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Volume 62 No. 06

Shell delays final decision on LNG project

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

1.30 INCLUDES TAX

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By Todd Hamilton Kitimat Northern Sentinel Royal Dutch Shell is delaying its final investment decision (FID) from the anticipated April 2016 timeline to December on the proposed LNG Canada terminal in Kitimat. In its 2015 fourth-quarter report, Royal Dutch Shell, a 50 per cent stakeholder in the “This is not project, stated that a final decision will inconsistent investment now be made in late with the 2016, however, LNG said the news information Canada is not startling and very LNG Canada much in keeping with has shared their timeline. “Shell’s quarterly with the results [Thursday] community.” included information that the LNG Canada project FID decision will occur right at the end of this year. This is not inconsistent with information LNG Canada has shared with the community,” Kirsten Walker, LNG Canada spokesperson, said in a prepared statement. “We have always stated that our joint venture participants plan to make a final investment decision in 2016. We are pleased, given the current oil and LNG prices, and turmoil in global energy markets that the joint venture participants in LNG Canada are still working toward a final investment decision for the proposed facility late this year.” Continued on Page 2

Kitimat, the town the Portugal built

Page 8 Marlins are the champs at Northwest Regionals Page 12 PM477761

Members of the Haisla Sr. Ladies — representing Kitamaat — enter the opening ceremonies at the 57th Annual All Native Basketball Tournament in Prince Rupert on Sunday. The Haisla team earned a first-round bye and tipped off in their first game on Monday night. Shannon Lough photo

Feds silent over $100 million duty By Jackie Lieuwen Special to the Kitimat Northern Sentinel Nathan Cullen doesn’t understand why federal customs authorities want to place a $100 million duty on a floating platform which would contain a liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant planned for the Kitimat area. The NDP MP for Skeena-Bulkley Valley said attempts to find answers have, so far, met with silence. The floating platform which would be moored offshore in the Douglas Channel is part of the planned Douglas Channel LNG being promoted by Calgary energy company AltaGas and partners. At an estimated $600 million, the project is one of the smallest LNG projects being proposed but also one of the more advanced because it would take natural gas from the existing Pacific North-

ern Gas pipeline already servicing northwestern B.C. But federal customs officials last year ruled the floating platform is a ship and slapped on the $100 million duty using regulations designed to encourage domestic ship building. In this circumstance the platform would be built at an Asian site and towed across the Pacific. AltaGas has appealed the ruling, saying the platform does not have the characteristics of a navigable vessel and have been waiting for the results of the appeal since late last fall. In a letter sent in December to federal public safety minister Ralph Goodale, Cullen noted that the duty would add to the cost of the project. “This represents a tremendous barrier for this small-scale but important project, which has strong support from local com-

munities and First Nations,” wrote Cullen to Goodale, who is responsible for the Canadian Border Service Agency. Cullen now says he’ll redouble efforts to find out what is happening. “It would seem there is a relatively easy fix,” said Cullen this week in emphasizing that importing the planned floating platform for Douglas Channel LNG would not contravene the reasoning behind the customs duty provision which is to protect Canadian shipbuilders. “There’s some urgency. Here we have a project which has a lot of [local] support. You’d think the government would be in support at a time when there isn’t a lot of economic activity,” said Cullen. Last fall when AltaGas officials announced they were appealing the duty decision, they said it would also affect several other LNG projects planning to use floating platforms.


2 Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Project still on track: LNG Canada Continued from Page 1 Business analysts had expected the consortium of Royal Dutch Shell, PetroChina, Mitsubishi Corp., and Korea Gas Corp., in partnership with the Haisla First Nation to make a decision in April whether or not to proceed with the $40-billion (Cdn) project. Shell released its 2015 fourth-quarter results that showed a 44 per cent drop in earnings due mainly to slumping oil prices, a major factor in the postponement of the FID. “The LNG Canada joint venture partners have agreed that due to market conditions, it makes sense to shift the FID decision to late 2016. In the meantime, the joint venture will continue to work on the competitiveness of the project,” Tara Lemay, a Shell Canada spokeswoman, said in a statement. Shell did not stop there noting they have already begun to drastically cut expenses. “Operating costs and capital investment have been reduced by a total of $12.5 billion as compared to 2014, and we expect further reductions in 2016,” said Shell CEO Ben van Beurden. LNG Canada and the Province of British Columbia were quick to point out that the announcement by Shell is, given market conditions, quite promising.

Premier Christy Clark, who campaigned on having at least one small LNG operation up and running in 2016 and three more by 2020, told reporters in Ottawa that the announcement was actually positive. “To me the good news in that, when you see energy projects getting cancelled all over the world, and you see producers cutting their capital investment in Alberta, in countries across the globe, (LNG Canada) announced that they’re re-committing to the project in British Columbia,” the Vancouver Sun reported. “The date’s changed but their commitment to it hasn’t, and you see that they’ve put it in writing.” Katharine Birtwistle of LNG Canada also issued a statement saying “we are still very much on track” to make a decision in late 2016. Susannah Pierce, director of external relations for LNG Canada, said despite the announcement current site preparation will continue. “This doesn’t impact our early work projects,” she said. “It’s still very, very critical to prove to our joint venture partners ... we have a very viable site. “We still have a very full year of work ahead of us.” See related story on Page 3

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REGIONAL BRIEFS River study  B.C.’s Ministry of the Environment is launching a study of water quality in the Kitimat River and some of its tributaries. A Northwest Coast Energy News report said that Jessica Penno, from the regional operations branch in Smithers, held a meeting with representatives of the District of Kitimat, the Haisla Nation Council, LNG Canada, Kitimat LNG, Rio Tinto BC Operations, Douglas Channel Watch, Kitimat Valley Naturalists and the Steelhead Society. Requests for an interview with Penno by the Northern Sentinel were not immediately returned.

Wells on In a report by Pipeline News North, Woodside Petroleum Corporation said that the Kitimat LNG Joint Venture brought its first Liard Basin well into production during the fourth quarter of 2015. The corporation also reports that the second development scale appraisal well was completed during the quarter and will be brought into production in early 2016. “Production from these wells will help confirm the performance of the Liard Basin,” Woodside wrote in its fourth quarter report Jan. 20. “The project continues to progress through the concept select phase.” The National Energy Board has approved an export licence and the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office reports the project was “substantially started” as of September 2015.

LNG Canada still committed to project By Tom Fletcher Special to the Kitimat Northern Sentinel With a world-wide slump in oil and natural gas prices extending further than expected, the Shell-led liquefied natural gas project proposed for Kitimat has delayed its final investment decision until the end of the year. The LNG Canada project is a key part of the B.C. government’s bid to enter the global LNG export market. Along with delays on the Petronas-led Pacific Northwest LNG proposed for Prince Rupert, the chances of a large LNG project being under construction by the 2017 provincial election have faded. Premier Christy Clark was attending an industrial development conference in Ottawa when the delay was revealed in Shell’s quarterly update. As with other global energy companies, the glut of oil resulted in a 44 per cent in earnings for Shell compared to the same quarter last year. Clark, who rode the prospect of an LNG revenue bonanza to victory in the 2013 B.C. election, acknowledged that the delay is significant. “What I was pleased to see, though, is that Shell has reconfirmed its intention to make a final investment decision this year, even in these very uncertain times,” Clark said. LNG Canada CEO Andy Calitz was attending the same conference and he noted that the delay means all four international partners have agreed to stay with the project. “LNG Canada is in great shape as a proj-

LNG Canada CEO Andy Calitz announces project proceeding to engineering and environmental assessment, joined by officials from PetroChina, Mitsubishi and Korea Gas as well as Premier Christy Clark and Natural Gas Development Minister Rich Coleman, April 30, 2014. Black Press photo ect,” Calitz said. “We have all our federal and provincial environmental approvals in place, and the National Energy Board recently decided that they support a 40-year export licence.” Another factor in the delay is the ongoing Shell takeover of British Gas Group, which had its own proposal to build a pipeline and LNG

terminal in the Prince Rupert area. LNG Canada has an agreement with TransCanada Corp. to build a pipeline through the Rocky Mountains from northeastern B.C., where Shell and others have major gas drilling operations in the Montney shale near Dawson Creek and other gas-rich formations.

Kitimat crime stats down significantly By Jackie Lieuwen Special to the Kitimat Northern Sentinel Crime in Kitimat has dropped significantly from 2014, with 700 less calls in 2015 compared to 2016. “Stats across the board have been generally down.. we are down to 2009-2010 levels,” said RCMP Sergeant James McLaren.

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$5,000, shoplifting, mischief and disturbances. Looking at traffic, motor vehicle warnings dropped from 607 to 585 and alcohol and drug suspensions dropped from 101 to 79 from 2014 to 2015. But the number of tickets police issued increased by nearly 100, from 375 in 2014 to 478 in 2015. Continued on page 6

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Overall call volume in 2015 was 3,864 calls, compared to 4,558 in 2014. Nearly all the more serious crime categories saw decreases in 2015 compared to 2014, including sexual and physical assaults, break ins and vehicle thefts. There has also been decreases in the more minor crimes from 2014 to 2015, including drug possession, criminal harassment, threats, thefts under

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4 Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Viewpoints

PUBLISHED BY BLACK PRESS LTD. AT 626 ENTERPRISE AVE. KITIMAT BC

Bewildering Sometimes events leave me shaking my head in wonderment. The recent Salmon Nation Summit hosted by the Friends of Wild Salmon in Prince Rupert is a prime example. The headline grabber of this conference was the Lelu Island Declaration which stated that Lelu Island, and Flora and Agnew Banks are hereby protected for all time as a refuge for wild salmon and marine resources, and are to be held in trust for all future generations. Lelu Island is where Petronas wants to locate its proposed LNG plant which would include a pier that runs out into Flora Bank, a plan that has raised concerns about the negative impact of the project in salmonrearing habitat on the bank and, by extension, salmon stocks the length of the Skeena River system. I am not going to get into the pros and cons of the proposal because that was not what caused my wonderment. Looking back, First Nations had for many years complained that they were not being consulted about development in their traditional territories. Successive court rulings have upheld that view with the result everyone should by now be clear that such consultation is a must when it comes to any action which could affect First Nations’ rights and title. Yet that does not seem to be the case with the declaration. While a number of First Nations stretching from the coast to interior signed the document, elected chiefs of the Gitxaala, Metlakatla, Kitsumkalum, Kitselas and Gitgaat made it clear the declaration was made without their consultation or support. So we have the bewildering spectacle of one group of First Nations flagrantly ignoring the need to consult with another group of First Nations. Even more bewildering is that federal Skeena MP Nathan Cullen and provincial Skeena MLA Robin Austin signed this declaration without, to quote the dissenting five chiefs, “any prior consultation or involvement with Tsimshian communities.” All the more so, since the overwhelming majority of members of those Fist Nations voted for Cullen and Austin in the last federal/ provincial elections. - Malcolm Baxter

Just wondering about a few things ... Just some random thoughts -- not quite one-liners ... but nothing that can be dealt with easily. I had a wish granted today. For weeks, I’ve been “put off” by media photos and video of Bill Cosby in ugly sweats and with a quarter-inch of truly ugly white stubble. Today, in court, in Norristown, Pa. — he showed up, clean shaven and wearing a smart suit and tie. Cosby looked a whole lot better. He is trying to get a judge to agree that a 10-year-old legal agreement absolves him from the pursuit of numerous sexual assault charges against him. Without pre-judging, I think a few trials are needed. The Great Bear Rainforest ... It has taken 20 years, but that area formerly known as the central and northern B.C. coastal region, plus the Queen Charlotte Islands; (an area, incidentally, that had been renamed the “Great Bear Rainforest” by a vague network of environmental non-governmental organizations, without any real consultation with local residents,) has now been 85 per cent protected

Under Miscellaneous by Allan Hewitson ahewitson@telus.net

from industrial logging, as a result of a Feb. 1 agreement reached between the Province of B.C. regional First Nations, the environmentalists and the forestry industry. The remaining 15 per cent may still be subject to logging, but under stringent conditions. So, let’s just see what happens now ... but, really, we could use a break in the “calamity” rhetoric directed at the region associated with northern energy proposals ... please? Syrian emigrants/refugees? While some may say, “you were warned” — Canada’s immigration minister, John McCallum seems semioblivious to many of the overwhelming problems being experienced by the

Liberal government along with its private sponsors, in achieving their ambitious plans to resettle 25,000 Syrian refugees in Canada. It seems nothing evokes a negative response from the ever-cheery McCallum, who is unremittingly focussed on achieving his numbers. “Canada has always been able to do this ... so, they will now ...” seems to be his everyday repetitive answer to such issues as cities crying, “hold it -we have no more affordable housing,” Questions on education, lack of language skills, health needs, or a bottle-neck in the flow of people through hotels are brushed off, as is the suggestion that Canadian citizens are being turned out of hotel housing and being pushed on to the street to make room. “We’re still within budget ... and have not yet needed to dip into contingency funds, he says, with about twothirds of his target total on Canadian soil. He acknowledges he has 150 families needing sponsorship — and five sponsor offers left on his list. Continued on Page 5

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The Kitimat Northern Sentinel is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulating body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to the B.C. Press Council, PO Box 1356, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. For more information phone 1-888-687-2213, or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org. Published every Wednesday by the Northern Sentinel • LOUISA GENZALE - Publisher / General Manager • CAMERON ORR - Editor 626 Enterprise Ave., Kitimat, BC V8C 2E4 • Ph. 250 632-6144 • Fax 250 639-9373 • Email newsroom@northernsentinel.com • www.northernsentinel.com KITIMAT NORTHERN SENTINEL Reg. $41.65 Senior $37.50 Mail: out of town or business $60.45. Includes tax.


Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016 5

Continued from Page 4 But Canadians will step up - they always have, says McCallum. Another one to watch, as the election promise stumbles along its way with little attention paid to side issues... Windows 10 ... now, or later? If you are a computer user, are you using Window 10 yet? I have a laptop, on which I am stubbornly running Windows 7 and a new desktop with Windows 10 downloaded. So you might think I’m in the middle, but really I am not. When I use my desktop, yes, I use the W10 system, but precisely the way I operate with W7. I use very few of the slew of programs that come with Windows 10. But I see my options to procrastinate are closing in, with Microsoft suddenly suggesting as of this week, it may change the status of “recommended” to mean that Windows 10 is going to install itself on the PCs of most of its users who have not made the upgrade. The change in tone has occurred abruptly. Last October Terry Myerson, executive vice president, Windows and Devices Group, issued this warning in a blog post: “Early next year, we expect to be re-categorizing Windows 10 as a “Recommended Update.” Depending upon your Windows Update settings, this may cause the upgrade process to automatically initiate on your device.” As it happens, “early next year” began on Feb. 1. Microsoft, announcing the change said: “We are committed to making it easy for our Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 customers to upgrade to Windows 10. We have updated the upgrade experience today for some of our customers, who had previously reserved their upgrade, to schedule a time for their upgrade to take place. Users are fully in control of their devices.” But clearly, Microsoft’s patience is limited.

Readers Write Letter to the Editor

Kitimat comes through for Food Bank Editor, There are many individuals, organizations and businesses who assist the Food Bank on a regular basis and we would like to thank them all for their ongoing support over the years: Overwaitea, Fields, Your Dollar Store With More, Pyramid Office Supplies, Robin Austin’s office, Ti Mat (Stacey), City Centre Mall, Envision Financial, Beitz Computer & Office Supplies, all the local schools and churches, Super Valu was a very strong Food Bank supporter for many years and now No Frills will carry on in their place. In my last letter I missed thanking Robin and Bill Willis who also give numerous volunteer hours to the Food Bank. The following groups brought in food and gifts before Christmas –

Snow Valley Ford, Marlin Swim Club, Vitality Spa & Clinic, Bandstra Transportation Systems Ltd., District of Kitimat (Tamitik and Riverlodge) and Shopper’s Drug Mart. Final donations received include: D. Egan $100; J A Hildebrandt $150; LNG Kitimat Food Bank Challenge $300; K. Douglas $60; D.L. Baker $2,000; S. Blackman $25; M. Gastel $100; Food Banks BC $1,404.26; D. Gleig $50; L. Mueller $250; C. Willis $100; J.M. McLeod (in memory of Nidia Cabral) $25; P. Reiter $50; B. Cranch $150, R. Krickan $100; L&P Larose $250; W&P Dawson $200; Golder Associates $1,000, C Yan $200; F Wheeler $500; M. Maesiele $100 and K. Lewis $100 for a grand total of $50,387.11. WOW! This brought us very close

to the $52,186.93 raised in 2014! These donations, along with all the gifts and food, allowed us to fill more than 272 hampers at Christmas and gives us enough to carry on through 2016. This continues to show how generous the citizens of Kitimat and Kitamaat Village are when it comes to supporting the less fortunate members of their communities. Thank you all again for your generosity. Once again a huge thank you to all the media and the Northern Sentinel who continue to ensure “the word” gets out to the community – we could not manage without all your support. Wishing each and every one a very prosperous and happy 2016. Sincerely, Luella Froess Publicity Chair

MSP-itis spreading to local government Editor, Sound the alarm: the provincial government’s MSP-itis is spreading. For years, the B.C. government has separated the Medical Services Plan (MSP) tax from income taxes as a way to make income taxes appear lower. It’s a hat trick for government: they still get their money, they get to claim they have the lowest income tax rates in Canada, and they get to brag at election time that they didn’t raise your income taxes. Now it appears cities are catching the bug. Around British Columbia, municipal councils are introducing or hiking infrastructure levies, carving them out from the overall property tax rate. This lets them give taxpayers the impression

PUBLIC NOTICE

Temporary Use Permit The District of Kitimat invites public comment before making a decision on the following land use application. TEMPORARY USE PERMIT, PAULA KEECH PHOTOGRAPHY The District of Kitimat is considering an application from Paula Keech regarding a Home Photography Studio at 103 Charles Street. Maximum permit is three years, one renewal for a further three years may be considered in 2019. NEED MORE INFO? The application, public comment received and other background material is available for review at the District of Kitimat reception desk, 270 City Centre, 8:30am to noon and 1:00 to 4:30pm, Monday to Friday excluding statutory holidays. Most of this information is also available at www.kitimat.ca/pn. Further inquiries should be directed to Community Planning & Development at 250-632-8900. HOW TO PROVIDE COMMENT Anyone wishing to comment on this issue may provide comment by email to dok@kitimat.ca; fax 250-632-4995; or to Community Planning & Development staff c/o 270 City Centre, V8C 2H7. Comments regarding the application must be received before Monday, February 22, 2016 at 4:30pm.

HAVE A STORY? Tell us about it! Email newsroom@northernsentinel.com or publisher@northernsentinel.com with your information

that they are dutifully holding the line on property tax increases, while still taking more money from homeowners. Make no mistake: we want our municipalities to invest in infrastructure. Sewer, water, roads; these are core responsibilities of local government and should be given priority. But repackaging this spending with a new tax is a slap in the face, especially given the steady, never-ending march of property tax hikes. Where has all the money gone that we already send city hall? Why haven’t those continual tax increases been invested in infrastructure? The truth your mayor doesn’t want you to know is that most councils have blown all that extra money on wages and

Weekly Crossword Solution in the Classifieds Clues Across

1. Iota 6. Goya’s “Duchess of ___” 10. Language of Lahore 14. Dance music 15. Cashmere, e.g. 16. “High” time 17. Fixing deeply 19. Forte 20. Old World wading birds with whiteand-black plumage 21. Oolong, for one 22. “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto) 23. Fix firmly 25. Absolute 26. Ancient Italian deity in human shape, with horns, pointed ears and a goat’s tail 30. Out-and-out 32. Charge a public official with an offense while in office 35. Large log traditionally burned at

Clues Down

1. The Beatles’ “___ Leaving Home” 2. Bridge, in Bretagne 3. “Cogito ___ sum” 4. “The Alienist” author 5. Uniform shade 6. Barley bristle 7. Hang around 8. Without a trace of moisture 9. Aquatic plant 10. Having little acquaintance with writing 11. Fowl place 12. Drench 13. Anesthetized 18. Denotes a state or condition, belief or principle 24. “___, humbug!” 25. Dark 26. Various evergreen trees of the genus Abies 27. “Absolutely!” 28. “What’ve you been ___?” 29. Cad

Christmas 39. Render verbally, “recite a poem” 40. Harangue 41. Breathing device for a swimmer 43. Elects 44. Hindu festival in October/ November celebrating the end of the monsoon 46. Mar, in a way 47. Birchbark 50. Directory contents 53. Acknowledge 54. Infomercials, e.g. 55. Out of working order 60. Ask 61. Disposition to laugh 63. Cambodian money 64. “Idylls of the King” character 65. Hyperion, for one 66. Romantic interlude 67. Long, long time 68. “South Pacific” hero

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benefits – not on repairing or building infrastructure. Taxpayers need to vaccinate their municipal councils against MSP-itis, and the only way to do that is to make themselves heard. If your community is looking to bring in a new infrastructure levy, push back. Demand that costs savings be found within city hall, and that money be reprioritized to these bread and butter issues. Ask why recent property tax hikes haven’t been sufficient to cover these vital investments. Ask how much of new property tax revenue has gone to staffing in recent years. Only together can we stop MSP-itis. Jordan Bateman B.C. Director Canadian Taxpayers Federation 4

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6 Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Crime numbers down, mental health files show dramatic increase Continued from page 3 Collisions were also down, from 157 in 2014 to 132 in 2015. The notable increase was in calls regarding mental health issues. In 2014, police dealt with 62 such files, but in 2015 that nearly doubled to 114. Asked by the District of Kitimat council why the increase, Sgt. McLaren said an increase is partly because of police assisting hospital staff, but it is also because they are growing in awareness. “I think we are just getting a bit more aware and control of scoring… understanding what we are trying to do when it comes to mental health,” he said. He said police have been developing tighter protocols and meeting with the administration at the hospital. “Cops and medical people sometimes don’t speak the same language and our priorities of action are a bit different at times, and we are getting a grip on that now.” Councillor Rob Goffinet said he had seen files of how police responded to mental health files at the hospital and the emergency shelter and thought highly of police response. “I must commend you, I think the detachment in Kitimat has got a good rapport with some people that are stretched,” he said. “If anything I am heartened by these numbers because I have seen you intervene positively, helping people. I would have said the

interaction was positive and you are almost like a helper in the community rather then just a police person. You are doing a lot more… I commend you with that.”

“Cops and medical people sometimes don’t speak the same language ...” A quick brief of staffing levels at the detachment, Sgt.

McLaren said they have only two vacancies, one corporal and

one road supervisor position that they are looking to fill.

“Right now we are doing really good,” he said. “We are maintaining our schedule and our coverage hours. We are not hurting in any way.”

He added that police are also continuing to upgrade training, including training in basic investigation as well as internet and computer crime investigation.

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Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016 7

Toastmasters New credit union eyeing move to Kitimat prove their worth in Kitimat By Cameron Orr Kitimat Northern Sentinel

eastern B.C. which is heavily reliant on the fortunes of the oil and gas industry. Chilcott said the move is intended to spread the risk and so provide North Peace with more than one geographical area of operation. “Credit unions in B.C. are provincially regulated so we could not go into Alberta and the Yukon is to the north,” he said. There are no geographic limitations imposed on B.C. credit unions – Kitimat’s credit union is Envision, a branch of a larger Lower Mainland credit union and

Chilcott noted that Northern Savings moved into Terrace from Prince Rupert, eventually absorbing the former Terrace and District Credit Union. “Members from Terrace, Kitimat and Prince Rupert will have access to NPSCU’s full range of business and personal banking services using Smart Technology and a local business account manager. The North Coast’s demographic aligns itself with NPSCU’s vision to be the preferred financial institution among small and medium-sized enterprises and

residents in every community that they serve,” Heather Desarmia, NPSCU spokesperson said. Chilcott hopes North Peace can hire a local person who is already familiar with the area. Formed in 1947, North Peace Savings and Credit Union has more than 13,300 members, an asset base of $492 million and branches in Fort St. John, Fort Nelson, Hudson’s Hope and Taylor, the latter location being 180 square feet in size with just one employee and a video connection to its other branches.

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Randy Norman said it was a hard time in his life which prompted him to look at Toastmasters as a way to get involved in the community and, most importantly, meet people. The year was 2005 when he first gave the club a shot. He worked at then-Alcan with the current Toastmaster president who encouraged him to attend. Toastmasters International’s stated purpose is to develop people’s communication and leadership skills. That’s obtained by following the club’s curriculum, done entirely at your own pace. The communication educational track is what most people likely recognize Toastmasters for; that’s the one which requires giving speeches. Speech giving is only one aspect of the club. Another, equally crucial aspect, is the immediate evaluations which follow speeches. Norman says he saw the potential for his personal growth. Today he credits the club for a major rebuilding of his confidence in the time since he joined. His star rose quickly within the organization. In 2007 he took on the role of Vice President of Membership, then did Vice President of Education, and spent three years as president. Then, he said, he made the “mistake” of asking too many questions and learned that the area governor for the club — which oversees the area including Prince Rupert to Smithers — was sick and left the post. Norman took on the job in 2011 but this year backed away from that role after three years in the job. The past-Kitimat president Reg Barnes stepped in, giving Kitimat a strong presence in the Toastmasters circles for the north. Norman has completed the first Toastmaster communications manual called the Competent Communicator and has his Competent Leader manual finished too. “It was a great experience,” he said, saying he felt the support from the whole organization. Norman pushed himself through the higher levels of the club and now boasts that he’s reached Distinguished Toastmaster, which is one of the highest distinctions members can receive. Norman says he’s seen other programs but thinks Toastmasters has the best public speaking and leadership development program, crediting mentoring and coaching within the club as a part of that. Not only that but the networking aspect of the club, from the local club to the district level too, has been very helpful. His goal of meeting new people when he signed up in 2005 has been met, and then some. During his time as Area Governor he even earned an Area Governor of the Year award. The nod came unexpectedly but he hands credit back to the club and its support. Due to other life commitments he’s unsure how involved he’ll be in the Toastmasters in the year ahead but he said whether an active member or not he will never hesitate to recommend the club to people. He sees its value everywhere, even at workplace meetings. He said he watched a speaker not long ago who used so many ‘filler’ words in their presentation. (An um here, an ah there.) Working together with fellow members, there is also continuous self-improvement.

Northeastern B.C.’s North Peace Savings and Credit Union (NPSCU) is moving into Kitimat, Terrace and Prince Rupert. Placing a business account manager in Terrace who, for now, will work out of his or her home, is being described as a modest first step. “We’re starting from zero and will build from there,” North Peace chief executive officer Mitchel Chilcott said. The decision has been two years in the making and is meant to diversify North Peace’s business out of north-

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8 Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Kitimat

Part II

The town that Portugal built Former Mayor Ray Brady raises the Portuguese Flag for a past Camoes/Portugal Day celebration. Below left, the Portugal soccer team poses at the village before a match. Below right, is the Luso Canadian club float in Kitimat’s famed First of July parade.

Continued from Jan. 27 Northern Sentinel Picking up where we left off last time, Margarida Ribeiro was the first Portuguese woman in town and her daughter, Margaret, was Kitimat’s first born Portuguese Canadian. Her father Sebastian maintains she was also the first Portuguese born Canadian west of Winnipeg. And it wasn’t long before the Ribeiros were embracing Canadian culture. When their second son was born in 1962 he was named Douglas after Tommy Douglas, premier of Saskatchewan, leader of the federal New Democrat Party and father of Medicare. But things weren’t always a bed of roses for the immigrants. As Herondina Franco explained, they were giving up so much for the prospect of a better life. Her trip from Terrace to her new home was through a dark canyon of menacing trees, so different from what she knew in the Azores. And her first glimpse of Kitimat, with so few houses and unending trees and wilderness, was overwhelming. She cried. And she cried again when she couldn’t share their new born children with her own parents back in the Azores. It hurt to raise their kids without the grandparents nearby. Other immigrants struggled with the customs of their new country, such as women wearing slacks. Alcina Couto remembers her husband coming home with new slacks for her. What, women wearing slacks! She just gave them to the neighbours. But as always there was much to be thankful for. For Angela Monteiro arriving at her new home to find a freezer full of food

“What, women wearing slacks?” was unbelievable. She thought Canada was paradise. For Maria Couto it was the Luso-Canadian Club for which she was most grateful and she always thought the original building was the best with oh so many fine memories. In the early years it was a social lifeline. Other favourite locales were the post office and, of course, the Catholic Church which was at first in Kildala elementary school. And with so many Portuguese here you could survive quite nicely without learning English. Sebastian Ribeiro was most thankful for running water, the CBC and the opportunity that Canada provided. Even though Kitimat was at the end of the road, there was easy access to a whole big country beyond. Besides the Portuguese festivities at the Luso-Canadian Club, church and at Christmas, the Dominion Day (July 1) parade was a highlight of the year. Mrs. Franco from Widgeon Street spent hours ironing new clothes and having her family looking just right for the big day. The Portuguese dancing and colourful floats and costumes were all so grand - they were proud of the Luso contribution. To start off the summer season Camoes Day - or Portugal Day as it is known in Europe was and continues to be celebrated as close to June 10 as possible. It commemorates the death of Luis de Camoes, the Portuguese equivalent of Shake-

speare. He was a poet during Portugal’s grand age of exploration when the country was one of the world’s super powers with colonies around the world. In Kitimat Camoes Day was also the time to celebrate the festival and pilgrimage of Our Lady of Fatima. Festivities would often go on for a week with a lot of visiting and feasting around town. It involved a lot of decorations, flags, costumes and dancing. You could also always count on good music, wine and maybe even some Chourisso or Morcela (Portuguese sausages). When it came to early Kitimat sports, soccer was king. Those games of the 50s and 60s were great entertainment but they were also, says Margarida Ribeiro, often taken too seriously. Games between Team Portugal, Team Germany and Team Italy could be tough. The crowds were large and loud and Margarida well recalls all the games, but also remembers they would inevitably degenerate into fights. She also remembers Alberto, a star Portuguese player who was from Terceira, her home island in the Azores. Kitimat’s Portuguese citizens did live it all. Francisco Trigo’s first accommodation was the iconic Delta King riverboat at Hospital Beach. During his first years in Kitimat Sebastian Ribeiro watched the houses on Brant Street being built and then bought one. And he lives there even today, nearly 60 years later. Like others he has earned pioneer status and

It’s Our

Heritage Walter thorne

he and his wife remain the only original residents left on Brant. However, life has changed over the decades. Unfortunately, the role of the Luso-Canadian Club has somewhat diminished because of the popular Portuguese TV channel, RTP International, which broadcasts directly from Portugal to all corners of the globe. Ed Goncalves has repeatedly said that credit must go to the management of RTP as well as the Luso-Canadian Club and its members for all the help and support given to him during more than five years of persistent lobbying to convince the Canadian regulatory body to allow RTP to be broadcast throughout Canada, day and night, both on cable and satellite. And he recalls the joy felt by Portuguese all over this vast land at this victory. Over the years Kitimat’s Portuguese community has of course matured. Descendants have prospered and some have moved away. For example one of Sebastian’s brothers now lives in California while the other has retired to his homeland of the Azores - as has Frank Tavares. But many have stayed and they continue to define the Kitimat we know. We salute our Portuguese pioneers. Bom dia!


Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016 9

All about family Joe and Anne Slanina to celebrate 60th wedding anniversary By Todd Hamilton Kitimat Northern Sentinel

Kitimat pioneers Anne and Joe Slanina will be celebrating their 60th wedding anniversary on Feb. 11. All of their 12 children are expected to be at the celebration along with as many as 34 grandchildren and great grandchildren. Todd Hamilton photo supporting one another. It’s not always easy-going. You Kitimat also grew. “Back then, it was a real challenge finding someplace. have to work at it, you just can’t expect it to work. You There just weren’t enough houses for people, it was a big have to talk things through, talk it out ... after, you feel challenge, it took a quite a long time for the town to be better about yourselves.” And over that 60 years, Anne can only remember one built. “There was only one grocery store — the Shop Easy — time when she had second thoughts. “I remember now, when I was [giving birth to the I tried to go shopping once a week. If I could.” Joe and Anne moved to Kindella and then to Omineca couple’s first born], I went into labour on a Thursday night and he [Joe Gerard] didn’t come until Saturday morning. where they spent three years. “Alcan was renting houses cheap ... there were three Joe was working the night shift and he came into the room, bedrooms and we were expecting Trish then, we were I turned around, I couldn’t even look at him ...” Anne said there for three years then we moved to Partridge (Street) with a smile and a laugh. Anne attributes the couple’s successful 60-year and our seventh was coming then.” The couple moved one more time, across the street on marriage to supporting each other, good health, but Partridge to a place with four bedrooms and one bathroom, ultimately having a family that spends time together. Anne and Joe have always been avid outdoors people, before finding their place in the world. “We lived on Partridge for 20 years, the first 10 we enjoying hunting and camping and when asked, who was moved all over the place ... and then we found this place the best shot in the family, Joe quietly, but quickly, pointed ... we’ve been here 30 years. Our family built this house at Anne. The other mainstay in the family was music. ... Willie was a carpenter, Joe was the electrician ... they “The homemade music was always something for us. really did a lot of work and really helped out.” The house in the evergreens has three bathrooms Anne Joe can play the violin and the piano ... and the banjo ... can’t get him to play the banjo anymore ... but I remember pointed out with a broad smile. For 30 years, the bucolic home outside Kitimat was when three or four of the boys would be playing guitar and we would be together ... sure made it very nice,” Anne said. perfect for the family of 14. Anne, a longtime volunteer with the Catholic church “It is just like living in the country,” Anne said. “We always had a garden ... we even had goats ... but [some of still enjoys sewing and singing, has in fact, joined a ukulele the younger] girls didn’t like the milk, so that didn’t last group and credits activity to not only the success of a long marriage but that of a healthy life. too long.” “At our age, we gotta keep movin’,” she said. Joe and Anne have a tight family of six boys and For Joe, who still works part-time as a welding inspector, six girls: Joe Gerard, who lives in Kitimat and works as an electrician; Michael, also an electrician and the success of a 60-year marriage was even more simple. “I got a good woman.” lives in Victoria; Lawrence, now retired from the City of Victoria; William, a carpenter in Kitimat; Samuel, who lives in Victoria; Matthew, who works at Rio Tinto; Kitimat Transit Trish Parsons, executive director of the Kitimat Chamber of Commerce; Pauline Clarke, a RN in Kelowna; Christine Howell, a nurse’s aide in Kitimat; Bernadette Mansour, a RN in Vancouver; Emily George, a teacher in Kitimat and Theresa Monaghan. And as Anne would suggest, having a Thank you to our sponsors for the free large family was always the plan. “I think it was actually. Joe came New Year’s Eve bus service. from a family of five and I guess it was a [prairie farm] thing. Lots of people at that time had big families, especially in Alberta,” she said. “It’s probably ... well, no, family is the biggest thing for [ the success of a 60-year marriage].” Kitimat Modernization Project However, Anne is very quick to credit Building the future together. her partner and best friend of 60 years. “I always had good support from Joe. District of Kitimat If I wasn’t able to do something ... he was always there. He can do anything. He’s great in the kitchen. Transit Info 250·632·4444 • www.bctransit.com “I think that makes the difference —

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Settled quietly in a secluded tall, thick growth of evergreens at the end of a cul-de-sac on the outskirts of Kitimat is a house a family built. A swing set sits front and centre in a large yard that, while busy with a utilitarian shed and garage, has an easy expectation of children playing and reminds one of a prairie farm homestead — just with more trees. Inside the house, family pictures adorn the walls and a large, comfy kitchen and dining room is the apparent, wellused centrepiece of the house. It is a house, but quickly one discovers, it is a home. A home built both literally and figuratively by and for family. For 30 years, Joe and Anne Slanina have called this house home — home for six sons, six daughters. But that’s just the last half of the story. On Feb. 11, 2016, Joe and Anne will celebrate with their large family 60 years of marriage. A marriage that started in very much less comfortable surroundings. On Feb. 11, 1956, as a man strummed a guitar in a tiny trailer next to the relatively new Alcan smelter site in Kitimat, Joe, 19 almost 20, and Anne, 21, exchanged their vows. Vows that have lasted 60 years and have their beginning with a Kitimat connection reaching all the way to the Peace River area of Alberta in the mid-1950s. In 1934, Anne was born in Bluesky, Alberta, a very tiny dot on the map and Joe was born about two years later in High Prairie. Anne was the second oldest daughter of a family with seven boys and seven girls living on a mixed farm near Bluesky where she went to school and then worked at the local Co-op. When her father passed, she found work at an old folks home in nearby Whitelaw. “There really wasn’t anything past Grade 9, there wasn’t a high school. That was it, so when my father died, there were financial problems, and we (her brothers and sisters) had to go to work to help our Mom,” Anne said. “We would send our money home ... to Mom.” While working as a nurse’s aide at the old folks home, run by nuns, one day, Anne saw a young man sitting near the entrance, he was an orderly named Joe. “I walked by and thought, ‘jeepers, this might be the right person’,” she said. “Actually, a few of my cousins were interested too.” The two began dating and made trips back to her family farm near Bluesky when they had days off. “We never owned a car. We would take the bus to the corner (near Bluesky) and walk two or three miles and visit (her home) ... but we knew we really wanted to get married.” At the old folks home in Whitelaw, a couple from Kitimat came to visit their father who was being cared for at the home. “Joe knew the couple from Kitimat, who were visiting his father in the home. That’s when Joe got the introduction to Alcan ... it was better work, better pay,” Anne said. “So, Joe went out there in November 1955.” Anne wanted to follow but ended up working in Vanderhoof — for a short time. “I wanted to work as a nurse’s aide but the nuns [in Vanderhoof] were running the place, they were pretty tough,” Anne said. “I worked there for three months but the nuns decided I was going to do all the cleaning, and I thought, ‘enough of that’ and that January I went to Kitimat by train. “A couple of weeks after that we were married.” Joe and Anne rented two rooms of a shared Starling Street house and in November 1956 their first of 12 was born — Joe Gerard. “From there on it was all about family,” Anne said. Over the next ten years, as their family grew, Joe and Anne moved several times as the fledgling town of


10 Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016 A10 www.northernsentinel.com

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Millwright Smithers BC

Kyahwood Forest Products is a Finger Joint mill located in Moricetown, 30 km West of Smithers BC. This entity is wholly owned by the Moricetown Band. We currently have an opening for Millwright at our facility. The ideal candidate will hold an Interprovincial Red Seal ticket and have two years of experience. Knowledge in the operation of an optimizer and finger jointing machine is an asset. Apprentices in the latter stages of their apprenticeship are also encouraged to apply. The successful candidate will bring good troubleshooting and problem solving skills to ensure the continuous operation and efficiency of the machinery, good communication and interpersonal skills as well as a working knowledge of digital and computer systems. Welding, machining and electrical experience would also be an asset. This position will be compensated with a competitive wage and benefit package that includes medical, dental and pension plan. Apply in confidence: Fax – 250-847-2763 Email: mbdc@bulkley.net Deadline for applications: February 15, 2016 No phone calls please!

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The Scarlet Group of Companies is a rapidly expanding full service security company. In anticipation of our ongoing and upcoming project requirements, we are now accepting resumes for the Kitimat and Terrace Regions in British Columbia.

Career Opportunities

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employertrusted program. Visit today: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career!

1

Full Time / Casual Security Officers

• Teachers • Special Ed Teachers • Education Assistants

Inclusions Powell River is hiring Residential Support Workers f/t, p/t and casual positions - Adult & Children’s residences. For more information visit: www.inclusionpr.ca e-mail: apply@pracl.ca

PUZZLE SOLUTION

EMPLOYMENT

Kitimat / Terrace/Prince Rupert Areas

Future Job Opportunities

• Carpenters • Labourers • Equipment Operators • Pipefitters • Boilermakers • Electricians • Millwrights • Sheet Metal Workers • Ironworkers • Painters • Insulators IDL Projects Inc. (“IDL”) is northern British Columbia’s largest general contractor. We are proficient in the construction areas of civil and infrastructure, commercial, public and institutional, industrial, mining and safety services. IDL is always looking for talented people that have drive, integrity, a commitment to safety and a desire to produce their best work. Our current job opportunities are for future jobs in and around Kitimat, British Columbia. If you are interested in being part of our dynamic, fast growing team that lives our core values of “Take Care of Each Other”, “Be Innovative”, “Build Great Things” and “Have Fun” please submit your resume outlining your past work experience, skills and contact information! You can submit your resume through our website or by email. www.idlprojects.com

kitimatinfo@idlprojects.com

TAKE CARE OF EACH OTHER | BE INNOVATIVE | BUILD GREAT THINGS | HAVE FUN

ME Y T nee O FIND EMPLOYMENT d YOU! NWe L T T T E P N N EARN EXTRAEN M M E E IN CLASSIFIEDS E CASH!!!YM PER M NE MWSPA OY OTHE Y Y L S! IER RR P PL CA NT PLO NT PLO E SPA PER ME M M T EM OYMNEW E E STUFFERS Y O NT MEN T L L N P P E E Y T EM YM PLO EM YM N O O E T L EEMN L M P P Y M M LO ENT E O YM T E P , T L re looking N N M EMEverything you for is P T T E E Y Ntoday! Call NEM YM M E LO inMEthe Y classifieds! M P TOYConnector LOSentinel LO N P P EM PLOY E L M250-632-6144. MMP EM E Y M E LO E LOOKING FOR

PERFECT FOR STUDENTS, RETIREES, OR ANYONE LOOKING TO

NO COLLECTING! DIRECT DEPOSIT.

WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY DELIVERIES.

AND

For THURS AFTERNOONS

PERMANENT CARRIER ROUTES

~ Baxter (40) ~ Albatross (65) ~ Davy, Dunn, Deville, ~ Williscroft, Swannell (60) 1103-1235 Tweedsmuir (95) ~ Teal, Wakita, Wozney (70)

TEMPORARY ROUTES

February 12 ~ Wigeon, Wren (65) ~ 1237+ Tweedsmuir, Farrow, Gwyn, Creed (100) March 1 to 31 Wed. Northern ~ Oersted, Whittlesey (60) K

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Contact the Northern Sentinel at

and

The Northern

626 Enterprise Avenue, Kitimat


Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016A11 11 www.northernsentinel.com

Northern Sentinel Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Merchandise for Sale

Rentals

Misc. for Sale

Apt/Condo for Rent

For Sale! Wrapped Oat/Barley haylage & 2nd cut Alfalfa haylage. Call 1 (250)249-5466

KITIMAT APTS BEST VALUE

Employment Trades, Technical Automotive Technician

Charlotte Tire has an immediate opening for an experienced auto technician. We are a very busy shop providing quality repairs on the Queen Charlotte Island. We offer a very competitive compensation package! Please e-mail resume: bill@citires.ca

Services

Financial Services GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com TAX FREE MONEY is available, if you are a homeowner, today! We can easily approve you by phone. 1st, 2nd or 3rd mortgage money is available right now. Rates start at Prime. Equity counts. We don’t rely on credit, age or income. Call Anytime 1-800-639-2274 or 604-430-1498. Apply online www.capitaldirect.ca

Starting at $725 Balconies Security Entrances Cameras for your safety Now includes basic cable Visit our Website www.kitimatapartments.com Phone: 250.632.APTS (2787)

POLE BARNS, Shops, steel buildings metal clad or fabric clad. Complete supply and installation. Call John at 403998-7907; jcameron@advancebuildings.com

KITIMAT

REFORESTATION NURSERY seedlings of hardy trees, shrubs, and berries for shelterbelts or landscaping. Spruce and Pine from $.99/tree. Free shipping. Replacement guarantee. 1-866-873-3846 or www.treetime.ca

MIDTOWN APARTMENTS

Free heat & Free Hot Water Furnished & Unfurnished 1 & 2 bedrooms Security Entrances No Pets. No Smoking

250.632.7179

SAWMILLS FROM only $4,397. Make money & save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD:

• • •

www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT

1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT

FULL SERVICE Plumbing from Parker Dean. Fast, reliable, 24/7 service. Take $50 off your next job if you present this ad. Vancouver area. 1800-573-2928.

STEEL BUILDING Sale. Really big sale: extra winter discount on now!! 21x22 $5,190 25x24 $5,988 27x28 $7,498 30x32 $8,646 35x34 $11,844 42x54 $16,386. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422 www.pioneersteel.ca

Merchandise for Sale

Rentals

Auctions

Apt/Condo for Rent

2 DAY ONLINE AUCTION FEB. 16 & 17 - 1000 PLUS LOTS INCL $350K INS. CLAIM OF FOOD EQUIP (some in orig. pkg) / 7 BAILIFF SEIZURES OF RESTAURANTS & GROCERY STORES / HIGH END SAUSAGE MAKING EQUIP / 3 X 350 GALLON STEAM KETTLES W-AGITATORS / ICE CREAM EQUIP & COMPLETE CAPPUCCINO BAR EQUIP. VISIT W W W. AC T I V E AU C T I O N MART.COM TO VIEW, REGISTER & BID. ONSITE VIEWING OPENS FEB 9. CALL 604-371-1190 OR EMAIL BUYIT@ACTIVEAUCTIONMART.COM FOR MORE INFO

HILLCREST PLACE APARTMENTS Totally Renovated (ask for details) Security Entrance, Dishwasher, No Pets, No Smoking 250-632-7814

Plumbing

• • • •

KITIMAT BOXES, BOXES, BOXES You need them .... we have them. Buy one bundle of 10 for $5.00 and we will give you a bundle for free. Come down to the Kitimat Northern Sentinel office at 626 Enterprise Avenue 9:00am - 4:30pm **Most boxes are @ 1 cu.ft.

QUATSINO APTS KITIMAT Downtown location Balconies Security Entrances Some furnished suites Call for an appointment 250.632.4511

www.kitimatapartments.com

250.632.4254

Homes for Rent FURNISHED and Unfurnished homes for rent in Kitimat call Stan 7809743945 or visit www.rentboard.ca or email marps68@hotmail.com

BUY AND SELL WITH A CLASSIFIED AD

PERFECT FOR STUDENTS, RETIREES, OR ANYONE LOOKING TO

EARN EXTRA

ER AP NEWSPThe CASH!!!in the Beautiful Babies will be published NO COLLECTING! DIRECT T IF G Kitimat 16! S! Northern Sentinel March A CA RRIER WnaIN DEPOSIT. at-based ted by Kitim Deadline for submission is Thursday, March 10 DELIVERIES. ce to ter for a chan

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WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY This is always a very popular AND feature and your child/ Trading Post grandchild/niece/nephew or 9 $9 Valued at For THURS AFTERNOONS any beautiful baby you know can be included. Fill inPERMANENT the form below and enter yourCARRIER baby pic today! ROUTES

NEWSPAPER STUFFERS

~ Baxter (40) ~ Albatross (65) ~ Davy, Dunn, Deville, ~ Williscroft, Swannell (60) . . . . .1103-1235 . . . . . . . . . . .Tweedsmuir . . . . . . . . . . . . (95) . . . . . .~. .Teal, . . . . .Wakita, . . . . . . . .Wozney ... (70)

Baby’s Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Baby’s Birth Date. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

TEMPORARY ROUTES

Parent’s Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

February 12

Phone . . . . . . . . Wren . . . . . . (65) ................................. ~ Wigeon,

ONLY

30

$

Call today! Sentinel and Connector

Submit this form along with a photo of the beautiful baby to: (100) ~ 1237+ Tweedsmuir, Farrow, Gwyn, Creed Northern Sentinel, 626 Enterprise Ave., Kitimat or March 1 to 31 Wed. email your photo to: Northern ~ Oersted, Whittlesey (60) classifieds@northernsentinel.com Northern Ph. 250 632-6144 fax 250 639-9373.

Fri. The Northern

size of ad is 2"x2" Sentinel approx. PLUS TAX includes photo and text Kitimat Contact the Northern Sentinel at 250-632-6144. 626 Enterprise Avenue, COLOUR INCL. K

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Legal

www.kitimatapartments.com

ul Babies B e a u tofi fKitimat! do

Legal

Newer Buildings Elevators Security Entrances Covered Parking Balconies

Helpyour Wanted Help Wanted Help Wanted Put baby’s picture in the Northern Sentinel’s

LOOKING FOR

The Average Canadian Will Spend Their Last Ten Years In Sickness.

FEB. 3 AGENTS OF THE APOCALYPSE This 16-week DVD Bible study on the Book of Revelation called “Agents of the Apocalypse” by Dr. David Jeremiah will be held every Wednesday evening beginning February 3 from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Kitimat Pentecostal Fellowship, 1340 Kingfisher Ave. A riveting look at the key players of the end times by Dr. David Jeremiah, pastor and founder of Turning Point Ministries. He is the author of 40 books and a well known Bible teacher on prophesies on the end times. Everyone is Welcome! FEB. 5 THE KITIMAT PUBLIC LIBRARY invites children ages 4 and older to an archeology day. Let’s go back in time to dig for fossils, make pyramids, experiment with hieroglyphics and mummify body parts. The fun happens from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Space is limited so please register by coming in or calling. 250-632-8985 FEB. 8 CELEBRATE FAMILY DAY at the Kitimat Public Library. The library will be open from 10:00– 2:00 p.m. and will host two children’s programs. Mother Goose StoryTime will take place from 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. targeted at preschooler aged children. Leggo’ My Lego is for all ages and runs from 11:30 – 12:30 p.m. Bring your own Lego or borrow ours. Lego participants and their parents/caregivers/friends are invited to a pizza party afterwards. To register for

SANDPIPER APTS KITIMAT

KITIMAT

We need YOU!

Coming Events

STUDENT ARTICLES WELCOME

Land Act: Notice of Application Take notice that TM Mobile from Burnaby, BC, have applied to the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (FLNR), for a Licence of Occupation for - Communication Sites and Utilities purposes situated on Provincial Crown land located on the East side of Hwy 37 just South of Nalbeelah Creek Wetlands Park. Crown Lands Files 6408891 and 6408892. Legal Description TOGETHER WITH THAT PART OF DISTRICT LOT 6211, 6212 AND THAT PART OF RIGHT OF WAY OVER UNSURVEYED CROWN LANDS AS SHOWN ON PLAN 10879 AND RIGHT OF WAY OVER 6211 AND 6212 AS SHOWN ON PLAN 5373 FILED IN PRINCE RUPERT TITLES OFFICE RANGE 5 COAST DISTRICT, CONTAINING 4.278 HECTARES MORE OR LESS. Written comments concerning this application should be directed to the Coast Mountains Authorization Specialist, FLNR, at Suite 200 - 5220 Keith Ave. Terrace, BC, V8G 1L1. Comments will be received by FLNR up to March 31, 2016. FLNR may not be able to consider comments received after this date. Please visit the website at http://www.arfd.gov.bc.ca/ApplicationPosting/ index.jsp for more information. Be advised that any response to this advertisement will be considered part of the public record. For information, contact the Freedom of Information Advisor at Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations’ Office in Smithers.

Together we create more survivors with the help from your donations.

www.heartandstroke.ca

Find a job you love. R

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are welcomed and encouraged to submit articles/ photos about events or issues at your school for the monthly student page to the Northern Sentinel at newsroom@northernsentinel.com.

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ALL KITIMAT STUDENTS

these programs come in or call 250-632-8985. FEB. 10 MID-WEEK LENT SERVICE begins Wed., Feb. 10 and will continue each following Wednesday until Easter. Starts at 6 p.m. with a light supper followed by a Service at 7 p.m. All are welcome. Please contact 250-632-6962 for more info. FEB 19-21 KITIMAT OLDER TIMERS HOCKEY LEAGUE is hosting a tournament on February 19,20 and 21. These games are FREE to attend. There are teams coming from Houston, Smithers, Prince Rupert and Terrace. The games will be held in Kitimat Ice Arena and Tamitik ice arena. The divisions are: Ladies Division. A Division 19 years and older B Division 35 Years and older C Division 35 Years and older D Division 50 Years and older For more information, please contact Brian at 250632-1299. FEB. 20 NATIONAL DAY OF KINDNESS FREE SWIM The Kinsmen Club of Kitimat is sponsoring a free swim from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at Sam Lindsay Memorial Aquatic Centre. There will be FREE refreshments and goodies. FEB. 29 BEREAVEMENT MINISTRY COMMITTEE at Christ the King Parish is sponsoring “Connecting Each Other with Hope,” a six-week grief support group for adults grieving the death of a loved one. The sessions begin February 29, from 7 to 9 p.m., in the Catholic Church hall. Sessions open to everyone, no matter religious affiliation. To register or learn more call Lidia at 250-632-6292, or Susana at the parish office at 250-632-2215. ONGOING ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION Branch 250 in Kitimat holds membership meetings the third Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. Meat draws every Saturday from 4 to 6 p.m. Members and bona fide guests are welcome. KITIMAT SENIOR CITIZEN Association, Branch 129, membership meetings are the third Thursday of the month at 1 p.m. at their facility at 658 Columbia Avenue. (Next to Riverlodge.) No meetings in July and August. PRAYER CANADA. We meet each week on Tuesdays 12 noon to 1 p.m. For location and further information please call 250-632-4554. Or e-mail lesleykitimat@hotmail.com. BLADDER CANCER CANADA - Do you or someone you know have bladder cancer? You’re not alone. It’s the 5th most common cancer in Canada. Bladder Cancer Canada is here to help... or just to talk. In Kitimat, call Glen Sevigny at 250-632-3486. Or emailglensevigny@gmail.com. THE KITIMAT LADIES AUXILIARY Branch 250 hold regular meetings every second Thursday of the month. More information by calling Nancy at 250632-4051, or Lyn at 250-632-2351. FRIENDS OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY To join contact Luce Gauthier at lucegauthier10@gmail.com or Virginia Charron at vcharron@kitimatpubliclibrary. org or call 250-632-8985. KITIMAT QUILTERS GUILD: If you are interested in joining the Kitimat Quilters Guild please contact Aileen Ponter at 250-632-6225 or Janet Malnis at 250-632-7387 for further information. THE KITIMAT POTTERY GUILD meets every Thursday in the Riverlodge arts wing, from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Interested in playing with clay? All experience levels welcome. For more information call Anne at 250-632-3318. HEALTHY BABIES drop in is held every Thursday from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Kitimat Child Development Centre. They welcome families throughout pregnancy and up to one year (older siblings welcome). Come meet other parents and infants over light refreshments with support from the CDC staff and a Public Health Nurse. For more information call 250-632-3144.

NALBEELAH CREEK WETLANDS PARK


12 Northern Sentinel, Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Sports & Leisure

Kitimat freeskier Jared Thornton, 16, competed in the Canadian Junior Freeskiing Championships Jan. 21- 23 at Red Mountain. Thornton placed 39th out of 58 athletes from all over North America. Photo by Angie Healey 

Members of the Kitimat Marlins Swim Club smashed 11 pool records and 13 swimmers established personal bests as they captured the Northwest B.C. Regional Championships recently in Kitimat. Submitted photo

Dumas, Cathers smash pool records for Marlins By Jason Cathers Special to the Kitimat Northern Sentinel The Kitimat Marlins Swim Club are the 2016 Northwest B.C. Regional Champions. The host Marlins won the meet by more than 200 points over second place Prince Rupert with Terrace and Smithers finishing in third and fourth respectively. Sixteen-year-olds Zachary Dumas and Kleanza Cathers looked sharp in their last meet before attending the Western Canadian Nationals in Winnipeg. Dumas broke six pool records in the 15-andover Boys including the 800 and 1,500 metre freestyle, 200 metre backstroke, 200 and 400 metre individual medley and the 200 metre butterfly. Dumas won all seven of his events on his way to overall gold medal in his category. Cathers broke five pool records in the 15-andover Girls category including the 200, 400, 800 and 1,500 metre freestyle and the 200 metre backstroke. Cathers won all seven of her events to pick up the overall gold medal. Other gold medal winners, who won every

event in their category, were Charlotte Collier, 13, in the 12-13 Girls Division and Jayden Johnston, 11, in the 11-and-under Boys Division. Other medal winners for the Kitimat Marlins for overall points were Emilie Krabes, 11, gold in the 11-and-under Girls. Olivia Pearson, 11, silver in the 11-and-under Girls. Ewan Thomopoulos, 11, took the silver in the 11-and-under Boys. Leah Desousa, 13, took the silver and Hannah Pearson, 13, the bronze in the 12-13 Girls Division. Laurence Boucher, 156, took the silver in the 14-and-over Girls Division. Nolan Striker, 15, achieved his first two AA provincial times in the 200 backstroke and the 400 freestyle. He becomes the 13th Marlin with a minimum of one AA provincial time or better. That’s more than the other three northwest B.C. teams combined! Striker was one of many Marlin swimmers who recorded personal best times at the meet. The other Marlins to do so were: Ewan Thomopoulos, Joshua Reis, Grayden Rusconi, Faith Silva, Halle Gray, Emilie Krabes, Kaelyn Manseau, Hannah Pearson, Annika Desousa, Sarah Toth and Brandon Ciemniack.

Franco-Fun Festival

I N K I T I M AT L’Association des Francophones et Francophiles du Nord-Ouest (AFFNO) invites everyone to experience a taste of Quebec

FEBRUARY 19 TO 21.

Francophone culture, food and family fun in a festival you’ll never forget! The Return of

Carnaval

featuring Anne Glover

FEBRUARY 19 at Kildala school

FREE Community Show

featuring bilingual story-teller Anne Glover and

Workshop

with members of Kouskous Both at Kitimat Public Library

FEBRUARY 20 AT 1PM

Franco-Fun Brunch Sunday, Febru

Noon to 2pm

ary 21

at Riverlodge

Doors open at 11:30am Tickets available at Kitimat Public Li brary. $15 Adult • $10 Child (6 $5 Children aged -12) 3-5

GET YOUR TICKET S BEF FEB.12 FOR ONLY ORE $10!

Call 250-627-1313 or email affno@citywest.ca for more information Sponsored by:

The Chalet K

Kitimat Public Library Association

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Sentinel

Northern

BCGAMES.ORG

Catch the excitement as 60 Athletes and 23 Coaches from the North West (Zone 7) compete against the best in the province.

February 25 - 28

Kitimat Northern Sentinel/Northern Connector, February 10, 2016  

February 10, 2016 edition of the Kitimat Northern Sentinel/Northern Connector

Kitimat Northern Sentinel/Northern Connector, February 10, 2016  

February 10, 2016 edition of the Kitimat Northern Sentinel/Northern Connector