 16-day event in the park. A disagreement with the provincial government over a volunteer agreement effectively halted their work in maintaining Crest Creek in 2013. While they can no longer volunteer in the park, the education and safety focus of the club remains. The club runs courses on everything from mountaineering skills (such as ice climbing and expedition training) to skills like how to navigate by 18

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They also teach low impact camping, and soft skills such as how to respond to people in a climbing group who are nervous.

“It ensures their soul and attitude is in the right place, and their motivation is true,” he says, later adding, “we try to keep it around the fireplace rather than the marketplace.” Alex Ratson was Barner’s very first student. The former Campbell River resident, now 32, was five years old when he first expressed an interest in climbing. He and his father happened to meet Barner a few years later, who decided to create a program for the then eight-year-old. Ratson says being trained in “a grounded grasp of both technical and soft skills” is something he continues to value to this day. He remembers giving back to the club by helping with trail maintenance and writing for the club newsletter. “The cost was sweat equity,” he recalls. “You gave back to the climbing community, and he hoped you could teach the next generation.”


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Barner’s passion for Crest Creek and the safety of those who climb there can now be found in a guidebook. He and co-author Ahren Rankin published Crest Creek Rock Climbs, which details the history of climbing in the park and describes the approximately 300 climbs available on the 50 walls. The club has also found other ways to give back to the community. Members are helping the Haig-Brown Institute upgrade the hatchery infrastructure at the Quinsam River by removing washed out bridges and fundraising for facilities to make it wheelchair accessible. “We take very much a different approach to community organization. We have no scheduled meetings, no secretaries,” Barner says.

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FURNITURE WITH SOUL NEEDFUL THINGS BRINGS SECOND-HAND, CANADIAN-MADE WOOD FURNITURE TO CAMPBELL RIVER BY KRISTINE SALZMANN PHOTOS BY ALI RODDAM

How important is a ‘Made in Canada’ label to you when you furnish your home?

ago, he’s learned to recognize the timeless Vilas and Gibbard pieces that sell well back home.

When Geoff Hancock goes on furniture buying trips, he keeps an eye out for high-end wood pieces manufactured mainly in Canada and the U.S.

As furniture companies turn to other countries for cheaper manufacturing costs, it’s become harder to find real wood pieces made in North America (according to the American Journal of Transportation, the U.S. imported $23.3 billion in wood furniture from Asian suppliers in 2017). But North American labels can still be found at the pre-owned furniture and home décor store in Campbell

Many of the brand names familiar to Hancock are ones that are no longer in production, pushed out by cheaper imports from overseas. But since he and his wife Kim took over Needful Things from her parents a little more than a decade

River. Geoff travels to Vancouver and Victoria a couple times every month to comb through pieces at estate sales and auctions. To the untrained eye, some finds look like they should be destined for the landfill. He and Kim clean and repair pieces before displaying them in their two-storey, 10,000 square foot store. “Bringing in good quality, second hand furniture – nobody does it on the scale we do,” Kim says.

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Needful Things was started in 2002 by Kim’s parents, Danny and Jackie Lukinuk. The Lukinuks had previously run a furniture store for 40 years with (and named after) Danny’s older brother Mitch, so furniture was something they knew well. They also owned the building at 1121 Ironwood St. and had recently lost a tenant. The couple decided to come out of retirement, but this time instead of selling new furniture, they decided to focus on “furniture with soul,” the company’s tagline. They sold the store to their daughter and son-in-law when they decided to retire again in 2006 but stayed on to train them, introducing Geoff to their buying sources and Kim to the business side of running the store.

Kim and Geoff continue to seek out furniture that is made to last and crafted out of natural materials such as teak, cherry, walnut, mahogany, maple and oak. They also maintain an eclectic collection of accent lighting, and usually have a Tiffany stained glass lamp or two in stock. “I relate ‘furniture with soul’ to items that are unique, antique, and one-of-a-kind,” Kim says. “It is furniture that adds character to a room and makes you feel good.” Increasingly, customers are concerned with supporting local businesses and cutting down on consumerism. Buying used furniture in their hometown is one way people can do both.

desirable, but people buy them and reinvent them, and transform them into something great,” Kim says, adding that customers often return to show her a photo of a freshly painted, purposefully distressed, or chalk-painted piece of furniture purchased from the store. The couple pride themselves on the large variety of styles and time periods they are able to stock in their vast showroom. And their own home has become full of finds since entering the business – Geoff mentions an Ethan Allen sofa set and teak dining room table as examples. “You just need to be patient and wait for just the right thing,” Kim says. “The fun is in the hunt.”

“Some of the pieces might be less

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PORT HARDY FIRE RESCUE: 50 YEARS IN THE MAKING SINCE THE INCORPORATION OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, THERE HAVE BEEN 275 MEMBERS BY TYSON WHITNEY PHOTOS BY KENDRA PARNHAM-HALL

Port Hardy Fire Rescue (PHFR) is turning 50 years old this year, but the history behind how the fire department officially came to be is shrouded in a bit of mystery. “Basically, the town had a few big fires and they had no fire department,” said former Port Hardy Fire Chief Les Storey (who joined the fire department in 1971). “Each time they said ‘we gotta do something’, and eventually the department formed in 1968.” Storey pointed out “the municipality had existed for two years at that point, so they formed a fire bylaw and went from there. It took quite a while, and there’s

missing numbers in the early numbering sequence — They said ‘we’re not sure who we gave numbers to, so we’ll just start again at 20’. It was so informal at the time, people just came in and were given a number. It wasn’t until the mid-70s when things started to get official.” When asked who the first fire chief was, current Port Hardy Fire Chief Brent Borg stated that through his research, “a couple of names came up, Jack Sanderson and Al Sloan — apparently Sanderson was the first fire chief unofficially, because in our books it’s Al Woodhouse, he’s number one on our roster.”

Borg estimated there was “probably a dozen” members when the fire department first became an official department, and the original fire hall was at 8760 Main Street, where the Port Hardy Hospital Auxiliary is currently located. Sometime in the 1970s-1980s, a second fire hall popped up out at Storey’s Beach, and then in 1993 another fire hall was built at 8890 Central Street, which is where PHFR continues to hang their gear up to this very day. Over the 50 years of fighting fires, PHFR has attended many difficult calls, with Borg stating the fire at Alpha Processing (where Marine SU MMER 2018 | W A V E M A G A Z I N E

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Harvest is currently located) in 2003 was “a big loss.” Borg said he remembers looking over the hillside at the destroyed building and thinking “this is going to change Port Hardy.” The salmon processing plant employed roughly 245 workers, but was thankfully rebuilt soon after and went back into business. The District of Port Hardy has always been willing to purchase fire protection equipment/apparatus for the department, most recently spending 1.1 million dollars on Ladder 17, a state of the art fire truck that features an extendible

ladder that can reach the tallest buildings in the district, which is “probably the biggest purchase the district has ever made for fire protection,” said Borg. As for stipends being given to the heads of the department, “They’ve always given us something,” said Storey, “but it was never about the money.” Back in January of 2018, the District of Port Hardy agreed to move to a paid on-call model, where all members of the department who put in hours during fire calls, training nights, and weekend hall duties, will benefit.

Borg was proud to point out that “Since the incorporation of the department, there have been 275 members that have come through these doors — and any of those people know the dedication and commitment it takes to be a part of the fire service. We have a huge responsibility on our shoulders and we all take it very seriously. We have six apparatus, two halls, 30 members, and peoples' lives and property in our hands.” The fire department will be celebrating its 50th birthday with a traditional Firefighters Ball at the Don Cruickshank Arena on Saturday, June 30. SUMMER 2018 | W A V E M A G A Z I N E

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PROVIDING A HOME FOR FRIENDLY POLLINATORS IS ONE WAY TO ‘BEE CANADIAN’ BY KRISTINE SALZMANN PHOTOS BY ALI RODDAM

Gordon Cyr tells the story of a friend in Black Creek whose plum tree produced only a dozen of the deep purple fruit in a given year. Cyr rented him a mason bee home, which housed 120 cocoons, and the next year his friend reported harvesting 50 pounds of plums.

Cyr has been raising mason bees since 1997 on his seven-acre hobby farm in Oyster River. The long-time floatplane pilot initially researched mason bees and purchased the supplies online in order to boost the production of his fruit trees. Eventually, he used his newfound expertise to make his own mason

bee homes, and soon friends were asking for some of their own. Cyr and his wife Debra now run Mason Bee Central, from which they sell handmade Mason bee homes, replacement tubes and liners, and the cocooned, dormant bees themselves. SUMMER 2018 | W A V E M A G A Z I N E

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I always say: pollination doesn't cost, it pays – with increased crops.

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What started as a small venture selling to friends has turned into a large investment. Cyr’s walk-in cooler contains 180,000 dormant bees, which he believes makes him one of the largest – if not largest – producer of mason bees in the country. His current customers range from local individuals with small gardens to commercial orchard growers. He also supplies his mason bee homes and dormant bees to garden centres across the country. When we spoke in April, the Moody Bee garden centre in Kimberley, B.C., had recently ordered 210 sets of bees – that’s 4,200 cocoons – and planned to have a bee launch party that week.

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Cyr also runs a homeowner program through which customers can rent mason bees and their homes and then return the supplies at the end of the spring pollinating season – this way they can leave the washing of the cocoons and cleaning of the trays to him. His homeowner rental program serves customers in the Comox Valley, Gold River and Duncan, with plans to expand further south to Victoria next spring. With the expansion will come a new website and name change, from Mason Bee Central to Bee Canadian.

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Did you know‌? Gordon Cyr flew floatplanes long before he made mason bee homes. While he currently flies for a local company, he used to work in remote areas of the Arctic, flying people to and from secluded communities and transporting wildlife surveyors and prospectors. Cyr has delivered fuel drums for helicopters used by scientists at a research station on Ward Hunt Island, one of the most northernmost pieces of land in North America.

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stressed populations of North American pollinators that have seen a startling decline. Cyr is happy to share his mason bee knowledge with the public and hosts a free workshop in both the spring and fall at the Campbell River Community Centre. He encourages gardeners of any skill level to keep mason bees if they want their fruit and berries to

be prolifically pollinated. “I always say: pollination doesn’t cost, it pays – with increased crops.” Mason Bee Central (masonbeecentral.com) starts shipping mason bee cocoons again in November. Cyr can be reached at info@beecanadian.ca.

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TOP CAESARS IN CAMPBELL RIVER


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WE DID A SOCIAL MEDIA Q&A TO FIND OUT WHERE THE BEST CAESARS IN TOWN CAN BE FOUND If you are looking for an awesome meal, as well as a savory beverage, look no further than Socal Restaurant. Though they have amazing Caesar's every day, Thursday is special at Socal. Every Thursday the chef creates an epic "Supreme Caesar" which can feature anything from stuffed chicken and a baked potato to Nanaimo bars and fruit kabobs. The Supreme Caesars are served Thursdays until they run out!

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P R O D U C T S A N D G I F T S F R O M YO U R N E I G H B O U R H O O D R OYS TO N S OA P WO R K S

After reciving handmade soap as a birthday gift, Royston Soap Works owner Michelle Forslund, realized she had never tried anything like it, and was instantly hooked! from there she opened “Michelle’s Soap Bar” on her Royston property, a small stand selling her boutique handmade soaps. Just 3 years Royston Soapworks was born. To find Michelle's beautiful handcrafted products visit www.roystonsoap.com or Michelle's Soap bar on Minto Road in Royston

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MLKANHNY (Pronounced Milk an Honey) Focuses on designing quality jewlery and objects for the unique woman. Each piece is made by hand in the Comox Valley by owner Madison Etheridge. MLKANHNY pieces have a unique and sculptural design in brass and sterling silver. To order online visit www. mlkanhny.com and in Courtenay at Rally co. & Campbell River at Quest Shoes.


ROUGH SEAS WOODWORKS

From humble beginnings collecting beachwood after winter storms and transforming it into home decor, owner Brad Ruff continues to make specialty items for the home using specific hardwoods, lumber slabs and beach wood. With a combination of new and vintage materials, Rough Seas' designs are ocean inspired and uniquely west coast. Find them on Facebook at facebook.com/ roughseaswoodworks.

C L A R I T Y KO M B U C H A

Childhood friends India Ford and Shasta Opal have taken their love of fermented beverage, and created the locally made Clarity Kombucha. Known for it's health benefits including high immounts of probitics, Clarity is the perfect combination of healthy and delicious. Handcrafted in Cumberland, Clarity comes in flavors such as blackberry/ rosemary, grape/thyme and raspberry/hybiscus/mint.

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ON THE BACKS OF A FEW HOW SNOWDEN DEMONSTRATION FOREST BECAME THE TRAILS TO RIDE & HIKE PHOTOS BY TIM MCNEIL

Snowden Demonstration Forest is a hidden gem of mountain biking, hiking and walking trails tucked off of Highway 19 just 20 minutes north of Campbell River. The area has an extensive history of both logging and recreational activities and was designed by the Ministry of Forests to show that logging and recreational activities could co-exist within the same area. With over 80 kilometers of winding trails in a mainly second growth forest – unbeknownst to many there is actually a small area of old growth – the network also connects to the Pumphouse riding area in Elk Falls Provincial Park. All of these trails would not exist without the dedication and vision of staff from the Ministry of Forests and the original volunteer work of Dan Clements, the first mountain bike trail builder in Snowden. While Clements was the first person to build mountain biking trails in the Snowden Demonstration Forest, he is quick to point out that many 36

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other people helped to build and develop trails in the region. Most of the mountain biking trails in Snowden, however, are as a result of Clements' original development which involved hundreds of hours of work in the mid-90’s. Many times Clements worked on trails with friends, but he also worked alone in the forest with his beloved dog Wylie. The trail Wylie’s Wood is named for his trusty companion who is buried in the area. Between 1929 and 1953, the Snowden Demonstration Forest was originally logged. Short railway lines were laid to log the area. Following the logging, the area was used as an educational venue for school children to learn about the forestry industry. When it became underused, Charlie Cornfield and Janet Leach, staff from the Ministry of Forests, decided to use new recreational funding to design hiking trails using the old railway lines. Cornfield and Leach’s vision was to

create a collaborative partnership between recreation and forestry in the form of a demonstration forest and to develop a 200 kilometre loop for bike camping. Trails such as Lost Frog and Lookout Loop are some of the trails developed by the Ministry of Forests, but as Cornfield points out, “We never got to finish the planned loop for bike camping before we retired.” Around the same time period, Clements had begun exploring new riding areas beyond the Beaver Lodge Lands because of the muddiness of those trails. Clements was joined by a group of friends to develop the first mountain biking trail outside of the Beaver Lodge: the Ridge trail in the Pumphouse area. “The trail,” he explains, “was an old deer trail that we opened up. It was at first just an out and back trail.” At the time of building, Clements thought he was on Crown land.


Highest quality service It wasn’t until later that he realized that the trail was in fact in the northeast edge of Elk Falls Provincial Park. His mistake could have involved a hefty fine from BC Parks. He is quick to admit that he immediately informed the local BC Parks representative about the trail. Much to his surprise, his mistake became a major triumph for the sport of mountain biking in British Columbia: BC Parks decided to sanction the trail and it became one of B.C.’s first legal mountain bike trails in a provincial park. After that, Clements had promised not to build in the park any further, so he was driven to look to new areas. When he discovered that Cornfield was exploring new recreational trails in Snowden, Clements and his friends knew that the straight and low grade trails chosen by the Ministry of Forests would not lead to the winding corners and steep grades loved by mountain bikers. Clements designed and put mountain bike trails into Snowden before the crew from the Ministry of Forests had finished developing their planned routes. Clements’ mountain biking trails remain today because of additional efforts from the riding community. Some of the old lines however, such as Mudhoney Pass (which was actually developed by a group of local female riders, with

some input from Clements) have been shifted in order to reduce environmental impact. In 2009, a provincial initiative to give work to unemployed forestry workers also allowed for the completion of major trail maintenance and an additional 10 kilometres of new trail. While Clements can still be seen biking regularly in Snowden with a pair of clippers and small saw on his pack, he has passed on the torch for the majority of trail building and maintenance to other volunteers. “What people don’t understand,” he says, “is that when you go out and you trail build for a weekend, that’s a weekend I didn’t get to ride!” He hopes that more people will become involved in trail maintenance, such as joining the trail days put on by the local River City Cycle Club: “If everybody did one day a year, the trails would be amazing.” Current stewards of the Snowden, the River City Cycle Club, regularly now host trail days and builder workshops and they are always looking for new volunteers to help with shovels, hoes and rakes under the guidance of experienced trail builders.

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WATCHING WHALES FOR OVER 20 YEARS

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Jack Springer ran the very first whale watching boat in Campbell River out of Painters Lodge in 1997. He said it took some convincing. Bob Wright, the owner of the lodge at the time didn’t believe that there would be return customers. But the tourists came, and they have been coming in larger numbers every year since then. Springer ventured out on his own in 2000 starting Hurricane Jack Adventures. In 2008 he transitioned the business into Campbell River Whale Watching with his business partner Erin Webber. At this point, Springer was using zodiacs for the tours. He says they

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are an easy sell because guests are engaged with all of their senses. The business has grown considerably since then. Springer said the summer months are crazy busy taking tourists out on the water. Luckily there are still pristine areas out there so each tour is unique. And there are more whales. Springer said that when he first started, he would see one or two humpbacks each summer. One day just this past April they had 19 sightings. He figures the whales are here because there has been a shift

in food. Humpbacks eat small fish like krill and krill feed on the small organisms that do better in warmer water. And the water may or may not be getting warmer due to global warming. However, Springer said that because of the communication network between the whale watching companies in Campbell River they might just know more about where the whales are. That’s one of the great things about Campbell River, Springer said. When there are whales sighted it isn’t top secret information, the companies share information with each other so that the tourists can

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have the best experience possible. However, with the increase in tourists and whale watching boats on the water, Springer said he is concerned for the safety of both the tourists and the animals. You can’t just drive away from a humpback when it dives, you could drive right over it, he said. 8945 Granville St, Port Hardy 250-949-7771 www.thesource.ca

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Springer is a member of the North Island Marine Mammal Stewardship Association and abides by their code of conduct and like flying the whale watching flag when engaged with what watching.


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They follow the regulations laid out by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans but they have regional specific viewing conduct which includes shutting off engines to reduce underwater noise and exhaust emissions whenever possible and keep a distance of at least 200 metres if animals show unfamiliar behaviour, signs of stress or habituation. The code of conduct also requires whale watching companies to tune into

VHF radio channel 07A to relay information about their activities and the activities of the whales they are watching, among other requirements. The society also requires companies use photos for social media and advertising that only show responsible marine animal viewing so that tourists have realistic expectations of what they are going to see.

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10 QUESTIONS VICKY CHAINEY GAGNON

Vicky Chainey Gagnon is the executive director and chief curator at the Campbell River Art Gallery. She moved to Campbell River in 2017, with her cat Violet, from her most recent curatorial job in St. John’s, Newfoundland.


Why do you do what you do for a living? Artists are visionaries; I often feel that their voices need to be amplified though, for the greater wellbeing of a community and for social change to happen. My role as a curator is to facilitate that exchange. What is the single best thing about living in Campbell River and why? Diverse landscapes and top-tier cultural offerings: the mountains, coastline and the arts are really amazing!

GROWING GROWING GONE

What is the first piece of art that you purchased and why? Kristiina Lahde, “Coil”, mixed media collage on board, 2006. I bought this artwork after I got my first curatorial job at the Foreman Art Gallery of Bishop’s University in Sherbrooke, Quebec. I knew instinctively that living with this artwork would inspire me daily. What is your secret to happiness? I try to be mindful of how I treat people. Respect for others, and honouring individual contributions are paramount to me. If the day was 25 hours long how would you spend the extra hour? Oh my! I’d still be thinking about, and looking at artworks and listening to Sarah Vaughan. What is the best piece of advice you have been given and who gave it to you? Father, 1981: “ Vicky: Do what you love. You’ll never have to work a day in your life.” Who is the most interesting person you have ever met? What was so special about them? Impossible to say. I work with artists, so I have the pleasure of meeting remarkable, singular, creative people all the time. The depths of the conversation when in a studio visit context can be simply aweinspiring. It would be too hard to choose, honestly! If all jobs paid exactly the same, what would you want to do for a living and why? I would award grants to artists to build siteresponsive artworks, much like the Delfina Foundation does in the U.K. to maximize opportunities for living artists to make the very best art possible, under optimal conditions. What is your go-to restaurant in Campbell River and what do you order when you go there? I love the lime chipotle mussels at Beachfire. Always delicious, always served with a smile. If someone was coming to Campbell River for the first time and you were in charge of their itinerary what places would you be sure to include? First you have to stop into The Ideal Café for lunch. Walk along the pier downtown, or the shoreline in Willow Point is fantastic too, and then check out the Campbell River Art Gallery for some art, followed by an evening performance at the Tidemark. Sunset at the Spit = obligatory.

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Special Features - June 06, 2018  

i2018060604154769.pdf

Special Features - June 06, 2018  

i2018060604154769.pdf