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PROVINCE TO BOOT 46 PHARMACIES FROM DRUG PLAN â–ś CRACKDOWN FOLLOWS AUDITS, CONCERNS OVER METHADONE DEALING patients or breaking PharmaCare’s billing rules,â€? Lake said. The B.C. government intends to Recent audits of pharmacies have effectively shut down as many as 46 turned up hundreds of thousands of Lower Mainland pharmacies by exdollars in billing irregularities. cluding them from the PharmaCare The ministry says some pharmacies program in the wake of a review that improperly filed drug information flagged various abuses. for patients into the province’s Letters have gone out to the pharprescription-tracking network, macies giving them three weeks to potentially risking their health, argue why they shouldn’t be denied while others gave false the ability to bill the information on their publicly funded drug plan enrolment applications. effective next month. A health ministry There have been past spokesperson would allegations of kickbacks not release specifics or paid by methadone-disthe locations of the 46 pensing pharmacies to targeted pharmacies, retain addicted patients, but said some are being among other concerns excluded for problems about their practices. unrelated to methaHealth ministry officials done. aren’t releasing specifics The 20 top methaor the locations of the done-dispensing pharpharmacies involved. macies in B.C. include “Many of these pharmafour each in Surrey and Terry Lake cies are dispensing methVancouver’s Downtown adone,â€? Health Minister Eastside, five elsewhere Terry Lake confirmed. in Vancouver, three in A regulatory change that took Abbotsford, two in Victoria and one effect in December now allows the each in Nanaimo and Kamloops. ministry to refuse to do business Together they were paid more with pharmacies with a history of than $12 million from the Pharproblematic business and billing maCare program to supply methpractices, and forces them to disclose adone in 2013, according to a their ownership, management and provincial review of the methadone track record. maintenance program completed in “Until now, it could be hard for the January. ministry to cancel the enrolment of a pharmacy taking advantage of continued on page 11 JEFF NAGEL

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Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

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Secondary suite owners flock to register their units ▼ HOWEVER, OUT OF 26,000 KNOWN SUITES, ONLY 2,844 OWNERS HAVE APPLIED FOR PERMITS TO BRING THEM UP TO CODE KEVIN DIAKIW

Owners of secondary suites are flocking to city hall en masse to register their additional dwellings in order to avoid stiff fines. Some registered before having to pay a penalty fee, some did not. In the first four months of this year, Surrey bylaw officers have issued $1,000 fines to 155 different homeowners. Surrey changed its zoning bylaw in 2010 to allow one suite per home. The city introduced a $1,000 fine for those who did not register and homeowners responded in big numbers to get them listed. There are now 25,890 suites and 1,074 coach homes registered with the city. But not all of those homeowners have come to the city to have the buildings brought up to B.C. Building Code yet. That has been a slow process. In 2011, The Leader reported that a year after one suite was allowed per home, only one owner had come forward to bring the unit up to code.

▶ POLICE GO PUBLIC Supervised by Aux. Const. Ken Merrells, Sajjan Sandhu, 3, checks out some of the training hardware at the Surrey RCMP’s annual open house at their main detachment on May 9. Behind them is the RCMP’s Tactical Armoured Vehicle (TAV II). The event coincided with Police Week (May 11-17). Surrey has the largest RCMP detachment in Canada with more than 1,000 police officers, municipal employees and volunteers. BOAZ JOSEPH

Metro air pollution authority contested

▼ DISPUTE BETWEEN FRASER SURREY DOCKS AND REGION COULD HAVE FARREACHING REPERCUSSIONS Thousands of homes in Surrey have secondary suites. Few have registered for permits to meet B.C. Building Code standards. FILE PHOTO

As of this month, 2,844 suite owners have applied for permits to bring them up to code. Jean LaMontagne, Surrey’s general manager of planning and development, said the city is working with the province to allow for some “equivalencies” in the code to reduce the cost for homeowners. An example would be that if a home has sprinklers, the province could relax the requirement for fire barriers, as it might be considered a redundant system. LaMontagne said he anticipates the province and city to come to some agreement on requirements late this year, or early in 2016. Secondary suites have been a controversial issues in Surrey for nearly 40 years. After decades of trying to find a solution, the 2010 rezoning was the first time a city-wide solution had been implemented. However, bringing all of the units up to code is expected to take more time.

JEFF NAGEL

A court dispute between Fraser Surrey Docks and Metro Vancouver over the regional district’s power to regulate air quality could have far-reaching implications beyond a proposed coal export terminal in Surrey. Fraser Surrey Docks already has port authority approval to build the coal-handling facility, which would bring U.S. coal by train through White Rock and South Surrey and load it onto ocean-going ships. Construction hasn’t yet begun and Fraser Surrey Docks hasn’t yet applied to Metro for a required air quality permit. ▶ “Why is this Instead, it is challenging Metro’s jurisdiction, delegated going to court by the provincial government and why isn’t the through the Environmental Management Act, to regulate province stepping industrial air emissions, arguup and playing a ing that power has no force on federal port lands. more outspoken The case, which goes to role...?” trial in provincial court next month, will see Fraser Surrey ANDREW WEAVER Docks contest a $1,000 fine

levied against it by Metro in 2013 for the discharge of soybean dust from its grain handling operations. “The ramifications of a decision in favour of Fraser Surrey Docks would be profound,” Green party MLA Andrew Weaver said. Any new industry – not just the coal terminal – could open on federal lands without obeying Metro regulations to control air pollution, he said. And Weaver suggested such a ruling might thwart the province’s power to control emissions on any federal lands in B.C., not just port land within Metro. He said there are many proposed industrial port developments – from LNG terminals to oil refineries – that could end up on federal port lands and pollute airsheds as far north as Kitimat and Prince Rupert. Weaver called on the province to take a stand. “Why is this going to the court and why isn’t the province stepping up and playing a more outspoken role about what they believe the role of Metro Vancouver and their role is?” Environment Minister Mary Polak was not available for an interview. An emailed statement from her office said the province has an interest in the case but will wait for the court’s decision before commenting further. “Sources of air pollution throughout B.C., including on federal lands, must be managed to appropriate levels,” it said. The coal terminal proposal is the target of separate court challenges filed by project opponents. Fraser Surrey Docks now intends to directly load the coal onto ships, rather than first to barges that would have had to be unloaded to ships at Texada Island.


4 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

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Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

▼ POLICE BRIEFS

Woman dies in domestic dispute

Three sent to hospital after latest shooting in Whalley ▶ SURREY RCMP RESPOND TO TWO INCIDENTS OF GUN VIOLENCE LAST WEEK KEVIN DIAKIW & SHEILA REYNOLDS

Three people were taken to hospital after another shooting in Surrey on Friday. On May 8 at 5:45 a.m., police were called to a Whalley address after a report of shots fired. Emergency response teams surrounded the home in the 10400-block of 128 Street. Police found a man in his mid-20s suffering from gunshot wounds. About the same time, a man and a woman arrived at hospital. The man had been shot and the woman suffered minor injuries. The two men were expected to survive. Surrey RCMP do not believe the attack was random and say the incident is not believed to be connected with the spate of shootings over the last eight weeks linked to dial-a-dope operations. And early Thursday morning, a drive-by shooting ended in a car crash in Surrey. RCMP say they received several 911 calls reporting shots being fired about about 2:25 a.m. in the neighbour-

hood near 68 Avenue between 121 and 124 Streets. When police arrived, they recovered evidence confirming shots had been fired and a dark-coloured Chevrolet sedan had crashed into a rock post. According to Mounties, witnesses reported seeing a vehicle stopped at 124 Street and 68 Avenue, when a gold-coloured car pulled up beside it and fired shots toward it. The Chevrolet drove westbound on 68 Avenue with the gold car in pursuit. The first vehicle then lost control at 121 Street, striking a post, and the gold car again fired shots at the Chevrolet. The driver of the crashed vehicle fled on foot and the gold car sped away. No one was injured in the incident and police say the driver of the victim’s vehicle is a Surrey man in his 20s who is familiar to them. Surrey RCMP couldn’t confirm whether the Thursday morning incident is connected to a string of more than two dozen shootings – including a fatal one – that have taken place in Surrey and Delta in recent weeks. Anyone with information about the most recent shootings, or on the gold-coloured car, is asked to call 604599-0502.

Senior struck and killed in Surrey An 84-year-old man is dead after being struck while out walking near a Surrey elementary school Thursday morning. Surrey RCMP say they received a report of a possible hit-and-run in the 6900-block of 142 Street at about 11 a.m. May 7. When police arrived, said Sgt. Dale Carr, they found a man in “severe medical distress.” The senior was transported to hospital, where he died from his injuries. While the driver initially left the scene, said Carr, they returned shortly after, having realized they’d struck someone. He said it appeared the driver was reversing when the man was hit. The car was seized and the driver is cooperating with the investigation.

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VIEWPOINT

The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

Nepal earthquake a shake-up call for B.C. The horrific earthquake in Nepal has prompted a wave of generosity from Canadians, which is heartening. Until the end of the month, the federal government has promised to match contributions made to Canadian-registered relief agencies that are working to help people who have been displaced by the earthquake, which took place on April 25. It’s a good incentive to give generously. Here in B.C., there are lessons we can learn from the Nepal quake. While there are vast differences in building standards between Nepal and B.C., it is important to point out how dangerous multi-storey buildings can be when an earthquake strikes. While newer buildings in B.C. are built to withstand strong earthquakes, older ones are not.

Knowing exactly what to do is important, but perhaps equally as important is knowing what would likely happen to the building you live or work in should a powerful earthquake strike. We will have a strong earthquake here at some time. The fault lines, as in Nepal, are nearby. There are almost constant earthquakes up and down the west coast of North America, and while most are small and cause little damage, there will eventually be a big one. Roads, airports, rail lines and other transportation arteries can suffer severe damage in earthquakes. That can mean help will be a long time in arriving. It is important to have a supply of water, medical supplies, food and

RAESIDE

plans for shelter, because it is entirely possible that you will be cut off from assistance for two or three days. Also important is a means of communication. While the cellphone network in Nepal seems to be holding up, there have been difficulties in communication. Having a landline telephone as a backup isn’t a bad idea. Access to information is also important. If the power is out, how will your computer or cellphone be charged? Do you have access to a battery-powered radio and flashlights? Most of the issues that keep people safe in earthquakes aren’t big ones – but they do require thinking ahead. The Nepal earthquake is a timely reminder of that.

Is the ‘Orange Crush’ headed west? BC VIEWS ▼ Tom Fletcher

Albertans have always laughed about their long-standing reputation as a reckless, immature society. The classic bumper sticker, now available as a T-shirt or coffee cup in several variations, states: “Please God, give us one more oil boom, we promise not to p--- it away this time.” Now they’ve thrown out the government that finally tried to stop blowing money like a roughneck fresh out of the bush. Jim Prentice had the gall to propose raising income taxes for high wage earners, doing away with former Alberta treasurer Stockwell Day’s signature flat tax. In response, voters have abruptly replaced the 44-year Progressive Conservative dynasty with an upstart NDP that wants to tax the rich and corporations even more. Facing an oil slump, layoffs and a huge structural deficit in Alberta’s lavish public service, NDP premier-elect Rachel Notley is committed to a 50-per-cent increase in the minimum wage and another “review” of resource royalties.

One headline in a national paper summed it up: “Go home, Alberta. You’re drunk.” In the sober days after the election, a few truths emerge. Alberta hasn’t been a fiscally conservative, small-government place for a long time. Among other things, it has ratcheted up teacher and nurse wages across the country. Alberta is broke, again, and even the NDP is afraid to resort to a sales tax. The minimum wage hike is a pet policy of Canada’s labour federations, which somehow remain convinced that poverty can be eliminated by state order. On the positive side, Notley has promised to end corporate and union donations to political parties, as has already been done federally. B.C. should be next, but the gravy train of business donations is too tempting for our nominally Liberal government. Here at the B.C. legislature, an NDP staffer passed out cans of Orange Crush to celebrate. NDP leader John Horgan pronounced himself “ecstatic,” and has-

tened to assure reporters that Notley is “as competent as she sounds.” Notley now has to sort through a caucus that includes typical NDP place-holders, college students and union staff running in faint-hope constituencies. Soon after the result, the party pulled down its website platform and candidate biographies, as Notley began phoning energy companies to reassure them Alberta will be “A-OK” on her watch. Horgan likes to describe the “capital flight” from new NDP governments as if it’s just a show put on by big business. Plummeting stock prices and relocation of corporate offices are all staged, according to the party line, nothing to do with actual investment conditions created by NDP policies. This fiction is all Horgan dares to say publicly, because it’s what his party base devoutly believes. Besides, they’re only branch offices of multinational oil companies like Shell,

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Horgan said. He used his favourite Tommy Douglas quote, about the bad news of a big oil company leaving. “The good news is, the oil is staying here.” B.C.’s natural gas might be staying here too. Horgan insists he supports a natural gas export industry, but his party seems more concerned with an ascending Green party and an urban base that believes you can run a resource economy on windmills and solar panels. Notley supports twinning the TransMountain pipeline, while Horgan continues to insist he has no opinion on the project Adrian Dix so memorably opposed. The Alberta NDP has a steep learning curve ahead. The B.C. NDP has a couple of years to see if the appearance of a like-minded Alberta government is a boost for them, or a cautionary tale for voters. Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press.

The Surrey/North Delta Leader is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org


INBOX

Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

7

‘Common sense’ ruling on teachers ▶ CLASS SIZE AND COMPOSITION ARE WHAT PROTECTS LEARNING CONDITIONS

The Supreme Court of B.C., in a four-toone ruling, has come down with a common-sense ruling – that it is the taxpayers, represented by the B.C. government, who are in charge of the public purse, and not the B.C. Teachers’ Federation. That is, the BCTF does not have a unilateral constitutional right to dictate to the B.C. taxpayers what class size or class composition should be. The next step for the BCTF is to go to the Supreme Court of Canada for a final decision. This august body of judges, has the option of hearing or not hearing this case. Since any decision on this case would affect every classroom in Canada, and not just the classrooms in B.C., the Supreme Court of Canada will weigh their options carefully. Meanwhile, the individual teachers in B.C. will have to make up their collective minds whether to shell out more money in legal fees for more court challenges or cut their losses. The latter would be the rational and prudent choice. The former would be herd mentality. Fred Perry Surrey

Letter writers praise and criticize the recent B.C. Supreme Court ruling on education. FILE PHOTO

Light rail plan on track for confusion ▼ WHERE WILL TRACKS BE AND WHAT ABOUT PASSENGERS? The transportation plan on which we are now being asked to vote proposes light rail from the Expo Line terminus in Surrey along both King George Boulevard and Fraser Highway. Where precisely are these tracks (two are required) going

The court ruling against teachers was a dark day for unions, our children and our future as a society; we can’t be supported by an uneducated, unemployable next generation. The B.C. Liberals’ Bill 22 is the culprit of today’s legal battles. It set a precedent. Previously negotiated language was struck out by the stroke of a pen. A generation of children have graduated from a system that has been and continues to be underfunded, held together by dedicated, stressed-out professionals. Class size and composition are what protects teaching and learning conditions. Anyone who says otherwise is misinformed.  Can we put one nurse in

to be placed? In both cases, space is at a premium, so, based on my experience of some 15 years in European cities, the rail lines are either placed on the green space between the separate roadways of the boulevard; the tracks actually go along the roadway (such that light rail really morphs into “street cars”) and are part of the street traffic; or a combination of these two. Driving along both proposed

charge of 20 patients and expect good care? There must be class limits in order to teach all children well. It is a disservice to a special needs child when a teacher is unable to carry out an individual education plan. If we don’t limit the number of special needs students in a class, there isn’t enough physical space for all their educational assistants. It is undemocratic for governments to renege on collective agreements. It’s vital for teachers to fight this at the Supreme Court of Canada. I believe there is whole-hearted support from all parents, teachers and workers across Canada. Niovi Patsicakis, Surrey

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routes, unless the current centre lanes are converted into light-rail only – thereby reducing existing four lanes to two – the street cars will (for the most part) join the vehicle traffic on these two highways. What is the plan for placing the tracks? And where will these street cars pick-up and drop-off passengers?

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Special ▼ FRASER SURREY DOCKS SHOULD ABANDON PLANS FOR COAL PORT So Fraser Surrey Docks (FSD) wishes to change their plans for a coal dock on the Fraser River to load the coal directly into ships instead of

using barges. On Oct. 27, 2013, a delightful, sunny Sunday, a rally was held on the Quay in New Westminster to oppose the plans for

▶ NDP WIN IN ALBERTA NOT ALL ROSY FOR B.C. COUNTERPARTS John Horgan says that he is pleased that the NDP won government in Alberta. Horgan now has a couple of problems on his hands because of this NDP win in Alberta. One is that the new NDP Premier Rachel Notely wants the Kinder Morgan pipeline to be

the coal dock. Across the river at FSD, a ship was being loaded when a large cloud of dust erupted into the air.  We were not sure what type of cargo was being loaded, but are we to believe the same situation will not occur if

built. Horgan, on the other hand, does not want this pipeline to be built.  The other problem is that if Notely receives an unsatisfactory report card after two years in government in Alberta,  which will be 2017, B.C. voters will have a provincial election.  A bad report card will have to be absorbed by John Horgan and the B.C. NDP, once again keeping the B.C. NDP in Opposition status.    Joe Sawchuk, Duncan

coal is the cargo ? We can only hope by the time the Massey Tunnel is gone, China will no longer need this U.S. coal and FSD will have aborted their plans.

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▼ PLEASE SIT DOWN Here’s a word of advice to the riders on the 502 bus in Surrey who constantly block the aisle and the rear exit doors: That’s dangerous while the bus is in motion. If the bus is empty, move to the back and sit down. To the bus drivers who do nothing, thanks a lot. Michael Bardouniotis Surrey

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8 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

Two ‘most wanted’ suspects arrested ▶ MATTHEW SOPER AND ALEXANDER JELASCO IN CUSTODY, TWO OTHERS STILL AT-LARGE SHEILA REYNOLDS

Providing Quality Child Care Since 1996 • Full-time (5 days a week) and Part-time (3 days or 2 days a week) spaces available • Care for Infants, Toddlers and Preschool Aged children • Learning Through Play Curriculum • 5% discount offered to families with more than one child enrolled at the same time • Conveniently Located at Surrey Memorial Hospital For more information or to go on the wait list please visit: www.aplacetogrow.ca

A PLACE TO GROW CHILDCARE CENTRE t: 604-585-5691 Surrey Hospital Community Childcare Society f: 604-585-5692 13730 94A Ave, Surrey BC V3V 1Z2 www.aplacetogrow.ca

Two of four men named by Surrey RCMP last week as their “most wanted” car thief suspects are now in custody. Matthew Sidney Soper, 29, and Alexander Rene Jelasco, 18, were arrested this week. Two other men, 44-year-old Richard James Mantler and Zak David Haight, 28, remain at large. Police say all four have a history of suspected auto-related offences and have outstanding warrants for their arrest. Soper was wanted for breach of probation, possession of stolen property over $5,000, dangerous operation of a motor

vehicle, driving while prohibited and identity theft. Jelasco was wanted for two counts of possession of stolen property under $5,000, possession of break-and-enter tools, possession of a weapon and breach of undertaking. Matthew Soper On Tuesday, Jelasco commented on The Leader’s website, saying, “Pretty funny that I one of those guys haha.” On Wednesday, he posted on his Facebook page that he planned to turn himself in on Monday, estimating he’d be in jail until November or December. “F**k it’s gunna suck being locked up

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A man died Friday afternoon after his ultralight plane nose-dived into a Surrey agricultural field. Just after 3 p.m. May 8, crews headed to the crash site, examining the wreckage of the plane – likely an ultralight – which appears to have taken a nose dive into the ground west of King George Boulevard. Witnesses say the plane was flying northwest, then turned east when it went down. The man, believed to be the pilot and the only person in the craft, died at the scene. The B.C. Coroner’s Service and the Transportation Safety Board are probing Friday’s crash.

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for months ... At lest it ain’t years .. Do your time don’t let time do you,” he wrote. Police arrested Jelasco Wednesday night. Mantler is wanted for two counts of breach of undertaking, breach of probation and assault. Haight is wanted for obstructing a police Alexander officer, driving while Jelasco prohibited and driving while suspended. Anyone who has information about the whereabouts of Mantler or Haight are asked to contact the Surrey RCMP at 604-599-0502, or if you wish to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or go to www.solvecrime.ca

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WE WANT YOU! SURREY FIREFIGHTERS NEEDS VOLUNTEERS to assist in the operation of our Thrift Store. If you would like to join a team of people dedicated to helping their community in a fun and robust working environment – we want you! A unique partnership with the Surrey Hospice Society ensures all net income of the store is used to bene½t the people of Surrey. Donations of items in good condition can be dropped off at the store or placed in a collection bin located at most ½re halls in Surrey. Drop by and visit us Monday thru Saturday 9:30 am - 5:00 pm, Sunday 11:00 am - 4:00 pm. We are located at the corner of 72 Avenue and King George Boulevard beside the Newton Wave Pool. Contact Thrift Store Manager 7138 King George Blvd, Surrey BC V3W 5A3 • 604-599-9930

Thank you for your support: Aspen Developments Magical Dreams Foundation Odyssey International

Upcoming SFFCS Events: 4th Annual Golf Tournament June 25, 2015 Soccer Tournament July 4, 2015 Charity Cycling Ride Sept 11, 2015

Thrift Store Events: Event on June 6. Summer shoes, clothing, patio stuff, garden stuff. PLEASE DO NOT DROP OFF YOUR DONATIONS WHILE STORE IS CLOSED.

Purses, Jewelry and much more. Come join us. MISSION STATEMENT To provide charitable programs that benefit the citizens of our community and to assist other charities within the community that have similar goals and objectives.

Contact Surrey Fire Fighters’ Charitable Society www.surreyfirefighters.com • Office: 604.574.5785


Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

9

Surrey man sentenced to year Transit Police chief in jail for teen’s sex assault ▶ SHALENDRA KUMAR EARLIER PLEADED GUILDTY TO RAPE AND FOUR OTHER OFFENCES SHEILA REYNOLDS

A Surrey man who pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a 15-year-old in 1994 has been sentenced to just over a year in prison. Shalendra Kumar Sharma also pleaded guilty to three thefts – one in 2001 and two in 2011 – as well as assault causing bodily harm related to a 2011 incident. All of the offences took place in Burnaby and all of the victims were sex-trade workers. Sharma, 46, was initially charged in February 2012 with four sexual assaults, as well four counts of confinement, one of kidnapping and two of uttering threats. According to court documents, the sex assault he admitted to involved a teenage female from a troubled background who was soliciting in Vancouver. Sharma approached her in his car, they made an arrangement for paid sex and she got in his vehicle. Part way through their interaction, she decided she didn’t want to continue.

▶ “... forced sexual intercourse is among the most intrusive kinds of behaviour...”

different women, In his reasons for then drove away with sentence last month, their purses and perwhich were posted sonal belongings in online this week, the car. B.C. Supreme Court The final incident, Justice Terence which occurred in Schultes said it was December 2012, inobvious the teen’s volved a 32-year-old sexual assault was the woman who worked most serious of the in the sex trade to offences. support “On the her drug spectrum addiction. of differShe got in ent ways Sharma’s of commitcar after ting sexual the two assaults, had made forced a cash-forsexual insex agreetercourse ment, but is among Sharma the most became intrusive angry kinds of when the behaviour woman captured Shalendra Kumar wanted to by that ofbe paid in fence,” said advance. Schultes. The two got out of He said mitigating the car – the woman factors in sentencing with a window scrapSharma included his er and Sharma with a being assessed at a steering wheel lock. low-to-moderate risk Sharma chased her to re-offend and his and struck her with lack of a prior crimithe lock, fracturing nal record. her wrist. Aggravating factors

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Transit Police Chief Neil Dubord is changing hats to become the new Chief Constable of the Delta Police Department. He takes over this summer from Chief Jim Cessford, who retired earlier this year after 22 years of service with Delta Police. Dubord, 52, was deputy chief of community policing in Edmonton, where he served 25 years before coming to the Transit Police three years ago. Dubord has degrees in leadership and training as well as business management, and has also studied at the Canadian Policing College in Ottawa and with the FBI. He currently chairs the traffic committee of the B.C. Association of Chiefs of Police and is a nationally recognized expert in critical incident command. Delta Mayor Lois Jackson said Dubord was choNeil Dubord sen after an intensive search. “We looked for a chief who is a strong leader with a proven track record in policing, a critical thinker and more importantly a person who believes in community policing and our ‘no call too small’ mandate,” Jackson said, adding she believes Dubord will be an excellent fit. The Transit Police board is expected to soon appoint an interim chief to replace Dubord once he departs June 29 and begin a recruitment process.

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included the vulnerability of the victims and the persistence of Sharma’s behaviour over a lengthy period of time. “Society has to express its collective condemnation of violence towards and exploitation of sex-trade workers,” said Schultes. “It is also important to send a message to any who might be inclined to act in this way towards vulnerable victims that they can expect to receive significant sentences.” However, he said, Sharma shows good prospect of rehabilitation and appears motivated to seek treatment. The judge sentenced Sharma to 11 months for the sex assault, one month for the assault and five days each for the three thefts. His sentence will be followed by three years probation and he must register as a sex offender.

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10 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

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Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

11

▶ MOM’S SPECIAL DAY Lori Block takes her 15-month-old daughter Rosa for a post-pancakes walk during the North Surrey Lions’ 54th-annual Mother’s Day Pancake Breakfast on May 10 at Kennedy Community Hall. BOAZ JOSEPH

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▼ METHADONE A LUCRATIVE BUSINESS The review found methadone costs covered by PharmaCare have climbed by an average of 7.6 per cent a year since 2001 to nearly $44 million, making it the program’s second-highest drug cost. More than 15,000 drug addicts received PharmaCare-funded methadone in 2013 – about 5,200 in Vancouver, 3,400 in Surrey, 1,200 in Burnaby, 1,000 each in Abbotsford and Greater Victoria, and another 2,000 split between Coquitlam, New Westminster and Nanaimo. The review notes the ministry has for more than a decade dealt with methadone dispensing problems, including the offering of inducements to patients and improper billing. “There appear to be significant concerns relating to the safety, acceptability, equity and efficiency of the [program],” the review found. It also pointed to B.C.’s “generous” dispensing fees, including a witnessing fee to make sure patients drink methadone at the pharmacy, that together make it a lucrative business. Dispensing methadone to a single patient is worth nearly $6,500 a year in fees to a pharmacy net of the drug costs, the review said, and dis-

pensing other drugs to the patient can triple that. Lake defended B.C.’s policy on fees. “The witnessing fee is important to ensure that the person who is prescribed the methadone actually takes the

methadone, because there is a market value on the street and we want to ensure that the proper person is getting the medication,” he said. “There’s just a very small number of pharmacists and pharma-

cies that have been shown be not following the rules.” Other pharmacies exist near each targeted one, Lake said, and a smooth transition of patients and their prescriptions is expected.

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12 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

Skateboard round-up comes to Cloverdale ▶ FOURTH-ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION WILL INCLUDE NEW LEGENDS CLASSIC DIVISION JENNIFER LANG

Competitors from as far away as China, Brazil, Japan and Germany

THE ME IN DEMENTIA: Increasing Understanding Along the Dementia Journey Please join us for a conference to learn about brain health, understanding dementia, personal planning and research. When Thursday, May 28, 2015 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where Comfort Inn & Suites 8255 166 Street, Surrey, B.C. Pre-registration required by May 21, 2015. Fee: $20 ($30 after May 21) Lunch is included. Call to register: 1-855-742-4803 For more information, please visit www.alzheimerbc.org.

return to the Cloverdale Rodeo this weekend for the fourth-annual World Freestyle Round-up Skateboarding Championships. The four-day battle puts the fairgrounds at the centre of the freestyle skateboarding universe, attracting top amateurs and professionals – as well as masters-level athletes taking part in a new “legends” category this year. There’s $10,000 in prize money up for grabs May 15-18, along with prizes from sponsors for amateurs, but that’s not the only reason more than 30 skaters from eight countries will be taking part. Last year, 12-year-old Japanese skateboarder Isamu Yamamoto took the competition by storm, beating out Kaue Araujo from Brazil for the top spot in the amateur division. Yamamoto will be back – this time in the pro division. Also look for Surrey’s Dillanger Kane, a 19-year-old who will be competing in the amateur division. He’s been skateboarding for seven years, but turned to freestyle four years ago.

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Japan’s Isamu Yamamoto, 12, won the amateur division last year and is turning pro at this year’s skateboard contest. JIM GOODRICH He’s currently studying computer science at BCIT and skates at least five days a week. Also returning is special guest Kilian Martin, a YouTube phenomenon presenting skateboard demos Sunday, May 17 from 2 to 6 p.m., and Monday, May 18 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. More than 80,000 people attended the rodeo and fair last year, making it the ideal location to showcase the sport, and for the competitors to take advantage of the smooth concrete surface of the venue, the Cloverdale Curling Rink.

Each day there are several shows featuring demos and contests, using a battle format, with three heats of about 20 minutes each for each show. There will be a DJ spinning tunes while the contestants battle it out. For the first year, the competition has opened a new division, the Legends Freestyle Classic for skaters 50 and over. “There’s quite a few of them out there,” notes promoter Monty Little, a Cloverdale resident who’s part of the team organizing the event

and is one of the sport’s most persuasive ambassadors. The up-and-comers enjoy mixing with the “legends” of the sport. “These are our forefathers,” Little says. Freestyle is a grassroots, highly technical style of skateboarding characterized by choreographed tricks performed on flat surfaces. There are no ramps, rails or stairs. With “maybe 350 (people) in the world” competing in freestyle, “we try to reach out to everybody,” says Little, who notes competitions are more likely to take place under a viaduct than in an arena-like venue like the Cloverdale Curling Club. While the competition is fierce, the event itself is almost more of a reunion for the entrants than anything else. Competitors scrape up enough money to cover travel costs and most billet or bunk with organizers during their stay in Surrey. “This is a family,” he says. “A lot of people feel it’s more than a contest. It’s a therapy camp.” Little allows that while there aren’t a lot of “sisters in the family” there is one woman taking part, Mic Murayama, and she’ll compete

against the guys for the third year in a row in Cloverdale. She placed eighth in the amateur division in 2013 and within the top 10 the year before, so it will be interesting to see how she fares in 2015. Since debuting at the Cloverdale Rodeo and Country Fair in 2012, the event has been a consistent (and weather-proof) crowd pleaser – drawing standing-room-only audiences and forcing organizers to bring out a fourth set of bleachers this year – and is emerging as the premier freestyle competition in the world. “It’s been so well received,” Little says. “That’s why the rodeo is so excited to have us.” It’s also free, exciting to watch for rodeo-goers of all ages, and, best of all, sure to inspire the next generation of freestyle skateboarders. Watch for freestyle demos at Thursday’s Bed Races (5:45 p.m., 176A Street at 57A Avenue), the Cloverdale Chili Cook-off Friday at Clover Square Village (4:45 p.m.) and as part of the Cloverdale Rodeo Parade Saturday, at 10 a.m. Visit theworldround up.com for more information.

Public Comment Period Consideration to Amend Permit No. 2012 – 072 Direct Transfer Coal Facility May 4 – 19, 2015

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Fraser Surrey Docks LP (FSD) is considering applying to amend its existing permit from Port Metro Vancouver (Permit No. 2012 – 072) that gives it conditional approval to build and operate a Direct Transfer Coal Facility within its existing lease area. The proposed amendment would have no impact on the volume of coal permitted to be shipped through FSD (4 million metric tonnes per year). It would allow FSD to load coal directly from the facility to ocean-going vessels eliminating or reducing the number of barges required. Please visit www.fsd.bc.ca/amendment to review the changes to the existing permit that FSD is considering and provide feedback on the proposed scope of the studies, which will assess the difference between the use of ocean-going vessels and barges.

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Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

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14 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

Vancouver unhappiest city in Canada? ▶ B.C. CITIES RANK LOW ON STATISTICS CANADA LIST OF HAPPY PLACES Cross This Bridge Toll-Free...

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B.C. may be a balmy lotus land where you can theoretically ski, golf and swim in the same day, but that doesn’t seem to make us any happier than the rest of the country. A national survey of life happiness across Canada found Vancouver was dead last among 33 cities surveyed, just behind Toronto. Statistics Canada’s

How’s Life in the City report paints a bleak picture of residents in other B.C. cities as well. Kelowna ranked highest at #12, Abbotsford was 24th (behind Winnipeg and Regina), while Victoria, which taunts the rest of the country with its January flower count, was 27th. Respondents were asked to rate how they feel about their life as a whole right now on a satisfaction scale from zero to 10. The question was asked of 340,000 Canadians between 2009 and 2013 as part of broad social and

health surveys, and the results were averaged by census metropolitan area and economic region. Topping the list of happy places were Saguenay and Trois-Rivieres in Quebec, followed by St. John’s, Newfoundland, and Sudbury, Ontario. The gap between the cities ranked is not large. Vancouverites rated their life satisfaction on average at 7.8 out of 10, while Victoria and Abbotsford averaged 7.9, Kelowna was 8.0 and chart-topping Saguenay is just over 8.2.

Teresa Conway M mb Me ber sin ince c 19990 ce

The findings also show 40 to 45 per cent of residents in Sudbury, Thunder Bay and St. John’s rated their life happiness a 9 or 10 compared to less than 35 per cent in Vancouver, the lowest in the country. It also measured the other end of the scale – the people who were least happy. The cities with the largest numbers of residents rating their life a 6 or lower were Windsor, Toronto, Abbotsford, Peterborough, St. Catherines and Vancouver, while Quebec cities had the fewest number of low scores. Life satisfaction appears to be higher in smaller communities, the report says, noting the top ranked cities have fewer than 250,000 residents, while Toronto and Vancouver are at the bottom. It cited a 2014 study that found “life satisfaction and happiness are lower in denser, more urbanized settings.” The Statistics Canada analysis points to health as a key factor for happiness, along

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with economic and social factors such as income, employment and marriage status. “Individuals rating their health as ‘excellent’ have life satisfaction scores a full point higher than those rating their health as ‘good’, and almost three points higher than those rating their health as ‘poor’,” it says. Being unemployed is a downer, it adds, while richer households tend to be happier. According to a global measuring stick, the World Happiness Report, income is the most important of six key variables that account for three-quarters of the variation in life satisfaction among people in the same country. The study also ranked economic regions. Northern Quebec was the country’s happiest. B.C.’s regions scored an average happiness level of 8.1 in the Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island and the Kootenays; 8.0 in the Cariboo, Thompson-Okanagan and North Coast-Nechako; and 7.8, the lowest in the country, in the northeast.

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The Alzheimer Society of B.C. will host the Me in Dementia: Increasing Understanding Along the Dementia Journey conference, May 28 in Surrey. Geared towards people with early-stage dementia, their caregivers and family members in the South Fraser region, the daylong conference is to include presentations on brain health, understanding dementia, planning for the future and a research update. On average, one in 11 Canadians over the age of 65 lives with dementia. Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain and results in increasingly impaired memory, thinking, reasoning and behaviour. The conference is set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Comfort Inn & Suites (8255 166 St.). The deadline to register ($20) is May 21. For more information, call 1-855-7424803.


Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

15

Detached houses record fastest price gains ▶ TOWNHOUSES, CONDOS LAG IN LOWER MAINLAND REAL ESTATE JEFF NAGEL

Detached house prices climbed 5.2 per cent in the past year in the Fraser Valley, while townhouse and apartment prices are stagnant. The Fraser Valley Real Estate Board reported its benchmark price for houses continued to gain in the early months of 2015 to reach $595,600 in April. That’s up 15 per cent from five years ago. The strongest gains were in South Surrey/White Rock, where houses were up eight per

cent since April of 2014. Townhouses have been tepid, however, with the Fraser Valley benchmark price of $300,400 up just 0.6 per cent from a year earlier and down 1.9 per cent from five years ago. Apartments have fared worse yet, with benchmark prices down 2.6 per cent from a year ago to $191,200. That’s a drop of 8.8 per cent from five years ago. Abbotsford has actually seen strong one-year price gains for townhouses (up 7.3 per cent) and apartments (up 11 per cent) but apartment price drops of around eight per cent or more in Langley, Surrey and North Delta have pulled the regional average

Snow shortage unlikely to dry up reservoirs ▶ WATER CONSERVATION BEATING REGIONAL DISTRICT’S TARGETS JEFF NAGEL

Metro Vancouver’s water reservoirs are nearly full and the regional district expects no water supply problems despite extremely low snowpacks. The lowest level is at Seymour Lake, which is 87 per cent full, but it and other reservoirs are expected to be topped up with rains in early May, according to a Metro staff report. Snowpacks levels near upper reservoirs are at less than 10 per cent of the long-term average so runoff to refill reservoirs this summer will be much less than normal, the report said. But conservation is working in the regional district’s favour. Tighter morning-only lawn sprinkling regu-

lations imposed over the past four years has pushed average daily water use in the region down by about 10 per cent since 2010 – better than a regional target of five per cent, or one per cent each year. Overall, Metro residents are using 27 per cent less water per capita than they were in 1993, the report said. Water stored in the reservoirs and alpine lakes that Metro can tap should be adequate, the report said, noting water use limits can be tightened further in the event of extreme drought or unusually high demand. Regular lawn sprinkling restrictions take effect June 1. Residential sprinkling is allowed from 4 to 9 a.m. only on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday for even-numbered addresses and Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday for odd-numbered addresses.

Southern Rail, union reach deal to end lockout

Prices of detached houses climbed more than five per cent in the Fraser Valley in the poast year. FILE PHOTO down. Price gains continue to be stronger closer to Vancouver in

CELEBRATE ARTS & HERITAGE IN SURREY

HELP US DISCOVER OUR NEXT

SURREY CIVIC TREASURE

CALL FOR 2015 NOMINATIONS ED MILANEY

BONNIE BURNSIDE

GEORGE ZUKERMAN

SHEILA SYMINGTON

LUCILLE LEWIS

CAROL GIRARDI

LORNE PEARSON

MARY MIKELSON

JIM ADAMS

MARC PELECH

BARBARA GOULD

STEPHEN HORNING

This award recognizes and celebrates Surrey’s highest achievers in the cultural sector, demonstrating that Surrey values arts and heritage and those people who achieve success in these fields.

Nominees should meet the following criteria: tBe a Surrey resident, born in Surrey or have a strong connection to the City of Surrey. tDemonstrate excellence and contribute significantly to the appreciation and development of culture in Surrey. tReflect the unique character and history of the City.

STEPHEN CHITTY

ROBERT DAVIDSON

ALLAN CLEAVER

DAVE PROZNICK

STAN CLARKE

CHRIS THORNLEY

NADINE GAGNÉ

tRepresent a significant achievement in the arts, heritage, cultural industries, cultural tourism, multiculturalism or related advocacy and philanthropy.

DAWN GOVIER

Nominations must be submitted by: Tuesday, June 9, 2015

JEFF NAGEL

A lengthy labour dispute is over between Southern Railway of B.C. and its unionized employees. Members of CUPE local 7000 voted 68 per cent to ratify the new contract, which includes wage hikes totaling 10.5 per cent over seven years, while preserving or improving other benefits or working conditions. The U.S.-owned firm locked out its 126 employees Jan. 5. During the 119-day lockout Southern Railway managers ran the short line railway, which hauls cargo around the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley. The lockout began after the union in December rejected a final contract offer of nearly 10 per cent in pay hikes spread over six years.

communities tracked by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) , which includes all

cities north of the Fraser as well as Tsawwassen. The REBGV benchmark price for detached houses was up 12.5 per cent from a year ago to $1.08 million and runs as high as $2.5 million on Vancouver’s west side. Greater Vancouver townhouses gained 5.7 per cent on average from a year ago to $493,300 and apartments climbed 4.4 percent to $394,200. “The supply of homes for sale today in the region is not meeting the demand we’re seeing from home buyers,” said REBGV president Darcy McLeod. “This is putting upward pressure on prices, particularly in the detached home market.”

JARNAIL SINGH

PATRICIA DAHLQUIST MAXINE LLOYD HOWCHIN

ELLIE KING

Please send these materials to: Attn: 2015 Surrey Civic Treasures Award Surrey Arts Centre 13750 – 88th Ave. Surrey, B.C. V3W 3L1 Or e-mail to: arts@surrey.ca

KELLY KONNO

ELIZABETH CAREFOOT

DON HUTCHINSON

EILEEN GRATLAND

In their respective fields of expertise, all of the Surrey Civic Treasures pictured above are champions of our City’s Arts & Heritage. For further information please contact: Jewel Jessen at (604) 501-5186

To submit a nomination: t Provide a written submission of approximately 300 words to describe the nominee and outline their accomplishments and contributions to the development and promotion of arts, heritage, cultural industries, cultural tourism, multiculturalism or related advocacy and philanthropy in Surrey. tPlease provide references to other individuals who may be able to provide further support to this nomination. tProvide the name, address and contact information for the nominee and include your name and contact information.


16 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

Johal appointed director of Fraser Health board ▶ FORMER TV REPORTER IS ALSO LNG PROMOTER JEFF NAGEL

Former Global TV reporter Jas Johal, currently a spokesman for the BC LNG Alliance, is the newest director on the board of the Fraser Health Authority. The one-year appointment was made by Health Minister Terry Lake, who cited Johal’s unique skill set and international and local media experience. “His strong ties to the South Asian community and his cultural background will allow him to provide an important perspective to the board around

health care needs of the people served in Fraser Health,” Lake said. There are currently two South Asian directors serving on the nine-member Fraser Health board – Royal Bank executive Inde Sumal and former Surrey councillor Barinder Rasode. Johal, a Tsawwassen resident, replaces Sumal, whose term expires May 31. Fraser Health directors are paid a base retainer of $7,500 a year and collect varying amounts – typically $14,000 to $20,000 in total – after meeting attendance fees are added and additional pay for chairing committees.

*

Green light, rules for pot producers ▶ PRODUCERS CAN BUILD ON LAND WITHIN THE ALR JEFF NAGEL

The province has given the green light for medical marijuana to be produced in the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) despite objections from some cities. Along with the formal change to the ALR regulation making medical cannabis an allowed use, is a standard that municipalities are expected to follow in passing local bylaws to control any federally licensed commercial pot producers within their boundaries. Delta, Langley Township, Abbotsford and Kelowna must have approval from the province on any bylaws they pass affecting farmland, so Victoria has a hammer to force them to comply. Other municipalities may have a somewhat freer hand in passing restrictions but they cannot prohibit licensed pot farms outright. The province’s bylaw standard sets out setbacks from streams

Cannabis plants growing at MediJean, a medical marijuana facility on industrial land in Richmond. The province has agreed licensed producers can also build on land in the ALR. MEDIJEAN and property lines, a maximum footprint size for the facility, and minimum distances from parks, schools and urban or ALR boundaries. The agriculture ministry said it expects all local bylaws to comply with the bylaw standard and the amended regulation by early fall, adding it sought to ensure as much ALR land is used for agriculture as possible

while balancing other requirements. Langley Township Mayor Jack Froese, one of the municipal leaders who opposed allowing the construction of heavily fortified pot factories on ALR land at all, said Friday he is studying the new rules. Froese said the province appears to have taken into account many issues raised by municipalities, but

added he is still concerned cities will face higher costs to regulate the facilities and police quiet country roads for any criminals they may attract. “The biggest concerns we have is safety and protection of the environment,” he said. Langley Township has already set a business licence fee of $5,000 for medical marijuana producers and Froese hopes that

won’t have to change. “That gives us some control over inspection and that’s important,” he said. “Medical marijuana, as far as I’m concerned, is a pharmaceutical. It’s a lot different than just growing tomatoes.” Under the provincial rules, pot producers on ALR land will still have to pay industrial property tax rates, not the lower agricultural rate.

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Top doc defends medicinal pot Free Nail Trim ▶ DR. PERRY KENDALL OPPOSES FEDS, MAKES A CASE FOR REGULATION JEFF NAGEL

B.C.’s provincial health officer is defending the value of marijuana as a medicine after federal Health Minister Rona Ambrose urged the City of Vancouver to shut down all local pot dispensaries rather than regulating them. Dr. Perry Kendall took issue with various federal policies on pot in an interview with Black Press, particularly Ambrose’s suggestion marijuana doesn’t have the utility of approved pharmaceuticals. He said there’s “a growing body of evidence” that cannabis is effective as an appetite stimulant, an anti-nauseant and as a chronic pain killer, including against spastic neurological conditions like ALS, among others. And he suggested access to medical marijuana saves lives when it supplants other pain control drugs that are more dangerous and addictive. “The U.S. states that have had medical cannabis access provisions actually have about a 20 per cent lower overdose death rate from opioid prescriptions than states that don’t have access to medical cannabis,” he said. “It’s probably a lot less dangerous than opioids are – less than morphine would be or Oxycodone, which can be highly addictive and quite lethal.” Unlike either alcohol or opiates, Kendall noted, “there is no lethal dose of cannabis.” He said the Supreme Court of Canada was sufficiently persuaded 10 years ago that a medical exemption for marijuana was justified and Health Canada’s own website outlines various studies on its medical applications, which he said range from “weak” research to “quite convincing.” Kendall said there’s also growing evidence that some young children who suffer from seizure conditions respond better to cannabis than any other medication.  He acknowledged that doctors and their professional organizations are divided on their comfort level in prescribing medical pot, how to make those decisions and the liabilities

that may flow. Ambrose’s central argument against storefront dispensaries is that they normalize and encourage pot use for teens who are more vulnerable to its risks. Kendall agreed developing young minds shouldn’t be exposed to pot – or alcohol or other drugs. He said young people who use any of those substances heavily Dr. Perry at an early age Kendall are at greater risk for future problems. “There is some evidence that links heavier cannabis use at a younger age with psychosis and perhaps early onset schizophrenia,” Kendall said, adding it’s unclear if the link is causal or reflects users who are self-medicating their existing conditions. “Infrequent use, as with alcohol, is certainly less harmful.” He noted Colorado has seen a huge increase in the number of medical marijuana dispensaries over several years, yet marijuana use among

youth has actually declined slightly. Asked if he takes issue with any elements of the federal policy on medical marijuana, Kendall listed the ban on home grows, which he said has pushed up the price of the drug for low-income patients. He also took aim at the federal policy that medical pot only be sold in the form of dried leaves, which is being challenged in court. “Smoking is not the best way of getting marijuana because you get all the combustion products in your lungs,” Kendall said, noting many users would prefer to buy oils, capsules or edible products, which may also offer a more gradual delivery of the active ingredients. He cautioned that legalization in Colorado has brought overdose “misadventures” because the state didn’t adequately regulate edibles like pot brownies. “You need some quali-

ty control over what’s in it, how much is in it and how much you’d eat of it,” he said. Another lesson from Washington State’s legalization experience, he said, is that differential taxes have made recreational pot much more expensive than medical marijuana sold by dispensaries, which users now favour as a result. Kendall has been an advocate in the past of some form of legalization and he isn’t wavering now. “It would be preferable to create a regulatory framework to direct product to informed adults who wanted to use it and are going to use it anyway,” he said. “You could control the price, you could tax it, you could hopefully develop a legitimate market and potentially take it out of the hands of criminal gangs.” Restrictions can ban advertising and otherwise reduce access to children, but Kendall said teens are likely to obtain marijuana and alcohol one way or another. “Just because kids get alcohol doesn’t mean

to say adults shouldn’t be able to buy it if they want to,” he said, adding adults also abuse alcohol at a significant cost to society. “Alcohol consumption during pregnancy is probably one of the most easily preventable forms of developmental disability in babies. But we don’t ban alcohol because some people use it irresponsibly.”

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18 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

Rules tighten for doctors who prescribe medicinal marijuana WHO WILL YOU RELAY FOR?

▶ NEW STANDARD TO CURB SPEEDY WEED DOCS, AVOID ‘FREE FOR ALL’ JEFF NAGEL

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Doctors who prescribe medical marijuana to their patients are being directed by their regulatory body to follow a new professional standard that may reduce legal access to the drug. The standard approved May 1 by the B.C. College of Physicians and Surgeons sets out detailed requirements doctors should follow if they authorize a patient to receive pot from a federally licensed commercial producer. Except in rare cases, it says, patients under age 25 shouldn’t get pot at all, nor should those with psychosis or substance abuse disorders, cardiovascular or respiratory

illnesses, or those who are pregnant or breastfeeding. And medical marijuana should only be prescribed with the consent of a doctor who has an ongoing “treating relationship” with the patient. Doctors of B.C. President Dr. Bill Cavers said he hopes that condition weeds out speedy pot authorizations from physicians who specialize in them, sometimes online via Skype. “I don’t think it’s appropriate for a person to walk into a clinic for the first time ever and then walk out with a doctor’s signature with no follow-up or ongoing therapeutic relationship,” he said. “Any physician providing a signature or access to marijuana for medical usage should know their patients.” Cavers acknowl-

edged approval will be “more difficult” for would-be medical pot users who don’t have a family doctor, but he said some walk-in clinics do offer ongoing care for patients.

Dr. Bill Cavers

He said he supports the new standard. “There needed to be guidelines otherwise it’s a free-for-all with a substance that we

know has had some deleterious effects in some people.” Cavers said the federal government has put added responsibility on doctors by requiring an authorization that amounts to a prescription for pot instead of the old system of merely confirming a patient had an eligible condition. He said most B.C. doctors don’t want to prescribe pot without much more evidence of its benefits and how it can be safely and effectively used – as with any other pharmaceutical. “It is the responsibility of Health Canada, I think, to come in and actually clarify this,” Cavers said. “Physicians are crying out for more investigation to find out whether marijuana is an effective substance and, if so, for what conditions, at what dosage and for what duration.

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We need all those answers to do a good job for our patients.” Pot-prescribing doctors who violate the new rules could be investigated by the college if a complaint is lodged and potentially face discipline. Doctors are supposed to document that conventional medicine hasn’t worked, that they discussed the risks of pot with a patient and assessed them for potential addiction. A doctor who can’t demonstrate they complied with the professional standard might also be denied insurance if a patient they prescribe pot gets ill and sues. It’s unclear what the changes may mean for the rapidly sprouting pot dispensaries that have varying rules on who they will sell cannabis. “Some dispensaries will sell to anybody who walks in with no paperwork at all,” said pro-cannabis crusader Dana Larsen. Others – including the one he operates – are stricter and require some form of physician approval, he said. Municipal regulations planned by Vancouver and potentially other cities may tighten those practices, he said. Larsen said the college’s standard may spur willing doctors to refuse to issue a formal authorization for cannabis from a licensed producer – which copies the paperwork to Health Canada – but instead provide a note to take to a dispensary. “When a doctor signs our paperwork nobody sees that but us and the doctor and the patient,” Larsen said. “If anything this could push some doctors to be more likely to prescribe for dispensaries and less likely to prescribe for licensed producers.” The college’s new standard also bars doctors from charging for patients for a cannabis authorization, or for any other associated services.


Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

19

Chiefs take two of three from the Reds ▶ PBL TEAM HAS A WINNING RECORD IN THE MONTH OF MAY

game Sunday, collecting six strikeouts without a walk to get credit for the win. Reds batters managed just five singles and a pair of doubles, failing to score a run. The Chiefs got three hits from Braeden Massignani, and two each from Ryan Kaplanis, Matt Legg, Soper and Espig. Legg, Soper, Espig and Ken Dubois each had a pair of RBIs. Pitchers dominated the final game of the weekend, with Soper throwing a complete-game one-hitter

RICK KUPCHUK

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

LEADER

After a very slow start to their season, the Whalley Chiefs have been a winning team in the month of May. The Chiefs have won five of their past seven B.C. Premier Baseball League starts, including two victories in three games against the Coquitlam Reds last week. Whalley hosted the Reds Thursday night and left Whalley Stadium with a 6-1 win. Sunday in Coquitlam, the Chiefs won the first game of a double header 8-0 before falling 3-2 in the second contest. Two weeks into the season, the Chiefs were 1-7 (won-lost) and in the league basement. Whalley is currently at 7-10 and firmly in a playoff position in the 12-team league. The Chiefs had little trouble topping Coquitlam Thursday

only to be tagged with a loss. Soper had a no-hitter going until the sixth inning, but issued three walks. The Reds then scored on a wild pitch and and infield out to tie the score, then got the winning on a single to left field. Soper finished the game with four strikeouts, and allowed four walks. Hirakawa-Kao smacked a two-run home run in the second inning to give the Chiefs an early lead, one of just three hits by Whalley batters.

The Chiefs are scheduled for a pair of evening doubleheaders this week. They were to play the first place Langley Blaze (12-3) last night at Whalley Stadium, then will play two on the road against the White Rock Tritons (3-16) Friday evening at 5:30 and 8 p.m. at South Surrey Athletic Park. On Sunday, the Chiefs are at home to the Victoria Eagles (13-5) for games at 1 and 3:30 p.m. at Whalley Stadium.

Thomas Espig (right) of the Whalley Chiefs covers first base during a PBL game earlier this season. Espig had three hits in a win Thursday over the Coquitlam Reds, then was the winning pitcher Sunday in Coquitlam. BOAZ JOSEPH night, jumping to an early 3-0 lead and cruising to a five-run victory. Kyle Stubbins pitched a complete game for the win, running his record to 3-0 with a 1.00 earned run average (ERA). He

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struck out five batters without a walk while holding Coquitlam to one earned run on four hits. Chiefs batters provided plenty of offense, belting out 12 hits over six innings, including a pair of

doubles from Lichel Hirakawa-Kao. Lucas Soper had three hits and a pair of runs batted in (RBIs). Thomas Espig also had three hits, including a double, and scored twice. Espig was on the mound in the first

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20 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

Popowich, Burzan taken early in WHL draft ▶ TEN LOCAL HOCKEY PLAYERS TAKEN IN ANNUAL BANTAM DRAFT RICK KUPCHUK

Two players from Surrey were among the top 10 selections in Thursday’s Western Hockey League Bantam Draft. Tyler Popowich of the Okanagan Hockey Academy (OHA) was selected third overall by the Vancouver Giants. The six-foot-four, 190-pound centre from Surrey played at

the Burnaby Winter Club until joining the OHA early in the 2013-14 season, his first in the Bantam division. This past season, Popowich scored 25 goals and 57 points in 47 games played. At the BC Cup Male U16 tournament last month in Salmon Arm, Popowich tallied six goals and added an assist in six games played. “Tyler is a big centre with tons of upside,” said Giants executive vice-president/general manager Scott Bonner in a statement. “He

competes, scores and Warriors. makes plays. The last Burzan played with big centre we had as Surrey MHA’s Tier 1 an organization was Bantam team in the James Wright, and 2013-14 season, then that draft joined class of the North ▶ “Tyler is players Shore Winborn in ter Club a big centre 1990 was just prior with tons of highly to this past successseason. upside.” ful. We’re A sixSCOTT BONNER excited to foot, welcome 165-pound Tyler to forward, the hockey club.” Burzan ranked second Luka Burzan of the in scoring at the WestNorth Shore Winter ern Canada Bantam Club (NSWC) was Championship in Winclaimed sixth overall nipeg with 10 points by the Moose Jaw (four goals, six assists)

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in five games played. The NSWC Winter Hawks went 3-1-1 (won-lost-tied) to win the championship. Burzan had 65 goals and 108 points in 52 games with the Winter Hawks. At the BC Cup, where he was a teammate of Popowich, he scored six times and assisted on six other goals. “For us, he was the best forward in the draft,” said Warriors general manager Alan Millar. “We just think that he’s a very complete player – skilled, skates very well and will be able to produce offence for our hockey club and be able to play both ways as well.” The draft, which allows WHL teams to select 15 year-olds who have completed their final season in the Bantam (14-15 year-old) division, had eight other local

players selected. The first pick of the third round, 45th overall, was Surrey’s Matthew Mosher. A member of the Semiahmoo Minor Hockey Association until joining the Delta Hockey Academy in Ladner for this past season, Mosher was chosen by the Saskatoon Blades. The Prince George Cougars took Tyler Ho of Surrey with the 66th selection. Ho played in the Surrey Minor Hockey Association before moving over to the NSWC for his second season in the Bantam division. He scored four goals and eight points in five games played at the Western Canada Bantam Championship, then totalled three goals and six points at the B.C. Cup. White Rock’s Kabir Gill, also a North Shore Winter Club member, went to the

Seattle Thunderbirds in the fifth round, 103rd overall. Justyn Gurney of North Delta was claimed 117th overall in the sixth round by the Calgary Hitmen. South Surrey’s Ethan Scardina of the Delta Hockey Academy was the 121st selection in the sixth round by the Everett Silvertips. Burnaby Winter Club member Ilijah Colina of North Delta was the171st pick, taken by the Portland Winterhawks in the eighth round. Delta native Owen Williams of Notre Dame hockey program in Saskatchewan was drafted by the Regina Pats, 190th overall in the ninth round. Delta Hockey Academy member Jack Judson of South Surrey was chosen by the Vancouver Giants 201st overall in the 10th round.

H E R I TA G E S E R V I C E S

Call for Multicultural Objects Has your family moved to Surrey from another country? Do you have objects related to your culture that you would like to donate to Surrey’s museums? The City is building its cultural collections to share Surrey’s diversity with all residents. We are looking for objects related to: • Personal clothing and adornment • Dance, music, crafts • Home wares and tools • Business and work • Ceremonies and ethnic traditions For more information contact Lana Panko, Curator of Collections for Surrey Museum and Historic Stewart Farm, 604-592-6405.

Call 604-575-5342 OR Email circulation@surreyleader.com

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ARTS S & HERIT HERITAGE IN N SUR SUR URREY RREY EY

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Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

21

Beeing number one ▼ KHALSA SCHOOL STUDENTS WIN NATIONAL SPELLING BEE COMPETITION EVAN SEAL

For Khalsa School student Prabhleen Kaur Sandhu, 12, competing on the national stage was extremely nerve-wracking. “I was so nervous, but I really wanted a medal,” said the Grade 6 student. “I was turning red and blue and all colours.” Sandhu and her classmates Mehar Kaur Sahota and Harshvir Singh Shergill were in Toronto May 1 facing off against the best spellers in the country at the 28th-annual Spelling Bee of Canada competition. And for all three, the competition was extremely competitive. After four rounds of words in the 12- to 14-year-old intermediate category, Sandhu had proven she belonged, not missing a single word. Then came the word “reassured,” and she nailed it, but for the next competitor, “Leucine” was not so easy and that word eventually eliminated many of the students from the competition. With only a few competitors left, a young boy in front of Sandhu was asked to spell the word “Astroturf.” Although he spelled the word correctly, he was not given credit. Sandhu then asked the judges, “is that a proper noun?” meaning it needed a capital “A.” She spelled the word again with the upper-case letter and her competitor was eliminated. Asking a clarification question is a strategy the Khalsa School spelling club coaches – Kylie Morrison and Harbax Kaur Jaswal – had drilled into their students. “We play a lot of spelling games in the club,” said Morrison. “It’s not overnight, it’s years of hard work. They have all worked so hard, it really comes down to them and all the practicing they do.”

Khalsa School spelling bee champions Mehar Kaur Sahota (left) and Prabhleen Kaur Sandhu. Sandhu eventually misspelled “becquerel,” however she would spell the word “cartouche” correctly to win third place, $1,000 and a trophy. Classmate Sahota competed in the nine- to 11-year-old age group, junior category, making it to the fourth round with 27 out of 30 competitors still standing, so she knew she was in a tough battle. Before the competition the students were given a list of 400 words to study, but after the fourth round comes the tie-breaker words – basically the dictionary becomes the list and the words become much tougher. In the fifth round Sahota correctly spelled “halfpenny,” but the next word was “Guernsey,” an island in the English Channel, and that eliminated 17 students. The competition rule is if a competitor gets a word wrong then that word gets passed to the next competitor, but as soon as one student gets the word right all those who misspelled the word are eliminated. For Sahota the competition came down to the 14th round with 10 students still left. She correctly spelled the word “antics,” but the next challenge was “calmative.” Every student spelled it wrong

and when Sahota had her chance to win it all, the coaching and practice kicked in. “I asked for a clarification and they said it was a type of sedative,” she said. “Some students had spelled it with a ‘comm’ or ‘kom’ but I thought sedative means ‘calm’ so I immediately knew it.” That was all she needed to win gold, a $1,000 cheque and a giant trophy. “We all had butterflies,” said school principal Kamalpreet Kaur Baga. “When we won I was screaming, we all had tears in our eyes.” Classmate Shergill, 8, also performed well, making it to the fifth round, but was eliminated on a tie-breaker. For English department head and co-coach Jaswal, who was herself a spelling bee champion in 1978, all the credit goes to the students. “The key for us is knowing the root words and the origin of the words,” she said. “We are constantly using word association and watching news stories to help make word connections.” Khalsa School is lobbying to have next year’s national spelling bee held at the school’s Old Yale Road campus.

▼ LIBRARY BOOK CLUB LOOKS BACK AT TWO DECADES

Members of the George Mackie Library Book Club. SUBMITTED

BLACK PRESS

▶ A CLEAN SWEEP Students at St. Bernadette Elementary School in Newtoon collected four garbage bagfulls of trash during a neighbourhood cleanup for Earth Day. The project was organized by Grade 4 students and coordinated with parents to provides a safe way for students to show their concern for the enviroment. SUBMITTED

The George Mackie Library Book Club recently celebrated 20-plus years together. The book club has read 12 books per year since conception, meeting at the George Mackie Library on the second Tuesday of each month to discuss the corresponding title.  Although library records indicate the George Mackie Library Book Club has been in existence for 20 years, original member Roslyn Simon says the group began in 1988.  Regardless, the current book club coordinator Carol Mores finds the longevity of the group amazing.  The group regularly sees six to 10 attendees each month reading titles they might not normally have chosen

EVAN SEAL

on their own. Twenty years ago the North Delta group was reading One True Thing by Anna Quindlen.  Recently, members met to discuss An Irish Country Doctor by Patrick Taylor.  In recognition of each group’s long history with Fraser Valley Regional Library, library staff provided tea and goodies at their last meeting. The library welcomes new members. Meet fellow book lovers and discuss a selected title. 

Future titles will be Language of Flowers, Love Anthony, 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out Windows and more. Call 604-594-8155 or visit the library (8840 112 St.) to learn which book is being discussed each month. Copies of the current month’s book are available at the library.  The Fraser Valley Regional Library Book Discussion Groups Collection currently has 325 titles on their inventory and supplies a total of 145 book clubs.


22

ETCETERA

The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

▶ ARTS The featured artists at the Newton Cultural Centre for the month of May are photographer Roland Rihela and Gunilla Kay, who creates stained and fused glass works. Their exhibit, titled Through the Looking Glass, will be on display from through May 30 at the gallery, located at 13530 72 Ave. For hours or more information, call 604-594-2700 or visit artscouncilofsurrey.ca.

Centre for the Arts, 11489 84 Ave. The Delta Arts Council welcomes Heins, who has been a regular guest at the monthly Open Mic and has wowed the audience. Doors open at 2 p.m. Admission is $10 at door. For more Information, call 604-596-1025 or 604-596-4485.

▶ COMMUNITY

Watershed Artworks is hosting the Whole Lotta Art Artisan Market on May 23 at the Gallery Shop, 11425 84 Ave. Food, entertainment, and, naturally, a whole lotta art. Want to be a vendor? Email June at june.bergen.holt@gmail. com

Conversation Circles at the George Mackie Library (8440 112 St.) take place on Thursdays, May 14, 21 and 28, and June 4, 11 and 18 from 7-8:30 p.m. Practice your English and meet people in a friendly, relaxed environment. There will be guided weekly discussions and activities on everyday topics.

The Dominik Heins Trio will perform on May 24 at 2:30 p.m. at the Firehall

Poetry Night in Punjabi takes place on four Tuesdays, May 19, June 16,

July 21 and Aug. 18 from 6:30–8 p.m. at George Mackie Library, 8440 112 St. In collaboration with Kendri Punjabi Lekhak Sabha, Uttari Amrika and Punjabi Lekhak Manch – Vancouver, the event is in Punjabi and Hindi. Two published poets/authors will read and discuss their work and answer questions from the audience.

▶ EVENTS The Surrey International Children’s Festival takes place May 21-23 at the Surrey Arts Centre and Bear Creek Park (13750 88 Ave.) Site entrance is free, as are many family-oriented activities. For information about ticketed shows, visit surreychildrensfestival.ca or call 604-501-5598. The Color Me Rad 5K takes place on May 23 at

SURREY MUSEUM

There’s Always Something Happening At The Surrey Museum Discovery Saturdays Ready to Rodeo

Ice Cream Afternoon

Include a visit to the Surrey Museum in your Cloverdale Rodeo plans. We’ll show cowpokes of all ages the ropes as you learn to lasso and try cow-folk crafts. Tap your toes to western music and a swinging country square dance performance. Saturday, May 16 1:00pm-4:00pm All ages, by donation

Let’s all scream for this frosty treat beloved by generations and cultures across Surrey. Take a turn cranking the old-fashioned ice cream maker, enjoy an ice cream cone, and get creative with chilly crafts. Saturday, June 20 1:00pm-4:00pm All ages, by donation

17710-56A Avenue Info 604-592-6956

9 a.m. at Holland Park, 13428 Old Yale Rd. This event features eight colour stations that will leave you covered from head to toe in powders and gels of pink, yellow, green, blue, and violet. Visit http://bit. ly/1IhBUHB to sign up. Antiques off the Roadshow takes place at the Surrey Art Gallery (13750 88 Ave.) on Saturday, May 30 from 12-3 p.m. Items will be given a verbal appraisal by experts who are knowledgeable about jewelery, antiques, collectibles, antiquarian books, and Asian, European, and First Nations art.

▶ FUNDRAISING The Surrey Heritage Society, which operates the BC Vintage Truck Museum, is holding its Italian Buffet fundraising dinner on May 21 at 6 p.m. at the Loft Bar and Grill, 5640 188 St. Tickets are $25 at the Vintage Truck Museum at 6022 176 St. Tickets include dinner, a drink, auction, 50/50 draw and door prizes.

▶ DRESSED TO RIDE Elite British dressage rider and double Olympic gold medalist (London, 2012) Charlotte Dujardin (right) guides Langley’s Dominique Buckland during a demonstration at the 2015 West Coast Dressage Symposia at the Cloverdale Agriplex on May 2. The event was presented by Scott Hayes Productions. BOAZ JOSEPH Lace Up with Team Diabetes in Surrey. Support the Canadian Diabetes Association at a family-friendly 2.5K or 5K walk/run on May 30 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Bear Creek Park. The run starts at 10 a.m. For more information on registration

fees, visit: www.diabetes. ca/laceup Selina Ye, a student at North Surrey Secondary, is selling her photography prints to raise money to help victims of the Nepal earthquake. Her prints are available online on two

separate websites: http:// bonvienna.bigcartel.com and http://bonvienna. storenvy.com. Proceeds benefit UNICEF’s efforts in Nepal.

▶ MUSIC The Ways of Water Surrey Schools Secondary Choral Festival takes place May 20 from 7-9 p.m. at Bell Performing Arts Centre (6250 144 St.). The Vancouver Chamber Choir will sing songs about “the ways of water” and then share the stage with choirs from North Surrey Secondary, Pacific Academy and Panorama Ridge Secondary. Tickets are $20 (or free for students). Call 604-507-6355 for tickets. The Delta Choral Society presents “Sing Into Spring” on May 23 at 7 p.m. and May 24 at 3 p.m. at Cedar Park Church, 5300 44 Ave. Admission is $15 for adults, $10 for students and seniors. Children under 12 free. Email info@ deltachoral.ca

▶ OPEN HOUSE

ARTS RTS & HE HERITAG AGE GE IN N SURREY R

www.surrey.ca/AH

Attention former staff, parents and students of Erma Stephenson Elementary: You are invited to an open house to celebrate the school’s 50th Anniversary on May 21 from 6:30-8 p.m. at 10929 160 St. Bring your old photos and memories to share. Check Erma Stephenson Elementary on Facebook or call 604-583-5419.


Wednesday M ay 13 2015 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader

We’re a major stopover for winging ‘peeps’ ▶ SHOREBIRDS PASS THROUGH DELTA ON THE WAY TO ALASKA BREEDING GROUNDS This is the time of year that over a million shorebirds visit local beaches as they head north for the nesting season. The smallest sandpipers, collectively known as “peeps,” are tiny birds, each weighing only as much as a granola bar. Individual birds are easily overlooked since their brownish-grey plumage blends with the mud. A large flock is much more noticeable, especially when they perform their amazing aerial displays. Peeps fly 11,000 ki-

lometres on migration The study authors from their wintering calculated that 600,000 areas in South AmerWestern Sandpiper and ica to their breeding 200,000 to 250,000 grounds in Alaska, and Dunlin, another the Fraser delta is one sandpiper species, stop of only a few to feed just at major stopRoberts Bank, overs en route. with similar It is essential numbers occurthat the mud ring on Boundary and sand flats Bay and Sturgeon of Boundary Banks. Bay, Roberts Each bird may Bank and Sturstay only two geon Banks, BY THE to three days, the three main foraging and BAY components roosting, before of the outer pressing on with ▼ delta, remain its journey. Anne viable habitat. Many other Murray According to shorebirds also a 2014 study stop over at these by Environimportant habment Canada and itats, most migrating Bird Studies Canada, through northwards in it is possible that the April and southwards entire Pacific Flyway between July and population of Western October. Sandpiper and DunSandpipers feed by lin may be found on probing in the mud the Fraser River delta for small creatures or during migration. by sucking up biofilm

from the surface. If disturbed, they try and resettle just a few metres along to resume their feeding. With the tide going out, the shorebirds become very spread out and distant, and can be difficult to observe. However, when the tide turns, the incoming water coaxes the feeding birds closer and closer to shore. With no more mud exposed, the birds sleep, preen, and relax, restoring their energy for the kilometres to come. At this time, they are very vulnerable to attack from falcons and eagles and disturbance by dogs and humans. Anne Murray is a local naturalist and writer. She blogs at www.natureguidesbc.wordpress. com

$50K for Surrey’s safety ▶ TRIGATE DEVELOPMENT CORP. DONATES TO SURREY CRIME PREVENTION SOCIETY BLACK PRESS

A longtime Surrey company has made a large donation dedicated solely to enhancing community safety in Surrey. Trigate Development Corp. gave a $50,000 gift to Surrey Crime Prevention Society (SCPS) May 6.

The money will go toward the society’s recently announced expansion of community safety programs. “With the on-going challenges rapidly growing cities face, Surrey needs those of us who have built our businesses here to step up and do our part in preventing crime and building a stronger community,” said George A. Tsakumis, president and CEO of Trigate, a property development company. “I salute all those tireless and brave volunteers with the Sur-

rey Crime Prevention Society, who give of themselves in aid and protection of others.” Karen Reid Sidhu, executive director of SCPS, said the donation will also help ensure the safety of the society’s volunteers by purchasing new equipment. “Our volunteers contributed over 28,000 hours towards the enhancement of community safety in the City of Surrey in 2014,” she said. For more information about SCPS, check www.preventcrime. ca

IF YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION on the recent

shootings in Surrey and Delta please contact the tip line at (604) 915-6566

23

Bird experts believe that between 200,000 and 250,000 dunlin (above) feed at Roberts Bank during their annual migrations.

P U B L I C N OT I C E

COMMUNITY CHARTER, S.B.C. 2003, CHAPTER 26 NOTICE OF INTENTION TO DISPOSE OF CITY PROPERTY SECTIONS 26 AND 94 Pursuant to Sections 26 and 94 of the Community Charter, S.B.C. 2003, Chapter 26, as amended, the City of Surrey hereby gives notice of the intention to dispose of the following One-Acre Residential (RA) Zone, community commercial designated, building lot: Civic Address:

16120 – 84 Avenue, Surrey, BC

Legal Description:

Parcel ‘A’ (Reference Plan 11879) Except: Part on Plan BCP13501 West Half Lot 3 Section 25 Township 2 New Westminster District Plan 2425

PID:

012-703-133

Property Description:

The property is a ±699 m² (7,526 ft.²) One-Acre Residential (RA) Zone building lot designated for community commercial use in the Fleetwood Town Centre Plan. Connections to municipal sanitary and water mains are available. Storm drainage is located at the property’s frontage within 84 Avenue.

Invitation to Offers to Purchase: The City invites offers to purchase this property. Interested persons or parties should submit their offers to purchase to the City of Surrey, Realty Services Division, Engineering Department, 13450 – 104 Avenue, Surrey, BC, V3T 1V8 before 3 p.m. on Thursday, May 21, 2015. Offers received after this closing date will not be accepted or considered. Delays caused by any delivery, courier, or mail service(s) will not be grounds for an extension of the closing date. All offers should be submitted in the Offer to Purchase form of document enclosed within the Information Package referenced below.

For more information:

Asking Price:

Minimum asking price is $450,000.

Further Information:

An Information Package can be accessed from the City’s website www.surrey.ca/realtyservices For further information please contact Karmelle Yakimovitch, Property Negotiator; Phone 604 598 5720; Fax: 604 598 5701.

The City of Surrey reserves the right to accept or reject the highest or any offer and may reject any or all offers without giving reasons therefore. The proposed sale and the terms and conditions thereof will be subject to final approval by Surrey City Council.

www.surrey.ca


24 The Surrey-North Delta Leader Wednesday May 13 2015

ENVIRONMENTAL EXTRAVAGANZA

Check out this week’s schedule of FREE, fun-filled events and programs! Shorekeepers Training Weekend Fri, May 15 |6:30-10pm Sat, May 16 | 9am-4pm *Preregistration is required; email Sharon at mshiker4@gmail.com or visit birdsonthebay.ca. South Surrey Rec. Centre (14601-20 Ave) Birding Walk at Surrey Lake Park Sat, May 16 | 9-11am Surrey Lake Park (7500-152 St - Entrance must be approached heading north on 152 St.) Sneak Peak at Sunnyside Sun, May 17 | 2:30-4:30pm Sunnyside Acres Urban Forest (Wally Ross parking lot; 24 Ave between 148 and 144 Sts.)

Movie Screening: Open Sesame, the Story of Seeds Wed, May 20 | 6-8:30pm City Centre Library (10350 University Dr, Dr. Ambedkar Room, 4th floor) Once Upon an Acorn: Nature Programs in the Library Fri, May 15 | 2-4pm (all ages, drop in) City Centre Library (10350 University Dr.) Tues, May 19 | 3:30-4:30pm (Salmon School, all ages, drop in) Cloverdale Library (5642 – 176a St.) Fri, May 15 | 3:30-4:30pm (Salmon School, all ages, drop in) Fleetwood Library (15996 – 84 Ave) Don’t forget your Environmental Extravaganza Passport to win great prizes!

Salmon Stewards Painting Party Wed, May 20 | 4-6:30pm North Point Park (16088-109 Ave)

Check next week’s paper for more Environmental Extravaganza events! 604-502-6065 www.surrey.ca/extravaganza

#EnvironmentalExtravaganza

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INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS ...............1-8 COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS ...9-57 TRAVEL.............................................61-76 CHILDREN ........................................80-98 EMPLOYMENT .............................102-198

7

OBITUARIES STAPLES, Olive Jean (DAHL, nee DELANEY) Sept 18, 1923 ~ May 5, 2015

IN MEMORIAM GIFTS

Olive, 91 years, passed away peacefully at Brookside Lodge on May 5, 2015. She is lovingly remembered by her sons, Ken (Sandi), Rob (Peggy), Norm (Rose); and stepsons, Bill (Kathy), Rob (Colleen) & Dan (Kathy; 12 Grandchildren & 7 great grandchildren, as well as many relatives & friends. Predeceased by her 1st husband, Julius Kenneth Dahl (1987) and her 2nd husband, Jerome Melville Staples (2008).

Make a gift that honours the memory of a loved one.

The family would like to extend a special thank you to the staff in the Garnet wing of Brookside Lodge for the wonderful, loving and caring way they tended to Mom’s every need. We can’t thank them enough.

BUSINESS SERVICES...................203-387 PETS & LIVESTOCK ......................453-483 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE...........503-587 REAL ESTATE ...............................603-696 RENTALS ......................................703-757 AUTOMOTIVE ..............................804-862 MARINE .......................................903-920

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS 6

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Alzheimer’s Society in Olive’s name.

33

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TRAVEL

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

NEED HELP. Anyone witnessing an accident on March 25, 2015 btwn 3-3:30 p.m. at the intersection of 132nd Street & 92nd Avenue involving a black truck and a grey Chevy Cavalier, please contact 604-594-7104, 604-319-2362

33

INFORMATION

WITNESSES NEEDED For a hit and run motor vehicle accident that occurred on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at 5:30pm on 68th Avenue and 128th Street in Surrey, B.C. involving a 2015 Honda Civic with BC plate no. AS6 61F and a white unknown vehicle. If you have any information regarding this accident please contact Rajan Dhami at 604-864-6131. WITNESSES NEEDED For hit and run accident on April 22nd, 2015 at 1:40pm on 84th Ave at 124th St., Surrey involving a Honda Odyssey van (plate #121 WVT), a red Nissan Altima (plate #AG9 96H) and an Impala car (plate #AN2 45S) that went through the stop sign at 122nd St and hit the Odyssey Van and then left the scene. If you have any information please call 778-987-8041.

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EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES GET FREE VENDING MACHINES. HIGH CASH PRODUCERS. $1.00 Vend = .70 Profit. Can Earn $100,000.00 + per Year. Be First in Your Area. No Competition. Protected Territories. For FULL DETAILS CALL NOW 1-866-668-6629 WWW.TCVEND.COM MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONISTS are in huge demand! Train with the leading Medical Transcription school. Learn from home and work from home. Call today. 1.800.466.1535 www.canscribe.com. info@canscribe.com.

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! Indemand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your workat-home career today! RENTALS: These listings cover all types of rentals from apartments, condos, office space, houseboats and vacation homes. So if you’re in the market to rent, or looking for a roommate, start here. bcclassified.com

You will have at least five years’ experience in a sales or business development role, and knowledge or experience in a community newspaper publishing environment. Your success in developing and implementing sales strategies is a result of your entrepreneurial spirit, well developed customer service and communication skills, knowledge of the publishing industry, and extensive business connections. As the largest independent newspaper group with more than 170 titles in print and online, Black Press has operations in British Columbia, Alberta, Washington, Hawaii and Ohio. This is a full-time position with a competitive compensation and benefits package. Qualified applicants should send a resume and covering letter before Friday, May 29th to: Bruce McAuliffe, President Black Press BC South c/o Kelowna Capital News 2495 Enterprise Way, Kelowna, B.C. V1X 7K2 Email: brucem@blackpress.ca

www.blackpress.ca


Wednesday May 13 2015 The Surrey-North Delta Leader 25 EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 114

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 115

EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 130

DHESI MEAT SHOP hiring Full Time/T; Business Address: 13588 88 Ave. Surrey. ButcherMeat Shop $15.00/hr Prepare special cuts of meat ordered by customers; Wrap, weigh, label and price cuts of meat. Meat Manager $22.00/hr Ordering, merchandising & pricing of packaged &and fresh meat products, while minimizing out-of-stock and overstock products to ensure fresh merchandise. Apply at: desimeatshopltd@gmail.com

CLASS 1 HIGHWAY LINE HAUL COMPANY DRIVERS Van Kamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Group of Companies requires Class 1 Drivers for the SURREY area. Applicants must have a min 2 yrs industry driving experience.

We Offer Above Average Rates! To join our team of professional drivers please send off a resume and current drivers abstract to: careers@vankam.com For more info about Line Haul, call Bev, 604-968-5488 We thank all applicants for your interest! Van-Kam is committed to Employment Equity and Environmental Responsibility.

HELP WANTED

124

FARM WORKERS 6 FARM WORKERS

Required for Vegetable farm Sal: $13.50/hr, F/T, 10 months contract, No edu. & exp. reqd. Basic farm knowledge or experience an asset. Duties: Plant, fertilize, cultivate, irrigate vegetables, Spray pesticides & weed control, Operate and maintain farm machinery & equipment, Examine products for quality & prepare for market. Report to and follow directions of farm supervisor. Lang: No specific required. Contact: Gurcharan from GC Farms, 3486-46A St., Delta, BC. Apply with resume to: gc_farms@yahoo.ca or fax 604-940-0953

HIGHWAY OWNER OPERATORS $3500 SIGNING BONUS Van Kamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group of companies req. Highway linehaul owner operators based in our Surrey terminal for runs throughout BC and Alberta. Applicants must have winter and mountain driving experience/training. We offer above average rates and an excellent employee beneďŹ ts package. To join our team of professional drivers, email a detailed resume, current driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s abstract and details of your truck to: careers@vankam.com or Call 604-968-5488 or Fax: 604-587-9889 Only those of interest will be contacted.

Van-Kam is committed to Employment Equity and Environmental Responsibility.

114

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

130

HELP WANTED

GARDEN HELP. Weeder reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d p/t for raised garden model railway. $12/hr.Must be dependable/keep to schedule. 604-592-0379 Elizabeth. TRAFFIC CONTROL - $15-$25/hr, Must have car & BC Cert. Send Resume to: bcrshs@bcroadsafe.com or www.bcroadsafe.com

114

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

Hiring in Vancouver and Surrey Professional experience is not required as we provide free, friendly training to qualiďŹ ed applicants with good driving & background records. UNR Class 4 or Class 2 preferred, but we will train the right applicants. No weekends or evenings. School holidays off. E-mail: wayne.ricketts@ďŹ rstgroup.com or fax: 604-225-5791

.Flagpersons & Lane Closure Techs required. Must have reliable vehicle. Must be certified & experienced. Union wages & benefits. Fax resume 604-513-3661 email: darlene.hibbs@shawbiz.ca

Landscaping Sales & Service Opportunities Up To $400 CASH Daily F/T & P/T Outdoors. Spring / Summer Work. Seeking Honest, Hard Working Staff. www.PropertyStarsJobs.com LIVE-IN CAREGIVER for Senior (75 years old) reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. Sal $10.50/hr, F/T, Pmt, High School, 1+ yrs. exp or 6 months Certification in the field reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. Duties: Plan & prepare meals, Provide care & companionship, Assists the senior in his personal hygiene like grooming, dressing & bathing, followed by clean-up, Make beds, Escort to religious services or events, may take him to appointments or activities. May take care of children also, Perform light housekeeping duties. Language: Basic English, Punjabi as asset. Location: Cross section 66 Ave & 128A Street, Surrey, BC, V3W 4C8

Contact Bachitter at: dilhe_bachitter@yahoo.ca for Senior reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. Sal $10.50/hr, F/T, Pmt, High School, 1+ yrs. exp or 6 months Certification in the field reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. Duties: Provide care and companionship, Plan prepare meals, followed by clean-up, Make beds & change linens, as needed, Assist with bathing, dressing & grooming, Engage in physical and mental exercises, Escort to religious services or events, take her to appointments or activities, Perform light housekeeping duties. Language: Basic English, Punjabi an asset. Location: Cross section 82 Ave & 132A Street, Surrey, BC V3W 8Z5

RING UP with bcclassified.com

Call 604-575-5555

EDUCATION

160

TRADES, TECHNICAL

WELDERS

Frontline Trailer Manufacturing Ltd. (7880 128th Street Surrey) is hiring 5 F/T Permanent Welders. Salary $22-26/hour. Operate welding equipment to fuse metal segments. Operate flame cutting equipment, metal shaping machines and brazing / soldering equipment. Experience 1 to 2 years.

E-mail: frontlinetrailer@gmail.com WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE ON THE WEB www.bcclassified.com

PERSONAL SERVICES 175 CATERING/PARTY RENTALS

115

EDUCATION

YES ENTERPRISES LTD hiring Full time/T; Business Address: 13835 92 Avenue Surrey Floor Covering Installer $22.00/hr Estimates, measures, and prepares floor surfaces for installation or repair of hard surface floor coverings; Drywall Installer & Finisher $22.00 Fasten drywall panels to the inside framework of building; Painter $17.00 Examine and maintain painted exterior and interior painted surfaces, trimming and fixtures; Apply at: yesenterprise15@gmail.com

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 130

HELP WANTED

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 130

HELP WANTED

Multi-Media Journalist The award-winning Chilliwack Progress has an opening for a temporary multi-media journalist. The successful candidate for this four-day-a-week maternity leave position will have diverse writing capabilities, including experience writing hard news. Photography and video skills will be key attributes, as well as excellent time management. An ideal applicant will have a strong grasp of social media best practices (Twitter, Facebook, etc.), a passion for online journalism, and an understanding of how to tailor content accordingly. We are looking for someone who will be a key contributor to the core print product, while bringing creativity and innovation to our web-based branding. Knowledge of basic Photoshop, iMovie and InDesign is an asset. Candidates should have a diploma/degree in journalism, or a related field. The successful candidate will show keen attention to detail, work well under deadline pressures, and be willing to learn in a fast-paced environment.

Specializing in Private Events! We Come To You! Doing It All, From Set-Up - Clean-Up.

FLAGGERS NEEDED. No Certification? Get Certified, 604-575-3944

WELDER REQUIRED for aluminum railing. Also helper. (778)855-5574

115

***FULL time Marketing/Receptionist/Admin needed Ucluelet BC. Send resumes to: info@discovervancouverisland.com

Surinder.dhaliwal@ pbdistribution.com

profits

EDUCATION

142 OFFICE SUPPORT/CLERKS ***FULL time Marketing/Receptionist/Admin needed, Ucluelet BC. Send resumes to: info@discovervancouverisland.com

If you are interested in this position and meet the above requirements, plse send your resume to:

An equal opportunity employer that values diversity.

115

LIVE-IN CAREGIVER Reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d for 1 yr old child. Salary: $10.50/hr, F/T, Pmt, High school, 1+ yrs. exp or 6 months Certification in the field reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. Duties: Supervise and care for child. Bathe, dress, feed and change diapers of child. Organize, participate & oversee activities. Plan, prepare and serve meals. Maintain a safe and healthy environment. Tend to the emotional well-being of child. May take child to appointments or activities. Perform light house keeping duties. Language: Basic English, Punjabi as asset. Location: Cross section 67 Ave & 146B Street, Surrey, BC, V3S 0Z4. Contact Sargaurav: sargauravarora@yahoo.ca

Requirements: F Picking & packing of customer orders F Operating RF scan guns F Stable work history F Ability to work as a team or independently F Ability to lift up to 50lbs F Repetitive / frequent lifting, standing and walking F Asset in knowledge of stand-up reach trucks/dock stockers F No experience necessary but is an asset

Contact Jaswinder at: jas_dhil@hotmail.com

www.ďŹ rststudentinc.ca

HELP WANTED

PB Distribution We are currently seeking people for our afternoon/night shift pickers in our cold storage warehouse.

LIVE-IN CAREGIVER

School Bus Drivers Needed

130

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

ORDER PICKER

FARM SUPERVISOR Required for Vegetable Farm Sal: $15/hr, F/T, Permanent, High school, 3+years experience with degree/diploma in the field will be an asset. Duties: Schedule & oversee the work of general farm labourers and harvest labourers, Co-ordinate harvesting activities to ensure peak efficiency, Perform activities like drive tractors, operate machinery, spray fields etc., Ensure farm safety, Maintain quality control & production records, May perform general farm duties as needed. Lang : Basic English. Contact: Gurcharan from GC Farms, 3486 - 46A St., Delta, BC Apply with resume to: gc_farms@yahoo.ca or fax 604-940-0953

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

â&#x20AC;˘ Home Dinner Parties â&#x20AC;˘ Meetings â&#x20AC;˘ Funerals â&#x20AC;˘ Weddings â&#x20AC;˘ B-B-Ques â&#x20AC;˘ Birthdays â&#x20AC;˘ Anniversaries Unique Taste, Unique Menus... Gourmet, Customized Menus Tailored To Your Function...

Kristy 604.488.9161

threescocatering@shaw.ca or Visit us at: www. threescompanycatering.ca

The Chilliwack Progress is part of Black Press, Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest private, independent newspaper company, with more than 170 community, daily and urban newspapers in B.C., Alberta, Washington State, Ohio and Hawaii. Those interested should email a resume, writing samples and a cover letter to: editor@theprogress.com Deadline for applications is May 31, 2015. Thank you to all who apply. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. No phone calls please. The Chilliwack

130

Progress

HELP WANTED

05/15W_CP13

Immediate Openings:

RAMP SERVICES AGENT

Vancouver International Airport (YVR)

About Us: Swissport International Ltd. is the leading Ground Services Provider to the aviation industry. Job Responsibilities: Ĺ&#x2DC;/RDGDQGXQORDGSDVVHQJHUOXJJDJHDQGFDUJR Ĺ&#x2DC;'ULYHDQGRURSHUDWHJURXQGVXSSRUWHTXLSPHQW Ĺ&#x2DC;2WKHUGXWLHVDVDVVLJQHG 4XDOLĹľFDWLRQVDQG&RPSHWHQFLHV Ĺ&#x2DC;+ROGDQGPDLQWDLQDYDOLG%&GULYHUVOLFHQVHDQGDELOLW\WRREWDLQDQG PDLQWDLQD<95'$OLFHQVH Ĺ&#x2DC;0XVWEHDEOHWRZRUNLQLQFOHPHQWZHDWKHU Ĺ&#x2DC;)OH[LEOHWRZRUNRQYDULRXVVKLIWV  GD\VHYHQLQJQLJKWVZHHNHQGVDQGKROLGD\V

Ĺ&#x2DC;/LIWKHDY\REMHFWVWKDWFRXOGUHDFKSRXQGV NLORJUDPV

Ĺ&#x2DC;0HHW7UDQVSRUW&DQDGDUHTXLUHPHQWVVWLSXODWHGLQWKH$LUSRUW 5HVWULFWHG$UHD$FFHVV&OHDUDQFH3URJUDP Please send resume: yvrhr@swissport.com or Fax: 604.207.9941 or apply online: www.swissport.com

Zone Checker The Surrey Distribution Centre is looking for energetic and customer friendly individuals for its Circulation Department. The right candidate must have excellent communication and organizational skills. Your attention to detail and ability to work with minimum supervision set you apart from other applicants. Basic knowledge of MS Word, Excel and Outlook Express recommended. Duties include overseeing 100+ youth carriers, recruit and hire new carriers, survey old and new delivery areas, monitor carrier performance and follow-up reader delivery concerns. A reliable vehicle is a must. A vulnerable sector criminal record check is also mandatory. This permanent part-time position is available immediately. Please forward resume to: Circulation Manager Surrey Distribution Centre Serving : â&#x20AC;˘ Surrey Leader â&#x20AC;˘ Surrey Now â&#x20AC;˘ Cloverdale Reporter #200-5450 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C., V3S 5J9 circmanager@surreyleader.com No phone calls please Only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

blackpress.ca

Sales Supervisor The Peace Arch News a twice-weekly award winning community newspaper has an exciting opportunity for the position of Sales Supervisor. The successful candidate will have an active account list and will also be responsible for driving revenues, exceeding budget targets and the day-to-day operations of the sales team. This individual will have a high energy level coupled with an entrepreneurial and innovated edge. They will lead by example and strive to build a team that will be one of the best in our exciting industry. The successful candidate will have a minimum of ten years worth of proven advertising sales experience. The position offers a great work environment with a competitive salary, commissions and a benefit package. Peace Arch News is part of Black Press, Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest independent print media company with over 170 titles across Canada and The United States. Please send your resume and cover letter by May 29th to: Dwayne Weidendorf Peace Arch News, #200 - 2411 - 160th St., Surrey, BC V3S 0C8 or email to dwayne@blackpress.ca

www.blackpress.ca


26 The Surrey-North Delta Leader Wednesday May 13 2015 PERSONAL SERVICES 182

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

257

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com LARGE FUND Borrowers Wanted Start saving hundreds of dollars today! We can easily approve you by phone. 1st, 2nd or 3rd mortgage money is available right now. Rates start at Prime. Equity counts. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rely on credit, age or income. Call Anytime 1-800-639-2274 or 604-430-1498. Apply online www.capitaldirect.ca

DRYWALL

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES 281

GARDENING

PSB DRYWALL â&#x2DC;&#x2026; All Boarding, Taping, Framing & Texture. Insured work. Dump Removal Service. 604-762-4657/604-764-6416

260

A Gas Fitter â&#x153;­ Plumber

FENCING

RENOS & REPAIRS Excellent price on Hot Water Tanks Furnace, Boilers, Plumbing Jobs & Drain Cleaning

6 FOOT HIGH CEDAR FENCE. $13/foot. Low Prices. Quality Work. Free Est. Harbans 604-805-0510. 1-A1 BRAR CEDAR FENCING, chain link & landscaping. Block retaining wall. Reasonable rates. Harry 604-719-1212, 604-306-1714

~ Certified Plumber ~ ON CALL 24 HOURS/DAY

Renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Repairs

6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; CEDAR FENCING. Free ests. Red Rose Landscaping. Harbiee 604-722-2531

Furnace, Boilers, Hot Water Heat Plumbing Jobs ~ Reas rates

341

Call 778-688-3724

All Gutter Cleaning. Window & Roof FULL HOUSE CLEANING Call Victor 604-589-0356

778-227-2431 WALTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S YARD WORKS & POWER WASHING

#1 CLEANING SERVICE Saving U Time! Supply Includes. 12 yrs. Exc. Refs. Bondable. 778.386.5476

PRESSURE WASHING

PAINT SPECIAL 3 rooms for $299

~ Furnaces 60 M ~ $3450 + tax Less FORTIS rebate, $800 ACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Hot Water Tanks

2 coats any colour

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Cloverdale Premium quality paint.

NO PAYMENT until Job is completed. Ask us about our Laminate Flooring.

604-461-0999

10% OFF if you Mention this AD! *Plumbing *Heating *Renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s *More Call Aman: 778-895-2005

shinelandscaping@hotmail.com

www.paintspecial.com 604.339.1989 Lower Mainland 604.996.8128 Fraser Valley Running this ad for 10yrs

LOCAL PLUMBER $45 Service Call Plumbing, Heating, Plugged Drains. Mustang Plumbing 778-714-2441

SHINE LANDSCAPING

329 PAINTING & DECORATING

Natural Airflow Heating Ltd.

BRO MARV PLUMBING Plumbing, heating, clogged drains BBB. (604)582-1598, bromarv.com

*Grass Cutting *Hedge Trimming *Yard Clean *Pruning *Pressure Wash

604 - 720 - 2009 ~We accept Visa & Mastercard~

284 HEAT, AIR, REFRIGERATION

~ 604-597-3758 ~

GARDENING

** ALCO LANDSCAPING ** Yard clean-up, Lawns cut, Hedging Moss out. 10% Off. 604-762-1725

CLEANING SERVICES

GUTTER & ROOF Cleaning/Power Washing since 1982. WCB/Liability insurance. Simon, 604-230-0627

287

POLAR BEAR PAINTING & Pressure Washing. $299~3 rooms (walls only 2 coats.) 604-866-6706

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

$25 Off with this Ad

Jerry, 604-500-2163

PETS AAA PRECISION PAINTING. Quality work. 778-881-6096.

~ PRO PAINTERS ~ INTERIOR / EXTERIOR Quality Work, Free Estimates

Call Ian 604-724-6373

CONCRETE & PLACING

353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

Member of Better Business Bureau

WCB INSURED

AKAL CONCRETE. All types of renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. â&#x20AC;˘Driveways â&#x20AC;˘Sidewalks â&#x20AC;˘Floors â&#x20AC;˘Stairs â&#x20AC;˘Forming â&#x20AC;˘Retaining walls. â&#x20AC;˘Breaking & Removal Concrete

ARBUTUS ROOFING & DRAINS Ltd We specialize in: F Shingle Roofing F Flat Roofing F Re-Roofing & Roof Repairs

Call 778-881-0961

UNIQUE CONCRETE

DESIGN

TRY A CLASSIFIED AD

FREE ESTIMATES

604 - 259 - 2482

.Jimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mowing. 310-JIMS (5467).

HEDGE TRIM, Tree Pruning, Garden Cleanup, Lawn care, Bark Mulch & Aeration. 778-383-7220

CURB APPEAL Landscaping, Mowing, Pruning & Clean-up. Small Delivery of Soil, Mulch, Rock. Sell your home faster. Dale 604 - 785 - 5982

TRADES, TECHNICAL

160

HANDYMAN CONNECTION HANDYMAN CONNECTION Handyman Connection - Bonded -Renovations - Installations Repairs - 604.878.5232

CONCRETE FORMING, FRAMING & SIDING. 604.218.3064

ALL BEST LANDSCAPING All Lawn Care ~ Free Est. Lawn Cut, Ride-on mower, Pwr Rake, Aerating, Weeding. Hedge Trim, Pruning, Reseed, Edging, Moss Killer, Bark Mulch, Pressure Wash., Gutter Clean. Roof Clean. Res/Comm. Reas. Rates, Fully insured. WCB.

BEAUTIFUL BATHROOM Plumbing + Drywall + Elect. + Tubs & Showers & Sinks + Toilets & Tile + Fan + Countertop + Painting = = BEAUTIFUL BATHROOM!! Sen disc. Work Guar.17 yrs exp. Call Nick 604-230-5783, 604-581-2859

Bill, 604-306-5540 or 604-589-5909

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE ON THE WEB www.bcclassified.com

160

NORTHSTARS PAINTING www.northstars-painting.com Master Painters at Students Rates. Best Value In Town, Book Now For Super Savings. 778.245.9069

Full Service Plumbing from Parker Dean. Fast, reliable, 24/7 service. Take $50 off your next job if you present this ad. Vancouver area. 1-800-573-2928

www.arbutusroofing.com

778-231-9675, 778-231-9147

Vincent 543-7776

Residential / Strata

.portkells nurseries 604-882-1344

A-1 CONTRACTING. Renos. Bsmt, kitchens, baths, custom cabinets, tiling, plumbing, sundecks, fencing, reroofing. Dhillon 604-782-1936.

288

TRADES, TECHNICAL

353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

296

Van-Kam Freightways requires two full-time Commercial Trailer Journeyman Mechanics and a full-time Commercial Transport Journeyman Mechanic to work out of our Surrey terminal located at 10155 Grace Road. The Transport Mechanic position would work the 11:30 pm to 8:00 am shift. Applicants should have an inspectors ticket, a minimum of 2 years of related experience, a positive attitude and able to work in a team environment. Experience in a freight fleet environment would be preferred as this is a busy facility providing service to a large fleet of Company Owned Trucks and Trailers. Seize this opportunity to work for one of Western Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest regional freight carriers. For more information, call Derek, at 604-587-9818 or 604-968-7149 Interested candidates should attach an updated resume and cover letter to: careers@vankam.com or fax: 604-587-9889 Van-Kam is committed to Employment Equity and Environmental Responsibility. We thank you for your interest, however only those of interest to us will be contacted.

160

TRADES, TECHNICAL

160

TRADES, TECHNICAL

RooďŹ ng Experts. 778-230-5717 Repairs/Re-Roof/New Roofs. All work Gtd. Free Est. Call Frank.

356

MECHANIC

Vancouver International Airport (YVR) About Us: Swissport International Ltd. is the leading Ground Services Provider to the aviation industry. Job Summary: To service, maintain and keep all ground HTXLSPHQWLQJRRGZRUNLQJRUGHU0XVWEHĹśH[LEOHWRLUUHJXODUVKLIW hours which include weekends. Job Responsibilities: Ĺ&#x2DC;+DYLQJD5HG6HDO&HUWLĹľFDWLRQRIFRPSOHWLRQLQRQHRIWKH IROORZLQJWUDGHV+HDY\'XW\&RPPHUFLDO7UDQVSRUWRU$XWRPRWLYH Ĺ&#x2DC;0HFKDQLFOLFHQVH&HUWLĹľFDWLRQPXVWEHNHSWLQJRRGVWDQGLQJ Ĺ&#x2DC;0HHW7UDQVSRUW&DQDGDUHTXLUHPHQWVVWLSXODWHGLQWKH$LUSRUW Ĺ&#x2DC;5HVWULFWHG$UHD$FFHVV&OHDUDQFH3URJUDP Ĺ&#x2DC;Hold and maintain a valid B.C. driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license & the ability to REWDLQDQGPDLQWDLQD<95'$OLFHQVH Ĺ&#x2DC;3URĹľFLHQWRQHQJLQHGLDJQRVHVUHSDLUEDVLFZHOGLQJDQGEDVLF K\GUDXOLFH[SHULHQFHDQDVVHW

Starting Wage $31.50/hr. 3OXV$&RPSHWLWLYH%HQHĹľWV3DFNDJH Please send resume: \YUKU#VZLVVSRUWFRP or Fax: 604.207.9941 or apply online: ZZZVZLVVSRUWFRP

RUBBISH REMOVAL

GARBAGE/JUNK REMOVAL

HOME REPAIRS

Same Day Service Lowest Price in Town Discount for MULTIPLE LOADS Please Call

RENTALS 703

ACREAGE

FOR LEASE

Facility, in Delta Near Scott Rd. & Hwy 10 Large 24 stall barn, outdoor riding arena and paddocks. Approx 8 acres. Close to public horse trails.

Meadows Landscape Supply

604-465-1311

MOVING & STORAGE

Phone (604) 916-3407

AFFORDABLE MOVING

706

www.affordablemoversbc.com

$45/Hr

APARTMENT/CONDO Cedar Lodge and Court Apts

JUNK REMOVAL By RECYCLE-IT! 604.587.5865 www.recycleitcanada.ca

LOCAL & LONG DISTANCE

TOOLS

SAWMILLS from only $4,397 MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.

Horse Boarding Stable

$59.00 Per Ton

587

MISC. FOR SALE

Do you have a DISABILITY? Physical or mental. We can help you get up to $40,000 back from the Canadian Government. FOR DETAILS check out our website: disabilitygroupcanada.com or CALL us today Toll-Free 1-888-875-4787.

Contact Mario 604-828-2806

SBroken Concrete RocksS $25.00 Per Metric Ton SMud - Dirt - Sod - ClayS $25.00 Per Metric Ton GrassSBranchesSLeavesSWeeds

604-537-4140

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

Hauling Garbage & Rubbish 20 Yard Bins Available

MISC SERVICES

From 1, 3, 5, 7 & 10 Ton Trucks Licensed ~ Reliable ~ 1 to 3 Men Free Estimate/Senior Discount Residential~Commercial~Pianos

German Shepherd pups, vet check, 1st shots, own both parents, gd tempered, farm & family raised in country, good guard dog/family pet. born feb 11. $750; 604-796-3799 or 604-845-6027, no sunday calls

KMM JUNK REMOVAL

â&#x153;śDump Site Now Openâ&#x153;ś

320

PETS

CATS GALORE, TLC has for adoption spayed & neutered adult cats. 604-309-5388 / 604-856-4866

778-323-2334

KITCHEN CABINETS

QUICKWAY Kitchen Cabinets Ltd. ****Mention this ad for 10% Off **** Call Raman @ 604-561-4041.

317

477

560

A1 BATH RENOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. Bsmt suites, drywall, patios, plumbing, siding, fencing, roofing, landscaping, etc. Joe 604-961-9937.

Commercial Trailer/Transport Mechanics (Surrey Terminal)

TREE SERVICES

PRO TREE SERVICES Quality pruning/shaping/hedge trimming/ removals & stump grinding. John, 604-588-8733/604-318-9270

Tree Removal/Topping/Spiral Thinning/Hedge Trimming/Stump Grinding. Free Estimates. WCB/Fully Insured

SAME DAY SERVICE AVAILABLE

F All types of concrete work F F Re & Re F Forming F Site prep FDriveways FExposed FStamped F Bobcat Work F WCB Insured

374

A SOFT TOUCH - HOME SOFTWASH. Done By Hand. No Pressure Washing. Siding, Gutters, Windows Special $99. 604-537-6180

POWER WASHING GUTTER CLEANING

242

. Aluminum patio cover, sunroom, railing and vinyl. 604-521-2688 .Aluminum patio cover, sunroom, railing and vinyl. 604-521-2688 www.PatioCoverVancouver.com

TREE BROTHERS SPECIALIST

RICHGOLD Contr. Ltd. Bsmt suites, framing, drywall, paint, decking, flooring, crown moulding & all kinds of renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Sam 604-992-8474.

POWER WASHING since 1982. WCB/Liability insurance. Call Simon for prompt service. 604-230-0627

Lawn Mowing Yard Clean up Rubbish Removal

SUNDECKS

Licensed - Bonded - Fully Equip. Residential Commercial, 1-3 Men BIG OR SMALL MOVES Start $45/hr ~ All size trucks Free estimate/Senior Discount www.miraclemoving.ca

283 GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

â&#x153;­ 604-312-7674 â&#x153;­

372

MIRACLE MOVING

meadowslandscapesupply.com

Gutters - Windows - Tile Roof cleaning - Pressure Cleaning. Please Call Victor 604-589-0356

RUBBISH REMOVAL

ABE MOVING - $35/Hr. Per Person *Reliable Careful Movers. *Rubbish Removal. *24 Hours. 604-999-6020

(604)465-1311

PLUMBING

356

Across the street - across the world Real Professionals, Reas. Rates. Best in every way! 604-721-4555.

â&#x153;ś Bark Mulch â&#x153;ś Lawn & Garden Soil â&#x153;ś Drain Gravel â&#x153;ś Lava Rock â&#x153;ś River Rock â&#x153;śPea Gravel

Please Call

MOVING & STORAGE

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING

7 Days / Week

778-323-2334

269

320

Meadows Landscape Supply Ltd.

Lowest Price in Town

338

GARDENING

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

Prompt Delivery Available

Got Bed Bugs?

ELECTRICAL

Low Cost. Same Day. Licensed. Res/Com. Small job expert. Renos Panel changes ~ 604-374-0062

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

281

Same Day Service

BEST LAWN & GARDEN Service. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just maintain, we improve. 25 yrs exp. Call Mike 604-868-3554

236

333 PEST CONTROL/SERVICES

PEST CONTROL

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call Lic #89402 Same day guarnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;td We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

281

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

EXTRA CHEAP JUNK / RUBBISH REMOVAL Almost for free! (778)997-5757

587

TOOLS

Quiet community living next to Guildford Mall. Clean 1 & 2 bdrm (some w/ensuites), Cable, Heat & Hot Water included. Onsite Mgr.

604-584-5233 www.cycloneholdings.ca

Ask about our

99

$

ROOM SPECIAL

CALL TODAY! 604-803-5041 www.benchmarkpainting.ca

CLOVERDALE large 2 bdrm apts $970/mo incl heat & hot water. N/P. 604-576-1465, 604-612-1960 Linwood Place Apts: 604-530-6555 1 & 2 bdrm apts, $650-$900/mo. Ask about our Move-In BONUS.

SURREY, 135/65 Ave. Bachelor apt $555/mo, quiet complex, no pets. Call 604-596-1099.


Wednesday May 13 2015 The Surrey-North Delta Leader 27 RENTALS 706

APARTMENT/CONDO

RENTALS 733 MOBILE HOMES & PADS

RENTALS 736

HOMES FOR RENT

TRANSPORTATION 830

TRANSPORTATION 845

MOTORCYCLES

TRANSPORTATION

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

845

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

The Scrapper

GUILDFORD GARDENS 1 bdrm. from $735 2 bdrm. from $865 Heat & Hot Water Included

NEWTON MOBILE HOME PARK. 2 Large RV Pads available for mobile home. Call 604-597-4787.

736

HOMES FOR RENT

FLEETWOOD 156/91. 5 Bedroom house, 2 kitchens, 3 baths, laundry, near bus. NS/NP. Avail June 1st. $1800/mo + utils. 778-908-3221

#1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE REMOVAL ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT $$$ PAID FOR SOME 604.683.2200

SURREY: 3 Bdrm up stairs, 1 large room downstairs+ 1 bdrm 3 bthrms, $2300: Avl. now. 604-512-6063

739

MOTELS, HOTELS

LINDA VISTA Motel Luxury Rooms w/cable, a/c & kitchens. 6498 King George Hwy. Mthly, Wkly & Daily Specials. 604-591-1171. Canadian Inn 6528 K.G.Hwy. 604-594-0010

2005 SAGA Dual sport (dirt / street) motorcycle. Mint condition, never off road, 800 original kms. Super commuter. $2,500 FIRM 604-349-4181.

• 24 Hour On-site Management

750

PETS WELCOME

BEAR CREEK. 1 Bdrm bsmt suite. Avail now. $550/mo incl hydro. N/S, N/P. (604) 355-9192 or 518-5468

• Walk to Elementary School & Guildford Town Center/ Walmart Supercentre • 1 min. drive to PORT MANN

838

RECREATIONAL/SALE

BEAR CREEK. newly reno g/l 1 bdrm, clse to bus, corner store, ldry. May 15. $550 incl utils. NS/NP. 778-997-2539, 604-597-2539.

Call Grace To View 604.319.7514 or text RENTAL to 57000 for details

CEDAR HILLS 122/97 1bdrm newer hse. Nr amen. skytrain $550 ns, n/p. Suit mature sgl 604-790-8076 CHIMNEY HEIGHTS. Close to 146/76 Ave. 1-bdrm bsmt. ste. Avail. June 1. Close to schools & bus. Cable & utils. incl. No laundry. N/s, n/p. $550. 604-240-9742.

PARKSIDE

CLOVERDALE near Willowbrook. 2 Bdrm ste, priv bath, avail now, $900 incl utils. N/S, N/P. (604)575-0670

APARTMENTS Homelife Pen. Property 604-536-0220

1 Bdrm. $775.00 2 Bdrm. $835.00

N. DELTA. 1 bdrm suite. New paint & carpet, NS/NP, June 1. $600 incl utils/cbl/net 778-839-6274

BIG DEALS

TRAVEL with bcclassified.com

604 575 5555

Crossword

This week’s theme:

MOM'S THE WORD by James Barrick

1996 FORD F250, V8, auto, 4x4, extended cab seats 6, long box w/canopy, 218K, plus a 1998 21’ Tahoe Series trailer w/SD slide, slps 3-5, micro, 3 pce bath, a/c. $10,000 (can sell separately). Call: 604-501-0563

SURREY - 2 bdrm bsmt suite, $800/m. No Laundry, N/S, N/P. May 15 or June 1st (778)242-9913

• Minutes walk to Surrey Central Skytrain Station & Mall & SFU Surrey Campus • 24 Hour On-site Management PETS ALLOWED • Walk To Holland Park, High School & Elementary School

SURREY - Fleetwood 88/163 St. 2Bdr suite. N/S, cat ok. No lndry/cbl June1 $750 incl utils. 604-584-4084

751

SUITES, UPPER

SURREY 7824 125 St. 3 Bdrm hse, 2 baths, lndry. $1250/mo. Avail now np/ns, 778-846-9231 778-838-2183

Heat & Hot Water Included

Surrey Nr Gateway Stn reno’d 3Bdr new flrs, lrg shed & deck. Suit quiet professionals Cats only. N/S $1250 + utils. June 1. text 604-889-5075.

To Arrange a Viewing Call Joyce

604-319-7517 SOUTH SURREY “Pacifica” Retirement Lifestyle Apt. Club amenities include Indoor Pool, Movie Theater, Private Concierge, Free Shuttle & Activities Center. One bedroom with full bath, laundry, kitchen & parking. Best location - unit on main floor, close to front entry. No stairs req’d Safeway & London Drugs loc’d right beside property. $2000/mo. Contact Barry - barryallan11@gmail.com or 1-360-393-1945

SUITES, LOWER

LL . A .. SM DS A

WITNESS TO MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT ON APRIL 13, 2015 Anyone witnessing or having any information relating to a motor vehicle accident, which occurred on April 13, 2015 at 5:30 p.m. on 152nd Street and 72nd Avenue in the City of Surrey, B.C. involving a 2002 Honda Civic and a Grey Mitsubishi Lancer, please contact Spraggs & Co. Law Corporation at 604-464-3333

752

1996 White Dodge Ram 2500 V8 5.9L ext cab short box seats 6, & 1998 23ft Slumber Queen 5th wheel. rear kitchen, slps 6, 2 way fridge, microwave, 3 pce bath, a/c, tandem whls, 15ft canopy, bike rack. $11,000 both. 604-576-0350 Cloverdale

TOWNHOUSES

SURREY 135/65 Ave. 3 Bdrm T/H, $1000 & 4 Bdrm T/H, $1065. Quiet family complex with washer/dryer. No pets. Call 604-596-1099.

.Hugh & McKinnon Rentals 604-541-5244.

SURREY 139/68 Ave. 2 Bedroom townhouse, $915/mo, in quiet family complex,no pets.Call 604-599-0931

© 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Dist. by Universal Uclick

SUNCREEK ESTATES * Large 2 & 3 Bdrm Apartments * Insuite w/d, stove, fridge, d/w * 3 floor levels inside suite * Wood burning fireplace * Private roof top patio * Walk to shops. Near park, pool, playground * Elementary school on block * On site security/on site Mgmt * Reasonable Rent * On transit route * Sorry no pets

Office: 7121 - 133B St. Surrey 604-596-0916 SURREY 75/120A St. 3 Bdrm apt, $1060/mo, quiet family complex, no pets, call 604-501-0505 Surrey

Beautifully Upscale 1 Bdrm Suites - perfect for the discerning renter! Starting at $810. Located close to bus routes & skytrain, 20 min walk to Surrey City Centre. Max occ. 2 people. Sorry no pets.

Call Surrey Gardens Apts at 604-589-7040 to view our Elite Suites!

Surrey Village 9835 King George Blvd. Renovated Suites Bachelor, 1 & 2 bdrms. F/S, D/W & micro, luxury floors, Gym, tennis court, sauna. Pet friendly. Close to King George Sky Train. Rents start at $799.

(604) 343-4233 www.realstar.ca

The right mix of legal services in your community. We are centrally located in the Guildford area of Surrey. We have řAHFƥQLŚBQDCDMSH@KR ATSVDOQDEDQ SNOQNUHCDDRRDMSH@KKDF@KRDQUHBDR SNNTQBNLLTMHSXHM@ANTSHPTD RDSSHMF 6DOQHCDNTQRDKUDRNM CDKHUDQHMFBQD@SHUD OQ@BSHB@K@MC BNRS DƤDBSHUDRNKTSHNMRENQKNB@K ATRHMDRRDR ƥM@MBH@KHMRSHSTSHNMR  Rosalyn Manthorpe @MCHMCHUHCT@KRVHSGODQRNM@K@MC ATRHMDRRKDF@KMDDCR 

Dominic Meslin

Just right...for all your legal needs. Manthorpe Law Offices 200, 10233 - 153 Street | Surrey, BC V3R 0Z7 Phone: 604.582.7743 | Fax: 604.582.7753 | manthorpelaw.com Centrally located near the Guildford Town Centre Mall in Surrey

ACROSS 1. Dalai -5. Free ticket 9. Web program 15. Gadfly 19. Ersatz: Abbr. 20. Greek peak 21. Take 22. Suffice -- -- say 23. Fussbudget cousin: 2 wds. 25. A kind of chaperone 27. Senior clergyman 28. Pasta variety 29. Yielding 30. Swellhead's problem 31. Darkened 33. Prairie dogs, e.g. 34. Rich dough 37. Draw from 38. Gaped 40. Staler anagram 42. White House name 45. -- Hashim Epps 46. "Simpsons" barkeep 49. "Nobody Knows the Trouble -Seen" 50. Arthur's castle 52. -- Abner 53. Complain 54. Strikes 56. Elec. units 57. Worn-out 59. -- -frutti 60. British length 62. Lord in feudal Scotland 63. Laved 64. Storm petrel: 3 wds. 68. Describing some dates 69. Bouquets 70. Bury 71. Wheyfaced

72. Provide freely 73. "-- there, done that" 75. Healthy look 78. Part of GUI 79. Lugubrious 80. Cubism pioneer 82. Noted ring champ 83. Roman god 84. Kind of Japanese soup 85. Lee and Musial 86. Media-giant name 89. Moderate 91. Abbr. on a map 92. Shelf 93. Like some parties 96. Break 99. Flag 100. State in India 101. Kudrow and Simpson 102. Island in Indonesia 106. Our world: 2 wds. 108. Scouts' leader: 2 wds. 110. Cay 111. Cloak 112. Cuckoopint 113. Antler prong 114. Homophone for seize 115. Stopped 116. Start for bit or ton 117. Pier DOWN 1. Hobble 2. Omnia vincit -3. Insect 4. Letterman 5. City in Portugal 6. Tennis great 7. Letters on a compass 8. -- Salvador 9. Yearned 10. Get in touch with 11. Pummels 12. Forfeit 13. Native of: Suffix 14. Worldly

15. 16. 17. 18. 24. 26. 28. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 39. 41. 43. 44. 46. 47. 48. 51. 53. 55. 58. 59. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67.

Felt for Hawke or Allen Artery insert Legal wrongs Gung-ho Like the firstborn Kind of cross Impress What Cerberus guards Fiber plant Hand in poker Inventor's middle name "Cinderella" villain Indian of Mexico Alarmed Common sense cousin: 2 wds. Alley cats Original home Of a grain Dame -- Diana Elizabeth Rigg Part of ABA or AMA: Abbr. Peat bog Bird dog -- and outs Diplomat's forte Subsequently Combatants Remove the chaff -- brevis Some domiciles Recipe word Hastens

68. 72. 73. 74. 76. 77. 79. 81. 84. 87. 88. 89. 90. 93. 94. 95. 97. 98. 99. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 107. 108. 109.

Peter -- Rubens Moved with care African people Letters Mr. Cassini Surveillance device Handguns Carries American inventor Texas landmark Racing event Dovetails "-- days hath..." Club performer Came to prominence Appellation Plant fiber Oohed and --- cum laude Turner or Del Rey Comfy Watery Regular expense Neighborhood Corrode Wall-like barrier One palindrome in another

Answers to Previous Crossword


28 The Surrey-Nor th Delta Leader Wednesday M ay 13 2015

May Days Unbelievable Savings STAIR CRAZY PRICING!

METAL SPINDLES Plain Black Metal Spindle

$ 88

4

Black Metal Single 54GV5844 Knuckle Satin Chrome 2 1/2” Spindle Hourglass Sleeve 15GCSL 15GBC58

$ 75

4

Satin Chrome Plain Round Spindle

$ 98

6

HANDRAILS

$ 99

Black Metal Double Knuckle Spindle

8

Paint Grade WM900

15GBC58 (X2)

$ 95

7

P Paint Grade W WM911

$ 98

9

F Finger JJoint

15GB5B5844

54GC5844

Satin Chrome Slim Basket

P Primed M Mushroom Rail WM920

$

1295

Linear Foot

$

Fancy Stair Post Cap ON SALE

35

EA

Reg. $55 ea. Also available in poplar, oak & maple

Bevelled Stair Post Cap ON SALE

Linear Foot

WE BUILD

Satin Chrome Double Knuckle

$

15GC58 (X2)

Linear Foot

Handrail H

Black Metal Slim Basket Spindle

15GCSB5844

$ 99

1 $ 89 2 $ 23 3

Handrail

CAPS

1353

CUSTOM STRAIGHT, CURVED, & PLYWOOD STAIRCASES. CALL US FOR YOUR STAIR NEEDS.

POSTS

Dover Routed Panel Shaker

Featured MDF Stair Posts Starting at

$

85 $

EA

Reg. 118 ea

DOOR & WINDOW HEADERS

WM9377 1-1/2” X 5-1/4” REG. $4.67

SALE

$ 99

2

/Lin ft

Two Step Panel Mould WM3746 3/4” X 1-1/2” (c/w 1/2” dado) REG. 86¢ SALE ........

NOW Selling Doors!

SALE

$ 59

3

/Lin ft

SPECIALS

8999

VGHEM PANELLING

PRIMED FJP Flat Stock

for 12” Plain HRM 26550

1”x 5” (Has Tan Primer) 11/16” X 4 1/2” ................................................................

PRIMED FJP Flat Stock

1”x 8” (Has Tan Primer) 11/16” X 7 1/4” ................................................................

29

1

07843 (clear) 11/16” x 3-1/4”

/ lin ft

/Lin ft

49¢

FLAT STOCK

CEILING MEDALLIONS

Starting at

WM9378 1-1/2” X 6-1/2” REG. $5.56

53

PRIMED FJP Flat Stock

PRIMED POPLAR CROWN WM434 9/16” x 4-1/4”

1”x 10” (Has Tan Primer) 11/16” X 9 1/4” ...........................................................

248

5

/16” x 2 /8 ”

WM 204

PFJP Base WM204 11/16” x 41/4”

FJ Pine Baseboard WM245 1/2 ” x 51/4”

Light MDF Casing WM109 5⁄8” x 31/4”

/Lin ft

/Lin ft

/Lin ft

BLACK WALNUT • CHERRY • OAK • MAPLE & many other Exotic Species available

/ lin ft

DESIGNER MOULDINGS PFJP Casing ¢ SUPER SPECIAL WM107 11

49¢ 69¢ 95¢

73 89¢ 88¢ 77¢ /Lin ft

/Lin ft

/Lin ft

/Lin ft

Light MDF Casing WM144 3/4” x 3-1/2”

49

¢

Light MDF Base Board

Crown Moulding Light MDF WM411 3/4” x 2-7/8”

WM2331 5/8” x 5-1/4”

69

¢

/Lin ft

$ 29 /Lin ft

WM434 9/16” X 4-1/4” REG. $1.74 SALE

69

WM435 5/8” X 5-1/4”

99¢

/Lin ft

Retail $1.82/Lin ft

Light MDF Casing WM1230 3/4” x 3-1/4”

PFJP Flatstock Baseboard

/Lin ft

WM212 3/8” x 3-1/4”

49¢

¢

61

/Lin ft

/Lin ft

79

¢

Retail 95¢/Lin ft

PFJP Flatstock Baseboard WM214 1/2” x 5-1/4”

78¢

/Lin ft

PFJP Chair Rail WM606 7/16” x 2-1/4” Reg. 93¢ SALE

1

¢

/Lin ft

WM1232 1” x 4”

Retail $1.32/Lin ft

WM2333 5/8” X 7-1/4” REG. $2.23 SALE

Crown Moulding Light MDF Light MDF Casing

/Lin ft

Light MDF Baseboard

Crown Moulding Light MDF

/Lin ft

88¢

48

¢

/Lin ft

604-513-1138 1-800-667-5597 18810 - 96th Ave, Surrey westcoastmoulding.com

PFJP Baseboard WM243T 1/2” x 3-1/4”

59¢

/Lin ft

Monday - Wednesday 7:30am-4:30pm Thursday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm DELIVERY AVAILABLE

Surrey North Delta Leader, May 13, 2015  

May 13, 2015 edition of the Surrey North Delta Leader

Surrey North Delta Leader, May 13, 2015  

May 13, 2015 edition of the Surrey North Delta Leader