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Bulkley Valley students dash through the drizzle at Riverside Park last Thursday at the school district’s annual cross-country run. Story and results on A19 and A20.

Xuyun Zeng photo

Election candidates on the Hwy 16 transport Trans-Pacific Partnership forum in Smithers By Chris Gareau Smithers/Interior News

On Monday, Canada’s 78-day election campaign comes to an end. In the final days leading up to the final vote, there have been plenty of issues for the candidates in Skeena-Bulkley Valley to chew on. The Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal was finalized last week, but has to be ratified by the new Parliament to go into effect. The 12 Pacific nations involved in the deal make up 40 per cent of the world’s economy. The deal would have a large impact on industry in the Northwest. According to the federal government, $7.9 billion was the average annual value of B.C.’s exports of metals and minerals to TPP countries from 2012 to 2014. Tariffs on lumber exports to Australia and Brunei would be eliminated immediately, with

exports to Japan becoming tariff-free within 15 years. But that deal does not solve the problem of the expired softwood lumber agreement, which ended Monday. It also does not end log export restrictions on B.C. “Obviously we would like to see this agreement move forward, and I think industry on both sides of the border would, but for reasons that were not entirely clear, the American administration hasn’t seen it that way,” Harper said in an interview with Black Press. “In terms of forestry, what the TPP does do is provide new tariff-free access to many Asian countries, including enhanced access to the Japanese market.” Restrictions on log exports from B.C. are also not eased by the TPP, which includes Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam, New Zealand and Australia. See TRADE on A16

Smithers/Interior News

News that Smithers will play host to a forum aimed at improving transportation along Highway 16 has been greeted with mixed reactions from advocates for the cause. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure and the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) announced Friday they were partnering to host a transportation symposium in Smithers on Tuesday, Nov. 24. According to a press statement from the ministry, the discussions would be attended

by representatives from 23 First Nations communities along with municipalities along the stretch of highway between Prince Rupert and Prince George. FNHA spokesperson Richard Jock said his organization hoped the forum would lead to safe and affordable medical transportation along the highway. “The FNHA assumed responsibility for medical transportation in 2013 and we look forward to working with First Nations, government and other partners to create new models which address transportation along the Highway 16 corridor in a more fundamental way,” said Jock. See MIXED on A2

TAYLOR MURDER TRIAL Damien Taylor takes the stand in his own defence for the murder of CJ Fowler.

BOVILL SQ. TRICKOR-TREATING Little ghosts and goblins can trickor-treat and catch a movie on Halloween.

REGISTRATION PROBLEMS A Two Mile voter had trouble registering for the first time in 30 years.

NEWS/A3

A&E/A21

THREE RIVERS/A27

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The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

N EWS Roi TheaTRe Mixed reaction to Highway 16 forum I Crimson Peak

From FORUM on Front

George. She said her organization, which works with families and friends of missing and murdered women along Highway 16, had wanted to be involved in running the symposium. Wilson, whose 16-year-old sister Ramona was murdered near Smithers in 1994, said the ministry should have collaborated with her organization. “I understand that they are trying to look for solutions but the consultation needs to be with the families and the organizations that are involved,” she said. “They have to be reaching out to the organizations that deal with the situation ... you have the Highway of Tears initiative that is on a daily basis working with the families and the different groups that these families are referred to. “It’s really disheartening when they don’t include us from the north when that’s where the situations are at.” Stikine MLA Doug Donaldson questioned why more consultation was needed. He said various provincially-funded investigations, including the Wally Oppal inquest and the 2006 symposium, had already recommended improving transportation along the highway. “It’s all fine and dandy to ask for public input but at some point that has to stop

Improving public transportation was one of the recommendations of the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry (MWCI), which was prepared by commissioner Wally Oppal in 2012, and a shuttle bus service was also recommended in the 2006 Highway of Tears Symposium Recommendations Report. The Ministry of Transportation last year ruled out the shuttle bus concept, calling it a “one-size-fits-all” approach that would not work. It said any expansion or alteration of public transit routes were the responsibility of local governments. Transportation Minister Todd Stone said the Smithers forum would aim to identify practical, affordable and sustainable transportation for communities along the highway. “I’m confident that, through our partnership with the First Nations Health Authority, and the information and ideas gathered at the symposium, we will be able to develop a vision for a community-based transportation model that is supported by First Nations and municipal communities along the Highway 16 corridor,” said Stone. Brenda Wilson is the coordinator of the Highway of Tears initiative run by Carrier-Sekani Family Services in Prince

and some actual concrete options have to be offered by the government,” he said. Donaldson said dedicating resources to link existing public transport services and improve scheduling could be options for making the highways safer. He said it was unfair to ask people in affected communities to share their stories again before offering solutions. “How many times does this government or this minister want to put people through that before some action is taken? So come back with options and a cost and plans and then we’ll have something to talk about,” he said. Smithers Mayor Taylor Bachrach said he hoped the symposium would shed light on the inadequacies of the current system. “Despite having a report that clearly calls for enhanced transit services we see a trend of declining passenger transportation so the trends are heading in the wrong direction,” said Bachrach. “We need to have a serious conversation about reversing that.” He wanted the forum to “focus on action”, such as finding ways to establish a more integrated regional service. “I see real potential in moving from the current fragmented, piecemeal approach to a more coordinated efficient approach that looks at the whole region as a system,” he said.

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The Interior News

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

N EWS Taylor takes the stand in murder trial By Cam Fortems Kamloops This Week

The 24-yearold man accused of murdering CJ Fowler is asking a jury to believe he awoke to see his girlfriend dead on the grass and that he fled in panic after seeing a red car approaching. However, the account Damien Taylor told the jury in his trial this week is the third version of events he has given since the body of the 16-yearold who grew up in Gitanmaax and was living in Terrace was found by dog walkers in the Kamloops Guerin Creek area on Dec. 5, 2012. Taylor is on trial in B.C. Supreme Court in Kamloops, charged with seconddegree murder in connection to Fowler’s death. Last Monday, he took the stand in his own defence. The first version told to police Taylor was treated as a witness by Prince George Mounties, who intercepted him at the Greyhound bus depot in the northern city hours after Fowler’s body was discovered. He told police he lost his girlfriend at Royal Inland Hospital. The pair had gone there after Fowler complained of chest pains she believed

were the result of using crystal meth, possibly tainted with another drug. It was at the hospital the couple was told the teenager was pregnant, news an emergency physician said Taylor and Fowler appeared to welcome. It was the second time she became pregnant as she had miscarried only three months before. Taylor told Prince George RCMP he became separated from Fowler at the hospital early on Dec. 5, 2012, and decided to go to the Greyhound depot in Kamloops, expecting she would arrive later. The second version told to police In another interview in Kelowna, where he was arrested 13 months after Fowler’s death, Taylor told RCMP he had killed Fowler by accident. That admission came following hours of questioning by police and after Fowler’s stepfather — whom Taylor called “poppa” — was brought into the interview room. In that police interview in January 2014, Taylor said he was trying to “scare her in a funny way” and cut her throat. “She was bleeding out of her throat,” he said in the police interview. Taylor also told

police he used “the boulders that were there” to end her suffering. But, that account — which Taylor now claims is false — doesn’t fit with the facts of her death. A pathologist testified Fowler died from asphyxiation, likely from a blow to her face and jaw from the concrete block found on her chest. Her throat was not slashed. “I was forced to make a false confession,” Taylor said on the witness stand. Taylor also admitted — after being shown video of the couple outside the hospital — that his first account to police, in which he said he lost Fowler at the hospital, was also a lie. He testified he lied to officers because he was worried they would know he was high on crystal meth and would search his backpack for drugs. Taylor testified during questioning from his lawyer, Don Campbell, and under crossexamination by Crown that the week before Fowler’s death was consumed by selling and taking drugs, including cocaine, crystal meth and heroin. He said the pair ate and slept little. During crossexamination, Taylor often responded, “I don’t remember.” At times, he took five seconds

or more before telling prosecutor Alexandra Janse he didn’t understand the question. When he was first intercepted by police in Prince George, Taylor wasn’t told by police his girlfriend was dead until he was in the interview room — news he responded to by sobbing and blurting out, “No way — what happened?” That video was played in court and watched by Taylor. On the witness stand, however, Taylor initially insisted police told him upon first intercepting him that Fowler was murdered. After that inconsistency with the video was pointed out by Janse, Taylor said police told him at the bus station that Fowler was dead.

hours of Dec. 5, 2012. Before they departed, Taylor said, he smoked more crystal meth and heroin. His next memory is of waking up and seeing Fowler on the ground, taking her pulse and finding her dead. He said he ran after seeing a red car. He said he changed clothes in order to run faster, eventually arriving at the Greyhound station, where he took the bus north to Prince George hours later. “That’s the only lie that’s left, isn’t it Mr. Taylor?” Janse asked upon completing her cross-examination. C l o s i n g arguments were scheduled to be made Tuesday. The jury is expected to start deliberations today.

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N EWS

The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

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TRUCK COMES TO REST IN DITCH Smithers RCMP responds to an incident at the corner of Viewmount and Old Babine Lake Roads last Wednesday. The RCMP did not return calls to provide more information about the accident. Alicia Bridges photo

VOTE Tyler Nesbitt

I’m in this race because I care deeply about this region. I will fight for our jobs, our security and our values. There are enormous economic opportunities at our doorstep like new mining and LNG projects that would deliver benefits for all the people of the Northwest. We must ask ourselves whether we seize these opportunities or risk squandering them by electing an NDP federal government – a party that no longer supports jobs but instead forces us to choose either the environment or the economy. We CAN protect both. We can grow our economy while being environmental stewards. On October 19 vote Tyler Nesbitt to protect our economy AND our environment.

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The Interior News

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

A5

N EWS Candidates put forth plans for local forestry industry By Xuyun Zeng Smithers/Interior News

NDP candidate Nathan Cullen believes that the future for forestry lies in valueadded products rather than raw materials. “We want to start to reduce the number of raw log exports and increase the number of jobs we have in mills across British Columbia and Canada,” said Cullen. “It seems like the province and the federal government have become more addicted to raw exports.” Cullen said that raw-material exports gave the lowest value for our exports. “It’s actually not exclusive just to the forestry industry, we’re seeing that now with raw bitumen pipelines, mining and fishing,” said Cullen. “Just about every natural resource we have is increasingly exported raw and along with it goes the jobs.” “That’s a rip-and-ship mentality that leaves a lot of communities and families

without work.” According to their press release, the NDP has pledged $55 million in forest product manufacturing, $40 million in research and development and $10 million in marketing for the forestry industry. “What we offer up to both large and small operations is an innovation fund,” said Cullen. “So for those people who have ideas about how to add more value to the wood that we get from our forest, also help businesses that exist promote their products overseas with our international partners.” Cullen repeatedly criticized the Conservative party on their track record in the forestry industry. “The results speak for themselves. We’ve lost about 450,000 value-added jobs in Canada since Harper became prime minister,” he said. “The facts speak clearly that their policies have been an unmitigated disaster for a lot of resource communities.” Conservative candidate Tyler Nesbitt

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disagreed and defended the Conservatives. “We’ve cut taxes for every single person across this country,” said Nesbitt. “And we’re reducing the small business tax rate.” “It’s interesting he [Cullen] still cites the outcomes and the consequences of the 2008 financial crisis when it suits his argument, but he won’t cite those things when it doesn’t.” Nesbitt said the Conservative party supports value-added products, pointing to the $43-million investment for the forestry industry to adopt new technology and develop new products, a $100-million research and development fund and a capital investment allowance. He also points to the funds derived from the Economic Action Plan. “Year after year, in every single budget, there has been billions of dollars invested in protecting that industry,” said Nesbitt. “Of special interest here is that there’s been a great deal of money spent on helping preserve those industries and those singleindustry towns.”

Nesbitt said he would push for greater marketing of Canada’s lumber worldwide, alongside developing new free trade agreements. Liberal candidate Brad Layton also believes fair trade deals are important to the forestry industry. “Part of the log exports ... are done under the [Softwood Lumber Agreement] to appease the Americans that we have an alternate system that wood can be bid on,” he said. “The problem with it is 97 per cent of log exports in all of Canada come from British Columbia.” “All the provinces that have forestry as an industry should be doing their share that’s required under it, not just left for B.C. to export our jobs and our future to make the deal for all of Canada.” He also believes that the federal government should help B.C. with forest rehabilitation in the aftermath of the mountain pine beetle infestation. “The province probably can’t afford to rehabilitate it all themselves,” he said.

Building Insight Written by Terry Fulljames, AmeriSpec Smithers B.C.

Skylights GFCI and AFCI

Improving the thermal efficiency the skylight assembly is the key to Let’s face it, skylights and our Protected Circuits and resolving most skylight issues. Canadian climate is not a match made in heaven, but there are sevReceptacles eral things you can do to improve Written by Terry Fulljames, AmeriSpec of Northern B.C. Installing GFCI receptacles outside WrittenWritten by Terry AmeriSpec of Northern byFulljames, Terry Fulljames AmeriSpec SmithersB.C. B.C. the design issues your home or near water sources Arc-Fault circuit interrupters or AFCIs provide additional

BuildingInsight Insight Building

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O PINION

The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Published by Black Press Ltd. 3764 Broadway Avenue, Smithers BC V0J 2N0

2010

Publisher Grant Harris, Editor Chris Gareau CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013

CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2014

Web poll Has social media played a large role in helping you decide who to vote for in the federal election?

Yes 11%

No 89%

Canadian values don’t apply to fishing regulations GUEST VIEW Bill Schneider

I

confess to being a lowly, “non-resident alien” angler (as defined by B.C. fishing regulations) who comes to B.C. twice a year to fly fish for steelhead, spending several thousands of dollars each year. If I were a Syrian refugee, I’d be welcomed and steered toward equality, at considerable expense to Canadian taxpayers, but as a fisherman from our close neighbour, Montana, I’m scorned and treated like an invasive species, even though I contribute significantly to the B.C. economy. I’ve often noted how proud Canadians are of their core values such as fairness, equality and non-discrimination. When it comes to fishing regulations,

however, those values seem hilarious, if not hypocritical. Here in Montana, we welcome all anglers to enjoy our world-famous trout fishing. B.C. resident anglers pay only US$70 per year, including unrestricted days on our “classified” rivers (called “blue ribbon rivers” here). All non-residents (from other U.S. states or foreign countries) can fish 365 days per year with no extra fees or restrictions. But when I, a despised “nonresident alien,” come to B.C. for steelhead, it costs me $540 to fish 20 days (about what I do each year) on Class II rivers ($400 more for Class I rivers), and I can only fish weekdays. If I were a B.C. resident 65 or older, which I am, I’d pay $45 annually to fish steelhead on classified rivers 365 days per year. But the money is not even

the biggest problem. I’m okay paying a reasonable premium over resident fees. Like most steelheaders, I fish from dawn to dusk. And I move from river to river based on water flow, visibility and fishing success. Yet, I have to buy daily, river-specific, classified permits in advance and have a printed, signed paper copy of the licence with me at all times. Note to B.C. residents — try to get a daily, classified licence at 9 p.m. in Small Town, B.C. or on Sunday. This process is unreasonably cumbersome and inconsiderate. And how unfair and discriminatory is it that I travel 1,800 kilometres (one way) from Montana for three or four weeks of steelhead fishing, but I have to sit around on the weekends and watch the locals fish? This is insulting, unprecedented discrimination,

and completely counter to those values Canadians hold so dear. The good news is this problem seems fairly easy to fix without hurting the “nonresident alien” revenue stream. 1. Allow “non-resident aliens” the option of buying an annual classified river licence for a reasonable cost, something like $100. This would apply to all classified rivers, so I wouldn’t have to choose which river to fish in advance. The $20-per-day fee can be remain an option for anglers who plan to fish only a few days per year, but the daily fee should also apply to all classified rivers. 2. If the annual classified licence is too big of a pill to swallow, at least stop requiring a signed paper copy of the daily, river-specific classified licences. This would allow me

InteriorNEWS THE

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to go online with a laptop or smartphone and pay my $20 anytime during the night for fishing the following day. After checking my signed paper basic licence, Conservation officers can go online to make sure I paid for that river. 3. River Guardians have told me the government wants to gather data on how many angler days per river. Okay, no problem, but require we “aliens” to send this information in after we finish fishing. I have to wonder, however, how valuable this information is because it doesn’t include resident anglers. 4. Allow all anglers to fish on weekends. 5. Stop calling us “Nonresident Aliens.” How about “International Anglers”? I’m not sure how things get fixed in Canada, but I hope somebody who can solve this problem is reading this.

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The Interior News

L ETTERS Canada is not a democracy Editor: Democracy is defined as majority rule, majority being greater than 50 per cent, so in Canada today when more than two political parties are running in an election where a “first-past-the-post” system is in place, a winning party only needs a minimum of 100 divided by the number of parties plus one per cent to win. In order to qualify these elections as democratic, a run-off is usually required to qualify a winner as a democratic choice. For an example of the “consequences” of a multiparty election without a run-off we only have to look at the results of the recent Alberta election. Rachel Notley’s NDP party “won” the election with only approximately 36 per cent of the vote, whereas the combined vote of the Wildrose and Conservative parties was approximately 64 per cent. It would be safe to predict that with a run-off vote, some form of conservative government would be in power instead of the NDP. Complicating this further is the practice in Parliament and provincial legislatures that requires a 50 per cent plus one to pass bills and so conduct government. The current election, considering how close the polls are, could result in a minority government, which will require another election. A run-off could be accomplished today aided by current technological advances. The initial choice

TO:

would be made between all parties running, while further choices would be displayed based on all possible results of the initial vote. This secondary run-off vote would be between the top two in all possible permutations and combinations. For example if there are three parties A, B and C: The run-off options or combinations would be between A&B, A&C and B&C. Voters would choose their preferences in each of these three scenarios. The computer program would log only the appropriate combination that is the one involving the top two parties and if the margin of votes is a majority, a democratic winner is chosen without a costly separate run-off vote. Initiatives like proportional representation is a secondary issue. A further refinement, the priority being to democratize the Canadian electoral process and make Canada the democratic country most Canadians already erroneously feel it is. Chris LaSha Smithers

Northern Gateway will cooperate with First Nations Editor: After Northern Gateway received government approval last year, we were very clear in stating that we still had more work to do in achieving further First Nations and Métis support. Although this work is ongoing, we are already seeing tangible progress in additional equity,

environmental assessment, and employment and skillstraining agreements. We are also very pleased with the success of our First Nations and Métis Community Communications Representative Program that is building community dialogue through grassroots communications and feedback. As stewards of the land, First Nations and Métis communities have a direct role in the environmental protection of lands and waters along our pipeline corridor and in marine operations. The involvement of these communities will also include input into the design of land and coastal emergency response operations. We believe First Nations and Métis peoples should be owners of projects on their lands and territories and should benefit directly from such projects. That ownership will result in long-term financial dividends, jobs, educational and economic opportunities, and will ensure that First Nations and Métis communities can directly contribute their traditional knowledge to make projects better and safer. Despite this litigation hearing, we remain committed to working collaboratively with the applicant First Nations and would be very pleased to develop mutually beneficial solutions with them. Northern Gateway is open to change. We will continue to adapt and address First Nation and Métis concerns as they arise and seek opportunities for meaningful, respectful

T HE E DITOR

Letters to the editor policy

Letters are welcomed up to a maximum of 250 words. Letters are subject to editing for clarity, brevity and legality. All letters must include the writer’s name, daytime telephone number and hometown for verification purposes. Anonymous, or pen names will not be permitted. Not all submissions will be published. Letters may be e-mailed to: editor@ interior-news.com.

Your

Grant Harris Publisher

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

TEAM

Chris Gareau Editor

Laura Botten Front Office

dialogue with all groups John Carruthers President Northern Gateway Vancouver

Election sign thefts Editor: One of the good things about an election is that it reminds us how fortunate we are to live in a society where everyone can express their opinions on how our country should be run. As my friends know, I love the opportunity to express my opinion and enjoy a passionate but respectful exchange. Let’s hope the day never comes when people aren’t allowed to express their opinions. Unfortunately, I’m starting to see signs of disrespect for an opposing opinion. This was manifested when somebody stole the election campaign sign from my lawn. I find it very sad to think that there are people in our town who think it’s okay to do something like that. It’s a criminal offense punishable by a $5,000 fine or up to two years in prison, by the way. Jim Senka Smithers

Rainbow crosswalk letters outrageous Editor: The letters in support of the rainbow crosswalk are getting more outrageous and inaccurate. I’d like to remind Vanessa Mueller that the paper is in fact acting in an unbiased manner by allowing both sides to be heard. I would also like to remind the mayor and council that according to the poll taken on the subject, twice as many citizens were in opposition to this symbol as supported it. Jim McGregor Telkwa

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Blurring facts not a solution I fully understand when a government has a different perspective on an issue from the opposition and decides to promote it through a media campaign. But when they knowingly mislead it demeans parliamentary institutions and decreases public trust.  Such was the case exposed last week and it didn’t have anything to do with LNG, Site C, job numbers or the economy.   Unfortunately it was about services to vulnerable kids in the province.  The government began the fall sitting of the legislature with a news release Sept. 28 from Minister of Children and Family Development (MCFD) Stephanie Cadieux trumpeting the hiring of 110 new social workers.  They knew after a series of horrible human tragedies in the last six months that some good news was needed.  And it appeared to be good news indeed. We have an underresourced and overstretched child welfare system. Almost half the social workers at MCFD are carrying more than 30 cases a month when experts say best practices is 16-17.  So 110 new hires would help kids right at the front line.  Repeatedly in the legislature when we questioned the premier and minister during the last two weeks on the Sept. 18 death of Alex Gervais while in care, and other recent cases, their response would include the 110 new social workers hired. And, of course, the media reported this fact straight up.  Last Thursday the

VIEW FROM THE LEGISLATURE MLA Doug Donaldson

independent children’s representative Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond released a wellresearched report on staffing levels in the ministry. She pointed out that we have 200 fewer social workers in MCFD than we did in 2002. The government shot back that the report was dated since it only went to January 2015 and the 110 new hires were put in place this year.  Then the bombshell from the children’s representative.  Sure 110 were hired but the Ministry lost 91 social workers during the same period meaning a net gain of only 19.  The premier and minister must have known this was the case when they kept bringing the 110 number up in the legislature, yet said nothing.  That is unbecoming of a minister and it demeans the office of the premier.  Attempting to blur the fact that the front line is overstretched does nothing to help families, children and youth who need our support.

THE INTERIOR NEWS, P.O. Box 2560, Smithers, B.C. 3764 Broadway Ave. • Phone 847-3266 Fax 847-2995 NEWS: editor@interior-news.com • ADVERTISING: advertising@interior-news.com

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The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

N EWS

Bus service doubts

By Alicia Bridges Smithers/Interior News

Greyhound Canada says it is not terminating its service in northern B.C. despite meeting with municipal leaders to discuss declining passenger numbers. Smithers Mayor Taylor Bachrach was one of three mayors in northern B.C. who met with Greyhound representatives about a month ago to discuss the company’s steadily dropping ridership in the North. He said last week the company gave him the impression it was thinking about shutting down its northern service completely. “They came to town and we sat down and we had a chat about Greyhound’s service,” he said. “They indicated to me that the company is struggling. “At the meeting I was given the impression that they were struggling and that they were looking at all of their options.” Bachrach said those options included, “the possibility of whether they could keep operating in our region at all.” Responding to the mayor’s comments, Greyhound told The Interior News last week it had not pulled any services. Asked whether any service cuts were being considered, the company said it was currently evaluating all of its B.C. routes. One service from Calgary to Cranbrook will be cancelled on Oct. 15. “We regularly assess our routes and customer loads per trip of these routes to determine the demand in each location,” said Greyhound spokesperson Ashley Sears.

She said the company would not release passenger statistics for competitive reasons but confirmed it was reviewing its schedules due to slumping numbers. Sears said the meetings with mayors in Smithers, Prince George and Terrace were to alert local leaders of possible changes. “We addressed the decline in ridership and that we are looking at all options available to us, as well as how Mayor Bachrach and other municipal leaders envision a transportation model,” he said. “We wanted to ensure we had open conversations with the leaders of any affected communities and what their needs are.” Bachrach stood by his impressions of the meeting. He hoped the company would not have to pull northern routes because losing the service would compound an already chronic shortage of passenger transportation in the Northwest. Bachrach has been outspoken about his support for increasing public transport along Highway 16, which is also known as the Highway of Tears because of the high number of women who have gone missing or been murdered along the route. Bachrach told The Interior News last week he believes local governments will need to spearhead the push to improve public transportation in northern B.C. “In light of service reductions and things like Wally Oppal’s report, I think the case for sitting down as local governments and talking about what an adequate level of service would look like is becoming increasingly clear,” he said.

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HOW DO YOU COMPENSATE FOR PAIN & SUFFERING? Rick Garner

I

k Sang Lee, 17, was partially crushed in his uncle’s car when two trailers spilled their load of lumber. He suffered a traumatic brain injury, personality changes, major chronic depression, facial scarring, and disabling pain, which had a “profoundly negative impact” on him. At trial, a jury gave Lee $2 million compensation for his pain and suffering (in addition to some $1 million for income and other losses). The judge then cut the pain and suffering award to $294,000. The case was appealed to the Supreme Court of Canada, but it refused to hear the appeal. Why? To understand how Canadian courts compensate for pain and suffering, you have to know about three cases decided by the Supreme Court of Canada in 1978, where the young victims suffered serious injuries (e.g., brain damage and quadriplegia). The court wrestled with how to compensate for pain, suffering and loss of enjoyment of life. Any amount would be arbitrary, based on a “philosophical and policy exercise,” said then-Chief Justice Dickson. As he added: “No money can provide true restitution.”

CHRISTMAS FAIR

The court chose a maximum figure of $100,000 as compensation for pain and suffering for “catastrophic” personal injuries (about $340,000 today when adjusted for inflation). Dickson explained this is meant to give the victim some solace. “Solace in this sense is taken to mean physical arrangements [that] can make his life more endurable rather than ‘solace’ in the sense of sympathy,” he added.

King & 2nd Avenue

Part of the reason for imposing an upper limit on pain and suffering compensation was to prevent runaway insurance premiums in Canada. If awards were too high, reasoned the court, no one but the very rich could own a car and pay the huge insurance premiums that insurance companies would have to charge. Some lawyers and legal scholars believe the cap isn’t fair or appropriate. But with the Supreme Court of Canada’s refusal to hear arguments about lifting the cap in the Ik Sang Lee case, it’s unlikely this will change soon.

at the Old Church Taking place - Nov 27 & 28

Art ! s n isan a s i t r s A There are still a few spaces left ! in this signature craft sale! Contact Martha: mwertz@telus.net by Friday October 16th to book a table.

If you’re injured in an accident, consult your lawyer. He or she can help you to obtain the best overall compensation possible in your case. Written by Janice and George Mucalov, LL.B.s with contribution by GILLESPIE & COMPANY LLP. This column provides information only and must not be relied on for legal advice. Please contact RICK GARNER of GILLESPIE & COMPANY LLP at 250.374.4463 or rgarner@gillespieco.ca for legal advice concerning your particular case. Lawyer Janice Mucalov is an award-winning legal writer. “You and the Law” is a registered trade-mark. © Janice and George Mucalov

Suite 200, 121 St. Paul Street Kamloops, B.C. 1.250.374.4463 | 1.855.374.4463 (toll-free) www.Gillespieco.ca | rgarner@gillespieco.ca


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

N EWS District consults BV citizens on re-use shed By Xuyun Zeng Smithers/Interior News

The Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako recently met with residents of Telkwa and Smithers to talk about the re-use shed. In an earlier interview, RDBN Burns Lake rural director Bill Miller revealed that the eventual goal is to reopen the re-use shed, but they are looking for solutions with regards to safety and liability through these consultations. Telkwa Mayor Darcy Repen was at the meeting last Tuesday. “I hope that it changes soon,” Mayor Repen said. “My expectation is that we’ll be able to take those ideas as well as generally being able to address safety and liability issues. And get those facilities either reopen or have a parallel that allows the same usage in a different form.” Some suggestions derived from Houston’s meeting include placing camera surveillance, charging an access fee, and having people sign a form clearing the RDBN of liability. Mayor Repen sees the re-use

SMITHERS UNITED CHURCH

Rev. Alyssa Anderson Sunday 10:00 AM Worship & Children’s Program

At the corner of Queen St. & 8th

250-847-3333

Bethel Reformed Church Welcomes you to worship with us 10 am & 2:30 pm every Sunday

Pastor Lou Slagter 3115 Gould Place Smithers

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CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH Sunday Worship Services 10 a.m. 4035 Walnut Dr. Sunday School for ages 3-6 during the morning worship service. Pastor Ken Vander Horst

smitherscrc@telus.net Phone 250-847-2333 “Groundwork” on The Peak at 9:30 am Sundays

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shed playing a critical role for the environment. “We want to be able to re-use things in the community and not bypass that second R of the three Rs,” he said. Mayor Repen added that he had a resident come up to him with a suggestion. “I was approached by a resident the following evening,” said Mayor Repen. “This person proposed the possiblity of a flea market, garage sale event that will also have free tables.” “I really liked that and I’m going to follow up with that resident.” The RDBN will host more meetings throughout its jurisdiction this month. The last meeting will be in Granisle on Oct. 26. After the series of meetings concludes, the RDBN will compile the information they collected and come up with a plan, Miller said in an earlier interview. Miller also revealed that the re-use shed represents one of the means the RDBN is trying to reduce what goes into landfills.

50

including GST

local area

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— Written with files from Robin Vander Heide. Come worship with us at

Main St. Christian Fellowship

FAITH REFORMED CHURCH OF TELKWA Pastor James Folkerts (URC-NA) 1170 Hwy 16, Telkwa

Sunday mornings 10:30 a.m. Pastor Rick Apperson

Services at 10 am & 2:30 pm

1065 Main St., Smithers Phone: 250-847-1059

Faith Alive Christian Fellowship Upper floor Fitness Northwest Centre, Broadway Ave. 10-12 noon Sundays Youth meeting Fridays at 7 pm

Listen to “Whitehorse Inn program” Sundays at 9 am on The Peak 870 am

Join us for Services. Renew your FAITH! We welcome visitors and new members.

ST. JAMES ANGLICAN CHURCH

FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH

Rev. Jacob Worley

Morning Worship 10:45 am with Junior Church and Nursery

1636 Princess Street

Sunday 10:00 am - Service and Sunday School

4th Sunday

2:00 pm service at St. John the Divine, Quick

Rev. Don Mott, Phone 250-847-3864

250-847-6155 • Quick 250-847-9881 • Smithers

on the corner of Queen St. and 7th Ave.

Pastor Chris Kibble www.smithersbaptist.ca

250-847-3725

This proof has been carefully prepared by THE INTERIOR NEWS

according to our understanding of your specifications. It may contain CANADIAN Mount Zion errors, please check for proper spelling of names, prices and phone numbers. Fax changes to us at 847-2995 REFORMED CHURCH Lutheran Church Sunday Worship Services

Meeting in the Historic St. Stephen’s Church

10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.

1620 Highway 16 in Telkwa

Pastor James Slaa 2788 Upper Viewmount Rd. All welcome to attend! Contact number 250-847-5879 www.smitherscanrc.org

Sunday Morning Worship 10 am

For information e.mail mtzionsmithers@yahoo.ca

Saturday Service • Everyone Welcome •

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH

Welcomes You! Sunday Shool – 9:45 a.m. Classes for all ages Sunday Morning Worship – 11:00 a.m. Corner of Viewmount Rd South & Hwy 16 250-847-2466

www.mvaonline.org Affiliated with the PAOC

Seventh Day Adventist Contact 250-847-5983 3696 4th Avenue

Rev. Dwayne Goertzen Pastor Trevor Brawdy 250-847-2929 Email: efree@uniserve.com Website: www.smithersefc.org Services at 9 & 11:15 a.m. Sunday School 10:15 a.m. 1838 Main St.

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The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

N EWS Phone fraudsters go phishing Smithers RCMP are warning citizens about a telephone scam after receiving a number of complaints. Fraudsters are calling victims claiming to be from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and are advising of a recent audit which resulted in an outstanding tax bill. The fraudster aggressively informs victims that if monies are not paid immediately, police will attend the victim’s house to arrest them. In a number of instances, the fraudsters have personal information such as addresses, present and past employers, and some banking details and are phishing for more personal details. Often

the fraudulent caller has a foreign accent and will try to persuade victims to provide their credit card information or go to Western Union to have money wired to them. It has also been reported that a phone program has been utilized that displays the CRA telephone number on call display in an effort to further legitimize their scam. Protect yourself by not taking immediate action. Verify what you are being told is the truth. Contact the CRA to confirm that you in fact owe back taxes, or are entitled to a refund, before providing any personal or banking information. — Released by Smithers RCMP

The Smithers Snowmobile Association’s annual general meeting is Wednesday October 14, 2015 @ the Prestige Hudson Bay Lodge at 7:30pm. This is a very important meeting as a new President needs to be elected as well as a Board of Directors including Vice-President, Secretary, Membership Coordinator, Cabin Coordinator, Website Coordinator among others. If you’re interested in the presidency or another position or if you just have a question, please contact us at snowmobilesmithers@ gmail.com. If you want to see change, have a voice and improve the club come out and show your support. This should be a great snow year so let’s start it right by having a great turn out!

World Food Day October 16, 2015

World Food Day (WFD) was founded by the United Nations’ (UN) Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to increase awareness of world hunger and poverty and to inspire solutions for world change. In Canada, the largest World Food Day event is celebrated in Langley, British Columbia organized by the Food For Famine Society. At 18.6%, BC’s child-poverty rate is the highest in Canada At 19.4%, Vancouver’s is the second-highest child-poverty rate among Canada’s 20 largest urban centres 32% of poor children in BC – 44,500 children – live in families with at least one adult working full-time, year-round 2013 Child Poverty Report Card

ALPINE PLANT WORLD Help make sure everyone has enough to eat.

These businesses have joined with The Interior News to support our local food bank.

Name: _____________________________

You can join us too! With a donation of a non-perishable food item, you will be entered into a draw for a prize package from these sponsors.

Telephone: _________________________

Ph/Fax: (250) 847-5898 Behind Frontier Chrysler

Address: ___________________________ Bring this entry form and your donation to the Salvation Army on Main St. for your chance to win. Deadline: Friday, Oct. 23, 4 p.m.

The Perfect Place for the Perfect Gift

Your Store for Art & More!

Home Décor, Furniture & Gifts 250-877-7778

Sherry Nielsen

1055 Hudson Bay Mt. Rd., Smithers facebook.com/nielsengallery 250·847·0070 by appointment

“I didn’t always know what I wanted to do, But I knew the kind of woman I wanted to be” - Diane Von Furstenburg visit us in store and online heartstringsdecor.com

Appreciations Flowers & Gifts

“If you can’t feed 100 people, then just feed one.” Mother Teresa

250-847-9166

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Experienced, friendly service. 250-847-2861 Sizes 10+

Books ~ Music ~ Tickets Coffees ~ Chai ~ Lunches (250) 847-5245 or toll free 1-800-668-5119 3775 3rd Ave., Smithers

A poor man cannot give because he doesn’t have. If a rich man cannot give, then he’s also poor.

1283 Main Street in the Smithers Plaza

250-847-3981 Box 265 – 3364 Hwy 16, Smithers, BC V0J 2N0


The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

N EWS Salvation Army suffering vandalism By Xuyun Zeng Smithers/Interior News

A recent rash of crimes has cost the Salvation Army over $3,000. Since last month, it has suffered a break-and-enter, two dumpster fires and damage to its heat management system. “Last month, we had a break-and-enter, and so, that individual did some damage to my office and to our back door,” said director Rick Apperson. “Apparently two individuals had gained access to our roof, and they did some damage to our heat management system, putting stuff inside of it, taking off a relay switch so it didn’t operate.” “They even tagged it with ‘Michael was here’ and ‘NWA’.” Apperson added that repairs and upgraded security had cost them more than $3,000. However, Apperson said that police have not found much to follow up on. “They’ve investigated all of these different incidents. I know with the break-and-enter they did investigate,” said Apperson. “I don’t think they have any

leads at this time.” Apperson added that with the dumpster fires, nobody has seen anything. “So there’s a lack of witnesses in any of these events.” Apperson could not figure out why these people targeted the Salvation Army. “This is very new, we’ve never had these kind of issues before. I don’t know if it’s just kids who are bored on a Sunday afternoon,” Apperson said. “Three of the events happened on Sunday. The two dumpster fires and the individuals on our roof were all on a Sunday evening.” The dumpster fires happened at 7 p.m. three Sundays ago and at 5 p.m. two Sundays ago. “I don’t know if people are just bored or if there’s more of a targeted thing behind that.” In a press release, Smithers RCMP said the Terrace Forensic Identification Section examined the break-and-enter. Stolen gift certificates were returned by an anonymous female, but $100 cash and donation cheques stolen from a locked safe were The Salvation Army suffered property damage that still missing. Anyone with information is includes two dumpster fires and damage to their heat asked to contact the RCMP or management system and a break-and-enter. Chris Gareau photo Crimestoppers.

www.interior-news.com

No More Backyard Dogs

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You see a dog tied day after day to a back porch or fence, lying lonely on a pad of bare, packed dirt. Abandoned, fed sometimes, mostly forgotten but chained up, it cannot move to comfort, shelter or companionship. Being alone goes against the dog’s most basic instinct.

A sad, lonely dog tied out back only suffers.

www.nwass.ca www.nwas.ca info@nwas.ca smithersnwass@hotmail.com Advertising space donated by The Interior News

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A12

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

N EWS Levant links LNG with global security By Chris Gareau Smithers/Interior News

The message delivered to over 150 people at Hudson Bay Lodge Friday night was that expanding LNG and oil capacity is a matter of global security. That message was delivered by Canadian conservative commentator Ezra Levant, who was in Smithers as the keynote speaker of Building Northern B.C., an event organized by Houston businessman Kyle Thomson. $3,075 raised by the event is going to scholarships and bursaries for students at Northwest Community College, according to Thomson. “We just have to make sure we’re engaged enough politically, and we know that the Northwest Community College needs support,” said Thomson. The room was filled by many people from the Bulkley Valley business community, including event sponsors BV Electric, Hy-Tech Drilling and Sullivan Motor Products. “The majority of the people here were the small business people of the community … and the medium-sized business, the guys that employ five to 100 people. If you want to think of small business as being the backbone of your economy, it really shows you that they are interested in economic development,” said Thomson. Conservative federal election candidate Tyler Nesbitt told The Interior News after Levant’s speech that it was important to

have someone of Levant’s stature visit the Northwest. Nesbitt gave a short speech on the importance of resource development, including oil and gas, before Levant spoke. “I said it from day one when I started to run for this nomination, the reason why I’m doing this is to ensure that we have jobs for our young people to stay here,” said Nesbitt. Thomson also spoke glowingly of the keynote speaker, who founded media company Rebel Conservative candidate Tyler Nesbitt (left) listens to Ezra Levant’s presentation Friday in Smithers. Media earlier this year. Chris Gareau photo “Ezra is fantastic, the way he related everything to it’s more than (hydraulic fracturing for natural gas). He just Canada at play. There’s a lot more pretends, but we should realize he’s not going on with the industry.” against fracking. He loves fracking. He will In his hour-and-a-half presentation, probably soon be the biggest fracker in the Levant spoke of the risk posed by Russia world.” and OPEC countries who he said were Levant also tied Russia’s military trying — and he insisted were succeeding — involvement in eastern Ukraine and to influence the environmental movement European security around natural gas, of against the oil and gas industries. which Russia is the largest supplier to the “It’s not just red team, blue team, continent. He used clips of former NATO orange team. [Russian president] Vladimir Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen Putin and Qatar and Iran have a bigger saying Russia was undermining Western stake than any of us, and they hate what environmental NGOs (non-government we’re doing. And they’re in a race, and organizations) to back up his claim that they’re signing deals with China,” said there was a global geo-politcal battle being Levant after his speech and slideshow. fought over oil and natural gas. “Don’t pretend Putin’s against fracking See ACTIVISTS on A13

The Interior News

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The Interior News

N EWS Environmental activists help Russia: Levant From LEVANT on A12 And while environmental activists were largely ignorant of the foreign involvement, according to Levant, they were playing into the game by attacking media outlets that were not friendly to their cause, using a protestor named Edgar in New Brunswick who only allowed APTN and Qatar-based Al Jazeera to cover the protest as an example. “He was, in [Soviet Union founder and early leader Vladimir] Lenin’s term, a useful idiot of the West,” said Levant. He connected that — along with local economic benefits — to his reasoning for encouraging oil and gas development in northern B.C. and Alberta. “It’s easy in politics to give in to conspiracy theories about who’s behind this or that. I try to limit my comments to real evidence,” said Levant. But B.C.’s LNG development and the Northern Gateway Pipeline oil, if they were to be completed, would be destined for east Asia and other Pacific Rim countries, not Europe. Levant suggested that if Canada, and northern B.C. in particular, did not move quickly on LNG development, Russia would become China’s source of natural gas.

He also defended natural gas’s environmental record, saying water tables were not contaminated and compared its environmental footprint to that of coal, wind turbines and hydro dams. “Fracking, you don’t even notice it. The rigs are there for a few months and then they’re gone,” said Levant, who pointed to gas extraction in the city of Los Angeles as an example of the small footprint. Visiting 10 days before the federal election was not lost on Levant, though he agreed that the main cause was to support college bursaries that would help train people for resource development industries. “I think the people in this room were generally prodevelopment to begin with. Even the Liberal fellow [candidate Brad Layton], who was quite friendly, told me he supports LNG. And I don’t think he was particularly hostile to oil sands either,” said Levant. “My goal … was to give people here some new facts or some arguments.” Piles of “yes to jobs” lawn signs and bumper stickers that can be seen around the Bulkley Valley were quickly grabbed up by those in attendance after the speech.

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

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A14 www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 15, 2014  The Interior News

The Interior News  Wednesday, October 15 2014

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BULKLEY VALLEY HOME CENTRE TELKWA

A14 www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 15, 2014  The Interior News

The Interior News  Wednesday, October 15 2014

Pre-Inventory ONE DAY ONLY! SALE Early Bird Specials!

SATURDAY, OCT. 17

Odd Ball Specials

Reg.

Culled Lumber & Treated Blowout Save 50% Bundled by size and tagged in courtyard ¾ Melamine cognac cherry 4x8 (40 pcs) 34CHM $34.99 window 72”x57.5” RO no jamb $506.45 window 48”x60” RO beige vinyl $300.00 door int 48”x80” Cheyenne JHA01091243 $250.00 door int 48”x80” 3 panel shaker JHA05011056 $460.00 tin roofing wf-636 36” 35pc 26’ long JHA09040845 $2800 Also used as Q-decking Galvalume tin roofing 32” x6’ 3 pc galvalume Ro32 $40.00 tin roofing galvalume Cr36 8 pc 17’8” 8 pc 14’9” $790.00 tin roofing 10pec 11’6” Red 36” wide Cr36 $350.00 8’x7’ garage door $750 siding CertainTeed 36 pc pacific/blue $450 Hardi trim 1x3 12’ sandstone beige GJD0726543 $9.99 composite decking weather wood 73pc—12’ Gude12w $3400 composite decking pewter Gude12/16p 15pc-- 16’ and 44 pc-- 12’ $2900 Misc. odd ball windows and doors, come check out the deals

ACQ Treated Wood

Reg.

Save on your next year’s deck or fence project All remaining 2x4’s, 2x6’s, 2x8’s, 2x10’s, 1 ¼” decking 4x4’s, 6x6’s, fence boards.

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Sale

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Reg.

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Check out the odd-ball specials

50% or MORE!

Some Great Christmas Gift Items

or more

Save 15%

Reg.

Save up to

Sale

www.interior-news.com  A15

Roofing (stock)

Special buy on tin Toughrib tin roofing seconds 8’ and 16’galvalume All Cambridge Shingles FEPA Felt Papers #15 Palruff and Suntuff - 8-ft and 10-ft

Plywood & Panelling ½ melamine hard rock maple 12hrm (21) plywood ¾ cherry 38 sheets 34cherry (6) All Fir G1S – ¼, 3/8, ½, 5/8, ¾

Lawn & Garden Utility dump cart 976-6403 (1) BBQ pellet grill 700 6534192 (1) Flower/Shrub Pots - good selection All Deck/Lawn Furniture All Cameo garden pots

Farm / Rural tarp 10 x 12 med 911-4158 (9) work gloves 700105217 (61) Barn Poles All Remaining Poly Waterline Utility & Non-Climb Fence Remaining Rolls Hi-Hog Gates & Panels

Windows & Doors Interior Doors & Bi-folds In-stock Vinyl Slider Windows All Exterior Doors w/jambs

Reg.

$2.40lf $27.49

Reg. 12.99 69.99

Reg. $240.99 $929.09

Reg. $14.69 $6.99

Reg.

Sale

$1.99lf $26.99 Save 15% Save 15% Sale 6.99 39.99 Save 10% Sale $139.99 $589.99 Save 25% 20% Off 50% Off Sale $5.99 $4.99 Save 15% Save 15% Save 15% Save 5% Sale Save 10% Save 10% Save 10%

B.V. Home Centre TELKWA STORE ONLY 250-846-5856

Power Tools

Tools marked down to clear include: drill 20v porter cable 8218273 (2) Grinder 4-/12” 849-1300 (4) Dewalt 20 v impact kit Dcf895m2 (2) recip saw 12 amp Milwaukee 651930 (4) compressor Rolair Fc2002 (2) compressor twin stack 4859963 (2) Hitachi 12v kit KC10DBLPS (2)

Tools & Accessories Bit set impact 33pc 8786634 (7) tie down 1x10’ 1197219 (11) toolbox 16” 0556746 (6) sort master 0556811 (5) ratchet tiedown 1”x14’ 134-1049 (7) Check out other discounted tools and accessories

Plumbing & Electrical Toilet Milano 1 pec Milano (14) 2 pk 13 inch light fixtures 3 colors 3 sku’s 4137808/545-4152/9815721 All Plumbing Fittings Cellcore 11/2”, 2”,3”,4” All Kitchen, Bath & Shower Faucets All In-stock Eurorite vanities All electric boxes, switches, plates, plugs Special pricing on discontinued faucets in center isle

Reg.

Sale

$170.99 $72.99 $349.99 $184.99 $349.99 $196.79 $249.99

$139.99 $49.99 $249.99 $99.99 $249.99 $119.99 $169.99

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Great Deals in Every Department Check out other discounted tools.

Paint & Accessories paint tray kit 8 pc Pthbkitz (29) Mistints – some nice colours All Regular Sikkens Stains All General Paint and Stains All Rollers, Brushes, Trays

Reg.

Sale

$12.99 $8.49 1/2 Price or less Save 15% Save 15% Save 20%

Early Bird Specials

Reg. Velcro blk strip 15’x3/4” 6372866 (9) $24.99 live animal trap 2 pc small & large 9924895 (3) $66.69 Chisel set 3 pc wood 5990734 (19) $15.29 Staple gun sharp shooter 136-8069 (13) $26.29 power bar 6 outlet 7915655 (5) $6.19 Solar floodlight black 1361328 (3) $28.99 Corn broom 505-4911 (6) $9.69

SALE $12.49 $44.99 $7.69 $12.99 $3.09 $14.49 $4.79

flash light lantern 6v 9451675 (8) $15.99 $7.99 sanding sponge holder 0076265 (11) $10.49 $5.29 gas can 25L 042-6140 (10) $23.29 $16.49 fire extinguisher 5L 154-2110 (11) $66.99 $49.99 Chair Adirondack natural 5180310 (6) $83.49 $49.99 Bonera tile mat set 12’x12’ 606-00100 (7) $39.99 $19.99 MANY MORE DEEP DISCOUNT ITEMS IN THE MIDDLE ISLE


A16

www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

N EWS Trade deal doesn’t fix U.S. lumber issue: Harper From ELECTION on Front B.C.’s control over Crown land log prices has been an irritant with the U.S. and Japan, while private and aboriginal land log producers are restricted by federal rules. “B.C. was able to ensure that both provincial and federal log export controls will not change as a result of the TPP, despite pressure from Japan to eliminate them,” B.C. International Trade Minister Teresa Wat said in a statement. “B.C.’s objectives for the forestry sector during the TPP negotiations were to gain market access for forestry products to important TPP markets ... while maintaining existing log export controls.” Premier Christy Clark said this week her first call to Ottawa after the election will be about continuing the U.S. softwood lumber talks. Harper expressed confidence that despite the history of U.S. legal and trade actions over the years, the existing deal can be extended. NDP SkeenaBulkley Valley incumbent candidate Nathan Cullen said he did not like how the trade deal was made. “Anybody can sign any deal, the question is the deal good for the country. To sign such a massive deal and keep it entirely secret doesn’t speak to their confidence about what’s in it,” said Cullen. A $4.3-billion subsidy over 15 years to protect current dairy, chicken and egg farm revenues has been promised. TPP countries would get duty-free access to 3.25 per cent of Canada’s dairy and 2.1 per cent of the poultry markets. “If it was so great a deal, why wouldn’t they release every detail in it? But instead they’ve just rolled out compensation which at least admits there’s going to be a lot of job losses in certain sectors,” said Cullen, who also did not like the deal being signed during an election. Liberal candidate Brad Layton also called the deal secretive, but said he could not say he supported it or not until

he saw the full text. He also said compensation hints at problems. “One thing that I’m adamant about

is we have to protect our supply system, our agriculture and food sources. That shouldn’t be traded away for a

number of reasons: I like my milk without hormones in it is one ... And we’ve been really trying to promote local

food sources. Well, if we open up our agriculture even more, we’re starting to get farther away from local,” said Layton.

Conservative candidate Tyler Nesbitt emailed a response on the topic, which is available at interior-news.com/

federalelection. He did not return requests for an interview on the topic. — With files from Tom Fletcher

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Discounts vary by model and cash credit excludes Terrain SLE-1 AWD/Acadia SLE-1 AWD. ** Government 5-Star Safety Ratings are part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (www.SaferCar.gov).

N EWS More changes coming after mill explosion inquest

The Interior News Wednesday, October 14, 2015

By Flavio Nienow

Black Press

B.C. is taking more steps following the accidents that occurred at Babine Forest Products in Burns Lake and Lakeland Mills in Prince George in 2012. “The government has taken action to improve workplace safety in British Columbia so that workers come home to their families at the end of the day,” said Shirley Bond, Minister of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training and Responsible for Labour. With the introduction of Bill 35, government seeks to address the Lakeland and Babine coroner’s inquest recommendations that were directed to the ministry of jobs. It builds on Bill 9 earlier this year that strengthened WorkSafeBC’s ability to promote and enforce occupational health and safety compliance in B.C. workplaces. The changes introduced will: Require employers to immediately report to WorkSafeBC all workplace fires or explosions

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that had the potential to cause serious injury to a worker; Require employer investigation reports be provided to the workplace health and safety committee or worker health and safety representative, or be posted at the worksite; Specify meaningful participation for worker and employer representatives in employer accident investigations; Specify a role for those committees to provide advice to the employer on significant proposed equipment and machinery changes that may affect worker health and safety; Allow WorkSafeBC to proactively assist those committees in resolving disagreements over safety matters. “I hope the proposed legislative changes signal how seriously we take the inquest jury recommendations, and represent a lasting legacy and some degree of closure for the families of the workers who lost their lives or were injured,” said Bond. When the inquest into the deaths at Babine Forest Products concluded on Aug. 31, 41 recommendations were made to improve safety in the industry. Two of these recommendations

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A17

were directed to the ministry of jobs. Seven recommendations had already been made to the ministry of jobs following the Lakeland Mills inquest, concluded on May 14. The changes to Bill 9 included WorkSafeBC: Implementing a new investigation model that preserves the ability to conduct both cause and prosecution investigations; Implementing the sustained compliance plan for sawmills; Significantly shortening the timelines for issuing penalties and to develop a hierarchy of enforcement tools.


A18 www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

The Interior News

The Evelyn 4H Club

leaders, members, and their families would like to thank everyone who came out to support the Bulkley Valley 4H Clubs at the 2015 Bulkley Valley Fair and 4H auction especially the buyers. In appreciation to our buyers for their support, the Evelyn club will be holding their annual Appreciation Dinner and Awards Night at the Paul Lychuk Hall on Saturday November 14, 2015. Please mark the date on your calendars.

Gabriel Barker would like to thank Chelsea & Jesse Forsyth for purchasing his market lamb

Zachariah Barker would like to thank BV Credit Union for purchasing his market lamb

Kaitlyn Bartlett would like to thank Panago Pizza for purchasing her market steer

Megan Bartlett would like to thank Alfred Aslin Contracting for purchasing her market steer

Thomas Glanz would like to thank the Sausage Factory for purchasing his market lamb

Miranda Huxtable would like to thank Sausage Factory for purchasing her market lamb

Rebecca Huxtable would like to thank Trails North for purchasing her market steer

Brandon Illes would like to thank the Trenterpries for purchasing his market hog

Janice Illes would like to thank Wolf Ridge Contracting & Frenzel Family for purchasing her market steer

Marissa Kearney would like to thank Lance Hoesing Logging for purchasing his market lamb

Dawsyn Remillard would like to thank Babine Animal Hospital for purchasing her market steer

Noah Remillard would like to thank Pacific Inland Resources for purchasing his market steer

Mikayla Schmid would like to thank Hoskins Ford for purchasing her market steer

Abigail Stavast would like to thank Willy Vandergaag for purchasing her market lamb

Adriana Stavast would like to thank Hammings Butcher for purchasing her market lamb

Emma Torunski would like to thank 6S Family Farm for purchasing her market lamb

The Evelyn 4H Club would also like to recognize members for their achievements in the following 2015 4H projects

POULTRY: Brandon Illes Dawsyn Remillard

CLOVERBUDS: Benjamine Glanz Emelia Huxtable Emily Benjamin Mattea Williams Michaiah Barker Roper & Wyatt Dejong Quinton Remillard

Sara Torunski would like to thank Sausage Factory for purchasing her market lamb

HORSE: Megan Bartlett Kaitlyn Bartlett Dawsyn Remillard Tieasha Pierre Marissa Kearney Hannah Benjamin

RABBIT: Gabrielle Barker Michaiah Barker Zachariah Barker Abigail Stavast Adriana Stavast Rebecca Huxtable 4H BC Ambassador: Chelsea Forsyth

All photos are courtesy of Stacey Price


S PORTS

The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

www.interior-news.com

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Schools run wet cross-country

Clifford Yuen pushes his daughter to the finish line. He wanted to ensure she participated in the run.

Xuyun Zeng photo

By Xuyun Zeng Smithers/Interior News

Grade 2 to Grade 7 students ran at Riverside Park last Thursday at the school district’s annual cross-country run. The light drizzle did not dampen the spirits of the 287 runners. They gave it their all as they crossed the finish line with parents cheering them on from the sidelines. “Cross-country run is a district event, so it happens in the fall traditionally in the school sports cycle,” said St. Joseph’s School’s principal Rosemary McKenzie. “The run is not cancelled if it’s raining, even if it snowed the night before, it goes on.” One such runner is Clifford

Yuen, who pushed his daughter’s wheelchair all the way to the finish line. “The purpose of me running in the run is to make sure that my daughter, Hailey, who can’t run, still gets the opportunity to take part in events like this,” said Yuen. Yuen’s daughter’s wheelchair was modified to ensure it could go through “semi-rough country”. “It’s a little challenging, but it’s not too bad, really,” said Yuen. “Our family’s fairly active, and we like to bring Hailey with us.” For Yuen, the cross-country run is a family event. Yuen’s two other children, Benjamin and Bella, also participated in the run. His wife also came to the run.

St. Joseph’s School organized the run this year. “This year we have nine schools participating, the furthest west would be Moricetown, and then it goes right to Houston,” said McKenzie. “Depending on their age, the younger ones do … a kilometre and the older students have to run several kilometres through the trails.” This involved going through the trails to ensure participants can run safely, and marking the trails and marshalling. Other participating schools also contributed to the organizing of the event. McKenzie pointed out that Muheim Elementary managed the finish line while Walnut Park Elementary managed the start line.

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INSPIRING SMITHEREENS Bulkley Valley’s breaststroke silver medalist and record-setting paraswimmer Jonathan Dieleman inspires swimmers at the Bulkley Valley Pool. Before leaving for Vancouver for further training, Dieleman showed the medal he earned at the Para Pan Am Games and spoke of his experience in Toronto. Xuyun Zeng photos

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

S PORTS

The Interior News

䜀刀䄀一䐀 伀倀䔀一䤀一䜀 伀挀琀漀戀攀爀 ㄀㜀琀栀 㤀 ⴀ 㘀瀀洀

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VOLLEYBALL MASTERCLASSES Paul Smith (right) coaches students on volleyball. Smithers Secondary School recently hosted two volleyball masterclasses with the help of Volleyball BC. Xuyun Zeng photo

夀伀唀 䬀一伀圀 唀匀Ⰰ  圀䔀 䬀一伀圀 伀唀吀䐀伀伀刀 倀刀伀䐀唀䌀吀匀⸀ 圀攀 漀昀昀攀爀 焀甀愀氀椀琀礀 愀渀搀 猀攀爀瘀椀挀攀 氀椀欀攀 渀漀 漀琀栀攀爀⸀

Cross-country run results 1st

Girls, 7&8 Gwen Mitchell (SJ)

2nd Michaiah B (WP) 3rd Kelcie Blackburn (SJ)

Boys, 7&8 Charles (MH)

Jules (MH) Carson (MH)

Girls, 9&10 Bryer (MH)

Boys, 9&10 Isaac D (TS)

Girls, >=11 Carwyn Mitchell (SJ)/ Claire T (MH) Adelle James Lia P N B (TS) (WP) (LK) Ava W Chad Shay (BC) Short- Toner er (SJ) (SJ)

Overall school winners 1st: Muheim Elementary School 2nd: St Joseph’s School 3rd: Walnut Park Elementary/BVCS

Legend: SJ: St. Joseph’s School WP: Walnut Park Elementary School MH: Muheim Elementary School BC: Bulkley Valley Christian School TS: Twain Sullivan Elementary School LK: Lake Kathlyn Elementary School ST: Silverthorne Elementary School

Boys, >=11 Salish (ST)

Jacob N (MH) Gregory B (LK)

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The Wetzin’kwa Community Forest Corporation (WCFC) will be conducting fall slash pile burning operations at various times during the month of October. We do so to ensure we are in compliance with fire hazard abatement practices established for the Province of BC. Our preference of course is to utilize as much of the timber resource as possible when harvesting occurs in a given area. However with the lack of local markets for logging residue (e.g. tops, rot, defect, dead and dry heavily cracked material) there are often slash piles associated with harvesting operations. These slash piles if left on a forested landscape have the ability to accelerate the spread of any wildfire in the area and create conditions that can impose an undue risk of wildfire occurrence adjacent to the community interface. WCFC annually conducts slash burning operations in an effort to mitigate the wildfire risk to communities and to ensure compliance with established regulations that govern our operations. However this year we would like to advise the communities of the Bulkley Valley why we do so and to make everyone aware that a portion of this burning will occur within eyesight of town (e.g. ridges just above Seymour Lake). WCFC also invokes best management practices around our fall burning operations and will do so once again this year. We have acquired custom venting forecast through the Ministry of Environment and will have ensured piles are assembled in a fashion that will burn hot and relatively clean. We will wait to ignite piles until the risk of escape is low and we will light the piles early (~8:30am) when daytime venting is best suited to favourably disperse smoke. WCFC has signed on and endorsed the Bulkley Smoke Management Plan and is striving to ensure that this undesirable portion of our forest operations is done as well as it can be with as few affects as possible on the communities surrounding the community forest tenure. WCFC will continue to seek opportunities to find alternative methods to burning and to reduce the annual amount of burning needed within the community forest boundaries. Thank you to everyone involved with burning operations in the Bulkley Valley. We truly look forward to a low impact slash burning program and to the understanding of this operational requirement from the communities at large. Yours truly, Jay Baker, RFT General Manager Wetzin’kwa Community Forest Corporation.


A&E

The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

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Gallery hosting workshops, calling for submissions By Xuyun Zeng Smithers/Interior News

Hone your art skills at the Smithers Art Gallery’s workshops this fall. Participants can learn to paint stilllife, as well as learn to make wildlifethemed leather art or metal jewelry in the silversmithing course. There is also a general painting course. “The fall art workshops are geared towards anybody who wants to try a new art form that they haven’t done before,” said manager Caroline Bastable. “They’re really introductorylevel courses to encourage people to have a go and try their hand at something new.” Each course runs for about three or four hours a session, and cost $30 to $100 dollars depending on its length. The workshops will see local artists provide instruction to participants. “We always hire artists who have some kind of professional standing ... to give the workshop, so that

you’re getting a professional level of instruction,” said Bastable. Bastable added that the workshops are aimed at older youth and adults. “Teenagers who are serious about art and they’re interested in taking [the courses] are welcome,” she said. “But they’re not really children’s programs.” In addition, the Art Gallery is also hosting a weekly art group called Nature First, which focuses on naturethemed sketching. “That’s a new project that we’re collaborating on with a professional artist called Julie Askew,” said Bastable. Bastable said Askew is also an art instructor. She is from England and just moved to Canada, currently living in Prince George. “She is a colleague of Robert Bateman’s. They’ve worked on many wildlife projects together,” said Bastable. “She’s used to teaching kids and adults and people who have never picked up a pencil and paper before. “As well those who are already advanced sketchers and those who are

artists in their own right.” Each session costs $20 for a onehour session held Tuesday. Bastable said this is for all levels. Finally, the Gallery is also looking for submissions for exhibition from June 2016 through to May 2017. “I think it’s a really great opportunity for an artist to have an exhibition in a public gallery,” said Bastable. “You get your work out there, and seen by people.” “People get to appreciate what you do and of course you also have the opportunity to sell your work direct to the public.” An independent committee will judge the submissions that will go on display. “The committee is made up of artists from the community and is headed by the art director from the Gallery,” said Bastable. All art forms are welcome. The deadline for submissions is Nov. 16. Application forms are available at the Gallery, and application is free.

A participant paints at a past workshop.

Contributed photo

Halloween trick-or-treat and movie at Bovill Square By Xuyun Zeng Smithers/Interior News

Bovill Square will transform into an outdoor movie theatre this Halloween. Children can also enjoy trick-ortreating and a live DJ from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. on Oct. 31. Motivated by the success of the first SkyHi Outdoor Movie Night last month, Mark DeHoog has decided to organize another. “It’s a second version of the film [night] that we did on Sept. 11 at Bovill Square,” said organizer Mark DeHoog. “We had an overwhelming response from the community. I think there were close to 500 people that showed up.” DeHoog wants to host one more event

before the winter comes, and he is using this event to solve a perennial Halloween problem in the Bulkley Valley. “I grew up in the Valley,” he said. “I grew up in a rural area outside of town, and we commuted into town if we wanted to trick-or-treat, but what that did was it created certain spots that were really hit hard with millions of kids and the candy ran out.” “And so we thought, what if we could kind of create an area right down at Bovill Square where we could have kids that could come and trick-or-treat there, and get tons and tons of candy just from Treat City.” DeHoog revealed that the first half of the event will be trick-or-treating, and the second half will be for the movie.

“Treat City will start at 5 p.m., our goal is to kind of have it along Broadway,” said DeHoog. “We’ll block off the street there in that area by the Sausage Factory and right on the sidewalk of Bovill Square, we’ll have the Treat City.” “Simultaneously we’ll have the DJ dance party in the grass of Bovill Square and then at about 7 o’clock, Treat City will kind of shut down and we’ll transition to watch the movie in Bovill Square.” Several organizations have signed up to hosts the tents that will line Treat City. “We’ve approached businesses in the town and asked them if they would sponsor [them],” said DeHoog. “They could put up a tent. They would either provide a game for the kids or we would provide volunteers for the game on their

behalf. We would have candy to give to the kids.” DeHoog is still looking for a few more organizations to host tents. “Ideally, if they could show up, bring a tent, have a game, and boatloads of candy to give to kids from their tent. That’s an ideal thing,” he said. “If they want to just sponsor the event, obviously we’re looking to have a large amount of candy. So we’re purchasing candy.” “If they want to just make a donation and have their name mentioned on our Facebook page, on the posters and on the evening, they could do that.” DeHoog is also looking for volunteers to help out. Interested parties can find out more in a Facebook event titled “Halloween Party Outdoor Movie Night”.

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Tim Horton’s Manager Tim Close and staff members Yarah, Carol and Jasmin present Rick Apperson from the Salvation army with a cheque for over $1,550 raised during their Smile Cookie Camping. Grant Harris photo


A22 www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

The Interior News


T HREE R IVERS R EPORT

The Interior News

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

A23

Young entrepreneur celebrates first year By Alicia Bridges Hazeltons/Interior News

The winner of a competition for young entrepreneurs in northern B.C. has wrapped up her first summer running the food truck she launched with her prize money. Hazelton area woman Ria Smith won $10,000 in the ThriveNorth Business Challenge with her pitch to set up a “farm to fender” food truck using ingredients from local producers and artisans. She was the youngest of four women shortlisted for the Best New Business Idea prize, along with runner-up Eleanor Stewart from Smithers. Smith used her winnings to set up the Hazeltons-based Fender Food Company food truck in time for summer. The mobile eatery serves a menu of comfort food from producers including The

Sausage Factory, Skeena Bakery, Mercedes Beans and Model Teas and Woodgrain Farms. Smith said the idea was to support local producers while keeping prices low enough for a community with a weak economy. “The economy in Hazelton isn’t the strongest but I wanted to both take advantage of both local producers and feed my community at the same time,” she said. “I sacrificed a bit of a profitmargin for that but in my first year I have no regrets.” Smith said support in the Hazeltons had been strong enough that she had not needed to travel with the truck, which she ran from locations including the Red Apple parking lot, Hazelton Farmers’ Market and Gitanmaax Food and Fuel. She plans to spend winter in Prince Rupert before returning to the Hazeltons to reopen the truck next summer.

Fender Food Company owner Ria Smith says strong community support helped make her first season running a food truck a success.

Alicia Bridges photo

Upset over school bus driver jobs By Alicia Bridges Hazeltons/Interior News

A group of longserving school bus drivers, who lost their jobs when the Coast Mountain School District changed contractors in June, say they will not reapply for their jobs because they believe they were being treated unfairly when the

contract changed. Mike Lawlor, Ben Dubeau and Shirley Stanley-Belisle were among a group of drivers who lost their jobs when the school district ended its seven-year contract with First Canada on June 30. The drivers, who were members of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), were

notified in April that their jobs would be terminated at the end of the school year. New contractor Diversified Transportation advertised the new positions publicly and, according to the company, at least 50 per cent of its new Hazelton crew were previously employed by First Canada. The contractor still has

two vacancies for drivers but the former drivers say they will not apply because they believe the company should have approached them directly. Shirley Stanley-Belisle, who was a bus driver for the company for 19 years, said she decided not to apply for her past job despite losing a substantial chunk of her income. “I thought about it,

I struggled with it all summer, wondering if I should, if I shouldn’t, to give up the paycheque and stuff but I just couldn’t bring myself to do it,” said Stanley-Belisle. “To just not contact, to not even acknowledge that we had done this job for all these years, I just thought it was really disrespectful and I just couldn’t do it.” Ben Dubeau, a bus

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driver of more than 20 years who usually works as a guide outfitter during summer, said he had decided not to apply for a job at this time. “I’m a third generation bus driver. I planned on going back but I figured it’s in such a mess right now I’ll let them straighten it out before I go apply,” he said. See OPEN on A24


A24

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T HREE R IVERS R EPORT

Have a Story?

Jobs open to anyone: company From UPSET on A23 “That whole company approach, they never considered us at all, the existing workers.” Mike Lawlor, who was a mechanic and bus driver for First Canada for 12 years, believes both the school district and the company should have done more to protect long-serving drivers. “When [Diversified] found out they had the contract they could have easily come to us, to all the drivers, introduced themselves and said, ‘Hey, we are going to be a new bus company coming in town, we’d like to get to know you guys, and if you guys would like, we’d like to know if you would like to come and drive

for us’,” said Lawlor. As the local CUPE representative, he said the union was unable to intervene. Lawlor also believes the school district should have done more to protect drivers’ jobs. CMSD secretary treasurer Alanna Cameron said Diversified’s management assured the school district there would be opportunities for the drivers. “Concerns of past employees were most certainly expressed to our new provider during our deliberations, and we were assured that management of Diversified would provide opportunity for past drivers to apply for positions with their company,” said

The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Cameron. “It is my understanding that several of our past drivers are now working for the new service provider.” Diversified operations manager Luis Gonzalez said the decision to advertise the vacancies was about fairness to the wider community. He said his company did not solicit for jobs. “We did not seek them but we did not turn away from them,” said Gonzalez. “We did not come and knock on the door saying here is a job, we just said to the community ‘we have runs to be covered, we need people who would like to be a part of our team’.” “The opportunity was there and I guess we were just

fair to the community.” Gonzalez said his company had not received any complaints from former drivers and it had not been contacted by the Union. He said the company was still looking for drivers, who would receive training regardless of their experience. “What we are obliged [to do] is to provide safe transportation with proper training and we did have an invitation to the community and we hope that more people either from the previous contractor or new people would like to be a part of our team,” he said. “I was still looking for more people for permanent rounds, we are looking for spare drivers.”

Federal election day is Monday

Are you ready to vote? If you’re a Canadian citizen, 18 or older, you can vote in the federal election. Your voter information card tells you when and where to vote. If you didn’t receive your card, you can still register and vote at your polling place. To find out where to vote, and what ID to bring, visit elections.ca or call 1-800-463-6868 ( TTY 1-800-361-8935). Elections Canada has all the information you need to be ready to vote.

Let us know

250-847-3266 Email editor@interior-news.com Find us on Facebook at Smithers Interior News Charlie McClary is proud to bring you this week’s...

Valley Food & Farm Update Submitted by the Smithers Farmers’ Institute

It’s time for some of your favourite farmers’ markets to go inside! Both the Bulkley Valley Farmers’ Market and the Pleasant Valley Farmers’ Market are hosting indoor markets. Bulkley Valley Farmers’ Market – Indoor markets will be every Saturday until Christmas at the Smithers Curling Club from 9:00am until noon. Pleasant Valley Community Market – Indoor markets will be held at the Houston Public Library between 2:00pm and 6:00pm on October 8th and 22nd, November 5th and 19th and December 3rd. Interested in local food? There is an app for that! The BC We Heart Local program has a map on their website and a mobile phone app that features farms, markets and other sources of locally grown food. Go to http://www.weheartlocalbc.ca/findlocal/ for more info. Notes for Producers: The BC Forage Council is hosting a Field Day on Tuesday, October 20th at Whispering Winds Ranch to showcase some of the new project activities in the Vanderhoof area, including extending the forage season using forage kale, performance of several alfalfa varieties, seeding rates and mixes for alfalfa establishment and more. Field day starts at noon and is free, but you must register to attend by October 13; to register contact Nancy Portman at nancy. portman@gov.bc.ca or phone 1-800-3343011. The BC Outstanding Young Farmers’ Program is accepting nominations for 2016. The deadline is October 13, 2015. More info at: http://www.oyfbc.com/nominations. html. The draft Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Hatching Eggs, Breeders, Chickens and Turkeys has been released and is available for public comment until December 4, 2015. The code and comment system are available at www.nfacc. ca/codes-of-practice/chickens-turkeys-andbreeders. Charlie McClary The BC Cattlemen’s Association is hostRe/Max Bulkley Valley - Smithers ing a workshop and847-5999 field Fax day with a focus Office (250) (250) 847-9039 (250)877-1770 Cellular on ‘Maximizing your forage’. It will be held at Bar K Ranch in Prince George on Friday, October 23 2015 from 9:00am-4:00pm. There is a $10 registration fee to cover the cost of lunch.

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I have a number of clients looking for residential properties. Give me a call if you are thinking of selling in the Smithers or Telkwa limits. Special requests : Smaller 1000 sq.ft. rancher hill top area/ Larger home needing reno and TLC/ Older home for rental investment/ Duplex unit. I am more than happy to get together with you for a free evalution on your home and help you with the decision process. Call me anytime to set up an appointment.

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The Interior News

T HREE R IVERS R EPORT

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

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NWCC anthropology and sociology students make the Skeena their classroom with a field trip to an ancient village site on Oct. 3. NWCC photo

River rafting a unique experience for students Northwest Community College students explored Gitxsan territory from a unique point-of-view when they rafted the Skeena River on Oct. 3. The sociology and anthropology classes launched from Guxts’eliksit, a Lax Skiik (Eagle Clan) fishing site and culture camp, before floating down the river with a view of the spectacular fall palette. College professor Chris Gee said the trip gave students unique experiences, such as engaging directly with

a wild salmon ecosystem. “Visiting a vibrant and working fishing camp and then travelling on the Skeena River to an ancient village site allows NWCC students the rare opportunity to connect academics to the water level realities of our region’s history and culture,� said Gee. A press statement from the college said outdoor classes were held as often as possible. “Our region’s cultural history and diversity and the benefits of local

   

   

   

First Nations knowledge, combined with the geography of this northwest B.C. and the wildness of the environment, make our outside-the-classroom learning opportunities appealing to University Credit students,� said college spokesperson Heather Kirk. She said many of the college’s field studies were developed and delivered in collaboration with First Nations communities, something that could not be replicated outside the Northwest.

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Dream reader shares skills with workshop By Alicia Bridges Hazeltons/Interior News

A Hazelton man who has spent decades learning to decipher the hidden messages in his dreams will teach a workshop on the topic in Smithers this weekend. Philip Ponchet wants to share his dream interpretation techniques with the public because he believes they can help people deal with problems such as stress and anxiety. At his upcoming workshop at the Northwest Community College, he plans to share techniques to help people understand the symbolism of their dreams. “People will be guided through a process of learning to better interpret the message of their dreams, so helping them to explore the meaning of why they dream and why it’s important to listen to those messages,” said Ponchet. The Hazelton resident said when it comes to interpreting dreams people have a tendency to analyze them instead of trusting their instincts. Students in Ponchet’s class will be asked to interpret each others’ dreams to help them hone their skills and learn to recognize their messages. He said learning to interpret symbols and messages could help people identify or deal with problems in their lives. “When we feel that we are struggling with something in our life, dreams have a way of highlighting what is going on, what’s behind that anxiety or

Philip Ponchet.

The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Contributed photo

stress that we are feeling,” he said. “It also points us in a direction to find solutions and answers to that situation that we may not be aware of.” Ponchet has written a workbook entitled Dreaming with Angels, which has chapters on the purpose of dreaming, types of dreams, remembering dreams, decoding symbolism, and deciphering the message. The book also provides examples and techniques to use dreams as a tool for selfdiscovery. Ponchet’s class runs this Friday to Saturday and costs $49. For more information contact NWCC on 1-877-277-2288.

CMSD saddened by trustee’s death The Coast Mountains School District was last week mourning the sudden death of trustee Gary Turner, who had been a member of the board for more than 15 years. Turner was in his sixth term as trustee when he died suddenly on Oct. 2 in Terrace. A statement from school board chair Art Erasmus said Turner approached his role with passion and devotion. “Gary made regular visits to his liaison schools and served on the business and budget working committees for the board of education,” said Erasmus. “He made a difference in our school district communities and played an essential role in the lives of thousands of students.” Erasmus extended condolences and prayers to Turner’s family, saying his friends and acquaintances at the school district share their loss and sadness. A celebration of life was scheduled to take place at the Knox United Church in Terrace yesterday afternoon. Schools closed early to allow students and staff to attend the service. “The void left by Gary’s passing will be filled with the legacy of his service, the memory of his smile and passion for the children,” said Erasmus.

Bulkley Valley Foundation

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The Bulkley Valley Health Care & Hospital Foundation is humbled by the outpouring of support for the Gala and for health care improvements in the Valley. We wish to sincerely thank all sponsors and attendees. The Fourth Annual Gala raised over $75,000!


The Interior News

T HREE R IVERS R EPORT

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

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Two Mile resident angered by voting complications By Alicia Bridges Hazeltons/Interior News

A Two Mile resident whose voting information was changed unexpectedly after 30 years is worried Elections Canada’s registration system will diminish turnout at the polls on Oct. 19. Bonnie J. McCreery called Elections Canada last Thursday because she had not received a voter’s card, but the person who answered her call was unable find her registration. She was redirected to the regional office which managed to find her details, however her voting information had changed. For 30 years McCreery had been registered at the Gitxsan Wet’suwet’en Education Society (GWES) in Hazelton, which is where she works, but this time she was signed up to vote at the Kispiox Valley Hall. The Kispiox polling station is about half an hour’s drive from the GWES building, meaning she would

need to take an hour off from work to drive there. McCreery said a manager at Elections Canada’s regional office eventually changed her registration and agreed to send her a new voter card. Although her situation was resolved, she is worried about the impact that registration problems could have on voter turnout. “I’m very angry, I’m angry that there are all kinds of people out there who won’t spend an hour, half an hour here and a half an hour there, trying to sort it out,” she said. “It’s extremely difficult to vote.” McCreery, who is an adult education instructor at GWES, said two of her colleagues were also waiting for voter’s cards. She questioned why changes to Elections Canada’s system were not postponed until after the election. Registration problems have been reported in other Canadian communities, including Cedarvale in north-

western B.C. Residents there were told they had to drive about 50 kilometres to vote in Hazelton instead of Kitwanga, which is about 19 kilometres away and where they voted in the last election. Elections Canada is now sending those voters new information cards which list Kitwanga as their polling station. Elections Canada

spokesperson Dorothy Sitek said there was nothing unusual about McCreery’s experience. “This is to be expected, it happens every election year,” she said. “So this is a normal period of adjustment that occurs and returning officers locally may proceed to change some [polling] locations based on internal reviews, feedback received

from electors.” Sitek said people need to check their cards to ensure they have the correct polling location and contact Elections Canada if they have concerns. She said she did not know how many people in the Two Mile area had been directed to a different polling location in 2015. “I don’t have local numbers, it’s 26.5 million voter

information cards that have gone out,” she said. “In the 41st general election which was 2011, returning officers sent out approximately 312,000 replacement cards which is what you get when your polling station has been moved ... and as of now approximately 200,000 voters have received a replacement card due to a polling change.” Sitek also said

there had not been any major changes to the voter registration system in 2015. She said there were other voting options for people who did not want to go to their designated polling location, such as casting a special ballot at an Elections Canada office. For more information about voter registration visit electionscanada.ca.

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See HIGH ROAD Services Society’s Dana Gorbahn and Alvin Henry battle it out against See HIGH ROAD Services Society’s DanaBay Gorbahn and Alvin Henry battle it outChapman against Mayor Taylor Bachrach and Hudson Mountain Adventure’s Chrissy in MayoranTaylor Bachrach Hudson Mountain Adventure’s ChrissyKitchen”! Chapman in exciting cook-offand in the styleBay of “Chopped” and “Cut Throat an exciting cook-off in the style of “Chopped” and “Cut Throat Kitchen”!

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C OMMUNITY

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

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Making progress where it matters By Alicia Bridges Smithers/Interior News

Identifying what matters in Smithers and developing a “report card” to measure progress in those areas is the focus of a strategic planning project launched last week. Community Vitality: How Do We Measure Progress? is a joint initiative between the Town of Smithers, Northern Health and the Bulkley Valley Social Planning Society (BVSPS). The concept aims to identify the community’s priorities, then develop an index which can be used to measure progress based on a combination of statistics and public feedback. The project got underway last Wednesday with a public presentation by University

of Victoria public health and social policy professor Trevor Hancock, who is a pioneer of the Healthy Communities movement. Hancock began by emphasizing his belief that gross domestic product (GDP) is a poor measure of a country’s progress. He outlined other examples of models which put more focus on quality of life, saying enacting change was most effective at a local level. “It’s about what people talk about as people-centred or human-centred development, in a sense it’s about us,” said Hancock. “It’s about how are we both as individuals and more importantly as a community; how are we doing as people?” He said developing a “report card” for an individual community such as Smithers

helped to ensure time and resources were invested in areas where they were needed. The first step to achieving that was to identify what was important locally, said Hancock. “If you know what matters, then you can measure what matters and then you can manage what matters, and that is going to make a difference,” he said. Identifying those community priorities and developing an index to measure them was the focus of a workshop held the next day. About 70 representatives from local organizations including the RCMP, Smithers Fire Department and Northern Health took part in the brainstorm last University of Victoria professor Dr. Trevor Hancock, Bulkley Valley Social Planning Thursday. Society member Dawn Hanson, Smithers Mayor Taylor Bachrach and Northern See SUCCESS on B2 Health Bulkley Valley Health Services administrator Cormac Hikisch. Alicia Bridges photo

Telkwa chooses rec upgrades By Xuyun Zeng Telkwa/Interior News

The Village of Telkwa is currently looking for quotes for upgrades to the Dockrill Rink and ball diamonds. Village staff will prepare a report for council with the quotations, and councillors will discuss how to spend the $100,000 grant from the Regional District at its Oct. 13 council meeting. “In terms of the ice rink, we’re going to get quotes on resurfacing, painting, boards and netting,” said Mayor Darcy Repen. “We determined that we want to move towards a roof, but we need to make the rink be in excellent shape first.” Village staff is also looking for quotes on resurfacing the ball diamonds. “The hope is that we can direct some [funding] to both,

but it will depend on what those quotes are coming back as, cost-wise. And what it looks like what we can move forward with,” said Mayor Repen. “The input that we got from the community was that there was strong support for both facilities.” “So one way or the other, we would like to make sure we’re keeping the focus on both and not one or the other.” The latest online survey taken by the Village in September saw 45 per cent of those polled supporting funds going to both facilities. 37 per cent supported all funds going to the Dockrill Rink while only 19 per cent wanted all the money to go to the Ball Diamonds. Other surveys have shown greater support for putting the full funding behind the rink. A June survey had eight people supporting putting a

roof over the rink, while only four people supported levelling the ball diamonds. This survey did not have the option to split the funding. Another survey on Facebook had 19 people supporting funding going fully to the rink, while five people supported the ball diamonds, and only two supported splitting the funding. Paper surveys showed 16 people supporting funds going to the rink, seven supported splitting the funds and only three to the ball diamonds. Mayor Repen added that this $100,000 grant could be used as a means to apply for further grant funding. “The expectation was that we would leverage that grant to actually get more grant funding, so we’re definitely going to try,” Mayor Repen said. “We’re not in a rush. We want to make sure to maximize the value out of that grant funding.”

ADVANCE VOTING Advance voting has its highest turnout in Canada on Thanksgiving weekend. It was no different in Smithers, where people lined up outside the Elections Canada office to cast their ballot early. The last chance to vote is election day, Oct. 19. Chris Gareau photo

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The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

C OMMUNITY

TRUST YOUR INTUITION

Finding a way to measure success From PROGRESS on B1 BVSPS member Dawn Hanson said the project aligned with her organization’s goals of improving planning from a social aspect or, “the softer sides that don’t get measured in terms of the number of business licences or gross domestic product.” Hanson said community report cards had been developed in the past, including a project in 2007-2008, but the indicators were always changing. She said the index would be a tool to help planners and leaders ask more informed questions about the future. “If we don’t have some way at looking comprehensively at this then we might think we need to put resources here, but actually that’s not really where they need to go,” she said. “By having a community report card or indicators or taking this snapshot, it can reveal trends and make us ask critical questions and hopefully dig down deeper.” Northern Health’s Bulkley Valley Health Services administrator Cormac Hikisch said the health authority was cofunding the project because it moved the approach to improving community health “upstream”. “We need to move away from the more typical thought in health services around making sure our hospitals are working effectively

and we have enough doctors in the community and move beyond that ... what we call upstream, and think about the factors that are affecting how healthy we are as a community,” he said. Hikisch said community engagement was an important part of the process. “What’s most important is that from that better view and stronger strategic grounding, it allows us as a community to make decisions on how to move forward and how to improve on where we’re at,” he said. Smithers Mayor Taylor Bachrach hopes the project will help the community develop a common language to talk about its successes. “Smithers is a diverse community and residents from different walks of life see the community differently,” he said. “At the same time I think there is so much that we hold in common when it comes to what we value, and so really the goal of the indicators’ work is to get us out of those silos and to build a common language so that we have a bit of a sense over time as to whether we are getting better as a community.” Information from last week’s workshop will be compiled in a report that will be available to the public. Bachrach said he expects the project will be completed within a year.

Inner Peace Movement of Canada Welcomes National Speaker Philip Ponchet

Tuesday, Oct. 20th 1pm & 7pm • Hudson Bay Lodge, Smithers Philip speaks on how peace of mind comes from acknowledging the good, kind, loving , understanding part of us , our true self. You are a soul, You are energy, the eternal part of each person. Explore the psychic gifts of clairaudience, clairvoyance, hunches, dreams and feelings and how to make them practical. The seven year cycles of life, guardian angels and life purpose. Community members contribute ideas at last week’s presentation by Trevor Hancock.

Aiicia Bridegs photo

Everyone is Welcome! Tickets at the Door $21 (incl. gst)

www.innerpeacemovement.ca

Community Calendar

To list your nonprofit coming events please drop off your listing at The Interior News, 3764 Broadway Ave., fax us at 250-847-2995, or email laura@interior-news.com. More information is available through our Online Community Calendar at www.interior-news.com. Deadline for submissions is Fridays at noon. Maximum 25 words. Limited space is available. We regret we cannot accept items over the phone. Living with Stroke Wednesdays 1-3 p.m., Healthy Living Centre, Oct. 7 to Nov. 25. Course by the Heart & Stroke Foundation for those who have had a stroke and their caregiver. Register 1-888473-4636 ext. 8002. DIY: Seashell Dream Catcher Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre. Join us to make your own Seashell Dream Catcher. All craft ideas are welcome. Light snack provided. Smithers Snowmobile Assoc. AGM, Wednesday, Oct. 14, Prestige Hudson Bay Lodge, 7:30 p.m. If you are interested in a position on the executive, snowmobilesmithers@gmail.com. Seniors Line Danicing starts Thursday, Oct. 15, 10 a.m., Pioneer Place Seniors Activity Centre. Newcomers welcome. Shirley 250847-2528, Justina 250-847-2591. SKEENA Book Launch, Award-winning author Sarah de Leeuw launches her latest book of poetry, Skeena, on Thursday, Oct. 15, 7 p.m. at Smithers Public Library. Dementia Dialogue: Warning Signs and Diagnosis Monday, Oct. 19, 9 a.m. to noon, Bulkley Lodge. Each session is an opportunity to learn about a different caregiving topic followed by a guided discussion. BVD Auxiliary Monthly Meeting Tuesday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m.,

Healthy Living Centre. Sharon Dempsey will give an overview of Home and Community Care, including how to access it. Glenwood Women’s Institute Annual Bazaar Saturday, Oct. 24, 12-3 p.m. Baked goods, crafts, home-based businesses and much more. Entry $5 inlcudes light lunch. Reloading Open House Saturday, Oct. 24, 1-3 p.m. BV Rod & Gun Clubhouse. There will be reloading stations for most disciplines and varied experience on hand to set you on the right path. Smithers Film Society Dukhtar Sunday, Oct. 25, 7 p.m., Roi Theatre. Vivacious in colour, heart-aching in scope, stunning in size and full of beautiful shots of Pakistan. Regular admission. BV Museum Cemetery Walk Saturday, Oct. 31, 1 p.m. Smithers Municipal Cemetery. Learn about the history of the Smithers Cemetery and some of the town’s earliest residents. Dress warmly and prepare to walk over uneven ground. Learn to play Bridge with Dennis Lee. Lessons start Tuesday, Nov. 3, every Tuesday and Thursday 7-9 p.m. during November, Room #504 at Smithers Secondary School. Use Della Herman entrance. Jane 847-3738 or Jeannette 847-9713. Fourth Annual Bat Box Workshop Saturday, Nov. 7. Learn to build bat boxes. $20 includes one bat box. Space is limited. Register by Oct. 31 at skeena@bcbats.ca.

Come Cheer your Champions Smithers Steelheads vs

Quesnel Kangaroos Sat., Oct. 17 Quesnel Arena Puck Drop 7:30 pm

Steelheads vs Lac La Hache TOMAHAWKS Sun., Oct. 18 Lac La Hache Arena Puck Drop 1:30 pm

ORANGE HARVEST Nathan Cullen supporters fill the Old Church in Smithers and hear some tunes from local musician Rachelle Van Zanten. The Saturday night event dubbed Orange Harvest was the NDP candidate’s last event before the Oct. 19 federal election. Chris Gareau photo

Drive Safe!

Admission: Adults $8.00 Seniors & Children $5.00 at the Door.


The Interior News

C OMMUNITY

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

B3

Breaking News? Let us know 250-847-3266 Email editor@interior-news.com Find us on Facebook at Smithers Interior News

With the oncoming cold and flu season fast approaching, are you prepared? Visit Pharmasave, talk to pharmacy team about these new product lines of vitamins & supplements to aid your quest for better health.

RECYCLED FUN About 20 children create various costumes and toys out of cardboard at the libraryhosted Global Cardboard Challenge. The event was inspired by Caine’s Arcade, which featured a boy who built a functional arcade out of cardboard in his dad’s shop.

OPEN Thanksgiving, Mon, Oct 12 from 10-5

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Smithers leads on organ donors Monday-Friday 9am-9pm Saturday 9am-6pm • Sunday & Holidays 10am-5pm

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Grief Support Group www.bvhospice.ca

Goal: To create an atmosphere where warmth, trust and compassion can

encourage people to explore, feel and

Service BC’s Sherrie-Lee Girling, Lisa Cote, Virginia Sampare-Woodworth and Stewart Dickson at their award-winning Smithers office.

express the pain of losing a loved one.

Smithers/Interior News

The Service BC office in Smithers received a community leadership award last week for its work registering people on the province’s organ transplant donor list. Government agent Stewart Dickson said the community helped the local office have a registration rate of 544 per cent when measured with total transactions — such as driver’s licences. That is compared to Service BC’s provincial goal of 85 per cent.

Dickson said it was important for everyone to sign up on the provincial database, whether they wish to donate for transplant or science. He added that many people do not realize that the process has changed, and people need to be on that database. According to the province, 95 per cent of British Columbians support the idea of donating a kidney to someone in need. Of those polled, 51 per cent thought they were a registered donor, but in fact, only 19 per cent of B.C. residents are actually registered on B.C.’s official organ donor registry. To register, visit the Service BC office or sign up online at transplant.bc.ca.

Starting: Thursday Oct 15/15 7-9pm BULKLEY VALLEY HOSPICE SOCIETY

Chris Gareau photo

By Chris Gareau

10 Week Program

LOCATION: HEALTHY LIVING CENTRE 1070 MAIN STREET – SMITHERS TO PRE-REGISTER or MORE INFO CALL: Cornelia 250 847-3449 or BVHS 250 877-7451

Toll Free Phone: 1-877-335-2233 Local Phone: 250-877-7451 E-Mail: bvhospicesociety@gmail.com


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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

C OMMUNITY

To collect or not to collect — that is always the question

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artiFact What will this object teach us about the past? Do we have one like it already? How can we use it, store it, display it? To collect or not to collect? In the past, museums often collected anything and everything, especially if it was “old” or antique. Today it is widely recognized that this method of collecting is unsustainable, and many museums now face tough decisions as they try to downsize or streamline their collections. Nowadays every donation is carefully evaluated and weighed against a museum’s collecting policy to ensure that preservation is balanced with practical matters like storage needs, and the resources to safely preserve an item. Here at the Bulkley Valley Museum we are regularly contacted by members of the public who wish to donate something to us. And while we are grateful for every offered donation, the fact remains that (as much as we’d like to) we simply cannot take everything! So how do we decide what to collect? In order to decide whether or not to keep an item, we evaluate based on criteria laid out in our Collections Policy. This includes: • Whether the item fits with our Mission Statement (the statement of purpose that guides our operations) • Whether information is available to explain how it was made, how old it is, who used it, its purpose, etc. • Whether we already have something similar • Whether we have the physical space and the resources to safely store and preserve it • Whether it is in good physical condition We also try to consider how the item might be used by the Museum. Donors often want to know when their donation will be

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displayed in an exhibit, and that is not always a question that we can answer! We stress to all of our donors that there are many reasons to consider donating an item to the Museum, including for research, or simply for posterity and preservation of the past. Just because we can’t immediately integrate an item into an exhibit display does not mean that it’s considered insignificant, or that it won’t be used for exhibits, programming, or research in the future. Most recently we put our policy into practice while evaluating a hand crocheted baby jacket and hat offered to us by a local resident. After careful evaluation against the criteria listed above, the items were selected to become part of our collection for the following reasons: • The items fit closely with our Mission Statement to collect and preserve items of historical and cultural interest from Smithers and the Valley, as they were made in Smithers in 1914, and were worn and used by individuals who were born in and lived in Smithers • The items were in excellent physical condition • The items could be easily and safely stored by the Museum To collect or not to collect – this will always be a question that curators face. And with every artifact that we evaluate we remember that our decision today affects not just us, but future generations who will look to the Museum to learn about the past. Have questions? Think you have something that belongs in the Museum? Drop by and visit us, or email us at info@bvmuseum. com. from the Sponsored by The Interior News

Telkwa Seniors Housing Society We’re looking for new members to join our small but vibrant seven person committee. We manage Telkwa House, an 8 unit complex on Aldermere Ridge. We welcome your input and fresh ideas, as we plan for possible future expansion. Contact John 250.846.9093 email buffymcd@gmail.com or mail to PO Box 46 Telkwa, BC V0J 2X0

REFUGE ... At the time I was annoyed. This past August, I stepped on the leg of some squatter at the Keleti station in Budapest. I was trying to read the information sign, and she was parked right in front of it. As I left the station, however, it dawned on me that something tragic was happening. In sleeping bags and tents, eating dinner and holding small children, hundreds of people were packed together like unsheltered winter campers on a cold day. “Migrants” are simply on the way to finding a new home. Others accurately call them refugees, as they’re coming from Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria. Fear-filled leaders have declared them an “infestation.” (Sounds like Nazi language justifying genocide by referring to victims as “vermin.”)

is my church family now in a new home that, I pray, serves more than our needs, but also this community’s! Coming home again, I realized how easy it is in Smithers to side-step folks looking for refuge in our town. Jesus was a refugee. In the Bible we’re told that, when toddler boys of His ethnicity were targeted by a tyrant, his parents took Him and fled to Egypt. Already at birth there was no room for Him. Later we find out that He had “no place to lay his head.” Dare I bar the door to my house? my church? my country? Though a son of immigrants, I’m still tempted to believe that foreigners “threaten” our society, as they don’t always share our values. Seems to me, no one ought to understand that better than our First Nations hosts.

Everyone needs refuge - not just refuSorry if I’m stepgees. How blessed ping on toes. But not I and my family are as bad as a leg. to have a home that meets more than our needs! How blessed Submitted by the Smithers Ministerial Association


The Interior News

C OMMUNITY

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

B5

CHECK US OUT ONLINE

interior-news.com PUBLIC NOTICE SMITHERS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD VACANCY

PRO LIFE MARCH A pro life march on Saturday morning makes its way to Bulkley Valley District Hospital after winding through Smithers. The annual march draws scores of people from several churches who are calling on the federal government to create a law addressing abortion. The Knights of Columbus marshalled traffic crossings for the group. Chris Gareau photo

A little fire in the belly would sway me

Brenda Mallory This is it! Time to make up your mind. The 78-day election cycle will end on the 19th of October. If you were to ask me the whole process seemed a little flat. There is more excitement when turkeys come on sale or a hockey game is happening. Blue Jays fans are all a twitter. But do you vote? As I write to you today the

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will have to look at the folks running in this region as well as taking a listen to the leaders of the parties. Let’s face it, I want to be inspired. A little fire in the belly would sway me one way or the other.  I say to you in all honesty that I normally vote the same way most elections. This time I am in a quandary. Should I vote as I always do? Should I vote strategically — whatever that means? Environmental issues, the new Pan Pacific trade deal, first nation issues and so on. At this point I will have to be careful not to have you skip this voting. Yours is just one vote but it could be the one that will make a difference. I am told by some that every time there is an election we don’t get anything up here. If

that is your problem then vote. If you have trouble getting to the polls contact one of the political party offices and I am sure a ride will come your way. I just hope whoever carries the MP banner for this

region does very well for all of us. Good luck to all the candidates and thank you for your commitment to the folks in this area. Give me a call to 250-846-5095 or just email to mallory@ bulkley.net.

14th Annual

TO ALL NOT-FOR- PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Bulkley Valley Community Foundation Call for Grant Applications 2016 Grant Funding The Bulkley Valley Community Foundation serves local community needs for Topley, Granisle, Houston, Telkwa, Smithers, The Hazeltons and Kitwanga areas. Grant Applications are now being accepted from October 1 to November 30, 2015, from Not For Profit Organizations within the service area. Projects must be commenced & completed in 2016. Special Funding is also being granted to organizations providing Education Services in Houston & Area and Special Needs in Smithers & Telkwa. NOTE: Applications will only be accepted via email. For further information contact: BV Community Foundation P.O.Box 4584, Smithers, B.C. VOJ 2N0 Phone: 250- 847-3310 e.mail - bvfoundation@bulkey.net Houston – Dee McRae 250-845-2550 The Hazeltons –Colleen Burns 250-842-6842 The application forms and Information/Policies packages are available in digital format from our web site www.bvcf.ca

Harvest Fest Meal

October 24th, 6 p.m. Evelyn Community Hall Ad supported by The Interior News

SPICE OF LIFE

big issue  for trying to gain poll points comes about with the issue of the niqab. The number of women who wear the face covering is very small. Is this really the big problem in our country? How about a bit of help for seniors? Does child care or child poverty ring a  bell? Guess not. The stump speeches go on and on. Those words come to us in monotone clips read from a teleprompter. Stick to the script at this point. I have to ask you — is that working?  As of today the Liberals are in the lead, the NDP  have slipped in popularity. Conservatives? Steady down the middle. When it comes time for me to decide for whom to vote I

The Town of Smithers has a vacancy to fill on the Smithers Public Library Board. The Library Board is made up of volunteers from the community who make operating and financial decisions regarding the Library. If you are interested in volunteering as a Library Board member please complete the application form that is on the Town’s website at http:// www.smithers.ca/municipal-hall/committees. Application forms are also available at the Town Office and at the Smithers Public Library. You must live within the Town municipal boundaries or in the rural Electoral Area “A” Fire Protection/Recreation & Cultural Benefitting Service Area to qualify. General information about Smithers Public Library Board member responsibilities can be found on the Town of Smithers website at www. smithers.ca and on the Smithers Public Library website at http://smithers.bclibrary.ca/ Please submit your completed application by October 23, 2015 to the Town of Smithers, Box 879, Smithers, B.C. V0J 2N0 or drop it off at the Town Office located at 1027 Aldous Street, Smithers B.C. Please feel free to contact the Town of Smithers at 847-1600 if you would like more information regarding this opportunity on the Board.

• Tickets: $15 Adults $10 Children 10 & under All proceeds go to hall insurance Turkey/ham and all the fixings Homemade pie for dessert Presold tickets only. Limited seating Call for your tickets today! Sherry Utz 250.847.9703 Mountain Eagle Books, B.V. Insurance

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B6 www.interior-news.com

C OMMUNITY

The Interior News

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

$75 SPEND ON ANY REGULAR-PRICED

°

Get in your ideas on the fate of the re-use shed

VIEW FROM THE PORCH Lorraine Doiron

Attended a meeting regarding the closure of all the re-use sheds in the Bulkley Nechako Regional District. Check out their document at rdbn. bc.ca: “Salvaging and Re-Use Shed B a c k g r o u n d Document”. Submit your ideas to the Village of Telkwa, the Town of Smithers and the Regional District on how to keep the sheds open without the misuse that has been building up over the years. The idea is to keep stuff out of the landfill. A n o t h e r informative meeting “ C o m mu n i t y Vitality — How Do We Measure Progress?” The presenter was Dr. Trevor Hancock from the University of Victoria. What things do we love about Smithers today and would never want to lose?

What changes would you embrace to make Smithers better? Check out www. victoriafoundation. bc.ca to get an idea of how this works in a community. Visitable housing. If you are wondering what in the world that is check out visitablehousingcanada. com. Super ideas for a home anyone can live in or just visit. The Pretenders, a local singing group, is seeking male voices and altos. They meet every Tuesday, 7:30 at the Senior’s Activity Center. The group has been singing for 30 years, all are 50plus in age; to listen and watch them it is evident they are having a good time. Contact Marie 250847-9473 for more information. The Glenwood Women’s Institute Bazaar, Oct. 24, noon to 3 p.m. Start your Christmas shopping with Mary Kay, Discovery Toys, Scentsy, Steeped Tea, and many more. The bake sale table is filled with scrumptious baking; there will be a silent auction, a fall gift basket draw. If you have items to donate for the auction, call 250847-9102 for pickup. Skeena Book Launch, Thursday Oct. 15, 7 p.m. at the library. A collection of poetry by Sarah

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de Leeuw, winner of the 2013 Dorothy Livesay Award for poetry, two-time recipient of the CBC Literary Award for creative non-fiction and the 2014 Western Gold Award. Bridge lessons with Dennis Lee. Learn this challenging game of cards, starting Tuesday, Nov. 3rd, at Smithers Secondary School. Lessons every Tuesday and Thursday from 7-9 p.m. for the month of November. For more information call Jane, 250-8473738. Register for Fall Art Workshops. Painting for D u m m i e s ; B e g i n n i n g Silversmithing; Leather Art and Embossing; Still Life for Beginners. Smithersart.org for full course information and to register. Don’t forget the library’s Annual Book Sale, Nov. 13 and 14 at the Legion. Books, CD, DVD, Video, records donations — drop them off at the Library or call 250-847-3043 and we will pick them up. Stock up on reading and listening material for winter.

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O UR T OWN

The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

B7

Broadway shelter opens doors to public By Alicia Bridges Smithers/Interior News

People first. That’s the approach that workers at the Broadway Place Emergency Shelter take to caring for people who find themselves homeless and in need of a place to sleep. In the seven years since the facility opened in its current location in downtown Smithers, it has facilitated 22,995 individual stays and served 88,500 meals. Its nine beds give people who are homeless a safe place to sleep for up to 15 days, protecting them from dangers on the street or the extremes of winter. Once they are inside, visitors to the shelter can access meals, showers, a laundry room and, of course, a bed in which to rest. Last Friday the facility, which is run by the Smithers Community Services Association (SCSA), opened its doors to the public. SCSA executive director Cathryn Olmstead said the open day gave the community a chance to become more informed about the role of the shelter. “I think there are a lot of preconceptions about the purpose of the shelter, what happens in the shelter and who accesses the services, so this offers us a nice way to introduce people to some of the work that we do and that they get a chance to meet some of the staff,” she

Smithers Broadway Place Emergency Shelter worker Mary Aldrich, Smithers Community Services Association executive director Cathryn Olmstead and shelter manager Candis Crump.

Alicia Bridges photo

said. The facility attracted controversy in September when it was blamed for bad behaviour and panhandling in the downtown area. Some business owners at the time called for the

facility to relocated into an industrial area. Olmstead, who defended the shelter at the time, said the open day was not held in response to criticism. She said similar events had been held in the past

and last week’s open day was more about about highlighting what the facility does. Olmstead said it provided people in crisis with much more than a place to sleep. “It’s like a springboard,

it’s a safe place where people can come and identify what needs to be in place for them to be the master of their own life and then we play a role in helping facilitate that,” she said. “What does that is the

consistency of staff and the relationships that are built over time, and the safety component that comes with having your basic needs met.” As an emergency shelter, people can only access it for a limited time so staff help patrons find avenues to a better situation. The facility has its own housing liaison officer whose job is to help people find a more permanent place to stay. Staff also help people with needs such as accessing mental health services, obtaining ID or applying for income support. Although the shelter acts as a sanctuary, it is not without its rules. People who want to stay there must check in before 10 p.m. and cannot re-enter if they leave and try to return. Drugs and alcohol are not permitted and visitors to the centre must empty their pockets, purses and bags to show they are not carrying any weapons. Worker Mary Aldrich, who has been at the shelter for two years, said patrons were generally respectful of the rules. Often when they arrive, she said, the best way to help them is just to listen. “Sometimes they come and they are pretty upset and they just want a listening ear for a half an hour,” “We just sit and we listen and that becomes our main focus regardless of other things that we need to do. “It’s people first.”

From cool to ghoul 250.877.9068 Main St. • Smithers

Primal Contacts get their attention!

Find us on Facebook to see many more examples


Al Booth passed in the comfort of his home Oct. 8, 2015. A Celebration of Life will be held at the Paul Lychak Community Hall Friday, Oct. 16 at 3 p.m.


The Interior News

Real Estate

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Bulkley Valley Real Estate

250-847-5999

Real Estate

B11

Real Estate

Email: remaxbv@telus.net Located in the Log Office at 3568 Hwy. 16 Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

Pick up your FREE copy of our Real Estate Flyer and our map of the Bulkley Valley. View more of our listings online at www.remaxsmithersbc.ca or on Facebook.

$62,000

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

$588,000

$324,900

NEW PRICE

$129,900

NEW PRICE

NEW PRICE

$287,000

$264,500

Unit 2&3–50 Hagan St, Granisle

15058 Kitseguecla Lake Road

2712 Tatlow Road

2690 Bulkley Drive

3874 Alfred Avenue

1314 Main Street

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Renovated double unit Ground level, view of lake 2 - 4 piece bathrooms, kitchen island Freshly painted, hardwood flooring

Jantina Meints

mls r2006209

40 acre country estate Hay land, pasture, 20 min to town 5700 sq ft, 6 bedroom, 3½ bathroom Picturesque setting, great views

Ron Lapadat

$389,000

mls r2007019

4 bedroom + den, 2112 sq ft home 8.031 acres, trails and creek 40x20 heated shop w/concrete floors Recent updates, quick possession

Karen Benson

mls n247647

Affordable country living, 4.6 acres 1995 2 bdrm mobile, mud room Close to town, trail to river Partially fenced, vaulted ceilings

Jantina Meints

$259,500

$249,500

mls n248207

Brand new ranch style home Wheel chair friendly 2 bdrm, 2 bathroom, open floor plan Opportunity to convert into office

Peter Lund

mls n244412

$192,500

Thriving Restaurant & Steakhouse 86 seat capacity Prime Main Street location Well maintained. Lease available

Donna & Leo

187,500

mls n4507517

$459,000

3245 Turner Way

#1-4223 Astlais Place

#43 Alpine Village Estates

#8 - 3278 Park Place

#10 - 3278 Park Place

1311 Lagopus Place

• • • •

• • • •

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4/5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms Floors above ground, concrete dw 10 years young, Willowvale Sub. Fenced backyard, perimeter trail

Donna Grudgfield

mls n247381

3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms 1/2 duplex, close to schools Double paved drive, garage New roof, new sun deck

Donna Grudgfield

$309,000

mls n246035

2 bedroom, adult oriented condo 2 bathrooms, natural gas fireplace Built-in vacuum system Wheelchair ramp, rear sundeck

Donna Grudgfield

$398,500

mls r2001717

3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms Double paved drive, covered carport New roof 2012, stainless appliances Wheel chair ramp, fenced yard

Donna & Peter

$259,900

mls n247002

1134 s.f. 2 bedroom home Addition for third bedroom 8x24 covered sundeck, fenced yard 8x13 front entry, freshly painted

Donna Grudgfield

$225,000

mls n243290

Large corner lot in Silverking Brick accents, clay tile roof Vaulted ceiling, Jacuzzi, 2 fireplaces www.realestatesmithers.com

Leo Lubbers

$219,900

LD

mls n243139

$267,000

2035 Aveling Coalmine Road

224 Viewmount Road

#7 - 3664 Third Avenue

Lot F Lawson Road

1361 Coalmine Road, Telkwa

4368 Second Avenue

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4 bdrm home, quiet area 4.94 acres, nicely landscaped Lots of upgrades, recreational area www.realestatesmithers.com

Leo Lubbers

mls n239358

7.5 acres, fenced & x-fenced, view Drilled well, outbuildings 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom, large rooms www.realestatesmithers.com

Leo Lubbers

$339,500

mls n246359

2 bedrooms, 2 bathroom condo Walk-in closet, ensuite, n/g fireplace Low strata fee, close to mail/shops www.realestatesmithers.com

Leo Lubbers

mls n247697

$379,000

134 acres, 25 minutes from town Within 200 yards of Bulkley River Excellent Steelhead fishing run Treed, meadows, ponds, wildlife

Ron Lapadat

mls n245637

$339,900

LD

SO

Ron Lapadat

$99,900

LD

Attractive, affordable 4 bdrm, 2 bath Private ½ acre, paved drive, shop New roof, new kitchen & more www.smithershomes.com

mls n246760

Great location, big fenced backyard Near highschool, park, pool, arenas 4 bdrm + den, 2 bath, suite potential www.smithershomes.com

Ron Lapadat

mls r2003804

$85,000

$439,000

LD

D L O

1816 Princess Street

4750 Manton Road

1431 Driftwood Crescent

#32-4430 Highway 16

4790 Tyhee Lake Road

8 Aurora Avenue

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Custom finished,4 bdrm,3 bathroom Beautifully renovated inside & out Fully finished basement, 99x122 lot www.smithershomes.com

Ron Lapadat

mls n245461

Updated open plan 4 bedrooms In town,by golf course, rural setting Paved drive, 24x24 workshop www.smithershomes.com

Ron Lapadat

$108,500

mls n246385

Immaculate Silverking, 4bdrm,3bath Sunny south backyard, deck, hot tub Beautiful maple hardwood Quick possession is available

SO

Ron Lapadat

$144,000

mls n242423

2 bedroom, 2 bath, gorgeous kitchen Vaulted ceiling, skylight, new floor Big fenced yard, new sundeck www.smithershomes.com

SO

Ron Lapadat

$284,500

mls n246382

SO

2.31 acres just 13 min from town 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom log home Many outbuildings, landscaped/treed Unlimited hiking trails

Sandra Hinchliffe

mls n248269

S

Sandra Hinchliffe

$239,000

$449,500

Lot 8 slopes towards the lake Great view of Hudson Bay Mountain Lakefront subdivision Swim, paddle, skate the lake mls n226282

$450,000

11 Pavilion Place

9257 Glacierview Road

5166 Nielson Road

3520 Victoria Drive

6635 Lake Kathlyn Road

3348 Highway 16 W, Smithers

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Premier home site Town sewer & water Lake front living Cul-de-sac location

Sandra Hinchliffe

mls n207784

Beautiful lot in a great neighborhood Partially constructed log home Shed and outbuildings Treed with lots of flat area

Sandra Hinchliffe

mls n244995

Country home, 1080 sf, 2 bedroom Pristine setting, 5 min to town Vaulted ceilings, rock fireplace Open design, detached sauna

Charlie McClary

mls n248159

Mulder Concrete Site Sells 5 acres, M-2 zoning Clean environmental report Prime location, easy access

Charlie McClary

mls n4507400

Large log home on 4.8 acres Terraced landscaped yard, shop Private setting 5 min from Smithers Affordable with potential

Ron & Charlie

mls r2001201

Far west building, prime location C-3 zoned, ½ acre lot 10,500 square ft divided into 3 units Shop bays, 2 stories of office space

Ron & Charlie

mls n4507093

$399,000

$234,500

$285,000

$229,000

$364,900

$354,000

1686 Telegraph Street

3843 Fourth Avenue

5716 Morris Road

1149 Hunter Avenue

17771 Highway 16 West

7060 Cedar Road

• • • •

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1936 sf family home in Telkwa 2 floors, 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms Large fenced yard, carport Quiet low traffic neighborhood

Charlie McClary

mls r2000621

4000 sf, zoned C-1A Ground level, separate meters Central downtown location 2 leased spaces

Karen & Leo

mls n4507509

10.68 acres, fenced and cross fenced Updated mobile with addition Drilled well, new appliances Gardens, greenhouse, shop

Karen Benson

mls n242286

4 bdrm, 3 bath custom built home Large lot, partially fenced 3,162 s.f. garage, sundeck Fam&rec room, great neighborhood

Karen Benson

mls n246602

900 sq ft well-built and clean home 2.23 acres, 8 minutes from town 2 bedrooms, full basement Quick possession

Jantina Meints

mls n247645

Great family home on 5 acres 4 bdrm, 3 bath, office,large rec room Double garage, large sundeck, osbe Beautiful view of Hudson Bay Mtn

Jantina Meints

mls n347477

Peter Lund Res. 847-3435

Donna Grudgfield Cell. 847-1228

Leo Lubbers Cell. 847-1292

Ron Lapadat Cell. 847-0335

Sandra Hinchliffe Cell. 847-0725

Charlie McClary Cell. 877-1770

Karen Benson Cell. 847-0548

Jantina Meints Cell. 847-3144

Kiesha Matthews Cell. 876-8420

Add illumination to rooms A dark home is a dreary home. Adding light can mean including more overhead and accent lighting. Under-cabinet task lighting is a nice touch. Inclusion of skylights and sun tubes can bring natural light into rooms that may not have south- or west-facing windows.


Wise customers read the fine print: *, †, Ω The All Out Clearout Sales Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after October 1, 2015. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,695) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees, other dealer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Dealer trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select new 2015 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. †0% purchase financing available on select new 2015 Ram 1500 and Ram Heavy Duty models to qualified customers on approved credit through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Example: 2015 Ram 1500 Quad Cab SXT 4x4 (25A+AGR) with a Purchase Price of $28,998 with a $0 down payment, financed at 0% for 72 months equals 156 bi-weekly payments of $186 with a cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $28,998. Ω$10,000 in total discounts includes $8,500 Consumer Cash and $1,500 Loyalty/Conquest Bonus Cash. Consumer Cash Discounts are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. $1,500 Ram Truck Loyalty/Conquest/Skilled Trades Bonus Cash is available on the retail purchase/lease of 2015 Ram 1500 (excludes Reg. Cab), 2014 Ram 2500/3500 or 2015 Ram Cargo Van and is deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. Eligible customers include: 1. Current owners/lessees of a Dodge or Ram Pickup Truck or Large Van or any other manufacturer’s Pickup Truck or Large Van. The vehicle must have been owned/leased by the eligible customer and registered in their name on or before October 1, 2015. Proof of ownership/Lease agreement will be required. 2. Customers who are skilled tradesmen or are acquiring a skilled trade. This includes Licensed Tradesmen, Certified Journeymen or customers who have completed an Apprenticeship Certification. A copy of the Trade Licence/Certification required. 3. Customers who are Baeumler Approved service providers. Proof of membership is required. Limit one $1,500 bonus cash offer per eligible transaction. Some conditions apply. See your dealer for complete details. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc.

T:10”

B12 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, October 14, 2015

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Smithers Interior News, October 14, 2015  

October 14, 2015 edition of the Smithers Interior News

Smithers Interior News, October 14, 2015  

October 14, 2015 edition of the Smithers Interior News