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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

COMMUNITY SPIRIT: Lacombe Special Olympics organization continues to make a difference – PG 3

MOTIVATION: Lacombe instructor outlines fitness benefits and popularity of indoor cycling – PG 15

PLAYOFFS: The Blackfalds Wranglers’ season came to an end last week in the playoff rounds – PG 17

DETERMINATION - Bentley General Carter Rigby tries to catch up to Innisfail Eagle Chris Bailer during a playoff game against the Innisfail Eagles at the Lacombe arena last Friday. The Generals tied up the series 2-2 at the following game on Sunday. Game five will be played on Feb. 28th at the Lacombe arena. Sarah Maetche/Lacombe Express

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

LACOMBE EXPRESS 3

Lacombe Special Olympics provides athletes opportunity

Area participants range in age from 10 to 70 years old BY ZACHARY CORMIER LACOMBE EXPRESS

T

uesday night may be one of the busiest of the week at the Ambassador Bowling Centre. The place is packed for a Tuesday night. About 50 people are gathered around the front five lanes of the 10-lane alley, all craning to make sure they can see the lanes and the 35 bowlers who are doing their best to post a good score. The roar of bowling balls and the clatter of pins fills the small establishment in downtown Lacombe. Suddenly, a cheer goes up from one of the lanes as they celebrate a strike by one of their competitors, who is grinning from ear to ear as he walks back to his seat, high-fiving everyone along the way. “It’s basically the same as any other bowling program,” said Dwayne Campbell, the chairperson of Special Olympics Lacombe Affiliate, whose bowling team practices on Tuesday nights every week in the city. Campbell said the program is very similar to other youth bowling programs in that the bowlers are organized into eight teams of four to five bowlers who rotate through playing other teams week to week, but there is one key difference. “One of the key parts with Special Olympics is, really, you compete against yourself,” he said. Every week the bowlers try to improve their scores from the previous session with the help of a group of volunteer coaches. “We do go to tournaments and that type of thing, but at the same time the thing is you establish your range for your ability and then you compete against that to try and improve as an individual and advance.” Lacombe’s Special Olympics program, which is now in its 11th year, allows athletes an opportunity to get active and compete with others at their own level and pace.

“We need to have a recreational opportunity for any athlete that doesn’t fit into other community-based programs,” Campbell said. “Some of them are just here for the fun, they just come and participate each week. Others have a little bit more interest or commitment to improve their performance, so we give them a little bit more coaching and give them the opportunity to be more successful.” According to Campbell, the Special Olympics program in Lacombe has a very wide variety of participants. “What we call it is ‘Lacombe and district,’ so we have athletes from Mirror, Ponoka, Lacombe, Blackfalds. We used to have a few from the west country; Bentley, Rimbey. Our athletes range from 10 years to 70 years, so a wide range of ages, a wide range of situations that limit them from other community sports,” he said. Participants can choose to compete in a couple of different sports, including five-pin bowling and swimming in the winter and softball and bocce in the summer.

“WE DO GO TO TOURNAMENTS AND THAT TYPE OF THING, BUT AT THE SAME TIME THE THING IS YOU ESTABLISH YOUR RANGE FOR YOUR ABILITY AND THEN YOU COMPETE AGAINST THAT TO TRY AND IMPROVE AS AN INDIVIDUAL AND ADVANCE.” DWAYNE CAMPBELL “The first thing is it’s just something for them to do for their own health and lifestyle and as far as their own well-be-

STRIKE! - Scott Borthwick celebrated bowling a strike during a Special Olympics Lacombe bowling practice at Ambassador Bowling Centre in Lacombe this week. The Special Olympics program in Lacombe offers athletes who may not fit in to other community sports an opportunity to compete. Zachary Cormier/Lacombe Express ing where you change it out and have some physical exercise,” Campbell said. In addition to providing athletes with an opportunity to compete, the weekly practice sessions and games are also good places for participants to socialize and find acceptance, said Salene Matheson. Matheson’s son, Kobe, is a junior high student who has been participating in the Special Olympics for four years. “It makes him feel like part of the community and part of a team. A lot of kids that have special needs don’t ever get to go to sports and challenge with other people. So when they come to the practices, they feel that they are on a team.” “I get strikes. I get to come out and meet new people. I have a

check your

bunch of new friends here,” Kobe added. The sports also give younger participants, like Kobe, a chance to develop communications skills that will help them later on in life. “He’s been able to develop a lot as an athlete. For him, having that opportunity, I think in a lot of different sports, gives him a sense of belonging and something to aim for. So it’s been good for him as a bowler and it’s been good for him to adapt and learn, meet new people. It teaches him how to communicate and how to celebrate, all the other things that he can’t do in a lot of other areas,” said Kobe’s father, Dan. One thing both the Mathesons and Campbell wanted to encourage was participation in Special Olympics. “I don’t think a lot of peo-

ple know that there is Special Olympics in Lacombe. To get some of the younger people out here would be really good, because I think a lot of the athletes are the older participants,” Salene said, adding that Kobe is the second youngest athlete in the bowling program. Campbell added that they are always looking for volunteers who would be willing to help out during any of the sports. “We probably have about 15 volunteers — a number are parents, a number are non-parents. It’s good support and good interest to come out and be involved.” If you would like more information on the Special Olympics programs in Lacombe you can visit the web site at www.specialolympics.ab.ca/lacombe.

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4 LACOMBE EXPRESS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

Annual Lacombe Victim Services Comedy Cabaret returns BY SARAH MAETCHE LACOMBE EXPRESS The annual Lacombe Victim Services Comedy Cabaret returns for the 14th year. The premiere fundraiser for the Victim Services Unit will be held this year on March 11th at the Lacombe Memorial Centre. Debbie Barron, Lacombe Victim Services Program Manager said the evening is of course, St. Patrick’s Day-themed and features a silent auction, a 50/50 draw and a live band. “We are looking forward to it,” she said. “It is going to be a really fun night.” New this year to the fundraiser is a live band, the Rockin Erbs, who will keep attendees dancing the night away to music from the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and ’90s. Comedian Brad Muise is the featured

headliner and is sure to bring along many laughs. He will be joined by fellow comedians Todd Ness and Noor Kidwai for the comedy portion of the evening. HT Catering will be selling hot appetizers like hot wings, burgers and fries throughout the evening for attendees to snack on. There will also be a cash bar operated by the Lacombe Lions Club. All the funds raised from the comedy cabaret go directly towards volunteer advocate training and education. The Lacombe Victim Services Unit was created in 1993, operating with a volunteer board and several hands-on volunteers. “One of our roles is to inform victims of their right to a victim impact statement, restitution and financial benefits as well as assist them through the court process,” said Barron.

She noted that Victim Services is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week through volunteer advocates in the local community.

“DURING A CRISIS, ANY TIME, DAY OR NIGHT, IT’S OUR VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES WHO ANSWER THE CALL.” DEBBIE BARRON “Over the last year we have seen an increase of around 200 per cent in the need for the service we provide,” said Barron.

“Our volunteer advocates are crucial as they are the ones who deliver the program.” It is imperative advocates keep their training up-to-date in order to better serve the community. “During a crisis, any time, day or night, its our volunteer advocates who answer the call,” explained Barron. Those looking for more information on the programs offered can check out www. lacombevictimservices.com or call 403782-3279 ext. 152. Doors to the Lacombe Memorial Centre open at 6:30 p.m. The entertainment will start at 8 p.m. Tickets are $30 each and a table of eight is $220. Tickets can be purchased at the Lacombe Police Services building or by contacting Barron. news@lacombeexpress.com

Find the Right Fit offers fitness possibilities at no cost BY SARAH MAETCHE LACOMBE EXPRESS Through the City of Lacombe’s program Find the Right Fit numerous fitness facilities in Lacombe have opened their doors to offer something for free to the public one day per month. Like a fitness smorgasbord, Find the Right Fit allows Lacombians to sample a variety of fitness facilities throughout the month. From yoga and spin, Cross Fit, Zumba, swimming or bootcamp, the possibilities can be endless in the quest to find the right fit. This past week a new provider has also been added to the number of participating facilities. POUND fitness, a rock out workout with lunges, squats and cardio

using weighted drumsticks, will be open to the public on the third Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at All That Jazz Studio (5029 56A St.) Sonya Beauclair, City of Lacombe Recreation and Culture administrative assistant said the idea behind Find the Right Fit is for participants to try out different fitness facilities and activities with no cost hindrance. “We know that everyone has different fitness needs and likes different things, so the best way for them to find what works is to be able to try it and find the right fit,” said Beauclair. The program launched on Jan. 1st and has been well attended thus far. When participants do attend a facility, they are required

to check in so the City can gauge the success of the program. Some of the providers offer different classes, some are open all day, or have different times they are open to the public. “You can basically take a month, try everything, see what you like and then hopefully you will sign up for whichever one you want to keep doing,” said Beauclair. “We know if you enjoy what you are doing, you are more likely to continue with it.” There are some limitations to the program. Each facility has one day a month that allows attendees in for no cost. You can attend each facility a total of three times. The program is open to anyone living in the City of Lacombe or Lacombe County.

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Some of the providers do have limited space so attendees are encouraged to show up early or contact the facility before hand to reserve a spot. “As the ChooseWell leader for Lacombe, I am always

trying to get people out and moving and eating healthy,” explained Beauclair. “The Active Alberta policy directs us to get more people more active more often and that’s exactly what we are trying to do.”

news@lacombeexpress.com

GIVING BACK - Bowl for Kids Sake, the premiere fundraiser for the Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Lacombe and District (BBBS) recently received a donation of $2,000 from the Lacombe and area Servus Credit Union. From left are Gloria Mamchur (Servus), Chelsey Hudkins and Karissa van der Heiden (BBBS), Dustin Nakonechny, Jessi Da Ponte, Teresa Wiebe and Kristen Hall (Servus). The donated funds will help make the photo submitted fundraiser, held on Feb. 27th at the LMC, a reality.

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

LACOMBE EXPRESS 5

Echo Energy funds channeled to Echo Lacombe Association BY SARAH MAETCHE LACOMBE EXPRESS City of Lacombe councillors approved the reallocation of Echo Energy funds to a newly named association this past Monday. Echo Energy is the City’s energy boutique that works off a simple concept — power is offered to local homes and businesses and the generated profits are funneled into a fund that it to be used to fund community projects within Lacombe. Modeled after Mountainview Power, an energy retailer created by the Olds Institute as a community sustainability initiative, Echo Energy was established in Lacombe in November 2013. The City itself does not generate power, but acts merely as an energy retailer, competing with other big name energy retailers, officials said. Up until this point, the Echo Energy funds have been collecting in an

account, set aside for community-minded projects. Guy Lapointe, City of Lacombe community economic development manager, told council the group formerly named the Community Economic Development Organization (CEDO) has now renamed itself to Echo Lacombe Association. “The group has been meeting regularly and has decided to name itself Echo Lacombe Association to take advantage of brand awareness already generated by Echo Energy and the Echo Lacombe Fund,” he said. “The group has also successfully recruited a total of eight members from a wide range of backgrounds within the community.” The group has achieved not-for-profit status and has also solidified a terms of reference and objectives. Its initial priorities include growing and adjudicating the Downtown Storefront Enhancement program (DSEP).

“To assist in further development of this program, the group will provide $4,000 from their existing funding to bring the total DSEP budget to $10,000,” said Lapointe. The group also wishes to promote the Echo Energy initiative. “The group also sees merit in gaining access to these proceeds to support their project goals in much the same way the Olds Institute does,” explained Lapointe. “Rather than finding another project, the Echo Lacombe Association believes they can maximize the potential of Echo Energy by bringing greater awareness to this opportunity.” In 2015 the Echo Energy proceeds totalled $11,250 and $1,900 in 2014. The funds have yet to be distributed to any projects or programs in the community. A minimum of 10% of the proceeds would remain in the Echo Lacombe fund. ”This is an opportunity for them to get

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some necessary dollars to really energize that group and take some necessary first steps,” said Lapointe. Councillor Wayne Rempel, who sits on the board for this group, made the motion to reallocate the Echo funds. “Once we get the funds for this group, we can really start moving on doing some great things in the community,” he said. The group will commit to supporting other initiatives in the community like arts and culture or fitness. “One thing the group wants to do is stimulate economic development, but do it through these other sources as well. The money would be used in a wide variety of different objectives” said Rempel. Council accepted the CEDO report as information and moved to reallocate the Echo Energy funds to the Echo Lacombe Association. news@lacombeexpress.com

Annual Urgent slope repair to be undertaken BY SARAH MAETCHE LACOMBE EXPRESS As an urgent repair, the City of Lacombe will be rebuilding a slope near an environmentally sensitive area. Councillors approved the 50th Ave. (Hwy. 12) slope repair contract at their council meeting this week. The area located northwest in the city limits, just before the QEII Hwy. interchange, along Crescent Lake, is an environmentally sensitive area. “It came up unexpectedly due to a blocked catch basin

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causing erosion down a fairly steep slope on the south side of Hwy. 12,” said Director of Operations and Planning Services Matthew Goudy. “It is what we consider a critical issue if left un-addressed. In the spring it could cause stability concerns for that section of Hwy. 12, which would be a major concern for the City.” In November of 2015, a resident advised the City roads manager of a possible sloughing issue along the roadway, next to Crescent Lake. After inspection of the site, City staff confirmed a

portion of the north slope has sloughed into Crescent Lake. The damage had likely occurred prior to November. A contract was immediately set with Stantec for a detailed design and professional services at a cost of $20,463, funded from the street reserve. The project was put out to tender earlier this year and closed on Feb. 17th. A total of six bids were received. Council awarded the construction portion of the project to Urban Dirtworks at a cost of $67,392. Stantec Consulting was also award-

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ed the contract at a cost of $29,081 for construction management and post construction services. Parkland Geo was awarded the contract at a cost of $1,160 for geotechnical testing. Goudy stated the City received good pricing as the project was one of the very first Capital Works projects tendered in the Central Alberta area this year.

“The engineering is a large component of this project, larger than you would typically see on a Capital Works project that the City is undertaking,” he said. “That was due to the environmental concerns of working within the lake. There is a lot of siltation that has eroded into the lake.” Due to the concerns, stringent reporting and moni-

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toring of the lake will occur before, during and after the project. “This is highly sensitive work from an environmental standpoint,” he said. “It is also quite difficult work from an actual construction standpoint.” The total cost of the project is estimated at $118,276, funded from the street reserve. news@lacombeexpress.com


6 LACOMBE EXPRESS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

Finding hope during challenging times I’m throwing in the towel. I just want to go back. I feel like giving up. Why did I ever agree to go there? I just want to walk away. In the news this week they began talking about ‘jingle mail’, where people are in so deep in house mortgages they mail their home keys to the bank and walk away with nothing. Some people may feel so bad about a setback they feel like throwing everything away. Troubles and impossible situations really are hard to address. I will never forget the night back about 1971, where a team of Bible college students got off the North West Bible College bus in North West Territories at Alexandra Falls, to drive on late into the night to Yellowknife for Sunday services. Back in those days the gravel roads were very hard on the vehicles. A nurse working on the mission field hospital, Marian Parks, met us to transport us in her car on the long lonely night trip to Yellowknife. Knowing the isolated road and the

In Good Faith with Greg

RATHJEN wear on tires she told us she had her car and tires checked before picking us up. The mechanic said they were in fair shape and so we pushed on with two spare tires to handle the hundreds of miles of rough gravel road. There was no traffic and we started on an about a 300 mile trip. With five ladies and myself, I was appointed to drive the car. After driving along the road for an hour or so, we had a flat which I changed. We headed into the lonely night on an isolated road. Sometime later, we had another flat and so we were very thankful for the bringing of two spare tires. As we pushed on north, about 50 miles north of Fort Providence, I felt the third tire going down. It wasn’t totally flat yet but

we stopped with unbelief that we had now face three flat tires. Now it is late night and we are stranded, me and five ladies. On our trip we would maybe meet a vehicle once an hour. As young Bible college students with a goal to get to Yellowknife, we prayed. After about 90 seconds, Marian said, “Praise the Lord. I believe the answer is coming.” In about a minute a semi-truck heading south stopped and as it turned out, the driver was related to other missionaries serving up north. Marian took the two flat spares and headed south to Fort Providence. A couple hours later she showed up in a taxi with some more gas and two new tires mounted. I changed the tire and we were on our way to the church Rev. Don Schneider was pastoring in Yellowknife. We arrived about 7 a.m. We had felt like giving up on the goal and heading back but we kept on and had wonderful services and met great people.

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The interesting thing we realized was, by stopping before the tire was totally flat, we made the connection with Chet the truck driver and that was the last vehicle we saw that night for many, many hours. This entire situation, crisis and solution, made quite an impression on us as young Bible college students. We saw an answer to prayer, experienced a life memory and had a great time sharing with the church people. After the evening we headed back driving all night to Hay River to meet the rest of the college group and travel back to Edmonton on the bus. Sometimes we have to face near impossible situations for us to take the time to really pray. Sometimes prayer is the only way to find the an-

swer and our only hope. As we are walking into 2016 in view of our Alberta economy with the huge downturn and very little natural solutions on the near horizon, prayer is one resource that can’t be exhausted. Looking at our full picture, a number of people ended up getting us up to Yellowknife. We may also find through our prayers, others will share as part of the answer. Don’t lose hope as long as we can pray. Many years ago running an orphanage in Great Britain, George Muller had little money and prayed for daily provisions. The best known story involves a morning when the plates and bowls and cups were set on the tables, but there was no food or milk. The children sat waiting for breakfast while Muller led

in prayer for their daily bread. A knock at the door sounded. It was the baker. “Mr. Muller,” he said, “I couldn’t sleep last night. Somehow I felt you didn’t have bread for breakfast, so I got up at 2 a.m. and baked some fresh bread.” A second knock sounded. The milkman had broken down right in front of the orphanage, and he wanted to give the children his milk so could empty his wagon and repair it. In his lifetime he housed 10,000 orphans and saw 50,000 answers to prayer. When setbacks pressure us to stop and give up, it is time to look up. There is hope as we push on to our goal. Greg Rathjen is the pastor of Bentley Community Church.

WINTERSCAPE - A raven flies high above a meadow during a winter day in the J.J. Collett Natural Area, northeast of Lacombe.

Sarah Maetche/Lacombe Express

DEVELOPMENT PERMITS Current to February 25, 2016

Permitted Use Take notice that the following development permits have been approved as PERMITTED USES in that they conform in every ry respect to the Land Use Bylaw: DATE

PERMIT#

LOCATION

DEVELOPMENT

February 25 February 25

61/250.23.16 61/250.33.16

5511 Wolf Creek Drive 4725 59 Street

Class 2 Signs – 3 Fascia, 1 Canopy Demolition of Fire Damaged Residence

Documents pertaining to the development permits may be inspected at City Hall, 5432-56 Avenue, during regular business hours. Anyone claiming to be affected by the approval of the Permitted Uses with Variances or Discretionary Uses may submit an objection within 14 days from the date of notice. The appeal must be in writing, accompanied with a $50.00 fee and be directed to: Lacombe Subdivision and Development Appeal Board, Attn: Secretary to the SDAB, 5432 - 56 Avenue Lacombe, AB T4L 1E9


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

5019A - 51 St Lacombe, AB T4L 2A3

403-782-5303

Editor

Sarah Maetche 403-782-5306 news@lacombeexpress.com

LACOMBE EXPRESS 7

OPINION

Improving Alberta’s addictions and mental health system Steps are being taken to improve Alberta’s current addictions and mental health system. The provincial government announced on Monday they will be acting on the recommendations that came out of the Mental Health Review, which includes creating new addiction treatment beds. The government launched a review of the existing policy last September. At the time Premier Rachel Notley stated the current mental health system did not measure up and the government would act on the matter. The Mental Health Review was co-chaired by Dr. David Swann, Alberta Liberal Party leader, and Danielle Larivee, Lesser Slave Lake MLA, both who have health

care backgrounds. An online questionnaire was launched allowing Albertans to provide feedback on the important service. “The Albertans who took part in the Mental Health Review shared their experiences with courage and strength,” said Minister of Health Sarah Hoffman. “I wish to thank the members of the review committee and everyone who came forward to provide their ideas and feedback. We look forward to working with our partners as we begin to build on the vision for a stronger mental health care system in our province. ” The report generated from the review included 32 recommendations, which aim to strengthen

service delivery for those in our province with mental illness and addictions. Six of the primary recommendations include adding detoxification beds for adults, including converting 20 beds in Red Deer, expanding access to treatment by opening three social detoxification beds for children and youth in Calgary, working in partnership with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities to develop an opiate addictions plan, creating an implementation team to work with communities and health partners and launching a youth mental health web site in the spring. “The current mental health system is not meeting the needs of an increasing number of Albertans,” said Swann. “We can and must

do better. Unfortunately, this is not the first time Albertans have heard this. Successful implementation of the Mental Health Review will require a higher level of leadership from Alberta Health, and the new AHS board, than that provided by previous governments. Today’s six priority recommendations are an excellent start.” It is good news that a review of a portion of our health care system that has been in neglect for so long has finally been completed. Many Albertans struggle in silence with mental illness and this report should be seen as a positive step forward. The report, titled Valuing Mental Health, is available on the Alberta Health web site.

Students are citizens of the digital world

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One of the ever-changing aspects of our daily lives is technology. Many of us remember a time when computers were either non-existent in schools or were just being introduced. At that time computers couldn’t do a lot and were not the educational tool they have become today. With the advancements in technology comes a digital world that exists not just in our homes, but our schools. And, it’s a world our students and children are living in. In responding to this evolving landscape, STAR Catholic School Division has developed and is implementing its own Digital Citizenship Curriculum. But first, what is a digital citizen? Alberta Education, in a report released in 2012, de-

Thalia

HIBBS fined citizenship, “As the state of being a citizen of a particular social, political or national community. Citizenship carries both rights and responsibilities.” Similarly, a ‘digital’ citizen should embody all those civic rights and responsibilities, but now as they also relate to his or her activity on, or use of the Internet, social media and digital platforms. The separation between the offline and the online world is narrowing. InternetWorldStats.com

reports that there are more than three billion Internet users worldwide. That accounts for 42.4% of the world’s population. There are 750 million Facebook users, 300 million tweets sent out on Twitter per day, and 100 hours of video uploaded to You Tube every four minutes. The digital world is here, and everyone — parents, co-workers, school staff, administration and students — are digital citizens. As digital technology is further embraced as a useful and effective means of teaching, the question of balance has come up. The question has been raised in an Alberta Education study, asking: should we consider students to have two separate lives— a relatively digitally

Lacombe & Blackfalds We want your input. ut t. We would like to receive ‘Letters to the Editor’ as well as local story ideas as from the community.

Please submit to the Lacombe Express editor at news@lacombeexpress.com or call 403-782-5306

unplugged life at school and a digitally saturated life away from school, or should we consider them to have one life that integrates their lives as students and digital citizens? In STAR Catholic, we have a responsibility to not only provide high-quality education to our students, but we do so through a lens of faith, rooted in the gospel and in the words and actions of Jesus Christ. We seek to impart not only knowledge, but are committed to the full development of the person. Students cannot be expected to live two lives, a digital and non-digital life. As the digital world continues to grow and expand, our students are further immersed in this online world, online communication and online social structures.

This means it is just as important for our schools to do our part in developing proper ‘digital’ citizens as it is to develop simply a citizen. A digital citizenship curriculum is critical for the growth of the 21st century student — academically, socially and spiritually. The aim is to teach students proper conduct, behavior and responsibility whether in the chat room or in the classroom, on facebook, face-to-face, online or off. Thalia Hibbs is a Lacombe trustee on the STAR Catholic Schools Division Board. STAR Catholic Schools has more than 3,700 students in 10 schools located in Beaumont, Drayton Valley, Leduc, Lacombe, Ponoka and Wetaskiwin. She can be contacted at thalia.hibbs@ starcatholic.ab.ca.


8 LACOMBE EXPRESS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

Your weekly Community Events Calendar

V ENTS EEVENTS The FYI, Community Events Calendar is a free-of-charge service for not-for-profit organizations and upcoming community events within the Lacombe and Blackfalds region. To submit your information, please email news@ lacombeexpress.com, call 403782-5306 or fax 403-782-5344. If you would like your event or organization to be included, please submit your information to the editor by noon, the Monday before the publication date. Annual meeting for the Lincoln Community Hall Society: Feb. 29th, 7:30 p.m. at the hall. All are welcome. 1st Lacombe Scouts 64th Annual Bean Supper: The members of the 1st Lacombe Scouts are again preparing for our Annual Bean Supper. It will be held on Sunday, Feb. 28th at the Lacombe Memorial Centre from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. The purpose of the annual bean supper is to provide a low cost bean supper to the community of Lacombe and to provide the members of the 1st Lacombe Scouts an opportunity to interact with people of all ages in Lacombe in a service role and emphasize awareness of Scouting within Lacombe.

Ti Tickets are $6 each, children four and under are free. Tickets are an available from any member of av the 1st Scouts or at the door. th Laco Lacombe Figure Skating Club is holding its annual Skating Carnival on Sunday, March 6th Ca at the Lacombe arena 1 p.m. The theme this year is “A Skating Stampede.” Tickets are $5 (five and under are free) and will be available at the door. Come on out and cheer on our local skaters for more information go to our website www.skatelacombe.ca. Easter Bake Sale: Featuring Easter breads. Sponsored by the St. Vladimir Parish UCWLC. Saturday, March 19th, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Vladimir Ukrainian Catholic Parish Hall, 3632-46th Street, Red Deer. For more information call Zonia at 403-347-2335. Lacombe Ukulele Group: Every first and third Tuesday in Lacombe. We’ll be meeting at Kavaccino’s in the front room between 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Join us for the evening or drop in for a bit. All ages and all levels of ability are welcome! For more information call 403-477-4630 or check out our Facebook page www. facebook.com/LacombeUkulele. The Jesus Fatwah: Love Your (Muslim) Neighbor as Yourself - a Thursday evening discussion group starting at 7 p.m. Using print and video resources and encounters with representatives of both Christianity and Islam, we will seek to dispel stereotypes about Islam, explore the diversity of Muslim belief and practice and discuss how we can build respect-

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ful relationships. This program would be appropriate for Christians, Muslims or those without faith commitments. Held at St. Andrew’s United Church. Please contact Ross Smillie at 403-782-3148 to indicate your interest and to get background reading material. Lacombe Hospice Steering Committee: Volunteers needed. Commit to 24 – 48 months’ term. Contact Florence at 403-782-5641 or email: lahospice@gmail.com. Friends of the Library will welcome Effie Bullis on Feb. 25th, 7 p.m. at the LMC in the County Room. Effie, born in the Ukraine, shares the story of her family’s journey back to Germany, the homeland of their great grandparents, and then on to Canada. Light refreshments will be served after the presentation in the Special EventsHistory 2016 series. Free admission. Friends of the Library is looking forward to present to our faithful audience and their guests, an evening of a new adventure in the Armchair Travel series on March 8th, 7 p.m. at the LMC in the County Room. Take in a wonderful story presented by Kirsten and Brent Bouwsma of their 2015, 6-week Scottish adventure with their young children, where they lived in a small industrial town in the “hillfoots of the Ochil mountain range.” Light refreshments will follow. Free admission. Friends of the Library History in the Making/History series will introduce guest speakers Dr. Janni and Christa Prins to present their experience living in South Africa and leaving 10 years ago to

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drumming, are asked to please contact us at 403-782-7183. Practices are held at the Red Deer Legion on Tuesdays at 7:00. St. Andrew’s United Church youth choir for ages five to 18. Meets Thursdays 5:30-6:30 p.m. contact Jessica at 403-352-5486 or jessmick16@gmail.com. St. Andrew’s United Church Adult Choir for those 18 and older. Practices on Wednesdays from 7:15 – 8:30 p.m. Contact Roberta at 403-782-0443 for more information. Cost is free. Invitation to join CNIB Peer Support Group: The Peer Support Group is a program dedicated to helping CNIB clients adjust to vision loss. Feelings of fear, anxiety, intimidation and anger are extremely common in adults who are diagnosed with vision loss. The goal of the group is to help transform these feelings into those of confidence and independence through education and group discussions. The program is facilitated by a volunteer who has gone through the process of adjusting to a life with vision loss. The group offers seniors a way to connect to others experiencing similar challenges. Participants receive empowering, practical and useful information about vision loss and how CNIB services can help, as well as suggestions from other participants on how to reduce the impact of vision loss on their daily lives. There is no cost to participate in the program which will meet once per month. The group meets at the Spruce Terrace located at 5002 – 51 Ave.

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provide a safe and better future for their children, on March 17th 7 p.m. at the LMC County Room. They will discuss the “new” South Africa, including education, government and people of the nation. Light lunch will follow. Free admission. An educational evening, come and bring a friend. Al-Anon: Does drinking alcohol by a relative or friend bother you? Al-Anon may be able to help you. Meetings are held every Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. in the lower floor of the Lacombe Masonic Hall at 4722 - 49B Avenue, Lacombe. For more information call 403-3073732, 780- 668-4395 or check the web-site at www.al-anon.ab.org. Calling all musicians! A jazzy new place to blow your horn or strum your strings - A jam session every fourth Thursday from 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. at the Lacombe Legion. $2 a person. For more information, call Rod at 403-782-1842. The Parkland Classical Singers, a community choir based in Lacombe, is looking for more members. If you like to sing, please join us. Rehearsals are held on Thursdays from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wolf Creek Community Church, beginning Oct. 15th. Two performances: Christmas 2015 and Spring 2016. For more information, call Carolyn 403-782-7365. The Red Deer Legion Pipe Band is actively recruiting experienced and inexperienced people from the Central Alberta area, who are interested in joining the pipe band. Anyone with piping or drumming experience, or if you would like to learn piping or

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

LACOMBE EXPRESS 9

Come see what the library has to offer Two weeks ago our theme was, of course, Valentines and the level of excitement in the young children is similar to Christmas. Receiving those little cards filled with hearts makes a three-year-old giddy with joy. One little girl told me that she even loved the Spiderman card cause it showed her that, “Boys have feelings too.” We were playing ‘Hot Heart’ which is Hot Potato with a stuffed heart and the comments in the game were priceless. “Miss Mary, she stole my heart!” “Miss Mary, he dropped my heart and stepped on it.” “Miss Mary, I don’t want to pass my heart to anyone.” These statements will come up again although in slightly different circumstances. Do you and your family enjoy a good swim? The library now has some weekly swim passes that patrons are allowed to borrow for one week.

Mary

POOLE This works just like a book but at the end of the week if the pass is not returned the card is cancelled and is no longer valid. So much has changed in libraries since Mrs. Schmidt used to reprimand me for breathing too loud. Our first meeting of the Drop-in Colouring Club for Adults was a huge success. The next meeting will be next month in the library. Materials are provided or you may bring your own and there is no charge to come and commune with other adults and enjoy the stressfree environment free from children. (Not that we don’t love children - just sometimes adults need a breather). On March 1st at 7 p.m. in

the Read and Relax area of the library the MCMPL Book Club will be discussing the novel March by Geraldine Brooks. This novel follows the life of Mr. March, the father of the girls in the famous Alcott novel Little Women, as he goes off to war. Everyone is welcome. We will be having a Jungle Jamboree special event in the children’s program room on Saturday, March 5th. I have added an additional class from 1 to 2 p.m. since the morning class filled up quickly. It’s fun for ages eight and under. Children must be accompanied by an adult. There will be stories and crafts and prizes! Space is limited. Please register by Feb. 29th. Our next Armchair Travel lecture will be presented on Tuesday, March 8th at 7 p.m. in the LMC. Our own Kirstin Bouwsema and her husband Brent will be regaling us with tales of their travels in Scotland with a lecture called: Over the Sea to Skye: A Six-Week

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Scottish Adventure with Two Small Children. Our book this week is No Better Friend: One Man, One Dog and Their Extraordinary Story of Courage and Survival in WWII by Robert Weintraub. This book describes the bond that developed be-

tween a RAF technician and a fiercely loyal purebred pointer named Judy, a pair who met in an internment camp during World War II where they became a symbol of hope to the other prisoners. This book was purchased

in memory of one of our loyal patrons. We appreciate the generous donation. Enjoy the week and come visit the library. Mary Poole is the children’s programmer at the Mary C. Moore Public Library in Lacombe.

ARTISTIC BOOST - The Lacombe Arts Endowment Fund recently received a donation from the Lacombe Knights of Columbus at City Hall. A cheque for $500, the proceeds from the Knights’ Oktoberfest fundraiser, was presented to help the arts in the City. From left, Knights of Columbus Grand Master Larry Riep, Lacombe Arts Endowment Committee representative Ellen Corea, City of Lacombe Recreation and Culture Services Manager Sandi Stewart. photo submitted

“Working out at the Gwen Bader Fitness Center is more than a physical workout. It is an emotional, physical and spiritual experience for me. I have met so many friends that I am now good friends with outside of the gym. I can’t imagine not coming here!” Shelby Sproule – Member since 2001

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10 LACOMBE EXPRESS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

City Page lacombe.ca

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Does your group or organization have an idea for a new initiative that would enhance the quality of life in Lacombe through recreation and culture? If so, you may be able to access the $12,500 in available funding through the City of Lacombe’s Recreation and Culture Grant. This grant is open to all non-profit community groups and businesses within the city. For more information visit www. lacombe.ca/recgrant, phone 403.782.1266, or email recreation@lacombe.ca. All submissions will be reviewed by the Lacombe & District Recreation, Parks and Culture Board.

A p p l i c a t i o n D e a d l i n e i s Fe b r u a r y 2 8 , 2 0 1 6

Lacombe & District FCSS

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Call For Applications The City of Lacombe has provided Lacombe FCSS with $22,000 in additional funds to facilitate the 2016 Community Grant Program. This program supports local social service programs that are preventive in nature and that promote and enhance the well-being of individuals, families and their communities. The Community Grant Program is open to social non-profit community groups in Lacombe. The deadline to apply for grant funding is February 26, 2016. For information on the grant eligibility criteria and the application process, please contact: Lacombe & District FCSS #201 5214-50 Avenue Lacombe, AB T4L 0B6 ph: (403) 782-6637 e: smacdonald@lacombefcss.net

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

LACOMBE EXPRESS 11

City Page lacombe.ca

What’s Happening?

Did you know that distracted drivers are three times more likely to be involved in a fatal crash? The Lacombe Traffic Safety Committee would like to remind everyone not to use your phone while operating a motor vehicle. When you are in your vehicle, your primary focus should be on driving. You cannot drive safely when you’re distracted. • • • •

Keep your eyes on the road, hands on the wheel – put your focus where it should be. Multi-tasking while driving could prove to be a fatal error in judgment. Distracted driving literally impairs your driving ability. Sending even a short text can take a driver’s eyes off the road for five seconds - enough time to travel the length of a football field

Alberta’s Distracted Driving Law restricts the use of hand-held cell phones and activities such as texting, reading, writing, personal grooming, and the use of other electronic devices while driving. The fine for distracted driving is $287 and three demerit points, and drivers who exhibit what is deemed to be more serious or risky behaviors could be charged with “driving carelessly” under the Traffic Safety Act. The penalty for driving carelessly carries six demerit points and a fine of $402.

City adopts service level ;JJ;HI7D:Ü;HJ?V97J;I<HECJ>; 7OEH changes for snow removal Mayor Steve Christie wishes to acknowledge achievement or outstanding community work by citizens or organizations with a custom certificate of congratulations or recognition to acknowledge special events and achievement in our community. Certificates are often presented to people and organizations on reaching a significant milestone in their life or history - an anniversary, birthdays for persons celebrating 65th birthdays and older, certificates to athletes, and to businesses on official openings, etc. Requests for these items must be made in writing at least a month in advance. Requests can be made to: Office of the Mayor City Hall, 5432-56 Avenue, Lacombe AB T4L 1E9 Fax: (403)782-5655 cmckean@lacombe.ca

City Council Dates Lacombe City Council Meetings are open to the public and all are encouraged to attend. Meeting agendas are posted online at www.lacombe.ca by 3 p.m. on the Friday before every Council Meeting. The next scheduled Council Meeting dates and times are: • Monday, March 7, 2016, at 5 p.m. (Committee) • Monday, March 14, 2016 at 5 p.m. • 5VFTday, March 29, 2016 at 5 p.m.

Upcoming Events Earth Hour Friday, March 19, 2016- City of Lacombe is sponsoring free candlelight yoga from 8:30-9:30 p.m. Reserve your spot at lacombeyoga.ca/schedule

Reminders Property Assessment Notices will be mailed out on February 19, 2016. Don’t forget to check your mailbox. The Outdoor Rink is now closed. Please stay off the lakes due to thinning ice conditions. BOLT Transit is now paperless. We are now using re-loadable cards for the automated fare boxes. Visit www.lacombe.ca/bolt for more information. Arts Endowment Grant is now accepting applications. If you’re a Lacombe or Lacombe Country resident involved in any art form – visual, performing, or literary you may be eligible. Go to www.lacombe.ca/artgrant for a downloadable application form. Application deadline is March 31, 2016. Find the Right Fit program is up and running. Try a variety of physical activities at no cost. For more information go to www.lacombe.ca/choosewell or call 403.782.1267.

Employment Opportunities Seasonal Workers #2016-03 The City is recruiting for seasonal Gardeners/Trail Maintenance/Park Mower Operators/Labourers. To view the full job description and to apply, visit www. lacombe.ca/employment Lacombe- live a beautiful life.

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12 LACOMBE EXPRESS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

Culture and Recreation grant deadline approaching BY SARAH MAETCHE LACOMBE EXPRESS The deadline to apply for a Recreation and Culture grant through the City of Lacombe is approaching. Those with an idea on how to enhance the quality of life for Lacombians through recreational or cultural activities are encouraged to apply for the grant. The City has been allocated $12,500 to distribute to the community towards

new programs. Applications must be in by next Monday, Feb. 29th. The application can be downloaded from the City web site under the Recreation and Culture tab. Information on where to submit the application is available at the same place. “We are still taking applications,” said Sonya Beauclair, City of Lacombe recreation and culture administrative assistant. “They can apply for doing things

on the art side or for recreation.” The grant is open to businesses, community groups, not-for-profits or individuals within the city. “Nothing has changed from the year before,”said Sandi Stewart, City of Lacombe recreation and culture manager. “It’s important to know it’s for new initiatives and services that fall under recreation and culture.” The grant was first in-

troduced in 2014 and was utilized to bring programs like Music in the Park, the FCSS Pass program and the Bill Nielsen Trail Run to fruition. In its first year, the grant program had $10,000 available, which was then increased to $12,500 the following year and matched this year. Last year grants were awarded to the Lacombe Cross Country Ski Club and the Canada Day concert

among others. Past recipients have included youth groups and dance studios. Beauclair added that the more aspects of the criteria that the application meets, like programs targeting youth, involving kids during after school hours between 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., can be seen as a strength. Grant application initiatives could also promote things like aging well or inter-generational participation. Application cri-

teria is based on the 2013 Recreation and Culture Master Plan. As there is no specific amount that each group can be awarded, funds are distributed as needed after applications are reviewed by the Lacombe and District Recreation, Parks and Culture Board. A large variety of programs may be eligible for a grant, so attendees are encouraged to check with Beauclair to see if their idea or initiative fits the program. For more information, contact Beauclair at 403782-1267. news@lacombeexpress.com

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The Herr Lecture Series presents ‘Love Knows No Bounds: A Christian Response to Omar Khadr’ by Dr. Arlette Zinck on Feb. 25th at 7:30 p.m. at Underhill Lecture Hall, McKibbin Centre, Burman University. Admission is free and open to the public. Beginning in 2008, Zinck, along with a Christian community of professors and students, spent years mentoring and tutoring Khadr, the former Guantanamo Bay prisoner. In her upcoming Herr Lectures talk Zinck, who first met Khadr at the notorious Camp Echo detainment camp in Cuba, will explore the meaning of love without bounds. Zinck is an associate professor of English at The King’s University, a Christian liberal arts university in Edmonton. She is one of King’s top-rated professors. Some of her published academic works include Learning to Read Salvation: Psychological & Spiritual Change in Bunyan’s Grace Abounding and The Pilgrim’s Progress and Reverend James Evans & the HBC: How a Cree Translation of Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress May Shed New Light on an Old Scandal. The Denise and Larry Herr Lectures in the Humanities feature presentations by highly qualified speakers on issues of public interest. The lectures provide a forum for dialogue, open discussion and reasoned debate in Central Alberta. For more information visit http://www.burmanu. ca/herrlectures or call Dr. Glen Graham, lecture series coordinator, at 403-782-3381 ext. 4106. - Maetche


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

LACOMBE EXPRESS 13

Lacombe Express

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1942 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2016 It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Arnold Haakonson, beloved husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather. He passed away February 21, 2016 at the Red Deer Regional Hospital, at the age of 73 years, surrounded by his family. Arnold was born in Lacombe, Alberta, the youngest son of Barney and Elizabeth (Lizzie) Haakonson on June 18, 1942. He took his schooling in the Lincoln and Iowalta districts and then in Lacombe. After graduating he went to work at Lacombe Feed Services working for Allan Hodge. In 1966, along with two partners, he started Lacombe Fertilizer and Farm Supply where he worked until he retired in 2009. In 1964 he met the love of his life, Shirley Moore, and on May 8, 1965 they were married. Arnold lived his entire life on the farm with the exception of three years that he and his family lived in Lacombe. In 1971 they moved back to the farm and in 1980 they bought their own farm where he lived until his passing. Arnold loved working with his cows, the smell of fresh cut hay and newly turned soil; whether it was in the field or the garden he loved to watch things grow. His children and grandchildren were his pride and joy. He loved passing on his wisdom and teaching them new or different ways to do things. Arnold is survived by his loving wife, Shirley, of 50 years, his children: Angie (Allan) Vanderzwan and their children Garret (fiancĂŠ Victoria), Mitchel and his son Treyce, and Cole, all of Sundre, AB; Edmund Haakonson of Edmonton, AB; Treena Cox and children Matthew, Emily and Stephanee of Lacombe, AB; Leslie (Sam)(Shannon) Haakonson and their children Ryan, Tristan and Chris of Lacombe, AB. He is also survived by his siblings, Gladys Jeglum of Clive; Elmer (Linda) Haakonson of Lacombe and Adeline (Richard) Bellerive of Lacombe; his mother in law Freda Gillespie of Innisfail, AB; numerous nieces and nephews, extended family and many friends. Arnold was predeceased by his father Barney in 1994; his mother Lizzie in 2006; his father in law Les Moore in 1977; his step father in law Delbert Gillespie in 2000; six brothers in law and one sister in law. Funeral Services will be held Tuesday March 1, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. the Lacombe Memorial Centre, 5214-50 Ave, Lacombe. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of the donorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice. Condolences may be made by visiting www.wilsonsfuneralchapel.ca

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OPEN CREEK DAM CAMPGROUND From May 1, 2016 to September 30, 2016 For contract details please contact: MARC DUBIELEW Phone: 403-704-3780 Email: marcdubielew10@hotmail.com Mail: Rimbey Fish and Game Association PO Box 634 Rimbey, AB T0C 2J0

Lowest tender will not necessarily be chosen. DEADLINE FOR TENDERS MARCH 15, 2016


Careers

14 LACOMBE EXPRESS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

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If you are interested in starting a new and rewarding career, please fax your resume to

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

LACOMBE EXPRESS 15

ARTS & LEISURE

There’s more to spin than a bike and sweat BY SARAH MAETCHE LACOMBE EXPRESS On any day of the week, a group of around 20 gathers at a second storey studio to pedal and sweat together, all to the constant beat of high energy music. Some may call this type of fitness ‘spin’ or ‘spinning,’ and it’s only growing in popularity. So what exactly is it? “It’s basically indoor cycling, just on a stationary bike,” explained Dawn Larson, owner/operator at Spin Out Studio in Lacombe. “You add a lot of tension to your bike to get increased cardio, more of a muscular work out. It’s not just riding a bike. It’s actually doing weight lifting on a bike, using your own body weight, setting tension and stuff.” The concept of spin began in the late ’80s in Los Angeles. A man who worked as a personal trainer and participated in endurance cycle races decided to take cycling off the street and it paid off. Since then, spin has only increased in popularity with studios cropping up across the nation, with most gyms offering cycling-based classes and also inspiring a reality TV show following a Los Angelesbased spin studio called Soul Cycle. While spin can sometimes be thought of as something ‘flashy’ or the latest craze, for Larson and her studio, there is an emphasis on year-round fitness, training, achievement and community. Larson first became interested in indoor cycling a few years ago after she took up running. “I found running was really hard on my knees and joints so then I took up cycling and doing triathlons,” she said. “Out of all the parts of the triathlon - run, bike and swim - the bike was my favourite. I started doing bike races and working a lot on the indoor trainer. During winter you can’t be outside so then I would basically do my own spin class in my own basement. I just got hooked and I started taking spin classes.” Most spin classes follow a similar formula. Riders enter the room filled with custom made stationary bikes and if they are new, they are shown how to sit on the bike, how to adjust their seat and where to place their hands on the handlebars. After that, with a warm greeting from the instructor, it’s off to pedaling to the set to the beat of music, first warming up then gradually building. Classes revolve around intervals - bursts of energetic cycling with higher intensity - mimicking hill climbs,

NEON GLOW - Riders pedal on specially-designed stationary bikes during a recent spin class held at Spin Out Studio in Lacombe. Sarah Maetche/Lacombe Express

sprints, or gliding downhill, depending on the type of class and length. Larson said the intent of her studio is to share fitness with people all throughout the year. “I would love to be outdoors everyday but we don’t always have that choice,” she said. “Our intent is to maintain that fitness level so that when you do go outdoors, you are able to hike. You are able to do whatever you want with your family, your friends.” Spin truly does suit all fitness levels, from beginner to advanced. “People often come in under the impression that they have to keep up with the instructor and it scares them,” noted Larson. “But that’s definitely not the case.

It’s your own challenge. It’s your own work out.”

“THAT’S THE JOY OF IT. YOU CAN WORK AS HARD OR AS LITTLE AS YOU WANT. IT’S BASICALLY YOUR OWN WORKOUT.” DAWN LARSON The spin instructors can be thought of as motivators, inspirational coaches

encouraging riders to push themselves further each class. So what exactly is the allure of indoor cycling? Larson said it’s that perfect combination of low impact exercise with cardio. “It’s at your own pace,” she said. “The instructor can say bump up your tension, but if you are not there yet, you just pedal. That’s the joy of it. You just have to keep spinning your legs. You can work as hard or as little as you want. It’s basically your own workout. The instructors are there to challenge what you can do. “We try to keep it fun and light,” said Larson. “It’s not just all about working so hard that you are not enjoying yourself.” news@lacombeexpress.com


ARTS & LEISURE

16 LACOMBE EXPRESS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

A double-barrelled package to treat hypertension Today millions of North Americans suffer hypertension and 99% are being treated by prescription drugs. Studies show that nearly 50% discontinue their medication due to unpleasant side-effects. But tossing away drugs is a hazardous move which can result in earlier death. This week, a double-barrelled natural remedy that helps to prevent high blood pressure. It can also be helpful to those with hypertension who wish to try managing it first without the use of prescription medication. It’s been said that, ‘societies get the blood pressure they deserve.’ It appears we deserve a lot. It’s estimated that 75 million adult North Americans have hypertension. What is more frightening is that doctors are now seeing this disease in young children who are obese and diabetic. What causes hypertension? In some cases doctors cannot pin-point the reason. Sir William Osler, one of the world’s great physicians, said it was good to be born with ‘genetically good rubber’. He was referring to soft, springy arteries less likely to cause hypertension. But since we cannot choose our parents many people, as they age, develop atherosclerosis

Dr. Gifford

JONES (clogged, hardened arteries), the big killer. Good sense tells us that if water pipes in our homes are clogged, the pressure affects the entire house. Similarly, the constant pounding from increased blood pressure on all our arteries and organs results in a host of problems, coronary attack, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and amputation of legs. So what can a double-barrelled approach do to prevent this major killer? Dr. Nathan S. Bryan, at the University of Texas, says that for 100 years researchers have known that nitroglycerine eased angina heart pain by increasing the blood supply to the heart’s muscle. But it was a mystery how this happened. Then researchers discovered the miracle molecule of nitric oxide (NO). They were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1998. Early in life we all produce large amounts of NO in the endothelial lining (the innermost lin-

ing of blood vessels). This keeps arteries expanded. But after age 40 the production of NO decreases, arteries constrict causing hypertension. This constant pressure injures the endothelium and triggers a chemical and inflammatory reaction that kills one North American every 37 seconds. A natural remedy, Neo40, is now available. It sends a message in nanoseconds to endothelial cells to start producing nitric oxide. Dr. Bryan reports some people take L-arginine to produce NO. But Neo40 is more effective since it contains L–citrulline, Vitamin C, beet root and hawthorne. The prescribed dose is to slowly dissolve one tablet in the mouth twice a day for two weeks, then one daily. This provides a quick start to lowering blood pressure. But it’s a lifetime treatment as once a deficiency occurs the body will never again produce sufficient NO. The next part of the double-barrelled attack involves high doses of Vitamin C and lysine. It’s also a lifetime treatment because, unlike animals, humans, due to a genetic mishap, lost the ability to produce this vitamin eons ago. Vitamin

C is needed to produce collagen, the glue that holds cells together and its lack sets the stage for atherosclerosis. The addition of lysine, an amino acid, strengthens arteries, decreasing the risk of rupture and stroke. However, unlike Neo40 that dilates arteries, high doses of C can prevent atherosclerosis, and if already present, begins to unclog all arteries. The dose is 4,000 - 6,000 mg daily of C and 3,000 – 4,000 mg of lysine daily either in capsule or powder form. Dr. Sydney Bush, the English researcher who made this revolutionary discovery, reports it takes six months before the first signs of arterial reversal can be seen. See the dramatic before and after photos at my web site www.docgiff.com It’s unfortunate that most doctors do not know about these natural ways to treat hypertension. Of course there is a place for prescription drugs to treat hypertension. But it’s tragic that these natural, safe and often effective remedies are not tried first. And they are as close as your Health Food Store. And remember prevention of hypertension is as important as treatment. For comments, email info@docgiff.com.

Properly thawing meat for cooking Most of us all lead very busy lives, or at least we claim to. We also freeze meat for future dinners because we either bought too much, it was on sale and so we stocked up, or we just plainly don’t want to grocery shop any more often than we have to. Perhaps you have freezing meat down to a science, such as airtight bags, labels, freezer stock rotation, etc. But what about the thawing process?

Chef

DEZ on Cooking There are a couple of thawing processes that I cringe at the thought of, a couple more that are questionable and two that are ideal depending on how far advanced you are in

your meal planning process. We have all been there: you come home from work, you have little time to prepare dinner and there is no meat thawed to cook with. If you are vegetarian, vegan, or it is the first day of the work week and you celebrate ‘Meatless Monday’, then you are in luck. For the rest of us meat-loving carnivores, what are our options? One of the worst things

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Thursday, March 10 at 6:30 pm County Room, Lacombe Memorial Centre,

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$25

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For information and Tickets: 403-885-5351 Or 403-396-9660

we could have done was to leave meat out on the counter all day to thaw. Food-borne bacteria growth happens at a fast rate between temperatures of 4C and 60C (40F-140F) and food should be kept out of this danger zone as much as possible. Leaving your meat on the counter is not an ideal climate as chances are your kitchen temperature is never below 4C. Some claim that small portions of meat that have been frozen in a flat manner (a thinner mass and more contact with the thawing surface area) can be thawed faster at room temperature if placed on an aluminum pan. Supposedly the aluminum will conduct the heat in the air faster to the meat, and thus provide faster thawing. However, I still believe that this would not be fast enough for safe temperature stabilization. Thawing in the microwave (you know we have all tried this) will bring parts of the meat into the danger zone, but for very little time in contrast to the all-day exposure to room temperature. However, this is still not ideal and microwave thawing also adds the undesirable effect of cooking the outer parts of the meat

during this so-called thawing process. Some insist that leaving the meat in a sink of cold water is best, but I still have to disagree. This is also an uncontrolled environment. Eventually the water temperature will change, albeit slowly because of the chunk of frozen meat submersed in it, because the surrounding air is still room temperature. The two best options in my opinion are as follows. Think ahead and transfer meat from the freezer to the refrigerator for 24 to 72 hours (depending on the mass size of the meat) before you intend on cooking it. This will keep the meat in a safe temperature controlled environment while it thaws. Keep in mind you will want to practice food safe measurements by keeping the meat well contained and in the lower levels of your refrigerator so as to less likely transfer raw meat bacteria to your fridge or other foods. The other option is to make sure the frozen meat is completely sealed in bags with little air. Transfer to a large container that will fit in your sink, but also will not block the flow of water through the drain.

Fill the container with cold water, and then reduce the flow of water to a slow trickle (or slightly more). Let the water continuously overflow over the sides of the container and run down the drain until the meat is thawed. This is very fast as long as the meat has been frozen in individual sized portions (not a bunch of chicken breasts stuck together for example). The continuous cold water will keep the water cold and the movement of the flowing water will also aid in the thawing process. Take note: this is to be done while you are at home and staying focused on the situation - not while you are away from the home. Prepping other parts of the meal while this is happening is a good habit to get into. I have thawed chicken breasts in this manner in less than 30 minutes and seafood in even less time. The obvious downside would be the waste of water. So contained in all good advice of meal planning, retirement savings and countless other situations and topics: plan ahead for best results. Happy cooking! Chef Dez is a food columnist, culinary travel host and cookbook author. Visit him at www.chefdez.com.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

SPORTS

LACOMBE EXPRESS 17

Wranglers swept from playoffs in second round BY ZACHARY CORMIER LACOMBE EXPRESS It wasn’t the way the Blackfalds Wranglers had expected this season to go. The Wranglers’ rollercoaster ride of a year came to an end on Sunday, when they were swept in four games in the Heritage Junior Hockey League North Conference semi-final series by the Mountainview Colts. “I’m proud of these guys. It’s just a crappy way to end it but that’s hockey. Someone’s got to win, someone’s got to lose. We can’t win every year,” said Wranglers Head Coach Sean Neumeier after Sunday’s 4-3 overtime loss to the first place Colts at the Blackfalds Multiplex. The Wranglers have sure seen their fair share of bad luck this season. They lost several key players to injury early in the season, including 2014-15 league-leading scorer Robin Carlson and runner-up Garrett Glasman. Despite that, though, Blackfalds managed to hold their own, especially in the second half of the season when a few of those players returned. “We’ve had a hell of a run. With all of the injuries and stuff that we went through, I think it’s a great year,” Neumeier said. Blackfalds finished the regular season with a 22-12-4 record, enough to put them in fourth place in the North and set up a best of three elimination round meeting with the Three Hills Thrashers. Blackfalds swept the series in two games, including an 8-2 romp in Three Hills in game two, to move on to the best of seven Conference semi-final series. That second round was never going to be easy, though. As the fourth place team, the Wranglers

TOUGH LOSS - From left, Evan Ingram and Jacob Vander Zaag of the Mountainview Colts celebrated teammate Ryan Klinck’s overtime winner while goaltender Nicolas Herrebrugh and defenseman Curtis Rajotte of the Blackfalds Wranglers looked on during game four of the best of seven HJHL North Conference semi-final at the Blackfalds Multiplex on Sunday. The Colts won the game 4-3 in overtime to sweep the Wranglers in four straight games. Zachary Cormier/Lacombe Express were the lowest ranked of the four teams that moved on to the semis, which meant they would have to play the first place Colts, a team against who they posted only a 1-3-0 record during the regular season. And the disparity between the two clubs showed during game one in Didsbury. “Game one should have been ours. That was one that got away in five minutes. They scored two goals in the first two minutes and then three goals in three minutes in the third and that can’t happen. That was one that

we had to have,” Neumeier said of the 5-2 loss during which the Wranglers out shot their opponents 32-31 and went 0 for 9 on the power play. Game two in Blackfalds, Neumeier said, was a slightly different story, despite the 7-2 loss. “The score in the second game didn’t really indicate that game at all. They had an empty net goal, we made a late push. The game was a little closer.” Then came game three, which wasn’t nearly as pretty. “Last night we laid a bit of an egg,” Neumeier said of

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the third game, during which Mountainview trounced the Wranglers 7-1 to take a 3-0 series lead and push them to the brink of elimination. That set the stage for game four, which was hands down the best game Blackfalds played throughout the entire series. They kept it close throughout the entire game, never falling behind by more than one goal. Blackfalds trailed 3-2 heading into the third but a late goal by Tyrell McCubbing, his second of the night, tied the game in dramatic fashion to send it to overtime.

Unfortunately for Blackfalds, the celebration was short-lived. A quick scramble in front of Blackfalds goaltender Nicolas Herrebrugh and a quick flip of the Colts’ Ryan Klinck just 1:19 into OT spelled the end of the game and, with it, the Wranglers’ season. Part of what makes the Colts so good is that they are excellent at exploiting the opportunities that they are given. Over their four game series with Mountainview they managed to outscore the Wranglers 23-9, despite being out shot in two of the games. They had a shooting percentage of 15.2, which is incredibly high for a four-game series. To put that in perspective, when the Chicago Blackhawks swept the Minnesota Wild in the second round of the 2015 NHL playoffs, they outscored the Wild 13-7 despite being out shot 131113. They posted a shooting percentage of 11.5 in that series and went on to win the Stanley Cup. “They’re first for a reason. That’s a good hockey team. We can’t be devastated that we lost to them, we’re the underdogs. On paper we were supposed to lose but you still never like to,” Neumeier said. Despite the disappointing end to the season, the coach added he’s optimistic about what next year might hold. “I think next year we’re going to be strong. Those affiliate players that we had are really good and they’re going to come join us. We might lose five or six guys but we get five or six APs that are ready to jump in too. We’re going to miss our 21-year-olds, they’re phenomenal people and great athletes but I think next year we’ll be really strong.” zcormier@lacombeexpress.com


SPORTS

18 LACOMBE EXPRESS

ATHLETES - The Zone 4 female hockey team finished first in Pool A at the recent Alberta Winter Games. The team battled hard in the gold semi-final only to find a loss four minutes into overtime. They finished the 2016 Alberta Winter Games strong battling the first place Pool B winner for the bronze. Unfortunately, with a few minutes left in the third, the opposing Zone 6 squeezed them out by one goal. The girls finished fourth overall. Players from the Lacombe area include Hailey Hoogkamp, Zoe Lorenz-Boser, Racheal Wood and Julie Wagner. photo submitted

PUBLIC NOTICE

Subdivision and Development Appeal Board Hearing An objection has been made to the Subdivision and Development Appeal Board against a February 3, 2016 decision made by the City of Lacombe Municipal Planning Commission to approve an application for conversion of two vacant commercial spaces to residential use, within a mixed use commercial/ residential building at C3 and C4, 4425 Heritage Way, Blocks 41 and 42, Plan 052 3783, zoned C2, with a 53 percent variance to the amount of space required to be designated for commercial use within the mixed use commercial/residential building to allow for the additional residential suites. The appeal relates to effects on the value and business growth of an occupied commercial bay.

TIME OF HEARING: 7:00 p.m. DATE OF HEARING: March 9, 2016 PLACE OF HEARING: City Hall Council Chambers City of Lacombe Municipal Office 5432 56 Avenue, Lacombe Any person affected by the proposed development may present a brief at the hearing. Written submissions should be presented to the Secretary of the Subdivision and Development Appeal Board, and must be received no later than 1:00 PM on Friday, March 4, 2016. DATE of First Publication: February 25, 2016 DATE of Second Publication: March 3, 2016 For information contact: Secretary, Subdivision and Development Appeal Board Phone: 403.782.1287

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

COMPETITORS - The Zone 4 ringette team attended the Alberta Winter Games in Medicine Hat earlier this month. The team is made up of players from Lacombe and Red Deer. Top row from left are Ami Rintoul, Kaylee Ludlow, Megan Taylor, Erin Musselman, Kianna Doyle, Katelyn Litwin, Victoria Derwantz, Holland Wagensveld, Bev Smith and Melissa Drake. Middle row from left are Aspen Dorn, Sierra Hilman, Kaylie Lyons, Adrienne Boudreau, Cassidy Lyons, Kaity Engel, Elyssa Leedahl. Bottom row from left are Camyrn Hutchison and Kendra Pollock. photo submitted

Central Alberta Sting ready to host provincials BY ZACHARY CORMIER LACOMBE EXPRESS It’s going to be a very busy weekend around the rinks in Lacombe. The 2016 Ringette Alberta AA Provincial Championships are set to kick off in the city this week, with the top teams in the province competing for the chance to represent Alberta on the national stage. “It’s really a neat thing for us,” said Shawn Wagar, the media contact for the Central Alberta Sting AA Ringette Club, who are hosting the tournament this year and are representing Lacombe. “You get lots of parents and grandparents and friends coming out to watch the various games and for us to have it in Central

Alberta is pretty cool.” More than 20 teams across all three divisions of AA ringette in Alberta will be in the city to take part in the tournament, which runs from Friday through Sunday this week, with the opening ceremonies taking place on Thursday evening. “It’s a very prestigious tournament. If you win the tournament at the 16 or the 19 level, you represent Alberta and become Team Alberta for Nationals and if you win it at the 14 level you become Team Alberta to go on to Westerns, so there’s some incentive there too,” said Wagar, who coached the CA Sting U14AA team to a Provincial Championship in St. Albert last season. The majority of the games this weekend will

Public Meeting to Discuss Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) Use on Gull Lake Environmental Reserve Interested persons are invited to attend a community meeting to discuss this matter on March 8th at 7pm at the Lacombe County Municipal building on Spruceville road. Please refer to the article on our website at www.lacombecounty.com and in the February County News. If you have any questions or concerns please contact Blayne West, Environmental Coordinator at 403-782-8959

take place at the Barnett Arenas in Lacombe, with a few scattered matchups at the Dawe Centre in Red Deer. “The games start off early Friday morning and go all the way until Sunday and Sunday’s the championship round, so our playoffs will be in the morning and then the gold medal games will go later in the day,” Wagar said. All three Central Alberta Sting teams are going into the tournament in a good position to compete. “Our U19s are having a great New Year, here. They’re coming in ranked very high,” said Wagar, adding the team won a pair of back to back tournaments in January, including the prestigious Calgary Golden Ring. The U16 Sting, he said, are coming off two very successful weekends playing in Vancouver and Regina, where they played Team Saskatchewan.

“They ended up winning four of five in Vancouver and then two of three in Saskatchewan,” Wagar said, adding the U14 team also made the trip out to Vancouver where they swept their series. “We’re all coming in on a fairly good high.” In addition to the great ringette, tournament attendees on Saturday afternoon will have the opportunity to meet six members of Canada’s National Ringette team and have their picture taken with the World Championship Trophy, which Canada won in December. “They’re going to do some autographs and some things like that.” All three Central Alberta Sting teams are in action on Friday, with the U19s starting at 8:15 a.m., the U14s at 12:15 p.m. and the U16s at 1:45 p.m. All of those games take place at the Barnett Arenas. zcormier@lacombeexpress.com

Lacombe Minor Softball AGM/ REGISTRATION NIGHT

Feb 29th 2016 @ 7:00pm County Room

Lacombe Memorial Centre 5214 - 50 Avenue Registration forms & Information available @

www.lacombeminorsoftball.com


HOMES & LIVING

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

LACOMBE EXPRESS 19

WITH A VIEW - This upstairs lounge area in a Colbray Homes show home in Blackfalds features large windows, offers views of the surrounding neighbourhood and gives the room an open feel.

Zachary Cormier/Lacombe Express

Don’t be afraid to explore fresh design ideas Lately there has been a great inspiration for change in my life. When I switched my career last fall it felt like jumping out of an airplane but the free fall was exhilarating and life affirming. I am always looking for new ways to reinvent myself and sometimes I can get ahead of what life is actually offering me. Now that I am working on selling homes I find that the reach back into what is comfortable and safe is all too tempting and when the new path I am on gets difficult I’m fighting the urge to run back to what is familiar. It can take a great deal of courage to step out into something new, like a new home or a new life. There will be times of doubt and many days of panic as you wonder what the heck you have done to yourself. Whether you are bidding on a new home or tearing

2016 2015

Kim

WYSE down walls in your existing house that initial leap can be terrifying and sometimes that fear can completely stop the progress. The journey to success begins with a single step, so how do you dig down and find the courage to put that first foot out? It is a matter of being alright with the outcome and to believe in your ability to make good decisions. I know that my home has potential for rental income and I’ve got to take the big leap to develop the basement and trust that this is the best decision for my future both with added revenue and for

future sale. Many people hold off on home renovations until they are just about to list and then do all the things that they had been planning for years. If a renovation is planned well and budgeted correctly you can benefit from the immediate enjoyment or increased revenue without worrying about when you will sell the home, it is a win-win situation. I always advise people who are unsure to take baby steps; paint a wall or buy new accessories. I had a client last week who started by painting one wall and soon area rugs and accessories were purchased. The thrill of accomplishment was palpable for her and I was so happy to see her be able to start making this house (that I had sold her) into her home. It just took a first step and I know that the fire has been lit and that she and her husband will be

diving into some more significant home renovations soon! Many times we fear stepping out because we don’t want to look foolish or like we don’t know something. I was hanging out with my new beau on Valentine’s Day and his dad called and wanted help feeding the cows because he had broken his arm. I was invited to help and to ride on the back of the tractor! I’m a city girl through and through and had to swallow my pride and climb up on that beast to take hay out to the large, stinky beasts. Before too long I was in the tractor learning how to drive – me in my sparkly nails and blinged out jewelry was quite a site shifting gears! Have courage, grab onto that next project with confidence and just go for it! Kim Wyse is a local freelance designer. Find her on Facebook at ‘Ask a Designer’.

Mark Your Calendars! th

MARCH 4, 5 & 6

Fri

12p

4

m-8

pm

Sat

10a

5

m-6

pm

Sun

10a

6

m-5

pm

www.RedDeerHomeShow.ca

Inspiring Change for 37 years!


20 LACOMBE EXPRESS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2016

Save 10% on your grocery purchases and enter to

Three Day Sale - Feb. 26-28 Kraft Singles or Asparagus Cracker Barrel Slices

WIN YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE BACK!

Tuesday March 1st

3 for

February Winners:

Lacombe: Leita Salomons Deer Park: Martin McKendrick Plaza: Ruby Linklater Innisfail: Margaret Wagers Spruce View: Robert Shippelt

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1 Pint Package Imported

Co-op Gold Thick Sliced Side Bacon

each

3

$

.49

Dempster’s English Muffins

1Kg package Limit 2

package of 6

6

8

$

Parkay Margarine

each

.99

Navel Oranges

2 for

$

2 lb

$ .49

No. 1 Grade imported

FRIDAY, Feb. 26 to THURSDAY, March 3 – 10% Tuesday March 1st

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Blueberries

9

$ .99

Selected Varieties First 3

$163.50 $228.77 $198.09 $120.32 $61.72

$5.49/kg

1/4 Squares or Soft 1.28-1.36kg

Large Size Produce of U.S.A

each

2.99

$

Nestle Real Dairy Ice Cream or Novelties

$2.18/kg

.99lb ¢

Selected Varieties - 1.5L or 4-12 Pack

It’s Back & Bigger Than Ever!

each

4.99

$

Starts Friday, Feb. 26th

Co-op Pork Side Ribs

Breast Bone Off - Value Pack Cut In-store from Fresh Western Canadian Pork

$7.69/kg

3.49 lb

$

Central Alberta Co-op English Estates Centre – Lacombe 403-782-6200 Open Daily until 9pm www.centralab.coop

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Lacombe Express, February 25, 2016  

February 25, 2016 edition of the Lacombe Express

Lacombe Express, February 25, 2016  

February 25, 2016 edition of the Lacombe Express