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FR Your Guide to Trails on the North Island

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2016/2017

OFF THE

BEATEN PATH

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Table of Contents 4 Description of Trail Guide 5 Travelling Logging Roads 6 Trail Etiquette Port Hardy 8 Tex Lyon Trail 9 Quatse Loop & Estuary 11 Georgie Lake/Songhees Lake Trail 13 Fort Rupert Trail/ Commuter Trail West Coast Area 15 North Coast Trail 16 Cape Scott Trail 17 San Josef Bay Trail 18 Raft Cove 20 Grant Bay 21 Ronning Gardens Winter Harbour 22 Botel Park Trail Quatsino 23 Colony Lake Trail

Port Alice 25 Beaver Lake Forest Trail 26 Marble River Trail 27 Alice Lake Loop 28-29 Map Port McNeill 30 Cluxewe Salt Marsh/ Bullock’s Beach Trail 31 Port McNeill Rotary Trail 33 School House Creek Trail 34 Merry Widow Trail 35 Lady Ellen Trail/Ledge Point 36 The Haddington Beach Trail 37 Shephards’ Garden Alert Bay/Cormorant Island 39 Alert Bay Ecological Park Sointula/Malcolm Island 41 Beautiful Bay Trail 42 Mateoja Heritage Trail

43 Pulteney Point Lighthouse 44 Kaleva Road Walkway 45 “S” Lake Trail Telegraph Cove 46 Dave Farrant Blinkhorn Trail 47 Bauza Cove Trail Woss 48 Mount Cain Ski Area and Alpine Trails 49 Woss Lookout Trail 50 The Woss Lake Grease Trail 51 Hoomak Lake Rest Area & Interpretive Trail Zeballos 52 Little Huson Park Trail Sayward 54 Kusam Klimb (Bill’s Trail)

A publication of the North Island Gazette 7305 Market Street, Port Hardy, BC V0N 2P0 • Copyright North Island Gazette 2015

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Welcome to the North Island Gazette’s 2nd Annual OFF THE BEATEN PATH GUIDE TO TRAILS ON THE NORTH ISLAND. The North Island encompasses the communities of Port Hardy, Port Alice, Port McNeill, Alert Bay, Sointula, Winter Harbour, Holberg, Hyde Creek, Quatsino, Zeballos and Woss as well as numerous First Nations communities. The 2nd Annual Off the Beaten Path - Guide to Trails on the North Island features information on 33 trails, up three from last year. We had no idea when we published the guide last year how wildly popular it would be. It literally flew off the shelf in under two months, so we have increased the number of guides printed. If you have information, or photos, you would like included in next year’s issue, please email them to publisher@northislandgazette.com We did our best to get all information correct in this guide with the much-appreciated help of our staff members who love to hike, as well as Western Forest Products, Vancouver Island North Tourism and the Regional District of Mount Waddington. If you find an error, please email the same address.

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Travelling On Logging Roads The network of gravel roads that connect us with the backcountry has been constructed primarily for forest industry use. • Expect to navigate independently, there may not be directional signs • Expect to be sharing the road with industrial vehicles, always stay alert and use caution • Yield to industrial traffic, pull over immediately and let the oncoming vehicle pass, use pullouts where possible, back up if necessary • Expect rough surfaces and potholes, slow down and drive to road conditions • Before heading out, ensure your vehicle has a full tank of fuel, a working spare tire and the tools to change it • If the road is dusty and you have limited visibility wait for dust to settle before continuing • Buckle up and always drive with your headlights on, even during the daytime

Forest Safety Council industrial road information: www.bcforestsafe.org/forestry_trucksafe/safe_driving_info.html

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Trail Etiquette DO ✓ Yield to logging trucks and faster moving vehicles on logging roads ✓ Drive with your lights on even during the day on logging roads ✓ Respect campground and backcountry camping fees and pay accordingly  ✓ Pack out everything you bring in ✓ Bring enough water and research trail accessible water sources before you leave for your trip ✓ Leave a note on your windshield if you are a solo hiker saying when you expect to be back at your vehicle  ✓ Use designated fire pits, and if none are available dismantle ones you create  ✓ Bring a bear hang rope or use provided bear caches to store food overnight  ✓ Bring a garbage bag to dispose of packages and uneaten food ✓ Plan meals meticulously to avoid excessive waste  ✓ Leave your camping spots the same or better than when you arrived ✓ Use provided toilet facilities or dig a hole to go to the bathroom, bury it, and pack out used toilet paper  ✓ Check with the band offices in the area to see if there are any traditional or sacred areas that you need permission to enter 

DON’T Don’t Leave food at your campsite overnight Don’t Forget to check if you need permits for your desired hiking/ camping area Don’t Sleep on fragile parts of our ecosystem like an area with many plants or a bed of moss  Don’t Rinse or wash dishes in a water source Don’t Dump garbage down composting toilets Don’t Bring dogs into areas where they are prohibited-park and trail sites in the area can tell you what the rules are on this  Don’t Forget the importance of excellent preparation, including meal planning including emergency meals, map and route planning, a well-stocked first aid kit, and an evacuation plan for each day in the backcountry

Reminder cell phone service is not available in many areas 6


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Tex Lyon Trail PORT HARDY/STOREY’S BEACH Length - 4.5 km Total Hiking Time - 8 hours round trip Trail Difficulty Classification - Difficult

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19), turn onto Byng Road towards the Port Hardy Airport; Turn left on Beaver Harbour Road; Turn right on Storey’s Beach Road and park in the lot near the boat launch and baseball diamonds; Walk along Storey’s Beach or Storey’s Beach Road to the trailhead at the end of Chatham Ave,. There is also parking here.

• Historical hiking route dating back to the 1940s • Trail begins at Storey’s Beach. • Challenging 4.5-kilometre trek to Dillon Point offers a wonderful adventure, but you need to be prepared before experiencing it. • Tell someone where you’re going and when you expect to be back, check the tide schedule, allow eight hours for the round trip, wear good hiking boots (no sneakers) and be aware of wildlife. Black Bears and Cougars live in the area. • Challenging eight-hour trek starts at Storey’s Beach and follows the rocky coastline surrounding the bay. • Trail provides the adventurous hiker with a panoramic view of Queen Charlotte Strait and the historic village of Fort Rupert. • Pack a picnic lunch and stop on the precipice of Dillon Point, allowing the cool, salty breeze to refresh you. 8


Quatse Loop & Estuary Trail PORT HARDY Length - 2.5 km loop Total Hiking Time - 1.5 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19), turn onto the Coal Harbour Road just south of Port Hardy; Turn left onto Byng Road; Turn left into the Quatse Campground.

• Take in the scenery as you enjoy an easy 2.5 km riverside loop or take a side trail to a wildlife-viewing platform in the estuary. • There is an option halfway through the loop to head into Port Hardy on a well-maintained community trail along the Quatse River and shoreline of Hardy Bay.

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Georgie Lake Trail/ Songhees Lake Trail PORT HARDY Length - 3.4 km Total Hiking Time - One day return Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

On Highway 19 head north to Port Hardy, just before Port Hardy, turn left onto Holberg Road (shortly paved). Turn right and cross the Tsulquate River. The access road to Georgie Lake is signed.

• Songhees Lake Trail is located near Port Hardy’s Georgie Lake on North Vancouver Island. • The small Georgie Lake Recreation Site campground provides boat launch access to Georgie Lake and good fishing. • Trailhead begins at Georgie Lake for the Songhees Lake Trail which is suitable for all age groups.

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Fort Rupert Trail/Commuter Trail PORT HARDY/STOREY’S BEACH Length - 3.7 km One way Total Hiking Time - 1 hour One Way Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19), turn onto Byng Road towards the Port Hardy Airport; Turn left on Beaver Harbour Road; park in the lot just past Fort Rupert Elementary School on the left hand side of the road. The hike can also be done from Bear Cove Road. Turn off on Bear Cove Highway on the way to Port Hardy.

• The Fort Rupert Trail starts near Storey’s Beach and extends to Bear Cove Road. • This trail follows the traditional route the Kwakiutl First Nations took overland to Bear Cove. • The trail includes board walk and a crushed gravel-type surface, and some uphill terrain. • It is not uncommon to see many different types of wildlife, including black bears, along the trail, as well as culturally-modified trees.

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North Coast Trail CAPE SCOTT Length - 59.5 km Total Hiking Time - 6 to 8 days one way Trail Difficulty Classification - Difficult

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19) drive north past Port Alice turnoff and turn left on the Cape Scott/Holberg road, which is just south of Port Hardy. Follow the active logging gravel road about 64km to the trailhead.

• The North Coast Trail is a 43.1-km extension to the original Cape Scott Trail. The total hiking distance is approximately 59.5km. The minimum recommended one way hiking time is 5 days; although, it is more commonly completed in 6 to 8 days. Hiking times are estimated for the average hiker in good physical condition in optimal weather conditions. • This is a very challenging route and is not recommended for inexperienced hikers. • Water taxi access at east end. • Many sections require hikers to climb over or along fallen trees, to cross through deep mud, and to use fixed ropes to climb up and over steep sections. • Dogs NOT allowed. • It is strongly recommended that ALL hikers carry a satellite phone or VHF radio in case of emergency. Cell phones do not work in the park, and assistance may be days away in case of an accident. • Cape Scott Provincial Park is rich with First Nations history. Many signs of their historic presence are evident in the park. Please respect all cultural sites and leave them in an undisturbed state. Do not touch or remove any cultural items. 15


Cape Scott Trail WEST COAST Length - 16.8 km Total Hiking Time - 5-6 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Follow the Island Highway (19) north past Port McNeill and turn left on the Cape Scott/Holberg road, which is just south of Port Hardy. Follow the gravel road about 63km to the trailhead.

• The Cape Scott Trail is a classic trek. Hikers will venture into the rainforests, marshlands, and along wide stretches of abandoned beaches to experience the remote beauty of the park. • It’s approximately an 16.8 kilometre, 5 or 6 hour hike, from the trailhead to Nel’s Bight. • Nel’s Bight is an ideal location to set up camp and explore the remote, sweeping beaches of Guise Bay, Experiment Bight and the Cape Scott Lighthouse, which is a 23.6 kilometre hike from traihead • The area offers unlimited beach camping and basic facilities, including pit toilets, food caches and a ranger cabin which is staffed throughout the summer months. • Set aside 2 or 3 days to give yourself enough time to really explore and enjoy the area. • It is strongly recommended that ALL hikers carry a satellite phone or VHF radio in case of emergency. Cell phones do not work in the park, and assistance may be days away in case of an accident. • Cape Scott Provincial Park is rich with First Nations history. • Many signs of their historic presence are evident in the park. Please respect all cultural sites and leave them in an undisturbed state. Do Photo Courtesy not touch or remove any cultural www.vancouverislandnorth.ca items. 16


San Josef Bay Trail CAPE SCOTT Length - 2.5 Km Total Hiking Time - 45 minutes one way Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19) drive north past Port Alice turnoff and turn left on the Cape Scott/Holberg road, which is just south of Port Hardy. Follow the active logging gravel road about 64km to the San Josef Bay/Cape Scott parking lot.

• Less adventurous hikers can leave the backpack at home and still get a taste of Cape Scott’s unique terrain and spectacular Pacific Ocean vistas • This well-maintained gravel trail ends at the sandy shore of San Josef Bay in the southeastern corner of the park. • One of the more noticeable features at San Josef Bay are the sea stacks. • A unique feature on Vancouver Island, these incredible geological formations are a popular stopping point on many peoples’ trek through the park. • Camping is allowed.

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Raft Cove Trail CAPE SCOTT Length - 2 k Total Hiking Time - 40 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification Difficult

How to Get There

Drive north on Highway 19, before Port Hardy follow the signs to Holberg. From Holberg head north follow the signs to Raft Cove. Access to this park is by active logging roads. The chance of encountering loaded logging trucks while travelling these roads is highly likely. Logging trucks have the right of way; vehicles must yield to logging trucks and use pullouts when possible. Follow the signs to Raft Cove

• From the parking lot in the main beach is approximately 2 km long and takes on average 40 minutes. • Some challenging sections, extremely muddy in areas. • End of the trail you will find yourself at the northwest end of the main beach, which stretches more than 2 km to the mouth of the Macjack River. • Trail cuts through coastal old-growth forest of hemlock, western red cedar and Sitka spruce. • For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. • Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.

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Grant Bay Trail WINTER HARBOUR Length - .5 km Total Hiking Time - 10 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy

How to Get There

Follow the Island Highway (19) north past Port McNeill and turn left on the Cape Scott/Holberg road, which is just south of Port Hardy. Take active logging road towards Winter Harbour which is approximately 75 km from Port Hardy. Turn right at West Main junction. Follow the signs to the trailhead. Parking is available at the trailhead.

• Grant Bay is an isolated bay on the north side of the entrance to Quatsino Sound from the Pacific Ocean, southwest of Winter Harbour. • Bounded by a shore of shoals and rocks, the main attraction of Grant Bay is the long and remote sandy beach. • Beachcombing is a popular pastime on the white sand. • The Grant Bay Trail is a hike of 10 minutes one way.

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Not to be Missed! Ronning Gardens CAPE SCOTT How to Get There

Drive north on Highway 19, before Port Hardy follow the signs to Holberg. From Holberg head north following the signs to Cape Scott and “Ronning 700”. The Ronning Gardens are located beside San Josef Wagon Road approximately 15 km west of Holberg, and can be reached by a pleasant 10-minute walk on a restored section of the old San Josef Wagon Road.

• Visit the garden and homestead established by Norwegian settler Bernt Ronning in 1910. • Ronning wrote to all corners of the world asking for exotic seedlings, planting nearly 5 acres with many species of trees, shrubs and flowers collected from all over the world. • His house and garden became a regular way station for the settlers hiking from Cape Scott, Raft Cove, and San Josef Bay. • After Ronning died in 1963, the garden was reclaimed by the temperate rainforest until the property was purchased some years later and the garden freed from the invading rainforest. • Find old and new Monkey Puzzle Trees; drifts of bulbs in spring; old rhododendrons in early summer; maple, beech, and oak leaves in fall; and gnarled branches in winter.

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Botel Park Trail WINTER HARBOUR Length - 1k Total Hiking Time - 15 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19) drive north past Port Alice turnoff and turn left on the Cape Scott/Holberg road, which is just south of Port Hardy. Take the active logging gravel roads through the community of Holberg and follow the signs to Winter Harbour.

• Come enjoy the forested trails of Botel Park in Winter Harbour. • A short hike through a rainforest and old growth trees leads you to the park site and a view which takes you down Forward Inlet, past Robson and Low Islands to the opening of the Pacific Ocean to Quatsino Sound. • With the trailhead located right behind the Outpost General Store, this trail leads to a beautiful rocky beach where you can explore for driftwood, shells, and other treasures. • Steep stairs to beach.

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Colony Lake Trail QUATSINO Length - 1 km Total Hiking Time - 20 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19) drive north past Port Alice turnoff and turn left on the Coal Harbour Road in Port Hardy. Old Quatsino is only accessible by boat, a water taxi will pick you up from Coal Harbour and take you to Old Quatsino, a scenic trip that takes approximately 20 minutes.

• Folks vacationing in Old Quatsino often take a stroll down to Colony Lake; a beautiful secluded spot that the locals keep a secret and no wonder... it is so peaceful and quiet with trout jumping and deep places for swimming.

Photo Courtesy www.vancouverislandnorth.ca 23


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Beaver Lake Forest Trail HWY 19 & HWY 30 JUNCTION Length - 0.9 km Total Hiking Time - 30-45 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy

How to Get There

Driving north on Island Highway (Hwy 19) this loop trail can be accessed just 50 metres passed the left turn on to Hwy. 30 (the road to Port Alice). Soon you’ll see Beaver Lake Recreation Site on your right, and just past it is Beaver Lake Forest Trail on your left. Turn left up the short road to the parking area. • This a well laid out trail featuring demonstration forest of the North Island accompanied by interpretive signage. • A combined effort between Western Forest Products and the B.C. Government, Beaver Lake Forest Trail is tastefully done, physically attractive and stable. • Easy walking, but log stairs going up and down the little creek valley. • Tricky for a stroller or a bike. • Covered picnic hut along the way.

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Marble River Trail PORT ALICE Length - 4.2 km Total Hiking Time - 1.5 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Driving north on the Island Highway (Hwy 19), turn left on to Hwy 30. Follow Hwy 30 for about 15 km. Turn right into the Marble River Recreation Site just past the Marble River bridge.

• This is a well-maintained hiking and biking trail that starts at the end of the upper loop of the Western Forest Products Recreation Campsite. • Interpretive signs along this trail offer information about the forest environment. • The Marble River flows through a shallow canyon bordered by forest covered bench lands. • Salmon spawning viewing areas are located near the trailhead and at Bear Falls. • An interpretive sign and fish ladder are also located at Bear Falls. • Visitors should be aware that black bears frequent the park, especially during salmon spawning season.

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Alice Lake Loop PORT ALICE Driving Distance

A full loop circuit, depending on the route you take, will be approximately 100 km. This route is accessed by gravel logging road so

driving time for the loop will be approximately 2.5 hours.

The feature karst sites have lots to explore and short hiking trails so make sure you give yourself enough time explore!

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19), take the Keogh turn off south onto a gravel logging road – this is a wide industrial intersection just north of Port McNeill; shortly after turning onto the Keogh road, you will see a large directional sign with a map of the Alice Lake Loop; choose your route from here. Driving Tour • Northern Vancouver Island’s Alice Lake Loop Tour offers one of the best opportunities in Canada to view features typical of a fascinating landform known as karst. • Named for a region in Europe’s Balkans where it was first studied, karst is a landscape largely formed by water action in soluble bedrocks, notably gypsum and carbonates such as limestone and marble. • Stop at the feature sites, the Eternal Fountain and the Devil’s bath to get a closer look at these formations. • Interpretive signage will help explain the process that has shaped these features. 27


Cluxewe Salt Marsh/ Bullock’s Beach Trail PORT MCNEILL Length - 3 km Total Hiking Time - 30 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Located off Hwy. 19, 10km north of Port McNeill (approximately 15 minutes). Turn onto Rupert Main (a gravel road to the right northbound), past the turn off into Cluxewe Beach Resort by a couple of kilometres. Watch for a small sign indicating a right turn into the trail. Approximately .5 kms after the turn you will arrive at the trail head.

• The Cluxewe Salt Marsh Trail is a gentle slope down to the beach through moss covered ground and trees. • You will find one set of well-made stairs (with hand rail) as part of the trail. • Bald Eagles can be seen all year, and at least two nest sites are found in the Cluxewe area. • Great blue herons and kingfishers are also year-round residents. • Many seasonal waterfowl like Trumpeter Swan, Green-winged Teal, Mallard, Pintail, Surf Scoter and Harlequin Duck can be viewed from the Cluxewe spit. • Black Bears, Black-tailed Deer, River Otters, Mink, and bats are common and occasionally wolves are seen. • Cougars are in the area, but rarely visible. Marine mammals, including orca, are sometimes viewed from the beach. • Excellent beach, but no amenities. 30


Port McNeill Rotary Trail PORT MCNEILL Length - 3.5 km one-way Total Hiking Time - 1 hour one-way Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy - Moderate

How to Get There

The Rotary Trail is located on the connector road coming into Port McNeill

• The Rotary Trail features an excellent walking/biking trail. • This trail follows along Hwy. 19 to East Main Logging Road (3.5 kms to logging road turn) and brings you back into Port McNeill. • Rotary Trail connects to an existing popular east-west trail which runs several kilometres to Port McNeill Airport and onto the beach before curling back to town. • Please get directions or stay on the trail if you are unfamiliar with the entire route.

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School House Creek Trail PORT MCNEILL Length - 1.6 km loop Total Hiking Time - 45 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Driving north on the Island Highway (Hwy 19) turn into Port McNeill. The trailhead is located on Shelley Crescent, just past the Port McNeill Museum (on your left) and the Scout Hall (on your right). • Situated directly in Port McNeill, this is the perfect short hike after being in the car or on the boat. • Winding its way through the forest, you will find a protected salmon-spawning stream along the unmaintained Schoolhouse Creek Trail loop circuit and several interpretive signs.

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Merry Widow Trail BENSON VALLEY/PORT ALICE Length - 8 km + round trip Total Hiking Time: 5-6 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Difficult

How to Get There

Exactly 3.7 km north of Port McNeill turn left on West Main logging road. Proceed 3.5 km on West Main to a prominent junction with Keogh Main Road after 3.5 km. Keep left on Keogh. From the West/ Keogh junction, drive 28 km up the Three Lakes valley to the junction with Raging Main and turn right. Proceed a further 2.5 km, cross the bridge over the Benson River and turn right again on to Merry Widow Main. Drive 1.2 km on Merry Widow Main and locate the signed Merry Trail Main/M1080 spur on the left. Drive as far as you can directly up Merry Trail Main.

Photo Courtesy: Steve Fines 34

• Between the Benson and Craft River watersheds to the east and west respectively and just 10 km as the crow flies from tidewater at the head of Quatsino Sound • Merry Widow offers the climber stunning ocean views and a unique perspective on its more formidable neighbours to the south and east as well as across the Strait of Georgia to the north coast mountains on the mainland. • To the north of the mountain the land drops rapidly to the lowlands north of the town of Port Alice. • Road is rough in spots and very narrow due to growing alders.


Lady Ellen Trail/Ledge Point PORT MCNEILL Length - 2 km Total Hiking Time - 45 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Located off Hwy. 19, north of Port McNeill by approximately 15 minutes; turn right at the second access down to the gravel road (Rupert Main). About three kilometres later turn right onto Ledge Point Main road. Turn left onto Ledge Point road (no signage) and drive another kilometre. The logging road that goes to the Lady Ellen Trail takes off to the left from the Ledge Point Road.

• Ledge Point is a forested finger of land which struts out into Broughton Strait between Northern Vancouver Island and Malcolm Island. • Lady Ellen Trail is located on your left at what appears to be a well travelled “Y” • Keep bearing left to a small clearing for parking; continue bearing right to find access to the beach at the top of McNeill Bay. • There is an EXCELLENT view of Port McNeill from here and to Ledge Point.

Photo Courtesy www.vancouverislandnorth.ca 35


The Haddington Beach Trail PORT MCNEILL Length: 1.4 km Total Hiking Time - 1 hour or less return Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy

How to Get There

From Highway 19 turn into Port McNeill. In town take Mine Road to the east, down the hill on the gravel. For the west end of the trail, continue to the end of Mine Road to the Lamare Lake Logging Office. If walking from downtown, take Beach Drive to its end and follow the gravel road to the Lemare Office. Take the small gravel road directly beside the office and follow it to the end, below the Sewage Treatment Plant. For the east end of the trail, turn right at the propane tanks, off off Mine Road onto Brown’s Road. (Beach Camp Road on some maps) then take the second road on the left and follow it to the end. Look for three blue dots.

• The Haddington Beach Trail is a beautiful rustic trail that follows the shoreline and provides many beach access points. The gravelly to rocky beach is a great place to observe interesting rocks and driftwood. • From the beach there are good views across the water to Malcolm Island, Haddington Island, Cormorant Island, and the snow-capped peaks of the mainland. • It is a quiet trail, as it is away from major roads, and northern Vancouver Island is sparsely populated. Hikers are free to enjoy the sounds of the wind, waves and birds. • More often than not bald eagles may be seen and heard calling. • This is a great place for a picnic, but bring a blanket, as there are no tables or benches. • The trail passes through a stand of large second-growth trees over 100 years old, taking advantage of game trails. • Local materials only were used for construction of rustic cedar bridges over the two small streams. Because the trail is mostly flat and fairly smooth, it is an excellent trail for beginner Photo Courtesy www.vancouverislandnorth.ca mountain bikers. 36


Don’t Miss! Shephards’ Garden PORT MCNEILL How to Get There

On the Island Highway (#19) turn off at Nimpkish Heights Road, turn left onto Nicholson Road, House #920.

• Sitting pretty on the Nimpkish River near Port McNeill, the Shephards’ Garden has been welcoming visitors since the early 1990s. • The floral bloom begins in February, rhodos run riot in May and hungry eagles eye migrating salmon as the Japanese maples turn red in the fall. • The Garden includes three and one half acres of perennials, shrubs, trees, and a food garden. Enjoy a relaxing walk-thru. • They are open daily from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. • In addition to the garden there is a unique forest trail that takes you to the Nimpkish River.

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U’mista Cultural Centre

www.umista.ca 1-250 974-5403 1-800-690-8222

U’mista’s Potlatch Collection tells an epic story of resistance and resilience. The Centre opened in 1980 to house repatriated Kwakwaka'wakw ceremonial regalia that had been seized by government authorities in 1922. One of the most complete and important collections of its type in the world, U’mista’s Potlatch Collection is a source of great joy and pride for the Kwakwaka’wakw community.

FILM FESTIVAL FRIDAYS July to Sept. 2 ~ 3:00-4:00 Enjoy Kwakwaka’wakwrelated movies & chat over tea & coffee

Check Facebook for more info: www.facebook.com/ Umista.Cultural.Society

FREE CULTURAL WORKSHOPS:

July/Aug.; Wed-Sat.; 10:00-12:00 & 1:00-3:00 • Kwak’wala with Pewi • Cedar weaving with Donna • Native Art/Design with Wah • Native Art/Design with Corrine Hunt Please check our Facebook for specific dates Special Exhibition “Yisyapa’inuxw: Expert Weavers” Celebrating the art of Chilkat and Cedar-bark Weaving

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Alert Bay Ecological Park ALERT BAY/CORMORANT ISLAND Length - 1.3 km trail one-way Total Hiking Time - 1 to 1.5 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy Grade

How to Get There

Travel Highway 19 to the community of Port McNeill BC Ferries terminal transporting people and vehicles to Alert Bay on Cormorant Island. Once on Cormorant Island proceed to Alder Street near the Alert Bay Campground and the trailhead to the Ecological Park.

The Ecological Park is near the Village of Alert Bay on Cormorant Island. Cormorant Island is located off the coastline of Northern Vancouver Island and is part of the Northern Gulf Islands. • Wetland park is a recreation destination complete with hiking trails and a boardwalk walkway. • Short, easy-grade, walking trail explores through a marsh and cedar forest. • Walking pathway begins as a dirt trail but only for a few 100 metres as it quickly connects to a boardwalk walkway leading into the marsh. • Boardwalk walkway navigates through the centre of the wetlands - exposing, to the left and right, cat tails, sunken trees and lily pads. • During the boardwalk section of the trail birdwatching is best. Make time to stop and look around. There could be a Bald Eagle perched on one of the sunken trees. Or standing tall in the corner of the wetlands could be a pair of Blue Herons. • For sure you will see many small song birds waving back and forth balancing on top of the cat tails. • The boardwalk walkway reconnects to the dirt trail after exploring the wetlands. It is here the ecosystem changes from wetland to forest. At the junction where the boardwalk walkway meets dirt trail again there is a trail map. • This area connects to the larger, 16-kilometre Alert Bay Trail system. 39


WINTER IS OVER – NOW THE FUN BEGINS! Hike the beaches, relax in the pub, look for whales and catch big fish

Malcolm Island Inn offers pet-friendly accommodations with oceanfront patios and fabulous views. Every room includes cable TV, WiFi, fridge, microwave & private bathroom.

250-230-6722 • www.malcolmislandinn.ca • Find us on

The SEINE BOAT INN is located in historic Alert Bay, on Cormorant Island, one of the numerous islands on British Columbia’s Pacific Northwest coast. Just steps from the ferry dock, shops and restaurants, the Inn is built out over the beach and the ocean, providing spectacular views and the best sleep you’ll ever have.

For reservations or information call: 1-877-334-9465, or email: info@seineboatinn.com. 7530757

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Beautiful Bay Trail SOINTULA/MALCOLM ISLAND Length - 2.5 km one way Total Hiking Time - Two hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Travel Highway 19 to the community of Port McNeill. Take a 35-minute BC Ferries sailing to Sointula on Malcolm Island. Turn left when you disembark from the ferry and follow 1st Street until you pass the Malcolm Island Harbour. Proceed to Bere Point Park. The trailhead is located in the park.

• 5 km round trip out-and-back trail. • Moderate hike along an earthy trail with exposed tree roots, some hills and protruding boulders. • 2.5 kilometre route explores through the island’s forest leading to hill tops with views of the surrounding ocean waters. • Beach exits and the tide give hikers the option of designing their own circuit route. • Most popular viewpoint are the Malcolm and Numas Lookouts. • Some hikers are lucky enough to witness a passing pod of orcas. • Even more remarkable is the sight of these black-and-white killer whales rubbing on the smooth pebble beaches. • Best viewpoint for this natural spectacle is the platform at the start of the Beautiful Bay Trail.

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Mateoja Heritage Trail SOINTULA/MALCOLM ISLAND Length - 3.2 km one-way Total Hiking Time - 3 to 3.5 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy Grade

How to Get There

Travel north on Highway 19 to the community of Port McNeill to BC Ferries terminal which transports people and vehicles to Sointula on Malcolm Island. Once on Malcolm Island proceed to Third Street. The trailhead is located on the street near the ferry dock. • Situated off the northern east coast of Vancouver Island • Accessible from the community of Port McNeill. • Great way to explore the many highlights. • Rugged trail leads explorers to a popular local swimming hole named Big Lake Marsh which is ideal for birdwatching and some viewing benches. • Route is enjoyed by walkers, joggers and mountain bikers

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Pulteney Point Lighthouse SOINTULA/MALCOLM ISLAND Length - 1.3 km one way Total Hiking Time - 20 minutes one way Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Take Highway 19 to Port McNeill. Board the BC Ferries to Sointula on Malcolm Island. From the ferry landing go left onto 1st Street, and turn right onto Bere Road. Turn left onto Pulteney Point Road. Just before the gate to the lighthouse property you will find a pullout for the lighthouse trail. From this point, it is a short walk to Pulteney Point Lighthouse.

• A barren sandspit that juts out from the southwest corner of heavily wooded Malcolm Island. • Pulteney Point marks the separation of Broughton and Queen Charlotte Straits. • The island and point were named in 1846 by Commander George T. Gorden of the HMS Comorant after Admiral Sir Pulteney Malcolm, a Scottish-born British Naval Officer.

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Kaleva Road Walkway SOINTULA/MALCOLM ISLAND Length - 3 km Total Hiking Time - 1.5 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Travel Highway 19 to the community of Port McNeill to BC Ferries terminal which transports people and vehicles to Sointula on Malcolm Island. The trailhead is located on Kaleva Road, starting at Dickenson Point.

• Kaleva Road Walkway is a 3 km long interpretive nature walk which goes to Mitchell Bay Road. • This seaside walk takes about 1 ½ hours return and has viewing platforms, benches and picnic tables to enjoy the stunning views of the landscape and wildlife. • You can bike, walk or drive down Kaleva Road with the ocean on one side and farmland on the other. Kaleva Road points of interest include an Artist Studio and stunning views of Vancouver Island, Cormorant Island and possibly even a glimpse of some of the many marine mammals that frequent this area in the summer.

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“S” Lake Trail SOINTULA/MALCOLM ISLAND Length - 1 km Total Hiking Time - 1 hour Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

Travel Highway 19 to the community of Port McNeill to BC Ferries terminal which transports people and vehicles to Sointula on Malcolm Island. Turn left off the ferry, follow First Street around to the other side of Rough Bay (approximately 4kms). Continue on the gravel road to the top of the hill and you’ll arrive at a map for Woodlot 1909. Follow the “S” Lake signs.

• This 1 km hike takes you through a mossy, delicate environment to a small lake and back. • You’ll see giant lily pads, ducks and old twisted trees. Depending on the time of year you visit, you may require gumboots and you may find the occasional, wild cranberry growing in the moss; and carnivorous sundew plants. • Stay away from the edges of the lake, they may look stable but are actually mounds of moss, growing on the surface of the lake itself. • “S” Lake is not for swimming and no camping is allowed in this area.

Photo Courtesy Gayle Cowan 45


Dave Farrant Blinkhorn Trail TELEGRAPH COVE Length - 4 kms Total Hiking Time - 3 hours one way Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19), take the turn-off to Telegraph Cove. The trailhead is located at the Telegraph Cove Resort campground.

• The trail was laid out under the direction of Dave Farrant, a local resident who grew up in Telegraph Cove. • Part of the trail follows the original Telegraph Line of 1912. • Huge old growth trees, culturally-modified trees, huge rock bluffs, part of the old telegraph line and beaches. • Great viewpoint overlooking western Johnstone Strait and Weynton Pass. • Blinkhorn Peninsula is a great place for viewing marine wildlife.

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Bauza Cove Trail TELEGRAPH COVE Length - .5 Total Hiking Time - 10 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy

How to Get There

Take Highway 19 north. Turn onto Beaver Cove Road/Telegraph Cove. Turn right onto Wastell Road following the signs to Telegraph Cove Resort Campground.

• From the Telegraph Cove Resort campground take a 10-minute stroll up the hill. • A short trail through the woods takes you to a lovely vista. Bauza Cove is situated between Ella Point and Blinkhorn Peninsula, and is also nearby to Wastell Point. • Bauza Cove is close to Beaver Cove, Double Bay and Dong Chong Bay. Telegraph Cove’s is located on Johnstone Strait, across from the Broughton Archipelago and close to Robson Bight ecological reserve.

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Mount Cain Ski Area and Alpine Trails WOSS Length - Hiker’s Choice Total Hiking Time - Hiker’s Choice Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate to Difficult

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19), take the Mount Cain/Schoen Lake Provincial Park turn-off just south of Woss onto a gravel logging road; Follow the signs to Mount Cain Ski Area.

• Mount Cain is located near Schoen Lake Provincial Park and is run by the Mt. Cain Alpine Park Society. • Once the winter snow recedes and spring opens up the alpine meadows, Mount Cain’s high alpine meadows, forests and lakes are excellent for hiking and wildlife viewing. • The rugged peaks and deep valleys that surround Mount Cain offer an incredible view regardless of the season. • There are 15 kms of marked trails and logging access roads. • For the mountaineer there are three peaks at 1,800m within a 5-km radius.

Photo Courtesy www.vancouverislandnorth.ca 48


Woss Fire Lookout WOSS Length - 1.8 km Total Hiking Time - 3 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Difficult

How to Get There

On the Island Highway drive north 9.7 km past Woss. Turn Right onto Markhusen Main and head east for 8.7 km. You will notice a parking lot area with a kiosk sign. Continue on foot to get to the trailhead.

• The access trail is very steep and the hike very strenuous with many rope-assisted sections. • Woss Lookout is located at 2080 feet (640 metres) on the summit of Lookout Mountain. • The lookout site provides extensive views of the Nimpkish Valley, Woss Lake, and the surrounding mountains of the Bonanza Range. • There are interesting flora an glimpses of the past (i.e. remnants of the old tree line telephone system) • The Woss Lookout was originally developed in 1948 by Canadian Forest Products Lt. (CanFor) who constructed an access trail and erected a 20-foot tower with a plywood cupola. • The Woss Lookout is one of the few remaining fire lookouts on Vancouver Island and has been added to the BC Register of Historic Places. • Please drive safely and watch for industrial traffic.

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The Woss Lake Grease Trail WOSS Length - 12 km Total Hiking Time - Five Days Trail Difficulty Classification - Difficult

How to Get There

Follow the Island Highway (Hwy 19) north to Campbell River. At Campbell River, turn west and take Hwy 28 to Gold River. At Gold River, you will see the Travel Info Centre and a large boot sculpture. At this point, just follow the road and watch for the signs directing you to Tahsis. Although not maintained as a marked route, this trail begins at the north end of the Tahsis dump. Go up North Maquinna Street to the north end of town and over the bridges.

• This ancient trade route was used by First Nations and crosses Vancouver Island from its southern terminus in Tahsis. • The route follows the flat valley bottom, often following the Tahsis River or its dry (in summer) watercourse. Occasionally, it follows old remnants of a logging road left from when the valley was logged in the 1940s. Much of this road has been obliterated by river erosion since then. • Spectacular views of Rugged Mountain. Mountaineers may want to use this route as an access to the aptly named Rugged and its glacier, the largest on Vancouver Island. The glacier is a steep hike of 1,000 metres (3,200 feet), although there is no marked route up (refer to a topographical map). • The Woss Lake Trail ascends steeply only at the headwaters and reaches a high point of 550 metres (1,800 feet) before descending to Woss Lake at 140 metres (500 feet). • There are no roads from this end of the lake (still within Rugged Mountain Provincial Park), but the other end is road-accessible from Woss. Arrange for boat pickup from this end of the Trail. • Water is available along much of the route, and there are some nice wilderness camping spots in the upper reaches of the Tahsis River. Most people take five days or longer to complete the walk. Photo Courtesy www.vancouverislandnorth.ca 50


Hoomak Lake Rest Area & Interpretive Trail WOSS Length - .08 km Total Hiking Time - 15 - 20 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Easy

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19), the lake is located 10 km (6 miles) east of Woss.

• This convenient rest area is located beside Hoomak Lake. • Walk the interpretive forest trail to stretch your legs. • This is also the location of the community sign displays with information on each community in the region. • Large Regional Visitors Map highlighting parks, trails and recreation sites. • Located between Woss and Mount Cain, the lake is also near Mount Markusen and Mount Elliott.

Photo Courtesy www.vancouverislandnorth.ca 51


Little Huson Park Trail ZEBALLOS Length - 350 metres Total Hiking Time - 10 - 15 minutes Trail Difficulty Classification - Moderate

How to Get There

From the Island Highway (Hwy 19), take the Zeballos turn-off just north of Woss onto a gravel logging road; Follow the signs to Little Huson Cave Regional Park.

• Nestled in the Nimpkish Valley, just a 20-minute drive off the Island Highway. • Little Huson Cave Park features limestone and rock arch formations. • Short trail through the woods from the parking lot brings you to a platform overlooking a unique rock bridge and deep pools filled with clear green water from Little Huson Lake. • View the spectacular cave formations by the lake or walk the trail to see the magnificent limestone arches and rock platforms. • Little Huson Cave Park offers just a small taste of the many caves and limestone features that form part of the Quatsino formation that runs through much of Northern Vancouver Island. • Spectacular natural beauty, containing karst features which are unique to Vancouver Island.

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Explore Our Gold Rush History THERE’S GOLD IN THE M HILLS! Heritage buildings • Self guided walking tours • Heritage museum OUTDOOR RECREATION PARADISE • Sportfishing • Kayaking • Walking trails • Birdwatching • Diving • Rock climbing

7530735

VISITOR SERVICES • Restaurants • Accommodations • Camping • RV sites • Boat launch • Store • Fuel

Call us: 250-761-4229

8:30am-4:30pm Mon-Fri • www.zeballos.com

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Kusam Klimb (Bill’s Trail) SAYWARD Length - 23 km Total Hiking Time - 9 hours Trail Difficulty Classification - Difficult Take Island Highway (Highway 19). Turn right at the Sayward Junction onto Sayward How Road and proceed approximately 3km to the Heritage Hall. Continue towards the Village to Get of Sayward for 2 km, turning right at Sabre There Road. Follow the pavement uphill to where it doglegs right. Turn left onto the gravel road 100 metres and you will see a trail sign on the right. • The Kusam Klimb is a wild and rugged 23 km loop heading up and over the back of Mt. H’Kusam then down the Stowe Creek watershed. • Starting at sea level, participants pass through some of the most spectacular scenery on Vancouver Island with views of mountain peaks and the Johnstone Strait as they negotiate their way over the well-developed trail. • While the trail is open for year-round hiking, an organized event is held once per year on the summer solstice. • The trail is named for Bill West-Sells, a resident of the Village of Sayward who, in 1989, needed to bring water to his rural property. So he built a trail up the west side of H’kusam from his property until he found a suitable source, installed the waterline and then – just kept on going. Thirteen years later and with the help of many forward-looking local people, Bill’s Trail was finally finished! • Summit views are superlative. To the west and south is Victoria Peak and the Sutton Range and further south the highest of the summits in the north part of Strathcona Provincial Park. Johnson Strait shimmers below with the mainland beyond. Unusually for Vancouver Island, you can look down to the west to the pastoral setting of the Sayward valley below. • H’kusam Mountain is named for the Walatsumas First Nation of nearby Kelsey Bay. 54


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Special Features - Off the Beaten Path 2016/2017  

i20160516155815107.pdf

Special Features - Off the Beaten Path 2016/2017  

i20160516155815107.pdf