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APOCALYPSE

WINDSURFERS RIDE THE STORM

HEAVY DAMAGE TO UKEE TRAIL

Locals hit high speeds in Ucluelet’s harbour.

Donations needed as WPT takes a beating

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7

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Surfrider sets sights on markers

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Writing utensils added to single-use plastic fight ANDREW BAILEY andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

Straws and plastic bags have some new company in the crosshairs of local ocean lovers as pens, highlighters, markers and all their caps are now also being targeted by the Surfrider Foundation’s Pacific Rim Chapter. Vancouver-based recycling company Terracycle has launched a new program aimed at recycling plastic writing utensils that are often simply discarded when they run out of ink. Surfrider has brought the initiative to the West Coast thanks to partnerships with Tofino’s Ultramarine Art Supply and Ucluelet’s Blackberry Cove Marketplace, which will serve as dropoff locations for locals to bring their writing utensils to. Surfrider’s local chapter manager Lilly Woodbury said that, while writing utensils are not as pervasive as other more commonly found beach-debris items like coffee cups or takeout containers, they are a single-use plastic worth tackling. “Many of these utensils, mostly markers and highlighters, cannot be refilled. Once their content has been used up, they are fated for landfill or waterways,” she said. “This is yet another step on the path to divert more waste from landfill, and to eliminate the need to extract raw resources for plastic production.” Continued on A8

ANDREW BAILEY PHOTO

TSUNAMI SCARE: Ucluelet Mayor Dianne St. Jacques reviews Tsunami Warning reports alongside the district’s emergency and environmental services manager Karla Robison and local police chief Sgt. Steve Mancini inside Ucluelet Secondary School’s gym early Tuesday morning. West Coast locals were evacuated from their homes around 3 a.m. following a 7.9 earthquake in Alaska that prompted a Tsunami Warning in Tofino and Ucluelet. Read about it on page 3.

Colossal waves pound Pacific Rim NORA O’MALLEY nora.omalley@westerlynews.ca

Some locals say it’s been almost a decade since they’ve witnessed waves of such grandeur. For the majority, Thursday’s “black swell” that closed public access to Ucluelet and Tofino beaches and had surf forecast sites projecting over 30-feet waves, was a first time in a lifetime. Jim and Jill Wilkin, visitors from Sherwood Park, Alberta, said in the 20 years they’ve been coming to the Coast, they’ve

UPCOMING UCLUELET EVENTS

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Family Literacy Day & Saturday Matinee @ the UCC Midnight Madness Is Coming. Shop Local! Sponsored by the Judy Gray Team. Giving back to Ukee! Call Judy at 250-726-2228 to get your event featured.

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never seen a storm like that. “I don’ think you can describe it adequately,” Jim told the Westerly News from the safe viewing area established at Amphitrite Point. “Even in pictures you show the kids and that, unless you’re witnessing it live, it’s like no other,” said Jill. “Unless you come out and experience it, the sounds, even lying in bed when it first started, the sounds are something we’ve never experienced. The force of nature is beyond your comprehension unless you actually come here and see it,” she said. Continued on A9

January November 2018 2017 Bring your family to the Ucluelet Community Centre for a book Details: Put on your walking shoes and join the exchange and movie date! Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul Ucluelet wide is at 1pm and thefestivities Book Thiefand is at shopping 2:30pm. extravaganza Friday Nov 24th, 2017 Date: Saturday, January Date: 27 Time: 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm 5-ish - Midnight (late-ish) Time: Where: Ucluelet Community Centre, Room 1

#StartLivingInUkee


A2 Wednesday, January 24, 2018

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ANDREW BAILEY PHOTO

Ukee local David Gerbrandt flashes a smile while surfing in the wind off Ucluelet’s 52 Steps dock on Jan. 17.

UCLUELET CO-OP Co-op Community Spaces is dedicating up to $2 million to fund projects across Western Canada.

Riders on the storm Windsurfers find delight in high winds ANDREW BAILEY andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

Project funding: $25,000 – $150,000 / project Recreation: Providing enhanced recreational spaces in the community. Examples: recreation centres, playgrounds

Environmental Conservation: Preservation of natural spaces in the community. Examples: green spaces, interpretative centres

Urban Agriculture: Small-scale community agricultural initiatives in both rural and urban spaces.

How to Apply

Examples: community gardens, food-education facilities

Eligible organizations wishing to apply for project funding must submit an application online at www.communityspaces.ca between February 1st and March 1st 2018 Questions or inquiries? Contact: communityspace@fd.ca

Main Store Hours: 9AM-7PM Gas Bar Hours: 9AM-10PM

Wind warnings coming in from Environment Canada last week were music to the ears of local windsurfers. After hearing that an “intense Pacific frontal system” would bring Southeast winds of up to 90 km/h to the West Coast on Jan 17, Ucluelet locals Jesse Jared Cohen and David Gerbrandt were amped to get on the water. “I’ve been cringing at work all day,” Gerbrandt told the Westerly News from the water at Ucluelet’s 52 Steps Dock. “It’s really fun. It’s the most addictive thing. Once you do it, you’re hooked. It’s just too much fun. It’s like surfing and motocross combined. That’s the best way I could describe it.” Gerbrandt, 38, said he started windsurfing around Nitinat Lake while living in Bamfield and continued the sport when he moved to Ucluelet with his family two years ago. “We love it,” he said of Ucluelet. “It’s a playground.” Cohen, who has been windsurfing for roughly six years and earned a fourth place finish in Oregon’s 2017 Pistol River Wave Bash amateur division, said he’d first heard of the incoming winds about four days prior and his excitement increased as weather reports remained consistent

during the week, serving as an invitation to a thrilling Wednesday evening experience. He said Wednesday’s readings recorded winds around 45-59 knots, but the sheltered harbour around 52 Steps offered a more rideable 15-20 knots. “You get pretty stoked. Anything over 15 knots of wind, that’s where we really come alive. The sail power is just bang on,” he said. “With the experience I have, it’s no longer scary. It’s actually fun…The biggest joy about doing this on stormy days is the fact that we’re able to have fun outdoors when it’s so miserable out.” Windsurfing has not caught on in popularity around the West Coast and is more common around Parksville and Victoria, according to Cohen who estimated he hit local waters about 50 times in 2017. “There’s safer spots to windsurf on the stormy south-east low pressure systems, but on the West Coast there’s only a couple of us that are really chasing it,” he said. “The wind’s just way more gusty and unpredictable on this side.” He added though that Ucluelet’s harbour provides a sheltered space to learn and anyone looking to get into the sport should expect to spend about a week getting a feel for it. “The Ucluelet harbour offers really sheltered waters and there’s a lot of light-wind days,” he said. “This is an easy spot for learning.”


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Wednesday, January 24, 2018 A3

www.460realty.com JAN 24 • UCLUELET RECYCLES Remember –

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE!

SonBird

Refuse & Recycling

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ANDREW BAILEY PHOTO

Ucluelet Mayor Dianne St. Jacques, right, updates evacuated community members at USS during a Tsunami Warning around 3 a.m. Tuesday.

Tsunami scare shakes Coast

West Coast locals and guests wake to 3 a.m. evacuation order ANDREW BAILEY andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

Tofino and Ucluelet residents breathed a collective sigh of relief around 4:30 a.m. Tuesday morning as the Tsunami Warning that had evacuated them from their homes and into their community’s emergency muster stations was cancelled. “The warning has been downscaled to an advisory. So, that’s good news” Ucluelet’s Manager of Environmental and Emergency Services Karla Robison said into her megaphone at the Ucluelet Secondary School around 4:30 a.m. “We’re safe to go home.” The school’s gym was packed as hundreds of community members had gathered after receiving alerts to evacuate after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake hit off Alaska around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday morning. Local police and members of the Ucluelet Volunteer Fire Brigade were knocking on residents homes around 3 a.m. advising them to head to the gym. After relaying the good news that the warning had been cancelled, Robison explained an advisory means to stay away from docks, shorelines and harbours. “A warning means you need to evacuate, an advisory means you don’t go surfing, you don’t go hang out on the docks, you don’t go boating, you don’t go fishing,” she said. “An advisory is just to stay away from the ocean because there could be some stronger currents and there could be some smaller-type

surges, but no large waves.” An automated message from Tofino’s One Call emergency notification system went out at 4:42 a.m. advising Tofitians the Tsunami Warning had been cancelled. Ucluelet local Pieter Timmermans said he and his wife Barbara Schramm were in bed when they heard the tsunami siren. “We thought, ‘Okay, something’s going on,’” he said. “We were waiting for a text to come through on the cell phone, but nothing came through so I called the local RCMP and they said, ‘There’s a tsunami alert’ and we boogied out.” Schramm added that she was surprised a tsunami advisory wasn’t immediately posted on the district of Ucluelet’s website. “Still in my bed, I looked for that and there was no notice,” she said. Timmermans said he was in the school’s gym by the time he received an alert on his cell-phone and added he was impressed with how many people heeded the warning and made their way to the gym. “It was really interesting to see everybody get up and at ‘em and obey the warnings,” he said. “It was a good learning exercise. Even though the texts didn’t go out in time, I’m sure next time this will help iron out some of the wrinkles.” “It was a really good drill,” said Ukee local Julie Chernis. “Neighbours came to the door and pounded on our

door and then, 10 minutes later, the fire department came…It was neighbour-to-neighbour. They were banging on the door. They knew we were there and they didn’t let up until we got up and said ‘Hey, we’re on the go.’” Julie’s husband Ed Chernis suggested he’d like to see a quicker alert from the district office next time. “What gets me is that, if the earthquake was at 1:30 a.m., why did the emergency notification from the district get to me at 3:49 a.m.?” he asked. “I had to rely on a neighbour to come pounding on our door to let us know.” Ucluelet Mayor Dianne St. Jacques told the Westerly News inside the gym that the community responded well to the event and that she and her team will discuss the evacuation event and ways to improve in the future. “It was a very good dress rehearsal. As always, there are things to learn when these things happen so we’ll definitely have a debrief with our gang here, but everybody was very professional and very calm and did what needed to be done. I think we’re on a good path with emergency preparedness,” she said. “The community did awesome…The firemen did a great job getting to all the low lying areas, evacuating everyone and getting them up here to this reception area. People were very patient and very calm. So I’m very impressed and, luckily, it turned out to be downgraded to just an advisory so we’re very grateful for that.”

‘Jeff’ tops list for bus company JOCELYN DOLL Campbell River Mirror

Last week, the team at Tofino Bus All Island Express asked their Facebook followers for new name recommendations. At first, the ideas were pretty tame such as “VI Express” and “West Island Express”, some even suggested just using “All Island Express.” But then at midnight on Jan. 18,

David Taylor suggested “Jeff ” as the new name. Since then more than 1,000 people have commented supporting Taylor’s suggestion and making arguments in favour of choosing the name Jeff. “Jeff is a fairly simple name and easy to work around and some of the best people I can think of are also named Jeff ” wrote one commenter. The Tofino Bus All Island Express now provides transportation ser-

vices to most parts of Vancouver Island as well as a direct connection to Vancouver. The North Island Express goes to Port Hardy, Campbell River, Courtenay, Nanaimo, Victoria and Vancouver. The Tofino Express goes to Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo, Parksville, Port Alberni, Ucluelet and Tofino. And, the Vancouver Ferry Shuttle goes from the Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal to the Vancouver Bus Depot.

TIDES & WEATHER

THURSDAY JAN. 25, 2018 TIDE

00:27 07:11 13:55 19:59

Metres

Feet

1.4 3.2 1.3 2.5

4.6 10.5 4.3 8.2

8°/5° Rain; breezy in the morning

FRIDAY JAN. 26, 2018 TIDE

01:32 08:12 15:09 21:26

Metres

Feet

1.5 3.3 1 2.6

4.9 10.8 3.3 8.5

7°/5° A couple of showers

SATURDAY JAN. 27, 2018 TIDE

02:44 09:14 16:15 22:40

Metres

Feet

1.6 3.5 0.8 2.7

5.2 11.5 2.6 8.9

9°/5° Cloudy with rain tapering off

SUNDAY JAN. 28, 2018 TIDE

03:54 10:14 17:12 23:40

Metres

Feet

1.6 3.6 0.5 2.9

5.2 11.8 1.6 9.5

8°/6° Cloudy with showers

MONDAY JAN. 29, 2018 TIDE

04:58 11:11 18:04

Metres

Feet

1.5 3.8 0.3

4.9 12.5 1.0

8°/-1° Cloudy with showers

TUESDAY JAN. 30, 2018 TIDE

00:32 05:55 12:04 18:52

Metres

Feet

3.1 1.4 3.9 0.1

10.2 4.6 12.8 0.3

8°/-1° Periods of rain

WEDNESDAY JAN. 31, 2018 TIDE

01:19 06:48 12:55 19:37

Metres

Feet

3.2 1.3 3.9 0.1

10.5 4.3 12.8 0.3

6°/3° Afternoon rain

mid island realty Ucluelet / Tofino midislandrealty.com

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NEWS TIP? Call the Westerly Newsroom at 250.726.7089 andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca


OPINION

A4 Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

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The Westerly News is published every Wednesday by Black Press Ltd. 102-1801 Bay St., Ucluelet Phone: 250-726-7029

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Behest of the West

Hear the calls and wake up to preparedness “We are fine here. False alarm,” read a text from my mother around 11 a.m. on Jan. 13. Its intent was clearly meant to reassure, but no one informed me I was supposed to be panicking and being told everything was fine somehow seemed very ominous. As it turned out, someone had pushed a horrifically wrong button in Hawaii while my parents were sleeping that suggested a ballistic missile was headed their way. There was no missile, but there was more than a few minutes of terror. On Tuesday morning, I woke up to what I thought was my my cellphone’s alarm blaring. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary at all and I set about doing all the things I do before stepping into the world each day. It wasn’t until Const. Jarett Duncan began banging on my door at 3 a.m. that I realized my alarm was still hours from going off and the ‘alarm’ I’d heard had actually been concerned phone calls from people

who’d been told a tsunami was headed my the kits we’ve been urged to. What are the rest of us waiting for? One way. There was no tsunami, but there was day, the alarm won’t be false. Being prepared more than a few minutes of terror. could save our loved ones from heartbreak We did well during this week’s scare. Our first responders reached us and, based or stop us from being a burden on our first on the attendance inside our responders when that real dihigh school’s gym, most of us saster finally strikes. followed the evacuation order This Coast is awesome. Endiligently. joying it irresponsibly is not. That solid showing is worth Know the risks. Make a plan. pats on the back, but how Get a kit. many of us had an emergency Prior to Tuesday morning’s kit in tow? terror, the world’s eyes were already on us. I didn’t. Water giants hammered on We have fantastic resources Andrew Bailey on this Coast. Ucluelet’s Karla our beautifully rocky coastlines Robison and Tofino’s Keith and sandy shores last week, Orchiston are emergency preparedness pro- earning oohs and aahs from an orchestra fessors eager to share impressive wealths of of onlookers. The most powerful storm knowledge and both district’s websites have in a decade, some say longer, showed up what we need to know what to do. and showed off the awe-striking power of Some of us have paid attention and packed our ocean.

Storms are awesome. Enjoying them irresponsibly is not. The federal government doled out about $800,000 to our region back in 2013 to build us a program that would increase the safety of our shores by making us and our visitors smarter explorers. Bear in mind, that wasn’t the free-spending, read: money-burning, Trudeau government. It was the penny-pinching, read: sensible, Harper regime. Those dollars were infused with our committed local knowledge and CoastSmart was born. It’s a dynamic resource and some of us have paid attention to the goldmine that it is, but there were enough photos floating around social media last week to suggest we’re not all onboard with staying safe near the waves. Let’s get into the ‘Know before you go near the water’ mantra and encourage our visitors to join us.

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CARMEN MERKEL PHOTO

Carmen Merkel captured this shot of a monster wave breaking in the distance as Team Canada stand up paddle board racer Jason Bennett tested his might at a heavy Cox Bay on Tuesday. Do you have a story you’d like to share? Send it to us at Office@WesterlyNews.ca.

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Question of the week Did you evacuate during Tuesday’s Tsunami Warning?

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Last week’s question Do you plan to sign up for a local recreation class this month?

YES 67%

NO 33%


LETTERS

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Letters to the Editor Deadline: Sundays 2:00pm Andrew.Bailey@WesterlyNews.ca

Letters to the Editor must be signed and include your full name, home town and contact phone number. Those without these requirements will not be published. Letters must be 300 words or less and are subject to editing. The News retains the right not to publish submissions.

THANKS FROM BAND CLASS I have the privilege of teaching Band at USS. Running a band program is made easier and more fun by help from the community. The communities on the West Coast are outstanding in this regard. On behalf of myself and my students, I would like to thank the following people and businesses for their help over the past year: Thanks to Jamie’s Rainforest Inn for hosting our performances and feeding us delicious food! Thanks to all the parent volunteers for chaperoning trips, and organizing fundraisers. Thanks also to all those of you who bought poinsettias and coffee, or attended paint night. Thanks to the Foggy Bean for donating coffee. Thanks to Courtney and Sarah for working their Glee rehearsals around our Band practices, and thanks to all my colleagues, especially Beth Harling, for their flexibility around trips and performances. Finally, thanks to Geoff Johnson and Dave Brown for lending us gear. As the year progresses, we’re looking forward to more concerts and our trip to Vancouver in May. Dave McPherson Ucluelet

I wish Tofino could get a nice community center like Ukee before any other project. With a real venue for shows and events. Sophie L’Homme Read the full story online at:

westerlynews.ca

NEW APARTMENT BUILDING PROPOSED IN TOFINO:

Amenities” increase costs for purchasers through higher sell prices and higher strata fees. The simpler the better unless Tofino council really doesn’t want affordable housing? Sharryn Modder The council says it wants affordable housing but doesn’t seem to be embracing it. Jeff Hillier To much humming and hawing. Need another assessment I suppose. Add it to the millions of dollars worth of them on the shelves. Marty Kukler

Read the full story online at:

FACING REALITY OF DEATH, B.C. MAN LEARNS REAL MEANING OF LIFE: Such a damn shame for Kevin and his beautiful family. Praying for miracles. Camilla Thorogood

Patricia Garland My heart is so sad for this lovely family. I had the pleasure and privilege of working with Keven when he was first in the coast. Such a kind caring gentle man. I’m also praying for a miracle.

No. The 2 worst people I know are called Jeff.

Heidi Shaw

Lucy Myob

Cancer SUCKS! So sorry you did not get your trial...you are far to young to die!

Vernon Cook

Terry Graff

60% of the time, Jeff works everytime. Andrew Crawford Read the full story online at:

The Westerly News is a member of the national newsmedia council which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact: editor@ westerlynews.ca or 250-726-7029. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information.

hn Ford

e

the Pacific Rim Whale Festival Photo Showdown

is Back!

Pacific Rim

Whale Festival

– CATEGORIES –

1. Wildlife 2. Landscape 3. People + Nature Subtidal Adventures & Hello Nature Adventure Tours

Stand by for full details in next week's Westerly.

westerlynews.ca

SURVEY SAYS TOFINO BUS ALL ISLAND EXPRESS SHOULD CHANGE THEIR NAME TO JEFF:

Letters to the editor must be signed and include your full name, home town and contact number. Those without these requirements will not be published. Letters must be 300 words or less and are subject to editing. Deadline for letters is Sunday at 2 p.m. The Westerly news retains the right not to publish submissions.

Photo Jo

This contest is sponsored by

What a tragedy. I have no other words.

Love it.

Get Your Photos Ready, Folks...

TRENDING ONLINE

TRENDING ONLINE TOFINO’S COUNCIL SPLIT ON ICE RINK DECISION:

Wednesday, January 24, 2018 A5

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A6 Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

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‘Ups-cheek ta-shee’ a step to reconciliation Elders name new Park Reserve path NORA O’MALLEY nora.omalley@westerlynews.ca

Elders from the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation and Ucluelet First Nation have given the new 25-kilometre multi-use trail in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve the Nuu-chah-nulth name ‘Ups-cheek ta-shee’. While the literal translation of the name ‘Ups-cheek ta-shee’ is “going in the right direction on the trail”, the phrase has many layers of meaning, depending on how it is used. Individually, it can refer to our personal journeys in life, going in the right direction. To remember we are on the trail, and going in the right direction refers to being mindful of the environment and all living things. Collectively, the Elders wrote in a news release, “the land we walk on is made from the dust of our ancestors – in our life journey, we walk it carefully, respectfully, with humility and dignity.” In context, the name chosen by the Elders represents the journey between the First Nations and the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. The multi-use use trail is considered a healing path and an opportunity for First Nations, communities and Parks Canada to work together. Tla-o-qui-aht First Nations Natural Resources Manager Saya Masso said he is really proud to have a Nuu-chah-nulth name put on the map. “Let’s do more,” he said. “It’s a tremendous step in the right direction towards reconciliation. Our Nation has a tribal park declaration where we’ve renamed parts or our territory already, like Kennedy Lake is ‘haa’uuk-min’.” Parks Canada is committed to using the Nuu-chah-nulth name for the trail in future communications.

PARKS CANADA PHOTO

An artist rendering of the future multi-use ‘Ups-cheek ta-shee’ trail in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. “We are really honoured to have an Indigenous name for the trail,” said Parks Canada Public Relations and Communications Officer Kiri Westnedge. “It’s going to be on all our signage. It is the official name. It’s going to be used everywhere in all our communications about the trail. It’s pretty exciting,” she said. Acting Superintendent for the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, Dave Tovell, said in an email that the Nuu-chah-nulth name is one way to acknowledge the cultural significance of the area to the Tlao-qui-aht First Nation and Ucluelet First Nation. “The Government of Canada is committed to nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, and government-to-government relation-

ships with Indigenous peoples, based on a recognition of rights, respect, co-operation, and partnership. No relationship is more important to the Government and to Parks Canada than the one with Indigenous peoples,” said Tovell. Westnedge said they will talk to visitors in person to help with the pronunciation of the First Nations name. The phonetic spelling will also be included on signage and other places where the name is written. “We are also working on an audio file for the website,” she said. ‘Ups-cheek ta-shee’ is located in the traditional territories of the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation and Ucluelet First Nation. It will extend approximately 25-kilometres from the southern to the northern

boundary of the Long Beach Unit of the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. The multi-use paved trail (or ‘ta-shee’) will be open to the public in 2020. Additional Indigenous names in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve include the Kwisitis Visitor Centre, the Nuu-chahnulth Trail, and the S-ih-ch-k-oo—oo-tl auditorium, named in honour of Barbara Touchie, who over the course of her life was dedicated to revitalizing the Nuuchah-nulth language. Anyone interested in learning more about the Nuu-chah-nulth language is encouraged to visit: www.firstvoices. com/en/Nuu-chah-nulth or the Nuuchah-nulth Tribal Council website: www.nuuchahnulth.org.

Tofino Wedding Fair returns this weekend Event’s third annual appearance covers West Coast with romantic ambience NORA O’MALLEY nora.omalley@westerlynews.ca

Love is in the salty sea air this weekend as the Tofino Wedding Fair sets-up for its third annual showing. Presented by Tourism Tofino, residents and visitors to the Coast are invited to soak up the romance on Saturday, January 27 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Shore Pier waterfront building (368 Main Street). “The event is open to the public. Locals should drop-in to see our local business community putting their best foot forward,” said Tourism Tofino’s marketing coordinator Caitlin Hedley.

Tofino continues to flourish as a Canadian destination wedding. According to a B.C. Vital Statistics report, Tofino hosted 321 weddings in 2017. July was its busiest month with 54 marriages followed by September with 48 couples saying ‘I do’. By comparison, Ucluelet hosted 142 weddings last year and Whistler hosted 313. Zoe Baillie, owner of West Coast Cake Co. and wedding planner at Rare Earth Weddings, wasn’t at all surprised by the stats. “We have barely even begun to book up for the summer and we are already at 65 and up weddings

for this season. We will probably do 80 to 100 from now until next November. It doesn’t shock me at all that there is that amount.” Out of all the weddings she helped plan last season, she said one of the coolest ones took place at a local airport hangar. “I think people come here because they want it to be more about the love and family and it’s always a little bit more laid back here. I think everyone kind of feels that same thing when they come through the pass you can take a deep breath. I certainly feel that when I’m away for a while and come home,” said Baillie. Like most Tofino businesses that will be on display at the

Wedding Fair, the young entrepreneur tries to infuse her product with as much of the West Coast as possible. “I pull a lot from Tofino. I try to incorporate cedar rounds and eucalyptus, salal, mussel shells… I try to pull all the elements that I can from Tofino just to showcase how beautiful we have it here,” she said. “People come here and they find comfort in the rainy Tofino West Coast feel. And I think I’ve embodied that and tried to show that in my cakes.” There are 36 local businesses from both Tofino and Ucluelet confirmed for Saturday’s Wedding Fair.

Exhibitors include local photographers, florists, caterers, wedding planners, videographers, hair and make-up, outfitters, venues, and more. Guests who pre-registered for the Fair will have the opportunity to take venue site tours of several resorts around Tofino that cater to weddings. About 60 to 100 couples are expected to attend. Baillie encourages locals to stop by the Shore and show support. “Wedding industry supports a lot of tourism here,” she said. “It’s good to see some new faces too and recognize that there are some fresh things happening and it’s not the same old stuff.”


PROFILE

www.westerlynews.ca

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

Wednesday, January 24, 2018 A7

Do you have something to say? Andrew Bailey, Editor 250-726-7029 • andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

WILD PACIFIC TRAIL SOCIETY PHOTO

Massive waves tore apart several viewing decks and other amenities along Ucluelet’s Wild Pacific Trail last week and locals are encouraged to help the popular facility’s rebuilding efforts.

Thrashing waves smash up Wild Pacific Trail Donations needed as Society looks to rebuild destroyed viewing decks and bridges ANDREW BAILEY andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

The largest waves to hit the West Coast in recent memory hammered Ucluelet’s Wild Pacific Trail last week smashing viewing decks, destroying bridges and sending benches flying. “Waves picked up benches weighing close to 1,000 pounds and flung them 50 feet,” the Wild Pacific Trail Society’s President Barbara Schramm told the Westerly News on Monday. “These waves shifted decks that are the size of a small house.” She said various sections of the trail

are now inaccessible and that the heaviest damage was done to the northern area around the trail’s Artists Loops section. “It was repeatedly struck over many hours. It wasn’t just one wave. It was a continuous process,” she said. “We really do need the public to pay attention to the closed sections. They think, ‘Oh well, it’s no big deal, but they’ll encounter having to wade through a creek.” She added the trail’s Lighthouse Loop section, which features the popular Amphitrite Lighthouse, was also affected. “To the north of the lighthouse, there’s huge bites out of the trail,” she said.

“These waves shifted decks that are the size of a small house.” – Barbara Schramm

“There’s some viewpoints that will be closed for the foreseeable future because you won’t even know they were there.” Schramm said the society is currently assessing the damage and putting a strategy together for repairs. “There’s also sections inaccessible by equipment, which makes it a lot harder,”

she said. “We’re looking at hand-work. These places are inaccessible. You can’t bring an excavator in and pick up a deck.” She added the damaged viewing decks were shifted by the waves, but did not blow apart thanks to the work of Wild Pacific Trail creator Oyster Jim Martin. “What’s amazing is that he constructed these so strong that they didn’t fly apart. They just got shifted off their foundations,” she said. “Imagine something strong enough to shift these massive decks, but they were so over-engineered that they stayed in one piece.” Continued on A11

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A8 Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

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Woodstove Exchange Program Exchange your old, uncertified woodstove (pre-1994) for a new CSA-EPA emissions-certified wood, pellet, or electric heat pump, gas or propane stove - and...

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SMARTER BURNING, CLEANER LIVING Depending on which option you choose receive a: • $250 incentive and $150 retailer discount for changing to a cleaner-burning wood stove • $400 incentive for changing to a qualifying electric heat pump, gas or propane stove, or pellet-fuelled stove and $300 retailer discount at following participating retailers: • Alberni Valley Refrigeration Ltd. - Port Alberni - 250.723.5335 • Bamfield Builders Supply Ltd. - Bamfield - 250.728.1223 • Dolans Gas Fitting and Heating Ltd - Port Alberni - 250.723.4328 • JT Total Heating & Sheetmetal Ltd - Parkville - 250.248.4200 • Pioneer Fireplace - Parksville - 250.954.0331 • The Place - Ucluelet - 250.726.4634 • Tilley’s Plumbing & Heating - Port Alberni - 250.735.8989 This offer applies to residents of the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District and is valid from 31 Jan 2018 to 30 June 2018. 27-$250 rebates and 9-$400 rebates are available on a first-come, first-served basis. For further information and how to qualify please visit our website at www.acrd.bc.ca or phone 250.720.2700

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Call 250.726.7029 or email nora.omalley @westerlynews.ca

#102-1801 Bay Street, Ucluelet

ANDREW BAILEY PHOTO

Susan Lee of Ucluelet’s Blackberry Cove Marketplace is thrilled to be a drop off point for a new recycling program that has locals handing in their used-up plastic writing utensils rather than simply throwing them in the trash.

New recycling program From A1 “Imagine in one year in Canada how many tons of plastic will be recycled from writing utensils alone.” Andre McGillivray, the co-owner of Ultramarine Art Supply said signing up to help propel the effort locally was a “no brainer.” “We deeply care about living life with as small a footprint as we can possibly execute and anything we can do to improve that is a great idea,” he said adding he and many other locals have likely thrown old pens away without thinking of the impact. “It’s a one-time plastic thing. We forget how much that adds up…If we can avoid that moving forward, then that would be incredible.” He added it’s important for local businesses to get onboard and support Surfrider’s ongoing environmental efforts. “Surfrider has cleaned up the beach hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of times and will continue to do so,” he said. “Even after this major storm here, we’re all seeing the result of our neglect with the microplastics that have washed up…We’ll be cleaning these things up forever and Surfrider propels us and reminds us to be diligent, disciplined and continue.” When Blackberry Cove’s owner Susan Lee heard about Ultramarine’s efforts in Tofino, she immediately reached out to Surfrider and offered her marketplace as a venue for Uclueletians to drop off their old plastic writing utensils. “I wanted to participate because we’re doing as much as we can on our end to try to run a business with as low an environmental impact as possible and to live up to my values of environmentalism and a very big part of those is reducing the use of plastic and also making sure that plastic stays out of the stream where it eventually ends up in our oceans,” she said. “It’s just a small little step but it’s raising awareness and when you add up all the pens that would end up going into landfills or into the ocean, it’s actually a big deal.”

“Imagine, in one year in Canada, how many tonnes of plastic will be recycled from writing utensils alone.” – Lilly Woodbury She added she believes the program will be successful. “I know there’s people in Ukee, because they come into my store everyday, that have the same values and so I thought this was a simple thing that I could do,” she said. “I’m sure there’s a ton of other really good little ideas out there and maybe this will stimulate some other ideas of small easy steps that will make a difference when it’s all accumulated.” Woodbury was thrilled to see McGillivray and Lee take hold of the initiative and said it’s important for local businesses to take ownership of their surroundings and practice good stewardship. “Now more than ever, we all have a responsibility to get involved in lowering the amount of plastic used and plastic waste generated,” she said. “Businesses are included in this, and have a great opportunity to be the example in terms of eliminating single use plastics because they interact with so many people on any given day.” She added businesses can influence their customers’ behaviours, especially in the West Coast’s tourism economy. “Think of all of the businesses in the Pacific Rim that have eliminated plastic straws, people all over the world who have interacted with these businesses have been part of this operational change and have gained insight on why plastic straws are not used,” she said. “As a community with an exceptional amount of visitors, it is extremely important for the business community to lower the amount of plastic pollution, and for businesses to consider other environmental policies regarding resource use and waste.”


Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

www.westerlynews.ca

Wednesday, January 24, 2018 A9

Locals and tourists wowed by big waves From A1 Tofino Mayor Josie Osborne Instagrammed an unusual find she came across after walking the high tide line after the storm. “We rarely see the tombolo out to Frank Island so flat, so clean, and so devoid of detritus,” she wrote. “The storm removed a lot of sand from middle Chesterman Beach and unveiled another stump from the World War Two era when the beach was lined with tall posts to prevent enemy planes from landing.” Longtime Ucluelet local Mark Fortune said he noticed surge channels flooding right onto parts of the Wild Pacific Trail as he walked his dog early in the morning. “It’s pretty spectacular. It gives you a real appreciation of the power of the ocean,” he said. Fortune, who is the Deputy Fire Chief for the Ucluelet Volunteer Fire Brigade, said he thought the District was being proactive for closing off a lot of the trail for public safety. “A lot of people don’t realize just looking out they see one wave, you know the rocks look clear in front of us here, but five minutes ago this whole area was just awash with ocean water.” “You have to read the terrain the rocks. Never turn your back on the ocean and never put yourself in a spot of jeopardy. Once again, you’re witnessing a lot of raw power and it’s impressive when viewed from a safe distance,” he said. Parks Canada issued an Extreme Wave Hazard advisory for the Pacific Rim region for Jan. 18 to Jan. 20. In an informal

NORA O’MALLEY PHOTO

Roy Wilmin and Silva Johansson were giddy like school kids when watching big waves smash into the rocks by Amphitrite Point on Thursday morning. conversation with a Parks Canada staffer and a member of the West Coast Inland Search and Rescue team, the Westerly was informed that no rescues were re-

ported during the storm. However, several visitors had “close calls” with the high tide and got their pant legs and socks drenched.

Folks heading out to do some storm watching are reminded to respect the ocean and be CoastSmart, by staying above the high tide and off rocks and logs.

New Patients and Families Welcome! Dr. Kenneth McCracken

is accepting New Patients at Alberni Valley Dental Centre ( formerly Dr. Harry Sperber). Dr. McCracken is a graduate of the University of Glasgow, Scotland 1989 and has practiced in Canada ever since. He has continued his education at the Misch Institute in Detroit and the Kois Institute in Seattle. He has also attended the Canadian Institute of Implants and e Las Vegas Institute for cosmetic dentistry. In addition, Dr. McCracken has training in orthodontics, conscience sedation, and IV sedation. He enjoys coastal living, golf, boating and fishing.

Our mission here at Alberni Valley Dental is to provide friendly, professional and complete dental services that encourage our patients to take an active role in caring for their teeth and gums. In our warm environment, you will find that our staff are extremely approachable and helpful throughout your entire visit. We offer our patients a wide range of preventative and restorative dental care services including One-Appointment Crowns and Bridges. Call us today or visit our website to find out more about our dental care services or to book your New Patient Consultation!

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Every Ad You Place Runs in Print and Online Call 250.726.7029 or email nora.omalley@westerlynews.ca westerlynews.ca

A lot has happened over the last few years with Mascon and Tofino. It seems like only yesterday the fastest internet speed in town was 1 Mbps, streaming Netflix was impossible and most of the town was still on analog TV. Fast forward and nearly everyone in Tofino has access to 150 Mbps internet, analog TV was replaced with Full HD and streaming is now possible. We are very proud of this evolution and appreciate all the support we received along the way. As you may know, Mascon was purchased by TELUS in 2017. The Mascon network will be turned down on March 28, 2018 so we encourage our Mascon customers to make the switch to TELUS. Please call 1-855502-2332 as soon as possible to avoid any disruptions of service. We're confident that you'll be happy with TELUS PureFibre internet and Optik TV service with Video on Demand. Thank you all for your support. Sincerely, Andrew, Darren, Malcolm and the Mascon Team


IN FOCUS

A10 Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

www.westerlynews.ca

Brigitte Rudan and her toddler, Alexander, braved the strong winds and watched the wave show from a safe viewing area established on the Wild Pacific Trail.

Biggest waves in a decade

The West Coast was a storm watcher’s paradise last week as large ocean swells and King tides brought waves the size of houses crashing upon the shore. The Pacific Rim National Park Reserve issued an extreme wave hazard advisory and both the District of Tofino and the District of Ucluelet temporarily closed public access to local beaches. The storm caused much damage to the Wild Pacific Trail and forever rearranged the Pacific Rim’s coastal landscape. Find more storm coverage, including photos and video, on our website www.WesterlyNews.ca or our Facebook page www.Facebook.com/WesterlyNews.

NORA O’MALLEY PHOTOS

Folks gathered in the safe zone, cameras ready for the big splash.

One of the many rolling ‘monsters’ that hit the Coast.

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WEDDING & EVENTS AFFAIR 2018

Peter, Deb, Bronwyn, and Morgan had a birds-eye view.

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ORGANIC, LOCAL AND HAND MADE FALL IN LOVE WITH IVAN’S TRUFFLES BY ERIN HALUSCHAK PHOTOS BY KAREN MCKINNON

I

van Loubier knew that chocolate struck a chord with him.

WEDDING & EVENT

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The Comox Valley chocolatier and owner of Ivan’s Truffles spent time as a chef in Toronto prior to devoting much of his time now to the decadent treats.

Loubier worked with a chocolatier and noticed people’s reaction to chocolate. “Full-bodied chocolate – there’s a neurological love. The texture, flavour and feeling of eating truffles are so perfect. They’re so small, but have so much happiness in one bite.” Loubier saw the simplicity in the product, and realized that he wanted to dedicate his business to making handmade, high quality, fresh truffles.

VIEWS TO TAKE YOUR BREATH

Following an entrepreneurial course in Vancouver, Loubier started Ivan’s Truffles, specializing in natural, GMO-free, handmade, ethical truffles. He uses a rich flavoured ganache which is hand-piped, individually enrobed in tempered dark chocolate, and dusted with premium cocoa power. Additionally, he uses only Valrhona chocolate, organic cream, local honey, organic teas, edible organic flowers and organic fruit. While he uses regular flavours such as lavender, Loubier also experiments with other local delicacies such as Cumberland Brewing Company beer and, in the summer, orange and basil, and grapefruit and rosemary. When it comes to weddings, Loubier works with a client both in terms of flavours and portion size. On average, he makes around three batches a week (around 300 pieces) in order to maintain the integrity of the product. For wedding options, the truffles can be used as part of the dessert or as favours for the guests. Generally, Loubier suggests one jar per person, but there are many options in which he can work with the client. Through his website, ivanstruffles.com, Loubier creates his delicacies not only for those in the Comox Valley (he is a frequent vendor at the Comox Farmers’ Market) but can ship across the country. He is hoping to expand to find vendors in Victoria, Calgary, Vancouver and Toronto. Call 778-922-4826 or email Ivanstruffles.CV@gmail.com. W I N T E R 2 01 8 | H I T C H E D M A G A Z I N E

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hat would the perfect back “The drop for your wedding most popular one is the Comox be? Glacier tour, it’s 45 minutes,” Fleury said. three helicopters at the same time. Next to a pristine alpine lake? The On a mountaintop “The best one I’ve intimate rides and overlooking both had was a First Nation romantic views the ocean and Strathcona quickly attracted wedding, a really a different kind nice Park? On an of isolated beach with “…They had this really one,” said Fleury. client, people planning nothing but the cultural wedding an epic that was orcas and eagles proposal. really interesting.” to break the silence? Make the epic scenery “It’s always fun,” For those with a Fleury said. “I’ve smaller budget of the North lots had still dream Island the backdrop of different reactions, of the dramatic photos,that of your big day but always North with 49 North Helicopters. tears and happy. 49 has also picked It’s nice to see.” up after the ceremony the newly weds The company started That has grown in 2007 with into planning them to mountaintopand and taken training helicopter destination s for photos weddings of sorts. pilots. Owners JeanWhere before returning them to Marc Messmer and the destination their guests. is a Sheena Ell have both been in the with a spectacular nearby location, “It doesn’t really industry for 25 years. get any better to view, that is only be on accessible by helicopter. a mountain top for “They were just a wedding,” Fleury working everywhere said. in Canada then finally “We’ve done quite came here,” said a few now and Bastian Fleury people have been From the Coastal pilot Mountains across manager for 49 North. and marketing Fleury said. “It’s really happy so far,” Strait to the the hidden gems not pretty easy for us fifteen to minutes away organize now.” From training, from the Campbell 49 North expanded River Airport, the pilots into fighting fires, The largest wedding at 49 North know forestry work and all the company of the best views, heliskiing before all you need to know branching off into has done so far is 14. They used two is what backdrop you want tourism. Which ensures helicopters and made for your big they are busy a couple of trips. day and they will year round. But the size of the find a way to make party really depends happen. it on the budget as 49 North can do up 28 HITCHED MA GAZINE | WI to NT E R 2 01 8

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t was Halloween in Victoria, and Indiana Jones and a surfer dude with a fake tan caught each other’s eye. The story almost ended there, with these two shy costumed students never going past bashful hellos. But three years later, after they both had gone abroad separately for their studies, their similar experiences brought them together in conversation.

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www.westerlynews.ca

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

Wednesday, January 24, 2018 A11

More youth needed to get rugby started Tofino hopes to offer “great” sport ANDREW BAILEY andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

Tofino is hoping to introduce the sport of rugby to its recreational landscape for the first time but needs more kids to get rucking. Recreation Programmer Kaela Tompkins told the Westerly News that the goal is to have around 10-15 youth between the ages of nine and 12 sign up to launch a season and she’s currently got seven onboard. “When you say, ‘rugby,’ to kids, they haven’t played, so they don’t know to be excited about it,” she said. “It’s a fun sport and you never know what kids are going to like. We might ignite a passion that kids didn’t even know was out there.” She said she and her recreation team are currently thinking of ways to boost the sport’s notoriety locally and lure enough youth onto the field to play. “We want to start rugby because rugby is a great sport,” she said adding rugby’s popularity is growing across Canada. “We’d love to bring some of that stoke here. There seems to be a large adult population who’s interested in rugby. I’ve had people coming out of the woodwork to coach…We just don’t have enough kids yet.” Anyone interested in getting involved can contact Tompkins at 250-725-3229 ext. 704 and parents of interested youth should reach out quickly because Tompkins is wary of pushing the potential rugby

DON VOAKLANDER PHOTO

Tofino’s Kaela Tompkins is hoping to get a rugby league going to get local youth into the sport that’s popular among Canadian Universities like UVic whose Paige Farries set a one-day record by scoring nine tries in Day One of the University of Alberta Rugby 7s Tournament on Saturday. season deep into spring when field time would be fought over with youth baseball. “We want to expose our children to as many sports as possible and rugby is an option out there that, when they go to colleges or universities, they might want

to play,” she said. “And, if we can, why not?” She added anyone wanting to bring a different sport into the recreational fold should contact the Tofino Recreation Department.

“We’re always brainstorming about new programs we could bring forward,” she said “If there’s someone in the community who’s interested in any sport, the door is always open to offer it.”

Trail Society needs support after storm From A7 The repair costs are currently unknown, though Schramm noted, “It cost tens of thousands to put it in, so that’s what we need to put it back.” “We don’t have the money it’s going to take to replace these bridges and decks. It took 20 years to build what’s out there with a slow trickle of donations,” she said. “We’re reliant on donations. This is not a taxpayer’s burden.” Donations can be made through the trail’s website or Facebook page. “Small amounts from a lot of people would go a long way,” Schramm said adding the trail is an important local feature to support. “There’s nothing like it in the world and it’s worth rebuilding what was damaged.” While the waves roared through, many locals and visitors descended on the trail to experience the ocean’s power and Schramm was happy to see Ucluelet’s district office working diligently to ensure stormwatchers stayed safe. “The district showed up all hands on deck and physically prevented people from hurting themselves. They were amazing,” she said. “Everyone did their jobs really, really, well.” She said tourists continue flocking to the trail, particularly around the lighthouse,

The Wild Pacific Trail Society is encouraging locals to donate to the trail’s rebuilding efforts after last week’s massive storm. and she urges locals to spread the word about being CoastSmart. “We’ve now become famous as storm-central,” she said. “We’re being flooded with people wanting to see these waves and my personal fear is that they will put themselves in harm’s way. They’ll go out beyond the trails and get themselves killed.”

Anyone heading out to the trail must stay away from rocks and closed areas. “A wave weighs a tonne per cubic metre,” Schramm said. “People think they’re just going to get a little wet. Would they stand in front of a semi-truck barrelling at them at 60 miles per hour? Of course not. But, that’s what a wave is. They don’t get that sense of fear

WILD PACIFIC TRAIL SOCIETY PHOTO

that they should…A wave that can shatter a house shouldn’t be played with.” Schramm has lived in Ucluelet for about 30 years and said she’d never seen anything like Thursday and Friday’s storms. “I think this is an extraordinary event, but, with climate change, we can’t rule out that this becomes more frequent,” she said.


A12 Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

GAMES & PUZZLES WEEKLY CROSSWORD

PUZZLE #181410

www.westerlynews.ca

Bulldogs beat Cowichan Darren Rizzolo nets game winner in 7-6 final SUSIE QUINN Alberni Valley News

CLUES DOWN 1. Skater Lipinksi 2. Data 3. Single step 4. Destroyed financially 5. Fail to interpret correctly 6. Fava d’__: tree found in Brazil

– Matt Hughes send it into overtime. Darren Rizzolo scored the winning goal at 4:24 of the second overtime, assisted by Selleck and Cole Poliziani. John Hawthorne got the win in goal for the Bulldogs. “It was an up and down game,” head coach Matt Hughes said. “We were proud of how our guys stuck with it and came back from multiple deficits in the hockey game.” “Getting the extra point was good for our guys.” The teams are now 1–1 in a three-game, homeand-home stand. The Capitals beat the Bulldogs 6–2 at the Island Savings Centre on Jan. 17. Luc Salem and Julian Benner scored for the Bulldogs in Wednesday’s contest.

HOROSCOPE ARIES Plans to get together with friends this week could be delayed by other responsibilities, Aries. Do not feel the need to cancel; just reschedule your plans. TAURUS Financial issues may force you to work a little harder right now to make some extra money. Make a concerted effort to save more and take care of your financial obligations. GEMINI You may need to wait a little longer to receive some news you have been anticipating. Don’t let this get you down. Change is on the way and will come soon enough. CANCER Treat yourself to a brief respite from the daily grind. Spend time with the family and enjoy some well-deserved rest and relaxation in the days ahead. LEO Make a concerted effort to open a line of communication with someone who means a lot to you. He or she may need a helping hand, and you are just the person to provide that assistance. VIRGO Treat yourself to a present this week, Virgo. A nice dinner, an unexpected luxury or even a spa treatment is the kind of pampering that can go a long way..

SUDOKU

7. Vehicle 8. Limited 9. Old English 10. Aussie golfer Norman 11. Job 12. Loose-fitting undergarments 13. Protected by balancing 14. Give up 17. Fifth note of a major scale 22. Extravagantly bright 23. Takes dictation 24. 19th letter of Greek alphabet 25. Rounded knob (biology) 26. French philosopher Pierre 28. Mothers 29. Dardic ethnic group 32. Supports the rudder 36. An ugly evil-looking old woman 38. Of a fasting time 40. Filled with passengers 43. Below the ribs and above the hips 44. Binary-coded decimal 45. 51 is a famous one 46. Goes into a funk 51. Chief O’Hara actor 54. Videocassette recorder 55. Scored perfectly 56. Type of tree 57. __ Spumante (Italian wine) 58. Popular commercial “pet” 59. Supreme god of Ancient Egyptians 60. Room in a home 62. __ and behold

THIS WEEKS ANSWER

CLUES ACROSS 1. Measurement (abbr.) 4. Returned material authorization (abbr.) 7. Sorting 12. Attribute 15. Poked holes in 16. Angers 18. Doc 19. MLB journeyman pitcher Dillon 20. Not don’t 21. Snubs someone 24. Where kids bathe 27. One might be in distress 30. Chair 31. Music industry honors (abbr.) 33. Dash 34. Owed 35. Caucasian language 37. One thousand (Span.) 39. Musical style drum and bass 41. Evergreen trees native to warm climates 42. Begin __: start fresh 44. Marshy outlets 47. A chicken lays one 48. Yemen’s largest city 49. Conversion rate 50. Single Lens Reflex 52. Atlanta rapper 53. Reduce the importance of 56. Faces of buildings 61. Something achieved 63. Distribute again 64. Tooth caregiver 65. 007’s creator

Action was intense at the Dawg Pound on Jan. 19 as the Alberni Valley Bulldogs beat the Cowichan Capitals 7–6 in double overtime in their second of three home-and-home B.C. Hockey League games. Paul Selleck opened scoring for the Bulldogs just 51 seconds into the game—his 13th goal of the season—setting the tone for the night. The first period ended with Cowichan in the lead 2–1 on goals by Brendan Cherwalk and Troy MacTavish. The second period saw both teams score seven goals in total, with the Bulldogs scoring four on goals by Christian Simeone with two, Tyler Vanuden and Keaton Mastrodonato to draw even 5–5 with Cowichan. The Caps broke the tie at 13:10 of the third period on a goal by Tyler Pochipinski. Mastrodonato scored his second of the game for the Bulldogs at 15:46 to deadlock the game 6–6 and

“We were proud of how our guys stuck with it and came back from multiple deficits in the hockey game.”

LIBRA Make an effort to lift the spirits of a loved one this week. Responsibilities may be weighing on them, and you can lighten their mood just by being there for them. SCORPIO Sometimes you may feel as if you are the only person getting things done. Just keep up your hard work and the rewards will come. Others are taking notice. SAGITTARIUS If your patience is wearing thin, try to embrace distractions that can help you pass the time. This can make things less stressful. CAPRICORN You have been doing well financially, but you still hope to do better. Speak with a planner or a knowledgeable relative on how to make your money work harder. AQUARIUS Engage in activities that make you feel good and boost your selfconfidence this week, Aquarius. This may be as simple as hitting the gym for a workout. PISCES Phone a friend and set up a time to get together, Pisces. Reconnecting and sharing a laugh or two will be a boon to both of you and raise your spirits.

THIS WEEKS SUDOKU ANSWER

Fun By The Numbers Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test!

Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!


Wednesday, January News 24, 2018 A13 A13 Wed, Jan 24, 2018 Ucluelet Western

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

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INFORMATION

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PERSONALS MAKE A Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat Call FREE! 250-220-1300 or 1-800-2101010. www.livelinks.com 18+0

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employertrusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING Online-based 43 wk program incls 8 wk practicum. Regulated Pharmacy Technicians earn $25-$28/hr in hospitals & $20-$27/hr in community pharmacies. Accredited by the Canadian Council for the Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP). www.stenbergcollege.com Toll-Free: 1-866-580-2772

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Community Newspapers

Hiring for all positions:

• Fish Graders • Forklift Operators • Tally Person • Icers

Experience is an asset, but not necessary. Must be dependable, willing to learn & hardworking. Competitive Wages, lots of work & over-time hours. Join the Neptune Ice Team in Ucluelet. Call Crystal 250-726-7761 or fax resume: 250-726-2283

COUNSELLING IF YOU want to drink, that’s your business. If you want to stop, we can help. Alcoholics Anonymous, Ucluelet/Tofino 1800-883-3968.

STEEL BUILDING SALE...”REALLY BIG SALE IS BACK-EXTRA WINTER DISCOUNT ON NOW!” 20X23 $5,798 25X27 $6,356 30x31 $8,494 32X33 $8,728 35X35 $11,670. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-2127036 www.pioneersteel.ca

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

TENDERS

TENDERS

TENDERS

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Maintenance and Operations Services Contract Salmon Beach Service Area The Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District is requesting proposals for the Salmon Beach Service area. The general scope of this contract is to provide maintenance and operation services to Salmon Beach District infrastructure. Details are available at www.acrd.bc.ca, under the ‘What’s New’ tab. Proponents are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the Salmon Beach Community and the works and services required. Your proposal must include: 1. Familiarity, experience and history with this type of work; specifically ground maintenance and pump and haul; and 2. Your proposed hours of work for both the winter and summer seasons to meet the needs of the Salmon Beach Community; 3. Your proposed monthly fee structure for required services for both summer and winter seasons to meet the needs of Salmon Beach Community 4. Hourly rate for services over and above required amount. Proponents must be an Independent Contractor and meet the requirements as set out in the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District’s Contractor Safety and Coordination Policy. Enquiries may be directed by telephone to Mr.Randy Fraser at 250.720.2717 Sealed proposals must be in an envelope marked “Proposal - Salmon Beach Maintenance and Operation Services” and will be received by the undersigned until 2:00pm local time on February 2, 2018. The ACRD reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. The lowest price Proposal will not necessarily be accepted. ACRD reserves the right in its absolute and sole discretion to accept the Proposal that it deems most advantageous and favourable in the interests of ACRD.

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Randy Fraser | Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District | 3008 Fifth Avenue, Port Alberni, BC, V9Y 2E3

Elections Canada is an independent body set up by Parliament to conduct federal elections, by-elections and referendums.


A14 Wednesday, January 24, 2018 Wed, Jan 24, 2018 A14 Ucluelet Western News

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

www.westerlynews.ca

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES with Black Press (Vancouver Island) Black Press is Canada’s leading private independent newspaper company with more than 170 community, daily and urban newspapers in Canada, Washington State, Hawaii, California and Ohio and has extensive digital and printing operations.

Compliance and Security OďŹƒcer (Security Guard)

Multi Media Journalist (Victoria) The Victoria News has an opening for a full-time, digital-first, permanent Multi Media Journalist. The successful candidate will possess an attention to detail as well as the ability to work under pressure in a deadlinedriven, goal-oriented environment. Temporary Multi Media Journalist (Campbell River) The Campbell River Mirror, an award-winning newspaper on central Vancouver Island, is looking for a journalist to help us produce dynamic and creative content for our print, web and social media platforms, on a 10 month contract basis. We are looking for a combination of education and experience in writing, reporting, photography and video skills. Experience with InDesign is also an asset. Multi Media Sales Consultant (Campbell River) The Campbell River Mirror has an exciting opportunity for a Community Media Sales Consultant that will be focused on digital and print sales. The successful candidate will be comfortable with both digital and print media and will be responsible for selling mobile, run of site, SEO, programmatic, websites, print campaigns and special sections within our paper. Production Worker (Ladysmith): Ladysmith Press is hiring Production Workers for their continually expanding collating department. This is a general labour position that requires frequent lifting up to 10 kg and involves the handling of newspapers and advertising supplements.

-Seasonal - PaciďŹ c Rim National Park Reserve, Ucluelet/ToďŹ no, BC

For more information on these vacancies and other regions throughout B.C. visit:

blackpress.ca/careers

DISTRICT OF TOFINO Box 9, 121 3rd Street ToďŹ no, BC V0R 2Z0

Recreation Programmer 2 (Temporary, Maternity Leave 18 Months)

DEPARTMENT: Community Sustainability CLOSING DATE: January 28, 2018 POSITION: The District of ToďŹ no is seeking a qualiďŹ ed individual to ďŹ ll a temporary full-time position as the Recreation Programmer 2 in the Community Sustainability Department. This temporary position is being posted as a result of an 18 month maternity leave. The position will begin on Tuesday, April 3, 2018. Reporting to the Manager of Community Sustainability, the Recreation Programmer 2 performs duties related to the provision of recreational services to the residents of ToďŹ no. The Recreation Programmer 2 coordinates, promotes and implements recreational programs and special events for a diverse variety of programs in sport, outdoor, social, arts and cultural areas. Responsibilities also include supervision of volunteers, contractors, and seasonal sta. The Recreation Programmer 2 liaises with Recreation Commission and other community organizations to coordinate service delivery. The Recreation Programmer 2 works with the Manager of Community Sustainability to develop annual budgets, work plans, projects, and Council reports. The preferred candidate will have post secondary education in a related ďŹ eld and previous work experience in a recreation position. Preference will be given to those with a valid class 4 BC Drivers License, experience managing sta, administrative experience, and current ďŹ rst aid training. A detailed job description outlining the duties and qualiďŹ cations is available on the District’s website at www.toďŹ no.ca. HOURS OF WORK & SALARY: This is a temporary position to cover an eighteen month maternity leave and based on a 37.5 hour exible work week that may include weekends and evenings and is subject to the term of the Collective Agreement of the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 118. The salary for this position will be $29.86 per hour plus 14.8% in lieu of beneďŹ ts. The successful candidate will complete a 60 working day probation period at 90% of the hourly wage. APPLICATION: QualiďŹ ed applicants are invited to submit a cover letter and resume indicating the position applied for, in conďŹ dence, no later than 4:00 p.m. Sunday, January 28, 2018, to: Aaron Rodgers, Manager of Community Sustainability Email: arodgers@toďŹ no.ca District of ToďŹ no, PO Box 9, ToďŹ no BC, V0R 2Z0 121 Third Street, ToďŹ no BC The District thanks all applicants but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Duties: Providing security and compliance services in Green Point Campground and the day-use areas at the Long Beach Unit of PaciďŹ c Rim National Park Reserve of Canada. This shall be done by informing and educating the public of the regulations and policies that govern user activities in the Park and requesting voluntary compliance with such direction. Non-compliance will be reported to the appropriate authority. Must Have: Must have a valid BST, OFA1 and Class 5 driver’s license; *Note: Personnel assigned to this location must have accommodations close by (i.e. in Ucluelet or ToďŹ no) OR have access to a trailer or Recreational Vehicle (RV) and a RV site will be provided for no charge. Please submit your cover letter and resume job to: job.openings@cviy.ca HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

PIONEER BOATWORKS

CLEANING & SANITATION TECHNICIANS Full Time with Benefits

Hoping to start or further develope your aquaculture career? Cermaq Canada is currently looking for multiple full-time permanent Cleaning & Sanitation Technicians to join our ToďŹ no Fish Processing Plant. There is company provided bus transportation available from Port Alberni. As a Cleaning & Sanitation Technician you’ll have the opportunity to put your keen sense of attention to detail to use doing physical work and playing an important role in helping our high-quality Atlantic salmon get to market. Your primary responsibility is to ensure that the plant is properly sanitized and meets hygiene regulations by using a pressure washer to clean our equipment and materials. If you have an exceptional eye for detail and are a team player who is physically ďŹ t, then we want to hear from you! For more information about this opportunity please visit our careers page at www.cermaq.ca. To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to careers.canada@ cermaq.com and state “Cleaning & Sanitation Technicianâ€? in the subject line before 5:00 PM February 28, 2018. If a suitable candidate is identiďŹ ed, this position may be ďŹ lled prior to the closing date. Cermaq Canada is an equal opportunities employer who provides a workplace that is free of discrimination.

Sales Clerk Wanted Part time seasonal front counter sales clerk position available. Applicant must be friendly and well groomed. General sales clerk duties including: t8SJUJOHPVUJOWPJDFTBOEUBLJOHQBZNFOUT t3FTQPOTJCMFGPSTFSWJDJOHDVTUPNFSTXIFO TIPQQJOHGPSNBSJOFHPPET t6OQBDLJOHTUPDL QSJDJOHBOEEJTQMBZJOH marine goods. "LOPXMFEHFPGUIFmTIJOHJOEVTUSZBOE boats an asset. Must be capable of work independently and available to work weekends Apply with resume to: Pioneer Boatworks Store 166 Fraser Lane, Ucluelet, on the waterfront HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

PIONEER BOATWORKS General Shipyard Labourer Wanted General Labourer wanted for Pioneer Boatworks. Applicant must be friendly and well groomed. Duties include: t1SFTTVSFXBTIJOHBOEQBJOUJOHCPBUT t.BJOUBJOJOHBDMFBOXPSLJOHFOWJSPONFOU t)FMQJOHTIJQXSJHIUTJOUIFQFSGPSNBODFPG UIFJSEVUJFT t#BTJDVTFPGIBOEUPPMTSFRVJSFE t#BTJDSFBEJOHBOEXSJUJOHTLJMMTOFFEFE t8PSLIPVSTNBZWBSZBUUJNFT "LOPXMFEHFPGUIFmTIJOHJOEVTUSZBOECPBUT an asset. .VTUCFDBQBCMFPGXPSLJOEFQFOEFOUMZBOE BWBJMBCMFUPXPSLXFFLFOET Apply with resume to: Pioneer Boatworks Store 166 Fraser Lane, Ucluelet, on the waterfront

SALTWATER HUSBANDRY TECHNICIANS Full Time with Benefits

Hoping to start or further develop your aquaculture career? Cermaq Canada is currently looking for multiple full-time permanent Saltwater Husbandry Technicians to join our saltwater production team. We have opportunities at our sea sites located across Vancouver Island with company provided transportation from various Island communities. As a Husbandry Technician you’ll play a critical role in growing healthy salmon in a sustainable manner. You’ll spend the majority of your day outside on the water caring for the ďŹ sh. This role is the perfect opportunity to satisfy your love of the outdoors, expand your husbandry skills, and contribute to local communities through sustainable aquaculture. Preference will be given to candidates with a diploma or degree in aquaculture. If you are a team player who is physically ďŹ t, enjoy being outside in all weather conditions, and have a passion for sustainable aquaculture, then we want to hear from you! For more information about this opportunity please visit our careers page at www.cermaq.ca. To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to careers.canada@ cermaq.com and state “Saltwater Husbandry Technicianâ€? in the subject line before before 5:00 PM February 28, 2018. If a suitable candidate is identiďŹ ed, this position may be ďŹ lled prior to the closing date. Cermaq Canada is an equal opportunities employer who provides a workplace that is free of discrimination.

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C O M M U N I T Y

events

CALENDAR ongoing

FAMILY LITERACY DAY, Saturday, Jan. 27. 1-4pm. UCC. Bring the family for a book exchange! TOFINO WEDDING FAIR, Saturday, Jan. 27. 11am-4pm. The Shore Pier Building.Local businesses under one roof showcasing their service and what a wedding in Tofino can offer. Free event, open to the public! WEST COAT WINTER MUSIC, Cheng2Duo, Saturday, Jan. 27, 7:30pm, Clayoquot Theatre., “Russian Soul” with Bryan Cheng, violin & Silvie Cheng, piano. Tickets $25 at Mermaid Tales & at door. COMEDY IN THE HATCH, Saturday, Jan. 27. 8-9:30pm at Tofino Resort + Marina. Canadian comedians Matt Billon & Peter Hudson will leave you wanting more! Entry only $5, don’t miss out! MOVIE NIGHT, Monday, Jan. 29, “Loving Vincent”, PG. same time / place/ cost. Each of the 65,000 frames in this remarkable animated film is an oil painting on canvas, created by a team of 100 painters using Van Gogh’s technique. CLAYOQUOT CAFE: SPOTLIGHT ON FISH FARMS, Wednesday, Jan. 31. Doors at 7pm, event starts at 7:30pm sharp. Darwin’s Cafe. Please come early for tea & chummus— Suggested donation $5 (includes coffee, tea and yummy cookies). UCLUELET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AGM, Wednesday, Jan. 31. 7-9pm @ Black Rock Ballroom. RSVP by January 25th to chamberoffice@ uclueletinfo.com. Food and beverages provided.

UCLUELET ALANON GROUP Wednesdays, 7:30pm, Catholic Church (use side entrance below), 1663 Peninsula Rd.

FEATURED EVENT OF THE WEEK

Wednesday, January 24, 2018 A15

24/7 access to your local news wherever you are

DROP IN CRAFTING, Wednesdays, 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Coastal Bliss Yoga. Materials not supplied, please bring everything you need with you. PILATES Mondays and Wednesdays, 6-7pm. Tofino Community Hall. $10 drop-in. LIVE MUSIC Wednesdays, 3-6pm The Great Room at Long Beach Lodge. PICKLEBALL Mon., Wed., Sat., 8am-12pm, Tofino Community Hall. Free. CHI GONG Wednesdays, 10:3011:30am, UCC Main Hall. $2 drop SOUP LUNCH Thursdays, Noon1:30pm. the Hub, UCC. All welcome! Free. BINGO Wednesdays, 7-9pm, Tofino Legion. BASKETBALL Tuesdays, 7-9pm, USS. Drop in fee $2. DANCE FIT 55+ Thursdays 9-10am, UCC Fitness Studio. $6 drop-in. TUFF WOMEN DO BRUNCH Fridays, 10-11am. WCRS Tofino space directly behind Tofino Pharmacy.Share food & conversation! BADMINTON Sundays, 7-9pm. USS Gym. $2 drop-in

WCRS DOC NIGHT Thursday, Jan. 25 7-9 p.m. at the Ucluelet Community Centre Told from a first person perspective, “Fight Like A Girl” is about women overcoming their demons through boxing, while telling a larger story about abuse, trauma, mental illness and healing. Throughout the film, how she and the other women she trains with arrive at boxing is revealed. The real emotional history, and traumas bubble up fleshing out a compelling story about women overcoming adversity in what many consider a violent sport. Free film event! Bring a friend!

ongoing

service

DARTS Mondays, 7pm. Tofino Legion

ST. COLUMBA CHURCH Sundays, 10:30am. 110 2nd St.

OUTDOOR SOCCER Mondays, 7-9PM. USS Field/Gym. $2 drop-in.

HOLY FAMILY CHURCH Sundays, 10am. 1163 Peninsula Road

FOOD BANK Tuesdays, 1-3pm. 160 Seaplane Base Rd., Ucluelet. To register call 250-726-6909

ST. LAWRENCE CHURCH Sundays, 11am. Ahousaht

service ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHOLIC CHURCH Saturday, 5pm. 441 Main St., Tofino TOFINO BIBLE FELLOWSHIP Sundays, 10:30am. Tofino Legion.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH Sundays, 10:30am. UCC ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHOLIC CHURCH Tuesdays, 5pm. 441 Main St. Tofino

TOFINO LEGION All Canadian Citizens and Many Others are Welcome to Join – No Military History Needed

0

8:30AM - 7:0

Be sure to Renew your Legion Membership for 2018.

GAS BAR: DAILY 0 PM

6:30AM - 11:0

H I N G: T O L C E F I L O TOFIN M DAILY

REGULAR EVENTS GAMES & SOCIAL FRIDAYS 4-11pm • Drop in Pool, Ping Pong, Foosball, Darts

THE OUT TO LUNCH BUNCH • Monthly seniors’ lunch and socializing at the Legion. • All seniors welcome. For details: 250-726-6655.

s r u o H r e t Win : FOOD STPOMRDEAILY

MEMBERS & GUESTS - Info: Call 250-725-3361

BINGO! WEDNESDAYS 7-9pm

TOFINO

CHRIST COMMUNITY CHURCH Sundays, 10:30am. 1419 Peninsula

To submit your activities, e-mail: office@westerlynews.ca, fax: 250-726-4248 or drop by: #102-1801 Bay St, Ucluelet. We accept your Arts & Entertainment, Service Group, Non-Profit Organization, Church, Library, Fundraiser, Open to the Public Notices on a first come, first served basis.

DART LEAGUE MONDAYS 7pm

Visit your local community Black Press Media newspaper website & click on the E-EDITIONS button at the top of the page.

TAKE OUT @ THE HATCH 11AM - 11PM ALL SPECIALS available plus Beer & Wine off-sales

Visit tofinoresortandmarina.com to view the menu & CALL 250.726.6122 to order!

- 5:0AY0APND MONDAY) 0AMN SU 10:0 ND LOSED O (C

O R E: T S E R A W D R HA ON-FRI

0 PM M 8:30AM - 5:3 SAT & HOLIDAYS 0 PM 8:30AM - 5:0(CLOSED SUNDAYS)


A16 Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

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The War Amps

Key Tag

Service The War Amps returns nearly 13,000 sets of lost keys every year! “I want to thank the person who found my keys and called the number on the back of my key tag. I received my keys back from The War Amps today by courier. You guys are fast!” – War Amps supporter

To order key tags, please visit waramps.ca or call 1 800 250-3030. When you use key tags, you help support programs for amputees.

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ANDREW BAILEY PHOTO

MONDAY MOTION: Dylan Nakagawa and Alex Louie ducked out of Monday’s wet weather to play some basketball at Ucluelet Secondary School’s gym.

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Celebrating 10 years in the Islands, Alaska offers low fares and the most nonstop flights to Hawai‘i from the West Coast. Learn more at alaskaair.com.

Your complete source for island travel.

RULES:For complete contest details visit Hawaii.com. No purchase necessary. Must be 21+ years old to enter. Entries accepted at Hawaii.com through Jan 31, 2018, at 11:59 PM HST. Multiple participants are not permitted to share the same email address. Any use of robotic, repetitive, automatic, programmed or similar entry methods or agents will void all entries by you. Employees (and their immediate families) of Oahu Publications, Inc. (Hawaii.com) and all participating sponsors are not eligible. Winner will be responsible for all taxes applicable to the total value of the prize(s) received. Prize(s) are non-transferable, not redeemable for cash and must not be used for resale. Prize(s) are for travel, accommodations, and tickets during specified dates only. Winner will refer to the prize vouchers for complete details, terms, and restrictions. If the winner has any issues with the prize(s) or is not able to redeem the prize(s) as specified they must forfeit the prize(s) and another winner will be drawn. Changes or extensions will not be made by Hawaii.com. Winner authorizes OPI to use their name and likeness for promotion at no additional compensation. Winner will be contacted. No phone calls, please.

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News, January 24, 2018  

January 24, 2018 edition of the Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News

Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News, January 24, 2018  

January 24, 2018 edition of the Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News