Page 1

FR 2018

EE

TRAILS OF THE WEST COAST Your Guide to the Best Beaches & Hiking Trails on Vancouver Island’s Pacific Rim

DIRECTIONS | HELPFUL INFO | UNIQUE FEATURES

Westerly News


Be CoastSmart Know before you go near the water

How to be CoastSmart PLAN YOUR TIME

WATCH YOUR BACK

Don’t get trapped by the tide or changing weather conditions.

BE PREPARED ■

Know where you are, take a phone, tell a friend, and bring the essentials.

Large waves can reach above the tide line, flooding beaches, small islands, and rocky headlands.

STAY ON THE TRAIL ■

Trails are safe places for storm watching. Rocks and logs can be very slippery and exposed.

The ocean can sneak up on you. Watch your back.

Visit CoastSmart.ca 2

tofinohiking.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome ������������������������������������� 4 Trail Etiquette ����������������������������� 6 Hot Springs Cove ���������������������� 8 Walk The Wildside ������������������� 10 Lone Cone Trail ������������������������ 12 Big Tree Trail ���������������������������� 14 Tonquin Beach Trail ����������������� 16 Radar Hill ���������������������������������� 18 Tofino Botanical Gardens ������� 19 Canso Plane Crash ������������������ 20 Schooner Cove Trail ���������������� 22 Area Map �����������������������������24-25 Combers Beach Trail ��������������� 26 Rainforest Trail������������������������� 28 Shorepine Bog Trail ����������������� 30 A Walk In The Forest ��������������� 31 South Beach Trail �������������������� 32

Nuu-Chah-Nulth Trail �������������� 34 Willowbrae Trail ����������������������� 36 Half Moon Bay Trail ����������������� 38 Wild Pacific Trail ���������������������� 40 Lighthouse Loop ���������������������� 42 Mount Ozzard Trail ������������������ 44 Cover Photo: ‘Peekaboo’

by Brian Congdon, Subtidal Adventures Inc. LIABILITY DISCLAIMER - LEGAL NOTICE The authors and publishers of this Trail Guide, including Black Press Group Ltd., TofinoHiking.com, associated corporations and the officers, directors, employees, agents, subcontractors of all of them disclaim any liability for the content of this Trail Guide. The content is intended only as general information and not as a substitute for topographical maps, marine charts, experience, familiarity with terrain, or as a substitute for guiding services, all of which should be considered and, if appropriate, employed before and during any wilderness adventure to minimize the risks involved. It is each user's responsibility to evaluate all information, opinion, advice, and other content contained in this Trail Guide and the TofinoHiking. com website. The authors and publishers do not warrant that any trail description or other content is accurate, complete, reliable, current, or error-free. Copyright and all other intellectual property rights are claimed in all content, including advertising content - 2018.

A Publication of the Westerly News� PO Box 317, #102-1801 Bay St�, Ucluelet, BC

West Coast Wild 1/2 Page remotepassages.com

Local 250-725-3330

Toll Free 1.800.666.9833 westerlynews.ca

3


WELCOME The trails in this guide are all located in the traditional territory of the Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations. Remember to be a good guest and respect the community and the land. In partnership with Tofino Trails (tofinohiking.com), the Westerly News is proud to offer this free trail guide to visitors and residents of Canada's beautiful West Coast. The publication features information and photography on 20 trails in the region. From the remote wilderness of the Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve through to the network of hiking paths in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and straight up Ucluelet's Mount Ozzard, we sincerely hope this guide will inspire all who peruse it to explore the lush rainforest and coastal heaven that surrounds us. If you have a comment you'd like to share or find an error, please email office@westerlynews.ca. Happy Hiking!

Nora O'Malley, Westerly News

4

tofinohiking.com

Michael Chang, Tofino Trails


Photo credit: Ocean Outfitters Guide, Kyler Vos

westerlynews.ca

5


TRAIL ETIQUETTE

DO

✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

DON'T

✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘ ✘

Pack out everything you bring in Respect trail closure signs and wildlife advisories Know today's weather forecast, tides and ocean conditions Stay on designated trail Dress in layers and equip yourself for sudden weather changes Bring enough water and research trail accessible water sources before you leave for your trip Leave a note on your windshield if you are a solo hiker saying when you expect to be back at your vehicle Use designated fire pits, and if none are available dismantle ones you create Bring a bear hang rope or use provided bear caches to store food overnight Bring a garbage bag to dispose of packages and uneaten food Plan meals meticulously to avoid excessive waste Leave your camping spots the same or better than when you arrived Use provided toilet facilities or dig a hole to go to the bathroom, bury it, and pack out used toilet paper Check with the band offices in the area to see if there are any traditional or sacred areas that you need permission to enter Don't Feed wildlife Don't venture onto rocky headlands, drift logs, or beaches when the surf is high Don't Leave food at your campsite overnight Don't Forget to check if you need permits for your desired hiking/camping area Don't Sleep on fragile parts of our ecosystem like an area with many plants or a bed of moss Don't Rinse or wash dishes in a water source Don't Dump garbage down composting toilets Don't Bring dogs into areas where they are prohibited Don't Forget the importance of excellent preparation, including meal planning, map and route planning, a well-stocked first aid kit, and an evacuation plan If you encounter a bear, cougar or wolf: Pick up small children. Face the animal, stay calm and retreat slowly. Do not run or play dead. Talk in a normal voice. In the unlikely event of an attack, try to appear bigger. Be aggressive. Shout, wave a stick, and throw rocks. Attacks are extremely rare. Free-roaming pets may attract predators and be attacked. Keep dogs on a leash.

EMERGENCY NOW DIAL 911 PARKS CANADA WILDLIFE SIGHTINGS DIAL 250-726-3604

6

tofinohiking.com


Outfitting you for the West Coast! TOFINO FISHING & TRADING 4TH & CAMPBELL 250-725-2622

Follow our Facebook pages and our Instagram @tofinotriangle for updates!

STORMLIGHT OUTFITTERS 390 MAIN ST. 250-725-3342

METHOD MARINE SUPPLY 380 MAIN ST. 250-725-3251

3 STORES IN TOFINO TO SUIT YOUR OUTDOOR NEEDS Pull up a chair at this local mainstay which happens to be Tofino’s only pub. Enjoy original live music or relax on our waterfront patio as you share your tales of the day. Bring the kids if you like—minors are welcome until 10pm.

www.tofinoresortandmarina.com 634 Campbell St., Tofino • 11:00am–1:00am Daily • TAKE OUT 250-726-6122 westerlynews.ca

7


HOT SPRINGS COVE

Distance: 4 km Elevation Gain: 1000 stairs Camping: Yes How to Get There Hot Springs Cove is located along a remote area of Vancouver Island’s west coast, in Maquinna Provincial Park, about 50km northwest of Tofino. Access to the park is by taking a 1.5 hour water taxi trip or a Hot Springs Cove

20-minute float plane flight from Tofino. From the dock, the geothermal hot springs are located at the end of a 2km walk along well maintained boardwalks and wooden stairs.

The Trail The area is located on a major geological fault, an unstable area of the earth’s crust. The ocean water is pulled into the earth to a depth of 5km, heated to more than 100 degrees celsius, before pressure pushes the water back up the earth’s surface. The heated water is released through fractured rock at a temperature around 50 degrees celsius. While the temperature of the water pouring from the rock is quite hot, when it becomes mixed with the cold ocean water, the temperature becomes very enjoyable. Once you are at the dock, walk to the shore and past the sign, following the wooden boardwalks into the forest. The route is relatively easy and should only take about 30-40 minutes.

Mate Islands

Once at the hot springs, there is an area to change before heading down onto the rocks. The rocks are quite sharp and best to have footwear like sandals or shoes you don’t mind getting wet. Make sure to leave enough time for the hike back to the dock for the ride back to Tofino.

8

tofinohiking.com


www.jamies.com

westerlynews.ca

9


WALK THE WILDSIDE

Distance: 11 km one way Elevation Gain: None Camping: Yes How to get there

This trail is operated and maintained by Ahousaht First Nation. For more information visit: www.wildsidetrail.com. Walk The Wild Side is located on Flores Island in the community of Ahousaht. It’s a

30-minute water taxi or an 8 minute float plane ride from Tofino. There are numerous operators in the area who would be happy to shuttle you on a private boat over to Flores Island. The cost is approximately $20-30 cash one way. There are also private water taxi charters hikers can hire ranging anywhere between $150-300. To arrange a water taxi, head down to First St. dock in Tofino. Here there will be a queue of operators waiting to shuttle people around Clayoquot Sound. There is no set schedule so just head down to the dock roughly 30 minutes before you wish to depart to ensure a timely departure. The first water taxi usually arrives at 10:30 a.m. You can than arrange with your water taxi driver what time you would like to be picked up to be brought back to Tofino.

The Trail Flores Island

Ahousaht

Cow Bay

10

tofinohiking.com

White Sands Cove

The Ahousaht First Nation village of Maaqtusiis on the breathtakingly beautiful Flores Island is the gateway to the Wild Side Trail. The trail winds its way through ancient Sitka forests and visits two of the most spectacular pristine beaches in Clayoquot Sound: Whitesand Cove and Cow Bay. The trail ventures through old growth forest and along eight of the most beautiful beaches in Clayoquot Sound. Your water taxi driver will point you in the direction of the Wild Side Trail head office. That said, there are also signs in the village pointing hikers in the right direction. At the


trail head office you will sign in and pay your trail fee of $25 per person and if you wish to spend the night along the trail there is also a $10 per person camping fee. These payments can be made in cash, credit or debit. At the trail head office you can also pick up a copy of the trail map, you will have the opportunity to ask the informative Trail Guardian any questions you may have. There are quite a few muddy sections and places where boards are missing along the boardwalk. The trail is constantly getting improved so have patience with the conditions of the trail. Depending on tides you can shave off an hour by wading through the river just after Kutcous Point. There is an emergency shelter located about half way which should only be used in a crisis. There are three designated campsites along the trail that have outhouses and bear/ wolf caches but feel free to camp anywhere along the trail or beach. Bear, cougar and wolf encounters are possible at any location along the trail, so try to keep negative encounters to a minimum, use the metal food/storage caches or bring a long rope

and a waterproof sac to store all food items and anything food smelling (ie deodorant, shampoo etc) and hang them at least eight-feet high on a tree limb. Do this whenever you leave camp, are not cooking, and at night. If camping isn’t for you there is also the Aauuknuk lodge. Please visit www.aauuknuklodge.com for more information. Dogs are not encouraged or recommended to bring as they attract wolves who can be quite territorial. There have been a high number of wolf sightings. Please use caution. Two days are recommended for ultimate trail experience. Round trip day hike is approximately 8.5 hours. Please note there is limited natural drinking water available on the entire route. As with any area, filtering or treating water before drinking is highly recommended. The most reliable natural water source of water is at the southern end of Cow Bay. Please pack out what you pack in. Walk The Wild Side trail information courtesy of Ahousaht First Nation.

THE AHOUSAHT WAWIIH (CHIEFS) INVITE YOU TO EXPLORE, DISCOVER & ENJOY THEIR HISTORICAL HAʼHOULTHEE (CHIEFS LANDS). Aauuknuk Lodge is an ecologically sustainable, ecotourism operation. We provide quality service and comfort to our guests along with a cultural experience that exposes visitors to the rich culture and history of Ahousaht First Nation. The Aauuknuk Lodge has 21 rooms with double beds, for single or double occupancy. We have a full operational kitchen, lounge area, showers/washrooms and a coin-operated laundry room. Our TV room has satellite TV and also a cell booster and wifi for your convenience. Aauuknuk Lodge is an adventure that day-hikers and campers will always remember when they walk the Wildside Trail and cruise up to the Hot Springs.

BOOK YOUR NEXT ADVENTURE NOW!

250-670-9679 www.aauuknuklodge.com westerlynews.ca

11


LONE CONE TRAIL

Distance: 7 km Elevation Gain: 730 m Camping: Yes How To Get There This trail is operated and maintained by Ahousaht First Nation. For more information visit: www.loneconetrail.ca. Lone Cone is located on Meares Island and

Meares Island

Kakawis

Tofino

12

tofinohiking.com

requires one of several water taxi services to take you to the start of the trail. The cost of this service is about $40 per person and includes return travel. It is best to have a cell phone with you to call for pickup when you return to the dock. There is also a $10 trail fee that is payable to the Ahousaht Nation either at the trail head (cash) or at the Hostel and Campground (cash, credit or debit).

The Trail Located on Meares Island and clearly visible from Tofino, the towering mountain known as Lone Cone rises from the ocean in the Clayoquot Sound. The views from the top on a clear day are nothing short of spectacular as you look south towards Tofino and can see the Pacific Ocean and a large section of the surrounding area. However, the hike is very strenuous as the trail climbs more than 700-meters in just over 1.5km and is best done by those who are fairly fit. From the dock, walk up the gravel road and follow it for roughly the first 1km. There is a sign that points left to go to Lone Cone. Go left and walk past the trail markers on the trees as the route begins to narrow into a trail. At first, you go through a short section of recently planted trees before things become a bit more rugged as you step


over logs, slippery roots, and the occasional muddy section. The trail is still relatively flat through this section. When you reach a sign that says “Guided Tours Only”, go left and past the sign as the trail begins to climb. From here on, it’s all uphill but it starts out relatively gradual. Follow the trail through the beautiful west coast forest, stopping occasionally to catch your breath and listening to how quiet the area is. Climb down and over a log and use the rope on the other side to pull yourself back up to the trail. Shortly after, the trail passes under a huge fallen tree as you continue making your way up hill. The trail passes a section that is not very steep for a brief moment but then things get really steep. The hike becomes very difficult as you rapidly gain elevation while having to step up and over logs and large tree-rooted steps. There are very few switchbacks as the trail feels though it goes straight up the mountain. Take a moment to look at glimps-

es of the ocean between the trees, which gives you an idea how far up you have gone. Eventually, the steep trail becomes a little less steep, signalling that you are getting close to the top. The trail goes to the right and up one final section to the first viewpoint on top of a rocky outcrop. Continue along the trail to the second viewpoint, which is the largest, offering the best view of the Clayoquot Sound region. There are a few other views further along the top worth seeing as well. After enjoying your time at the top, hike back down the steep trail, being careful to watch your step and not lose control on the slippery, loose dirt. When you’re back at the gravel road, this is a good time to call your water taxi to pick you up as cell reception is good at this point and walking the last 1km to the dock gives them time to meet you there. Walk back along the gravel road and back to the dock where you were dropped off earlier in the day.

GROUND HOSTEL & CAMP

ul Located on beautif , BC no fi To d, an Meares Isl Free water taxi and

ed!

select parking includ

IL.CA

ONECONETRA L • 9 6 1 .2 5 2 250.7 ccess • Private Beach A als • Kayak/SUP rent • Volleyball • Wifi • Hot Tub • Full Kitchen • Games Room

tivities! & many more ac westerlynews.ca

13


BIG TREE TRAIL

Distance: 3.5 km Elevation Gain: 106 stairs Camping: No How To Get There Big Tree Trail is located on Meares Island and requires you to take one of Tofino’s water taxi services. The cost of the water taxi is about $30 per person and scheduled pickup is usually pre-planned in advance. It is also a good

Morpheus Island

Calf Island

14

tofinohiking.com

Meares Island

idea to take a cell phone to call the water taxi for pickup if you are going to be longer or arrive quicker at the destination than expected.

The Trail Located on Meares Island, the Big Tree Trail has some of the largest trees in B.C. The old-growth forest consists of spruce, hemlock, and western cedar trees that are more than 1,000 years old, with the largest tree known as the Hanging Garden. There are two options for this hike. The first option, you can explore the big trees along the wooden boardwalks, which ends at the Hanging Garden, and then return via the same boardwalks for a trip total of 2.4km taking about 1-1.5 hours. The second option is you can continue on a loop trail for an additional 3km (4.2km total) that follows a dirt path through the forest, passing a beach, then returning to the boardwalks close to where you were dropped off, taking a total of 2.5 hours. We describe, and recommend, the loop route below but it should be noted to bring proper footwear as the trail can often be muddy. After being dropped off on the rocks, climb up onto the log and follow the wooden boardwalks into the forest. For the first 1.2km, you will stay on the boardwalks and pass several large trees as you carefully


make your way up and down the slippery wooden steps. Plans were made to log the area in the mid-80’s but the Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations fought the logging plans and the courts ruled that no logging would take place on Meares Island, saving the many trees that are more than 1,000 years-old. At the end of the boardwalks stands the Hanging Garden, the largest Western Red Cedar tree. While it looks dead, the tree is still alive and was given its name because of all the other trees and plants that are growing from it. It is about 18 meters wide and estimated to be 2,000 years old, making it one of the oldest trees in the world. The wooden boardwalks wrap around the tree, offering views from all angles of this giant. The Hanging Garden marks the end of the boardwalks and some people choose to return via the same route. To continue on the loop, a dirt trail heads off into the forest from the otherside of the Hanging Garden. Follow this trail as you continue to pass

large trees. While this trail is not marked, it is relatively easy to follow and should you come to a junction with another trail, the rule-of-thumb is to go right so you keep moving in a clockwise loop. Much of the trail is similar terrain and can often be very muddy. After hiking about 2km from the Hanging Tree, the trail descends quickly down a hill where there are some short trails on the left that lead to a beach. Follow these short trails and emerge from the forest for some scenic views of Clayoquot Sound from the southwestern tip of Meares Island. Return to the trail and go left, following the route as it steps over and crouches under fallen trees. Within 30-minutes, the trail reaches the wooden boardwalks where you walked earlier. At this point, it’s worth making a phone call to the water taxi for pickup as you are within minutes of the pickup area. Go left onto the boardwalks and walk down the stairs, returning to the rocky area where you were dropped off.

westerlynews.ca

15


TONQUIN BEACH TRAIL

Distance: 3 km Elevation Gain: 91 stairs Camping: No How To Get There Access to Tonquin Beach is best done at the end of Tonquin Park Road, where there is a number of parking spots at the end of the road. It is only a 10-15 minute walk from Tofino. To get there by car or foot, go

Third Beach

16

tofinohiking.com

to 1st Street and turn left heading southbound. When you reach a park on your right, go right onto Arnet Road. A few hundred meters later, go left onto Tonquin Park Road and drive / walk to the end where a trail begins on the left side. A second option with more parking is to start your walk from the Tofino Community Hall. To start from the Community Hall, drive south on 1st Street from Tofino and turn left onto Arnet Road. Drive to the end where it veer right into the parking lot.

The Trail The Tonquin Trail is an easy walking trail that passes through rainforests along the Pacific coast and provides access to Tonquin Beach, which is a great location for watching sunsets. There are some wooden stairs along the trail down to the beach but the forest trails are gravel and offer a fairly easy walk. From the parking area at the end of Tonquin Park Road, walk up the paved path as it passes between some houses and quickly reaches a wooden platform at the top of a set of stairs. Walk down the stairs and cross the bridge, continuing into the forest. Within a couple of minutes, you reach the end of this section of trail as it arrives at Tonquin Beach.


The beach is a popular spot during the sunny evenings as it’s one of the best locations in Tofino to watch the sunset. Since the beach is not located directly facing the Pacific Ocean, it does not receive the giant ocean waves and therefore, is much calmer than other areas, like Long Beach. To continue hiking the rest of the Tonquin Trail, return to the trail where you accessed the beach and just to the right, further along the forest’s edge, there is another trail. Follow this trail to the right as it reaches a large set of wooden stairs. Walk up the wooden stairs to the top and continue a short distance until you reach a junction, where the trail to the left goes to the Tofino Community Hall. Go right at the junction and follow the trail as it wraps along the coastline, staying in the forest above the ocean. Continue following the trail and taking the opportunity to walk along any short trails to the right that offer viewpoints of the

ocean. There is also a short forest loop at a junction on your left, which takes a brief excursion along a different route before return to the trail along the coastline. You can choose to do this path either on the way or when you return as it gives you a different option. The Tonquin Trail eventually heads down a hill and ends at a rocky beach that is surrounded by the small B.C. coastal rock. Return by walking back up the hill and following the same route you took. If you did not take the side trail through the forest, you can do that on the way back, or simply stay on the coastal route and pass both junctions for the side trail. Continue walking until you reach the junction with the parking lot to the Community Hall. If you parked at Tonquin Park Road, go left and down the wooden stairs, returning to the beach briefly. Then step back up onto the trail that enters the forest, crosses the bridge, and heads up the wooden platform of stairs, before returning down the paved path to the start of the trail.

RUBIO 366 Campbell Street Tofino www.rubio.ca Amber • Larimar • First Nations Jewellery • Glass westerlynews.ca

17


RADAR HILL

Distance: 0.2 km Elevation Gain: 15 m Camping: No Wheelchair Accessible

and follow the road up the hill to the parking area. From Ucluelet: Drive north, straight past the intersection and through Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. After leaving the park area, watch for signs to Radar Hill and turn left. Follow the road up the hill to the parking lot.

The Trail How To Get There

Radar Hill is located between the northern edge of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. From Tofino: Drive south along Highway 4 and watch for signs to Radar Hill. Turn right

Radar Hill

18

tofinohiking.com

As the site of a historic radar station during World War II, this short, picturesque walk features the Kap’Yong Memorial – in honour of the 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, which served during the Korean War. On a clear day, the 0.2 kilometre-long Radar Hill trail offers spectacular panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean, Clayoquot Sound, Tofino Inlet and the majestic northern mountains. The Radar Hill Trail is short, wide and wheelchair accessible. Start at the pathway from the parking lot to access this trail, then walk up the concrete route as it veers right until you arrive at a viewpoint and the Kap’Yong Memorial, which overlooks the ocean. From this point, continue on the trail as it wraps around to a high point, then walk a bit farther as it stretches to another scenic viewpoint looking southward. To head back, simply retrace your steps down the pathway and walk in the direction of the parking lot.


TOFINO BOTANICAL GARDENS

Wheelchair Accessible

$

Admission Fee

❂ Open from Dawn to Dusk How to get there

From Tofino town centre, head southbound on the Pacific Rim highway for about 2km. Turn left when you see the sign for Tofino Botanical Gardens, Darwin’s Cafe and the Ecolodge. There is ample parking available in the gravel lots outside the Garden.

The Trail

A network of paths take you through a lily pond, cultivated gardens, old growth forest and one of Canadan’s best sculpture collections. The trails reach down to the edge of the Tofino Mudflats, an incredible expanse of intertidal mud teeming with life, revealed twice a day at low tide. Tofino Botanical Gardens is full of surprises, and speaks to plant lovers, art lovers and lovers... There is even a kissing bench to be discovered. Resident goats and chickens may also accompany you on part of your walk.

westerlynews.ca

19


CANSO PLANE CRASH

Distance: 5 km Elevation Gain: 35 m Camping: No How To Get There

The trail to the Canso Plane Crash Site is located exactly 15 telephone poles south of the turnoff to Radar Hill. There is no parking allowed along the highway, so the closest parking is at the Radar Hill turnoff a few hundred meters from the highway.

4

Radar Hill

20

tofinohiking.com

Once you have parked in the lower Radar Hill parking lot, walk back towards the highway and walk south, counting the number of telephone poles until #15. Be very careful walking alongside the Highway as there is very little space between the road’s shoulder and the speeding cars in some sections.

The Trail

This hike provides an opportunity to visit the site of a Royal Canadian Air Force Canso 11007 that crashed shortly after takeoff on February 12, 1945. The plane still remains on the side of a hill and is surprisingly fairly intact despite the damage sustained from the crash. The trail to the site is located just south of Radar Hill and it passes through a bog that is EXTREMELY MUDDY, even during the late summer months. Gumboots are highly recommended. From the lower parking lot at Radar Hill, walk back along the road towards the Highway and turn right, walking alongside of the highway heading south. Begin counting the telephone poles as you make sure to stay off the road and away from the passing cars. The trail enters the forest at the 15th telephone pole south of the Radar Hill turnoff. When you are close, there is a very small drawing of a plane on the telephone pole.


The first section of the trail is very easy as the wide trail heads into the forest and quickly away from the noise of the cars along the highway. Within minutes, the trail begins to climb gradually but is still not that difficult. Within 1km, you reach an old, abandoned building. Walk up the stairs and inside the building as the graffiti, ripped walls, and dangling wires come across as very creepy. Go left inside the building, past the spray painted words saying the “Trail is this way”, and exit out of the back of the building. Follow the trail away from the building as it begins to descend quickly from the building through a much narrower section. Near the bottom, you enter the bog and this section is extremely muddy and will slow your progress. Continue following the markers through the muddy bog. There are several different coloured markers and the string on the trees marks the boundaries of the trail area, all lead in the same general direction. The trail eventually becomes less muddy as you

find yourself walking through a section of rugged, coastal trees. Eventually, you pass a small pond that is almost perfectly circular. This pond is actually a crater that was created when the rescuers removed the bombs from the plane and, instead of trying to move them out through the difficult terrain, decided to detonate them near the wreckage. Just beyond the pond, the tail end of the plane begins to come into view between the trees as it lays on the side of the mountain. After you have spent time at the wreckage, carefully climb back down to the bottom of the hill and walk back along the trail, passing the pond. Walk through the muddy bog, staying on course via the ropes and trail markers. The trail ascends up the hill and back to the abandoned building as you leave the difficult part behind. From the building, walk back along the wide trail to the highway, then turn left and walk alongside the highway heading north as you return to the parking lot at the Radar Hill turnoff.

Parks Canada & Westcoast Inland Search and Rescue are called out on a regular basis to rescue hikers on the Bomber Trail. If you plan on making this hike PLEASE REMEMBER TO:

LEAVE A PLAN Let someone know where you are going and when to expect you back.

GIVE YOURSELF ENOUGH TIME Give yourself enough time before dark in case something does not go as planned.

TAKE THE ESSENTIALS If you were to get lost and stay out overnight would you be prepared? Bring water, snacks, a flashlight and medications. The trail is very muddy at times, dress according to the weather and take a few extra clothes... people do get lost overnight, it gets cold and wet out here.

CHARGE YOUR CELL PHONE Make sure your cell phone is fully charged or conserve if not. Signal is poor.

PAY VERY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE ROUTE The route is very braided and you can lose your way easily.

westerlynews.ca

21


SCHOONER COVE TRAIL

Distance: 2 km Elevation Gain: 336 Stairs Camping: No

How To Get There Schooner Cove is located on the north end of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, just north of Long Beach.

4

Schooner Beach

22

tofinohiking.com

From Tofino: Drive south and watch for signs to Schooner Cove. At the Schooner Cove sign, turn right into the parking lot. From Ucluelet: Drive north along Highway 4, past the intersection and into Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Watch for signs to Schooner Cove, then turn left into the parking lot.

The Trail As a short and relatively easy trail, this scenic hike leads you through lush rainforests and over gentle meandering streams before arriving at a spectacular beachfront area. To begin your hike, walk to the far corner of the parking lot, where you’ll see the start of the trail as it crosses a gravel road and enters the forest. The trail continues briefly on a gravel path before reaching a set of wooden stairs, which quickly descend into the forest. Here, the forest floor is thickly covered with green moss, and the trail continues on a series of stairs and boardwalks before dropping into the first small valley and bridge, which crosses one of several little creeks. From here, climb the wooden stairs and continue along the boardwalk. After a few steps, the trail descends into another set of steps and into a small valley before continuing up a third


set of steps, which will guide you through the valley. As you wind through Schooner Cove’s verdant rainforest trail, the rolling sounds of the ocean are hard to miss. Continue following the path, and you’ll eventually catch a glimpse of the water. Keep on the trail, and a short distance away is a set of steep wooden steps that descend onto a flat boardwalk section, which leads out onto the beach. This beautiful and pristine beach offers amazing views of a rocky outcrop, which can be accessed at low tides. However, it’s important to be extremely careful as tides can change quickly in the area, making it easy to become trapped by a single rising tide. To explore this area further, walk south along the ocean to Long Beach, a 10-kilometre expanse of beachfront that seems to stretch on forever.

Discover Hiking NEAR VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA

Ove 190 Tr ar to Cho ils os From! e

Elfin Lakes, Garibaldi Provincial Park 22 km round-trip • 1 hour 45 minutes drive from Vancouver

vancouver trails vancouvertrails.com

victoriatrails.com westerlynews.ca

23


Hot Springs Cove

TRAILS OF THE WEST COAST 1

Flores Island Ahousaht

Clayoquot Plateau Provincial Park

24

tofinohiking.com

Kakawis

Meares Island 4

B ro w

6

1

n in g

Pa ss a

ge

Lo



8

4

2

9 ✈

ESOWISTA

enned

LONG BEACH

1

Radar Hill / Radar Beaches

2

Bomber Trail

3

Schooner Cove Trail

4

Long Beach Access

5

Combers Beach / Spruce Fringe Trail

6

Rainforest Trail

7

Wickaninnish Interpretive Centre

8

Florencia Bay

9

Shorepine Bog Trail

PA

IF

Pacific Ocean

12 Willowbrae / Half Moon Bay Trail

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve Vistor Information Centre Tofino Airport Grice Bay Boat Launch 5 km 2 mi

5 6

ac

10 South Beach / Nuu-chah-nulth Trail

0

10

Be

14

h

Kennedy Kennedy Lake Lake

11 7

10

C

er

4

ng

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

yR iv

4

Lo

Hikes and Points of Interest:

0

rK

Grice Bay

3

11 Gold Mine Trail

we

9

15

12 8

13

11

17 16

IC

O

i

5 TOFINO 7



o fi n To n l e t I

Meares Island

4

ern

Tofino

Clayoquot Arm Provincial Park

lb

Stubbs Island

tA

✪ 3

To Po r

Vargas Island Provincial Park 1. Hot Springs Cove 2. Walk The Wildside 3. Lone Cone Trail 4. Big Tree Trail 5. Tonquin Beach Trail 6. Radar Hill 7. Tofino Botanical Gardens 8. Canso Plane Crash 9. Schooner Cove Trail 10. Combers Beach Trail 11. Rainforest Trail 12. Shorepine Bog Trail 13. A Walk In The Forest 14. South Beach Trail 15. Nuu-Chah-Nulth Trail 16. Willowbrae Trail 17. Half Moon Bay Trail 18. Wild Pacific Trail 19. Lighthouse Loop 20. Mount Ozzard Trail

 4

✪ 2

“THE JUNCTION”

20

12

C

E

A

N

18

UCLUELET Ucluelet

19

westerlynews.ca

25


Hot Springs Cove

TRAILS OF THE WEST COAST 1

Flores Island Ahousaht

Clayoquot Plateau Provincial Park

24

tofinohiking.com

Kakawis

Meares Island 4

B ro w

6

1

n in g

Pa ss a

ge

Lo



8

4

2

9 ✈

ESOWISTA

enned

LONG BEACH

1

Radar Hill / Radar Beaches

2

Bomber Trail

3

Schooner Cove Trail

4

Long Beach Access

5

Combers Beach / Spruce Fringe Trail

6

Rainforest Trail

7

Wickaninnish Interpretive Centre

8

Florencia Bay

9

Shorepine Bog Trail

PA

IF

Pacific Ocean

12 Willowbrae / Half Moon Bay Trail

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve Vistor Information Centre Tofino Airport Grice Bay Boat Launch 5 km 2 mi

5 6

ac

10 South Beach / Nuu-chah-nulth Trail

0

10

Be

14

h

Kennedy Kennedy Lake Lake

11 7

10

C

er

4

ng

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

yR iv

4

Lo

Hikes and Points of Interest:

0

rK

Grice Bay

3

11 Gold Mine Trail

we

9

15

12 8

13

11

17 16

IC

O

i

5 TOFINO 7



o fi n To n l e t I

Meares Island

4

ern

Tofino

Clayoquot Arm Provincial Park

lb

Stubbs Island

tA

✪ 3

To Po r

Vargas Island Provincial Park 1. Hot Springs Cove 2. Walk The Wildside 3. Lone Cone Trail 4. Big Tree Trail 5. Tonquin Beach Trail 6. Radar Hill 7. Tofino Botanical Gardens 8. Canso Plane Crash 9. Schooner Cove Trail 10. Combers Beach Trail 11. Rainforest Trail 12. Shorepine Bog Trail 13. A Walk In The Forest 14. South Beach Trail 15. Nuu-Chah-Nulth Trail 16. Willowbrae Trail 17. Half Moon Bay Trail 18. Wild Pacific Trail 19. Lighthouse Loop 20. Mount Ozzard Trail

 4

✪ 2

“THE JUNCTION”

20

12

C

E

A

N

18

UCLUELET Ucluelet

19

westerlynews.ca

25


COMBERS BEACH TRAIL

From Tofino: Drive south and into the park. Watch for signs to Combers Beach, and turn right into the parking lot.

Distance: 0.5 km Elevation Gain: 6 Stairs Camping: No

How To Get There The Combers Beach Trail is located in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, along Highway 4.

4

Combers Beach

26

tofinohiking.com

From Ucluelet: Drive north and past the intersection by the Tourism Info Booth. Enter the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, then continue until you see a sign for Combers Beach. Turn left into the parking lot.

The Trail Located in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and situated near the Esowista First Nations Reserve, Combers Beach is a beautiful beach area on Vancouver Island that is particularly popular with surfers. The trail to the beach is short but steep, and descends towards a gravelly path from the parking lot. To begin the hike, simply follow the gravel trail as it enters the forest and makes a sharp descent, weaving you through the thick majestic trees. (A wooden bench marks a resting spot for the return trip, which is mostly uphill.) The trail veers to the right and continues downhill before reaching a three-way junction. Make sure to go left onto the wooden boardwalks to continue following this trail, where – a short distance away – it exits the forest and arrives at Combers Beach.


(pronounced ups-cheek ta-shee)

THE MULTI-USE TRAIL IN PACIFIC RIM NATIONAL PARK RESERVE

An artist rendering of the future multi-use trail that is scheduled to open in 2020. (Parks Canada photo)

NOTICE: Trail under construction Approximately 25 km long, the trail will provide new ways for visitors to explore the ancient coastal rainforest and vast beaches of the national park reserve. The trail is designed to be family friendly, avoiding steep grades and highway crossings, and with room on the trail for cyclists and pedestrians to pass safely. Trail users will visit scenic viewpoints and park facilities, and signage will help them discover the wildlife, environment and aspects of local Indigenous heritage in the area. As work progresses on this exciting project, Parks Canada is appreciative of the support from and partnership with the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation and Yuu-thlu-ilth-aht, as well as the support from the communities of Tofino and Ucluelet and park visitors. We are honoured to have the Elders Working Group, comprised of Elders from the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation and Yuułu ił ath, give the multi-use trail its official name. apsčiik t’ašii (pronounced ups-cheek ta-shee) has many layers of meaning, and refers to “going in the right direction on the trail.” While visitors won’t be able to use apsčiik t’ašii for a few years yet, there is plenty of work going on. After environmental, archaeological and geotechnical studies, and a rigorous planning process, the trail moved from planning to reality in 2017. Work to clear the trail bed began at the north end of the national park reserve and included the creation of a new parking lot at Radar Hill Road. In the last half of the year, and over the winter of 2017-18, clearing the route proceeded from Incinerator Rock at Long Beach to the southern boundary of the national park reserve. This work was scheduled around the migratory bird nesting period; to avoid times when fish were in the streams; and to minimize the impact of construction on our visitors. In 2018, work to build the trail continues, and visitors can find regular updates on progress on our social media accounts: Facebook (facebook.com/ PacificRimNPR) and Twitter (twitter.com/pacificrimNPR). Parks Canada is investing an unprecedented $3 billion dollars over 5 years to support infrastructure work to heritage, visitor, waterway and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada. These investments represent the largest federal infrastructure plan in the history of Parks Canada. westerlynews.ca

27


RAINFOREST TRAIL

Distance: 2 km Elevation Gain: 731 Stairs

From Tofino: drive south and into Pacific Rim National Park. Watch for signs to the Rainforest Trail and turn right into the parking lot area. From Ucluelet: drive north, past the intersection, and into the park area. Watch for signs to the Rainforest Trail and turn left into the parking lot.

Camping: No

How To Get There Located in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, the Rainforest trail parking area is south of Long Beach.

The parking lot is on the west side of the road. Route A starts from the east side on the other side of the highway. Route B begins at the far end of the parking area.

The Trail Rainforest Trail has two routes, one on each side of the highway (listed as “Route A” and “Route B” below). The parking lot is located on the west (ocean) side of the highway.

East

A 4

B

Route A starts from the east side of the highway, which means you’ll have to carefully cross the highway from the entrance of the parking area. Speed limits in this area are up to 80 kilometres per hour, so it’s important to be alert and cautious in making sure there is plenty of distance between yourself and any oncoming cars as you cross this busy stretch of road. Once on the other side, enter the forest along the wooden boardwalk and go left

28

tofinohiking.com


at the junction. This 2-kilometre trail runs parallel to the road for a short distance before curving deeper into the forest, leaving the sound of cars behind. You’ll see a pair of grand, old trees lying across the trail - simply duck down to pass underneath them. The trail then drops down to a steep set of stairs taking you farther into the forest and weaving you through the thick foliage. You’ll soon reach a junction with a short trail on the left. (To the right of the trail, however, stands a grand, majestic tree that’s not to be missed: This one is nearly twice as thick as the trees surrounding it.) Continue along the trail as it drops and climbs through the forest until you reach another junction with a short trail to the left, offering a view of a small creek. Back on the trail, walk up the wooden steps and follow the boardwalk as it leads you back towards the junction. A short walk to the left returns you to the highway, where you (again) carefully cross the busy road and

return to the parking area. Route B starts from the far right side of the parking lot. To begin this 2-kilometre hiking loop, follow the gravel trail - which soon turns into a wooden boardwalk. At the junction, turn left and follow the trail as it descends farther into the forest and passes alongside beautiful moss-covered trees and tiny streams. Along the way, you’ll find several signboards offering information about the local ecosystem. Continue as the trail climbs and then again descends, threading its way deeper into the forest before looping back around. (Of course, all of those steps you walked down earlier means you’ll have to now climb a number of wooden steps for your return trip.) Follow the trail as it climbs back up, passing a few viewpoints along the way, before reaching the junction you came across earlier on your hike. Veer left for a short walk along the gravel trail, which will guide you back towards the parking lot.

Ocean Village is nestled comfortably on beautiful MacKenzie Beach, minutes from the picturesque village of Tofino. Our property is ideally located for guests to enjoy unobstructed views and direct beach access from our oceanfront cabins. Renovated and updated for maximum comfort, our iconic “beehive” cabins are available year-round at affordable, family-friendly rates. Great for couples, families, and even dogs!

Ocean Village Resort Tofino 555 Hellesen Drive, Tofino Telephone: 1-250-725-3755 Toll Free: 1-866-725-3755 info@oceanvillageresort.com

westerlynews.ca

29


SHOREPINE BOG TRAIL

Distance: 0.8 km Elevation Gain: None Camping: No Wheelchair Accessible How To Get There

The Bog Trail is located just off Wick Rd., a short distance from Highway 4. From Tofino: Drive south and into Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, passing Long Wick Rd.

Pacific Rim National Reserve

Nuu-Chah-Nuulth & Florencia Bay

30

tofinohiking.com

Beach and the Rainforest Trail. Watch for signs to Wickaninnish Beach, and then turn right onto Wick Rd. Drive straight past the first road, then (after a short while) turn left into the parking lot. From Ucluelet: Drive north along Highway 4, passing the highway junction. Then enter Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and watch for signs to Wickaninnish. Turn left onto Wick Rd., then drive straight past the first road and (shortly after) turn left into the parking lot.

The Trail

Consisting entirely of boardwalks, this 0.8-kilometre hike is a very family-friendly loop that is stroller and wheelchair accessible. The bog, itself, is a unique ecosystem in the Park, as only a few plant species are able to survive in the acidic soil found here. To access the Bog Trail, start from the parking lot and walk onto the boardwalk and into the bog area. Here, you may find it helpful to pick up an interpretive brochure that offers more information about the bog, and acts as a guide along the trail (as the marked numbers along the trail correspond with the text in the brochure). At the junction, veer right and continue your walk. Then, loop around in the direction of the junction and turn right for a short walk back to the car.


A WALK IN THE FOREST

parking area on the left side of the highway. Turn into the lot and park your car. This is where the trail begins.

Distance: 600 m Elevation Gain: None

The Trail

Camping: No

How To Get There

From the Tofino-Ucluelet Junction, head east towards Port Alberni for about 1km. Keep your eyes open for a large gravel

Trailhead

tR Wes

oad

4

Pacific Rim Visitor Centre

Nestled in the traditional territory of the Ucluelet First Nation, this easy interpretive trail guides you through beautiful sights and sounds of a peaceful temperate rainforest. Restoration crews have worked together to restore logging damage to Lost Shoe Creek. This important coho salmon spawning stream has sustained people and wildlife for many generations. In 2012, Central Westcoast Forest Society extended the trail to include an educational outpost centre overlooking Lost Shoe Creek. Follow the boardwalk and veer off to the left when you reach a T-intersection. Continue on the boardwalk a dozen or so more paces until you reach a path turning left. This path leads you to the viewing outpost. Retrace your steps back to the main boardwalk and continue on, pausing to read the panels about old-growth forest and salmon habitat. This path loops back to the parking lot. Take your time and soak up the beautiful forest around you. westerlynews.ca

31


SOUTH BEACH TRAIL

Distance: 1.6 km Elevation Gain: 46 Stairs Camping: No

How To Get There Located on the Wick Rd., the South Beach trail begins from the parking lot next to the Kwisitis Visitor Centre in the Pacific

Kwisitis Visitor Centre

Rim National Park Reserve. From Tofino: Drive south along Highway 4, entering the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, and watch for signs to the Wick Rd. Turn right onto the Wick Rd. and drive straight until you reach a sign with the option of turn left or right. Turn left and park in the parking lot. From Ucluelet: Drive north along Highway 4, past the highway junction and into the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Watch for sign to Wick Rd., turning left onto the road and continuing until the end where a set of signs direct traffic left or right. Turn left and park in the parking lot.

The Trail As one of the most scenic hikes in the area, the South Beach Trail follows along the Pacific Ocean shoreline and offers stunning views of unique, rugged rock formations and foamy waves crashing on the beach. This 1.6-kilometre trail descends through a thick forest and arrives at a sandy beach that features striking rock formations, which help create some memorable (and massive) scenes of wild ocean spray from the sheer force of the oncoming waves. The South Beach Trail starts from behind the Kwisitis Visitor Centre. From the

32

tofinohiking.com


driveway, then go right and continue up the hill. The trail starts with a viewpoint next to the Interpretive Centre. Continue along this paved trail as it passes several other scenic viewpoints of Lismer Beach. The path will soon turn into a gravel trail and reach a totem pole, offering several more viewpoints.

socks and shoes. To make your way back, simply retrace your steps back up the stairs and follow the trail back to the parking lot by the Interpretive Centre. Or, for a longer hike, take the Nuu Chah Nulth trail to Florencia Beach.

Follow the trail as it curves around a few more corners, and you’ll soon reach a wooden boardwalk with a steep climb. (To help prevent slipping, the boardwalk is covered with roof shingles.) At the top, you’ll reach a junction with the Nuu Chah Nulth trail. Continue straight as the South Beach Trail moves through some trees before reaching a steep set of wooden stairs. Here, walk down the steps and onto the beach, which offers spectacular views of the ocean and some giant rock formations. Be careful of rogue waves as the water has been known to reach up to these immense Black Rock Ad - Trail Guide Feb 2017 rocks and spray large amounts of water, Size: 5.0” (w) x 4.0” (h) • Rev 1 • Feb 20/17 leaving unsuspecting visitors with soaked

DISCOVER BLACK ROCK UCLUELET • BRITISH COLUMBIA

Take a walk on the wild side and then join us for apres hike relaxation on the patio or in the spa. 1-877-762-5011 • www.blackrockresort.com westerlynews.ca

33


NUU CHAH NULTH TRAIL

Distance: 3.8 km Elevation Gain: 284 m Camping: No

How To Get There The Nuu Chah Nulth Trail begins half way along the South Beach Trail and ends at Florencia Beach. Park next to the Kwisitis

Kwitsis Visitor Centre Nuu-Chah-Nuulth & Florencia Bay

Visitor Centre and walk along the South Beach trail until you reach a sign on your left marking the start of the Nuu Chah Nulth Trail. From Tofino: Drive south along Highway 4, entering the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, and watch for signs to the Wick Rd. Turn right onto the Wick Rd. and drive straight until you reach a sign with the option of turn left or right. Turn left and park in the parking lot. From Ucluelet: Drive north along Highway 4, past the highway junction and into the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Watch for sign to Wick Rd., turning left onto the road and continuing until the end where a set of signs direct traffic left or right. Turn left and park in the parking lot.

The Trail As the longest hiking trail in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, the 3.8-kilometre Nuu Chah Nulth Trail follows a path of raised wooden boardwalks through the dense rainforest towards Florencia Bay Beach. Formerly known as the Wickaninnish Trail, the Nuu Chah Nulth Trail begins along the South Beach Trail. At the junction next to the map, walk up the wooden

34

tofinohiking.com


steps onto the boardwalk and follow the trail as it makes a steep climb before reaching a viewpoint that overlooks Long Beach. As you move along the raised boardwalk, the trail remains fairly level with just a few steps moving up and down before reaching a short set of stairs that slope down. Continue on the boardwalk path as it weaves you through the thick forest, and you’ll soon hear the waves of the Pacific Ocean as they crash onto the rocks in the distance.

parking lot located not too far on the left. Go right and walk along the gravel trail as it heads towards Florencia Beach. Then, climb down the steep set of wooden stairs and step onto the beach area.

The trail eventually reaches a wetland, where the boardwalk trail temporarily comes to an end. Step off the last wooden plank of the boardwalk and carefully make your way across several tree roots. The boardwalk path then continues on the other side of the wetland, where you climb a short distance before levelling off and continuing south in a straight line. After a short while, the boardwalk path turns into a dirt trail that threads you through the lush forest. The trail soon reaches a junction with a

il et ra & g T CP k e boo t o u Qu yo n he w

% 5 1

! F OF

CANADIAN PRINCESS LODGE & MARINA

We’re open YEAR ROUND and have upgraded the Canadian Princess Lodge with all sorts of new amenities! New Communal Kitchen • Loft Rooms Have Brand New King Beds Refreshed Outdoor BBQ Area • New Carpets & New Roof

1943 Peninsula Rd, Ucluelet 1-844-926-7771 • www.canadianprincess.com info@canadianprincess.com westerlynews.ca

35


WILLOWBRAE TRAIL

Distance: 2.8 km Elevation Gain: 173 Stairs Camping: No How To Get There

The start of the Willowbrae Trail is located 2km south of the Tofino-Ucluelet junction. From Tofino: Drive south and pass through the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

Halfmoon Bay

36

tofinohiking.com

continue driving to the Tofino-Ucluelet junction. Go straight at the junction towards Ucluelet and watch for a gravel road on the right 2km further. Turn right onto the gravel road and drive a short distance up the road to a parking area next to a yellow gate. From Ucluelet: Drive north and watch for signs to the Willowbrae and Halfmoon Bay Trails. Turn left onto the dirt road and drive a short distance, parking near the area next to the yellow gate.

The Trail

The 2.8-kilometre Willowbrae Trail is a short hike that follows a wide gravel route before descending down a long wooden staircase to a beautiful, secluded beach area known to locals as South Flo. Although the Willowbrae Trail begins south of the Tofino-Ucluelet junction, the trail is still within Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. From the dirt parking lot, walk through the wooden gate and along the wide, gravel path as it heads in an almost straight direction towards the beach area. Follow the trail as it eventually reaches the boardwalk, and towards a long stretch of stairs that take you down to the beach. Walk down the steps and onto the beach, but be careful as waves tend to come right up to the edge of the stairs during high tide and storms.


Your Ultimate Ucluelet Storm Watching Resort

Luxurious Oceanfront Lodges Tent/RV Site Camping Yurt Glamping

Book Online at

WyaPoint.com Proudly First Nations Owned & Operated

1-844-352-6188 250-726-2625 (local) www.wyapoint.com

RESORT westerlynews.ca

37


HALF MOON BAY TRAIL

Distance: 1 km Elevation Gain: 123 Stairs Camping: No How To Get There

The start of the trail to Halfmoon Bay is located along the Willowbrae Trail, on the left side of the trail at the top of the wooden stairs.

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

Halfmoon Bay

38

tofinohiking.com

From Tofino: Drive south and pass through the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and continue driving to the Tofino-Ucluelet junction. Go straight at the junction towards Ucluelet and watch for a gravel road on the right 2km further. Turn right onto the gravel road and drive a short distance up the road to a parking area next to a yellow gate. From Ucluelet: Drive north and watch for signs to the Willowbrae and Halfmoon Bay Trails. Turn left onto the dirt road and drive a short distance, parking near the area next to the yellow gate.

The Trail

This 1km trail is a short hike that takes you through a lush rainforest before descending a steep set of wooden, cliff-hugging steps that exit onto a scenic and secluded beach area. Halfmoon Bay trail starts along the Willowbrae Trail, at the top of the steps that lead down to a small beach. Walk along the trail and up the stairs, following the boardwalk and a dirt path as it meanders through the lush, mossy forest. Continue along the trail as it rounds the corner onto a gravel section and reaches the top of a long set of stairs and downward wooden ramps. Climb down the steps and zigzag back along the hillside, then carefully make your way down the final wooden ramp and onto the beach.


www.460realty.com westerlynews.ca

39


WILD PACIFIC TRAIL

Distance: 8.8 km Elevation Gain: None Camping: No

How To Get There The Wild Pacific Trail is located along the western edge of Ucluelet. To reach the parking lot, drive south to Ucluelet and

Penins ula

Brown’s Beach

Road

turn right onto Pacific Crescent. Drive a short distance along Marine Drive and watch for a gravel parking lot on your right. Continue on Pacific Crescent, then turn right at the stop sign on Cynamocka Road. Follow Cynamocka Road as it meets Marine Drive. Drive a short distance along Marine Drive, and then watch for a gravel parking lot on your right.

The Trail The Brown’s Beach section of the 8.8-kilometre Wild Pacific Trail offers stunning coastal views along a gravel path that skirts the Pacific Ocean coastline. To access the trail, start from the parking lot off of Marine Drive, then go right along the trail and continue as it loops through the forest before crossing a road. Continue on as you pass a series of viewpoints, each featuring a unique vista of the ocean waves crashing on the rocks below. Follow the trail as it passes a few junctions that lead to Forbes Street; however, stay on the trail by going left at these junctions, hiking alongside the ocean. Eventually, you’ll leave behind the ocean views and head inland, towards the highway. From the highway, you can either

40

tofinohiking.com


retrace your steps and hike back along the trail - or return by an alternate route along the highway. To head back through the alternate route, walk along the highway until you reach Forbes Street, next to Co-op Gas Station. Go right and walk up the hill, which veers to the left. You’ll soon come upon a large sports field. Next to this field is a gravelly

parking area. Walk across this parking lot, where - at the far edge - you’ll see some signs and trails that lead back into the forest. Take the trail on the left as it meanders through the forest, crosses a few roads and then returns to the parking lot you started off from.

RUBIO Corner of Main Street and Cedar Road Whiskey Landing, Ucluelet

www.rubio.ca Amber • Larimar • First Nations Jewellery • Glass westerlynews.ca

41


LIGHTHOUSE LOOP

ing gas stations and town shops along the way. Turn right onto Coast Guard Drive and drive up a short hill, then turn left into the gravel parking lot. The trail begins next to a map of the area.

Distance: 2.6 km Elevation Gain: None Camping: No

The Trail How To Get There To reach the start of the trail, drive south on Highway 4 from the Tofino-Ucluelet junction and continue onto Ucluelet, pass-

Terrace Beach

Pe

nin

Amphitrite Point Lighthouse

42

tofinohiking.com

sul a

Roa d

As part of the larger Wild Pacific Trail, the Lighthouse Loop Trail features a stop at an active lighthouse, along with spectacular views of massive rock formations along the Pacific Ocean coastline. This 2.6-kilometre trail is particularly popular with storm watchers due to its proximity to the ocean, which provides a fantastic opportunity to witness the sheer force of high winds and rain - combined with the ocean’s powerful waves pounding against the rugged coastal rocks. To start the Lighthouse Loop, walk to the map board near the parking lot and veer right along the trail. Hike the trail for a short distance, moving towards the sounds of the ocean, and then go right at the junction with the viewpoint trail. Along this next section of the trail, you’ll find several viewpoints that provide striking views of the huge ocean waves crashing over the rocks below. Continue along the trail until it reaches the first viewpoint of the lighthouse. Just beyond this viewpoint, you can


walk down to the lighthouse to take some closer photos before returning to the trail. Follow the trail as it continues on, offering more views of the rocks below. It should become less windy as you pass the side that is most exposed to the coastline. Go right at the junction, then hike up a steep hill as the trail leaves the viewpoints and wanders through the forest. At another junction to He-Tin-Kis Lodge, veer right and continue on. From here, it is only a few hundred metres back to the road and the parking lot on the other side where you began your hike.

Please use CAUTION near the power of the open ocean. Tragically, people are swept off rocks or caught by rip currents every year. Don’t let this happen to you.

westerlynews.ca

43


MOUNT OZZARD TRAIL

Distance: 10 km Elevation Gain: 766 m Camping: No How To Get There

Coming from Ucluelet, take a right onto Port Albion Rd. Follow Port Albion Rd. then take your second left onto the gravel road with signage for Muscle Beach. (If you see the signs for the Fish Hatchery, you’ve gone too far.) Stay on the gravel road for another 2km then take your second left onto a dirt road that will lead you

Yellow Gate Radar Tower

Itatsoo Lake

44

tofinohiking.com

up a hill to the start of the trail. Warning to the wise, this dirt road is steep and has many large potholes, rental cars are not recommended. Continue about 1km up the dirt road to the yellow gate. DO NOT park directly in front of this gate. Coast Guard has a communications station at the summit and may need to gain immediate access to the road. Park across from the gate.

The Trail

Most famous for the giant golf ball shaped radar tower at the summit, Mt. Ozzard is an easy 2-3 hour trek. Simply follow the winding gravel service road up to the radar station. The path is in an active industrial area and you may encounter heavy vehicle and helicopter operations en route, so please use caution. On a clear day, you’ll be wowed by views of Barkley Sound and the Broken Group Islands to the left and the Ucluelet peninsula on the right. Beyond that, you can also breath-in panoramas of coastal mountains and glimpses of Tofino and Clayoquot Sound. The descent back to the your car takes less than an hour. CAUTION: In the summer months there are a lot of berries along the road, which means there’s a good chance of encountering a bear. If this should occur, stay calm and back away slowly. Do not run. To avoid a bear encounter, hike in groups and stay on the open road.


Start your day with the best Eggs Benedict in town and the most gorgeous view of Mount Ozzard and the Ucluelet Harbour.

OPEN EVERY DAY 7AM-4PM Serving Breakfast & Lunch until 4pm FULLY LICENSED The Blue Room Caesar is a must try! The Blue Room is available for Private Parties! Talk to us about Catering your next event. LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 2010

250-726-4464 • 1627 Peninsula Rd, Ucluelet

westerlynews.ca

45


The

CROW’S NEST

AREA’S LARGEST GIFT STORE IN HISTORIC BUILDING

Jackets • Shirts • Hats • Gifts • Souvenirs • Books Copy, Scan, Fax and Print Services 205 Main Street Ucluelet • 250-726-4214 • Open Daily

Ucluelet, BC

10am daily!

(check posters for details)

Explore Forest Glories and Sea Stories with a Wild Pacific Trail Naturalist Free summer walks−all ages welcome!

Did you know: slugs have more teeth than a shark? They also like to keep the trail clean, please walk carefully!

46

tofinohiking.com


Call for reservations:

250-726-7336

ONE STOP ADVENTURE SHOP

Eco Tours • Whale Watching • Bear Watching Fishing • Zip Lining • Kayaking • Hiking Flight Seeing • Paddling on the River Gray Whale Deli & Ice Cream

www.subtidaladventures.com • www. wcwild.com www.cameronoceanadventures.com • www. hellonature.ca

Come see us at SUBTIDAL ADVENTURES for all of your WEST COAST ADVENTURES! 1950 Peninsula Road, Ucluelet westerlynews.ca

47


48

tofinohiking.com

February 28, 2018  

Section T of the February 28, 2018 edition of the Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

February 28, 2018  

Section T of the February 28, 2018 edition of the Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News