Kamloops This Week, December 11, 2015

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KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK FRIDAY |

kamloopsthisweek.com kamloopsthisweek kamthisweek

DECEMBER 11, 2015 | Volume 28 No. 149

30 CENTS AT NEWSSTANDS

LISTINGS/B1

WEEKEND WEATHER:

REMEMBER THE BUSHMAN? Some of the documents of the famed woodsman who eluded Mounties are for sale A3

ROAD TRIP

The sweaty, smelly reality of 1,800 km on a bus full of Blazers A16

CHRISTMAS!

A few more of the KTW newsroom’s favourite things B1

High 3 C Low 1 C

SUN PEAKS SNOW REPORT: Alpine: 110 cm | Mid: 101 cm Snow phone: 250-578-7232

PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER PAGES A6/A7

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

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FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

As you enjoy the Christmas season, please celebrate responsibly. Todd G. Stone

Minister of Transportation & Infrastructure MLA, Kamloops – South Thompson 446 Victoria Street Kamloops, BC (250) 374-2880

toddstonemla.ca

Please Don’t Drink & Drive!

Planning some holiday cheer?

.COM

Call a deer! 250-372-5110

Hours of operation : 9:00pm - 3:00am December 11, 12, 18, 19, 25, 26, & 31

We look forward to having you celebrate the season with us at the Fox n Hounds, But PLEASE – arrive safe, consider Operation Rednose for your ride home. - Al Deacon

Fox n Hounds Owner

DON’S Auto Towing Ltd. 671 Athabasca Street West Kamloops, BC 250-374-6281 • 1-877-374-6281

Terry Lake, MLA

Kamloops – North Thompson

This holiday season, plan for a safe ride home.

HOLIDAY HOURS

20-945 Columbia St. W. 250.374.9425 | WWW.FOXPUB.CA

DEC.24: 11am-6pm Christmas Day: CLOSED BOXING DAY: 11am-1pm DEC. 31: 11am-7pm New Years Day: 11am-Midnight

DRINK RESPONSIBLY! Enjoy yourself at the parties, have fun and laugh loudly, but please be SAFE! - Linda Coles

Sahali Liquor Store Manager

618B Tranquille Road, Kamloops, BC

Terry.lake.mla@leg.bc.ca 250.554.5413

WWW.TERRYLAKEMLA.BC.CA

Holiday H lid H Hours: DEC DEC.24: 24 99am-11pm 11 | XXmas D Day: 10 10am-6pm 6 Boxing Day: 9am-11pm | Dec. 31: 9am-11pm | New Year’s Day: 9am-11pm

945 Columbia St. W. | 250.851.8603 | www.sahaliliquorstore.com

HAVE A SAFE HOLIDAY SEASON

don’t drink & drive.

Plan for a safe ride home this holiday season. Don’t Drink & Drive!

Cathy McLeod, MP THOMPSON INC.

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO! www.DriveBC.ca

979 Victoria St. Kamloops, BC cathy.mcleod.c1@parl.gc.ca 250-851-4991 www.cathymcleod.ca

HELP KEEP KAMLOOPS SAFE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON BY VOLUNTEERING JUST

6

HOURS OF YOUR TIME

If you or someone you know is interested in volunteering this Holiday season, Please call 250-320-0650, or visit us online at www.operationrednose.com VOLUNTEER APPLICATION FORMS AVAILABLE AT THE RCMP Office. Please bring completed forms with 2 pieces of ID to RCMP Office


FRIDAY, December September11 5, 2015 2014

www.kamloopsthisweek.com www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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LOCAL NEWS

LOCAL NEWS

NEWS FLASH? CALL 778-471-7525 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

INSIDE KTW

GREAT WEATHER FORE A ROUND

Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . A8-9 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A15 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A18 National News . . . . . . . . . . . . . A21 Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B10

TODAY’S FLYERS *Selected distribution

Christmas in Kamloops, Loblaw, Peavey Mart, Surplus Furniture, The Source, SPH Consultancy*, Princess Auto*, Osiris*, Home Hardware*, Highland Valley Foods*, City Calendar*, Budget Blinds*, Andre’s Electronic*

WEATHER ALMANAC

One year ago Hi: 14 C Low: 4 .5 C Record High 14 C (2014) Record Low -29 .4 C (1919)

ONLINE

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

DAVE EAGKLES/KTW

You can own a slice of the Bushman [web-extra]

CAM FORTEMS

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek

Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/KamThisWeek

Watch our videos on YouTube: youtube.com/user/ KamloopsThisWeek/videos

HOW TO REACH US:

Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 Emails: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

Aaron Chmelyk (left) and Cody Forsythe were a bit surprised to find themselves golfing at Mount Paul Golf Course in December. They were among a few other duffers taking advantage of this week’s double-digit temperatures to hit the links. The weekend should remain playable, with highs of 5 C through Sunday. The mercury will dip into next week, with a high of zero forecast for Tuesday and a high of -1 C on tap for Wednesday.

STAFF REPORTER

In September 2001, KTW interviewed the Bushman in the woods of the Shuswap. Read that story online at kamloopsthisweek.com

cam@kamloopsthisweek.com

Call it the treasure of the Bushman. A retired Kelowna private investigator is listing for sale a file of poems, a court transcript and photos from the infamous Bushman of the Shuswap, the fugitive who eluded frustrated Mounties more than a decade ago. “I put them in a binder,” Rob Nicolson said of a file he kept on John Bjornstrom, dubbed the Bushman of the Shuswap. “I moved and was going through my stuff and said “OK . . .” Bjornstrom escaped from what was then the Rayleigh prison camp in late 2000. He plundered cabins and evaded police for more than a year. He arranged for interviews with reporters and called radio stations. But, his fixation with fame eventually led to his downfall when RCMP, posing as a documentary crew, arrested him in November 2001. Nicholson listed for sale on Kijiji a number of documents obtained from what he said was his work as a private investigator for Bjornstrom. Those include a transcript of court proceedings, Bjornstrom’s statement to RCMP in Salmon Arm, a letter to the RCMP Public Complaints Commissioner and a letter regarding the Bre-X fraud — the latter part of the Bushman’s fixation that he was being pursued by operatives from

visions.ca

check out this week 's flyer !

KTW FILE PHOTO

John Bjornstrom, seen here during his clandestine meeting with KTW in September 2001, was dubbed the Bushman of the Shuswap after escaping from jail in Kamloops and living in the woods of the Shuswap, plundering cabins for survival while evading capture until November 2001.

the mining company. Also part of the package are photos of the Bushman’s hideaway in the woods near Sicamous — “taken by John himself,” the ad states. The hideaway, inside an abandoned mine shaft, was equipped with a generator, washing machine, computer and other appliances. Nicolson said Bjornstrom gave him the

Last Minute

documents to keep after he was sentenced. “He wanted me to keep a copy of everything that was going on.” Bjornstrom was eventually given a 23-month conditional sentence on charges that included break and enter, uttering threats and extortion. Last year, Bjornstrom re-emerged in the news as a mayoral candidate in his home community of Williams Lake. He lost to Walt Cobb. Nicolson said he doesn’t know the value of the items and is open to serious offers. He said a documentary crew offered $5,000 for the material “when it was still hot in the media.” But, Nicolson added, he was wary of legislation preventing criminals from profiting from their notoriety. He said he advertised the items in hopes a new offer might come forward. “I thought someone might want to write a book — or maybe someone whose cabin he broke into.”


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FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITYpage

www.kamloops.ca

Council Calendar December 15 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing

How much of what you give will end up as garbage?

December 16 5:00 pm - Social Planning Council DES Boardroom January 12 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing

In December alone, residents of Kamloops will generate over 7,000,000 kgs of garbage. The best way to reduce our garbage this holiday season is not to create it in the first place. Use reusable gift bags or wrap, look for items with little to no packaging, rethink using disposable products, or consider giving experiences instead. And always be sure to recycle your Christmas waste, including foil-free wrapping paper.

January 19 9:00 am - Council Budget Meeting 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting Regular City Council meetings are broadcast on Shaw Cable as follows: Thurs and Sat at 11 am and Sun at 7 pm.

Happy Holidays Kamloops!

Council meetings can also be viewed online at: kamloops.ca/webcast. Meeting schedule is available at kamloops.ca/council.

City of Kamloops

Career Opportunities Join our team of 650 employees, who work in a variety of fullfilling and challenging careers. Visit www.kamloops.ca/jobs for a list of current opportunities.

Ready... Set... RIDE!

Notes Snow Removal Reminder The City of Kamloops would like to remind residents and businesses to remove snow and ice from the sidewalks that border your property. Single Family Dwellings Owners/occupiers of single family dwellings are required to remove snow, ice or rubbish on the sidewalk adjacent to any property owned/occupied by the person. Properties other than Single Family Dwellings Every person/occupier of real property is required to remove snow, ice or rubbish on any sidewalk adjoining the land or premises no later than 10 am each day (except Sunday). Community Safety & Enforcement 250-828-3409 Snow and Ice Control for Municipal Properties City Parks staff are responsible for maintaining snow and ice control on municipal properties. Municipal properties consist of public buildings (i.e. City Hall) parks (i.e. MacArthur Island Park) community centres (i.e. Hal Rogers) and walkways (i.e. Schubert Drive Rivers Trail). Priorities for snow and ice control on municipal properties is governed by Council Policy. PRS – 13. Keep Kamloops Accessible Please support your fellow citizens who use canes, walkers, wheelchairs, guide and assistance dogs. Keep your sidewalks clear of snow and ice. Take a few extra minutes to clear any curb cuts and bus stops near you as well. Be sure to keep disabled parking free of snow and ice.

Job Opportunities Term Contracts

Early Childhood Program Assistant Deadline: Dec 11, 2015

GRAN FONDO

A Spin-a-thon to End MS

ZŝĚĞ Ă ůŝƩůĞ͕ Žƌ ƌŝĚĞ Ă ůŽƚ͊ ,ŽƉ ŽŶ Ă ƐƉŝŶ ďŝŬĞ Žƌ ďŝŬĞ ƚƌĂŝŶĞƌ ĂŶĚ ƌŝĚĞ ĨŽƌ ƵƉ ƚŽ ϲ ŚŽƵƌƐ ŝŶ ƐƵƉƉŽƌƚ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ D^ ^ŽĐŝĞƚLJ͕ <ĂŵůŽŽƉƐ ĂŶĚ ƌĞĂ ŚĂƉƚĞƌ͘ dŚĞƌĞ ǁŝůů ďĞ ĨŽŽĚ͕ ĨƵŶ ĂŶĚ ĨĞƐƟǀŝƟĞƐ͕ ĂŶĚ ďĞ ƐƵƌĞ ƚŽ ďĞ ƚŚĞƌĞ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ŐƌĂŶĚ ĮŶĂůĞ ĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ůŝǀĞ ĞŶƚĞƌƚĂŝŶŵĞŶƚ͊

Kamloops Indoor Gran Fondo

FEBRUARY 8, 2016 Tournament Capital Centre

REGISTER AT: KAMLOOPSGRANFONDO.CA

Part Time Fitness Instructors Deadline: Dec 13, 2015 Part Time Yoga Instructors Deadline: Dec 13, 2015 For all positions, please submit your resume, cover letter, and three personal/professional references to: Megann Rodhe Email: mrodhe@kamloops.ca Phone: (250) 828-3698 Fax: (250) 828-3619 Visit www.kamloops.ca/contracts for more details.

myKamloops - the City's smart phone app myKamloops - the City's first smart phone app for quickly and easily helping the City by reporting civic issues such as graffiti, potholes, fallen trees, over-flowing garbage cans, obscured or fallen signs, or other similar issues. With myKamloops you can track the status of your request and can even send a photo, video, or audio clip with your report to help describe the issue. Download the app from your smart phone's Store/Marketplace or go to www.kamloops.ca/mobileapp to learn more.

7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | Phone 250-828-3311 | Fax 250-828-3578 | Emergency only after hours phone 250-372-1710


FRIDAY, December 11 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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LOCAL NEWS TOYS“R”US

Due to circumstances beyond our control, Pie Face (sku 239227) will not be available in all stores and rainchecks will not be issued. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. Toys “R” Us Flyer December 11th-17th, 2015

AM I ENTITLED TO JOB SECURITY? Generally speaking, non-union employees are not entitled to job security. This often comes as a surprise to many people.

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

Representing The Mortgage Centre, mortgage advisor Ryan Foreman (second from right) presents a $1,000 cheque to United Way manager of communications Amber Harding (right), which is to be matched by the agency, resulting in a $2,000 donation to Kamloops Immigrant Services. On hand to receive the donation is Kamloops Cariboo Regional Immigrant Society president Rod McLeod (left) and executive director Paul Lagace (holding a donation plaque to be mounted on the donor wall). The money will go specifically toward traumacounselling services for refugees who come to Kamloops.

An employer can release an employee for many different reasons. For example, economic factors may change and an employer may need to downsize its operations. Essentially, as long as the reason for dismissal does not violate human rights, an employer can let an employee go for any reason. If the dismissal is without cause, meaning that it was due to no fault of the employee, an employer must provide the employee with either reasonable working notice of the dismissal or payment in lieu of notice. The period of notice will vary depending on several different factors, including the employee’s length of service, age, position, education, etc.

First wave of refugees lands DALE BASS

STAFF REPORTER

dale@kamloopsthisweek.com

A plane carrying 164 Syrian refugees arrived in Toronto last night — but it’s doubtful any of them are heading to Kamloops. Paul Lagace, executive director of the Kamloops Immigrants Society (KIS), said the four families bound for this area — three planning to settle in Kamloops and one in Clearwater — are being privately sponsored and local agencies that anticipate supporting them are unaware how they will arrive. The four are moving to the area with the support of the Refugees and Friends Together (RAFT) group that operates through the Kamloops United Church. “I don’t think it’s too far off, though,” Lagace said of the arrival of the quartet of families. British Columbia has been asked by the federal government, which has control over where refugees end up, to accept 3,500. Premier Christy

Clark has agreed to that figure. That could mean more may locate to the Interior, perhaps to Kamloops, and Health Minister Terry Lake has speculated he could see as many as 150 eventually coming to the area. Lagace agreed more may choose to move to smaller communities like Kamloops rather than live in the Lower Mainland. “But, there’s no way to confirm right now how many are going and where,” he said. Lagace expects new Syrian residents will be well-received in Kamloops, noting some of the anti-refugee postings seen on social media appear to have died down. To help Kamloopsians prepare, KIS has organized a public community discussion for Friday, Dec. 18, at the agency office at 448 Tranquille Rd. It begins at 11 a.m. with a presentation by a Syrian Canadian Council representative, who will talk about the country’s culture.

The council, created in 2011, works to support Syrians in the country, strengthen their community ties, promote their culture and traditions and advocate for freedom, democracy and human rights. A panel discussion is planned for 1 p.m. that will include Lagace, a RAFT representative and human-rights lawyer Bill Sundhu. A light lunch will be provided at noon and the event is scheduled to wrap up by 3 p.m. Lagace said people can come for all or part of the discussion, although those planning to stay for lunch are asked to call the society so they can ensure enough food is on hand. It can be reached at 778-4706101. Lagace said donations to help support new Syrian families are being accepted at his agency, through RAFT at the church office and through the United Way Thompson-NicolaCariboo at its office at 177 VIctoria St. and online at unitedwaytnc.ca.

DENNIS HORI, Q.C. Employment Law Lawyer Fulton & Company LLP

If you have questions about job security or what constitutes reasonable notice, contact the Employment Law Team at Fulton & Company LLP.

CONTACT OUR EMPLOYMENT LAW TEAM

DENNIS HORI, Q.C.

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FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS Dave (Woody) Woodruff suffers from Parkinson’s disease and sundowner’s syndrome, a form of dementia that brings with it confusion and agitation that worsens in the late afternoon or early evening as the sun sets. Woody and his family have endured a life-changing journey through the health-care system. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

MANOEUVERING IN THE HEALTH-CARE MAZE DALE BASS • STAFF REPORTER • DALE@KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM

H

ow do you tell your husband of 59 years he can’t live at home anymore? Joyce Woodruff never imagined having to answer that question — one that became her family’s reality this year. The decisions that flowed from it took Joyce, husband Dave (better known as Woody), their children and grandchildren on a journey through a health-care system about which they knew nothing. They have emerged from the other side with new knowledge and confidence that, as hard as the journey has been for them, they’ve made well-informed decisions. It all started when Woody went for a drive. He had given up his driver’s licence a couple of years before as the onset of Parkinson’s disease forced the issue. But, on one particular day earlier this year, he decided to drive to the grocery store. The reality was sundowner’s syndrome was also starting to affect Woody. It’s a form of dementia that brings with it confusion and agitation that worsens in the late afternoon or early evening as the sun sets. Woody was admitted to Royal Inland Hospital, “where the nurses got a full eyeball on how he behaves at night,” Joyce said of her husband’s agitation and challenges his condition posed for staff on the ward. He was occasionally kept in restraints as staff worked to find a way to deal with his illnesses. “It was very scary to come into the system because of what you hear,” Joyce said. “But, it’s important to convey that we had nothing but the best and most professional care for him. Everyone has had his best interests in mind.”

Once stabilized, Woody was moved to Ponderosa Lodge and, later, to Hillside Centre as the health-care system worked with his conditions and his family worked with what it meant for them — Joyce couldn’t care for her husband at home and he needed long-term professional care. “Dad was in the navy,” daughter Marilee Hermiston said. “He’s a man’s man, very social, always the life of the party. His grandsons adore him. “How do we tell him we’re doing this?” Joyce cried at the memory, but praised geriatric psychiatrist Dr. Carol Ward for helping the Woodruff family get through the emotions to acceptance. “She was on top of things,” Joyce said. “She kept confirming there was light at the end.” Marilee’s husband, Greg, described Hillside as outstanding. Marilee said the staff there “worked a miracle.” Woody became well enough to live in a long-term care facility and, in Overlander Residential Care Hospital, the family found a caring staff and a family atmosphere. “We’re encouraged to be there whenever we want to be there,” Marilee said. “The people [who work] in long-term care are very special.” They also compose a unique team, one brought together by the PIECES program (Physical, Intellectual, Emotional, Capabilities, Environmental Social) the Interior Health Authority uses throughout the district. Simply put, the program sees anyone who has an interaction with a patient — from a maintenance man to a therapist to a nurse or doctor — asking themselves three questions when the patient’s behaviour changes and puts either or both at risk. What changed?

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Why did it change? What can we do to help? The answers help guide every step that follows. For Woody, that means the family is focused on his quality of life. If he goes for a walk and bumps into something and gets a scrape or a bruise, that’s part of life and better than keeping him in his bed. It means determining what might be causing his agitation and finding a way to resolve it. For some patients, that might mean distracting them. Maybe it’s a care aide who, realizing a patient is agitated and may be escalating, suggests they go for a walk or work together on something that refocuses them. Overlander manager Matt Renfrew called it a gentle persuasive approach, one that most of the hospital’s staff, regardless of their role at the facility, has learned. “It’s what do we know and how can we redirect them in these times of need so they are still having a positive experience,” he said. For Joyce and her family, knowing this approach has helped them. “A lot of all this has to do with the family,” she said. “We know they can’t just cure him, but we chose to say we know they also can’t follow him around 24/7.” Marilee and Greg are at peace with this knowledge. “Of course we would love to have him at home,” Marilee said. “And, on a good day, he’d say that. But, I’ve noticed he’s settled here, he’s more of the dad I remember. “He’s reasonably happy and we’re 100 per cent confident he’s being cared for.”

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FRIDAY, December 11 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Passing the PIECES to all who interact with patients DALE BASS

STAFF REPORTER

dale@kamloopsthisweek.com

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

Nurse Sandra Kelsey meets with Woody and Joyce Woodruff at Overlander Residential Care Hospital. Kelsey said the PIECES program is a good tool to bring people together.

Help us pay it forward d this holiday season in raising up to

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for Kamloops f families & local charities

WWW.K KAMLO OOPS SFOR RD.C CA/PAYYITFFORWARD

There are so many ways to describe how the Interior Health Authority’s PIECES program works. For those using it, three questions are at the program’s core application when dealing with a patient who is acting out, being aggressive or agitated: What changed, why did it change and what can we do to help? For geriatric psychiatrist Dr. Carol Ward, a member on the province’s PIECES project steering committee, it’s about “trying to get to know the person.” For Overlanders Residential Care Hospital manager Matt Renfrew, it’s knowing his staff will use a gentle, persuasive approach and redirection to deal with situations that have the potential to persist or escalate. For the family of Dave (Woody) Woodruff, however, PIECES is just one more tool they know will be used by all the people who interact with him every day. PIECES stands for Physical, Intellectual, Emotional, Capabilities, Environment, Social framework, a tool created in Canada for those who work with older adults who have complex health issues — physical and mental. “What we do is good geriatric mental-health medicine and care,” Ward said. “Great people who put the person first and focus on their quality of life. “It’s a strategy of thinking about a problem. “We’re dealing with people who have complex mental issues, physical and psychological issues and are generally frail, too,” Ward said. “We ask the three questions of ourself and we bring in assessment of risk, causality. It’s an integrated plan of action.”” Once they focus on the person and not just the patient, they become more attuned to what could be causing aggressive behaviour, Ward said, because

there’s always something that has sparked the change. For nurse Sandra Kelsey, PIECES is a good tool to bring together anyone who is involved with the person “and help resolve the behaviours . . . to see it’s just another person having a bad moment in time.” Recreational therapist Sherry Read said in Woody’s case, she knows not to tell him what to do. “You suggest and coax,” she said. “And, when we can’t get him to do something, someone else might try.” It’s important to have many people use the protocols because it’s not just the nursing staff interacting with patients. For Woody, one of the first new friends he made in the Blueberry ward at Overlander — a 25-bed unit for patients with dementia — was a housekeeper and the two often have conversations. Staff at every long-term care facility in Kamloops, public and private, have been taught the PIECES approach, Ward said. “Training is important and the staff has to be flexible in how they approach with care,” Renfrew said. “It’s not getting the 10 things done you think you had to do. It’s how you get them done.” Read said having most of the staff trained is a benefit. “We don’t have to wait for people to do an assessment and we’re all talking the same language,” she said. For Woody’s daughter, knowing any agitation or aggression her father might exhibit won’t be treated in the same manner by staff is reassuring. “We all felt better right off the bat,” Marilee Hermiston said. She has a son who is a social worker on the Coast. He went to the first team meeting to learn about his grandfather’s new home and new life. “He said to me, ‘Mom, you have nothing to worry about’,” Hermiston said. “If he understood and could buy in, there was no reason for me to worry at all.”

Did you witness a motor vehicle accident on November 15, 2015 at approximately 8:30 a.m. on Highway 1 near Greenstone Road (near the Cherry Creek Store) where a black Ford pickup was forced off the road by a semi that had crossed the centre line? If you have any information about the accident, know of anyone who may be involved or is a witness themselves, please contact Scott Ellis at MJB Lawyers 250-374-3161 or email sbe@mjblaw.com.


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FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

VIEWPOINT

KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK is a politically independent newspaper, published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 1365B Dalhousie Dr. in Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5P6 Ph: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 e-mail: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops This Week is owned by Thompson River Publications Partnership Limited

THE HOT AND NOT OF THE WEEK Kamloops This Week looks at the stories of the week — the good, the bad and all in-between: HOT: The advance work being done by the federal and provincial governments and private organizations like Kamloops Immigrant Services and the Kamloops United Church’s RAFT program. All of the above and more are working hard to have housing and services ready when Syrian refugees begin arriving in Canada. The first planeload of the new Canadians was to land in Toronto last night, with a second plane scheduled to arrive in Montreal tomorrow. We don’t know yet how many families will end up in Kamloops, or when, but we do know RAFT is awaiting four families it is sponsoring. This is good work being done. Kudos to those who care.

OUR

VIEW

NOT: News that a new South Kamloops secondary will not be rising from the ashes of the current aging building on Ninth Avenue any time soon. Education Minister Mike Bernier toured South Kam and Bert Edwards science and technology school this week as part of his mission to learn more about that which he governs. As part of his tour, Bernier mentioned a new South Kam — which would cost at least $50 million if construction began today — is not on the province’s three-year shortlist of capital projects. In the meantime, classes will continue in the school that was built alongside the birth of rock and roll.

KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Publisher: Kelly Hall

Editor: Christopher Foulds

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

EDITORIAL Associate editor: Dale Bass Dave Eagles Tim Petruk Marty Hastings Andrea Klassen Cam Fortems Adam Williams Jessica Wallace Jessica Klymchuk ADVERTISING Manager: Rose-Marie Fagerholm Ray Jolicoeur Don Levasseur Randy Schroeder Brittany Bailey Linda Skelly Tara Holmes Neil Rachynski Clay Ganton

CIRCULATION Manager: Anne-Marie John Serena Platzer FRONT OFFICE Manager: Cindi Hamoline Nancy Graham Lorraine Dickinson Angela Wilson Marilyn Emery PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Fernanda Fisher Mike Eng Sean Graham Jackson Vander Wal Dayana Rescigno Kaitlin Moore

CONTACT US SWITCHBOARD 250-374-7467 CLASSIFIEDS 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com CIRCULATION 250-374-0462 All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rightsholder.

Getting billed for saving

K

en Christian is right on the money when he says Kamloops taxpayers might not have any left to give. The Kamloops councillor mused recently about taxpayers being at or near the point where they can no longer afford tax and fee increases — and, in Kamloops, taxes and fees from all three levels of government rise every damn year. Christian was commenting in the wake of a council decision to sign a contract extension with Emterra Environmental to process recyclables the city collects from residents. That contract, which comes into effect on Jan. 1, carries with it a whopping 84 per cent increase in cost, which means homeowners will be paying much more in recycling fees next year (from $33 per year to about $50 a year beginning in 2016). Oh, and there will also be the automatic two per cent (at minimum) property-tax hike next year, despite the fact the rate of inflation has been stuck at about one per cent all year. The numbers can and will change between now and April, when city council finalizes its budget. As of today, Kamloops’ residential property owners are facing $58 extra in fees and taxes. Last year, when council finalized its budget, the average hit to taxpayers was $49. A hundred bucks every couple of years will have a serious impact on many households as that money joins much more being sucked out of wallets by Victoria and Ottawa. The rationale for the property

CHRISTOPHER FOULDS

Newsroom

MUSINGS tax hike (set now at about $38, on average, per household) is it is needed to cover increased costs for electricity, transit and natural gas, none of which the city can control, and wage hikes for Mounties, firefighters and city staff, some of which the city can control through contracts it signs. When residents voted down the proposed $91-million performing-arts centre by a landslide margin last month (a landslide is generally considered a result in which the margin of victory/loss is at least 15 percentage points, into which the margin of the PAC yes/no vote falls), they were clearly indicating they could not afford an extra $38 coming out of their pockets every year. City council needs to find savings. The city has shown it can be inventive in saving huge sums of money. It has kept about $5 million in its coffers since centralizing purchasing four years ago. But, for every creative effort at saving money comes a mindboggling puzzle like the watermeter effect. For years, the city has urged residents to conserve water, espe-

cially in the hot days of summer. Finally, in 2010, by a vote of 7-2 (Denis Walsh and Pat Wallace were opposed), council decided to install water meters in every Kamloops home. The argument was the $14.2-million cost would lead to a reduction of water consumption by at least 20 cent. That reduction, said thenutilities director David Duckworth, would mean savings to taxpayers in that needed watersystem expansion would be pushed back to 2023 from 2012. Great news, right? Um, then we learned that residents will likely see a hike in water rates in 2018 because they have, essentially, done too good a job at fulfilling the city’s request to save water. Consumption has plummeted (as requested by the city), resulting in fewer dollars going to city hall from taxpayer purses (as promised by the city), leading to a need to raise rates for the cost of getting less water to residents. While you shake your head in utter disbelief, allow former mayor Cliff Branchflower to sum it up perfectly, as he did in a recent letter to the editor: “Despite the fact water meters — you may remember that issue — have reduced water usage by tens of millions of litres per day in hot weather, it is very likely water rates will have to go up because of increased pumping costs. “It’s costing more to pump, treat and distribute far less water than was the case before meters? Get real.” Or unreal, as the case may be. editor@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @ChrisJFoulds


FRIDAY, December 11 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

YOUR OPINION LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

KAMLOOPS NEEDS PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT Editor: Thanks to Kamloops This Week for providing space for our elected city council members to show their passion for Kamloops. I really enjoyed Dieter Dudy’s Dec. 8 column (‘Please do speak up’) on public engagement (or not) and I am taking Dudy up on his invitation to say what I think. I have been active in Kamloops for many years in community associations and notfor-profits. In those roles, I feel respected and heard by council and city staff, usually on a one-on-one basis. The broad-scale public-engagement process, however, is a different matter. As a former staffer myself, I know that, going into one of these sessions, staff needs to be well prepared. Council has been briefed and is more or less on side with the general direction. What remains is to demonstrate the idea to the public.

What is left out, and leads to the disconnect over time, is the lack of a feedback loop. What was apparent on the Columbia Street widening sessions, for example, was that decisions had been made, engineering was complete and the project was going ahead in this manner. Same with the performing-arts centre. After the brainstorming two years ago, the planning was done in-house or with special interest groups and presented as a done deal to the shareholders. There was no room for modification and as our leader said at the time, “Maybe we could look at changes after it is approved.” But, the basic tenets of the project were already cast. Last year during the fall budget presentation, which was well attended, the opening remarks by our leader was that there would be no public comment and no open mic. The departments had their draft budgets at

the tables and we were welcome to circulate. The management style is known as define and defend. Needless to say, not many people bothered to come back this year. What is the point when decisions are already made? We need a change in culture with respect to public engagement in Kamloops. This can come from mayor and council, who must say the way we are doing things is not good enough, based on the evidence. We can start with the performing-arts centre, a crucial project for our city’s future. We should be conducting some post-vote sessions — Why Did You Vote No? — designed for people to have a real say and redesign the project for a win. It isn’t that difficult. We just need to be willing to give a little. Chris Ortner Kamloops

HERE’S A TIP: MAKE SURE SERVERS ARE RESPECTED Editor: As the Christmas season approaches, I would like to point out a situation that occasionally arises during restaurant dinner parties. My son-in-law, who is the father of two, came home frustrated one night while working as a waiter. As a student in TRU’s trades program, he provided for his family as a restaurant server. On this particular day, he had been serving a large group of 12 to 14 businessmen at lunch for their Christmas party, where he would usually earn a 15 to 20 per cent tip. At the last minute, because

everyone left cash on the table for their individual lunches, the last man to pay picked up all the money and paid the balance with his credit card, leaving a trivial tip. This customer not only picked up all of Tim’s tips, but certainly had his own lunch paid for — and made extra. What most customers don’t realize is that waiters and waitresses make minimum wage, and sometimes less, because their tips are supposed to make up the difference. In this instance, my son-inlaw made less because he had to tip out the support staff at

the end of the day. When I expressed my indignation, he said it happens more often than you would think. He also said when sports teams come into restaurants, the servers don’t expect much in the way of tips. Most of the time, parents sit by themselves away from the team and haven’t taught their teens what is acceptable in the way of tipping. Again, the server loses money because he has to tip out everyone else working, but hasn’t made enough to do so. As the mother of several student athletes, I have had my share of

team dinners and wasn’t aware of this. I am hoping people will be more aware of their waiter or waitress when dining out in big groups. Pay your bill individually or be conscious of what is being paid at the end. Be sure your team tip has been covered I have been known to write a “thanks for your service” on the receipt when I’ve had exceptional service. Many of those working in the restaurant business are holding down two jobs or trying to pay their way through school. Kasandra Mathieson Kamloops

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked:

Do you believe man-made climate change is real and should be addressed?

Results: Yes: 563 votes No: 241 votes Total votes: 804

What’s your take? NO 30%

YES 70%

Do you think the Liberals’ planned inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women will result in concrete action?

Vote online:

kamloopsthisweek.com

[speak up] You can comment on any story you read @ kamloopsthisweek.com

A selection of comments on KTW stories, culled online RE: LETTER: YES, CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL; YES, IT SHOULD BE ADDRESSED:

“The Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991 put as much greenhouse gas into the atmosphere as all of man’s activities since the start of the Industrial Revolution.” — posted by Watcher1983

RE: STORY: THE EPIC TALE THAT IS JACKO LAKE:

“Respectfully, and being quite honest as a resident of Kamloops and one who fishes Jacko Lake, I’ll have to admit I have never heard about this ‘epic tale’ locally. “It sounds very interesting and with a colourful rendition being presented.” — posted by Les Evens

Kamloops This Week is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 1-888-6872213 or go to bcpresscouncil.org.

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DISASTER RESTORATION 101

LOCAL NEWS

Greg Buffel – ServiceMaster Restore® Kamloops Owner & Master Restorer with 23 years industry experience.

Is your home ready for winter? Here are some tips on how you can prepare your home for winter and safeguard yourself against property loss this season. Freezing temperatures and increased precipitation can wreak havoc on homes and businesses if not prepared. Last year ServiceMaster responded to hundreds of calls stemming from winter-weather related property damage. Some damages could have been prevented by taking these extra steps when winterizing your home. · Clean rain gutters and extend downspouts away from your home. · Add an extra layer of insulation to your attic.

· Caulk around windows and doors, install weather-stripping and check for cracks around outlets and pipes. · Insulate water pipes that are exposed to the cold. · Shut off and remove garden hoses from outdoor faucets. · Have your chimney and heating system cleaned by a professional. · Test sump pumps and ensure interior and exterior drains are flowing property. Locally owned for 23 years #106 - 1366 Hugh Allan Drive Kamloops, BC, V1S 1L8

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Water rates will stay flat in the City of Kamloops for the next year, but ratepayers should expect to see changes to their bills around 2018. Finance director Kathy Humphrey said a full water-rate review is in the works for 2017, once all residents have spent a year on metered billing. As Kamloopsians cut back on water use, the amount of money the city brings in through billing is on the decline. Public works director Jen Fretz said the city brought in $1.7 million less in water fees in 2015, which represents a 9.9 per cent reduction in the city’s water budget. This past summer, utility services manager Mike Firlotte told KTW he was seeing some of the city’s lowest hot-weather water consumption levels in years, with usage sometimes dropping as low as 75-million litres per day — less than half the water the city’s treatment plant can supply per day. Fretz said the city

It’s very “likely

that things will have to change based on this reduced water consumption.

— JEN FRETZ, PUBLIC WORKS

is required to bring in enough money through water fees to cover the operating and maintenance costs of water service. “If people are paying less, then we have less money recovered,” she said.“I don’t know what that reassessment will look like or end up looking like, but it’s very likely that things will have to change based on this reduced water consumption.” However, decreased water use means some costly capital projects are off the books for the time being. “Some of the bigger projects we were looking at having to do are things like upgrading the capacity at the water-treatment plant, as well as piping under

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Utility rates now and then In the past five years, the average Kamloops household has seen its utility rates rise by about $100, according to figures provided by the city. In 2010, the average household paid $890 in garbage, sewer and water fees. In 2015, the amount was $991. That total doesn’t include new rates set by the city for 2016, which will see additional fees of about $20 for curbside recycling and sewer service. Sewer rates and those for garbage and recycling pickup rose the most — climbing by almost $37 and $39, respectively. The city brought in three sewer fee increases in the past five years, in 2012, 2013 and 2014, each ranging from just under $12 to just under $13. Garbage and recycling fees also went up three times, with back-to-back increases of about $16 in 2012 and $8 in 2013, followed by a $15 hike at the beginning of this year. Water fees rose once during the past five years, in 2012 when they were hiked by $26. the river to the North Shore and Westsyde,” Fretz said, noting both projects would have been required in the next five to seven years had consumption not dropped. “Even if there was a

small increase after the rates were considered, it would not be anywhere near as large as the rates would have been if we continued using the same amount of water city wide that we had in the past,” she said.

TNRD NAMES CHAIR, VICE-CHAIR HOLIDAY HOURS

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John Ranta has secured another term as chair of the Thompson-Nicola Regional District. The longtime chairman and 25-year mayor of Cache Creek was re-elected by acclamation on Thursday afternoon, unchallenged in an election at the TNRD’s December board of directors meeting in downtown Kamloops. In electing a vice-chair, however, the vote tied for incumbent Willow Macdonald and Ronaye Elliot. With a re-vote, Elliott took the position. Had it ended in a draw twice more, the vice-chair would have been selected by drawing a name from a hat.

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A12

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

PARKING PRESENTS

Richard Sparklemuffin-Foreman (left) is happy to be able to void a parking ticket for a great cause, as he donates a new toy for a child to Impark customer service representative Rebekah Frudd on Thursday (Dec. 10) at the Salvation Army on Popular Avenue.

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MAN JAILED FOR VIOLENT CRIMES TIM PETRUK

STAFF REPORTER

tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Kamloops woman alleged to have used a fake handgun to rob a mentally disabled man of his glasses before breaking into a nearby home will spend the foreseeable future in a jail cell. Sarah CalifouxSchneider, 22, is facing seven charges stemming from an alleged brief but violent crime spree in October. During a bail hearing in Kamloops pro-

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was armed with a handgun. “One of them said, ‘What have you got for me?’” Drake said. “He told them that he had nothing except for his cowboy hat, his Cheezies and his glasses.” Drake said the two attackers then beat the pedestrian in the middle of the street, kicking him in the head repeatedly, before taking his glasses and running away. The prosecutor said the woman then went to a nearby apartment building and began banging on the door. Drake said she demanded cash from a resident and was told to try next door. Drake said the woman then kicked in the door of the next apartment unit and was confronted by a resident, who knocked the imitation pistol from her hands. The woman then fled, Drake said, but

not before smashing the window of a vehicle parked outside. Police showed up a short time later and Chalifoux-Schneider was taken into custody. Drake said the robbery victim was shaken by the incident. “He is quite a lowfunctioning individual and this event had a very severe impact on him,” she said. Defence lawyer Michelle Stanford said her client was using drugs at the time and has since sobered out in jail. She said ChalifouxSchneider would like to enter rehab in the Lower Mainland and then move in with her parents in Kamloops. Judge Stephen Harrison disagreed. “The offences alleged are serious and the Crown case is strong,” he said. Chalifoux-Schneider is due back in court on Dec. 21.

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FRIDAY, December 11 2015

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A13

LOCAL NEWS

Meanwhile, at the ranch . . . ANDREA KLASSEN

STAFF REPORTER

andrea@kamloopsthisweek.com

Organic farming could come to the Tournament Capital Ranch lands as early as next spring — if the city can find farmers. A request for proposals (RFP) to farm lease 25 hectares of land at the southern end of the property, located between Rayleigh and Heffley Creek, closes today. Parks planning and sustainability supervisor Mike Doll said the city is looking for proposals that use no pesticides, with a preference for food production. “We tried to leave the RFP as open as possible because we want as many submissions as possible, so we can sort through them and try to get the ones we think are best,” he said. To develop the ranch, which is also home to rugby fields, a softball park and planned space for the Kamloops Exhibition Association, the city is required by the provincial Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) to use at least 14 hectares of the property for farming. “That’s a must,” Doll said. “We’re going to take it a step further and farm 25 hectares.” The city is also in the process of setting up a farm-incubator program on another five hectares,

which would offer aspiring farmers small plots of land, mentorship and equipment-sharing. That program, which will be offered in partnership with Community Futures Thompson Country, wants to start planting in 2017. Doll doesn’t know yet how many submissions the RFP has generated, but he is optimistic, based on interest in the land farmers in the region have previously shown. “We’ve had conversations with local farmers that were chomping at the bit to have this RFP come out, so I’d be very shocked if they didn’t submit something,” he said. Doll said the city is open to farmers taking all of the farmland on offer, or leasing smaller portions for a mix of projects. He hopes to see someone working the land by the spring. Other development at the site could also push ahead in 2016. In addition to the KXA project, the city has ALC approval to build a trail that will encircle the area. A section of trail is already in place near the rugby fields at the property’s northern end and Doll would like to see more of the trail developed once the farmland has been fenced in. Within the next five years, the city also needs

to demolish jail buildings on the property, left over from its days as a corrections site.

Water park wait

A destination water park could still come to the Tournament Capital Ranch, but don’t start blowing up your water wings just yet. Parks, recreation and cultural-services director Byron McCorkell told KTW the unnamed developer behind the park is still interested in the project, but is putting it on hold as the Canadian dollar continues its slump. “It would be all imported materials,” McCorkell said. “I think they’re just going to take a little break and see what happens.” While the city has ALC permission for some of its development plans at the ranch, the provincial body requested more information on the water park, “We’ve gone back to

the proponent and said if you still want to pursue this, here’s what you’ve got to do,” McCorkell said. “They’ve indicated they’re still interested, but they’re not running down the hill to get it all done.” If the water park doesn’t proceed, the city could face some expensive works at the ranch, according to Doll. “They were going to finance the potable water problem they have out there. They were going to finance all of that,” he said. The ranch doesn’t have water service. Water is trucked in and emptied into a cistern in a washroom building. Doll said the city could connect the ranch to water service at Dairy Road on the other side of the North Thompson River, build a well system or pump water up from the river and treat it at the site. “There’s no cheap fixes for that,” Doll said.

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FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

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LOCAL NEWS

has joined Dr. Daryl Shinkewski and Dr. Glenn Neilson in the practice of family dentistry. Dr. Li is fluent in Mandarin.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 6:30 PM Monday December 21, 2015 Sun Peaks Mountain Resort Municipality Council gives notice that it will hold a Public Hearing in Council Chambers at 106-3270 Village Way, Sun Peaks, BC, to consider proposed Bylaws 0051, 0055, 0056, 0057, and 0058.

What is Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 0051, 2015? It is a change to Zoning Bylaw No. 1400 to rezone lands at 2306 Sunburst Place (legally described as Lot 18, District Lot 6337, KDYD Plan KAP53479), as shown shaded in bold outline on the map below, from RS-1: Residential Single Family One to RS-1A: Residential Single Family One – Tourist Accommodation Zone to permit tourist accommodation (nightly/short-term rental).

JESSICA KLYMCHUK/KTW

Mental-health medical professionals gathered this week with messages from grateful patients of 1 South — the focus of the Royal Inland Hospital Foundation’s holiday campaign in support of mental health.

SUPPORTING MENTAL HEALTH

‘We all know someone who has been here . . .’ JESSICA KLYMCHUK

STAFF REPORTER

jklymchuk@kamloopsthisweek.com

What is Zoning Bylaw Amendment Bylaw 0055? It is a change to Zoning Bylaw No. 1400 to allow the issuance of tickets under the Bylaw Enforcement Notification Bylaw in place of enforcement through the court system initially. What is Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 0056, 2015? It is a change to Zoning Bylaw No. 1400 to rezone lands at 4128 Sundance Drive (legally described as Lot 10, District Lot 6410, KDYD Plan KAP67926), as shown shaded in bold outline on the map below, from RS-1: Residential Single Family One to RS-1A: Residential Single Family One – Tourist Accommodation Zone to permit tourist accommodation (nightly/shortterm rental). Additionally, the proposed Bylaw would allow the existing dwelling on the property to have a floor space ratio of 0.37 and allow an existing auxiliary residential dwelling unit (suite) to have a gross floor area of 81.5 square metres. What is Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 0057, 2015? It is a change to Zoning Bylaw No. 1400 to rezone lands at 4129 Sundance Drive (legally described as Lot 3, District Lot 6410, KDYD Plan KAP67926), as shown shaded in bold outline on the map below, from RS-1: Residential Single Family One to RS-1A: Residential Single Family One – Tourist Accommodation Zone to permit tourist accommodation (nightly/short-term rental).

The Royal Inland Hospital Foundation is asking the community to donate this Christmas season in support of mental health. With this week’s launch of its holiday campaign, the Foundation announced it will be fundraising to support renovations at 1 South — specifically its common area. Though the psychiatric unit will be housed in the patientcare tower — the second phase of hospital improvements to be completed in about five years — foundation CEO Heidi Coleman said they felt it was important to improve conditions at 1 South for the time being. The unit is housed in the Alumni Tower — one of the oldest buildings at Royal Inland Hospital. “We said, ‘What can we

What is Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 0058, 2015? It is a change to Zoning Bylaw No. 1400 to rezone lands at 4159 Sundance Drive (legally described as Lot 7, District Lot 6428, KDYD Plan KAP72523), as shown shaded in bold outline on the map below, from RS-1: Residential Single Family One to RS-1A: Residential Single Family One – Tourist Accommodation Zone to permit tourist accommodation (nightly/short-term rental). All persons who believe that their interest in property may be affected by the proposed Bylaws shall be afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard at the Public Hearing. Additionally, they may make written submissions on the matter of these Bylaws (via any of the below options) which must be received at our office prior to 4:00 p.m. on the 18th day of December 2015. The entire content of all submissions will be made public and form a part of the public record for this matter. How do I get more information? A copy of the proposed Bylaws and all supporting information can be inspected from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday - Friday (except statutory holidays) at our office from December 1, 2015 until 4:00 p.m. the day of the Hearing; or please contact us via any of the below options.

No representations will be received by Council after the Public Hearing has been concluded. Rob Bremner, Chief Administrative Officer Mail: PO Box 1002, Sun Peaks, BC V0E 5N0 Email: admin@sunpeaksmunicipality.ca Phone: 250-578-2020 Fax: 250-578-2023

do that’s the most important thing for now without changing everything?’”Coleman said. “We all know someone who has been here. Some of us have been here ourselves and we just want to do the best we can do to improve it.” The idea to focus this year’s holiday campaign on mental wellness was brought to Coleman’s attention by former city councillor Nancy Bepple, who has been open about her own struggles with mental health and learning to maintain it. 1 South sees almost 1,000 patients per year, one being Jen Rauschenberger, who spent time in the unit last year battling anxiety and depression. “My experience was actually very positive,” she said. “It was, to say, life-changing, primarily because of the staff. “They’re working with a space that is older than I am and they

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still were able to do their job in a professional way.” Amanda Lavigne, manager of acute mental-health services, said the common area is the multi-purpose focal point of the building, the place where patients often dine, visit with family, play games, listen to music and read. “We’re very overwhelmed by the attention and focus the foundation has really brought for mental health,” she said. “It’s not often the focus of attention in such campaigns, so we’re really appreciative to have this opportunity.” Through December, donors are encouraged to dedicate a holiday ornament to a loved one or to a caregiver when they support the campaign. All will be displayed in the hospital over the holiday season. To donate, go online to rihfoundation.ca and click on the “donate online” button.

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SPORTS

FRIDAY, December 11 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A15

Dario Piva (15) may be among the Kamloops Storm’s scoring leaders, but his wardrobe hasn’t been anything to write home about this season. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

THE BEST AND WORST OF THE KAMLOOPS STORM ADAM WILLIAMS STAFF REPORTER adam@kamloopsthisweek.com

Keaton Gordon’s sewerball skills have not been positively reviewed since his return. The Kamloops Storm forward, who rejoined the club earlier this season after playing his first half in junior A, was the near-unanimous pick as the worst in the Storm’s pre-game warm-up, which can only be described as a fusion of soccer and hacky sack. “He’s more of a power-forward type, not that Zack Andrusiak finesse with a soccer ball,” Storm assistant coach Kyle Panasuk said of Gordon’s footy skills. “He tries to use his vet status all the time to stay in,” echoed forward Kole Comin. “He doesn’t really play the ball.

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He just yells at everyone,” added forward Brendan Lane. All this came as quite the surprise to Gordon. “I’m the best, are you kidding?” he said, stunned at the results. “The worst is probably [forward Austin] Crossley — he has no feet, no feet at all. He can’t juggle.” The assessment of sewer skill was just one of many off-the-wall questions levelled at the Storm earlier this week in an attempt to better know the players behind the numbers. Who, for instance, is the Storm’s best trash talker? Forward Dallas Otto received a few votes — including one from himself — though none of his teammates could offer up any witty one-liners that were safe for print. Panasuk had a different take.

“We’re not great at it,” he said with chagrin and a bit of a laugh. “Not that he ever [trash] talks to the players or anything like that, but Ed [head coach Patterson] has a couple good one-liners that we usually keep quiet behind the bench.” When it comes to questions of attire, defenceman Sol Seibel and forward Lucas Byl received generally positive reviews, while more than a few voters threw Dario Piva and his grey sweatpants under the bus as the Storm’s fashion faux pas. Seibel tried to hide his surprise at being named Storm fashionista. “Walmart clothes are pretty good,” he replied with a smirk. Seibel didn’t deny his other title, though — the Storm’s ladies man — his only response being

it doesn’t take much to come out ahead of some of his teammates. “Being a young guy, he talks well,” Panasuk said of his 16-yearold defenceman’s charm with the fairer sex. “He’s sneaky — he’s not that over the top, but he knows what to say at the right time, so he’s good like that.” Perhaps the most hotly debated accolade was the owner of smelliest equipment. Nearly every player had a different take, often influenced by dressing-room neighbours. The dubious title leaned slightly in Comin’s direction. “Its ripe, just straight sour,” Otto said, an assessment later echoed by Panasuk. “He’s from the Yukon. There’s just something wrong with him.” There were positive titles

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awarded, too — Byl and forward Wilson Northey both got the nod for highest IQ, on the ice and off, while Otto has the best music taste and his legendary line dancing also put him on top of So You Think You Can Dance Storm. The 18-year-old was certainly the most mentioned as KTW explored the lighter side of the Storm, either a nod to his skills or his over-the-top personality. “He’s got a lot of likes out there,” Comin joked. “Jack of all trades.”

On the road again

The Storm will be on the road again this weekend, but will return to Kamloops and McArthur Island on Sunday for a contest against the Revelstoke Grizzlies. Game time is 5 p.m.

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SPORTS

Travelling Blazers talk life on the road, on the bus MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

It’s an adventure. It’s gruelling. It’s a blast. It’s galvanizing. Life on the road in the WHL is all of those things and the Kamloops Blazers will get their fix on an 1,800-kilometre, sixgame East Division swing that started on Tuesday and finishes in Swift Current on Dec. 19. “It has that pro-like feeling, travelling from town to city and playing in different arenas,” Blazers’ defenceman Cam Reagan said. “It’s cool to see the different atmospheres in different buildings and different towns you play in. “It’s not the best time, sitting beside someone for 17 hours on a bus, but you get to know them a little better and you get close to them.” Niggling, chirping, griping, carping, quibbling and grumbling are unavoidable. “It gets pretty hectic,” Kamloops forward Matt Campese said with a laugh. “A lot of fighting through texts, through verbal and even through some physical, but it’s a lot of fun and we have a good time.” Reagan said the most annoying Blazer to travel with is the affable Collin Shirley, a 19-yearold Saskatoon product. “He’s a little loud on the bus,” the 18-year-old blue liner said of Shirley. “He’s always in a peppy mood and bouncing off the walls.” Reagan did not escape unscathed. “It’s funny that Reags said that because I think he might be the most annoying,” said Campese, a Prince Albert product. “He’s always dressed up real nice, but we’re on a bus, so I don’t really understand that.” Campese said much of what happens on the bus is not for public consumption, part of the hockey code, but he offered up one behind-the-scenes piece of information. “There’s a lot of stuff that goes on and some stuff I just can’t share,” he said. “But, if we win and we’ve got a long ride home, we all usually get to the back of the bus

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

Dawson Davidson (above, right) of the Kamloops Blazers will enjoy home cooking this weekend in Moosomin, Sask, at The Red Barn, a restaurant owned by his parents. The Blazers play the Blades tonight in Saskatoon, the first test on a six-game eastern trip that wraps up in Swift Current on Dec. 19. Kamloops goaltender Connor Ingram (left) is a tad miffed a stop in Imperial, Sask., is not scheduled.

and go at it, wrestling.” An interesting form of celebration, to be sure. Rookies pay their dues on road trips, forced to sit in the less-comfortable front of the bus, a rig driven by Kamloops Venom head coach Justin Bosher, and asked to complete the lion’s share of menial tasks. “As a rookie myself last year, I had to do a lot of the heavy lifting, bags and stuff,” Campese said. “It’s just part of the experience with the team.” Eastern swings are also homecomings for players and staff alike, chances to visit with and perform in front of friends and family scattered across Western Canada.

Six Blazers — Campese, Shirley, Connor Ingram, Spencer Bast, Garrett Pilon and Dawson Davidson — are from Saskatchewan and Jermaine Loewen is from Manitoba. Radio NL play-by-play man Jon Keen is from Lanigan, Sask., and spent 11 years calling games in Swift Current. Media man and jackof-all-trades Tim O’Donovan has Saskatchewan roots. Ingram is feeling a little hard done by on this road trip, disappointed a stop at his favourite eatery, Georgie’s Place, in his hometown of Imperial, Sask., is not on the itinerary. “I just wanted a lemon tart,” he said.

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FRIDAY, December 11 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A17

K A M LO O P S C r i m e S to p p e r s WA N T E D

SPORTS

www.kamloopscrimestoppers.ca

HAPPY AT HARPER CRIMES OF THE WEEK

MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

RESIDENTIAL BREAK & ENTER

General manager Norm Daburger is thrilled with earlyseason conditions at Harper Mountain, crossing his fingers and wishing for the good luck to continue. “It got a little bit warm in town and we got a little bit warm up here but, you know what, it’s a perfect early season for us,” Daburger said. “The coverage is amazing. The base is there.” Harper opened a week ahead of schedule, the T-bar operational last Saturday and the chairlift churning last Sunday. “This weekend, we’ll be fully operational — the handle tow, T-bar, chairlift and tube park,” Daburger said. “All of our runs are open, which, for this time of year, is rare.” Last season was a down year for ski resorts across the province and some meteorologists warned of another sub-par season in 2015, due to El Nino. That forecast has yet to ring true at Harper.

The owners of a house on the 1800 block of Mckinley Crt., had returned home on Sunday, they noticed their home had been broken into. It appears the suspects smashed a lower floor window to gain entry into the house. Once inside the suspects searched the entire house, they did take some jewelry, liquor, silver ware and a set of car keys. There is a very good possibility some of the neighbours may have seen some suspicious activity in the area. This is good reminder to make sure your residence is secure and if possible and good alarm system is installed. If you do see something suspicious, whether it is a vehicle or people in the area call the police right away, they will attend to find out who and why the people are in the neighbourhood. If you wish to remain anonymous, please contact Crime Stoppers, you will never have to go to court or give a statement.

“Our snow level might not be as high as some previous years, as far as our high-end years with the most volume, but our coverage is second to none,” Daburger said “I don’t think I’ve ever seen it this early, where our steeps and and our lower elevations all have such a strong base and great coverage. “In the last six El Ninos, I can remember two were poor years, including last year, two were average and two were really good.” The snow base at Harper yesterday was 45 centimetres, with about five centimetres of the white stuff having fallen in the past few days. Harper will be open tomorrow and Sunday, but will shut down after that until daily operations begin on Dec. 19.

“It seems the main [weather] systems are petering out, but we might see a few flurries this weekend,” Daburger said. “Anything now is just icing on the cake because the coverage is so good.”

Toonie Day haul

Never has Toonie Day at Sun Peaks Resort raised so much coin for the Kamloops Food Bank. Skiers and snowboarders bought lift passes for $2 and the donation of a nonperishable food item on Monday. Sun Peaks sold 4,670 lift passes, smashing the annual event’s old record of 3,786 set in 2004. The profit of $8,500 has been donated to the food bank.

Six games in nine days From A16

What makes the slight even tougher to bear is the team will dine at The Red Barn, a restaurant in Moosomin, Sask, owned by Dan Davidson, Dawson’s father. “These guys this weekend are getting the old creamy chicken penne with Caesar salad, garlic toast and water, the winning meal,” said Dan, the ambient sound of Red Barn customers chattering in the background. “We’ve been up to Kamloops twice already this season. This is the great time now. We get to start touring. We’ll be watching all six games. Normally, he’s 18 hours away in Kamloops. When he’s this close, we’re not missing a thing.” That stop at the family restaurant just off Highway 1 between Regina and Brandon and the fresh air accompanying it will provide respite from the rigours — and occasional rankness — of the road. “I’ll just say Jake Kryski has some bad farts,” Shirley said. “That’s all I’m going to say. He stinks that bus up pretty good.” The time for joking — and stinking up the joint — ends tonight in Saskatoon, where the Blazers will play the Blades. Kamloops is in Prince Albert

tomorrow, Regina on Tuesday, Brandon on Wednesday, Moose Jaw on Dec. 18 and Swift Current on Dec. 19. Remaining focused amid the distractions — especially on a trip that leads directly into the Christmas break — can be challenging and the Blazers (12-10-3-1) can ill-afford to take a night off, sitting tied for seventh with the Portland Winterhawks in the Western Conference. “Christmas is in the back of the mind for everyone and, for the young guys, it’s their first time and they miss mom,” Shirley said. “It’s important to stay focused on the task and having a good road trip.” Looking past the Blades won’t be an issue for 20-year-old defenceman Ryan Rehill, a wily veteran relishing the last lengthy road trip of his WHL career. “It’s kind of exciting, but not at the same time,” Rehill said. “I’m not going to have another long bus trip like this in the near future. “Life on the road’s been good over the years. There’s not much to it. Off and on the bus, different hotels, different arenas . . . it gets pretty tiring, but it’s part of the league and everybody’s got to do it.”

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If you know where any of these people are, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). The tip line pays up to $2,000 for information leading to the arrest of fugitives. Remember, Crime Stoppers just wants your information, not your name. Crime doesn’t pay, but Crime Stoppers does. This program is jointly sponsored by Kamloops Crime Stoppers & Kamloops This Week. People featured are wanted on arrest warrants not vacated as of 3 p.m. on December 9, 2015.

LILLOOET NEEDS OUR HELP Sometime overnight Thursday November 26th, suspects drove to Seton Lake, where the Walden Power Station is located and took a large diesel generator. These thieves had a plan to remove this generator, a large truck with a hydraulic winch or a flat deck with some type of crane would have been needed to load this generator up. The generator is large, similar to a small pickup truck

and is described as a Caterpillar 3406 Turbo diesel, yellow in colour with “Finning” decals on it the side. The value of this generator is over $47,000. It is very possible that someone may have seen this generator being removed on flatdeck or the deck of a large truck. This is your opportunity to do the right thing and call the police, if you want to remain anonymous, please

contact Crime Stoppers only your information will we used, never your name.

THEFT FROM TELUS COMPOUND Sometime overnight on December 5th , suspect entered the Telus compound on the 1800 block of the East Trans Canada Highway by cutting through two fences. The suspects broke into 3 containers, then searched through a number of company

trucks. Good crime preventions techniques prevented anything from being taken, the suspects left empty handed. This is a very busy location day or night, with pedestrian and vehicle traffic in the area. There is no doubt that someone in the area saw some

suspicious active in the area. If you saw something suspicious or have any information on the attempted theft, please contact Crime stoppers, you will remain anonymous and we receive a cash reward upon the arrest of the suspects.

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A18

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NATIONAL SPORTS

REID NOT THE ONLY ONE CALLING PLAYS IN KC DAVE SKRETTA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — In his dorm room on the campus of Missouri Western, shortly before the Kansas City Chiefs wrapped up training camp, Andy Reid lounged in a chair with a smile on his face. The reason? He was talking about play-calling. There aren’t many things that get him more excited in the game of football. So when Reid let slip last weekend he has begun turning to Chiefs offensive co-ordinator Doug Pederson to help with the plays, a small admission became big news. And, while Reid tried to downplay the entire situation this week, he nonetheless had pulled back the curtain on the way the team operates. “We all feed off each other. I came up with Mike Holmgren, who would do the same thing,’’ Reid explained. “The bottom line is what’s best to be successful on the offensive side.’’ The Chiefs (7-5) take on the San Diego Chargers (3-9) this weekend. Reid earned his chops in the NFL for his creativity on offence. His work with the offensive line and a quarterback named Brett Favre in Green Bay helped him land the head job in Philadelphia, where he successfully turned Donovan McNabb into one of the game’s premier quarterbacks. So nobody is disputing Reid knows what it takes to run an offence. But, even he is willing to acknowledge that sometimes he gets into a little bit of a rut.

Andy Reid and the Kansas City Chiefs take on the San Diego Chargers this weekend. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS

“I’m looking at the game and kind of knowing what’s going on,’’ Reid said. “If I think we need a change-up, then we go with it. I think it’s also healthy, whether you’re in a slump or not. I just think it’s healthy to mix it up a little bit.’’ It’s almost impossible to declare a point in the season when Reid began consulting more with Pederson, or with offensive guru Brad Childress and run-game co-ordinator Andy Heck. But there is one way to chop up the season: They were 1-5 over their first six games, and 6-0 over their last six.

The Chiefs are averaging 32.3 points during the win streak, second only to Carolina. Just maybe the turn-about coincides with some fresh ideas on offence. “Doug Pederson has done a great job. I’ve watched him grow from being a player for me, now as a coach, and each year he’s done this thing — now a co-ordinator — he’s growing,’’ Reid said. “Unfortunately, he’s got a head coach who’s an offensive guy, so he doesn’t get enough credit for what he does, but I have full trust to turn the whole game over to him and let him call.”

Besides, this isn’t something new. Reid did the same thing with Childress when he was offensive co-ordinator in Philadelphia and Childress parlayed the experience into the head job in Minnesota. Reid and Pederson may have subtle differences in the way they call a game, each giving their choice of plays their own distinct flavour. But, they’re still operating out of the same playbook, going off the same game plan, so telling the difference is nearly impossible. The screens to running back Charcandrick West? Still a big part of the offence. Deep routes down the sideline to Jeremy Maclin?

Still part of the offence. Short, safe throws that are a big reason why Alex Smith has thrown 305 passes without an interception? Yep, still part of it. Speaking of Smith, even he has no clue who is calling each play. The only voice he hears in his inhelmet radio is that of Pederson, who has always been the one to relay the calls. “I have no idea where it’s coming from,’’ he said. “I know all those guys talk and it’s an open line, and there’s a lot of voices helping out. I have no idea where the final say is coming from.’’

Former Canucks coach Vigneault set to coach 1,000th game JOSHUA CLIPPERTON

THE CANADIAN PRESS

Alain Vigneault paused for a moment when asked what advice he would give a younger version of himself — one who had yet to spend a single game behind an NHL bench as a head coach. “You sacrifice a lot of things on a personal level,’’ he said. “The balance people have in life between their family lives and their work is really tested and put to the limit. I’ve never felt I worked a day in my life because I love the game. “I was willing to make that sacrifice.’’ Vigneault will coach his 1,000th NHL game tonight when

his New York Rangers visit the Edmonton Oilers, a milestone he has reached despite a roller-coaster career. The Quebec City native was in his late 30s and leading the Montreal Canadiens in the 2000-2001 season when he was blindsided by an abrupt firing just over three years into his tenure. “Challenging would be an understatement. It was six months where, even though I had sent my resume to tons of people and I had just been up for coach of the year with the Habs, I couldn’t find a job,’’ Vigneault said. “I was six months out of work, I was going through a chal-

lenging [marriage] separation, two young daughters, a lot of bills.’’ After a brief career as an NHL defenceman, Vigneault got his start coaching in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League and as an assistant with the expansion Ottawa Senators. He knew he would have to take a step backward to get another crack at the big time after Montreal, so he signed on with the QMJHL’s PEI Rocket before the Vancouver Canucks hired him to coach their AHL affiliate. And, when thenCanucks general manager Dave Nonis fired Marc Crawford in 2006, Vigneault was the man

entrusted with getting the club to the next level. “To say that I was very confident that I would get back [to the NHL] would not be the truth,’’ he said in Vancouver earlier this week prior to the Rangers’ game against the Canucks. Vancouver made the playoffs and Vigneault won coach of the year in his first campaign, but the team missed out on the post-season in 2007-08, with Nonis paying the price for that failure with his job. Mike Gillis came on board as GM and supported Vigneault during a rough stretch in 2008-2009 when many were clamouring for

him to be fired. “[Gillis] never buckled,’’ said Vigneault. “He was right by my side.’’ Gillis’ faith was repaid and two years later Vigneault led Vancouver to the best record in the league and within a game of winning the Stanley Cup. Canucks forward Alexandre Burrows, who played eight seasons for Vigneault, said honesty is one of the coach’s greatest attributes. “There’s no grey areas,’’ said Burrows. “If you’re a shooter you better shoot, if you’re a grinder you better grind. He tells you how it is.’’ A second Presidents’

Trophy followed in 2011-12, but Vancouver bowed out in the first round of the playoffs that season and again in the spring of 2013, leading to Vigneault’s dismissal. “Hockey’s a tough business and expectations here were high,’’ he said. “I understand the organization doing what it had to do. I have nothing but good memories.’’ Vigneault — who has record of 538-349112 as he prepares to become the 23rd coach in NHL history to reach 1,000 games — landed on his feet with the Rangers, but got off to a slow start in New York. “I’ve had a lot of dif-

ferent coaching styles,’’ said Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist. “What really struck me the most was his patience when he came in his first year and we were struggling.’’ Vigneault stayed patient and led the Rangers to a Stanley Cup appearance in 2013-2014 before losing out in the Eastern Conference final last season. Vigneault has flown under the radar for much of his career. That doesn’t seem to bother him, at least on the surface. “This is a tough business to get into,’’ he said. “In my case, it’s tough business to get back into.’’


FRIDAY, December 11 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A19

Obituaries & In Memoriam PAT SORENSEN ANOTHER CHRISTMAS IN HEAVEN

December 13th, 2012

We hear the Christmas songs that you always held so dear, We know your Christmas Angels sing to us this time of year. We so deeply miss you, that’s so very true, But our hearts rejoice with memories of the precious years with you. Thank you mom / gramma, for all those “Memory Makers” Love from Dad, Deb & Bryon, Ken & Bonnie, Shelley & Didier and all your grand and great-grandchildren

BILL LANG

TREVOR JENSEN

1952 - 2015

It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of Bill Lang on December 6, 2015 at 63 years of age. He is survived by his brother Pat (Brenda) and his sister Maureen (Vince), nieces Katelyn (Dustin) and Hailey, nephew James, great nephews Austin and Carter along with numerous aunts, cousins and friends. He was predeceased by his mother Jean, father Jim, half-brother Ken and nephew Matthew. Bill was born in Edmonton on January 23, 1952. He moved to Kamloops in 1957. School was always easy for Bill; skipping grades enabled him to attend S.A.I.T. at the age of 16. He then went to BCIT for four years and completed his degree as a Metallurgical Technician. He worked for many years at Highland Valley Copper (Lornex) and he stayed working in the mining industry until his retirement in early 2015. Bill’s love for music and his happy demeanour left him with many friends throughout his life. A Celebration of Life will take place in the spring or summer of 2016. The family wishes to give a special thanks to Barb and Terry for their kindness, support and love. Memorial donations may be made in Bill’s name to the Canadian Cancer Society, 214-141 Victoria Street, Kamloops, BC V2C 1Z5. WE’LL MISS YOU. ROCK ON BAD BILLY BEER CAN. Arrangements entrusted to Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services 250-554-2324 Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

First Memorial Funeral Service 250-554-2429

ESTHER LITTLE

September 7, 1919 - December 5, 2015 Esther Little passed away December 5, 2015 at the age of 96. Left to mourn her passing are her husband of 75 years Harry Little, her sons Douglas (Janice), Lester (Kandy) and her daughter Joyce (Jack) Potts. She also leaves four grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Esther was predeceased by her parents Olaf and Ellen Moe, brothers Albert, Odmond, Clifford, Bernard, Bill and sisters Alice and Dagney. There will be a Graveside Service for family and friends on Friday, December 11, 2015 at 10:00 am with a Memorial Service at 1:00 pm at the First Baptist Church, 454 Columbia Street. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Gideon’s or the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice in memory of Esther. Condolences may be made at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com Schoenings Funeral Service 250-374-1454

On December 5th, 2015 our beloved husband, father and grampa, Trevor Jensen passed away peacefully in his sleep at the age of 73.

Good Questions, Honest Answers! Every Friday in KTW!

Trevor will be lovingly remembered by his wife of 47 years Bridget, sons Chris Jensen (Deanna), Scott Jensen and daughter Shannon (Colin) Dunlop, grandchildren Hannah, Joshua, Grace Jensen, Maddy and Zack Jensen and Katie and Ian Dunlop. He is predeceased by his parents Roy and Florence Jensen and his sister June Lambert.

Q: How do I get Murray’s ashes to Toronto?

A lifelong resident of Kamloops, Trevor touched many lives and will be greatly missed by all who were lucky enough to travel his path. A Celebration of his Life Service was held on Thursday, December 10th at 11:00 am in St. Paul’s Cathedral Parish Hall. Should friends desire, a memorial donation may be made to the Kamloops branch of St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog Program. On-line condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

Drake Smith, MSW Your Cremation Expert

A: I think couriers stopped shipping them some time ago. It’s understandable that Greyhound Bus won’t accept acids, ammunition, compressed gases... and corpses! But they also forbid shipping “cremated remains!” So, a relative can take Murray from Kamloops by car, plane or train. Or use Canada Post.

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WALTER DIRCKS Born December 26, 1929 in Annaheim, Saskatchewan and passed away peacefully on November 29, 2015. Walter came to Kamloops in 1954 and started the Kamloops Septic Tank business shortly after. He ran this thriving business for approximately 30 years. He mourned the loss of his second wife Marjorie who predeceased him by almost 10 years. Walter is survived by his daughters Joanne and Kandi as well as his son Ken. His daughter Roxanne predeceased him by six years. He had nine siblings four of whom predeceased him (Ben, Elaine, Louise and George) his remaining siblings will miss him (Donald, Mildred, Norbert, Ted and Wilfred). He will be remembered as an avid outdoors man who enjoyed boating, snowmobiling, target shooting and hiking. He suffered from Parkinson’s in his later life and thus spent five and a half years at The Hamlets in Westsyde. He was grateful for their excellent care and attention. The family will hold a private remembrance.

Oh Great Spirit ... Oh Great Spirit Whose voice I hear in the wind Whose breath gives life to the world Hear me I come to you as one of your many children I am small and weak I need your strength and your wisdom May I walk in beauty Make my eyes ever behold the red and purple sunset Make my hands respect the things that you have made And my ears sharp to hear your voice Make me wise, So that I may know the things you have taught your children The lessons you have hidden in every leaf and rock Make me strong, Not to be superior to my brothers But to be able to fight my greatest enemy — myself Make me ever ready to come to you with straight eyes So that when life fades, as the fading sunset My spirit will come to you without shame.


A20

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FAITH

God’s incarnation is aimed especially for the lonely to live

On December 6th, The 8th Annual Shoe Memorial was held at St. Andrew’s On The Square. Over 300 pairs of donated shoes were on display.

F

Each pair of shoes represented one women or girl missing or murdered in BC. Lynn Chasse, Coordinator of

The Annual Shoe Memorial would like to thank the following: • Kamloops & Labour District Labour Council • Cupe 900 • Barb Nederpel - KDLC • Glendene Grant - M.A.T.H. • Tara Phillips & Lana Love - WOS Local 1-417 • Jody Beesley & Pat Tomlinson - KSACC • Silent Witnesses • Lois Rugg • Runner’s Sole - Wayne Richardson • Lo-Boy Market • Classic Fx • YMCA/YWCA

• Son Mai Spa • City Of Kamloops Co-Workers • Wendy Feist • Kelly Mihalech • Sherrie Lewis • Sandy Desautels • Barbara Brabant & Family • Dale Bass - KTW • Jesse Lepp - CFJC • Angel & Damien Corson & Barb • Helena & Cole Byrd • St. Andrews On The Square

To the people of Kamloops - thank you for the donations & support that made this shoe memorial possible.

rancois de Bonivard, a monk and patriot from Geneva, is considered as the inspiration of Lord Byron’s epic poem The Prisoner of Chillion (1816). From 1530 to 1536, Bonivard was held prisoner in the dungeon of the castle of Chillion where, in the damp and darkness, he paced the narrow confines of his cell. But, one day he climbed painfully up the wall to the tiny window, from which he saw the lovely sky, the swiftly flowing River Rhone and the distant towers in the valley below. Then he dropped back into the cell, his grimy living grave. That sight from the window filled his soul with passion and he

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began to beat on the door and cry, “O God, I must get out!” That narrative is, in a sense, a picture of the world and its prevailing need some 2,000 years ago. Prior to Jesus’ advent, people had “seen” the God — the universe, as it were — through a tiny window. Then, with a holy passion, they yearned for a fuller disclosure of the reality of His being. In response to their need, God sent His Son to a dark and lonely world. According to the gospel writer Luke, “they were all waiting for him” (Luke 8:40). Now that God had become more real in Jesus Christ to us, loneliness has been taken out of the practice of faith in him. I doubt if there is anyone who does not feel faith and religion is a lonely business in this century. It is so much easier to be one of a jolly, irreligious crowd than to be dubbed a killjoy. Hence, there is the tendency to throw principles overboard and to lose one’s self in what most people regard as “the thing to do.” The notes of moral indignation and of adventure are softpedalled by those who do not have the will to dare to take a lonely stand upon issues of faith. We read in the gospels how, on one occasion, the eager and the plaintive crowd waited all night for Jesus and was now pressing in upon him like a wave of the world’s great heartache and spiritual loneliness.

Among them was a poor, diseased and haggard woman trying to reach the Master and being constantly pushed aside by stronger competitors. At last, she could stretch out a scrawny hand, saying, “If I only touch his garment, I will get well.” Suddenly, amidst the jostling crowd, Jesus turned and said: “Your faith has made you well” (Matthew 9:21,22). She was a miserable outcast of the Hebrew society but, in response to her wailing soul, Jesus made her into a new creature and, what’s more, he became the friend of her lonely heart forever. What a lesson for those who spurn religion today because it is too lonely an adventure. Whenever our sincere faith and earnest desire are focused on Jesus, he turns to us and becomes our companion for life. Phillips Brooks has clearly expressed it in his lovely Christmas carol: “How silently, how silently, the wondrous Gift is given! So God imparts to human hearts the blessings of His heaven. No ear may hear His coming, but in this world of sin, where meek souls will receive Him still, the dear Christ enters in.” He comes to those who are prepared and waiting to receive him. We see from this how one question cuts sharply through all the clamour and tinsel of our Christmas preparations: Are we prepared to receive him in this advent season? I grant that in certain sections of our world, there never has been such a moral mess as there is today. Certainly God meant it

— NARYAN MITRA

to be better than it is. Yet, whenever anyone permits Jesus to come in on all he does and says and plans, not only is everything different in the person’s life, but wherever Jesus touches the world, things are different. An adventure in loneliness? Only one person against the world? Yes, but with God in that person, everything is different. Not only we are against the world but, with God’s Son, within us we can overcome the world. Isn’t the problem with people in every age that they have hardly anything to live for — simply because they have nothing for which to die? This was more true before Christ came than it is now or need be. In the ancient world, the religious people had the Law of Moses. But, who had ever heard of a man dying for a code of law? However, when the time had fully come, God sent forth His Son. Then, life became real and meaningful because even at the cost of death itself, men would go on living for him. Will our Christian faith lose its loneliness this Christmas and become a venture with him for whom no cost is too great to die and for whom to live is life everlasting?

KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Columns should be between 600 and 800 words in length and can be emailed to editor@ kamloopsthisweek.com. Please include a very short bio and a photo.


FRIDAY, December 11 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A21

NATIONAL NEWS

First mass arrival of Syrian refugees begins in Ontario GOVERNMENT SEEKS TO BRING IN 10,000 REFUGEES BEFORE YEAR’S END STEPHANIE LEVITZ

THE CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA — They escaped a civil war that has killed hundreds of thousands of people and displaced millions more, leaving behind homes that have been bombed to pieces, their livelihoods and future hopes in tatters. They fled to Jordan, Turkey, Lebanon — living in refugee camps, shantytowns and private apartments, trying to figure out their next steps, watching as what they thought would just be a temporary move away from their home country began to look more permanent. This week, hundreds of Syrians will be on the move again, this time to Canada with the first mass arrival of refugees as part of the Liberal government’s commitment to Syrian refugee resettlement. The first flight, a military plane with 160 people on board, left Beirut yesterday en route to Germany, where it made a stop for refuelling and a fresh crew before heading on to Toronto. A second flight is set to arrive tomorrow in Montreal. All told, about 300 people will arrive in the next few days with a chance to make a home in Canada thanks to private sponsors who’ve been working for months to prepare for them. “We have great hopes for the success of this group of people that are arriving and their families as they

We have great hopes for the “success of this group of

people that are arriving and their families as they build their new home here in Canada. — ARIF VIRANI, PARLIAMENTARY

SECRETARY FOR IMMIGRATION

build their new home here in Canada,’’ said Arif Virani, the parliamentary secretary for immigration. The sponsors will still have to wait a little while longer to meet their new arrivals. Border agents, health officials and immigration officers will be on hand when the plane touches down to run the refugees through a battery of tests. They will spend the night in hotels before moving on to their new homes. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is planning to be on hand, and he has invited opposition leaders to be there too. Montreal and Toronto will be home to dozens of such flights in the coming weeks as the government seeks to bring 10,000 Syrians to Canada by year’s end, and then a further 15,000 by the end of February. While Syrian refugees have been arriving with some regularity since the Liberals were sworn into office on Nov. 4, they’ve arrived on commercial flights. Thursday sees the first government aircraft return from a deployment specific to a program that began

as a Liberal campaign promise. Even when in opposition, the Liberals called for Canada to increase its commitment to Syrian resettlement, suggesting back in March that 25,000 was the number in their sights; the prior Conservative government had initially pledged to take in 11,300 people by the end of 2018. But during the campaign, the Liberals put forward a more ambitious goal — the government would take in 25,000 people itself and work with private sponsors to bring in even more. They later went further, saying they’d bring in that many people by

the end of this year. Work on that started the very day the Liberals won power, with companies like Air Canada reaching out immediately to see if their planes could be helpful as part of the program. Once the first two military flights arrive, private chartered flights will shuttle the vast majority of the remaining Syrians to Canada. It wasn’t until the Liberals struck a cabinet sub-committee specifically designed to roll out the program that plans began to coalesce — and one of the first things they heard from their international partners was a plea to reconsider their original year-end deadline. Together, Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon are hosting close to 3 million of the 4.28 million UN-registered refugees who have fled Syria since the war began there in 2011. The Liberals also broke their plan down into stages. To meet the 25,000

goal, about 10,000 would be those who have private sponsors at the ready and in many cases, those files were already in the immigration system because of the previous Conservative commitments. Those would be the cases targeted for settlement by the end of the year; private cases are easier because the support structure is already in place. Then, a further 15,000 spaces would be reserved for government-assisted refugees with the goal of bringing them in by the end of February 2016. In recent months, thousands of Syrian refugees have been arriving in Canada but the Liberals are only counting those who’ve landed since they officially took office on Nov. 4 as part of their commitment. As of Dec. 7, that number was 416. The government says they have 11,932 applications currently in the system.

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A22

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NATIONAL NEWS

Funeral held for boy whose town gave him an early Christmas parade THE CANADIAN PRESS

ST. GEORGE, Ont. — Evan Leversage, a terminally ill southern Ontario boy whose wish to see another Christmas prompted his community to stage an early Santa Claus parade was laid to rest Thursday. Pastor Steve Barna told family and friends in attendance at the ceremony in St. George, Ont., that Evan,7, also touched the lives of those across the world, including some notable figures. Barna says Ashton Kutcher gave a

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shout out to Evan on Facebook and wished him Merry Christmas and Gov. Gen. David Johnston wrote a personal letter to the seven-year-old as a word of encouragement to him. Evan, who suffered from an inoperable brain tumour, died at a Brantford, Ont., hospice on Sunday in the arms of his mother — Nicole Wellwood. Doctors told his family this year that they weren’t sure if he would live to see this Christmas, so St. George put on an early Christmas parade in October, complete with

artificial snow strewn around Evan’s home. The boy got to hop onto Santa’s sleigh and ride with him through the streets of St. George with thousands of townspeople looking on. Evan was admitted to the hospice on Nov. 4 and his family maintained a vigil at his bedside until his death. “One of Evan’s favourite highlights during his stay at the hospice was the day that staff wheeled his bed into the family room so that he could direct the volunteer firefighters who were putting together the

huge 12-foot Christmas tree,’’ a statement on the hospice’s Facebook page said. “Evan took great pride in telling them where to put each decoration on that tree and also enjoyed a special visit from Santa.’’ Evan’s story attracted international attention with people reaching out from as far away as Australia and the United Kingdom. The Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada joined with his family earlier this year to launch a fundraising campaign to support research into childhood brain cancer.

Environment minister worried about rights of indigenous peoples THE CANADIAN PRESS

PARIS — Federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna has expressed deep concerns about opposition at the international climate conference to what she called a “critically important’’ issue — the rights of Aboriginal Peoples. “The (final) agreement must recognize adequately the importance of respecting human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples,’’ McKenna told a plenary session early Thursday. “We are deeply concerned that the reference to human rights and rights of indigenous peoples’’ was still being challenged, she added. The deadline for the release of the final agreement is Friday, when the conference ends. Ontario Environment Minister Glen Murray, who is attending the Paris conference, urged McKenna to stand firm in pushing for the respect of native rights in the final agreement. “We in Ontario would like to

see the government of Canada continue to support our relationship with indigenous people,’’ he said. Indigenous rights and climate change were also on the agenda Thursday in Gatineau, Que., where the Assembly of First Nations was holding its annual special chiefs assembly. Two young girls from Wikwemikong First Nation on Ontario’s Manitoulin Island, dressed in traditional ceremonial robes and headdresses, brought the house down with emotional appeals that cast the climate fight forward a generation. “I promise my future children we will work to make this planet green and keep it that way,’’ 12-year-old Francesca Pheasant told the chiefs. “Some of our world leaders are worried about war. We need to also worry about climate change because it is happening now and it is happening fast. We have to stop it before it gets so bad we can’t do anything about it.’’ Autumn Peltier, 11, then warbled an Anishinaabe song of prayer for the earth’s water,

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breaking into sobs as she sang but finishing nonetheless. She left most of assembly hall in tears. “This young child-woman that brought forth tears, it’s the tears of Mother Earth,’’ Francois Paulette, the acting regional chief for the Northwest Territories, said in response. “That’s where we are in our history of our world. Climate change, global warming, is happening.’’ NDP Leader Tom Mulcair, who had earlier addressed the gathering, told reporters talk of a nation-to-nation approach is not enough. “It has to have a base that’s solid, that’s concrete - and that includes a place at the table .... First Nations have to be there,’’ he said. On Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told First Nations leaders that a new relationship based on recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership needs to be established with Aboriginal Peoples. — With files from Bruce Cheadle in Gatineau, Que.

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FRIDAY, December 11 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NATIONAL NEWS Canadian scientist formally receives Nobel Prize, meets idol Mats Sundin

SEND US YOUR CHRISTMAS STORIES! As is our annual tradition, KTW will publish your Christmas stories as part of our Christmastime editions. Your stories can be funny or sad, heartfelt or light — if you have a Christmas tale to tell, let’s share it with the Kamloops This Week audience. Send your stories by email to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com and include name, address and contact phone number.

CHRISTMAS COMES EARLY AT SPECTRA

THE CANADIAN PRESS

Canadian scientist Arthur McDonald was formally presented Thursday with his Nobel Prize at a ceremony in Stockholm, but received a prized gift earlier in the week from one his idols, former Maple Leafs captain Mats Sundin. McDonald, a retired professor from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., was the co-winner in physics for his work on tiny particles known as neutrinos. “It is a great honour to receive this prize,’’ McDonald said in a statement. “It is wonderful to share it with many of my (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory) colleagues and their partners here in Stockholm and with hundreds more who contributed so much to our success, at Queen’s and our other Canadian and international institutions.’’ McDonald and Japanese scientist Takaaki Kajita were cited for the discovery of neutrino oscillations and their contributions to experiments showing that neutrinos change identities. They determined neutrinos have mass, which fundamentally changed the understanding of the laws of physics. The prizes in medicine, chemistry, literature and the Nobel Memorial Prize in economic sciences were also handed out at the ceremony, each receiving a medal from Sweden’s king, Carl XVI Gustaf. McDonald’s work was trumpeted by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. “This is a proud moment for Canadian science and for all Canadians,’’ Trudeau said in a statement. “The Canadian government values the work of our country’s scientific community — and fully supports it — by encouraging excellence and respecting scientists’ independence. We will ensure that all future decisions on matters that affect Canadians will be informed by scientific evidence.’’ McDonald attended with his wife and family. But if anything could rival receiving a Nobel Prize, it may have been a meeting arranged by the Canadian embassy in Sweden where he hobnobbed with Sundin and former Leafs defenceman Borje Salming, both Swedes. He had a busy week that included giving the customary Nobel Lecture on his work and a meeting Tuesday with former members of his favourite hockey team, the Maple Leafs. Immediately after receiving word from Sweden that he had won a Nobel Prize, McDonald hugged and thanked his wife. Shortly thereafter he spoke with his friend, Lars Bergstrom, a Swedish physicist, according to a Queen’s University spokesman. The talk quickly turned from the award to hockey, with McDonald telling Bergstrom he wished Sundin still played for the Leafs. The Swedish embassy caught word of the story and invited Sundin and Salming to a reception with Canada’s ambassador to Sweden, Kenneth Macartney, and McDonald.

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• Polaris 44 HP ProStar 570 Engine • 11” Ground Clearance • Legendary Independent Rear Suspension with 9.5” of travel • On-Demand True All-Wheel Drive • Huge 1,255 LBS Towing Capacity • Electronic Power Steering •EBS (Engine Brake System)

• Powerful 44 HP Liquid Cooled Pro Star Engine • Electronic Fuel Injected • On Demand True All Wheel Drive • 10.5” Ground Clearance • Seating for 3 Passengers • 1500 LB Towing Capacity

MSRP $16,499

• Powerful 68 HP ProStar HO engine features 13% more power • 2000 LBS Class-Leading Towing Capacity • On Demand True AWD/2WD/Versa Trac Turf Mode • Smooth and Robust 10” Dual A-Arm Suspension • 11.3 “ Ground Clearance •Seats 6

ve 4 S1a,80 $

Comes With 1 Year Warranty

SALE PRICE

9,995*

$

MSRP $11,799

2016 Polaris RZR 570 • Powerful 45HP ProStar Engine • Electronic Fuel Injected • Light Weight Transmission • 9” Superior Front Travel • True All Wheel Drive • 1500LB Towing Capacity

Warning: The Polaris RANGER and RZR are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license to operate. Passengers must be at least 12 years old and tall enough to grasp the hand holds and plant feet firmly on the floor. All SxS drivers should take a safety training course. Contact ROHVA at www.rohva.org or (949) 255-2560 for additional information. Drivers and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Be particularly careful on difficult terrain. Never drive on public roads or paved surfaces. Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. Check local laws before riding on trails. ATVs can be hazardous to operate. Polaris adult models are for riders 16 and older. For your safety, always wear a helmet, eye protection and protective clothing, and be sure to take a safety training course. For safety and training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887. You may also contact your Polaris dealer or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. ©2015 Polaris Industries Inc.

SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. *Plus freight and PDI of $585, plus tire levy, plus applicable taxes. All pricing net of rebates, dealer keeps rebates. In stock units only, call dealer for details. Some units shown with additional charge options (like winches), these accessories are not included in prices shown unless otherwise stated.

NOW!WITH EVEN LOWER PRICING ities

Limited Quant

Comes With 3 Year Warranty

2015 Polaris Indy Voyager 155

New AXYS® RMK® Instantaneous Lift Rider Balanced™ Control Immediate Response

• New 800 Clean Fire engine • All new front and rear suspensions • Track

pricing Call foer mo del on th of your choice!

- 2.6” Series 6 / 155” and 163” lengths / Awesome deep snow performance with trail manners / Light weight single ply. - 2.6” and 3” available.

• All new RMK Axys raised chassis

- Even lighter weight than the Pro Ride. - Still up to about 50 - 70lbs lighter than the competition!

2015 Polaris Indy LXT 144 INT

2015 Polaris 550 Indy Adventure 155

Comes With 1 Year Warranty

Comes With 1 Year Warranty

Comes With 1 Year Warranty

• 550 Fan Engine • Electric Start • PERC Reverse • Articulated Rear Suspension • Pro-Ride RMK Front Suspension • High-Flotation 15” x 155” x1.6” track

• 550 Fan Engine • 15 x 144 x 1.35 Track • Electric Start • PERC Reverse • CVTech Powerbloc 50/ Invance Clutching

• 550 Fan Engine • Electric Start • PERC Reverse • Articulated Rear Suspension • Lock & Ride Convertible Passenger seat • High-Flotation 15” x 155” x1.6” cobra track

SALE PRICE

6,495

$

*

MSRP $8,599

www.spectrapowersports.com

770 North Broadway, Williams Lake • 250-392-3201 • hseibert@spectrapowersports.com SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. *Plus freight and PDI of $585, plus tire levy, plus applicable taxes. All pricing net of rebates, dealer keeps rebates. In stock units only, call dealer for details. Some units shown with additional charge options (like winches), these accessories are not included in prices shown unless otherwise stated.

SAHALI MALL DECEMBER 12–24

SALE PRICE

11,995*

2015 Polaris Ranger 900 Crew

MSRP $11,499

www.spectrapowersports.com

Getting You OutThere!

$

9,995*

MSRP $7,599

2016 Polaris Pro RMK 800 155

1

LEFT

$

770 North Broadway, Williams Lake • 250-392-3201 • hseibert@spectrapowersports.com

Lightest in Class 408 LB Class Leading Horsepower

Comes With 2 Year Warranty

SALE PRICE

5,995*

$

MSRP $6,899

ve 4 Sa,50 $4

MSRP $16,499

2015 Polaris Ranger 570 Crew EPS

4,995*

Getting You OutThere!

SALE PRICE

11,995*

$

LEFT

MSRP $8,499

SALE PRICE

• Powerful 31 HP Liquid cooled ProStar Engine • Electronic Fuel Injected • On-Demand True All Wheel Drive • Legendary Smooth Independent Suspension • 10.25” Ground Clearance • 1225 LB Towing Capacity

Comes With 2 Year Warranty

2015 Polaris Sportsman 570 EPS

$

2016 Polaris Sportsman 450

ve 4 Sa,50 $4

Comes With 2 Year Warranty

MSRP $4,099

2015 Polaris Phoenix 200

VISIT US IN KAMLOOPS AND GIVE THE GIFT OF SNOW! Gift ideas for all the snow lovers on your list! Everything from resort gift cards and lift tickets to toques and souvenirs.

A23

SALE PRICE

$

6,495

*

MSRP $8,899

SALE PRICE

6,995*

$

MSRP $9,999

Warning: The Polaris RANGER and RZR are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license to operate. Passengers must be at least 12 years old and tall enough to grasp the hand holds and plant feet firmly on the floor. All SxS drivers should take a safety training course. Contact ROHVA at www.rohva.org or (949) 255-2560 for additional information. Drivers and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Be particularly careful on difficult terrain. Never drive on public roads or paved surfaces. Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. Check local laws before riding on trails. ATVs can be hazardous to operate. Polaris adult models are for riders 16 and older. For your safety, always wear a helmet, eye protection and protective clothing, and be sure to take a safety training course. For safety and training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887. You may also contact your Polaris dealer or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. ©2015 Polaris Industries Inc.


A24

ZIMMER WHEATON

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

GMC

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*Must be 19 years or older to play. Must hold valid driver’s license. Claim of Credit Award: Each participant will be given a confirmation number in respect of their Credit Award, which must be redeemed on an eligible 2015 or 2016 Chevrolet, Buick, or GMC vehicle on or before January 4, 2016. Certain GM Canada incentive programs may NOT be combined with the awards available in this Contest; see your dealer for full details. Only one Credit Award can be applied against the purchase or lease of a selected vehicle. Credit may only be transferred to an immediate family member with proof. Please see dealer for full contest details. Vehicles may not be exactly as shown. Sale price includes $1000 Connect And Win cash credit. Total Paid based on $3000 down: #F288598 $31,922, #F170884 $35,434, #G360306 $47,182, #F160476 $28,859, #F213101 $31,676, #F222726 $44,125, #F221214 $46,998, #F223169 $51,136, #F264144 $63,877, #F263555 $60,219. Offer ends January 4, 2016.


KTW friday

Thousands of bulbs to light up at the B.C. Wildlife Park tonight. Story/B4-B5

TODAY ▼ FRI., DEC. 11

WHAT’S HAPPENING

THIS WEEKEND

To submit an item for THIS WEEKEND, email listings@ kamloopsthisweek.com.

DECEMBER 11, 2015

a few of our favourite things PART THREE OF THREE

KTW’S NEWSROOM LOOKS BACK AT PERSONAL HOLIDAY TRADITIONS AND SHARES SOME WITH YOU. IN TODAY’S FINAL INSTALMENT, TURN TO B3 FOR OUR FAVOURITE MUSIC.

COMMUNITY: • Anything Can Happen Fridays, Kamloops Library, 465 Victoria St., drop in 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Info: 250-3725145. • Front and Centre: Western Canada Theatre at 40 exhibition of costumes, props, videos and other elements, Kamloops Museum and Archives, 207 Seymour St. Display continues to March 26, 2016. • One on one Ebooks class, 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., North Kamloops Library, 693 Tranquille Rd. • Windows 10 class, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Kamloops Library, 465 Victoria St.

SAT., DEC. 12 COMMUNITY: • Front and Centre: Western Canada Theatre at 40 exhibition of costumes, props, videos and other elements, Kamloops Museum and Archives, 207 Seymour St. • Microsoft Windows 10 class, 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., North Kamloops Library, 693 Tranquille Rd.

TUE., DEC. 15 COMMUNITY: • Front and Centre: Western Canada Theatre at 40 exhibition of costumes, props, videos and other elements, Kamloops Museum and Archives, 207 Seymour St.

More listings B2

W inter i s H ere !

Ski or Ride 1 Day FREE! With your 6 Day Ticket Pack Single Lift Tickets Tickets

arper

Mountain

family owned and operated since 1973

Gift Cer tificates!

Available at: arper Mountain

family owned and operated since 1973


FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

From B1

Community: Thompson Valley Advanced Toastmasters, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Odd Fellows Hall, 423 Tranquille Rd.

Wednesday, Dec. 16

• Front and Centre: Western Canada Theatre at 40 exhibition of costumes, props, videos and other elements, Kamloops Museum and Archives, 207 Seymour St. Display

AND

continues to March 26, 2016.

Community: High Country Achievers Toastmasters, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Desert Gardens Community Centre,

Thursday, Dec. 17

elIGIBle costco memBeRs ReceIVe An AddItIonAl

$

540 Seymour St. • Front and Centre: Western Canada Theatre at 40 exhibition of costumes, props, videos and other elements, Kamloops Museum and Archives, 207

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ON SELECT F-SERiES

Seymour St. Art: Arbour Aboriginal Artists Collective youth workshop, 12 and older, with Chris Bose, Kamloops Art Gallery, 465 Victoria St., 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Free.

WHEN YOU CAN GET Up TO

$

750 2016 ESCAPE

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WISE BUYERS READ THE LEGAL COPY: Vehicle(s) may be shown with optional equipment. Dealer may sell or lease for less. Limited time offers. Offers only valid at participating dealers. Retail offers may be cancelled or changed at any time without notice. See your Ford Dealer for complete details or call the Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. For factory orders, a customer may either take advantage of eligible raincheckable Ford retail customer promotional incentives/offers available at the time of vehicle factory order or time of vehicle delivery, but not both or combinations thereof. Retail offers not combinable with any CPA/GPC or Daily Rental incentives, the Commercial Upfit Program or the Commercial Fleet Incentive Program (CFIP). ¥Offer valid between December 11, 2015 and January 4, 2016 (the “Offer Period”) to Canadian residents. Receive $500 (on 2016 model years) or $750 (on 2015 model years) towards the purchase or lease of a new Ford Fusion, Mustang (excluding 50th Anniversary Edition and Shelby), Taurus, Flex, Escape, Expedition, Transit Connect, E-Series Cutaway, Transit Van/Wagon, Transit Cutaway/Chassis Cab, F-150, F250 to F-550, (all F-150 Raptor models excluded) (each an “Eligible Vehicle”). Only one (1) bonus offer may be applied towards the purchase or lease of one (1) Eligible Vehicle. Taxes payable before offer amount is deducted. Offer is not raincheckable.*Until January 4, 2016, receive 0% annual percentage rate (APR) purchase financing on new 2015: Focus BEV, C-MAX, Mustang (excl. Shelby and 50th Anniversary), Transit Connect, F-150 Super Cab XL (except in Quebec, where F-150 SuperCab XL receives 0% APR purchase financing up to 36 months) and 2016: Escape, F-250 Gas Engine models for up to 72 months, or 2015: Focus (excluding BEV) and 2016: Fusion models for up to 84 months to qualified retail customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit Canada Limited. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest interest rate. Example: $25,000 purchase financed at 0% APR for 48/ 60/ 72/ 84 months, monthly payment is $520.84/ $416.67/ $347.22/ $297.62, cost of borrowing is $0 or APR of 0% and total to be repaid is $25,000. Down payment on purchase financing offers may be required based on approved credit from Ford Credit Canada Limited.**Until January 4, 2016, receive $500/$750/ $1,000/ $1,500/ $2,000/ $2,500/ $2,750/ $3,500/ $3,750/ $4,250/ $4,500/ $4,750/ $6,000/ $10,000/ $11,500 in “Year-End Clearout Cash” (Delivery Allowances) with the purchase or lease of a new 2016: Explorer/2015 and 2016: Focus, C-MAX; 2016: Fiesta, Fusion/ 2015: Edge, Flex; 2016: Edge, Expedition/ 2015: Transit Connect; 2016: E-Series Cutaway, Transit, F-250 Gas Engine, F-350 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) Gas Engine/2015: Taurus (excluding SE); 2016: Transit Connect, F-350 to F-550 Chassis Cabs/ 2015: E-Series Cutaway, Transit/ 2015: F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2) 5.0L; 2016: F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2)/ 2016: F-250 Diesel Engine, F-350 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) Diesel Engine/ 2015: F-150 SuperCrew 4x4; 2016: F-150 SuperCab and SuperCrew / 2015: Fiesta, Fusion, Explorer, Escape/ 2015: F-350 to F-550 Chassis Cabs / 2015: F-150 SuperCab/ 2015: Expedition / 2015: F-250 Gas Engine, F-350 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) Gas Engine/ 2015: F-250 Diesel Engine, F-350 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) Diesel Engine -- all stripped chassis, F-150 Raptor, Medium Truck, Mustang Shelby and 50th Anniversary excluded. Delivery allowances are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives.^Until January 4, 2016, lease a new 2016: Fusion for up to 36 months, or a 2016: Escape for up to 48 months, and get 0% APR lease financing on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit Canada Limited. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest APR payment. Lease a model with a value of $30,000 at 0% APR for up to 36/48 months with an optional buyout of $13,200/ $10,800 and $0 down or equivalent trade in, monthly payment is $466.67/ $400.00, total lease obligation is $16,800.12/$19.200.00, interest cost of leasing is $0 or 0%APR. Additional payments required for PPSA (RDPRM for Quebec), registration, security deposit, NSF fees (where applicable), excess wear and tear, and late fees. Some conditions and mileage restrictions apply. Excess kilometrage charges are 12¢per km for Fiesta, Focus, C-MAX, Fusion and Escape; 16¢per km for E-Series, Mustang, Taurus, Taurus-X, Edge, Flex, Explorer, F-Series, MKS, MKX, MKZ, MKT and Transit Connect; 20¢per km for Expedition and Navigator, plus applicable taxes. Excess kilometrage charges subject to change, see your local dealer for details. All prices are based on Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price. ≠ Offer only valid from November 3, 2015 to January 4, 2016 (the “Offer Period”) to resident Canadians with an eligible Costco membership on or before October 31, 2015. Receive $1,000 towards the purchase or lease of a new 2015/2016 Ford (excluding Fiesta, Focus, C-MAX, GT350, GT500, F-150 Raptor, 50th Anniversary Edition Mustang, Mustang Shelby 350/350R and Medium Truck) model (each an “Eligible Vehicle”). Limit one (1) offer per each Eligible Vehicle purchase or lease, up to a maximum of two (2) separate Eligible Vehicle sales per Costco Membership Number. Offer is transferable to persons domiciled with an eligible Costco member. Applicable taxes calculated before CAD$1,000 offer is deducted. ®: Registered trademark of Price Costco International, Inc. used under license. † Remember that even advanced technology cannot overcome the laws of physics. It’s always possible to lose control of a vehicle due to inappropriate driver input for the conditions. ‡F-Series is the best-selling pickup truck in Canada for 49 years in a row based on Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association statistical sales report up to 2014 year end. ©2015 Sirius Canada Inc. “SiriusXM”, the SiriusXM logo, channel names and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc. and are used under licence.©2015 Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. All rights reserved.

B2 www.kamloopsthisweek.com

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT LISTINGS@KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM. Space permitting, they will appear in KTW’s Friday edition and online at kamloopsthisweek.com.

SEND EVENTS TO:

Available in most new Ford vehicles with 6-month pre-paid subscription


FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

B3

o t y e K r You sre a m ChortrhililssSt hopping Cent

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Do you hear what I hear?

at N

KTW REPORTERS SHARE THEIR FAVOURITE HOLIDAY MUSIC ADAM WILLIAMS: Burl Ives, The Christmas Collection. A family favourite, it just doesn’t feel like Christmas without it.

It’s often met with disdain from teenagers and fathers alike but, now, I find it nostalgic. DAVE EAGLES: Handel’s Messiah, (I’ve actually taken part a few times in the singalong Messiah), I love those high tenor notes. Bing Crosby, White Christmas (1986), Choral music, (I always take in Serious Options’ winter concert at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church).

DALE BASS: Fairytale of New York. Best Christmas song ever. Happy Xmas (War is Over). Second best Christmas song ever. JESSICA WALLACE: Joy to the World. Often the final song at Catholic Christmas masses I attended as a kid, the song reminds me of happy feelings and excitement when the family could go home and open presents. A horrible singer, I remember belting my heart out to that song with my mom and brother, “And heaven and nature sing . . . And heaven and nature sing . . .” I also enjoy the vibe from A Very She & Him Christmas album because Zooey Deschanel has the voice of an angel.

TIM PETRUK: I Wish It was Christmas Today. One of Saturday Night Live’s great musical numbers, featuring some of the show’s former veteran stars — Horatio Sans, Jimmy Fallon, Tracy Morgan and Chris Katan. CAM FORTEMS: The Little Boy that Santa Claus Forgot (Nat King Cole). As a child, this song made me weep like an overflowing Christmas tree base. It likely would again today, so I skip ahead to other Nat King Cole Christmas classics.

JESSICA KLYMCHUK: We Wish You a Merry Christmas. Whenever my extended family spends the holidays together there is a tradition we, after a large Ukrainian Christmas Eve dinner, all join in the living room to sing carols.

MARTY HASTINGS: O Holy Night. We attended a Christmas Eve service at Portal Peace Alliance Church at 11 p.m. Pastor Phil Vanderveen would

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From Saturday, November 28th through Sunday, December 13th, 2015 Choose a Treasure Chest Key with any purchase at participating stores. (One key per purchase) Wednesday, December 9th through Sunday, December 13th, 2015 Bring your key and try to open our Treasure Chest! You could win one of over 100 great prizes! Rules and regulations apply and will be posted.

FOR MORE INFO 250-376-1259 www.northillscentre.com 700 TRANQUILLE ROAD, KAMLOOPS

OV E R 4 0 S TO R E S A N D S E RV I C E S F O R YO U R SHOPPING CONVENIENCE close the night with a goosebump-producing rendition of the song.

version), the repetitive rum pum pum pum and drumline, accompanied by the stark beauty of the song’s message, makes this a Christmas song without peer.

CHRIS FOULDS: Fairytale of New York, The Pogues. It is a nostalgic romp through the Christmas of my childhood — an alcohol-soaked tale of deep love, intense fighting, wistful regret, delusional hope and that precise moment when the tree gets knocked over, metaphorically and literally. Also, Little Drummer Boy. No matter who sings this song (and I love Bony M’s R I F F S

A D I E U

C H O P S

R E T R Y

D I G S E D A M

E V I L R O L O

M O N A S T E R I E S

R H E A S T C H A R L E S

P O L E V A U B L I T O

C V J O I N T

O E U F

M E S H

S I P P T Y O O A L M I S T I G L U L E E S R S

I V I E S

A T R O T O N Y A T T O L E E R I A S S T L H O E E M T S E T P L O R I A U L D

R A M P A N C K Y E L M O P O

B L O B

ANDREA KLASSEN: Any song from the greatest holiday episode of Dan Harmon’s cult classic sitcom Community could’ve made this list for me, but Christmas Infiltration knocks out the competition if only for the line, “If years were seasons, this December would be the December of our December.” R H E T T O P E R N O R M P A O L O

I P S S A R E H M O W E R S S V E A D U P O N T E R S E A K T O S O R G E N O R O T I G H T M S H I B A E C A T R E A L E A L L Y B S Y E R M I W L I O N A G A G Y S T A

P E T N A M E D A N A

S E E N S A Y

H E R E A P E D H I N G C O Y G E O N D O L T O N D E L L E R L Y N E C C O Y O R S E M U S P S I T A T E A R X T R A I M U M E M O N B C T A O

ANSWERS TO NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ON PAGE B15

Kids,

drop off your letters to Santa at Northills Centre and enter for a chance to win a $300 grand prize from... Also 2nd & 3rd place letters will receive gift certificates from Northills Centre Stores!

Dear Santa, Your Friend, Phone ALL ENTRIES RECEIVE A FREE KIDS’ MEAL SANTA HOURS: • Friday & Saturday 12:00-2:30 & 3:00-5:00 • Sunday 12:00 – 4:00 • Monday & Tuesday 12:00-2:30 & 3:00-5:00 • Wednesday & Thursday – No Santa

Bring your letter to Santa at the Northills Centre and receive a Kids’ Meal from A&W. Letters become the property of the Northills Centre. Contest closes December 15, 2015.

y e K r You We’re

To Christmas!

700 Tranquille Rd. Kamloops, BC 250-376-1259

Pick up a KEY with any purchase at participating

NORTHILLS CENTRE STORES November 28th through December 13th.

COME TO NORTHILLS CENTRE DECEMBER 10TH THROUGH DECEMBER 14TH AND TRY TO OPEN THE TREASURE CHEST TO WIN ONE OF OVER 100 PRIZES, FROM TABLETS TO POWER BANKS, GIFT CERTIFICATES FROM NORTHILLS CENTRE STORES AND MORE.


B4

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

Court Location: Kamloops

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Court File No.16017

In the Provincial Court of British Columbia To: Robert Pattison

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The Director under the Child, Family and Community Service Act, is applying to the Provincial Court for a Continuing Custody Order. The Court has ordered that the Application for an Order be served upon you by way of this advertisement. TO RESPOND TO THE APPLICATION YOU MUST: Contact the Duty Worker Youth Team at the Ministry of Children and Family Development, 250-371-3600, 125 -1165 Battle Street, Kamloops, BC V2C 2N4 If you do not respond within 14 days of the date of this publication, the Court may make an order in your absence. You may obtain the forms at the above address or view the documents in your case at the court registry. Refer to court file number 16017.

LIGHT UP THE NIGHT WILDLIGHTS BEGIN TONIGHT

DALE BASS STAFF REPORTER dale@kamloopsthisweek.com

I

t seemed like a good idea at the time — find out from the people who created Zoolights in Calgary how they did it and bring the idea to Kamloops. The year was 1997 and Rob Purdy, then general manager of what was then called the Kamloops Wildlife Park, contacted the Calgary Zoo for some advice on lighting up the park for the festive season. The Calgarians sent Purdy a small rope-light tree fixture to learn from but, in researching the cost to buy them, he discovered they were expensive. And, with a park that covers 45 hectares (110 acres), the idea was starting to add up to a hefty bill. “We said this is crazy, we can make these, we’re talented people,” said current GM Glen Grant, who was one of the people who first floated

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the idea that became the B.C. Wildlife Park’s Wildlights. Now numbering more than 600,000, those lights will be turned on today as the park opens for its 18th annual celebration. It continues to Jan. 3 and is open from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. each day except Christmas Day. Just as there’s a formula to determine the number of lights — one every inch for rope lights, a specific number for the old incandescent — there’s a formula for Wildlight dates, with the festival starting one week before schools close for the Christmas season and ending on the Sunday before classes reopen. The festival has come a long way from the early days, when there would be generators — lots and lots of them — scattered through the park to keep the lights burning bright. “It was wicked noisy and the power cost was insane,” Grant said. Through the years, light-emitting diode lights (LEDs) have replaced many of the original fiveand seven-watt bulbs. New exhibits have been added — each made by park staff using onequarter-inch steel rods, black tape, rope lights and ingenuity.

Information Valid for

Friday, December 11 to Thursday, December 17

www.cineplex.com

Friday, December 11 to Thursday, December 17. Evening: Adult/Youth $8.50 - Senior/Child $6.50

In the Heart of the Sea 122 MINS.

PG

Trumbo

In the Heart of the Sea (3D)

Fri: Sat: Sun: Tues: Wed: Thu:

Fri: 9:30 Sat: 9:30 Sun: 9:30

125 MINS. TBC

180 MINS. Fri: Sat: Sun: Mon: Tues: Wed: Thu:

6:45 6:450 6:45 7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30

7:00, 9:45 7:00, 9:45 7:00, 9:45 7:45 7:45 7:45

PG

Cavalleria Rusticana (ROH) 125 MINS.

TBC

Sat: 10:00 Mon: 6:30

ALL SEATS NOW COST $3.50 ON TUESDAYS!! • SUPER SAVER MATINEES • ALL AGES $6.00 3D SURCHARGE APPLIES TO ALL 3D FILMS

THE GOOD DINOSAUR (G) FRI, TUE 4:45; SAT 11:50, 4:45; SUN 11:55, 4:45 THE GOOD DINOSAUR 3D (G) FRI, TUE 7:15, 9:45; SAT 2:15, 7:15, 9:45; SUN 2:20, 7:15, 9:45; MON, WED 7:15, 9:40; CC/DVS THURS 7:15, 9:50 THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY, PART 2 (PG) (VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI, TUE 4:15, 7:20, 10:20; SAT-SUN 1:10, 4:15, 7:20, 10:20; MON, WED 6:50, 9:50; THURS 7:10, 10:20 THE PEANUTS MOVIE (G) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI,TUE 4:20; SAT-SUN 4:45 THE PEANUTS MOVIE 3D (G) CC/DVS FRI, TUE 7:10; SAT-SUN 12:05, 2:30, 7:10; MON, WED 7:05 VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN (PG) (VIOLENCE) FRI, TUE 10:15; SAT-SUN 9:40; MON, WED 10:00 SPECTRE (PG) (VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI, TUE 3:55, 6:55, 9:40; SAT-SUN 12:20, 3:35, 6:55, 10:10; MON, WED 6:45, 9:30 THE NIGHT BEFORE (14A) (COARSE LANGUAGE, DRUG USE, NUDITY) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI, TUE 4:55, 7:25, 9:55; SAT-SUN 12:00, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55; MON, WED 7:20, 9:45 KRAMPUS (14A) (FRIGHTENING SCENES) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI, TUE 5:05, 7:35, 10:05; SAT-SUN 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:35, 10:05; MON, WED 7:10, 9:35; THURS 7:30, 9:55

KRAMPUS (14A) (FRIGHTENING SCENES) STAR & STROLLERS SCREENING THURS 1:00 STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS () NO PASSES THURS 10:35 STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS 3D () NO PASSES THURS 7:00, 7:20, 7:40, 10:15, 10:45 SISTERS (14A) (DRUG USE,COARSE AND SEXUAL LANGUAGE) NO PASSES THURS 7:35, 10:25 CREED (PG) (VIOLENCE,COARSE LANGUAGE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI, SUN, TUE 3:50, 7:05, 10:05; SAT 1:15, 4:10, 7:05, 10:05; MON, WED 6:55, 9:55 LEGEND (14A) (FREQUENT COARSE LANGUAGE, VIOLENCE) FRI 4:00, 7:00, 10:00; SAT-SUN 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00; MON, WED 7:00, 9:55; TUE 4:00, 7:00, 10:05; THURS 7:05, 10:05 LEGEND (14A) (FREQUENT COARSE LANGUAGE, VIOLENCE) STAR & STROLLERS SCREENING THURS 1:00 HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS (G) SAT 11:00 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: THE MAGIC FLUTE SPECIAL ENCORE () SUN 12:55

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B5

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 20 15 /20 16 se as on

Director Bruce Dunn | Music

CHRISTMAS WITH THE KSO pops Masterworks | Kelson Group

A Kamloops festive tradition. Come sing along with us. SATURdAy, dECEMBER 12, 2015 7:30 pM SUNdAy, dECEMBER 13, 2015 2:00 pM SAGEBRUSH THEATRE

Bruce dunn

ANDREA KLASSEN/KTW General manager Glenn Grant shows off one of the displays at this year’s Wildlights event, running until Jan. 3 at the B.C. Wildlife Park. Optimus Prime and his fellow Transformers join bears, fish, dragons and more in this year’s holiday light display.

Tickets: Kamloops Live! Box Office | 250-372-5483 | kamloopssymphony.com season sponsors

RON AND RAE FAWCETT Black

grants CMYK

That creative process starts with finding an image — among the many scattered around the park are A Charlie Brown Christmas, a bear chasing a man up a tree, Transformers, diving dolphins and a fire-breathing river creature. The image is copied onto a transparency, then enlarged and displayed on a wood backing that creates the outline for all the steel-rod bending and twisting. Add some black tape and hundreds of feet of lights of varying colours — even the rope lights can be cut and spliced together to mix colours — and you end up with a winter wonderland filled with all those lights, including 370 life-size sculptures. There are plenty of new aspects this year, including a Tuba Christmas concert on Sunday, at 6 p.m. featuring students of the Kamloops Interior Summer School of Music. There’s a new Candy Cane Lane. At the request of the folks who run the Wildlife Express, new lights will do away with the darkness along some of the train’s route through the park. The Symphony of Lights Show and maze are back, as are nightly elk feedings. The doors open for visitors to take in the Bird of Prey exhibit.

Elf on a Shelf — a storytime for the children — is also back many evenings at 6 p.m. and 7 p.m.; Uncle Chris the Clown will be at the park on Dec. 18, Dec. 23, Dec. 24 and Dec. 31. Grant said while staff create the images, much of that success is due to the involvement of Ralph Warner of Warner Rentals, who answers every request for help with a “yes.” Mike Miltimore of Lee’s Music is another big supporter — his equipment was already in place for the Symphony of Lights on the day KTW visited the park. Aberdeen Mall has also added to the festive flavour, donating four of its large animated objects that used to be part of its own Santa display. Through the years, attendance has hit about 380,000. Grant is hoping the park will top 400,000 this season. On most evenings during Wildlights, about 1,000 people arrive at the park at the far east end of Dallas Drive. General admission is $12, $10 for seniors, $8 for those ages three to 17 and free for children two and younger. For more information, go online to bczoo.org or call 250-573-3242.

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B6

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

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TRAVEL

INSIDE: Classifieds B10 | Comic B14

TRAVEL CO-ORDINATOR: JESSICA WALLACE 778-471-7533 or email jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

A South Indian Christmas

IRENE BUTLER

TRAVEL WRITERS’ TALES

F

ishermen in from their catch reset their nets. The Arabian Sea laps at our feet as we walk along the cream-coloured sand. All around us are frolicking native vacationers and foreign sun seekers. Holy cows commandeer a section of beach. Stray dogs chase scurrying crabs. Swaying palms sweep the sky. Colva Beach in Goa is traditionally included in our India visits and, ah, we remember it well. Being that this is the Christmas holiday season, festive splashes dot the small resort town. A Santa here, a decked-out tree there. Not much changes in Colva, but we do note one difference this time-round: a Russian prominence. Shops and restaurants have added Cyrillic to their signs and roadside vendors speak some Russian in hopes of increased sales. Our intention to do as little as possible for two weeks is adhered to as if it were law. In our mellow state the most taxing decisions are where to dine, morning or evening beach time (or both), and whether to take a dip in the ocean or resort pool. An exception is visit-

ing Old Goa, the capital during Portuguese colonial times, which has husband Rick spouting, “Is this not the strangest thing we have ever done around Christmas?” “Yes,” I respond. “But how can we miss seeing the relics of St. Francis Xavier when they are only in exposition for six-weeks every 10 years, drawing millions of pilgrims?” The compound has high security check points, armed military and hundreds of volunteers to steer the masses. As we shuffle along in the lengthy outdoor queue the saint’s story swirls through my mind. Francis Xavier was in his late 30s when

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he came to Goa as a missionary in 1542. A decade later while sailing to China he fell ill and died nearby on a Chinese island. Xavier was buried in a coffin filled with lime to speed decomposition, so his bones could be picked up when the ship sailed back months late. But, when exhumed, his body is said to have been “as fresh as the day it was buried.” Physicians could find no explanation. Periodic opening of the coffin showed no deterioration for years. Then desiccating and darkening skin was reported, again for no apparent reason. Xavier was canonized in 1622 for his tireless work with the

poor, sick and imprisoned and the miracle that his body somehow escaped being reduced to dust. The first exposition took place in 1782. We enter the cavernous Se Cathedral and file past the silver trimmed glass casket. The feet, one hand (the other was sent to Rome long ago) and head remain exposed – these extremities in dark brown solidity have fingernails and toenails; scalp-hair frames facial features still visible after 462 years. It’s a spine-chilling, yet intoxicating experience to be among the throng of emotionally charged devotees. Back at Colva Beach on Christmas Eve, Jingle Bells ring out

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from speakers of our favourite restaurant as we feast on masalabutter chicken. Up early on Christmas morning we’re off to the airport for our short flight to Chennai (Tamil Nadu state). It is barely noon when Santa greets us and a choir sings Silent Night in the lobby of our five-star hotel. An afternoon Skype session with our family in Canada is heartwarming. And it’s a sheer delight to find roast turkey with all the trimmings on the hotel’s supper buffet. The next day we are ready to re-visit our favourite Chennai spots. Pondy Bazaar area is a blast — people line up outside Hindu temples, the ubiquitous

flower-garland shops do a brisk business. Further along the road, shops sell everything from foodstuffs to bargain clothing to gold jewellery — the streets so plugged with people dodging hornhonking vehicles and motorbikes you’d think they were giving the 24-karat commodity away. Our next venture involves a tooth-rattling tuk-tuk ride which ends in a screeching stop. We have arrived! Chennai’s urban Marina Beach is the same as it was years ago — fully dressed locals (nary an ankle showing), small food stalls that can’t keep up with the hungry crowds, acrobats performing for rupees and

May 15 May 21 May 29

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carnival rides. Before we know it dusk creeps over the sands and the Bay of Bengal — the close of another great day. Our split between Colva Beach and Chennai turned out to be the best of both worlds — fishing village to city chaos, highly Christian Goa to mostly Hindu Tamil Nadu, with friendly greetings embracing us at every turn — an unusual and sensational Yuletide! Travel Writers’ Tales is an independent travel article syndicate that offers professionally written travel articles to newspaper editors and publishers. To check out more, visit travelwriters tales.com.

Photo: Catalina Island & Coastal Cruise

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B7

TRAVEL

The force is strong at Disneyland before movie

M

ickey Mouse meets Darth Vader and Chewbacca as the force awakens in Disneyland. Disneyland is entertaining the dark side and the light side for the holidays! In celebration of their new movie: Star Wars: The Force Awakens, the resort is putting a Star Wars twist to some favourite attractions in Tomorrowland as part of Season of the Force. Disney will be starting the construction on the Star Wars themed lands to Disneyland and Walt Disney World in 2016. But, you don’t have to wait for the new lands to open to get your Star Wars fix at Disneyland because Season of the Force opened in November, giving guests daily opportunities to explore, interact and celebrate the galaxy far, far away. Two of my favourite things are Star Wars and Disneyland, so I was thrilled to celebrate the opening day in Disneyland. During my personal meet and greet with Darth Vader, I kept checking my pulse to ensure I was still alive. If you are a Star Wars fan, this is the place to be. Disney bought Lucasfilm, the company behind the Star Wars films, from its chairman and founder George Lucas in 2012. During an interview Lucas said: “It’s now time for me to pass Star Wars on to a new generation of filmmakers.” And they have. Here are some changes you will find in Tomorrowland with the launch of Star Wars Season of the Force.

Hyperspace Mountain

Hop an X-wing fighter on Hyperspace Mountain and fly into the middle of a battle

with Darth Vader or Chewbacca.

Star Tours

KATE ASHBY

Cruisin’

against the Imperial forces in space. TIE fighters and explosions surround you, plunging your X-wing fighter into the Star Wars galaxy as they whip through the twists and turns of Space Mountain. Space Mountain has been reimagined with an impressive Star Wars overlay to this classic roller-coaster. Once guests deplane, a cast member says, “Welcome back, pilot.”

Star Wars Launch Bay

Inside the newly refurbished Tomorrowland Expo Centre is the new Star Wars Launch Bay. The Launch Bay is the place to celebrate all things Star Wars. My favourite part of the Launch Bay were the galleries throughout, where you can view Stormtrooper armor, rebel flight helmets, Jedi lightsabers, classic models of X-wings and TIE fighters, props, costumes, droids and other outstanding items from a galaxy far, far away. With a blue milk drink in hand from the Cantina (perfect replica), you may have a surprise encounter with bounty hunter Boba Fett. Don’t be surprised at who you find roaming the Star Wars Launch Bay. After trying out the demos and upcoming video games, you can watch interviews and clips from directors, writers and crew members. Line up for a personal meet and greet

The Star Tours Ride now includes scenes and characters from the new movie, which opens in December. Star Tours is one of my favourite attractions of all time and I personally think the 3D effects on the updated Star Tours is amazing. In the newest edition of this attraction, Star Tour introduces you to new adventures and characters. One of the new novelties of Star Tours is it generates random sequences for riders, so it is meant to be different each time you ride. In one of my three times on board, we opened with the usual scene of Darth Vader asking about the Rebel spy but, unlike my previous flights, the Sith Lord was joined by none other than bounty hunter Boba Fett. On another trip, we finished up on a landing pad on Coruscant but, instead of being lowered into a garage full of Star Tours starspeeders, Chewbacca was looking at us from the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon.

Path of the Jedi

Star Wars Path of the Jedi, which takes over the Tomorrowland Theatre, showcases a short film compilation of all the Star Wars films, including The Force Awakens. Guests can relive the story following Luke Skywalker’s journey with immersive elements including lights, motion and more. Path of the Jedi made me want to rush home to re-watch all the movies. The Tomorrowland Theater was the former home of another George Lucas co-creation: Captain EO.

Build lightsabers You’ll notice Star

Wars has taken over the entire Star Traders store and features new and exclusive merchandise. You can build your own lightsaber, cross-guard lightsaber, tri-saber or broadsaber. Whatever you call, it will put Kylo’s lightsaber from to shame.

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Learn Aurebesh

Have you been teaching yourself to read the Star Wars written language of Aurebesh? Although some may consider you a nerd, it’s your time to shine. During Season of the Force, you’ll find Aurebesh lettering all around Tomorrowland — especially in the Star Wars Launch Bay. Brush up on your basics and impress everyone else in the queue.

Galactic food

I had a chance to try out some of the food at Galactic Grill and it all looks and tastes great. The Tomorrowland Terrace has turned into the eatery, serving items such as anta Milk French Toast, Dark Side Burgers, Light Side Chicken Sandwiches and a Darth by Chocolate dessert. Not feeling the Force? There are parts of Tomorrowland untouched by that faraway galaxy. Disney is getting ready for Star Wars in a huge way, but for a whole new generation of Star Wars movies, lands and fans. If the force is calling, please be aware of some of the park closures as Disney works to make room for the new lands at both parks. Changes have already started and certain attraction closures start as soon as Jan. 10. The Star Wars presence at Disneyland will continue to grow. May the force be with you.

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B8

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

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Re Stk’emlupsemc w7ec te tsyecwminst.ses re Pípsell The Stk’emlupsemc who are the caretakers of Jacko Lake & area

Chief Petit Louis (Secwépemc)

From the Chiefs of the Shuswap, Okanagan and Couteau Tribes of British Columbia. Presented at Kamloops, B.C. August 25, 1910 We take this opportunity of your visiting Kamloops to speak a few words to you. We welcome you here, and we are glad we have met you in our country. We want you to be interested in us, and to understand more fully the conditions under which we live. We expect much of you as the head of this great Canadian Nation, and feel confident that you will see that we receive fair and honorable treatment. Our confidence in you has increased since we have noted of late the attitude of your government towards the Indian rights movement of this country and we hope that with your help our wrongs may at last be righted. We speak to you the more freely because you are a member of the white race with whom we first became acquainted, and which we call in our tongue “real whites.”

Chief John Chilahitsa (Syilx)

Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier (Canada)

One hundred years next year they came amongst us here at Kamloops and erected a trading post. After the other whites came to this country in 1858 we differentiated them from the first whites as their manners were so much different, and we applied the term “real whites” to the latter (viz., the fur-traders of the Northwest and Hudson Bay companies. As the great majority of the companies’ employees were French speaking, the term latterly became applied by us as a designation for the whole French race.) The “real whites” we found were good people. We could depend on their word, and we trusted and respected them. They did not interfere with us nor attempt to break up our tribal organizations, laws, customs. They did not try to force their conceptions of things on us to our harm. Nor did they stop us from catching fish, hunting, etc. They never tried to steal or appropriate our country, nor take our food and life from us. They acknowledged our ownership of the country, and treated our chiefs as men. They were the first to find us in this country. We never asked them to come here, but nevertheless we treated them kindly and hospitably and helped them all we could. They had made themselves (as it were) our guests. We treated them as such, and then waited to see what they would do. As we found they did us no harm our friendship with them became lasting. Because of this we have a ‘warm heart to the French at the present day.’ We expect good from Canada.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission affirmed that, “Reconciliation requires that a new vision, based on a commitment to mutual respect, be developed. It also requires an understanding that the most harmful impacts of residential schools have been the loss of pride and self-respect of Aboriginal people, and the lack of respect that non-Aboriginal people have been raised to have for their Aboriginal neighbours. Reconciliation is not an Aboriginal problem; it is a Canadian one. Virtually all aspects of Canadian society may need to be reconsidered.” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau maintained this when he told his new cabinet ministers: “No relationship is more important to me and to Canada than the one with Indigenous Peoples.” Recently Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett further stated that the new Liberal government will rebuild the relationship with First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples by including them in every decision that affects them and their land. These are the first steps towards building a just and reciprocal relationship as called for by our Secwepemc Chiefs for over 100 years. The 1910 Memorial to Sir Wilfrid Laurier is a historic document that demonstrates the involvement of Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwepemc Nation (SSN) in asserting our title, rights, and sovereignty in the early twentieth century. It is a historic narrative, which tells the story of the previous hundred years of relations with European newcomers from the Aboriginal perspective. It reflects Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwepemc Nation’s continued and consistent traditional concepts around being the hosts in their lands, and the reciprocity that the host-guest relationship entails. It underscores the Aboriginal concepts of land ownership and tenure, Aboriginal political authority, and sovereign relations with the Crown and government. We maintain the position of our Chiefs in 1910, “We have no grudge against the white race as a whole nor against the settlers…we welcome them to this country it is not in most cases their fault. They have taken up and improved and paid for their lands in good faith it is their government which is to blame by heaping up injustice on us. But it is also their duty to see their government does right by us, and gives us a square deal.” To present our tellings as foundation for Reconciliation, the Laurier Memorial of 1910 and the Oliver Memorial of 1911 will be published. We do this to give voice to our history. As we, the Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwepemc continue to organize and pursue recognition of our Aboriginal Title and Rights from a political and legal standpoint, creating new opportunities to bring this vision into reality.

Kukpi7 Fred Seymour Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation

Kukpi7 Ron Ignace Skeetchestn Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation

B9

TO SIR WILFRID LAURIER, PREMIER OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA

Dear Sir and Father,

Chief John Tetlenitsa (Nlaka’pamux)

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

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When they first came among us there were only Indians here. They found the people of each tribe supreme in their own territory, and having tribal boundaries known and recognized by all. The country of each tribe was just the same as a very large farm or ranch (belonging to all the people of the tribe) from which they gathered their food and clothing, etc., fish which they got in plenty for food, grass and vegetation on which their horses grazed and the game lived, and much of which furnished materials for manufactures, etc., stone which furnished pipes, utensils, and tools, etc., trees which furnished firewood, materials for houses and utensils, plants, roots, seeds, nuts and berries which grew abundantly and were gathered in their season just the same as the crops on a ranch, and used for food; minerals, shells, etc., which were used for ornament and for plants, etc., water which was free to all. Thus, fire, water, food, clothing and all the necessaries of life were obtained in abundance from the lands of each tribe, and all the people had equal rights of access to everything they required. You will see the ranch of each tribe was the same as its life, and without it the people could not have lived. Just 52 years ago the other whites came to this country. They found us just the same as the first or “real whites” had found us, only we had larger bands of horses, had some cattle, and in many places we cultivated the land. They found us happy, healthy, strong and numerous. Each tribe was still living in its own “house” or in other words on its own “ranch.” No one interfered with our rights or disputed our possession of our own “houses” and “ranches,” viz., our homes and lives. We were friendly and helped these whites also, for had we not learned the first whites had done us no harm? Only when some of them killed us we revenged on them. Then we thought there are some bad ones among them, but surely on the whole they must be good. Besides they are the queen’s people. And we had already heard great things about the queen from the “real whites.” We expected her subjects would do us no harm, but rather improve us by giving us knowledge, and enabling us to do some of the wonderful things they could do. At first they looked only for gold. We know the latter was our property, but as we did not use it much nor need it to live by we did not object to their searching for it. They told us, “Your country is rich and you will be made wealthy by our coming. We wish just to pass over your lands in quest of gold.” Soon they saw the country was good, and some of them made up their minds, to settle it. They commenced to take up pieces of land here and there. They told us they wanted only the use of these pieces of land for a few years, and then would hand them back to us in an improved condition; meanwhile they would give us some of the products they raised for the loan of our land. Thus they commenced to enter our “houses,” or live on our “ranches.” With us when a person enters our house he becomes our guest, and we must treat him hospitably as long as he shows no hostile intentions. At the same time we expect him to return to us equal treatment for what he receives. Some of our Chiefs said, “These people wish to be partners with us in our country. We must, therefore, be the same as brothers to them, and live as one family. We will share equally in everything—half and half—in land, water and timber, etc. What is ours will be theirs, and what is theirs will be ours. We will help each other to be great and good.” The whites made a government in Victoria—perhaps the queen made it. We have heard it stated both ways. Their chiefs dwelt there. At this time they did not deny the Indian tribes owned the whole country and everything in it. They told us we did. We Indians were hopeful. We trusted the whites and waited patiently for their chiefs to declare their intentions toward us and our lands. We knew what had been done in the neighboring states, and we remembered what we had heard about the queen being so good to the Indians and that her laws carried out by her chiefs were always just and better than the American laws. Presently chiefs (government officials, etc.) commenced to visit us, and had talks with some of our chiefs. They told us to have no fear, the queen’s laws would prevail in this country, and everything would be well for the Indians here. They said a very large reservation would be staked off for us (southern interior tribes) and the tribal lands outside of this reservation the government would buy from us for white settlement. They let us think this would be done soon, and meanwhile until this reserve was set apart, and our lands settled for, they assured us we would have perfect freedom of traveling and camping and the same liberties as from time immemorial to hunt, fish, graze and gather our food supplies where we desired; also that all trails, land, water, timber, etc., would be as free of access to us as formerly. Our chiefs were agreeable to these propositions, so we waited for these treaties to be made, and everything settled. We had never known white chiefs to break their word so we trusted. In the meanwhile white settlement progressed. Our chiefs held us in check. They said, “Do nothing against the whites. Something we did not understand retards them from keeping their promise. They will do the square thing by us in the end.”

What have we received for our good faith, friendliness and patience? Gradually as the whites of this country became more and more powerful, and we less and less powerful, they little by little changed their policy towards us, and commenced to put restrictions on us. Their government or chiefs have taken every advantage of our friendliness, weakness and ignorance to impose on us in every way. They treat us as subjects without any agreement to that effect, and force their laws on us without our consent and irrespective of whether they are good for us or not. They say they have authority over us. They have broken down our old laws and customs (no matter how good) by which we regulated ourselves. They laugh at our chiefs and brush them aside. Minor affairs amongst ourselves, which do not affect them in the least, and which we can easily settle better than they can, they drag into their courts. They enforce their own laws one way for the rich white man, one way for the poor white, and yet another for the Indian. They have knocked down (the same as) the posts of all the Indian tribes. They say there are no lines, except what they make. They have taken possession of all the Indian country and claim it as their own. Just the same as taking the “house” or “ranch” and, therefore, the life of every Indian tribe into their possession. They have never consulted us in any of these matters, nor made any agreement, “nor” signed “any” papers with us. They ‘have stolen our lands and everything on them’ and continue to use ‘same’ for their ‘own’ purposes. They treat us as less than children and allow us ‘no say’ in anything. They say the Indians know nothing, and own nothing, yet their power and wealth has come from our belongings. The queen’s law which we believe guaranteed us our rights, the B.C. government has trampled underfoot. This is how our guests have treated us—the brothers we received hospitably in our house. After a time when they saw that our patience might get exhausted and that we might cause trouble if we thought all the land was to be occupied by whites they set aside many small reservations for us here and there over the country. This was their proposal not ours, and we never accepted these reservations as settlement for anything, nor did we sign any papers or make any treaties about same. They thought we would be satisfied with this, but we never have been satisfied and never will be until we get our rights. We thought the setting apart of these reservations was the commencement of some scheme they had evolved for our benefit, and that they would now continue until they had more than fulfilled their promises but although we have waited long we have been disappointed. We have always felt the injustice done us, but we did not know how to obtain redress. We knew it was useless to go to war. What could we do? Even your government at Ottawa, into whose charge we have been handed by the B.C. government, gave us no enlightenment. We had no powerful friends. The Indian agents and Indian office at Victoria appeared to neglect us. Some offers of help in the way of agricultural implements, schools, medical attendance, aid to the aged, etc., from the Indian department were at first refused by many of our chiefs or were never petitioned for, because for a time we thought the Ottawa and Victoria governments were the same as one, and these things would be charged against us and rated as payment for our land, etc. Thus we got along the best way we could and asked for nothing. For a time we did not feel the stealing of our lands, etc., very heavily. As the country was sparsely settled we still had considerable liberty in the way of hunting, fishing, grazing, etc., over by far the most of it. However, owing to increased settlement, etc., in late years this has become changed, and we are being more and more restricted to our reservations which in most places are unfit or inadequate to maintain us. Except we can get fair play we can see we will go to the wall, and most of us be reduced to beggary or to continuous wage slavery. We have also learned lately that the British Columbia government claims absolute ownership of our reservations, which means that we are practically landless. We only have loan of those reserves in life rent, or at the option of the B.C. government. Thus we find ourselves without any real home in this our own country. In a petition signed by fourteen of our chiefs and sent to your Indian department, July, 1908, we pointed out the disabilities under which we labor owing to the inadequacy of most of our reservations, some having hardly any good land, others no irrigation water, etc., our limitations re pasture lands for stock owing to fencing of so-called government lands by whites; the severe restrictions put on us lately by the government re hunting and fishing; the depletion of salmon by over-fishing of the whites, and other matters affecting us. In many places we are debarred from camping, traveling, gathering roots and obtaining wood and water as heretofore. Our people are fined and imprisoned for breaking the game and fish laws and using the same game and fish which we were told would always be ours for food. Gradually we are becoming regarded as trespassers over a large portion of this our country. Our old people say, “How are we to live? If the government takes our food from us they must give us other food in its place.” Conditions of living have been thrust on us which we did not expect, and which we consider in great measure unnecessary and injurious. We have no grudge against the white race as a whole nor against the settlers, but we want to have an equal chance with them of making a living. We welcome them to this country. It is not in most cases their fault. They have taken up and improved and paid for their lands in good faith. It is their government which is to blame by heaping up injustice on us. But it is also their duty to see their government does right by us, and gives us a square deal. We condemn the whole policy of the B.C. government towards the Indian tribes of this country as utterly unjust, shameful and blundering in every way. We denounce same as being the main cause of the unsatisfactory condition of Indian affairs in this country and of animosity and friction with the whites. So long as what we consider justice is withheld from us, so long will dissatisfaction and unrest exist among us, and we will continue to struggle to better ourselves. For the accomplishment of this end we and other Indian tribes of this country are now uniting and we ask the help of yourself and government in this fight for our rights. We believe it is not the desire nor policy of your government that these conditions should exist. We demand that our land question be settled, and ask that treaties be made between the government and each of our tribes, in the same manner as accomplished with the Indian tribes of the other provinces of Canada, and in the neighboring parts of the United States. We desire that every matter of importance to each tribe be a subject of treaty, so we may have a definite understanding with the government on all questions of moment between us and them. In a declaration made last month, and signed by twenty-four of our chiefs (a copy of which has been sent to your Indian department) we have stated our position on these matters. Now we sincerely hope you will carefully consider everything we have herewith brought before you and that you will recognize the disadvantages we labor under, and the darkness of the outlook for us if these questions are not speedily settled. Hoping you have had a pleasant sojourn in this country, and wishing you a good journey home, we remain Yours very sincerely, The Chiefs of the Shuswap, Okanagan and Couteau or Thompson tribes – Per their secretary, J.A. Teit –


B8

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Re Stk’emlupsemc w7ec te tsyecwminst.ses re Pípsell The Stk’emlupsemc who are the caretakers of Jacko Lake & area

Chief Petit Louis (Secwépemc)

From the Chiefs of the Shuswap, Okanagan and Couteau Tribes of British Columbia. Presented at Kamloops, B.C. August 25, 1910 We take this opportunity of your visiting Kamloops to speak a few words to you. We welcome you here, and we are glad we have met you in our country. We want you to be interested in us, and to understand more fully the conditions under which we live. We expect much of you as the head of this great Canadian Nation, and feel confident that you will see that we receive fair and honorable treatment. Our confidence in you has increased since we have noted of late the attitude of your government towards the Indian rights movement of this country and we hope that with your help our wrongs may at last be righted. We speak to you the more freely because you are a member of the white race with whom we first became acquainted, and which we call in our tongue “real whites.”

Chief John Chilahitsa (Syilx)

Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier (Canada)

One hundred years next year they came amongst us here at Kamloops and erected a trading post. After the other whites came to this country in 1858 we differentiated them from the first whites as their manners were so much different, and we applied the term “real whites” to the latter (viz., the fur-traders of the Northwest and Hudson Bay companies. As the great majority of the companies’ employees were French speaking, the term latterly became applied by us as a designation for the whole French race.) The “real whites” we found were good people. We could depend on their word, and we trusted and respected them. They did not interfere with us nor attempt to break up our tribal organizations, laws, customs. They did not try to force their conceptions of things on us to our harm. Nor did they stop us from catching fish, hunting, etc. They never tried to steal or appropriate our country, nor take our food and life from us. They acknowledged our ownership of the country, and treated our chiefs as men. They were the first to find us in this country. We never asked them to come here, but nevertheless we treated them kindly and hospitably and helped them all we could. They had made themselves (as it were) our guests. We treated them as such, and then waited to see what they would do. As we found they did us no harm our friendship with them became lasting. Because of this we have a ‘warm heart to the French at the present day.’ We expect good from Canada.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission affirmed that, “Reconciliation requires that a new vision, based on a commitment to mutual respect, be developed. It also requires an understanding that the most harmful impacts of residential schools have been the loss of pride and self-respect of Aboriginal people, and the lack of respect that non-Aboriginal people have been raised to have for their Aboriginal neighbours. Reconciliation is not an Aboriginal problem; it is a Canadian one. Virtually all aspects of Canadian society may need to be reconsidered.” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau maintained this when he told his new cabinet ministers: “No relationship is more important to me and to Canada than the one with Indigenous Peoples.” Recently Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett further stated that the new Liberal government will rebuild the relationship with First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples by including them in every decision that affects them and their land. These are the first steps towards building a just and reciprocal relationship as called for by our Secwepemc Chiefs for over 100 years. The 1910 Memorial to Sir Wilfrid Laurier is a historic document that demonstrates the involvement of Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwepemc Nation (SSN) in asserting our title, rights, and sovereignty in the early twentieth century. It is a historic narrative, which tells the story of the previous hundred years of relations with European newcomers from the Aboriginal perspective. It reflects Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwepemc Nation’s continued and consistent traditional concepts around being the hosts in their lands, and the reciprocity that the host-guest relationship entails. It underscores the Aboriginal concepts of land ownership and tenure, Aboriginal political authority, and sovereign relations with the Crown and government. We maintain the position of our Chiefs in 1910, “We have no grudge against the white race as a whole nor against the settlers…we welcome them to this country it is not in most cases their fault. They have taken up and improved and paid for their lands in good faith it is their government which is to blame by heaping up injustice on us. But it is also their duty to see their government does right by us, and gives us a square deal.” To present our tellings as foundation for Reconciliation, the Laurier Memorial of 1910 and the Oliver Memorial of 1911 will be published. We do this to give voice to our history. As we, the Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwepemc continue to organize and pursue recognition of our Aboriginal Title and Rights from a political and legal standpoint, creating new opportunities to bring this vision into reality.

Kukpi7 Fred Seymour Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation

Kukpi7 Ron Ignace Skeetchestn Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation

B9

TO SIR WILFRID LAURIER, PREMIER OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA

Dear Sir and Father,

Chief John Tetlenitsa (Nlaka’pamux)

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

When they first came among us there were only Indians here. They found the people of each tribe supreme in their own territory, and having tribal boundaries known and recognized by all. The country of each tribe was just the same as a very large farm or ranch (belonging to all the people of the tribe) from which they gathered their food and clothing, etc., fish which they got in plenty for food, grass and vegetation on which their horses grazed and the game lived, and much of which furnished materials for manufactures, etc., stone which furnished pipes, utensils, and tools, etc., trees which furnished firewood, materials for houses and utensils, plants, roots, seeds, nuts and berries which grew abundantly and were gathered in their season just the same as the crops on a ranch, and used for food; minerals, shells, etc., which were used for ornament and for plants, etc., water which was free to all. Thus, fire, water, food, clothing and all the necessaries of life were obtained in abundance from the lands of each tribe, and all the people had equal rights of access to everything they required. You will see the ranch of each tribe was the same as its life, and without it the people could not have lived. Just 52 years ago the other whites came to this country. They found us just the same as the first or “real whites” had found us, only we had larger bands of horses, had some cattle, and in many places we cultivated the land. They found us happy, healthy, strong and numerous. Each tribe was still living in its own “house” or in other words on its own “ranch.” No one interfered with our rights or disputed our possession of our own “houses” and “ranches,” viz., our homes and lives. We were friendly and helped these whites also, for had we not learned the first whites had done us no harm? Only when some of them killed us we revenged on them. Then we thought there are some bad ones among them, but surely on the whole they must be good. Besides they are the queen’s people. And we had already heard great things about the queen from the “real whites.” We expected her subjects would do us no harm, but rather improve us by giving us knowledge, and enabling us to do some of the wonderful things they could do. At first they looked only for gold. We know the latter was our property, but as we did not use it much nor need it to live by we did not object to their searching for it. They told us, “Your country is rich and you will be made wealthy by our coming. We wish just to pass over your lands in quest of gold.” Soon they saw the country was good, and some of them made up their minds, to settle it. They commenced to take up pieces of land here and there. They told us they wanted only the use of these pieces of land for a few years, and then would hand them back to us in an improved condition; meanwhile they would give us some of the products they raised for the loan of our land. Thus they commenced to enter our “houses,” or live on our “ranches.” With us when a person enters our house he becomes our guest, and we must treat him hospitably as long as he shows no hostile intentions. At the same time we expect him to return to us equal treatment for what he receives. Some of our Chiefs said, “These people wish to be partners with us in our country. We must, therefore, be the same as brothers to them, and live as one family. We will share equally in everything—half and half—in land, water and timber, etc. What is ours will be theirs, and what is theirs will be ours. We will help each other to be great and good.” The whites made a government in Victoria—perhaps the queen made it. We have heard it stated both ways. Their chiefs dwelt there. At this time they did not deny the Indian tribes owned the whole country and everything in it. They told us we did. We Indians were hopeful. We trusted the whites and waited patiently for their chiefs to declare their intentions toward us and our lands. We knew what had been done in the neighboring states, and we remembered what we had heard about the queen being so good to the Indians and that her laws carried out by her chiefs were always just and better than the American laws. Presently chiefs (government officials, etc.) commenced to visit us, and had talks with some of our chiefs. They told us to have no fear, the queen’s laws would prevail in this country, and everything would be well for the Indians here. They said a very large reservation would be staked off for us (southern interior tribes) and the tribal lands outside of this reservation the government would buy from us for white settlement. They let us think this would be done soon, and meanwhile until this reserve was set apart, and our lands settled for, they assured us we would have perfect freedom of traveling and camping and the same liberties as from time immemorial to hunt, fish, graze and gather our food supplies where we desired; also that all trails, land, water, timber, etc., would be as free of access to us as formerly. Our chiefs were agreeable to these propositions, so we waited for these treaties to be made, and everything settled. We had never known white chiefs to break their word so we trusted. In the meanwhile white settlement progressed. Our chiefs held us in check. They said, “Do nothing against the whites. Something we did not understand retards them from keeping their promise. They will do the square thing by us in the end.”

What have we received for our good faith, friendliness and patience? Gradually as the whites of this country became more and more powerful, and we less and less powerful, they little by little changed their policy towards us, and commenced to put restrictions on us. Their government or chiefs have taken every advantage of our friendliness, weakness and ignorance to impose on us in every way. They treat us as subjects without any agreement to that effect, and force their laws on us without our consent and irrespective of whether they are good for us or not. They say they have authority over us. They have broken down our old laws and customs (no matter how good) by which we regulated ourselves. They laugh at our chiefs and brush them aside. Minor affairs amongst ourselves, which do not affect them in the least, and which we can easily settle better than they can, they drag into their courts. They enforce their own laws one way for the rich white man, one way for the poor white, and yet another for the Indian. They have knocked down (the same as) the posts of all the Indian tribes. They say there are no lines, except what they make. They have taken possession of all the Indian country and claim it as their own. Just the same as taking the “house” or “ranch” and, therefore, the life of every Indian tribe into their possession. They have never consulted us in any of these matters, nor made any agreement, “nor” signed “any” papers with us. They ‘have stolen our lands and everything on them’ and continue to use ‘same’ for their ‘own’ purposes. They treat us as less than children and allow us ‘no say’ in anything. They say the Indians know nothing, and own nothing, yet their power and wealth has come from our belongings. The queen’s law which we believe guaranteed us our rights, the B.C. government has trampled underfoot. This is how our guests have treated us—the brothers we received hospitably in our house. After a time when they saw that our patience might get exhausted and that we might cause trouble if we thought all the land was to be occupied by whites they set aside many small reservations for us here and there over the country. This was their proposal not ours, and we never accepted these reservations as settlement for anything, nor did we sign any papers or make any treaties about same. They thought we would be satisfied with this, but we never have been satisfied and never will be until we get our rights. We thought the setting apart of these reservations was the commencement of some scheme they had evolved for our benefit, and that they would now continue until they had more than fulfilled their promises but although we have waited long we have been disappointed. We have always felt the injustice done us, but we did not know how to obtain redress. We knew it was useless to go to war. What could we do? Even your government at Ottawa, into whose charge we have been handed by the B.C. government, gave us no enlightenment. We had no powerful friends. The Indian agents and Indian office at Victoria appeared to neglect us. Some offers of help in the way of agricultural implements, schools, medical attendance, aid to the aged, etc., from the Indian department were at first refused by many of our chiefs or were never petitioned for, because for a time we thought the Ottawa and Victoria governments were the same as one, and these things would be charged against us and rated as payment for our land, etc. Thus we got along the best way we could and asked for nothing. For a time we did not feel the stealing of our lands, etc., very heavily. As the country was sparsely settled we still had considerable liberty in the way of hunting, fishing, grazing, etc., over by far the most of it. However, owing to increased settlement, etc., in late years this has become changed, and we are being more and more restricted to our reservations which in most places are unfit or inadequate to maintain us. Except we can get fair play we can see we will go to the wall, and most of us be reduced to beggary or to continuous wage slavery. We have also learned lately that the British Columbia government claims absolute ownership of our reservations, which means that we are practically landless. We only have loan of those reserves in life rent, or at the option of the B.C. government. Thus we find ourselves without any real home in this our own country. In a petition signed by fourteen of our chiefs and sent to your Indian department, July, 1908, we pointed out the disabilities under which we labor owing to the inadequacy of most of our reservations, some having hardly any good land, others no irrigation water, etc., our limitations re pasture lands for stock owing to fencing of so-called government lands by whites; the severe restrictions put on us lately by the government re hunting and fishing; the depletion of salmon by over-fishing of the whites, and other matters affecting us. In many places we are debarred from camping, traveling, gathering roots and obtaining wood and water as heretofore. Our people are fined and imprisoned for breaking the game and fish laws and using the same game and fish which we were told would always be ours for food. Gradually we are becoming regarded as trespassers over a large portion of this our country. Our old people say, “How are we to live? If the government takes our food from us they must give us other food in its place.” Conditions of living have been thrust on us which we did not expect, and which we consider in great measure unnecessary and injurious. We have no grudge against the white race as a whole nor against the settlers, but we want to have an equal chance with them of making a living. We welcome them to this country. It is not in most cases their fault. They have taken up and improved and paid for their lands in good faith. It is their government which is to blame by heaping up injustice on us. But it is also their duty to see their government does right by us, and gives us a square deal. We condemn the whole policy of the B.C. government towards the Indian tribes of this country as utterly unjust, shameful and blundering in every way. We denounce same as being the main cause of the unsatisfactory condition of Indian affairs in this country and of animosity and friction with the whites. So long as what we consider justice is withheld from us, so long will dissatisfaction and unrest exist among us, and we will continue to struggle to better ourselves. For the accomplishment of this end we and other Indian tribes of this country are now uniting and we ask the help of yourself and government in this fight for our rights. We believe it is not the desire nor policy of your government that these conditions should exist. We demand that our land question be settled, and ask that treaties be made between the government and each of our tribes, in the same manner as accomplished with the Indian tribes of the other provinces of Canada, and in the neighboring parts of the United States. We desire that every matter of importance to each tribe be a subject of treaty, so we may have a definite understanding with the government on all questions of moment between us and them. In a declaration made last month, and signed by twenty-four of our chiefs (a copy of which has been sent to your Indian department) we have stated our position on these matters. Now we sincerely hope you will carefully consider everything we have herewith brought before you and that you will recognize the disadvantages we labor under, and the darkness of the outlook for us if these questions are not speedily settled. Hoping you have had a pleasant sojourn in this country, and wishing you a good journey home, we remain Yours very sincerely, The Chiefs of the Shuswap, Okanagan and Couteau or Thompson tribes – Per their secretary, J.A. Teit –


B10

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

ClassiÀeds

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kamloopsthisweek.com Announcements ...............001-099 Employment....................100-165 Service Guide ..................170-399 Pets/Farm ......................450-499 For Sale/Wanted..............500-599 Real Estate .....................600-699 Rentals ..........................700-799 Automotive .....................800-915 Legal Notices ................920-1000

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Household items, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc.

Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max.)

Special: Add an extra line to your ad for $10

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Announcements

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2pm Tuesday for Thursday’s Paper.

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Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

LET’S DANCE - TVASC 700 Victoria St. - KCC. Dec. 12th/15. 8:00 pm - midnight. Tickets $10. Music by: REFLECTIONS . Contact for tickets: 250-372-0091, 250372-3782, 250-299-7221. TVASC Meet & Greet Potluck 3rd Tues. every month 6pm. Monthly Meeting 1st Wed. every month 7pm. Odd Fellows Hall at 423 Tranquille Road. www.tvasc.ca

Happy Thoughts

PERFECT Part-Time Opportunity

3 Days Per Week

upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

your event.

Tell everyone with a classified ad. 250.374.7467

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

go to

kamloopsthisweek.com and click on the calendar to place

7320995

Board of Directors Interior Representative

First Nations Health Authority: The First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) is a non-profit Society governed by a Board of Directors appointed by the Society’s 15 members (themselves appointed by BC First Nations). The FNHA is based out of West Vancouver, BC and provides health and wellness programs and services to First Nations province-wide. Eligibility: Residents of British Columbia are eligible to apply for the FNHA Board of Directors, with the exception of: • Elected or hereditary First Nations leaders (Chief or Councillor) • Any individual eligible for membership in the First Nations Health Directors Association (a Health Director or senior health lead employed by an organization delivering health services within or on behalf of a First Nations community or communities) • Elected federal, provincial, or municipal officials • Any individual working for an organization currently receiving funding from the FNHA Qualified First Nations individuals are strongly encouraged to apply. To Submit Mary McCullough, Regional Manager (Interior) 520 Chief Eli LaRue Way, Kamloops, BC - V2H 1H1 Phone: 778.220.1372, Fax: 604.913.2081 Email: Mary.Mccullough@fnha.ca For additional information, please visit our website: www.fnha.ca/about/regions/interior Application Deadline: December 18, 2015 at 4:30 pm View this posting online: www.fnha.ca/about/work-with-us

Garage Sale

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Lost & Found

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

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Classifieds WORK!

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~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

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Employment

Lost: Hub cap for 2014 VW Jetta. 250-851-3669.

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1 Issue...................................$16.38 1 Week ..................................$39.60 1 Month ............................. $129.60

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Lost: Honda key in the Scotia Bank Tranquille parking lot. 250-852-1911.

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(No businesses, 3 lines or less)

Lost: Fob contains Hyundai key on Dec 3rd in Walmart Store or parking lot. $50 Reward. 250-372-7052.

Coming Events

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phone: 250-371-4949 fax: 250-374-1033 email: classiÀeds@kamloopsthisweek.com

7352137

Teach English in China 6 week TESL C ertificate • Program begins January 4th • Nationally accredited program • Qualify to teach in Canada and internationally • Jobs include return airfare & accommodations in China For more information contact Karen Densky at kdensky@tru.ca or call 250-371-5653. http://www.tru.ca/hse/esl/tesl.html

MATERNITY LEAVE POSITION

RECEPTION/ADMINISTRATION Mary MacGregor Law Corporation is looking for a receptionist/administrative assistant/legal secretary. This is a full time position starting mid-March 2016, to cover a one-year maternity leave. This is not an entry level position. Duties include reception duties, managing lawyer calendar, mail, bookkeeping, file opening and closing, land title and other searches, and correspondence. Salary commensurate with experience. Apply with resume to Mary MacGregor Law Corporation, 975 Victoria Street, Kamloops BC V2C 2C1 or via e-mail to laura.miller@mmlc.ca.

7311910

Truck Driver Training

Professional Truck Driver Program - Funding available for those who qualify!

CERTIFIED ICBC AIR BRAKE COURSE

December 18-20 • January 8-10

Air Brakes

TRAINING TRUCK DRIVERS FOR 27 YEARS!

16 Hour Course 20 Hour Course

call 250.828.5104 or visit

tru.ca/trades

Class 1, 2, 3 and B-Train Driver Training 7336173

Bonaparte Indian Band CAREER OPPORTUNITY - BAND ADMINISTRATOR

The Bonaparte Indian Band is growing! Located just outside of scenic Cache Creek, it’s an exciting time for our Band as we’re already seeing much growth and change. We are seeking an experienced professional to fulfill the role of Band Administrator as our current Band Administrator is retiring. The Band Administrator is responsible for reporting to Chief and Council, operating within the approved budget and authorizations approved by Council, and administering the affairs and programs of our growing Band. This leadership role requires you to have related experience that includes good working knowledge of departmental regulations and procedures of various programs specific to Indian Bands. A strong understanding/background in financial management with a focus on funding and economic development will be essential to your success. Completion of a relevant post-secondary education in Business Administration of Management would be highly desirable; however, this role will be highly suited to an individual with hands-on management experience in a similar role. You are highly socially capable of dealing with public, staff, Chief and Council, as well as trained in conflict resolution. The position is a full time position, working 4 days a week. Join a strong team and help shape the services of a growing and innovative Indian Band on the threshold of unprecedented growth and positive change. General Responsibilities, Position Requirements and Qualifications posted at:

www.bonaparteindianband.com/careers

CLOSING DATE: January 4, 2016 at 12:00pm TO APPLY: Submit a resume and a cover letter outlining why you are interested in this position and stating your salary expectations. Apply attention to: Ryan Day – Chief 2689A Sage Hill Rd, Hwy 97 N Box 669 Cache Creek, B.C. V0K 1H0 kukpi7.stuxwtews@bonaparteindianband.com Only qualified individuals being considered will be contacted for an interview. Preference will be given to First Nations candidates.

TRY A CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Employment Drivers/Courier/ Trucking US capable Class 1 Drivers required immediately: We are an Okanagan based transport company looking for qualified drivers for US loads we run primarily in the Pacific Northwest, Utah, Arizona and Nevada. We offer a new pay rate empty or loaded. All picks and drops paid. Assigned units company cell phones and fuel cards. Regular home time Direct deposit paid every second Friday with no hold backs. We offer a rider and pet policy. Company paid US travel Insurance. All applicants must have reliable transportation and a positive attitude. Please fax resume & abstract to 250-546-0600 or by email to parris@ricknickelltrucking.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Education/Trade Schools HUNTER & FIREARMS

Courses. Next C.O.R.E. Jan. 9th & 10th, Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L. Dec. 19th, Saturday. Challenges, Testing ongoing daily. Professional outdoorsman & Master Instructor:

Bill

250-376-7970

Help Wanted 2 Painters needed with min 5 yrs exp. Commercial and Residential Salary $22per hour Call (250) 318-3146 or email protouch@shaw.ca

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Sales

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

ADVERTISING Consultants: Our company is always looking for great sales representatives to add to our team. Our business requires a highly organized individual with ability to multi-task in a fun, fastpaced team environment. Strong interpersonal skills and a strong knowledge of sales and marketing are required. Excellent communication skills, valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle are necessary. If you have a passion for the advertising business, are creative and thrive on challenges, we want to hear from you. Interested applicants should email their resume and cover letter to:khall@aberdeenpublishing.com We thank all applicants; only those being considered for an interview will be contacted.

Trades, Technical Controls Electrician & HVAC/R Mechanic

Tri-City Refrigeration Inc. now has opportunities for permanent, full time work in Terrace, BC.

Electrician Requirements: • Red Seal Certification • FSR designation preferred • Experience w/ DDC controls

Mechanic Requirements:

• Red Seal Certification • B Gas Ticket • Experience w/ building controls

We offer competitive wages with full benefits!!!

Valid BC Driver’s License & Criminal Record Check required.

For further job details, email tcradmin@citywest.ca by December 30, 2015.

Work Wanted HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call ! Steve 250-320-7774.

EARN EXTRA $$$

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462 Farm Worker: Dhaliwal Farms Location: Heffley Creek, Kamloops. Duties: Planting, harvesting, packing vegetables. Workers must be in good physical condition. Work consists of heavy lifting, long periods of bending and standing. Wage $10.49/hour Start Date: immediately Positions: 20. Please Fax resumes to 250578-7160.

Job wanted by Computer Programmer-Analyst /Office Worker/Tutor Detail oriented, organized, problem-solver, extremely computer literate. Strong proofreading, editing, technical writing, public speaking skills. Can teach practically anything I know. IT work preferred but any job using problem-solving skills could be a good match. Gene Wirchenko 250-8281474. genew@telus.net

I PAY Cash $$$ For All Scrap Vehicles! and $5 for auto batteries Call or Text Brendan 250-574-4679

Pets & Livestock

Pets is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at

250-374-0462

Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

PETS For Sale? TRI-CITY SPECIAL! for only $46.81/week, we will place your classified ad into Kamloops, Vernon & Salmon Arm.

Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information.

Bigger circulation, Better value

Every Tuesday, Thursday and Friday over 65,690 readers in over 30,000 homes and businesses receive Kamloops This Week and find it full of relevant, local news. Communicating with customers must be cost-effective. Our large circulation and reasonable ad rates mean your cost per reader is exceptionally affordable. Your ROI is high!

B11

(250)371-4949

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com *some restrictions apply.

Help Wanted

HAS THE FOLLOWING DOOR TO DOOR DELIVERY ROUTES COMING AVAILABLE ABERDEEN / MT DUFFERIN

ADVERTISING CONSULTANT Award winning Kamloops This Week has an opening for an Advertising Consultant. The position requires a highly organized individual with ability to multi-task in a fun, fast-paced team environment.

BROCK / NORTH SHORE

Strong interpersonal skills and a strong knowledge of sales and marketing are required. Excellent communication skills, valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle are necessary.

DALLAS / BARNHARTVALE

If you have a passion for the advertising business, are creative and thrive on challenges, we want to hear from you. Interested applicants should send their resume and cover letter to: Attention: Rose-Marie: 1365 B Dalhousie Drive Kamloops BC V2C 5P6 Fax: 250-374-1033 Email: sales@kamloopsthisweek.com We thank all applicants; only those being considered for an interview will be contacted. Kamloops This Week is part of the Aberdeen Publishing Group

Hospitality

Hospitality

7350180

DOWNTOWN / LOWER SAHALI

Rte 583 - Butte Pl., Chinook Pl, 1423-1670 Mt Duffern Dr. 42 papers. Rte 562 - Englemann Crt, 1802-1890 Lodgepole Dr. 66 papers. Rte 7 - 1002-1058 Crestline St, Crestline Pl, 24112592 Fleetwood Ave. 37 papers. Rte 33 - 2115-2280 Fleetwood Ave, Ponderosa Ave, 2002-1090 Windbreak St. 80 papers.

Rte 405 - Anvil Cres, Bestwick Crt & Dr, Mahood Pl, Morrisey Pl. 90 papers. Rte 406 - 108-492 McGill Rd. (houses) 64 papers Rte 408 - Monashee Crt & Pl. 44 papers. Rte 412 - Thor Dr. 38 papers.

SAHALI Rte 472 - 1750-1795 Summit Dr. 40 papers. Rte 477 - 477 - Sunhill Crt, 1820-1880 Tremerton Dr. 51 papers. Rte 483 - Breakenridge Crt, Cathedral Crt, Grenville Pl, 409-594 Robson Dr. 63 papers.

Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl. 31 papers. RAYLEIGH Rte 751 - 5310 Barnhartvale Dr, Bogetti Pl, Viking Rte 830 - Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. 62 papers. Dr, Wade Pl, 5485-5497 East Trans Can Hwy, 5300Rte 833 - 4102-4194 Cameron Rd, 5599 Dallas Dr - 62 papers Davie Rd. 42 papers. Rte 752 - 5600 - 5998 Dallas Dr, Harper Pl, Haper VALLEYVIEW / JUNIPER Rd. 65 papers. Rte 603 - Chickadee Rd., Storm Rd, Comazzetto DOWNTOWN / LOWER SAHALI Rd, 1625-1764 ValleyView Dr. Rte 311 - 423-676 1st Ave, 440-533 2nd Ave, 10742 papers. 237 Battle St, 167-173 Saint Paul St. 27 papers. Rte 608 - Curlew Pl. & Rd, 1925-1980 Glenwood Rte 330 - 1062-1125 7th Ave, 1066-1140 8th Ave, Dr. 80 papers. 601-783 Douglas St. 50 papers Rte 610 - 2001-2025 Glenwood Dr, 167-174 Oriole Rte 333 - 1005-1075 Pine St, 1003-1176 Pleasant Rd, Plover Rd. 27 papers. St. 49 papers. WESTSYDE Rte 334 - 975 13th Ave, 1104-1274 Pine St, 1201Rte 249 - 3085-3132 Bank Rd, 600-655 Bissette Rd, 1274 Pleasant St. 44 papers. Cooper Pl, Haywood Pl, Norbury Rd. 51 papers. Rte 335 - 1175-1460 6th Ave, 1165-1185 7th Ave, Cowan St, 550-792 Munro St. 74 papers. Rte 373 - Clarke St, 24-60 West Columnbia St. 20 papers. Rte 381 - 20-128 Centre Ave, Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. 48 papers. Rte 404 - Chapperon Dr, Pyramid Crt, 111-439 Greenstone Dr. 71 papers.

INTERESTED IN A ROUTE? FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 250-374-0462

COOK 0957207 BC Ltd DBA Citrus Restaurant at 339 St. Paul Street, Kamloops, BC, V2C 2J5, requires a permanent full-time Cook. Duties: prepare and cook complete meals or individual dishes for individuals, small groups, and large functions, prepare and cook buffets, individual menu items, and ball room caterings, maintain inventory and records of food, and clean kitchen and work area. Requirements are completion of secondary school, 3+ years of commercial cooking experience, experience cooking for large groups, and willingness to work shifts starting at 5:00 am. Competitive salary, 2 weeks vacation, extended medical and dental, and an employee discount at all Hilton properties. Email resume at dboyal@gmail.com

Businesses & Services Mind Body Spirit

Help Wanted

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Snowclearing

Relax and unwind with a full body massage for appointment couples welcome (250) 682-1802

Financial Services $500 loans and more No credit checks

1-877-776-1660 Apply at moneyprovider.com

Fitness/Exercise WE will pay you to exercise!

Help Wanted

Home Improvements

Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 3 issues a week!

call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

GREAT PRODUCT. SMART SERVICE. Carpet - Hardwood Laminate - Vinyl Tile - Stone

WWW.NUFLOORS.CA info@nufloors.ca | 250.372.8141

TRY A CLASSIFIED AD

Stucco/Siding

Landscaping YOUR BUSINESS HERE

Only $150/month

Run your 1x1 semi display classified in every issue of Kamloops This Week

Call 250-371-4949

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

VWRC - OPERATOR I

(Regular) Reporting to the Manager, Vernon Water Reclamation Centre (VWRC), this position operates, maintains and repairs equipment, analyzes data and recommends remedial action. This position also performs janitorial, ground, and general housekeeping duties pertaining to the VWRC and irrigation works. Please see our website at www.vernon.ca for a complete job description and method of application. Closing date is December 16, 2015. Please quote competition # 110-COV-15.

Handypersons RICKS’S SMALL HAUL For all Deliveries & Dump Runs. Extra large dump trailers for rent. Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!!

250-377-3457

Painting & Decorating B and C PAINTING 25 years experience. Fully insured. Free estimates. No job to small. 250-319-8246, 250-554-8783

Miracle Painting & Handyman Services. 30 years plus, licensed. Senior discount. Ask for Gilles (250) 571-5560

TRY A CLASSIFIED


B12

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Appliances

Firewood/Fuel

Inglis Washer and Admiral Dryer. Excellent condition. $400. 250-554-1219.

PELLETS Pinnacle Fir‌‌..$260 a ton Pinnacle SPF‌‌$210 a ton Quality Pinnacle Pellets from Armstrong, taxes included in price. 250-578-8733 or 250-319-7564 B&B Alternative Heating

$500 & Under Do you have an item for sale under $750? Did you know that you can place

Furniture

your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Call our Classified Department for details!

250-371-4949

*some restrictions apply

Computer Equipment

Gibbard 4poster qu bed $700obo Persian wool rugs 8x10 & 6x8 exc cond cream color $750 (778) 471-8627 Solid Wood Corner display unit curved glass sides $400 250-372-5062 Teak dining room table w/6 chairs.$340. Golf clubs & cart $30. 250-579-8584

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Real Estate

Jewels, Furs

Sporting Goods

Houses For Sale

White Gold engagement ring. Main diamond is .94 carat with another .5 carat in smaller diamonds. Size 7. Recently appraised at $5500 asking $4000 Call to view 250-578-7202 after 5pm

Cardio Style Trainer Exercise bike only used 6 months $325 250-372-2862 call 124pm

Large 1bdrm apt in Logan Lake n/p, $600 hot water/hydro/tv incl Minimum 6 month lease (250) 523-6933

Multi-spd Raleigh Mtn Bike. $150. Elliptical Trainer. $650. 778-471-1816.

Northland Apartments

Misc. for Sale 4 Goodyear winter tires. 235/55/R17, used 1 season $400. 250-377-3002. Beautiful 9X12 Persian wool area rug, cream/teal colour. $750. 778-471-1816. MISC4Sale: Camperette $300, Oak Table Chairs-$400, 2-Standard 8ft truck canopies $300/ea Call 250-320-5194 after 6pm or leave msg.

Holzer saw $1500, Safety Harness $500, Myte Extractor $2500. 250-377-8436.

classiďŹ eds@kamloopsthisweek.com

Real Estate

Heavy Duty Machinery

Apt/Condos for Sale

FOR SALE OR TRADE for residential property in Kamloops. This very bright, fully furnished, three bedroom/two bath corner unit townhouse in Big White offers your very own hot tub on the patio, carport, high end furniture/appliance pkge, stacking washer/dryer and rock-faced fireplace. Short stroll to Gondola, skating rink, tube park, Day Lodge. Ideal for family or as a revenue generator throughout the ski season. Strata fees only $155.00 per month. Call Don at 250682-3984 for more information. Asking $189,000.00

ALL SEASON FIREWOOD. For delivery birch, fir & pine. Stock up now. Campfire wood. (250)377-3457.

A-CHEAP, LOWEST PRICES STEEL SHIPPING Dry Storage Containers Used 20’40’45’53’ and insulated containers all sizes in stock. 40’ containers as low as $2,200DMG. Huge freezers. Experienced wood carvers needed, full time. Ph Toll free 24 hours 1-866-528-7108 or 1778-298-3192 8am-5pm. Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

ROLL ENDS AVAILABLE $5-$10/ ROLL 1365 B Dalhousie Drive Kamloops BC call for availability 250-374-7467

1BDRM a/c, patio, n/p ref required heat and hot water incl (250) 376-1485.

Food Products

Food Products

ROMANCE Your Christmas Local BC Adult Retailer Shop Online Now & Receive 25% OFF! www.shagg.ca

2bdrm apt. Downtown. $1200/mo. heat included. N/S, N/P. 250-319-3680.

WANTED! Newer MacBook Pro or MacBook Air 250-3711333

Firewood/Fuel

Solid oak table $97, China Cabinet $119 Kitchen cabinet set $395 (250) 299-6477

Box 67, 100 Mile House B.C. V0K 2E0

BEFORE YOU SELL: • ASPEN • BIRCH • COTTONWOOD • PINE • SPRUCE • FIR PULP LOGS Please call KATHERINE LEPPALA (250) 395-6218 (direct line) • (250) 395-0584 (cell) (250) 395-6201 (fax)

Misc. for Sale

Misc. for Sale

TARPS! TARPS! “BEST PRICES IN TOWN!�

BLUE TARPS 10X8 weave (Medium Duty) STARTING AT 2.19 $

Tapes $1.00, CD’s $2.00, Video’s $2.00. 250-851-6951.

Misc. Wanted COLLECTOR BUYING coin collections, Royal Canadian Mint coins, US Mint coins, silver coins, antique coins, old money, antique silver & gold Todd - 250-864-3521 Private Coin Collector Buying Collections, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins, Estates Jewelry+ Chad: 1-778-281-0030 Local.

Furniture

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent

For Sale By Owner 2bdrm 2bth Townhouse downtown 1 1/2 blks from hospital new a/c, hot water tank, appl, reno’d, new windows, flooring and more. Nice back yard (250) 377-4138 3 Kam West End Prop 9,997 sqft view lot $125,000. 2bdrm hse $225,000 also 4200 sqft ex home on double lot 1 million all obo (250) 374-1417

WHITE TARPS

Acacia Tower

1bdrm & bachelor suites starting @$615/mth. Located downtown with great views, close to hospital, pharmacy, shopping & transit. 1 yr FREE Telus Essential TV pkg with signing 1 year lease. N/P, N/S. reference, credit check & security deposit required.

250-374-7455

Rayleigh - Pulp mill stink free. 2002 Custom house, 5bdrms, 2-baths, two garages, wine cellar, red tiled roof etc. 1/2 acre dividable lot. 4493 Cammeray. $454,000. 250-5788681.

Available spacious 1bdrm apts. Starting at $850/mo. The Sands Apartment. Centrally located. On-site Management. 250-828-1711.

Furniture

Furniture

RUNSOLD TILL

t $BST t 5SVDLT t 5SBJMFST t 37 T t #PBUT t "57 T t 4OPXNPCJMFT t .PUPSDZDMFT t .FSDIBOEJTF t 4PNF SFTUSJDUJPOT BQQMZ t *ODMVEFT JTTVFT QFS XFFL t /PO #VTJOFTT BET POMZ t /PO #VTJOFTT BET POMZ

ly On

35

10X10 weave (Heavy Duty)

STARTING AT 3.99 $

BLACK TARPS

00 3 lines PLUS TAX

Add an extra line for only $10

14X14 weave (Industrial Duty)

STARTING AT 5.49 $

FOAM SHOP MATTRESS REPLACEMENTS SINGLE TO KING SIZE 2� TO 6� THICK - CUSTOM CUT OR CUSTOM ORDER MEMORY FOAM TOPPER PADS - 3LB DENSITY SINGLE TO KING SIZE - 2� & 3� THICK

CUSHION REPLACEMENTS TORN OR TATTERED? SOFAS, CHAIRS, OTTOMANS, SNOWMOBILES SEATS, TRACTORS

YOU NEED IT - WE WILL CUT IT!

CAMPING FOAM, MEDICAL WEDGES & BOLSTERS, PILLOWS

“ A CUT ABOVE THE REST� FIND US ON FACEBOOK

www.surplusherbys.com

248 TRANQUILLE RD, NORTH SHORE - KAMLOOPS 250376-2714 • OUT OF TOWN CALL 1-800-665-4533

250-371-4949

Misc. for Sale

L RUN TIDL SOL

Misc. for Sale

TURN

Rentals

Apt/Condo for Rent

Mobile Homes & Pads 2bdrm MH, N/Shore. Quiet, storage shed. W/D. N/S, N/P. $950 +util. 250-376-1421.

Recreation

1 Bedroom Suite Adult Oriented No Pets / No Smoking Elevators / Dishwashers Common Laundry $825 per month North Shore 250-376-1427

Tools

Buying or Selling?

Rentals

✰SHUSWAP LAKE!✰

NORTH SHORE

1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Clean quiet buildings. Reasonable Rental Rates Utilities not included

CALL 250-682-0312

5 Star Resort in Scotch Creek B.C. 1-bdrm 1-bath Park Model. Tastefully decorated guest cabin. One of only 15 lots on the beautiful sandy beach with a wharf for your boat. Provincial Park, Golf, Grocery/Liquor Store and Marina all minutes away. Resort has 2 pools, 2 hot-tubs, Adult and Family Clubhouse, Park, Playground. Rents for $1500/week. FMI CALL 1-250-371-1333

Room & Board

Bed & Breakfast

Furnished room and board Valleyview N/P $800per month ideal for student 778-538-1958

BC Best Buy Classified’s

Senior Assisted Living

Place your classified ad in over 71 Papers across BC.

Independent and assisted living, short term stay’s, 24 hour nursing care and respite.

Call 250-371-4949 for more information

Commercial/ Industrial OfďŹ ce Space for lease. Free parking. Fantastic view. South Sahali. 250-372-7212

250.377-7275 www.berwickretirement.com

Duplex / 4 Plex

Shared Accommodation

3bdrms, full bsmnt. F/S, Close to all amenities. Carport. N/S, N/P. $1,400. 250-376-0113.

Female roommate wanted Batchelor bsmt suite your share is $500 250-571-6874

N/Shore 3bdrms, F/S, W/D, DW. N/P. $1350/mo. plus Utilities. 250-376-5933.

Looking for roommate to share apt. N/Shore. N/S. $500/mo. (250) 319-8674

Houses For Sale

Houses For Sale

• ICBC AUTOPLAN • FLEETS • BUSINESS • HOMEOWNERS • PRIVATE AUTO • LIABILITY • BOATS • RV’S • TRAVEL MEDICAL

Emsland & Associates Insurance Services Ltd 605 - 1801 Princeton Hwy Phone: 250-828-2248 Fax: 250-828-2250 Toll Free: 855-844-2248 www.emslandinsurance.com

Run Till Rented

Misc. for Sale

YOUR

STUFFINTO

“Read All About It� Kamloops This Week Run Till Rented gives you endless possibilities...

$

$5300 + tax Max 3 Lines Max 12 Weeks Must be pre-paid (no refunds) Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time

3 items-3 lines for $35

Private parties only - no businesses

CASH$

Additional items/lines $10 each Non business ads only Some restrictions apply

Does not include: Car/Truck/RV’s/Power Boats/Street Bike

%BMIPVTJF %SJWF t 250-371-4949

(Must phone to reschedule)

- Some Restrictions Apply

Special: Add an extra line to your ad for $10

CALL 250-371-4949

The Heart of Your Community


FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

B13

Rentals

Rentals

Transportation

Transportation

Transportation

Transportation

Transportation

Shared Accommodation

Townhouses

Cars - Domestic

Cars - Domestic

Commercial Vehicles

Recreational/Sale

Sport Utility Vehicle

North Shore $400 per/mo incl util & basic cable, np/ns 250-554-6877 / 250-377-1020 Roommate to share townhouse Aberdeen n/s, n/p $600 student $500 (250) 320-1526 Roommate wanted $500/mo. util incld. Logan Lake. Avail Dec. 1st. Call 778-214-1942

Suites, Lower

Best Value In Town

NORTH SHORE *Bright, clean & Spacious 2&3 bedrooms *Big storage rooms *Laundry Facilities *Close to park, shopping & bus stop

1BDRM+den Aberdeen, N/P N/S, $850/mo util included 250-819-3404 Avail immed.

Transportation

1bdrm + den level entry w/view f/p and a/c cls to TRU n/p, n/s avail now $850 heat and elec incl (250) 377-3622

Antiques / Classics

2bdrm daylight suite, Sahali. $900/mo. incld util. N/S, N/P. Near bus stop. 250-318-4756. 2BDRM large N/S N/P Close to schools Working person pref’d $950 incl util 819-3368 2bdrms. $975/mo heat, hotwater, lights included. 1300 Tranquille Rd. 250-371-4801. 3BDRM/1 bath parking laundry near shopping/bus Feb 1st $1250 inclds util 778-220-8118 Riverfront 1bdrm daylight level entry, util incl $600. Avail January 1st 250-579-9609. Sahali, 2bdrms,covered parking. N/S. $850 inclds util. Avail now. 250-374-6834. Welcoming Cumfy 1bedroom. Close to University, Hospital. Student or quiet person. Excellent Location. $495or$725 ns/np. Call (250) 299-6477

Suites, Upper 3bdrms top floor suite 1300 Tranquille. n/s, n/p, laundry on-site. $1100 inclds hotwater, heat. (250) 371-4801.

w

FAST!

2009 Hyundai Accent Sport. 91,000kms. 2 sets of tires. $5,000. 250-374-0452.

318-4321

lilacgardens1@gmail.com

Sell your car

2002 Nissan Altima. 4 door, auto. Fully loaded. Good condition. $5,500. Call to view. 250-376-4077.

PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED

1bdrm daylight suite fully furnished incl all util w/d, n/s, n/p and garage prk $950 250-5795763 /778-220-0440 avail now

2bdrm 4 quiet working person or couple, c/a, nice yard, no pets, shr util, ref $900 Avail Dec. 1st (250) 376-0633

Contractors Tundra HD Econo Custom. Hwy, hauler $35,000 Concrete work as possible part of the payment. 250-377-8436.

TOWNHOUSES

2007 Altima 3.5 SE. Loaded, 6 speed manual, clean. $7,500. 250-579-2233.

1967 Ford Falcon Futura St.6 Auto 2dr all original runs good, $5,500 obo (250) 376-5722

Auto Accessories/Parts

2-215/60R16 Snow tires. $200. 2-245/50VR16 Eagle Snow. $200. 4-275/45R20 Eagle M&S. $400. 2-225/60R16 M&S. $200. 2-275/40ZR17 M&S. $300. 250-319-8784.

Cars - Domestic 1972 AMC Javelin SST. Second owner. Exec mech cond. $3,000/obo. 250-372-2096. 1997 Honda Prelude V-Tec, fully loaded. Clean inside & out. $5,500. 250-578-2080. 2002 Malibu Sedan. 4dr, auto, V-6. 235,125kms. Loaded. $2950/obo. 250-554-1023. 2003 Malibu V-6, 142,000kms. Grey, 4 winters on rims. 1owner. $3400. 250-376-1697. 2005 Toyota Corolla 5 speed extra set of mounted tires /rims $4900.00 250-318-8870

Motorcycles 2014 Motorino XPH Electric Scooter bike. 850kms. No scrapes. $1500 250-574-9846

NO PETS

1-set of Nokian Winters on rims 235/75/R16. Used one season. Regular price new $1200 selling for $400. Call 250-851-1304.

250.374.7467

2008 Cadillac CTS Premium. 130,000kms. AWD, Great in the winter, BLK w/leather interior, CD, power windows, seats, mirrors, locks, heating/cooling seats. $14,850. 250-320-6900. 2009 Hyundai Sonata. 4dr, auto, fully loaded. 143,000kms. $7,000. 250-579-0195. 2010 Toyota Yaris hatchback. 112,000kms, fully loaded. $7200. 250-318-9558. 2013 Nissan Leaf SL, electric, black/tan. 12,000kms under warranty $27,500 250-3778436

Run ‘till SOLD

* Some conditions may apply

Off Road Vehicles 2011 Nissan Juke SL, AWD. Sunroof, winters, heated seats. $13,800. 250319-8240.

Honda Big Red 3 Wheeler top shape $1650 250-554-0201

Absolute gorgeous 03 Cadillac Deville one owner low kms $6900.00 obo 250-554-0580

1989 Fleetwood AClass 120,000km slps 6, well kept, $8000obo (250) 579-9691

RUN UNTIL SOLD

2005, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, sleeps 6, appl incld, fully loaded, $14,900. (778) 468-5050.

ONLY $35.00(plus Tax) (250)371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

Cars - Sports & Imports

Run until sold

New Price $56.00+tax

Trucks & Vans

Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* • $56.00 (boxed ad with photo) • $35.00 (regular 3 line ad)

‘07 Ford Sport Track 4X4, 4dr, mint cond. 90000km every conceivable option. $18000. 778-257-6079

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

1996 GMC Suburban 4x4 good shape runs great $2900obo Call (250) 571-2107

Call: 250-371-4949

Scrap Car Removal

1987 Chev S10 Sport Sm V6 5spd transmission Gd winter tires $750obo (250) 579-8339

2004 Dodge Dakota 4x4, quadcab, canopy, 4.7V-8. $10,500/obo. 250-679-3889.

Recreational/Sale

Sport Utility Vehicle

2005 Sprinter 25’ w/slide 1995 F250 Ford diesel w/low mileage both in exc cond. asking $20,000 obo for both (250) 314-6661

2004 Toyota Sienna XLE limited edition. Exec cond. 7 pass, all leather, auto doors, sunroof, brand new all seasons 2nd set of rims. 247,000kms. $5500. 250377-1296.

2008 Fleetwood Mallard. 23ft. like new, fully loaded. $15,000. 250-554-1035. 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser. Must sell. Auto, fully loaded, good condition. 272K highway kms. $15,799/obo. Partial trades/financing considered. Call Dave 250-4347263

2006 Audi A3 2.0 turbo 6spd auto 145,000km 2 sets of tires $13,500 (250) 879-0774 Dave

Commercial Vehicles

1987 GMC Cube Van. Setup for tradesman. Runs good. $2,600. 250-3741988.

Jeep YJ 4x4 1987 restored, 6cyl 5sp, lifted, 33”tires on Eagle Rims, 10,000 lb Winch, over $15,000 invested asking $12000 (250) 828-0931

2010 Mountaineer 305RLT $28,000. 34.4ft. One Owner, full load. Triple hydraulic slides, elec. stabilizers, awning. 2006 Silverado Diesel 151,000kms. $25,000. Package $50,000. 250-679-2518, cell 250-3183144. 9FT Okanagan Camper. F/S, bathroom. Good shape. $1,500/obo. 250-376-1841.

2008 Denali Crew Cab AWD. Sunroof, DVD, NAV. Fully loaded. 22” chrome wheels, leather. 141,000kms. $28,800. 250319-8784.

Boats 2007 Sea Doo Speed Boat, 4 Seater.$15,000obo Call 250320-5194 (after 6pm)or lv msg 2008 Ford Escape XLT. Urgent Sale. $8,800. 250376-3741.

Erickson aluminum custom boat,new, 12’ one piece construction $3000. 778-257-6079

Memories Milestones &

After Almost 9 Months of Construction

Ivica & Mary Bozinovic together with Alan & Dawn Gozda are thrilled to announce the engagement of their children

One Little Project is Complete

JAXSON JAMES MACDONALD

Ivana & Blake

Arrived November 3rd at 6:45 pm 7lbs 11oz - 53.5 cm PARENTS MARCUS AND PAM Proud Grandparents Karen Schneider and Kevin and Janice MacDonald are delighted

Mike & June Deegan are thrilled to announce the engagement of their daughter KELLY FRANCES DEEGAN to JARED JACOB MOE Son of Tom Moe and Theresa Moe

Wedding to take place in the summer of 2016 in Vancouver BC

Let us help you say Friday Edition Kamloops This Week • Full Colour Announcements • Bonus No Extra Charge for Colour

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

WEDDING TO TAKE PLACE JULY 15, 2017 IN KAMLOOPS

Call 250.374.7467 for details


B14

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

WEEKLY WORD SEARCH

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRANK & ERNEST

BY BOB THAVES

T H E B O R N LO S E R

BY ART & CHIP SAMSOM

B I G N AT E

BY LINCOLN PEIRCE

Answers

BLOUSE BUTTONS COAT COLLAR CORSET COTTON COUTURE CREASE CUFF DESIGN DRESS FROCK

HEM INSEAM JACKET LAPEL LENGTH LINGERIE PLEAT POCKET POLYESTER SEAM SEASONAL SHELL

SHIRT SILK SKIRT SLACKS SPORTS COAT SPORTSWEAR SWIMSUIT TAILOR TUCK UNDERWEAR WOOL ZIPPER

SUDOKU

THE GRIZZWELLS

FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test!

BY BILL SCHORR

HERMAN

BY JIM UNGER

K I T ’ N ’ C A R LY L E

BY LARRY WRIGHT

Answers

WORD SCRAMBLE

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

MON—SAT @ 10AM SUNDAYS @ NOON

ANSWER 1:INGREDIENTS ANSWER 2: BEATING

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS:

Rearrange the letters to spell something pertaining to Baking D G I N E R N T E S I

I

T

G

A

KAMLOOPS CIGAR & VAPE 100+ Flavours! Come and browse our selection!

• LOCALLY MADE • KOSHER • HIGHEST STANDARDS • CUSTOM BLENDING AVAILABLE!

338 Seymour St. Kamloops, BC (778) 471-5641 (Located inside The Zoo Ice Cream & Crepery)

B

E

N


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A R C T I C C I R C L E BY ALEX HALLATT

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD WITH DRAWL

B A BY B LU E S

BY RICK KIRKMAN AND JERRY SCOTT

H AG A R T H E H O R R I B L E

SHOE

BY CHRIS BROWNE

BY GARY BROOKINS AND SUSIE MACNELLY

B15

BY PATRICK BERRY

ACROSS 1 Butter? 4 Out patient’s state 8 Three of a kind, to a poker player 13 Earth, e.g. 19 Marriage agreement? 20 Take a turn 21 American hub 22 Stacked messily 23 Half a sawbuck 24 How you might classify a blade, a gas-tank cap or a starter handle? 27 Reason to stay only at Hiltons or Marriotts? 29 “Frozen” reindeer’s name 30 Giving evasive answers 31 Roll served at a bar 32 Little one 33 Timeworn words 35 Kind of strength 39 “____ the Housetop” (Christmas song) 42 Extremely, in dated slang 45 Mob that disturbs the peace in new and interesting ways? 49 John of England 50 2013 Spike Jonze dramedy 51 ____ mater (spinal membrane) 52 Affect in a personal way 54 Small, secluded, wooded valley 55 Maker of indoor cars 57 Druggists’ implements 59 Hospital worker 61 Attractive blacksmith at a stable? 63 Like Paganini, by birth 65 Food-service giant based in Houston 66 CPR expert 67 Corruption 68 Candy brand since 1901 72 Rough 75 Municipal leaders who work the late shift? 78 Director of “Carlito’s Way,” 1993 81 Panasonic rival 82 Outback runners 83 Songwriter Novello 84 Beseech on bended knee 87 Gaggle : goose :: clowder : ____ 88 Trident-shaped letter 89 Bass organs 91 Troy, in the “Iliad”? 95 Cold shower? 96 Word in a New Year’s Eve song

97 98 100 102 105 107 109 113 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124

Never closed, as a resort “We won” gesture Nonprofit network One who gets no credit? Historical chapter “Preparation meeting opportunity,” it’s said Smallest possible aspirin dose? Normandy’s coat of arms, basically? Punk subgenre D-Day invaders Green stuff Wildly enthusiastic Jimmy Fallon’s employer Moves quickly, informally Big Easy lunch Hang around “I Ching” concept

DOWN 1 Repeated musical phrases 2 Leave-taking 3 Brothers’ keepers 4 Front-wheel-drive coupling, for short 5 French ingredient in French toast 6 Interlock 7 Like many student films 8 Fictional Potawatomi tribesman 9 Butler on a plantation 10 Maker of Healthy Naturals food 11 Supporting 12 Wraps (up) 13 Least bit 14 Honey or pumpkin 15 “Serves you right!” 16 Seismological focus 17 City near Lake Tahoe 18 Pushing the envelope 25 Many a 1950s B-movie 26 Chicago suburb 28 Mother of Zeus 34 First Pierce Brosnan 007 film 36 ____ cup (spillproof container) 37 Northeast octet 38 Dogfight preventers 39 College team named for a tribe 40 Blowtube projectile 41 TV alien’s home 43 Occupant of a small house 44 No more than

45 46 47 48 53 56 58 60 62 63

Musician’s virtuosity Have another go at Castaway’s site Phone-button abbr. Treasure from una mina Missouri’s original capital Large volume Mike’s “Wayne’s World” co-star Easily manipulated sort Van ____, “Lane in Autumn” painter Principled Stair’s face Bedroom on a train, e.g. Piece of pizza? Actor/activist Davis “____ right?” Unchecked growth Expected amount Kids’ outdoor game Chum at sea Does an investigation Maleficent Attempt to pass the bar? Mr. ____ of “The Wind in the Willows” Boston skyscraper, with “the” “____ Darlin’” (Count Basie number) Ben of “Zoolander” Place for visual aids Talking toy since 1965 City dweller’s yell Suppose Renaissance painter Uccello Road less traveled Dance from Cuba Bygone gas-station name Dutch export Nestlé candy brand Dole’s 1996 running mate Lava-lamp lump Oil field sights Defensive ring Personal assistant in “Young Frankenstein” Book-jacket info John of England

64 67 69 70 71 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 85 86 90 92 93 94 99 100 101 103 104 105 106 108 109 110 111 112 114 115

Crossword Answers FOUND ON B3 1

2

3

19

20

23

24

27

ZITS

BY JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN

4

5

6

37

56

42

48 53

58

59

66 74

84 90

95 98

68 76

107

92

96

97 100

114

ANSW ANSW PlaceExpertise it online kamloopsthisweek.com/events

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93

101 110

111

112 116

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118

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124

More more info: email joberry@telus.net Welcome! Learn atEveryone boogiethebridge.com

Help us pay it forward d this holiday season in raising up to

103

104

94

102

AGM

in Marketing, Fundraising and Sponsorship in an asset, but WEDNESDAY, DEC 9TH no experience is necessary. 6:00-7:00 p.m. Time requirements vary Victoria #203-242 from 2-4 hours per month. Street, Kamloops

71

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We are seeking smart, savvy, fun people who are passionate about making a difference and BOOGIE THE BRIDGE SOCIETY communitycontributing to community health! calenDar? Do you have an event for the

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99

106

44

64

75

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43

54

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83

18

60

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17

49

63

73

16

34

41

52

57

72

JOIN OUR TEAM!

40

62

89

15

30 33

47

113

14

26

39

51

79

13 22

38

46

65

105

12

25

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61

BY BIL AND JEFF KEANE

11

32

55

BY VIC LEE

10

29

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9

28

50

FA M I LY C I R C U S

8 21

31

45

PA R D O N M Y P L A N E T

7

for Kamloops f families & local charities

WWW.K KAMLO OOPS SFOR RD.C CA/PAYYITFFORWARD


B16

FRIDAY, December 11, 2015

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BC WILDLIFE PARK PROUDLY PRESENTS

THE 18 ANNUAL WILDLIGHTS TH

BC WILDLIFE PARK KAMLOOPS

l a v i t ef s

BC WILDLIFE PARK KAMLOOPS

• Symphony of Lights featuring spectacular Laser Light Show nightly. • Enjoy 600,000 lights while taking a ride on the Wildlife Express Train • Get lost in our giant maze

Wildlights each evening from

December 11th 2015 to January 3rd 2016 ( Except Christmas Day )

5:00 pm to 9:00 pm Adults: $12 • Seniors $10 Children $8 (GST/PST not included) 2 & under - Free Annual Passholders receive discounted rate. The British Columbia Wildlife Park is located 15 minutes east of Kamloops (exit 390 & 391 on the Trans Canada Highway) For more information please phone 250.573.3242 or visit our website at: www.bcwildlife.org


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