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COMMUNITYCONNECTION • JANUARY 2018 PUBLICATION

TOGETHER we LEARN

AUTHORS OF OUR OWN LEARNING: A STUDENT VOICE EDITION

Central Okanagan Public Schools Together We Learn www.sd23.bc.ca

INSIDE Grade 3 Student Asks the Hard Questions

Paving the Way to a New Career PAGE 13

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A Place to Belong PAGE 6

Special Pullout Insert: Guide for Online Enrollment PAGE 9 - 12

Learning to be a good human PAGE 16

2018 District Calendar PAGE 19

HERE’S OUR STORY! Ashlyn Swan and Cadence Quigley, Grade 5 students, South Rutland Elementary

This year, South Rutland Elementary’s Grade 5’s are so thankful that they were the Grade 5 students from Mr. Peters and Ms. Miles first school in Kelowna to do this project! Lynn classrooms wrote and edited stories to be Stevens went to school at the New York Institute of Photography, and has now made published in a book! Lynn Stevens an outstanding business by offering at Big Heart Publishing took their I really stories and turned them into a enjoyed being this free opportunity to schools. On book. The kids each selected an able to make a December 16, 2017, the kids got celebrity treatment at the Okanagan animal from a photograph to write book with my Regional Library in Rutland for their about. The book they created, friends and book signing. Thanks to everyone at “Animal Tales”, has 35 stories by peers the library for hosting this event for kids and some teachers. the kids! Ashlyn Swan Ashlyn from South Rutland Grade 5 Student Elementary said “I really enjoyed You can order a copy of “Animal

being able to make a book with my friends and peers!” Ms. Miles, a Grade 5 teacher from South Rutland Elementary said, “I loved seeing them all in the book and not everyone has an opportunity to be a published author! So to see them in an author’s shoes is impressive.” The kids created a variety of different story topics. Some are sad, humorous, romantic, and realistic. The

Spring Break

Tales” on the Big Heart Publishing website, www.bigheartpublishing.com/product/ animal-tales/, and all profits go back to the school. Again, these kids have done an amazing job, and if you’re a teacher who is interested in this project, you can contact Lynn Stevens on Facebook, or go to the BHP website. Thanks Lynn Stevens!

Excerpts from Animal Tales are featured throughout this edition. Delivered by:

CAMPS!

You won’t want to miss these fun, active camps for kids ages 3–12 at the Kelowna Family YMCA, H2O Adventure + Fitness Centre, and Mission Creek Alliance Church. YMCA of Okanagan

Register today! Limited space available.

250-491-9622 ymcaokanagan.ca

We offer financial assistance to those in need. Charity Registration # 11924 0224 RR0001


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Learning by

Asking

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Ariella Amato

Grade 3 student, Hudson Road Elementary

As an experienced Kid Reporter for Castanet.net, Ariella sat down with Board Chairperson, Moyra Baxter, and Superintendent of Schools/CEO, Kevin Kaardal, with her own list of questions to learn more about Central Okanagan Public Schools.

Ariella Amato: Do you ever get bored in your office? Moyra Baxter: The funny thing is, I don’t really have an office because I’m elected, so I’m part of the school board. I don’t get bored, because I’m not here every day. I’m all over the place, looking at things going on in schools and things like that. AA: If a lot of people disagree with you on the board, how do you handle it? MB: If we have something that we disagree on, which doesn’t happen very often, then we have a vote. You have to make sure that you listen to everyone, that you give everybody an opportunity to say what they think, and if there’s no agreement, then you have to come down and vote on it. AA: What was your own experience as a student?

MOYRA BAXTER

MB: My education was in England so it was quite different there. In those days, when kids were 11 years old they took an exam, and that decided where they were going to go to school. I like what we have now much better, because I think every student has the chance to think about what they’re interested in and if they don’t understand something, they can ask, “Can

I do that again?” or say “I need more help.” We weren’t allowed to do those things, it all came down to tests, so it was pretty horrible, really. AA: How do you decide curriculum? Are any students involved in the research or do only adults decide how children learn in classrooms? MB: When the province sets the curriculum they often ask students their opinion and I think that’s why the curriculum’s changing. We’re going away from “have to learn this, have to learn that,” to more saying “How can I find out how this works?” “Do I have any questions?” and “Do I need more information?” That’s a much better way of learning, I think. So kids were asked how they want the curriculum to be and I think the government listened, so we got a lot of changes. AA: What do you like about your job? MB: Well, I like the fact that it’s all about kindergarten to Grade 12, so it’s about students who are starting off in schools and just learning what it’s all about, right up to Grade 12 where they finish and they decide whether they’re going to go to university or college or go out and get a job. It’s just interesting going through all the years with the students, so I like it a lot.

Ariella Amato: How often do you visit schools and meet with parents and community members to hear their concerns? Kevin Kaardal: At least one day a week, I visit schools. When I’m in schools, I always talk to the students, to see how they’re doing, and I talk to the teachers too, so that I can understand how things are going in schools and report back to the Board of Education, which is part of my job. I also attend the Central Okanagan Parent Advisory Council meetings every month, so I hear from a group of parents about what their hopes are for the district and the education of their children. AA: If a child learns differently than others, is it a problem, and how do you teach them? KK: The exciting thing about the new curriculum is we know there are 7 billion brains in the world, so everybody learns differently. It used to be that we taught information that fit most kids in the middle. The kids who were starting their journey in learning a particular topic were left behind, and those who are way ahead of the rest sat there bored. That’s not the case anymore. It’s really about personalizing learning, that’s how we’re designing education today.

KEVIN KAARDAL

AA: Are you planning on doing away with genders like they have in other Canadian schools? KK: We have no intention of doing away with genders. What we want to do is make sure that we recognize everyone for who they identify as. We want people to feel safe, welcome, and included, so that whoever they are, they can feel comfortable in our schools. AA: Do you like your job? KK: I love my job. The best part is when I see young people like you doing amazing things like interviewing the board chair and the superintendent so effectively; I get to see people reach their potential. It’s my goal to set the conditions so everyone can learn, and people can leave our school district with dignity; (so they know who they are and they’re really proud of it), with purpose; (“I know what I’m going to do in society”), and options. We ensure learners have the skill set that makes them adaptive experts, so they can change careers and do what they find fulfilling.

AA: Do you have kids in the school system? KK: My two daughters are adults now, so they’ve long since graduated from the school system. They attended public schools and they did outstanding. I was very proud of the work that happened in those public schools for them. It’s led them on to exciting careers that they find fulfilling right now, but they have those skills as adaptive experts. I know, as young women, they will make strong contributions to our society.


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Meet the District Student Council Rutland Senior Secondary

In Central Okanagan Public Schools, all five secondary schools delegate students to the District Student Council (DSC).

Kelowna Secondary

The purpose of the District Student Council is to create a connection between students and the Board to facilitate input into District decisions, advocate for the betterment of student life, take an active leadership role on behalf of students, and promote positive relationships between schools.

Arjan Thouli (Grade 12), Kali Syrnyk (Grade 10), Keneisha Charles (Grade 11), and Jessica Proulx (Grade 12) We chose leadership so that we could be an amplifier for the voices of the minorities within our school whose voices have always been quiet but nonetheless there.

Here’s why they chose leadership roles: Okanagan Mission Secondary

Leadership is our way of discovering our core values through building a sense of community and connectivity in our school.

We joined DSC because we know that we are stronger when we are united and that together, as schools, we can achieve wonderful things.

George Elliot Secondary

Mount Boucherie Secondary

Josh Duncalfe (Grade 12), McKinley Kemp (Grade 10), Darius Konstant (Grade 12/DSC co-president)

Tiana Calao (Grade 12), Jordan Johnston (Grade 10), Matthew Richardson (Grade 11), Yi Han Xia (Grade 12)

Riko Mizushima (Grade 12/DSC co-president), Skye Noh (Grade 12), Isis Darosa (Grade 11), Saphia Ediriweera (Grade 11), Yvonne Wood (Grade 10) We joined the DSC to inspire, influence change, and find a voice in our community. We wanted to help connect the people around us in our community and try our best to make a difference in it as well.

Nolan Koblischke (Grade 11), Logan Braun (Grade 11), Lily Robinson (Grade 10) and Noel Drachenburg (Grade 12, not pictured) We chose leadership because we wanted to see if we could make a positive difference in our school.

Central Okanagan Public Schools Together We Learn

Our Mission: Our Overarching Goal:

To educate students in a safe, inspirational learning environment where each student develops the knowledge and skills to be a lifelong learner and a healthy productive member of our global society. Each Central Okanagan Public Schools student (K-12) will provide evidence of being a learner, thinker, innovator, collaborator and contributor.


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A Syrian student’s journey to Kelowna Rob Aviani, Vice-Principal, Rutland Middle

JORYA ALSHAHOUD Rutland Middle School, grade 6

Jorya Alshahoud is a typical Grade 6 student at Rutland Middle School. The journey that brought her family from Syria to Kelowna, however, is quite extraordinary. Jorya was three years old when the shooting began in her neighbourhood. Her family had to leave quickly. “My father moved us to my grandmother’s house,” shares Jorya. “He also helped about 100 other families find a place to stay. We all slept with chickens and had to use blankets as walls to make rooms.” The Alshahoud family eventually made their way from Syria to Jordan, but the trip was not easy. They became separated from Jorya’s brother and then later, from her grandmother. Luckily, the family reunited in the city of Irbid. One day, Jorya’s father got a phone call asking him if his family wanted to move to Canada as

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ABOUT...

I love learning about the Core Social Responsibility Competencies, especially Social Responsibility. I am collaborating with my group to design a project that will help others. We are hoping to raise money to support needy families in Kelowna. It’s important to me to help others and it’s fun to work together! GRADE 6

KARMEN CHU É CO L E D O R OT H E A WA L K E R E L E M E N TA R Y

refugees. Mr. Alshahoud was excited by the prospect of moving to Toronto but was very happy to come to Kelowna. However, the first five months were hard. “Our family was one of the first Syrian refugees in Kelowna,” says Jorya who was in Grade 3 when her family moved to the community. “There was nobody who spoke Arabic. After a while, more families were able to come to Kelowna which was nice.” “I started Grade 3 at Pearson Road

Elementary School. Everybody helped me learn English and understand stuff. It was exciting. There was one girl in my class named Samaya who spoke a little bit of Arabic and helped translate some words for me. I made a lot of friends and played basketball with them.” Jorya’s biggest piece of advice for new refugees is to learn how to use the Google Translate app. “It was really helpful. In Grades 3 and 4, that is the main way that I communicated with my teachers.”

Our New Life in Canada at Bankhead Elementary Nour Al-Hussein Al-Khalaf and Mohamed Masri, Grade 5 and 6 students, Bankhead Elementary We are Mohamed and Nour. Nour is in Grade 5 and I am in Grade 6. We came from Syria and have been in Canada for about 2 years. When we came to Canada, we were upset because we had to leave our nanas (grandmas) and jitos (grandpas), aunts, uncles, and cousins. It took us a long time to get here. We came on two planes, one bus, and one car to get to our new houses. (Mohamed) I feel so happy to be in Canada and I like Kelowna. (Nour) I was happy because another Syrian friend was on the plane with us and lives very close to me. (Mohamed) I came to Bankhead before Nour did, then she came some months later. We were a little nervous and uncomfortable, but everyone is very nice to us. (Mohamed) When I started to learn English, I felt bad because it was hard. I felt good when I learned English. It was easier to make friends because they could understand me. (Nour) I liked learning English it was a little hard but I am so happy to speak English and I get better and better. (Mohamed) We

think Bankhead is an awesome school, because the teachers are so nice and we are learning so fast! (Mohamed) I learn a lot of math, like multiplication. (Nour) I’ve learned so much about writing stories. (Nour) My Teacher Ms. Nittel is funny and awesome. (Mohamed) Mr. Batchelor is a good teacher and Mrs. Fedorchuk helps me with most of the things I learn in class. Mrs. Nanci is in the office and she is so nice. (Nour) All of the teachers at Bankhead are so nice. (Mohamed) Mrs. Fedorchuk, Ms. Nittel, and all the kids in my class think I am funny and I don’t know why I am so funny, haha. We are so happy to be in Canada. (Nour) Canada is so different from Syria. In Syria, you cannot watch whatever you want on TV. In Canada, we feel safe, there is no war. (Mohamed) I teach my teacher and my friends how to count in Arabic and say words. We like Bankhead Elementary very much. We would like to say thank you to the Canadian people and the people in Kelowna.

INTER SOCCER ACADEM W 8 Y 201

A M T R I O F N N I THURSDAYS – AGES 5 TO 7YRSO • Boys & Girls (2011-2013)

NOUR AND MOHAMED WITH MS. CATHY FEDORCHUK AND MS. KEIKO NITTEL at Bankhead Elementary.

Check with your school to find out how they will celebrate....

JAN 11TH TO MAR 15TH, 2018 • 4:00pm to 5:00pm

MONDAYS – AGES 8 & 9YRS • Boys & Girls (2009/2010) JAN 8TH TO MAR 12TH, 2018 • 3:30pm to 4:30pm CENTRAL OKANAGAN YOUTH SOCCER A

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THURSDAYS – AGES 10 TO 12YRS • Boys & Girls (2006-2008) JAN 11TH TO MAR 15TH, 2018 • 4:00pm to 5:00pm LOCATION: Valley First Soccer Center, Gordon Drive COST: $150 REGISTER: Online at kelownaunited.com • payable by cheque, e-transfer or credit card ACADEMY GEAR: Is needed (Jr Heat T-shirt, Black shorts & socks) can be purchased from KU (JH T-shirt-$15, Shorts-$20, socks-$10) paid by cash, cheque or e-transfer

February 21 2018 This year’s theme is RESILIENCE - order your t-shirt through School Cash online

Middle School Harmony Day Living Library Conference - January 30


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A Long-Standing Relationship Scott Parker, Principal, Glenrosa Middle

Constable Neil Bruce (CNB) and Glenrosa Middle School (GMS) share a special long-standing relationship with our sister school, Chubu University Haruhigaoka Junior High School in Kasugai, Japan. Each year, approximately 100 staff and grade 9 students from Japan come to West Kelowna to experience a bit of Canadian life in a homestay with students from the two schools.  This last November, four West Kelowna students traveled back to Japan on a special scholarship to experience a week of everyday life, Japanese-style!  Millie Rippon and Deston Giang (CNB), and Kaylene Eytcheson and Gavin Monro (GMS) spent a week living in a Haruhigaoka student’s home, traveling to school and attending classes with them.  During their stay in Japan, our Canadian students were particularly impressed with their visit to Nagoya Castle, a 500-year-old Castle from Japan’s Edo Period.  Gavin’s favourite experiences were eating at a sushi restaurant that served the sushi on a conveyor belt, and Kaylene remembers a fun night where the students went bowling and sang karaoke.

West Kelowna scholarship students from CNB and GMS inside the Nagoya Castle with fellow Japanese students.

Currently, both CNB and GMS are preparing for the annual Haruhigaoka Junior High School visit to Canada this February, and it will be a special occasion this year as all four of our scholarship students will be able to take a turn hosting their billets from Japan and showing their friends what a week in Canada is like. Gavin wants to show his billet how cold it is in Canada and how much fun we can still have outside, and Kaylene can’t wait to take her new friend to a hockey game.

Host families needed!

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Thanks to the relationship among Haruhigaoka Junior High (Japan), Glenrosa Middle, and Constable Neil Japan Bruce Middle, four students were able to participate in an exchange program in November. While in Japan, we created memories and friendships that will last forever. We were able to experience their culture and day-to-day life firsthand, while enjoying school activities. We felt fully immersed and accepted by our homestay families, and we truly hope that they enjoyed having us as much as we enjoyed staying there. It is a memory that we will never forget.

ABOUT...

GRADE 9

MILLIE RIPPON CO N S TA B L E N E I L BRUCE MIDDLE

Exchanging cultures

Sandi Van Den Heuvel, Parent, École Kelowna Secondary

Fantastic! Educational! Fun! Enriching! These words describe our experience with the Central Okanagan Public Schools Exchange Program with France. Our son Christopher, who attends Grade 11 at KSS, was matched with a student named Alexis from La Biolle, France. The administration did an excellent job pairing them because both boys are athletic, enjoy the sciences, and have similar personalities, so they connected right away. Alexis’ English was very strong so our ability to communicate with him was easy. Over the six weeks, looking at our Canadian culture through the eyes of a curious student gave us a fresh perspective. It was heartwarming to watch the joy on his face as he carved a pumpkin and decorated a gingerbread house for the first time. Activity highlights included spending a weekend in Vancouver, tobogganing at Big White, seeing a Rockets hockey game, and exploring the valley.

Christopher is very excited to start his journey in France between March – April, 2018. We know he will flourish and reap lifetime benefits absorbing the French culture. Personally, we would like to extend a special thank you to Central Okanagan Public Schools and Armelle Moran, French Immersion Consultant, for facilitating such an amazing experience for our students in both BC and France.

CHRISTOPHER:

At first I was hesitant about doing this exchange, but by the time Alexis arrived in Kelowna we had already become friends. If I were to rate it, I’d give it a 10 out of 10! I would definitely do this again if I get the opportunity. This experience was a great way to step out of my comfort zone.

ALEXIS:

I heard that Canadians are the nicest people in the world; it is now true for me! I already miss Canada. This was one of the best experiences of my life. I would like to thank you very much for everything you did for me, I will never forget!

Our popular program grows every year and we need more families to help welcome the world to our community. Discover how hosting an international student can enrich your family by visiting

www.internationaleducation.ca or call 250-470-3258

CHRISTOPHER (left) and ALEXIS get set to do a little building together.

By Jakob Bruce | Age:10 Host family compensation:

$800 /month

$900 as of Sept. 2018

Our students are from all over the world: Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Europe & Asia.

Together We Learn

continue walking. 10 minutes later. “Wait where did we come from?” Joe says. Joe and Keith look around unknowing of where they are. They continue walking although they are a little worried. There is no dirt trail back to the place.

The Bird Escape We will go to a forest near a beach in New Zealand. We meet Joe, he is a Kea and he is an alpine parrot that is intelligent and curious. Joe has a friend named Keith who is a yellow-eyed penguin who tends to get grumpy easily. They have one more friend named Josh, he is a kea who has green and purple mix feathers, a sharp beak, and is a little crazy.

They are lost. They spot a human going past so they run. They must hide from humans. The human does not see them. They find a small building and go inside. Josh is locked up in a cage. “Josh!” Joe yells. “Oh hey guys,” Josh says. Keith rams the cage but nothing happens and Keith falls over. Keith gets up. Joe stands silently questioning what just happened. Joe looks around for something useful. Joe spots a hammer and flies up to it and grabs the hammer then charges at the cage bashing it with the hammer creating a dent in the cage. Joe swings again creating a small hole in the dented area.

Central Okanagan Public Schools

Joe, Josh, and Keith are walking in the forest. Five minutes later, Josh suddenly speeds ahead leaving a cloud of dust behind him. “Well he’s gone,” Keith says. Joe and Keith

International Education

Excerpt from South Rutland Elementary’s book Animal Tales.

Once the hole is complete they trace their way back home. Josh decides to never run ahead again!


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I love learning all about Aboriginal history. I like learning about spirit animals and what the medicine wheel means to the whole world and me. We set up a medicine wheel in the center of our class and sat in ‘circle’, then we discussed where we think items belong and there wasn’t any wrong answers. That’s the part I love most about learning about Aboriginal culture: there are no wrong answers, it’s my own thoughts. I would normally have to write tests and write things down, but the way we learn about the medicine wheel is to discuss and share about it. I learn and remember it way better this way.

ABOUT...

Aboriginal History

GRADE 6

KEEGAN RENNIE R O S E VA L L E Y E L E M E N TA R Y

CHLOE CHAPPLE (left) AND JEWELL MCNAUGHT (Right)

A Place to Belong Chloe Chapple, Grade 11 student, Mount Boucherie Secondary My name is Chloe Chapple and I’m a Grade 11 student at Mount Boucherie Secondary (MBS). I am in my second year in the Academy of Indigenous Studies at MBS. I am Métis on my father’s side, from the Sioux Nation. I am the only one in my family who is cultural; because of that I never really knew anything about my ancestors. Since I didn’t know anything or practice any of my culture, I felt ashamed calling myself Aboriginal. I did not think I deserved that special title. Being in Aboriginal Leadership really helped me feel like I belong. We are like any other leadership class as we organize events, put up posters, and do activities in class to better our skills, but we practice our culture. We smudge,

we drum, and we sing. This class is like a second home to me. My classmates are like family. I believe I can do almost anything in this class. I’ve struggled with my past and I missed almost two months of school last year. When I came back to school I felt like I was lost. The tutors and advocates really helped me adjust my learning plan and get me back on track. I go to the Advocates for everything, whether it is a struggle or accomplishment; I feel safe telling them anything. The Academy of Indigenous Studies has helped me with so many things: catching up in school, dealing with personal issues and even finding myself. I feel like I belong here; I feel home.

The Best Choice I Have Made

Jewell Mcnaught, Grade 11 student, Mount Boucherie Secondary

My name is Jewell Mcnaught, born in Winnipeg and from the Sagkeeng Nation in Fort Alexander, Manitoba. I am a Grade 11 student in Mount Boucherie Secondary School’s Academy of Indigenous Studies, taking First People’s English and Contemporary Indigenous Studies. Aboriginal support has always been an important part of my life, whether it was needing someone to talk to, or needing help when I didn’t understand a concept. It wasn’t until Grade 7 that I began to understand my family’s story and that’s when it actually started to take effect on my everyday life. Without Aboriginal support, I would not have been able to overcome the hard situations I was experiencing. When I first came to Mount Boucherie Secondary, I had to adapt to a whole new school and leave my support team from my middle school, which meant starting over. After struggling with my mental health and being out of school for over a month at the

beginning of semester 2, it was all new classes. The Aboriginal Advocates and tutors helped me get through this tough situation by being supportive and understanding. Their room was always a place I could go to when class felt like too much. Joining Aboriginal Leadership was the best choice I made after being away. I’m glad Ms.Winacott convinced me to join. When I was growing up I never really connected with my culture, but when I joined Aboriginal Leadership it gave me the opportunity to learn and participate in traditional activities. My first day coming back, my biggest supports were my Aboriginal Advocates. They understood that I was struggling and gave me the time and support I needed to wean myself back into school. I am now attending every day, making healthy choices, and got a ‘work ethic’ award on my last report card. Without the support from the Academy of Indigenous Studies at Mount Boucherie Secondary, I wouldn’t be as successful as I am right now.

Plug into a career connecting the world N e t w o r k a n d Te l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s E n g i n e e r i n g Te c h n o l o g y IT employers seek Okanagan College graduates to ensure the lifelines of their communications systems are reliable and secure. We offer a two-year diploma program with a co-op work option that provides students with the skills and knowledge to design, implement, maintain, manage, secure and troubleshoot data communication systems.

To find out more, visit okanagan.bc.ca/nten


Creating a sense of belonging

Alexandra Kopas and Ava Halprin, Grade 7 students, OKM Secondary School The first day of Grade 7, we were introduced to our community leaders or, as other schools call them, our teachers. On this day, we were given a local indigenous animal that would represent our learning community. We are the Bald Eagles. There are seven other communities including the Black Bears, Kokanee Salmon, Deer, Fox, Painted Turtle, Dragonfly, and Grizzly Bears. We like the fact that we have local animals to represent us because then we feel more connected with our community and with our natural world. Our teachers are planning to have some Indigenous Elders visit and tell us some legends about our community animals. We think that will be really great. We also learn a lot about the Circle of Courage and developing the four traits of Kindness, Community,

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Mastery, and Independence in our lives at school and at home. We do many activities with the other learning communities. Sometimes it is for a special event, or sometimes on a Friday afternoon, we will play teambuilding games together. It makes school way more fun. We can make more friends in other communities and get to know more teachers. This truly makes us have a sense of belonging in our school. On the aspect of academics, it is constructive to have only two main teachers for our core classes.

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I love my choir because the teacher is talented and really knows how to teach. In my group, we always support each other and together, we sound amazing. The best part is that we will go together to Los Angeles and we get to sing in the most amazing places that you could ever dream of. When I sing, it helps me to forget everyday life for a moment. I get to learn new things and sing with the most wonderful friends.

ABOUT...

Choir

I N T E R N AT I O N A L S T U D E N T

VIIVI RÄTY

MOUNT BOUCHERIE S E CO N DA R Y S C H O O L

In conclusion, we enjoy our learning communities because it simplifies coming into Grade 7. We feel our teachers have helped us feel connected to our school and we look forward to the rest of our Grade 7 year.

H20 Field Trip

By Kaitlyn Sharman, Grade 6 student, Chief Tomat Elementary

When I was in third grade, I went on a field trip to H20 Adventure + Fitness Center. It has always been an important part of the grade three and four curriculum, and an exciting opportunity that all students in Central Okanagan Public Schools are privileged to experience. Amidst all the hustle and bustle of school work, students get to take three trips to the fitness center to sharpen their swimming skills. I believe that knowing how to swim is an important skill for all children, especially those living in a place such as the Okanagan, as we are surrounded by water. This field trip is a great opportunity for students to try something new, or for those who already know how to swim, a chance to practice and expand on those skills. As well as the fact that students need to know how to swim for safety reasons, swimming is also a quite enjoyable activity that many people tend to be fond of. Swimming is an activity that most people adore, and it is a life-long avocation that those who are introduced to early in life will grow to love for many years to come.

This string game activity promoted teamwork and communication between students at the beginning of the school year.

Central Okanagan Public Schools would like to acknowledge the contributions of The YMCA of Okanagan and the Across the Lake Swim Society in offering the Okanagan Swim Program to all Grade 3 and 4 students in Central Okanagan Public Schools. This program is provided with the mission to drown proof the Okanagan, by teaching our students lifesaving skills and techniques in three free swimming lessons at the Kelowna Family YMCA or H2O Adventure + Fitness Centre.

By Luka Lange | Age:10 Edmond the goose lives in a city park in the Netherlands. He has a friend named Big Mick the duck. They were out playing tag when Edmond the goose was hit by a car and had his foot ran over. Edmond starting honking because he was in pain. There was a woman walking by and she noticed the goose, so she brought the goose back to her car. Then she brought the goose to the doctors. The doctor said, “Take the goose for a week. After a week if its feeling better you can let it go.” The woman brought the goose and Big Mick to her farm. When they get to the farm they couldn’t play tag but they could play hide and go seek. Big Mick the duck and Edmond enjoyed riding the tractor and playing games together. They lived in the treehouse and had fun.

Edmond the Goose

After a week Edmond was feeling better and the woman brought them back to the park. Big Mick the Duck and Edmond were friends forever, and Edmund decided to only cross the street when there were no cars coming.

KMBA SPRING LEGENDS LEAGUE

is now open! Register at kelownamba.com Grade 1-9 Divisions boys/girls. Players in grades 10-12 are encouraged to form a team, find a coach, and enter into the club league. Basketball: team sport, good source of activity, clean dry and warm!

Excerpt from South Rutland Elementary’s book Animal Tales.

YOU WILL NEVER RIDE THE BENCH IN THIS LEAGUE!


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New CEA Program a Hit!

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Kathy Weninger, Principal, George Elliot Secondary

Kenna Schorn, a 2017 George Elliot/ Certified Education Assistant (CEA) graduate had these comments regarding the CEA program: “I really enjoyed it. The training

KENNA SCHORN

that we received was very helpful for understanding the needs of children in the school setting. I learned to be flexible and be able to adjust to different situations as they came up during the course of the school day”. When asked about the instruction of the program, Kenna said, “The teachers were very experienced and shared their expertise with us. They offered a lot of advice and provided many situations to think about when working with children. Our class time involved many classroom discussions on a variety of topics. We also completed projects at school and worked with classmates. I found the conversations to be very engaging and informative ”. For Central Okanagan Public Schools students, the CEA program includes a month long practicum in an elementary school setting. Kenna’s practicum was at North Glenmore Elementary School, where she worked with a Grade 1 class and a combined Grade 5/6 class. She reflected that when working with Grade 1 students, it involved more behavior and routine reinforcement. When Kenna worked with the older students’ she could really see when the students understood and made progress. “I really appreciated the opportunity to work with Grade 1 and Grade 5/6 students to see the difference between the younger and older students,” said Kenna. “During our class time, we were taught about being flexible and when I was in my practicum I could certainly understand why that is so important.” As someone who hopes to pursue a CEA career in her future, Kenna has the following words of advice for anyone thinking of taking the CEA program: “Take part in classroom discussions and do your best to be open and flexible.”

sd23.bc.ca

LOVE L E A R N I N G

I love learning about the culinary arts because I love cooking. I really like making something that other people can enjoy. The culinary arts program lets me earn hours and credits for graduation, and helps me prepare for a career as a chef.

Certified Education Assistant Program

Central Okanagan Public Schools has numerous dual credit programs available for students. One of the most recently added programs, the Certified Education Assistant (CEA) Program, is housed at George Elliot Secondary and is applicable for any student who looks to enter into a “helping” profession. This 20-week program takes place during semester 2 of the school year (late January to June) and is available to any District Grade 12 student who has completed English 12 and has in an interest in working with children. For more information on the District’s Dual Credit CEA program, please contact Career Programs Co-ordinator, Doug Meraw, at 250-870-5102 or 250-862-7151.

Youth Curling

Starts Saturday, January 13

A Great Dolphin Escape Hi there, my name is Danny Dolphin, I’m 15 years old. Today, I will tell you about the time I almost drowned. It was a sunny day and I was going for a swim. I saw Samantha at Starbucks. I bought the “fish fever”, and it tasted great. On my way to volleyball try outs, I saw Patrick flying around. I called, “Patrick, come here!” but he didn’t hear me. So I kept swimming. I tried my best at the try outs and they said that I

made the team! I was so happy, I went for a victory swim. I closed my eyes and did flips in the water. As I was swimming, I realized I couldn’t move. I screamed, “HELP ME!” but there was no answer. I kept trying to move, but was stuck. I sat there for a while. It seemed like hours but it was only a few minutes. I can only hold my breath for so long. I screamed again louder, “HELP ME!!” but again no answer. I could do nothing. Suddenly, I could see a shadow circling above me. At first, I thought it was a big bird, but it was only Patrick. It looked like he was heading to work. I yelled, “PATRICK!” He heard me. I was so happy, I yelled again, “PATRICK!” Patrick started coming. I saw Samantha walking by and I called to her and she heard me. I was so glad. Patrick found a sharp piece of coral and they cut me free. I swam out with such power. I could do flips again. I checked the time and I was going to be late. I swam as fast as I could. I was going to be really late. I swam faster. I made it just in time for my first volley ball game!

Excerpt from South Rutland Elementary’s book Animal Tales.

GRADE 12

R U T L A N D S E CO N DA R Y S C H O O L

Youth Learn & Curl

By Summer Routly | Age:10

Culinary Arts

TREVOR RASMUSON

Recently hired CEA, Desjaray Jackson, supports Grade 8 Dr. Knox Middle student, Coleton Jackson, with his socials class assignment.

Grade 10 Rutland Senior Secondary student, Marcel Bekker, working with recently hired CEA, Davis Reis in P.E. Class.

ABOUT...

Little Rocks and Juniors hit the ice Saturdays combining skill training with game play Ages 7-19

Saturdays

9:30 am-11 am

Make friends! Have fu n!

Middle/High School League Starts Tuesday, January 16

Tuesdays

4:00 pm-5:30 pm Must be in middle or high school and lessons given the first three weeks of the season. League play for the rest of the season. Ask about the Inter-Cit y League!

Family Fu n!

New Sunday Novice League | 1 pm start Visit our website to find our costs: www.kelownacurling.com

250-762-3112 or

info@kelownacurlingclub.com


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CENTRAL OKANAGAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

A HOW TO GUIDE FOR ONLINE ENROLLMENT

2018-2019 School Year (for Kindergarten, new students, and Schools of Choice for K – 12)

REGISTRATION OPENS - FEBRUARY 5, 2018 AT 7AM

IN YOUR WEB BROWSER TYPE:

https://enrollment.sd23.bc.ca NO INTERNET ACCESS? Go directly to a school on February 5, 2018 or later to complete the on-line application. Assistance will be provided. Applications will be assigned a date-time stamp on a first-come, first-served basis, which will factor into a student’s placement priority. Complete the on-line application as early as possible, and provide the required documents listed below directly to the school either in person or by email by Friday, March 16, 2018.

AFTER March 16, 2018 New in-catchment area enrollments: Parents will be notified by a confirmation email when the school has accepted the student’s application for enrollment. Board Policy 405R – Student Placement (Regulations), will be used to determine student placement and priority. New out-of-catchment area enrollments: Parents may not be notified until after the summer enrollment period (August 28-30, 2018) is over and all in-catchment area students have been placed.

WHAT WILL YOU NEED? BIRTH CERTIFICATE or other government issued proof of age and citizenship

PROOF OF B.C. RESIDENCY • BC driver’s license of parent/legal guardian AND • BC CARE card of parent/legal guardian OR • Other supporting documentation:

http://www.sd23.bc.ca/DistrictInfo/schoolenrollment/ PROOF OF STUDENT’S LIVING ADDRESS • Property ownership, lease or rental agreement OR recent utility bill

Qualifying age: The School Act requires that a child must be five years of age by December 31, 2018 to qualify for school enrollment in September 2018. No exceptions. For further information, please visit the School District website: www.sd23.bc.ca or call 250-860-8888

WHERE DO I FIND THE LINK TO REGISTER ONLINE? Go to any District school site and click on the Student Enrollment Information link.

OR type https://enrollment.sd23.bc.ca into your browser. We recommend that you use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox. We do not recommend that you try to complete an application on a smartphone or tablet. HOW DO I KNOW WHAT SCHOOL I SHOULD CHOOSE? You can find out what your catchment school is by entering your address into the Catchment School Locator. Find this link on any school homepage under Quick Links near the bottom of the page. This will give you a list of schools which are your catchment schools for elementary, middle and secondary. You may have several elementary schools to choose from or only one depending on the area you live. You will need to provide a first and second choice.

WHAT IF I WOULD LIKE TO CHOOSE A SCHOOL THAT IS NOT MY CATCHMENT SCHOOL?

The District allows parents to apply to schools outside of their catchment area, however, there are a few things to consider. Catchment area students will receive priority according to District policy. Available spaces may be given to an out of catchment student, however these spaces will only be given out after the Summer Enrollment Application Period (August 28-30, 2018). This means you may not know if you will have a space for your child in the out of catchment school until the first week of school in September. It is recommended that if you choose an out of catchment school as your first choice that your second or third choice be your catchment area school.

WHEN WILL I KNOW IF MY CHILD HAS BEEN ACCEPTED TO MY FIRST CHOICE SCHOOL?

If your first choice school is your catchment area school, you will find out in April 2018 if your child has been accepted or if they have been placed on a waiting list.

I ALREADY HAVE A CHILD IN THE SCHOOL. DO I STILL NEED TO REGISTER MY YOUNGER CHILD FOR KINDERGARTEN?

Yes, don’t forget to do this. Priority will be given to students with siblings in the school. However, if you do not register during the early registration period, you may lose this priority.


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STRONGSTART CENTRES

CENTRAL OKANAGAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS STRONGSTART CENTRES

StrongStart

is a free drop-in family/caregiver participation early learning program for children birth to 5 years (or prior to kindergarten entry).

StrongStart

welcomes all children and families into a culturally safe and inclusive environment. Our centres are a place for partnerships between family and schools, and support transition to kindergarten.

A.S. MATHESON ELEMENTARY 2090 Gordon Drive • 250-870-5112 8:45am - 11:45am Monday - Friday

RAYMER ELEMENTARY

At StrongStart We Believe That:

657 Raymer Avenue • 250-870-5125 8:45am - 11:45am Monday - Friday

• Families are their children’s first and most influential teachers.

PEARSON ROAD ELEMENTARY

• Children learn through play.

700 Pearson Road • 250-870-5118 8:45am - 11:45am Monday - Friday

• Children and their families/caregivers are unique and deserve to be treated with respect and dignity.

SOUTH RUTLAND ELEMENTARY

• Physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and communication/language development are all important to the development of the whole child.

200 Mallach Road • 250-870-5113 8:45am - 11:45am Monday - Friday

• Children need a variety of experiences to explore and express themselves.

ÉCOLE GEORGE PRINGLE ELEMENTARY 3770 Elliot Road • 250-870-5103 8:45am - 11:45am Monday - Friday

• Our Centres are a place for partnerships between families and schools, and support transition to kindergarten.

HUDSON ROAD ELEMENTARY 1221 Hudson Road • 250-870-5141 8:45am - 11:45am Monday - Friday

ÉCOLE PETER GREER ELEMENTARY

StrongStart

10300 Sherman Road • 250-870-5129 8:45am - 11:45am Monday - Friday

REGISTRATION

PEACHLAND ELEMENTARY 5486 Clements Cres. • 250-870-5122 8:45am - 11:45am Monday - Friday

You may register throughout the year at any of our centres. Please bring along one of these required legal documents for your child/children to assist in registering:

• Canadian Birth Certificate • Canadian Passport • Aboriginal Status Card • Certificate of Canadian Citizenship For families that do not have Canadian citizenship identification or any valid identification for their child, please contact the Central Okanagan Public Schools’ Welcome Centre at 250-470-3258 for assistance with registering.

French Immersion Information Kindergarten 2018

Parents interested in the French Immersion program for Kindergarten students were recently invited to attend open houses at schools of their choice. Please contact the school of your choice if you were unable to attend the open house, and would like further information.

Bonjour!

Comment ça va?

Bonjour!

Salut!

École Glenmore Elementary

250-870-5136

École Belgo Elementary

250-870-5115

École Casorso Elementary

250-870-5135

École George Pringle Elementary

250-870-5103

École Dorothea Walker Elementary

250-870-5138

École Peter Greer Elementary

250-870-5129

For more information, please contact any of the schools listed above or call 250-470-3227. On-line registration for the 2018-2019 school year begins on Monday, February 5th at 7:00am. Central Okanagan Public School Website: www.sd23.bc.ca


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DUAL CREDIT PROGRAMS & REGISTRATION INFORMATION WHAT IS DUAL CREDIT? Dual credit opportunities are available to all secondary students in the District. These options give students a competitive advantage in the work force by allowing our students access to post-secondary training while still in high school. Credits are earned in both the secondary and post-secondary systems.

WHEN CAN I START?

PARTIAL & FULL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE FOR ALL PROGAMS: Students can apply to these programs in Grade 10 or 11 and start them in Grade 11 or 12 (depending on the program). Students can begin their trades training program in their Grade 12 year. Apprenticeships (ITA Youth Work) can begin as early as Grade 10 and continue past their Grade 12 year as long as they are school-aged as required by the Ministry of Education. In all cases, dual credit students must be school-aged as per the Ministry of Education requirements in order to receive tuition funding for post-secondary trades training.

HOW TO APPLY:

FOR THESE PROGRAMS AND RECEIVE TUITION SCHOLARSHIP: 1. Contact the Career/Life Programs Coordinator at your school and pick up an application package. 2. Complete the District Dual Credit Application Package and hand it in at your school’s Career Center.

SCHOOL SUPPORTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

• Counsellors • Resource Teachers • Learning Assistant Teachers

MIDDLE SCHOOL

• Counsellors • Resource Teachers • Learning Assistant Teachers • Behaviour Intervention Teachers

SECONDARY SCHOOL

• Counsellors • Resource Teachers • Learning Assistant Teachers • Behaviour Intervention Teachers

DISTRICT SUPPORTS

3. Successfully interview with a Dual Credit Coordinator.

• Learning Disability Teachers

4. Once you are accepted into the program, you must pay a deposit to hold your spot ($200 for OC or $250 for BCIT).

• Physiotherapist and/or Occupational Therapists

LIST OF DUAL CREDIT PROGRAMS:

• Low Incident Resource Teachers

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT THE DUAL CREDIT PROGRAM WEBSITE: HTTP://WWW.CAREERLIFEPROGRAMS.COM/DUAL-CREDIT-OPPORTUNITTIES.HTML • Apprenticeship Work (ITA Youth Work) • Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Mechanics) • Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Structures) • Automotive Collision Repair Technician • Automotive Refinishing Prep Technician

• Auto Service Technician • Computer Information Systems Administration (Advanced Placement)

• Electricity and Industrial Electronics (construction electrician)

• Plumbing & Piping

• Emergency Medical Responder

• Refrigeration and

• Culinary Arts (OC)

• Firefighting

• Culinary Arts (MBSS)

• Utility Arborist (Forestry)

• Education Assistant • Heavy Mechanical Trades • Electrician (construction electrician)

Trades • Recreational Vehicle Technician

AC Mechanic • Residential Construction

• Speech and Language Pathologists • Vision Teachers • Hearing Resource Teachers • Psychologists • Gifted Support Teachers • Kindergarten Transition Support Teachers

(Carpentry)

• Hairstylist

• Sheet Metal

• Health Care Assistant

• Trades Sampler

• Heavy Duty Mechanics

• Autism Support Teachers

• Welding • Carpentry / Joinery

eSchoolBC: Distributed Learning Programs eSchoolBC is a Distributed Learning Program (formerly known as Distance Learning) within Central Okanagan Public Schools. We are able to offer students flexible schedules while sustaining access to teaching and learning opportunities provided by public school teachers.

OUR PROGRAMS WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE:

BLENDED INTERMEDIATE (GR.4/5) BLENDED MIDDLE (GR. 6-9)

We use a Blended Learning model, where students work from home as well as in person and virtually as a part of our regular program. This includes scheduled instruction online, with broadcast virtual lessons. It also includes weekly in-person activities such as robotics, coding, visual arts, drama and outdoor education activities, to name a few.

BLENDED SECONDARY (GR. 10)

This is a synchronous model of learning, where students participate within a community of gradegrouped learners.

DISTRIBUTED LEARNING (GR. 10-12)

Full-time or part-time students work at their own pace online (asynchronously). Many of our students are cross-enrolled with local schools. Students have regular access to teacher support either by phone, video conference, email, or in person. Each of our secondary schools also has a local eSchoolBC teacher contact for additional school-based support.

ADULTS (GRADUATED AND UNGRADUATED)

Courses are free for residents of BC and count fully towards graduation and university/college prerequisites.

Please visit www.eschoolbc.com to learn more about our programs and for registration information.


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DISTRICT ACADEMIES - REGISTRATION INFORMATION MIDDLE SCHOOLS

Constable Neil Bruce Middle (CNB) Dr. Knox Middle (DRK) OUTDOOR EDUCATION ACADEMY

Offered: All year to Grade 9 students only Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 2, 2018 How to Register: Must be registered at CNB to apply. Comes out with Course Selection booklets. Program Information:  Tony Cescon Cost: $320

SOCCER ACADEMY

GOLF ACADEMY

Offered: All year to Grade 9 students only Registration Date(s): Thursday, February 7, 2018 to Monday, February 19, 2018 (course selection) How to Register: Course selection and application forms at office Program Information: Dave Roberts Cost: $300

Offered: All year to Grade 8 and 9 students Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 2, 2018 How to Register: Must be registered at CNB to apply. Comes out with Course Selection booklets. Program Information: Emily Verstraete Cost: $220

Offered: All year to Grade 8 students only Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 16, 2018 How to Register: Must be registered at SMS. Application Process. Program Information: Al Aeckersberg and Ryan Taylor Cost: $225

Offered: All year Eligibility: Grade 8 & 9 students Registration Date(s): Thursday, February 1, 2018 to Friday, March 16, 2018 How to Register: Go to http://klohcsa.weebly.com/onlineapplication.html Contact: Sebastien Valois and Dan Ruggiero Cost: $1100

Rutland Middle (RMS)

CURRENTLY, RMS DOES NOT HOST ANY ACADEMIES.

SECONDARY SCHOOLS

George Elliot Secondary (GES)

Mount Boucherie Secondary (MBSS)

Offered: Second Semester Registration Date(s): Register by March 16, 2018 How to Register: Please contact George Elliot Secondary School Contact: Tim Frechette

Offered: First Semester Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 16, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.mbs.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs/ Courses, select Course Offerings Program Information: John McParland • Cost: $150

SOCCER ACADEMY

Offered: Second Semester Registration Date(s): Register by March 16, 2018 How to Register: Please contact George Elliot Secondary School Contact: Dan Vicaretti Cost: $350.00 with a $100.00 deposit due in March

Okanagan Mission Secondary (OKM)

SWIM ACADEMY

Offered: Both semesters Registration Date(s): Deadline for application is March 9, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.okm.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs & Services select Sport Academies Program Information: Sarah Sinclair Cost: $550

HOCKEY CANADA SKILLS ACADEMY

Offered: Both semesters Registration Date(s): Deadline for application is March 9, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.okm.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs & Services select Sport Academies Program Information: Kurt Corman and Dan Ruggiero Cost: $1100

ADVANCED HOCKEY CANADA SKILLS ACADEMY

Offered: Both semesters Registration Date(s): Deadline for application is March 9, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.okm.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs & Services select Sport Academies Program Information: Kurt Corman and Dan Ruggiero Cost: $2300

SOCCER ACADEMY

Offered: Both semesters for grade 7/8, Second semester for grade 9-12 Registration Date(s): Deadline for application is March 9, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.okm.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs & Services select Sport Academies Program Information: Blain Wright Cost: $550

GOLF ACADEMY

Offered: Second Semester Registration Date(s): Deadline for application March 9, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.okm.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs & Services select Sport Academies Program Information: Paul Janke Cost: $975

Offered: Full year course (grades 7, 8, 9) Registration Date(s): A mandatory parent information meeting is held prior to Spring Break (applications are date stamped that night) How to Register: Course selection forms at office and online (mandatory registration meeting held in late Feb/early March -- date TBA) Contact: Brent Hayter and Kailee Ryan Cost: $1600

OUTDOOR EDUCATION ACADEMY

HOCKEY CANADA SKILLS ACADEMY

Cost: $550.00 with $100.00 deposit due in March

HOCKEY CANADA SKILLS ACADEMY

Springvalley Middle (SMS)

KLO Middle (KLO)

GOLF ACADEMY

Glenrosa Middle (GMS)

Rutland Senior Secondary (RSS)

CULINARY ARTS

BASEBALL ACADEMY

HAIRDRESSING ACADEMY

SOCCER ACADEMY

Offered: Full Year Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 16, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.mbs.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs/ Courses, select Course Offerings Program Information: Barb Butler/Maurita Graham • Cost: $850

FIRE ACADEMY

Offered: First Semester Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 16, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.mbs.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs/ Courses, select Course Offerings Program Information: David Marks • Cost: $300

BASEBALL ACADEMY

Offered: Full Year Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 16, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.mbs.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs/ Courses, select Course Offerings Program Information: Robert Tonsaker • Cost: $130

Offered: 1st semester Registration Date(s): Deadline for application is March 16, 2018 How to Register: http://rssbaseballacademy.weebly.com/ Program Information: Dan Ruggiero Cost: $1200 Offered: Both semesters (subject to student demand) Registration Date(s): Tuesday, February 13, 2018 to Friday, March 16, 2018 How to Register: Course selection and application forms at office Program Information: Darryl Smith Cost: $550

HOCKEY CANADA SKILLS ACADEMY

Offered: 1st semester Registration Date(s): Deadline for application is March 16, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.cohockeyskills.ca Program Information: Dan Ruggiero Cost: $1000

Kelowna Secondary (KSS)

CURRENTLY, KSS DOES NOT HOST ANY ACADEMIES.

SOCCER ACADEMY

Offered: First Semester Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 16, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.mbs.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs/ Courses, select Course Offerings Program Information: Jessica Briker • Cost: $200

GOLF ACADEMY

Offered: Full Year Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 16, 2018 How to Register: Go to www.mbs.sd23.bc.ca, at Programs/ Courses, select Course Offerings Program Information: Gordon McGarva • Cost: $150-$375 

HOCKEY CANADA SKILLS ACADEMY

Offered: Second Semester Registration Date(s): Application deadline is March 16, 2018 (limited seats available) How to Register: Go to http://mbsshcsa.weebly.com/ Program Information: Tom Nagy and Dan Ruggiero • Cost: $850

ACADEMY OF INDIGENOUS STUDIES

Offered: Full Year Please contact Ms. Winacott for further information: kyla. winacott@sd23.bc.ca

FINANCIAL HARDSHIP All District academies are equity-based programs and access to students who cannot meet the costs of the program will be provided. As per Board Policy 425R, “a student will not be excluded from any education program due to financial hardship”. Where there are financial challenges, parents are asked to contact the principal directly to ensure confidentiality.


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I

LOVE L E A R N I N G

I enjoy being in hockey academy because it Hockey helps me grow as a person, as a student, Academy and as an athlete. At the start of the year, every student in class sets three goals each for academic, athletic, and personal growth. These goals really help me assess how I am doing. The academy gives me a chance to show leadership on and off the ice. I always make sure I’m paying attention in all classes, and hockey academy also helps me do that.

ABOUT...

GRADE 8

WILSON MAXFIELD

Paving the Way to a Dressed for success New Career GLENROSA MIDDLE SCHOOL

Aaron Paul, Grade 12 student, Rutland Secondary In this course I learned many skills including falling trees with chainsaws, climbing, and work My favorite safety, as well as learning how to part of this deal with work life course was and how to be a the firefighter part of a team. This training we did course is more than to earn our S100 just a program that Fire Prevention Rutland Secondary Certificate. School offers, it’s Aaron Paul an experience that makes every day Grade 12 Student a field study and paves the way to a new career as a utility arborist or beyond to postsecondary training. My favorite part of this course was the firefighter training we did to earn our S100 Fire Prevention Certificate. We had to race to attach hoses and get pumps working. When I first signed up for this course, I expected it to be like any other course I had taken, with maybe a little more exercise, but in the end it changed my entire outlook on what it means to work and to appreciate the rewards you get for doing what needs to be done. This course would be completely impossible without the guidance of the teachers. When I had difficulties learning what I needed to learn to work safely and efficiently, Mr. Kolkind and Mr. Herbison found the time to walk everyone through what was needed step by step. I hope every future member of this course gets the same experience, if not a greater one.

A Tale of Friendship Hi there, my name is Pecks. I live in Australia with my friend Bill. He’s a platypus and I’m a pukeko. I love going to work everyday with Bill because he makes the long shifts workable! He’s always there for a warm hug! Well, not that warm, but still they’re good. Today is his last day in this part of Australia. He’s moving to Outback because the sport store we work at offered him a better position, and he took it. So I’m going to see him right now to say good-bye. I got to his house and sighed heavily when I saw the suitcases we built together last year, outside his door. Bill walked outside. “Hi Pecks,” Bill shouted. “I’m so nervous.” “Don’t be! You will do great!” encouraged Pecks. “But wait,” said Pecks, “I have to talk to you about your

AARON PAUL

By Ashlyn Swan | Age:10 trip. I’m going to miss you a lot, so I made a friendship book. It has all the great adventures we had when we were little.” “Pecks”, said Bill, “I don’t want to go. I’m going to call off the trip. Besides, there’s no cell service and no Dairy Queens!” Pecks said, “Bill, you don’t have to.” Bill said, “I know, but I want to. Besides, we’ll be able to hang out together. Well, I’ll see you in a bit.” As Pecks walked away he spoke to his boss on the phone and asked if Bill could get a massive raise. The boss said, “Yes, what position?” Pecks said, “He was offered the position of a manager. So could he get that?” The boss said, “Well, OK then. What are you doing standing around? Go and tell him the good news!” So Pecks set off to Bill’s house. When he got to the door, Pecks shouted, “Bill! Get out! I need to talk to you about your job!” Bill walked out. “Bill!!” Pecks screeched, “I got you a job as manager here!” “No way,” said Bill. “I can’t believe it! That was the story of their friendship!

Skye Docksteader, Grade 12 student, Mount Boucherie Secondary

I am a student in the hairdressing academy at Mount Boucherie Secondary School. This program teaches you the fundamentals of being a hairstylist. It is composed of theory and hands-on skills – 75% of the course is hands-on training. We learn the importance of sanitation in a salon, as well as the makeup of the hair strand. We also learn the importance of customer service and how to deal with clients in the best way possible so they leave your salon content and happy. We are taught how to cut and style both men and women’s hair. We also learn how to use various chemical treatments and styling products for each client. The reason this course interested me is because it supplied me with numerous opportunities and good training for the work environment. This course allows you to graduate high school with a trade and the ability to be hired in a salon as a stylist. I have already been hired as a hairstylist apprentice in my work experience salon after only 3 months of placement. Upon completion of 3600 work hours, you have the opportunity to challenge

the Red Seal test. Being certified as a Red Seal hairstylist allows you to be able to work anywhere in Canada and you will be recognized as a highly trained hairstylist. This program supplies you with many different options for career choices such as wedding hairstylist, colour specialist, wig specialist, or even working on a cruise ship.

SKYE DOCKSTEADER

Baby not sleeping well? Toddler won’t stay in bed? I can help. Call me for a free 15 minute consultation. Servicing Lake Country, Kelowna, Vernon and areas Jessica Bennett |Sleep Coach

Upon a Dream Sleep Consulting

250-870-7991

Excerpt from South Rutland Elementary’s book Animal Tales.

jessica@uponadream.ca www.uponadream.ca


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SOCIAL JUSTICE

sd23.bc.ca

POETS

Grade 6 students at École Casorso Elementary researched social issues and had some strong feelings about what they learned. They expressed these feelings through poetry and put together a book featuring original poetry and artwork called Poetry from the Heart. The class also researched charities to which they could donate proceeds from the sale of the book, and decided to contribute to the JoeAnna’s House project at Kelowna General Hospital.

INTERVIEWS

MR. BEAUDRY INTERVIEWED A FEW OF HIS GRADE 6 STUDENTS ABOUT THE PROJECT:

Q: WHY DID YOU FEEL YOUR SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUE WAS AN IMPORTANT ISSUE TO ADDRESS?

ABIGAIL

(TOPIC: WAR): I wanted people nowadays to realize the conditions of war and how it impacted others. Also, to bring awareness to others the price that was paid for our freedom, and to help people understand it wasn’t just grown men fighting, it was children too. A child soldier can be anybody under the age of 18 and both boys and girls. I think people need to realize war isn’t always the answer.

Q: AS A SOCIETY, HOW CAN WE OVERCOME YOUR SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUE?

SOPHIE

(TOPIC: CYBERBULLYING): As a society, we can work to overcome cyberbullying by simply standing up for them. Bullying will always be around, but if we can stand up for others we can keep the bullies at bay.

Q: HOW DOES YOUR SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUE AFFECT OUR COMMUNITY AND SOCIETY?

ELLA

(TOPIC: GENDER INEQUALITY): A common type of gender inequality is women being paid less than men, no matter how hard they work. Another common form of gender inequality is the stereotype that boys are stronger than girls, just because they are boys. Gender inequality affects women everywhere. It makes women feel weak, “less than”, unwanted, angry, helpless, and undervalued.

Q: WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO DONATE TO JOEANNA’S HOUSE, AND HOW WILL JOEANNA’S HOUSE IMPACT OUR COMMUNITY?

SOPHIA Last year, someone I know was diagnosed with cancer. He and his family had to move to Vancouver for almost half a year. JoeAnna’s House is very similar to the Ronald McDonald House offering shelter, food, school, friends, counselling etc. This makes it so no one who needs a place to live while their loved ones are in the children’s hospital has to go to Vancouver or pay expensive prices to live at a hotel.

Social Justice at SMS

Jolina Cosar & Amber Emrich, Grade 8 students, Springvalley Middle (SMS)

Grade 8 SMS students get to know seniors in their community

Social Justice at SMS is where we better our community and our world. Anybody can join the Social Justice group. Our main goal is to focus on our community and its people. Each year we collaborate with the senior’s center and invite their seniors to join us for an afternoon tea. We had live music by our band and a group of students to serve treats, coffee and tea. The event was an extreme success! It helped us get to know our community’s seniors and for them to understand our generation

more. We told them our stories and in return, they told us theirs. By the end of the tea, we all felt that we had made new friends. We had one more thing in store for the seniors: homemade cards! Our Social Justice group made the cards for the senior guests. After the seniors had looked at their cards, we said our goodbyes. Then we walked them to their taxis. Our students were happy that they got to meet the seniors group. None of the Social Justice kids will forget this experience.


JANUARY 2018

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Building a future

Students in the Gateway program at Central School are learning the real value of their skills as they build and sell a variety of furniture items. Together We Learn caught up with young artisan Dallas Zackodnik, Grade 8, at the Central School woodshop. Tell me a little bit about CentralWorx. CentralWorx is a place where students can build items that get sold, and the students earn a percentage of the profits. What have you learned from the project? Mostly how to build – good building tips, how to use lots of saws and other machines, lots of safety. I’ve also learned how to design things better. What do you like most about it? Probably building and making cash. Is there a specific item you like to build? My favorite thing to build is wine crates. They’re popular and easy to build. Did you learn anything about yourself? That I could actually build good stuff – solid things that would stay together. It’s made me more confident in my skills. It’s also taught me to be more open-minded about what I can do. Has this experience changed your career plans? Carpentry seems like a good job option now since now I know how to do stuff. Like before I got here I would probably say no to being a carpenter because I wasn’t sure how to use machines and stuff and I wasn’t that good of a builder, but now it’s something that I think I can do. What do you want the community to know about CentralWorx? I think the community should know that a student builds 99% of everything we sell. You can find the beautiful and affordable furniture products Central School Gateway students create on their website at http://centralworx.weebly.com/

Amicia at SMS

Grace Mallette & Hope Wellings, Grade 8 students, Springvalley Middle Amicia is a student leadership program that started at RMS as a support system for young girls in grades 6-8. Amicia creates a happy environment, which all girls are welcome to join. The group’s goals are to empower girls to make safe decisions, respect each other and for them to be proud of being a girl. In Amicia, we talk about self-esteem, how to love and respect yourself. We also talk about healthy and nonhealthy relationships of all kinds. We

talk about the many different things that separate us from each other and fully support our differences. In Amicia, we build community in our schools and teach different skills we could use in our future. The girls talk a lot about strengthening mind, body and spirit. We learn ways to cope with mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, stress, etc. In Amicia, all girls are welcome to join and accepted in this amazing support group.

(Amicia was created by RSS graduate, Kelty Slaney)

ME 2 WE at CNB ME 2 WE Tree won second place overall at Mission Hill Winery’s Festival of Trees!!! The event raised $35,000 in total for BC Children’s Hospital! Congratulations to Alexandra Whitt, Jayda Dalgleish, Sydney Benner, Chloe Bikow, Kenedi Woodcox and Abby Schwab for their amazing work and for contributing to the community.

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This is how we do it Chloe Pulfer-Rempel and Jaxson Livingston, Grade 3 students, Oyama Traditional School

First, we needed to measure and saw each piece of wood for the box. Next, we sanded each piece and nailed them together at the workshop table. Then, we dyed the boxes with coffee, tea, and a stain made out of walnuts. Then the teacher wrote our names on the boxes and we put our books inside. We really enjoyed making these boxes as part of our learning.


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JANUARY 2018

Learning to be a good human

Keneisha Charles, Grade 12 student, Rutland Senior Secondary Nelson Mandela once said, “people must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.” Our world today is steeped in so much negativity and these words

or physical disabilities and all of our cultural, religious, gender, and sexual orientation minorities. It was student leaders that created our mental health awareness group ‘Lifesavers’ and have planned an annual mental health week and school-wide assembly since. It was

I

sd23.bc.ca

LOVE L E A R N I N G

ABOUT...

I love learning about puppies in Genius my Genius Hour. Genius Hour is Hour when I get to choose my own topic to research (I’m doing puppies), make a presentation and show the class what I learned. I hope I get to do more Genius Hours and I can come up with other ideas to learn! GRADE 6

SHAINNA VERMETTE PEACHLAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

21st century learners Nolan Koblischke, Grade 11 student, George Elliot Secondary and Tiana Calao, Grade 12 student, École Kelowna Secondary

KENEISHA CHARLES

helps a resident of Fernbrae Manor plant flowers in a raised garden bed that RSS students built for the seniors’ home. are more important now than ever. Just as Mandela states, it begins with education. Social-emotional learning to me means figuring out how to be a good human; which is hard, because it’s not something you can really read in a book, or watch in a TED Talk. It’s something gained from experiences— social experiences—which is difficult because being social can take you out of your comfort zone. That’s why it is so important for social-emotional learning to be immersed in our school environments and for youth to be the leaders in this. At my school, Rutland Senior Secondary, we’ve seen that when students take the lead, true social-emotional growth is achieved. It was student leaders that began making our school more inclusive through the creation of our Diversity Club, a group dedicated to creating a safe space for our students with mental

student leaders that took the initiative to mentor middle school students with the Amicia Girls female empowerment program and the Beyond the Hurt antibullying program. All of these groups and programs are for youth by youth. Through this personal, collaborative method, we’ve achieved those “aha moments”. From receiving over a hundred signatures on our diversity pledge to having a gym filled with over three hundred students pulling out their mobile flashlights and singing along during our mental health assembly, we’ve seen true growth. We’ve helped youth learn to love themselves and others around them. And it is when we are connected together that we can affect true change in our communities and beyond. It is this that will be remembered long after they graduate. This is the legacy of social-emotional learning.

Digital device usage in schools has been a highly discussed topic for quite some time, and our District seems to be making progressive steps to support the educational use of technology because we can all agree that it’s going to be here for quite some time. In our view, the pros outweigh the cons when it comes to phones and tablets in a classroom. Such devices are already used frequently in most classes for things such as fun class-wide online quizzes on Kahoot, or Quizlet, or checking your grade and seeing what assignments you still need to hand in on FreshGrade. “I really like Kahoot and Quizlet, it’s a fun way to get us engaged in learning.” says Julia Paulson, Grade 11 student at GESS. Technology progresses rapidly and it would be a terrible mistake to just ban it outright; our District is making the right choice by embracing the large-scale adoption of digital devices instead of banning them.

With these devices, students now have access to a multitude of new tools to help with their learning. Before, when you were assigned a project to do, you would grab a pencil and paper, and write the set amount of lines; we hated it and I’m pretty sure everyone else did too! Now, with the wonderful help of technology, we can make a slideshow on Google Slides, type out our project as a group on Google Docs, or even make a video talking about the topic with a phone camera. At the end, we can upload directly to the teacher through FreshGrade or Google Classroom! Technology in the classroom helps our students use all the resources available and makes completing assignments much easier. To be a 21st century learner, as our District wants us to be, we need to be able to adapt to the future. Technology is our future and having it available in a classroom will help our students learn to the best of their ability.

By Cadence Quigley | Age:10

The Decision In a castle, “La Hog”, in the middle of nowhere, there lives a pleasing groundhog named Caden. He also lives with his two BFF’S, Showie the great horned owl, and Voonsa the chipmunk. Every day after lunch they go to the Furry Park (for animals, because it has lots of trees and places to play catch with his friends, and don’t forget - an actual playground). One day they are playing truth or dare at the park. “It’s Caden’s turn, “shrieked Voonsa. “I’m chicken…truth! Wait…Ok truth,” supposed

Caden. “Have you ever wanted to be a female hog?” tests Showie. Caden mumbled than ran away. “Get him!” bawled Showie. They catch his furry arms. “Gah! Fine I’ll tell you, yes,” stutters Caden. “Oh my hog, really!” screamed Voonsa. “Let’s just go home,” stutters Caden. He flops on the couch. “How am I going to tell my parents?” Caden tests himself. A few months later…Caden has planned and has tried as many ways as hog possible. But there is one thing he has not tried, going up to his parents’ furry little faces and telling them about his secret. Finally, Caden sits down with his parents. First he has to ask them some questions such as: Should I grow my hair out? Did you want me to be a girl when I was born? Finally he says in a weak voice, “Can I be a girl?” Caden’s parents hesitate, “How! We will have to do so much! But, you are worth it.” A month later Caden is a girl. She is on the women’s team, has longer hair, and has Caden’s name changed to Cadenza! Oh and Cadenza’s friends accept her choice, and they became even better friends! All worked out well! The end!

Excerpt from South Rutland Elementary’s book Animal Tales.

GESS Students playing Kahoot, an online quiz game, in French class. RYLAN DANIELS , Grade 10, uses his phone to do research as he types up the project on his laptop.


JANUARY 2018

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INNOVATION GENERATION CHALLENGE The Innovation Generation Challenge connects budding young entrepreneurs with the marketplace in a way never seen before. By connecting young entrepreneurs with community business members, we’re uncovering the next breed of business gurus in the Central Okanagan! The iGen challenge is for Grade 7-12 students who want exposure to mentors and learning in innovative sectors of our local economy. The students gain access to mentors from local businesses to help them find innovative solutions to real world problems (UN Sustainability Goals). The iGen Challenge guides students through a start-up process to create companies and pitch their ideas to members of the innovation ecosystem in Kelowna. Many young entrepreneurial minds in Central Okanagan Public Schools need coaching, mentorship and opportunity to innovate: the iGen challenge was created to meet this need. 

iGen Challenge

Grade 7-12 students register at www.igc23.com

Step 1 – Register Step 2 - Orientation

Participants will develop their entrepreneurial skills, and learn the fundamentals of starting a business. Students will create teams and jointly develop a business concept over a period of a few weeks.

Step 3 – Community Mentorship

Participants receive guidance & feedback from local business mentors and industry experts on their business concept.

Step 4 – Video Pitch

Teams create a 1-2 minute video pitch and upload it to YouTube. The top 10 teams will be determined by a combination of video subscriptions (40%) and community business panel evaluation (60%). The top 10 teams will create a crowdsourcing initiative (i.e. GoFundMe )

Step 5 - Crowdsourcing Step 6 – Live Pitch

The top 10 teams will present to a panel of local community business professionals.

Step 7 – Live Pitch

The top 5 teams will present their pitches at the Jr. Metabridge event which is open to family, community, and business members from the Okanagan Valley to Silicon Valley!

By Teyla Larsen | Age:10

The Friends Adventure in Time In New Zealand, two young fur seals were swimming down the lake. Their names were Bob and Rob. But Rob wanted to move to the USA. Bob wanted to move to Canada. So they decided to split up. When they got to the USA, to drop off Rob, they found out that he can’t move there. So Bob said, “You can move with me!” When they got to Canada, they were not allowed to get in. So they decided to go back to New Zealand and build a time machine. On the way to New Zealand, they got lost but they found an old friend named Jon. He was looking

for them because everybody was worried about them. They followed Jon back to New Zealand and said, “Hi,” to everybody but after that, they started building a waterproof cover and the time machine. When they finished, they thought that they weren’t able to get it to work they went outside and saw themselves when they were one year old. “Yes it works,” said Bob. They went back to the USA but when they are there they met their grandpa. He said “Yes somebody made a time machine.” “Yes,” said Bob surprised. They talked to the mayor about keeping the USA open to every type of fur seal and he said,” Yes.” Then they went to Canada but they met their grandma she said “Hi my little boys.” “Hi,” Rob said. They talked to the governor to keep Canada open to every type of fur seal and the governor said “Yes.” After the meeting, they went back to 2017 and had a party to celebrate the success. They all had a happy ending.

Excerpt from South Rutland Elementary’s book Animal Tales.

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A CHALLENGE FOR MIDDLE AND SECONDARY STUDENTS TO START THEIR OWN BUSINESSES!


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JANUARY 2018

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CENTR AL O K A NA G A N P U B L I C SCH O O L S’ P R E S CH OO L P A R T NERS

Central Okanagan Public Schools is proud to host 14 preschools in our elementary schools across four municipalities. “The Board of Education believes that certain opportunities which provide for partnerships between the community and schools are beneficial to student success. Partnerships which enhance the preschool years and support all facets of early learning development (social, emotional, physical, creative and intellectual development) are important to the Board.”

CENTRAL Z ONE *A.S. MATHESON ELEMENTARY

BANKHEAD ELEMENTARY

ÉCOLE CASORSO ELEMENTARY

*NORTH GLENMORE ELEMENTARY

250-762-3914

250-762-7505

250-860-6430

*RAYMER ELEMENTARY

250-860-4336

250-762-4476

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

asmatheson@clubhousechildcare.com

bhfp@clubhousechildcare.com

osc@clubhousechildcare.com

www.boysandgirlsclubs.ca

www.lunapreschool.com

The Clubhouse at ASM Bankhead Family Place The Clubhouse at Casorso Little Gators Preschool

LAKE COUNTRY ZONE

* ÉCOLE PETER GREER ELEMENTARY

250-808-4769

RUTLAND ZONE *ÉCOLE BELGO ELEMENTARY

*ELLISON ELEMENTARY

*QUIGLEY ELEMENTARY

Luna Park

QUIGLEY ELEMENTARY

250-765-4416

250-863-1448

250-491-9699

250-763-4756

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

www.blossom-montessori.ca

jorobak@telus.net

ellison@clubhousechildcare.com

rutlandpppreschool@hotmail.com

Ki Low Na Friendship Society

Blossom Progressive Montessori

Le Petit Hibou (Fr. Immersion)

The Clubhouse at Ellison

Rutland Parent Participation

First Nations Preschool

W EST KELOWNA ZONE *CHIEF TOMAT ELEMENTARY

*ÉCOLE GEORGE PRINGLE ELEMENTARY

250-768-7123

250-491-9622 ext. 237

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

Preschool Name:

webber@obgc.ca

kathy@lepetithibou.org

www.ymcaokanagan.ca

webber@obgc.ca

250-768-3049 Okanagan Boys and Girls Club

Le Petit Hibou (Fr. Immersion)

*GLENROSA ELEMENTARY

Glenrosa YMCA Playing to Learn

*HELEN GORMAN ELEMENTARY

250-768-3049 Okanagan Boys and Girls Club

* Subsidies may be available

KEL O W NA CHILD CA R E SOC IETY CHILD CARE RESOURCE & REFERRAL PROGRAM

Funded by the Province of BC http://www.ccrr.bc.ca/ • www.kelownachildcare.com FREE CHILD CARE REFERRALS

CHILD CARE SUBSIDY SERVICES

FREE DEVELOPMENTAL CHECK-UPS

School-age referrals specific to

Assistance with completing and

Resources and information about the

the school your child is enrolled

submitting subsidy application forms

Ages & Stages Questionnaires

Child Care Resource & Referral

CONTACT the Kelowna Child Care Society in one of the following ways: Phone: 250.762.3536 • Email: resource@kelownachildcare.com In-person: #4 – 1890 Ambrosi Road, Kelowna (please visit our website for office hours)


JANUARY 2018

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Central Okanagan Public Schools

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Calendar

8 ril 3, 201 p io n A , y a d s in g V a c a t r Tue p S r e t f Reopen A » S c h o o ls 8 y 21, 201 a M , y a d ed) Mon h o o ls C lo s c 8 S ( 1 y 0 a 2 D , 12 » V ic t o r ia Februar y , y a 8 d n o M e 28, 201 n u J , y a s d s ay Thur r Student o F l o o » F a m il y D h c S 8 st Day Of y 23, 201 a r L a u » r b e F Friday, 9, 2018 l Day 2 a n e io ttend) n s u s J e , f y o a r d P Do Not A i r s r t F e n h e c d u a t e (S y »T 18 t r a t iv e D a 0 is 2 in , m 6 d 1 A h » arc V a c a t io n Friday, M g in r p S r C lo s e F o » S c h o o ls

r a d n e l a C 8 1 0 2

Disclaimer Message: Together We Learn is published through the support of the Deputy Superintendent’s office, in accordance with the Central Okanagan Public School’s Public Education Awareness Committee’s (PEAC) Terms of Reference. This publication is produced at no cost to the District. It is intended for parents who have students attending Central Okanagan Public Schools and includes information on District news, innovative programs and opportunities. Further District information and important dates can be found on the District website at www.sd23.bc.ca. Commercial advertising in this publication does not imply endorsement by Central Okanagan Public Schools. For more information, or to provide feedback or article suggestions, contact the Deputy Superintendent’s office at 250-470-3225. For information on advertising in future editions, please contact the Kelowna Capital News at 250-763-3212 or adsales@kelownacapnews.com.

WHEELS Transition to Employment Program

Full-service shoe repair Bicycle service and repair Ski & snowboard tuning

Bonnie Zimmer, a student in the WHEELS Program, creates a pattern for new soles on a pair of western boots.

Visit us at 1733 Dolphin Ave. Monday-Friday, 9:30 am - 4:00 pm 778-484-4054 It is the aim of the Transition to Employment and Bicycle Maintenance Project to provide designated youth and young adults in Central Okanagan Public Schools with opportunities to learn skills and gain experiences that will help them make successful transitions to adulthood.


Special Features - Together We Learn January 2018  

i20180124093430807.pdf

Special Features - Together We Learn January 2018  

i20180124093430807.pdf