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The Hope

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Some Hope residents kicked off 2015 at the second annual Resolution Walk 10

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 2015

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3 CANDIDATE JOINS ELECTION RACE

Seonaigh MacPherson announces her intention to run for the federal NDP

4 HOPE SAR TEAM RESCUES SKIERS

Two backcountry skiers were lost in the Falls Lake area along Highway 5

PATTIE DESJARDINS / THE STANDARD

15 LOCAL OFFICIALS

REF VALLEY GAMES Hope Minor Hockey players switch jerseys to gain more rink exposure

This week’s ice storm in Hope brought down hundreds of tree branches throughout the area and knocked out power to thousands of residents for days.

Winter ice storm cripples Hope

Kerrie-Ann Schoenit Hope Standard

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Hope is finally thawing out after being hit with a severe ice storm earlier this week. Environment Canada meteorologist Greg Pearce said the community hasn’t experienced a storm like this in decades. About 5-10 cm of snow fell on the ground over the weekend prior to 15-20 mm of ice in some areas around Hope. “You had cold arctic air and then you had this moist, mild air coming up from the southwest and it overran the arctic air and the rain froze as it fell,” said Pearce. “Hope was right on that transition boundary between rain on the coast and snow in the In-

terior. And it stayed pretty stationary for quite a number of hours and that’s why you got the heavy dose of freezing rain.” The ice storm brought down hundreds of tree branches in the Hope area, knocked out power to thousands of customers, and closed schools for days. The Fraser Valley Regional District opened up an emergency warming centre on Tuesday night at the rec centre to help residents affected by the power outages, offering access to washrooms and showers, as well overnight cots. Rock slides on Monday also forced the temporary closure of Flood-Hope Road, between Silver Creek and downtown Hope, as well Highway 1 east of Bridal Falls.

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Hope was the hardest hit community in the Lower Mainland from the winter storm. BC Hydro spokesperson Simi Heer said outages of more than 24 hours are unique and 29 crews in total were brought in, each comprised of up to three people. Crews targeted areas that would bring the largest number of customers back online first before moving to smaller neighborhood outages. Heer said they were also delayed by icy road conditions and highway closures. As of press deadline on Wednesday, there were still about 150 customers without power in the Hope area. However, that’s significantly down from a peak of about 14,000 on Monday. “Ice is one of the most challeng-

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ing weather issues for us to deal with, just because we have freezing lines and freezing conductors. We can also have branches come down far after the storm has passed. It tends to be an ongoing issue,” said Heer. “Once we got a problem cleared up, we saw additional problems pop up and they were often affecting the same lines and circuits.” The District of Hope has set up collection bins for tree branches at the rec centre near the small parking lot next to the washrooms. Any debris that can’t fit into the yard waste containers can be dropped off at no charge. For more information, contact district hall at 604-869-5671 or visit www.hope.ca For more pictures of the ice storm, see page 2.

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A2 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015

Ice Storm 2015

GORD HAVERY PHOTO

KERRIE-ANN SCHOENIT / THE STANDARD

LIBBY KIRKLAND PHOTO SHAR STERLING PHOTO JOSEE TREPAINIER PHOTO

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PATTIE DESJARDINS / THE STANDARD


Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015 A3

News

NDP picks candidate to run in Chilliwack-Hope Black Press

Seonaigh MacPherson has announced her intention to run as the next federal NDP candidate for the new riding of Chilliwack-Hope in the 2015 election. MacPherson of Chilliwack is an associate professor and head of Adult Education at the University of the Fraser Valley. “It is a real honour to be the candidate that will represent the Chilliwack-Hope NDP in the 2015 election,” said MacPherson. “This community is so important to me. I will work tirelessly in the coming months to

fight for the well-being of fami- about image, sound bytes, and celebrity,” she writes on her lies in this riding.” She has written two books blog. “Deep democracy is magand served on the board of the netic; it’s John Hums om e t h i n g phrey Centhat draws tre for Peace “I will work tirelessly in us in and and Hucaptivates man Rights. the coming months to us because MacPherson Äght for the well-being it’s intrinsiis also a successful entre- of families in this riding.” cally satisfypreneur who ing. And it’s runs a consatisfying Seonaigh MacPherson sulting busibecause it’s ness. important.” She’s said She looks she’s likely to opt for a simple forward to canvassing door to rather than splashy campaign. door and learn more about her “Democracy is about mak- neighbours and their perspecing informed choices, not tives.

She wants to visit 8,000 homes and to recruit other NDP canvassers to do the same. “I will take the time to write this daily blog. I will take the time to organize town halls and special events. I will do all this because I think we need deeper engagement with one another, as citizens, leading up to an election, especially this election, where so much is at stake. We need time together to talk, to think, to reason and decide.” She’s ready to go. “Talented, experienced, and intelligent, Seonaigh is an excellent addition to our B.C. team,” said NDP Leader Tom Mulcair.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Seonaigh MacPherson has announced her intention to run as the next federal NDP candidate for the new riding of Chilliwack-Hope in the 2015 election.

Redekopp to run for Conservative Party Paul Redekopp has announced that he will run as a nomination candidate for the Conservative Party of Canada electoral district association in the newly constituted federal riding of MissionMatsqui-Fraser Canyon. Through his experi-

PAUL REDEKOPP

ence as an independent contractor, former care giver (to those with developmental disabilities), federal, provincial and municipal politics, Redekopp says he can relate on issues that affect families – lower taxes, safer communities and job creation to ensure chil-

dren have a great future. Since the age of 10, when Redekopp went door-to-door raising money for the Timmy’s Telethon, he has not stopped serving and volunteering for his community. Currently, he sits on the board for The Child

Development Centre, his church council and volunteers with many charities and non-profit organizations. He plans to continue his legacy of building relationships, listening and working with the community members on issues that matter most.

Flu virus hits Fraser Health region hard 10 care homes dealing with outbreaks Jeff Nagel Black Press

Fraser Health has lab-confirmed flu outbreaks in progress at 10 different long-term care facilities following a spike in influenza activity over the holiday season. Medical health officer Dr. Michelle Murti said it’s remarkable to have 10 care home outbreaks active simultaneously as that’s as many as Fraser Health recorded in the entire flu season last year. “It’s quite a heavy year,” she said Monday, noting there have also been eight earlier facility outbreaks that have since cleared up. Flu season started early with residential outbreaks beginning in late September and early October. The bugs circulating had plenty of opportunity to find new victims as families and friends gathered over the holidays. The B.C. Centre for Disease Control on Jan. 2 reported a “sharp in-

crease” in influenzalike illness reports in the final two weeks of December. “With school back on we’ll now see more transmission in the community as well,” Murti said. The vaccine provided this flu season isn’t considered as effective as in past years because of some drift in the genetic makeup of the H3N2 flu virus that’s been dominant. But Murti said many care home residents are reporting relatively mild symptoms and some have been surprised to learn they have the flu at all. She said the less severe illness may stem from the partial protective effect of the vaccine against H3N2, or from residents’ built-up resistance from exposure to similar viruses in past years. Meanwhile, B.C. has recorded a third death linked to enterovirus D68 infection. The latest case is of a child who actually died

in November but the B.C. Centre for Disease Control did not receive confirmation until last week. There have been 220 enterovirus D68 cases detected in the province since mid-August. Of those, 140 required hospitalization and another five resulted in

neurological illness associated with the virus. Murti said enteroviruses are more prevalent in the summer and fall, and – as expected –  their activity has waned with the onset of winter. She offers the usual advice on avoiding flu and cold –  wash-

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YOUR VACCINATION CENTRE Welcome to the ¿rst Capsule Comments of this New Year. Our resolution is to ¿ll the column with interesting and useful tidbits of health information throughout the year. Our goal is to keep you informed about important health topics through the year. Speaking of resolutions, many people don’t bother making them at all. Those that do, sometimes make too many. Not good. Pick one or two areas of your life that you’d like to change and set some realistic goals for those changes.

Also, put a time limit on the goals, like 3 or 6 months. Shorter goals will enhance a feeling of accomplishment when you reach them. We’ve mentioned in this column before that writing down your goals is a positive way of helping you achieve them. Just seeing your goal on your bathroom mirror each day will help you keep on track. Also, tell a few good friends and relatives of your resolutions. They can be a great help in keeping your motivation.

Some people are adversely affected by the short winter days with decreased sunlight. Their moods are affected causing irritability, fatigue, lack of interest in activities and inability to concentrate. Even sleeping and eating patterns are affected. The condition is called “Seasonal Affective Disorder” (SAD) and can be helped by using light therapy.

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A4 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015

News

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On January 29, 2015 The Hope Standard will feature a special section dedicated to the newest member of your family. You won’t want to miss seeing your son, daughter, grandchild or family member showcased in this edition.

Deadline to submit your photo is: THURSDAY, JAN. 22, 2015 AT 5PM Mail or bring in a photo along with your payment of $20 to The Hope Standard Box 1090 540 Wallace St. Hope, B.C. V0X 1L0

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An elderly man lost control of his vehicle on Dec. 27 at about 3:20 p.m. and smashed into the brick wall and window of Bee’s Food Market on Wallace Street. The vehicle caused extensive damage to the outside, but luckily no one was hurt.

Lost skiers returned safely In the late afternoon of Jan. 4, Hope RCMP responded to a complaint of two backcountry skiers that had separated from their group and were lost in the Falls Lake area along the Coquihalla Highway. The pair of skiers later separated from one another. Hope Search and Rescue conducted a ground search remaining in contact with the lost skiers by cell phone.  One skier “walked” out of the area to safety, guided over the phone by mem-

bers of the Hope Search and Rescue team. The second skier built a shelter in preparation of spending the night on the mountain. Hope Search and Rescue maintained contact by cell phone with the skier until approximately midnight when the skier’s cell phone battery died.  On Jan. 5, search and rescue teams from Chilliwack, Mission, Central Fraser Valley as well as the Ministry of Transportation avalanche technicians had joined in

the search with other Lower Mainland teams on route. The lost skier was found uninjured by avalanche technicians in the late morning of Jan. 5. Hope Search and Rescue team members encourage back country enthusiasts to be safe by being up-to-date on high avalanche bulletins, ensuring avalanche beacons are carried, and staying with your group while enjoying the backcountry.

Gaetz returns as FVRD chair

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in unanimous vote at the inaugural FVRD meeting in December. As FVRD chair, Gaetz will be joined by Abbotsford Coun. Patricia Rose in the role again as vice chair, and Abbotsford Mayor Henri Braun, and Chilliwack Coun. Jason Lum as chair and acting chair of the Fraser Valley Regional Hospital

District Board. Gaetz has led the charge in trying to protect the regional airshed in opposing the Waste-to-Energy plan. “We are thrilled with the progress made in protecting our airshed, and look forward to working with Metro Vancouver to find positive, green alternatives to their plans to build a garbage incinera-

tor,” she said. Governed by a 23-member board, the FVRD serves to build prosperous, sustainable communities across the valley, with than 100 local, regional and subregional services provided to more than 280,000 residents in six municipalities and eight electoral areas.

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Sharon Gaetz has been given the nod for a fourth term as chair of the Fraser Valley Regional District. “I am energized by the accomplishments the FVRD has achieved over the past few years, and will continue to push forward with our regional interests to the province,” said Gaetz in a release. She was re-appointed

www.chilliwackchiefs.net

Tom Fletcher Black Press

Inspired by her holistic ranching background, Lieutenant Governor Judith Guichon has launched a provincewide environmental education program for high school teachers and youth leaders. Stewards of the Future offers grants of up to $800 per group to cover field trips, fees for programs and guess speakers, equipment and teacher release time for projects. It is offered for students from grades 9-12, First Nations educators, 4-H, Guide and Scout groups

and environment clubs, with an application deadline of Jan. 23 for the spring program. “Through Stewards of the Future, students will have the opportunity to explore issues that affect the land, water and other natural resources in British Columbia,” Guichon said. “The goal of this program is not to solve the challenges we face, but rather to encourage open discussion and gain a better understanding of the issues that affect our natural surroundings.” Program partners, including the education ministry and B.C. Parks, offer support for projects

such as research on invasive species leading to mapping and removal. The Stewards of the Future toolkit emphasizes hands-on “place-based” experience to appreciate and enhance biodiversity. Guichon and her late husband Lawrence Guichon are credited with pioneering holistic management in the B.C. cattle industry, emphasizing preservation of natural grassland on their historic Merritt-area ranch. Holistic management, developed by African biologist and game ranger Allan Savory, overturned the long-held belief that overgrazing is the result

of too many animals. Savory proved that reducing the number of animals doesn’t restore grasslands, which developed in the presence of large herds that were kept closely bunched and moving to avoid predators. Planned grazing mimics that pattern and gives grasslands time to recover. Details and application forms for the Stewards of the Future program are available at the Lieutenant Governor’s website, www.ltgov.bc.ca Guichon intends to visit programs in the province and incorporate an awards program for participants.


Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015 A5

News

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B.C. nurse Patrice Gordon caring for a one-month-old baby girl who tested positive for Ebola.

Courage gets B.C. face in Ebola fighter Patrice Gordon Nurse considering return to West Africa Jeff Nagel Black Press

B.C. Ebola fighter Patrice Gordon’s hospitalization this week after coming down with a fever has put a B.C. face on the army of medical heroes battling the killer disease in West Africa. The Rossland nurse practitioner was released from an isolation unit at Kelowna General Hospital Thursday after three tests for Ebola came back negative. She returned Christmas Day from four weeks in Sierra Leone and drove to hospital Dec. 29 – part way into her three-week period of self-quarantine at a Kelowna hotel – after developing symptoms now thought to be merely a severe cold. Gordon spoke out Friday after finding herself in a media spotlight, saying she hopes more B.C. volunteers help fight the epidemic and that they can return home to face less stigma and fear than she did. “Don’t be afraid of us when we come home,� she told reporters by phone, insisting medical workers like herself and designated hospitals are well prepared to prevent spread of the disease. “If I had it, it would have ended with me.� Gordon’s Christmas Day arrival was a lonely one – nobody met her at the airport and she

went straight to a hotel room to begin her isolation. “I would have loved to have somebody come and give me a hug. But I certainly wasn’t about to broadcast that I had just been in one of the countries affected by Ebola because I didn’t know what kind of reaction I was going to get.� Gordon previously worked overseas in Afghanistan and signed up with the Canadian Red Cross prior to the Ebola outbreak. She trained on procedures in Spain before going to an Ebola treatment centre in Kenema, Sierra Leone on Nov. 21. “The pull for me to be able to go and use my skills and try to make a difference there was huge,� she said. Her three adult sons were “not impressed� with her decision to go on the mission in the first place and were “very worried� to learn she was in hospital being tested for Ebola. But Gordon says she has no regrets, despite sweat-soaked work and having her “heart broken 10 million times� as victims young and old perished. “I would not change a thing, except to make Ebola go away,� she said. “This is how we make the world a better place – we go and do what we can.� Seven others from B.C. are now self-monitoring for symp-

toms during their own 21-day Ebola incubation periods and nine previous volunteers have undergone the three-week wait and been cleared. All shared in an unexpected honour – Time Magazine’s declaration of Ebola fighters as its Person of the Year. “They risked and persisted, sacrificed and saved,� Time’s Nancy Gibbs wrote, citing their “tireless acts of courage and mercy� that helped buy the world time to boost its defenses. “The rest of the world can sleep at night because a group of men and women are willing to stand and fight.� Gordon and other Red Cross workers celebrated in Sierra Leone when they heard the news but she immediately used it the next day to try to boost the spirits of their Ebola patients. “The entire world is pulling for you guys,� she recounted telling the stricken Africans, who she insists are the “real heroes� fighting the disease. A possible return to the Ebola battlefield of West Africa has already crossed her mind, even though the B.C. nurse remains under hotel room lockdown until she’s deemed safe from the disease on Jan. 14. “My family’s going to kill me,� Gordon said. “But they know me well enough to know that I would already be contemplating going back.�

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A6 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015

Opinion

Published at Hope, Boston Bar, Yale and surrounding area by Black Press

Sticking with your resolution Most people have cleared out their Christmas tree by now and holiday egg nog, rum cake and turkey with all of the trimmings are but a distant memory. The bills are starting to roll in, along with that feeling of perhaps overdoing it yet again, and, as the new year begins to take shape, we are faced with that desire to do better, to pare back and cut down. But for many of us this feeling lasts but a short while as evidenced by a poll taken early in 2014 which found a quarter of men broke their resolution to lose weight after one day. Who can blame them? Instead of dining on holiday delicacies, we’re back to the detoxing and juice cleanses; instead of spending on gifts, clothes, new phones and TVs at Christmas, we’re now supposed to cut back our spending and start putting something away for RRSP season. It’s a boom and bust cycle that’s hard on the nerves, which is why most people simply ignore the traditional New Year’s resolution in favour of, well, moderation. Perhaps, that’s the best resolution of all. - Black Press

2015: the year of climate adaptation B.C. VIEWS Tom Fletcher It’s time to look beyond the protests and political battles around climate change that dominated 2014, and look at the year and the decade ahead. From the California drought to shifting forest patterns across B.C., there is evidence that our climate is changing more rapidly. Public debate consists mainly of squabbling about the significance of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions, rather than what can be done to prepare. A draft discussion paper from the B.C. forests ministry on wildfire control was released in December after an access to information request. “ Climate Change Adaptation

and Action Plan For Wildfire Management, 2014-2024” describes the progress made in the province’s community forest fire prevention plan, and its goal to create “wildfire resilient ecosystems and wildfire adapted communities” over the next 10 years. The final discussion paper is to be released early in 2015, but the key research is in. It estimates that by 2017 there will be 788 million cubic metres of dead pine in B.C. forests. Fires in these areas spread 2.6 times faster than in healthy green stands, up to 66 metres per minute. The report calls for fuel management beyond community boundaries to stop “mega-fires” by creating landscape-level fuel breaks, with targeted harvesting, prescribed burning and new silviculture practices. It notes that bark beetle infestations and bigger, hotter fires are

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being seen across North America, with costs rising along with urban development. For example, the 2011 Slave Lake fire in northern Alberta generated the second largest insurance charge in Canadian history. The costs of preparing are huge. The costs of not preparing could be catastrophic. Also in 2014, the B.C. government appointed an advisory committee to prepare for the renewal of the Columbia River Treaty with the United States. While this 1964 the treaty has no end date, its flood control mandate expires in 2024. I spoke with Deborah Harford and Jon O’Riordan, members of the Simon Fraser University Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT), who, along with ACT senior policy author Robert Sandford, have written a provocative book on the treaty. They hope it will help lead to a

Standard

renewed agreement that will be a model for a changing world. “If you’re looking ahead 60 years from 2024, there’s a lot of climate change projected in that period, for British Columbia and the U.S.,” Harford said. “For the B.C. side, we’re looking at heavy precipitation and potential increase in snowmelt runoff, while in the States, you’re getting the opposite, much less snow. “There will probably be no snowpack left down there, and they’re looking at the prospect of quite drastically lower flows in the summer.” The treaty, sparked by devastating floods in 1948, led to construction of three dams on the B.C. side and one at Libby, Washington that backed up Kookanusa Lake into B.C. Between that reservoir and the Arrow Lakes, 110,000 hectares of B.C. land was flooded, including orchards,

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dairy farms and the homes of 2,000 people. Those dams hold back spring flood water and provide for irrigation that has allowed Washington to expand its agriculture to a $5 billion-a-year industry. The treaty shares the value of hydroelectric power generated by the many downstream U.S. dams such as the Grand Coulee, but it pays B.C. nothing for agricultural benefits that were achieved at the cost of B.C. farms and aboriginal territories. O’Riordan notes that climate shifts create a strategic benefit for B.C. The U.S. has no more dam capacity to exploit, and needs us more than ever, for flood protection and water supply. Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Twitter: @tomfletcherbc Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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BC Press Council: The Standard is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to : B.C. Press Council, PO Box 1356, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org


Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015 A7

Letters

Every bit helps with the climate Re: Climate talks end 2014 in disarray (B.C. Views, Dec. 31) I’ve always found it difficult to understand the fixation on China and India shown by those, like Tom Fletcher, who mock and obstruct all attempts to mitigate our climate mess. It seems they expect China and India to suddenly assume world leadership in this situation. A strange position, given the tendency for folks of Mr. Fletcher’s persuasion to hold up Western democracies as the right and proper leaders of this world. Thankfully, a bit of this confusion was cleared up towards the end of his column where Mr. Fletcher supported his “agnostic” attitude towards “human-caused global warming” by noting that the current trend of glacial recession started in the 1850s, “when a

sport utility vehicle had one horsepower in leather harness[.]” At that point, it became clear that Mr. Fletcher takes his analysis to the depth of a puddle. Unfortunately, the problem is very deep. All of the histories I’ve encountered give the late 1700s as the starting point for the industrial revolution. In 1840, Charles Dickens, an accurate and astute observer of his world, described a landscape where “as far as the eye could see into the heavy distance, tall chimneys, crowding on each other... poured out their plague of smoke, obscured the light, and made foul the melancholy air.” (The Old Curiosity Shop, Chapter 45). Dickens’s description is of a well-established industrial economy spewing highly polluting hydrocarbon emissions night and day from the coal-fired fac-

tory power plants that ran the steam engines of the early industrial revolution. Thus, it should come as no surprise that the first retreat of the glaciers appeared after decades of such pollution. And given this history, the demands of the developing nations that we in the West acknowledge our responsibility for the current state of the climate, and for mitigating the effects already being experienced, seem to have a compelling logic. After all, the “developing nations” lack our long history of intensively burning hydrocarbon fuels. It is this history of increasingly intensive economic efficiencies that created our current climate issue, while providing our affluent way of life. Mr. Fletcher, however, is correct when he points out the lack of effective leader-

ship on the climate issue. Mr. Obama is hamstrung by a Congressional leadership that determined from the beginning of his administration to block every initiative he put forward. Xi Jinping may be able to apply more effective leadership in China, but I doubt Mr. Fletcher would feel comfortable following that lead. As Wendy Mesley succinctly pointed out, however, Stephen Harper is well positioned to demonstrate responsible leadership by slowing the expansion of Canada’s hydrocarbon economy and by developing alternatives that satisfy our northern requirements. And regardless of how one chooses to slice and dice the scope and scale of the numbers, we’re all in a situation where every little bit helps. Russell Dorfman

Look after those who can’t take care of themselves Again, last week the news flies parallel to police bullets, as law enforcement find themselves on the front lines of mental health care, with more shootings of mentally distraught persons. Is this how we treat societies dysfunctional, with police bullets?   Is treating the mentally ill with the front lines of the justice system the economic alternative to compassionate forward medical treatment? Yes, it has become obvious that there is no real

concern for the mentally ill. Even though it’s been continuously articulated that there’s nothing to be ashamed of coming forward with your mental woes. This political rhetoric, is stated over and over. The truth is, there is no political will to help those that don’t have the skills to take care of themselves, or at least have some sort of support system to back them up. Because the mentally ill, unsupported, don’t vote. There are very few people in our society that will put themselves

on the front lines for extremely agitated or nonconforming individuals, that are not loved ones, or doing so without significant remuneration. The perfect example of this, is the existing Riverview mental health facility. Lately, the provincial government has announced opening up another 40 beds at the institution. Talk about a bandaid on an axe wound! Forty beds quite frankly is a joke. If this is all we have to offer, why even bother.

The same provincial government has just recently stated that the province needs at least a 300 bed mental health facility. So 40 beds is suppose to appease us? Are we all that ignorant and of no compassion that we play politics with those that roam the streets, and with those that have a life expectancy of less than fifty years of age. There is 250 acres at Riverview that is being totally wasted.  This property should be developed

and the proceeds from the construction sales, as well as the eventual residential property and business tax proceeds, should be used to pay for the management and operations of such a facility. Why hasn’t this been done, or why is there no political resolve to take on such a project? It is obvious that the economics are proven. Yet there is 250 acres of urban blackberry. What is the underlying reason that they let this important issue fall

Not impressed Chivalry is not dead in Hope with bus service On Nov. 14, 2014, we purchased two round-trip tickets to Calgary for Dec. 29. This was a second attempt - they were too busy to sell tickets the first time. We arrived 45 minutes early on Dec. 29 and two hours later – no bus. My wife queried the guy in side and he said he’d check. Until I went in and asked “Where the hell is the bus,” there was no answer. Seems our bus was cancelled, or full and didn’t stop – not sure which story to believe. We were told we couldn’t get a refund and he’d try to get us on a red-eye or try to get us on a run the next day. We are seniors. We do not need this. In any case, we drove to Calgary. Naturally this wasn’t free. We are told that Greyhound does this all the time. Well, we’ll drive or fly from now on. With the way bus fares are going, it will soon be cheaper. With the service we got, driving was faster. We have gone to Greyhound in Dallas for a refund. A breach of contract is a breach of contract. So, the question is: Why use Greyhound when they apparently don’t give a damn and why deal with an employee who seems to want nothing more than to get rid of you? J. Smith

Former Eagles president bids farewell In order to promote peace and harmony at the Hope Eagles, I have been removed from office by the agent from the U.S.

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their power returned. I explained I needed ice blocks but could not get to the store. Pauline was sympathetic but had no means of delivering – but, wait a minute! She told me another staff member was coming on in an hour and she would personally deliver five blocks of ice, which she did. Pauline not only saved our freezer supply but phoned an hour and a half later to make sure that we were OK. Chivalry is not dead – it lives in Hope. Thank you most sincerely Pauline. Carol Chaulk

I am sure that there are going to be many tales of woe from the recent ice storm – and in this regard, I would like to address a situation at our own home. We were without power for 36 hours and on the first full day – around 4:30 we were most concerned about our freezer (which had recently been stocked). We were unable to get our car out of the garage and decided I would try the local stores to see if we could have some block ice delivered... no answer until I tried Buy & Save and was told by a young woman that most of the staff had been sent home – but they had just had

45750 AIRPORT RD 604-795-9411

While quantities last.

P R I C E B U S T E R S

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the businesses, the citizens of Hope and Eagle members for their support over the last five years. It

was my pleasure to serve the community whenever possible and to the best of my ability the charities that so greatly need help. Herb Smith

Green

Circulation $1 per copy retail; $42 per year by carrier; $61.50 per year by mail in Canada; $185 per year by mail to the USA. All subscriptions are payable in advance of delivery. Copyright Copyright or property rights subsists in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of THE HOPE STANDARD. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Unauthorized publication will be subject to recourse by law.

to look after the ones in our society, who don’t have the skill to take care of themselves. It is not just a duty, it is an obligation! Art Green

Letters The Hope Standard welcomes letters from our readers. Typed or printed letters must be signed and should include an address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. The Standard edits letters for accuracy, taste, clarity and length. The Standard reserves the right to not publish letters. EMAIL:

news@hopestandard.com

CURRENT WEB POLL: Were you prepared for the lengthy power outages caused by this week’s ice storm? To answer, go to the home page of our website: www.hopestandard.com

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by the wayside, while this neglected urban eyesore sits idly overgrown in brambles, and the buildings have deteriorated to the point of no repair. It’s time we get our act together with this issue, and this property. Let’s forget about who might attain the political brownie points, forget about who’s books the economic capitalization belongs to. Because, quite frankly, it belongs to all of us. As a province, we are supposed to be humanitarian. We are supposed

Editorial Department To discuss any news story idea you may have – or any story we have recently published – please call the editor at 604-869-4992.

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A8 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015

Fred’s

Opinion

U.S. ripping us off on water B.C. VIEWS

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The U.S. has Canada over a barrel on water as well as oil these days, but the tide is turning. Last week I mentioned a new book called The Columbia River Treaty – A Primer by members of Simon Fraser University’s

SUDOKU PUZZLE 477

climate adaptation team. This slim volume makes the case that B.C. has ended up with a shockingly bad deal from this 1964 treaty, which concerned itself entirely with flood control and hydroelectric power. In those days there was little or no environmental assessment. Agriculture, fish habitat and aboriginal impacts were ignored. More than a decade after the disastrous flood year of 1948, once Ottawa stopped its bureaucratic delays, U.S. public and private power utilities paid B.C. $254 million to build three dams on the Columbia system. Those dams (and one at Libby, Montana that mostly floods B.C. land) hold back the huge spring runoff from the Rockies and then dole out water for power production in B.C. and for the 15 hydro dams previously built downstream in the U.S. The U.S. payment was for half the power over 30 years, which B.C.

didn’t need at the time. Then our American cousins cut us another cheque for $64 million, an estimate of the value of flood protection from 1968 all the way to 2024. Boy, did we get taken. The SFU team calculates the value of that flood control to the U.S. at more like $32 billion. That’s not even the worst of it. The Kootenays were once the leading fruit and vegetable growing area in B.C., bigger than the Okanagan. Now in the Arrow Lakes and other reservoirs, levels rise and fall dramatically to steady the flow south. In addition to the large areas permanently flooded by the Mica, Duncan and Hugh Keenleyside dams, this renders more of B.C.’s prime bottom land impassable. B.C. is paid precisely zero for this sacrifice, while Washington state has developed a $5 billion-a-year farm economy using our stable irrigation source. That has helped their tree

fruit growers push some Okanagan orchardists out of business. As U.S. billionaires continue to bankroll environmental attacks on B.C. and Alberta energy projects, it’s worth noting that long before the treaty, the U.S. military-industrial complex had wiped out the Columbia River salmon runs. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its private power partners dammed everything they could find, exterminating a fishery bigger than the Fraser that had sustained aboriginal people on both sides of today’s border for thousands of years. B.C. Energy Minister Bill Bennett and SFU’s Jon O’Riordan both described to me their experience at the Columbia River Basin conference, held last October in Spokane. Their main impression was that Americans, including traditional tribes, want those salmon runs restored. Vast amounts

have been spent on hatcheries and habitat to speed recovery below the Grand Coulee dam, which stands like a giant tombstone for migratory fisheries above it. Should the Americans ever manage to get salmon above their biggest dam, it will largely be up to B.C. to provide sufficient cool water to keep them alive. That service has an increasing value to the U.S. as well as an ongoing cost to B.C. Bennett surprised some in Spokane when he said the U.S. needs to pay more for the benefits from the Columbia River Treaty. The flood control agreement expires in 2024. The treaty requires 10 years’ notice for either country to exit. Climate shifts are expected to make B.C. water more important than ever. Your move, Uncle Sam. Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press.

B.C.-only wines in grocery stores Jeff Nagel Black Press

in the grid so that every row, every column & every 3 x 3 box HOW • Fill contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. TO • Each 3 x 3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few to get you started. Remember: you must not repeat the PLAY: numbers numbers 1 through 9 in the same line, column or 3 x 3 box.

ANSWERS IN THE CLASSIFIED SECTION OF THIS PAPER OPEN: Monday-Saturday CLOSED Sundays Eat-In or Take Out 377 Old Hope Princeton Way, Hope, B.C. 604-869-8484

The province’s latest liquor reform will make it easier for wine stores to relocate into grocery stores – provided they offer only B.C. wines – but there’s no sign the government is rethinking its change to wholesale wine pricing that will sharply drive up the price of more expensive bottles. Justice Minister Suzanne Anton’s announcement is being hailed by B.C. wineries because some supermarkets that can begin selling wine come April will be barred from stocking foreign wines. Under the change, existing VQA and independent wine stores can

January 8 Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS 4. Price of a ride 40. = to 10 amperes 34. __ Hitler 1. Mandela's party 5. 1/2 an em 43. Mined mineral 35. Marched in a procession 4. Gives up territory 6. Execute or perform 44. Greek god of war 36. Patchy in color 9. Yellow edible Indian fruit 7. Narrative poems 45. Don't know when yet 37. Trauma center 11. Storefront coverings 8. Breathe deeply and 48. Fellow 38. Time after midday heavily 14. King of Huns 49. Detailed criteria for a 40. The expanse of a surface 10. 1/40 inch button 15. Atomic #18 piece of work 41. Develops into measure 16. Jive talk for ignored 50. Special Spanish dish 42. Equally 11. Morally reprehensible 18. D. Tartt's third novel 53. Atomic #46 44. 4th month (abbr.) person 23. Three-toed sloth 54. CBS This Morning hostess 45. Nervous & taut 12. For instance 24. Gained through effort 56. Rubber tree genus 46. Emits blood 13. Members of U.S. Navy 25. Macaw's genus 58. Pa's partner 47. Assert without proof 17. Crown 26. Helps little firms 59. A tiny bubble in glass 49. Saturates in liquid 19. Old English 27. A large group of pheas60. Lost light 50. No. Italian river 20. Libyan dinar ants 63. Surface boundary 51. Article 21. Goddess of the rainbow 28. Baby bed 64. Islands 52. Mayflower cooper John 22. Catch 29. English dictionary (abbr.) 65. = to 1/100 yen 54. Filippo __, Saint 26. Fern spore mass clusters 30. Yellow-fever mosquitos 55. Begetter 28. Music disc 32. Liquify DOWN 57. Old Dominion state 30. All without specification 34. Add a supplement 1. Subside in intensity 31. -__, denotes past 61. Raised railroad track 38. Insistence on traditional 2. __ Hale, Am. revolutionary 32. A young canine correctness 62. Point midway between 3. Leafstalk herbaceous plant 39. Milk, butter & cheese N and E 33. Biblical Sumerian city ANSWERS FOR THIS WEEK’S CROSSWORD PUZZLE CAN BE FOUND IN THE CLASSIFIED SECTION OF THIS PAPER

relocate or transfer their licence to an eligible grocery store as long as 100 per cent B.C. wine is sold. Those licence transfers won’t be limited by a rule that disallows new outlets if there’s an existing one within one kilometre. Liquor policy reform leader John Yap called it a “winning combination” to allow grocery shoppers to also buy B.C. wine and support the local industry. The new model is different from the store-within-a-store model in that it allows B.C. wine to be on regular grocery store shelves and shoppers would pay for it at designated registers staffed by trained employees who are at least 19. Anton said

a limited number of new licences – she would not specify how many – will be made available to sell just B.C. wine in grocery stores. The extra licences will mean more competition for private wine stores that have already been critical of some of the province’s liquor reforms. Vancouver lawyer Mark Hicken, who acts for the wine industry, predicts there will be “no takers” on wine stores relocating under the new B.C.-only model because they would lose most of their international product lines. Hicken said the B.C.-only rule may violate Canada’s international trade agreements.


WINTER

Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015 A9

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A10 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015

The 2015 official visitor guide for Hope & area is coming soon!

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About 25 people participated in the second annual Resolution Walk in Hope on Jan. 1. The event aims to help people start the new year off right by establishing or maintaining an active lifestyle. The Resolution Walk kicked off at C.E. Barry and participants followed a five kilometre route through town, which included a walk through the new community recreation park and along the Coquihalla River dyke.

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Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015 A11

News

Prosecutors shift stance on vulnerable witnesses Change flows from handling of Pickton escapee

Jeff Nagel Black Press

B.C.’s Crown prosecutors are revising how they deal with vulnerable victims and witnesses to crime in response to the 2012 Missing Women Inquiry findings that their mishandling of one woman may have let serial killer Robert Pickton extend his murder spree for years. A prostitute barely escaped alive from his Port Coquitlam farm after a bloody knife fight with Pickton in 1997 but charges of attempted murder against him were dropped a year

later, in part because Crown decided the drug-addicted woman was unable to credibly testify. Inquiry commissioner Wally Oppal recommended changes in Crown procedures and suggested in his report that better support for the woman and preparation by prosecutors to deal with her might have gleaned more information from her and got the case to trial. At least a dozen women went missing from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside between the 1997 attack and Pickton’s 2002 arrest, includ-

ing the six women he was eventually convicted of killing. The province’s Criminal Justice Branch unveiled a new tailored policy Tuesday to deal with vulnerable victims and witnesses, recognizing that, in cases involving serious injury, they require ongoing support throughout the prosecution. The policy highlights various best practices, including early identification of witnesses needing support and seeking appropriate 2014

protective conditions as part of any bail order. “Crown counsel should keep in mind that vulnerable victims and witnesses may be particularly subject to pressure, intimidation and interference,” the policy says, adding Crown should try to determine why they’re reluctant to testify and develop strategies to address the issues. Vulnerable witnesses are defined as ones where there’s a reasonable likelihood that their effective par-

ticipation in the justice system “will be significantly diminished, or eliminated, if accommodations or supports are not made available.” It says people in the sex trade, as well as aboriginals, may be particularly vulnerable. But witnesses may be vulnerable due to various other factors, including addiction, homelessness, mental illness, advanced age, a history of being abused, precarious legal status or ethnic, religious or cultural perspectives.

BLACK PRESS FILE PHOTO

Missing Women Inquiry Commissioner Wally Oppal at the December 2012 release of his report Forsaken on how the justice system failed the victims of serial killer Robert Pickton.

19 Years In A Row!

Real estate gains strongest for detached homes in 2014 Jeff Nagel Black Press

Lower Mainland real estate prices recorded modest to strong gains in 2014, with detached houses generally rising faster than townhouses or condos. Year-end statistics released by the Greater Vancouver and Fraser Valley real estate boards show benchmark detached houses on average gained 6.7 per cent over the past year. Those increases ranged from more than 10 per cent in Vancouver, Tsawwassen and Burnaby to less than five per cent in West Vancouver, Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Langley, Abbotsford, Mission and parts of Surrey. The increases pushed the benchmark price of houses above $1 million for the first time in Burnaby and for the Greater Vancouver area as a whole. Benchmark house prices across the Fraser Valley area, which includes Surrey, White Rock and North Delta, ended the year at $573,100. Benchmark prices show the shifts of a typical property and exclude the most expensive ones that can skew average prices much higher. Price increases were more muted for townhouses and condos across the region. Townhouses or attached homes averaged a 2.6 per cent gain across the Lower Mainland, with the strongest gains of more than seven per cent recorded in Maple Ridge, North Delta, Squamish and Vancouver’s west side. Benchmark townhouse prices were $293,500 in the Fraser Valley and $476,000 in Greater Vancouver. Condo prices dropped in value in several areas in 2014, with the Fraser Valley benchmark down 0.8 per cent and the biggest drops of nearly 10 per cent in Maple Ridge and North Surrey. Greater Vancouver condos gained 3.5 per cent on average. Benchmark condo prices ended the year at $191,100 for the Fraser Valley and $380,700 for Greater Vancouver. The December 2014 statistics provided by realtor associations are different from the just-released home assessments, which are conducted by BC Assessment and are intended to provide a valuation snapshot as of each July 1. See the interactive charts on The Hope Standard website to compare price changes by community over as much as five years.

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HAPPY NEW YEAR!


A12 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015

News

Local arts groups receive strategic investments Three local arts, culture and heritage groups have attracted $14,500 in matching incentive funding that could leverage as much as five times that amount in business partnerships. The program, supported by a range of private and public sector funders including the provincial government,

has proved very successful in communities in various regions across B.C. artsVest has already helped almost 150 small to mid-sized B.C. arts groups acquire skills and make alliances that will help them continue to make their communities great places to live, work, visit and build a future. In 2013/14, artsVest BC com-

munities raised from three to six times their matching grants, from local businesses. “Arts and culture organizations need strong community support to remain a sustainable part of the local community,” said Chilliwack-Hope MLA Laurie Throness. “The artsVest program, anchored by its practical work-

shops, is helping local cultural groups build positive relationships with the businesses community to increase their funding base. Congratulations to all participants.” The local groups participating in 2014/15 are Chilliwack Community Arts Council, Chilliwack School of Performing Arts, and the Harrison

Festival of the Arts. “As a community based arts organization, the Harrison Festival Society values its business partnerships in the local community, not only due to the economic benefits, but also because community building is central to our mandate,” said Andy Hillhouse, executive and artistic director of

the Harrison Festival Society. “ArtsVest is an extremely effective program that presents training in how to pursue such sponsorships, and provides a strong motivation of matching funds to make the connections necessary. We are working on the process currently and it is giving a boost to our sponsorship program.”

“The standards we have – they’re second to none.” - Bob Graham, Field Integrity Technician, Kinder Morgan Canada

Trans Mountain employees are dedicated to continual improvement of pipeline and facility integrity to ensure the safest possible operation now and into the future. Key components of our Pipeline Integrity Program include hazard identification, hazard prevention, ongoing monitoring of hazards, as well as pipeline control and monitoring. Safety is our number one priority.

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For more information, go to blog.TransMountain.com Committed to safety since 1953.


Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015 A13

News

Stale pizza, no Wi-Fi among bone-headed 911 calls E-Comm releases Top 10 list of non-emergency nuisance calls Jeff Nagel Black Press

Do not call 911 because your slice of pizza is stale. Nor is it an emergency if Wi-Fi at the coffee shop isn’t working or you’ve lost your glasses. Those are some of the most bizarrely inappropriate 911 calls made by Lower Mainland residents in 2014, according to a Top 10 list released by E-Comm, southwest B.C.’s emergency communications centre. Besides complaining about the quality of take-out food, many bozo 911 callers appear to think emergency dispatchers can double as an information service, wanting to know everything from whether it’s a stat holiday to the phone numbers for taxis or travel agents. E-Comm spokesperson Jody Robertson said people who make “nuisance calls” to 911 tie up valuable resources for people with real lifeand-death emergencies, potentially putting lives at risk. “These kinds of calls come in every day pretty much all day long,” she said. There isn’t an accurate count of how many there are, but Robertson said it’s “way too many.” Nor can E-Comm staff instantly disconnect those calls – they have to be alert to the possibility that a caller feels threatened by someone nearby and is concocting a cover story so it doesn’t seem like they’ve dialed 911. “We have to make sure the caller can speak freely and there’s not something else going on,” Robertson said. The same sorts of scenarios –  is the caller silent because of a nearby assailant or because they’ve had a heart attack – are on the minds of EComm staff when they get a pocketdialed call or an accidental call where the caller hangs up. Call-takers must phone back to make sure the person is okay, and if the call came from a landline and they can’t be reached, police are dispatched. “Those kinds of calls can chew up a lot of resources unnecessarily.” The number of pocket-dialed 911 calls is running at about 70,000 a

year, while another 30,000 are accidental calls where the caller hangs up without explaining to staff. Those numbers have improved slightly, Robertson said, but still amount to more than 10 per cent of the 860,000 calls to 911 each year in the Lower Mainland. She said the most frequent “headscratcher” calls are ones seeking basic information, adding calls to report or seek information about power outages are a major recurring problem. True emergencies are police, fire or medical situations that require immediate action because someone’s health, safety or property is in jeopardy or a crime is in progress. Discovering your car broken into or vandalized should be a call to your local police non-emergency number, not 911. “We’re here to help people with real emergencies,” added 911 call taker Warner Yang, who fielded the year’s most unworthy 911 call – that Wi-Fi at the local coffee shop wasn’t working. “If someone calls 911 about internet problems that means I’m not available to help someone who really needs it.” Classic idiot calls from past years include callers who reported a large spider in their living room, that their TV was broken or that their son wouldn’t hand over the remote control. Other requests have included callers seeking permission to drive in the HOV lanes because of congestion or wanting to rent a fire truck to block off a street for a party.

FILE PHOTO

E-Comm, southwest B.C.’s emergency communications centre, has released it Top 10 list of the most bizarrely inappropriate 911 calls made by Lower Mainland residents in 2014. The No. 1 reason was Wi-Fi not working at a coffee shop.

Top ten reasons to not call 911: 1. Wi-Fi at a local coffee shop isn’t working 2. “What’s the fine for jay walking?” 3. Pizza not fresh; wants a replacement slice 4. “What’s the number for my travel agency?” 5. Caller phoned 911 to ask for a taxi referral 6. “Is today a stat holiday?” 7. Food they ordered is cold 8. Wants help finding lost glasses 9. Home Internet is not working 10. “What’s the date today?”

Property Owner’s Checklist

Local students invited to submit designs for Canada 150 logo Mark Strahl, MP for ChilliwackFraser Canyon, is encouraging local post-secondary students over the age of 18 to take part in the Canada 150 Logo Design Contest. “This is an opportunity for a young aspiring graphic designer to be part of Canadian history by designing a national logo that celebrates our country’s 150th birthday,” said Strahl. The logo, a key element in the multi-year effort to bring Canadians together for our country’s ongoing celebration of 150 years of Confederation, should evoke feelings of pride, unity and celebration, and it should reflect Canada as a diverse

nation with a rich past and a promising future. In addition to the recognition of having his or her logo used as the government’s brand for the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the winner will receive $5,000 and a display in one of Canada’s national institutions. A judging committee made up of community leaders and representatives from the arts, heritage and educational sectors will develop a shortlist of qualified entries for final consideration. Submissions for the Canada 150 logo design contest will be accepted until Jan. 23, 2015. For more details and information on how to apply, see Canada.ca/150.

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If not received in your mail by January 18, call toll-free 1-866-valueBC (1-866-825-8322) If so, review it carefully Visit www.bcassessment.ca to compare other property assessments using the free, newly enhanced e-valueBC™ service Questions? Contact BC Assessment at 1-866-valueBC or online at www.bcassessment.ca Don’t forget...if you disagree with your assessment, you must file a Notice of Complaint (appeal) by February 2, 2015


A14 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015 With a couple of clicks, add your event today.

Community

www.hopestandard.com

events there’s more v online »

Comedian Brent Butt in Chilliwack

Jon Watts Denture Clinic

hilliwack Serving C Years! for 50

OPEN WEDNESDAY EVENING & SATURDAY BY APPOINTMENT Email: jonwatts@jonwattsdentureclinic.com • Free Parking • Wheelchair Accessible

Across from Chilliwack General Hospital

12/14_JWD23

• New Dentures • Partials / Partial Additions • Regular & Soft Liners • Repairs

604.792.6312

Join us in Worship

Community of Hope Church Directory

CHRIST CHURCH ANGLICAN CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION

ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA & National Historic Site CONSECRATED 1861

Invites you to worship

SUNDAYS 10AM

THE REV. GAIL NEWELL www.anglican-hope.ca Corner of Park & Fraser St. 604-869-5402

Welcomes you to

Sunday Worship at 9:30am 888 Third Ave. Rev. Don Gardner

Anglican Network in Canada

Local info: 604-869-5599 Grace HOPE PENTECOSTAL Baptist ASSEMBLY Church Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada

“People connecting to Corner of 5th & Fort each other and 10:30am Morning Worship God,the World” & Children’s Sunday School www.gbchope.com

Pastor Jim Cornock

949-3rd Ave. • 604.869.5524

604-869-9717

“Helping people take one step closer to Jesus...”

MT. HOPE SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH

HOPE UNITED CHURCH

1300 Ryder St.

SATURDAY MORNING Study Hour 9:15 a.m. Worship Hour 11:00am Prayer Meeting - Tuesday, 7pm

Pastor Michael Hope 604-792-8471 ST. PAUL’S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH

Service held 2nd & last Sunday of each month. F.C. Hospital Conference Room – 2:30 pm

Wayne Lunderby, Pastor Contact: Linda 604-869-2073

590 Third Ave.

SUNDAY SERVICE: 10am

UNITED WE SING RETURNS FEB. 7 604-869-9381 A PASSION FOR CHRIST AND HIS KINGDOM SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 AM FREE STORE TUES/THURS 3:00-4:30 PM

Northwest Harvest Church

888 - THIRD AVE. 604-869-9969 (MESSAGE ONLY)

Canadian funnyman Brent Butt is coming to Chilliwack in March. From small town Saskatchewan to the big screen, Butt is one of Canada’s funniest and most successful comedians. Comedic storyteller, gifted writer, producer and actor, Brent created the TV series “Corner Gas.” It was an instant hit with unprecedented ratings, an International Emmy Award nomination (2004) and earning the moniker Funniest Show on TV from TV Guide readers. In March 2005, The Hollywood Reporter declared, “For the first time in a generation, the highest-rated sitcom on primetime schedules here is a Canadian show, not American.” To follow up Canada’s No. 1 comedy, Butt created “Hiccups,” a sitcom starring himself and Nancy Robertson winning multiple LEO Awards. Butt made the transition to the big screen as writer and star of the feature film “No Clue.” Fans anxiously awaited the much-anticipated return to Dog River with “Corner Gas: The Movie,” which hit theatres Dec. 3, 2014.  Butt is a regular at Just For Laughs as well as appearing on numerous national and internation-

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Actor/comedian Brent Butt will be at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre on March 15.

al television programs. His meteoric career was the subject of an episode of the cultural affairs program Adrienne Clarkson Presents.

Along the way, Butt has won four Canadian Comedy Awards for Best Male Standup (2001), Best Male TV Performance (Corner Gas,

2004, 2005) and Best Writing - TV Series (Corner Gas, 2004). His one-hour TV special “Comedy Now – Funnypants” earned him a Gemini nomination in the category Best Comedy Performance. Butt was also honoured with the Comedy Network Sir Peter Ustinov Award at the World Television Festival (2008). Past recipients include John Cleese, Bob Newhart, John Candy and Eugene Levy. Perhaps the most notable nod came with the honour of a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for his contributions to community and country (2013). “I love what I do” says Butt. “I still look at it as just having coffee. Only now it’s with a thousand or so people at a time.”  Rock.It Boy Entertainment presents Brent Butt on March 15 at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre, 9201 Corbould St. The show starts at 7:30 p.m., with doors opening at 7 p.m. Tickets are $39.50 (plus facility fee and service charges) from the box office, by phone at 604-391-7469 or online at www.chilliwackculturalcentre.ca. For more information about Butt, visit www.brentbutt.com

COMMUNITY CALENDAR MONDAY Auxiliary Monthly Meeting: We raise funds for our hospital and lodge and have several events throughout the year. We also have two gift shops, one in the hospital and the other in the lodge. We sell beautiful handmade afghans, baby layettes, sweaters, jewelry and cards at reasonable prices. With the money raised we are able to continue to purchase large items needed for patient’s comfort and care. We look forward to new members to join our volunteer group. Check out our website: auxiliarytofrasercanyonhospital.com. Monday, Jan. 12 1 p.m. Fraser Canyon Hospital conference room 1275 7th Ave. 604-869-3517 marybirc@gmail.com Depression Recovery Program Introduction: A program not only for those dealing with depression, but also to help overcome stress and anxiety, help a loved one with depression, or simply to achieve peak

mental performance and a healthier lifestyle. Monday, Jan. 12 7 p.m. Fraser Canyon Hospital conference room 1275 7th Ave. This introduction will be repeated Tuesday, Jan. 13 7 p.m. at Hope Centre, 888 3rd Ave. 604-869-3667 irene.loewen@shaw.ca Hope Al-Anon Group: Al-Anon supports friends and families of problem drinkers. Monday, Jan. 12 8 p.m. Fraser Canyon Hospital meeting room 1275 7th Ave. 604-869-7078 hopebcalanon@gmail. com

TUESDAY Senior fitness class: Total body workout for seniors 55+ using music to movement , weights and bands.. It runs Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9 a.m. Golden Ager’s Hall 560 Douglas St. 604-869-8435 jilllast1@gmail.com Hope Scrabble Club: Queue, quixotry,

zymurgy. If you are a serious Scrabble player looking for a challenging game, this is the group for you. Tuesday, Jan. 13 10 a.m. Hope Library 1005A 6th Ave. 604-869-2313 deb.ireland@fvrl.bc.ca Conversation Circles: If you are learning English and want to practice speaking with other people in a friendly, casual place then join us for weekly guided discussions about Canadian culture, food, current events and a variety of other topics. A ReadRight program.. Tuesday, Jan. 13 10:30 a.m. Hope Library 1005A 6th Ave. 604-869-1363 larissa.readright@gmail. com

WEDNESDAY $how Me the Money: A beginner’s financial literacy program that looks at creating and maintaining budgets, preparing for holiday expenses, and making smart food decisions. Learn to get the best bang for your buck,

and how to stretch a dollar a little further! Please pre-register by contacting via email or telephone! Wednesday, Jan. 14 1 p.m. Read Right Society Bay Room 895 3rd Ave. 604-869-1973 shauna.readright@gmail. com Westie Army Cadet Training: The cadet program prepares youth ages 12 to 19 to become the leaders of tomorrow through fun yet challenging activities. Wednesday, Jan. 14 6:30 p.m. Hope Legion 344 Fort St. 1789trg@gmail.com Fun with Food: Music, food demonstrations and samples, door prizes. Wednesday, Jan. 14 7 p.m. Fireside Room, Seventh-day Adventist Church 1300 Ryder St. 604-869-3261 sabinereflex@hotmail. com

THURSDAY Seniors Coffee and Conversation: Drop in to discuss current events

or visit with friends while you have a cup of coffee and a homemade treat. Thursday, Jan. 15 10:30 a.m. Hope Library 1005A 6th Ave. 604-869-2313 deb.ireland@fvrl.bc.ca

FRIDAY Friday Afternoon Help: Book a half-hour uninterrupted “Help!” session. Whether you are learning to use your new e-reader, mystified by email or anything in between - the library can help find you an answer! Registration required. Friday, Jan. 9 1:30 p.m. Hope Library 1005A 6th Ave. 604-869-2313 deb.ireland@fvrl.bc.ca

SUNDAY Happy Knit Group: Bring your knitting and share in the conversation about patterns and projects, ideas and yarns. Beginners and all abilities are welcome to join this cozy fireside knitting circle. Sunday, Jan. 11 1:30 p.m. Hope Library 1005A 6th Ave. 604-869-2313 deb.ireland@fvrl.bc.ca


Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015 A15

Sports

Contingent of young hockey officials in Hope Barry Stewart Hope Standard

While most of the country had an easy time tuning in to watch Canada beat Russia in the IIHF World Junior Hockey Championship on Monday night, a severe ice storm had left much of the Hope area without electricity. Hopians had to be lucky — or resourceful — to see the live broadcast. Such was the case for the James family of Dogwood Valley. Still able to communicate via Facebook on her cell phone, mom Vanessa said, “We broke out the generator for the gold medal game but it turned out our satellite dish was frozen anyway. “I remembered after the first period that I have Bell TV on my phone, so the two hockey players watched the game on my little phone screen. Technology can be a wonderful thing.” The Christmas break was a busy one for the James family, with brothers Dyllan and Marcus both playing in tournaments and Marcus joining a handful of local officials to help out at the 34-team Chilliwack peewee jamboree. Dyllan, 17, is on Chilliwack’s midget A1 rep team and they placed third in their tourney at Coquitlam last week. Marcus, 13, skates for Hope’s bantam C1 Wildcats and they took a tough road to victory at the 14-team Abbotsford tournament before Christmas. Coached by former Hope Minor Hockey teammates of the past century, cousins Mike Talarico and Clayton Kellum — the Wildcats won their first game, 3-0. After that, the next four games were all come-from-behind wins, said team manager, Jesse James. The Wildcats went up against Chilliwack C5 in the semi-final, a team that had only lost once in the regular season. Hope was down 2-1 after one period but were tied 3-3 after two. With only three seconds left in the game, Hope scored to make it 4-3 and put the Wildcats into the championship match against Langley C2. Langley held 1-0 and 3-0 leads at the ends of the first two periods before the Wildcats decided to make a game of it, with 10:21 left in the final frame. Wildcat

BARRY STEWART / THE STANDARD

Marcus James drops the puck during a match at the Chilliwack peewee jamboree last week. Hope Minor Hockey’s referee-in-chief, Paul Frederickson, said the association is well-served by a group of young officials including James, Jarek Inancsi, Blake Deschenes, Brandon Pennell, Vinny Pellegrino, Brennan Walker and his daughter Millar — many of whom have enhanced their training via the Murray Sullivan Officiating Bursary.

netminder, Micheal Frayn, shut the door on the opposition and the skaters got moving. “Dylan Younie got us going and then Marcus and Kade (Hansen) took over with their skating and determination,” said Talarico. “I don’t know what it was like for the coaches when I was playing minor hockey — but I was going gray on the bench!” 8:55 to go and Connor Douglas put one in, to make it 3-2, assisted by James and Damien Stephenson. 3:52 remaining and Stephenson got his third assist of the game, feeding James for the tying goal. 3:35 and Hansen converted a pass from Jerome Campbell,

giving the Wildcats a 4-3 lead. James completed the surge, putting Damon Campbell’s pass into the empty net with 38 seconds on the clock. Switching his jersey to a striped one, James joined a group of Hope officials who turned out to help in the 56th annual Chilliwack peewee jamboree. Hope’s referee-in-chief, Paul Frederickson, said he’s pleased with the contingent of young officials in Hope — and that they are able to work in games down the valley, to give them more exposure. “The Hope refs can access games in Chilliwack Minor Hockey through a system called Assignr.com, and depending on their training levels, games can

be accessed in Abby, Mission, Aldergrove and Langley, up to juvenile A. “Mrs. Sharrers helped put five kids through the Western Canada Referee School in Langley this summer, with the Murray Sullivan scholarship,” added Frederickson, whose daughter Millar is also an official. Barb Sharrers said on Tuesday that the fund is now finished. “I think there’s maybe four dollars in the account,” she said — though she is willing to stay as a director, along with Leah Romano, if the necessary donations were to come in. Sullivan was a well-known local ref and minor hockey coach who was killed in a motor vehicle

winter programs DROP-IN SPORTS 6:30 - 8:30 pm Silver Creek School

OPEN GYM NIGHT Tuesdays

DROP-IN BADMINTON Wed. & Fridays

DROP-IN PICKLEBALL Thursdays

Play any sport you want!

Bring your own racquet!

All equipment provided!

Limited racquets provided

1005-6th Ave | 604-869-2304 | www.fvrd.bc.ca | leisure@fvrd.bc.ca

accident in 1999, said Sharrers. Another ref, David Jones, pushed for the formation of a memorial fund and a fundraising tournament got the initial donations in place. “Easily, more than 20 young referees have benefitted from the scholarship — some of them, as many as five times,” figured Sharrers, whose son Jay is in his 25th year as an NHL on-ice official. ***** Tournament action comes to Hope this weekend, with the midget Cs hosting an 8-team event. The bantam house tournament follows on the January 2123 weekend.

JUNIOR CHEFS

A TASTE OF MEXICO Jan. 16 , 23 & 30 3:30 - 5:00 pm 6-12 years

For more information, please view our online schedule

“Best Ice in BC”

8/14H HR28


A16 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015

BUSINESS APPLIANCES s Sale

FRASER CANYON GLASS LTD.

JAY'S APPLIANCES

Windshield replacements Rock chip repairs All private insurance co. Certified Automotive Glass Technician 35 yrs exp.

Scratch & Dent and Used

Full Service Glass Shop

555 Wallace St.

604-860-4441

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

e r vic

e

&S

Services

DOMESTIC & IMPORTS

604-869-9514 • 531 Corbett St. -

FREE PICK UP & DELIVERY ASK FOR DETAILS.

CONSTRUCTION

ELECTRICAL

Hope Auto Body Ltd.

BARCLAY FLETCHER CONTRACTING LTD. Renovations & New Construction bÅetchercontracting.com

Scott Gilbert 604-860-8605

Cell: 604.869.1686 Fax: 604.869.7605

Bonded/Insured Hope, B.C. 94574

SPACE FOR RENT

SPACE FOR RENT

Your Ad Here! Hey! If this got your attention, then it worked... call today to advertise your business: 604.869.2421

Hey! If this got your attention, then it worked... call today to advertise your business: 604.869.2421

PLUMBING LICENSED, BONDED, TICKETED & INSURED

PLUMBING

DAVE’S

PLUMBING Licensed Plumber

Hope & Area

HOT WATER TANKS, GAS FITTER, WATER LINES, DRAINAGE

604.750.0159

22 Years Experience

BLUE’S PLUMBING

• Licenced Gas Fitter & Contractor • Hot Water Tanks • Bonded/Insured

FREE ESTIMATES!

604-869-4566

Serving Hope & Area

REAL ESTATE

Honest, Reliable Service

604-869-2945(office) 604-860-5478 (cell) 287 Wallace St. Hope

604-869-3449 (home) 604-869-1106 (cell) lornehislop@gmail.com

966 6th Avenue, 604 •869 •5244 www.hopeautobody.ca

FLOORING • Cloverdale Paint Dealer • Blinds • Carpet & Vinyl • Ceramic Tile • Hardwood • Laminates • Free Estimates • Expert Installation

CARPETS FLOORING TILE BLINDS PAINT

549 Wallace St• 604.869.2727

MOVERS

Integrity Movers Moving and Delivery Services “We’re not satisfied until you are” NEW TO HOPE

HOME IMPROVEMENT

BIGG

VICE HOM E IMP ROV EME NT SER

S

Carpentry + Plumbing Painting + Drywalling Sight Managing Landscaping + Rubbish Removal

Call Dave 604-869-7663 or cell 604-798-7885

PLUMBING & HEATING • Gas, Oil & Propane Furnaces • Water Heaters • Class A Gas Fitter

LLOYD’S UTILITIES

604-869-1111 604-869-6544

REAL ESTATE

TREE SERVICE

Nyda Realty (Hope)

ROBPELLEGRINO.COM “Lifetime Hope Area Resident” robp@remax.net 604-869-1290 (Cell Direct) 604-869-2945 (Office)

RE/MAX COMMUNITY TENT AVAILABLE

CONSTRUCTION

Precision Exteriors • Roofing • Siding • Windows • Doors & more

WCB Insured. Contact Jeremy for a FREE ESTIMATE

604-750-8025

“Protecting your inside from the outside”

BUSINESS of the week GLEN TRAUN

LANDSCAPING • Commercial & Residential Yard Maintenance • Hydro Seeding • Brush Chipping

REGISTERED WITH B.C. SAFETY AUTHORITY

604-860-5277

(Personal Real Estate Corporation)

Nyda Realty (Hope)

Custom Woodworking Solutions Complete Renovations Custom Kitchens & Bathrooms Fully equipped shop

• Complete collision & glass services • Courtesy Vehicles • Express repair facility - all insurance company estimates written here

WHETHER BUYING OR SELLING

ASK AN EXPERT waynedyble.ca

Est. 1990

L. HISLOP CONTRACTING

CANYON CARPETS • Residential • Rural • Commercial • New Construction • Renovations

CARPENTRY

PHILLIPS TREE SERVICES • Removals • Toppings • Chipping • Limbing

Free Estimates, Fully Insured, Locally Owned & Operated.

604-702-8247

Servicing Hope & Area since 1979

604-869-2767 SPACE FOR RENT

UPHOLSTERY

R O GE R S Upholstery

Hey! If this got your attention, then it worked... call today to advertise your business: 604.869.2421

Furniture, Windows, Fabric

604.860.0939

rogersupholstery@telus.net

In-home & on-line estimates

Your source for quality local professionals. ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Tuesdays at 4:30pm

Call Janice at 604.869.2421 to advertise on the Business Services page.


Thursday, January 8, 2015, Hope Standard A17

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS ...............1-8

7

OBITUARIES

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS ...9-57

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

INFORMATION

BENEFIT GROUP - Do you or someone you know suffer from a disability? Get up to $40,000 from the Canadian Government. Toll-free 1-888-511-2250 or www.canadabenefit.ca/free-assessment

TRAVEL.............................................61-76 CHILDREN ........................................80-98 EMPLOYMENT .............................102-198 BUSINESS SERVICES...................203-387 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE...........503-587 RENTALS ......................................703-757 MARINE .......................................903-920

AGREEMENT

Date: Mon. Feb.9, 2015 at 7 pm Where: Hyatt Regency Vancouver RSVP: 604-554-0078 or office@lawyerswest.ca www.LawyersWest.ca

FOSTER, John William Jan. 5, 1950 Dec. 31, 2014 John, while surrounded by his loved ones, was peacefully reunited with his beautiful bride Barbara Foster as well as his loving parents, Tena and Jack Foster. John will be greatly missed by his 3 daughters Tina, Shannon and Vickie, his 9 grandchildren and the many foster children he raised. They will always remember his love, wisdom and humour that he shared with them. John enjoyed music, hockey and teasing everyone. His witty sense of humour will be missed and always remembered. Please join us to honour and celebrate John’s life on Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 at The Hope Pentecostal Church. The service will begin at 1:00 pm. Donations will be accepted.

COPYRIGHT Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse by law.

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LOST AND FOUND

LOST: Cellphone in a bag in downtown Hope on Jan 4. Call Bill 604869-5358 Rm 17

TRAVEL 74

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VACATION SPOTS

RV Lot Rentals $8.95 a day. 362 days of sunshine, pets, events, classes, entertainment. Reserve by 02/14/2015. Web-site: www.hemetrvresort.com. Call: 1-800-926-5593

BIRTHS

2

BIRTHS

Sheldon & Sarah Traun

7 lb 6 oz

bcclassified.com

7

OBITUARIES

7

Grandparents Charmaine & Glen and Nancy & Tony are thrilled with her arrival

7

7

OBITUARIES

OBITUARIES

Evan MacDougall February 24, 1925- December 14, 2014 We are deeply saddened to announce the passing of Evan MacDougall on December 14, 2014, aged 89, in Chilliwack. He was predeceased by his wife Frances, his sister Charlotte, brother Lloyd, step-brothers Jerry, Merrill and Roland and step-sister Evelyn. He is survived by his step-sister Aileen, children Donna, Kyndree, Peter (Rachel) and Laurie (Kindy), his grandchildren Kyndree, Grant, Zoey, Caelee, Saje, Kiran, Samuel, Tavi, Ainav and Maxwell and great grandchildren Jake and Tao. Evan was born and grew up in West Vancouver in a large family. His childhood was a happy one in a busy and active home. Evan signed up to serve in World War II joining the First Battalion of the Royal Canadian Scottish Regiment. Following basic training in Canada, he was sent overseas and served in France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany. While he was not one to glorify war, his service in it was formative and a source of quiet pride throughout his life. He was a small businessman for over 30 years operating local businesses in Boston Bar, first as a logging contractor and then as the owner of a fast food restaurant. MacDougall’s Drive-In opened in 1963 and was a favourite of locals and travellers of the Trans-Canada for many years. Evan the Hamburger King was almost always to be found behind the grill. He was also an active member of his community volunteering in a number of organizations and in political life as a member of and provincial candidate for the CCF and NDP. He was elected as Regional Director for the Fraser Valley Regional District where he contributed to many improvements in the local community. Growing up near the water nourished a lifelong love of the sea. From childhood visits to Gambier Island to living and working in Bamfield and Half Moon Bay, the sea was never far from his heart. During his years in Boston Bar he was a boat owner and took many fishing trips up and down the coast; these were treasured times for him whether the water was calm or rough. He was in many ways a reserved and private man but not immune to the pleasures of a good party, a wee dram and the bagpipes at high volume. He was intellectually curious, liked a good debate, was a great reader, and had a great sense of humour. He was most comfortable at home, tending his garden and yard, splitting shakes and finishing furniture. We will miss him deeply. There will be no service by request.

GLADYS GRACE MATUS (Mageau maiden name Brett)

July 6, 1921 - January 2, 2015

1270 Ryder Street, Hope B.C.

604-869-2295 Funeral Chapels BC Ltd.

Lilly Anne Traun

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OBITUARIES

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EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

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Meet singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now: 1-800-712-9851

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are pleased to announce the birth of their daughter

INTRODUCTIONS

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EARN .95+/mile after costs on this lane

Gladys was born on July 6, 1921, in Paynton Saskatchewan. Gladys had three brothers and two sisters Herman, Fredrick, Wallace, Marjory and Muriel that have all predeceased her. At the age of seventeen, she married Wilfred Mageau. Her marriage to Wilfred lasted for 45 years until he passed away in Abbotsford BC. Gladys and Wilfred have two sons, Bryon Mageau (Linda) and Glenn Mageau. Gladys was remarried to Arthur Matus and they remained married for 23 years until Arthur's passing in 2008. During her 23 years of marriage with Arthur, they enjoyed trips to various parts of the world and both enjoyed the horse races or local dances. They shared some good years and they remained to be great companions to one another. Gladys has four living grandchildren, Tara Mageau, Nicole Dubois (Miles), Jonathon Mageau, and Rebecca Barton (Richard). She was predeceased, by her grandson Mathew Mageau, on June 4, 1991. She has eight beautiful great grandchildren, Raiden Flaxman, Lucas Flaxman, Kya Dubois, Joseph Dubois, Owen Dubois, Ella Barton, Sophia Barton and Hazel Barton. Gladys lived a full and rich life with many experiences and accomplishments over her 93 plus years. She will be sadly missed by her friend and companion Linda of 53 years. She was loved dearly by her grandchildren and her great grandchildren. Over her last years her greatest enjoyment was receiving the big hugs and kisses from the great grandchildren. We want to thank all of the staff at the Fraser Hope Lodge for the care and kindness offered to Mom and a special thank you to the extra care and compassion some offered to our Mother over the years, as this did not go unnoticed. Relatives and friends are kindly invited to attend a mass of Christian burial on January 15th, 2015 at 10am, at Our Lady of Good Hope RC Church, 671 Water Ave, Hope. Burial will follow at St. Peter’s RC cemetery, 100 Richmond St., New Westminster at 1:30pm. The funeral arrangements have been entrusted to the care of Martin Brothers Chapel of Hope Funeral Home.

040

76

2

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

TransX is now hiring Vancouver based Class 1 Owner Operators for Terrace and Central B.C. interior runs.

Annamarie Kersop, Lawyer, Injury & No-Fault Benefits

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NEW YEAR, NEW CAREER! CanScribe Medical Transcription graduates are in high demand. Enrol today and be working from home in one year! info@canscribe.com. 1-800-466-1535. www.canscribe.com.

Julie Fisher, Lawyer, Long-Term Disability and CPP

AUTOMOTIVE ..............................804-862

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

114

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Speakers: Dr. Alison Bested, on ME/FM, CFS, other

REAL ESTATE ...............................603-696

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Disability Benefits Free Seminar

PETS & LIVESTOCK ......................453-483

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EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

33

INFORMATION

33

INFORMATION

Celebration of Life for

Marge & Barry Dollis will be held Saturday, January 24, 2015 at 1:00 pm at the Legion Hall, Hope, BC.


A18 Hope Standard, Thursday, January 8, 2015

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 115

EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 160

TRADES, TECHNICAL

PERSONAL SERVICES 173

CERTIFIED GM TECHNICIAN TICKETED BODYMAN Vancouver Island, BC (see our community online at www.porthardy.ca) busy GM dealership looking for two full time positions to be filled immediately. Very competitive pay scales, benefits, and flexible schedules.

Send resume to cory@klassengm.com Excavator & Backhoe Operator Training. Be employable in 4-6wks. Call 604-546-7600. www.rayway.ca

130

HELP WANTED • SAW FILER • ELECTRICIANS • MILLWRIGHT/WELDER - Surrey B.C Searching for highly motivated and ambitious individuals to work and be challenged in their field. Competitive Wage & Good Benefit Package Offered! Please forward your resume: Fax:(1)604-581-4104 Email: careers@tealjones.com Visit: www.tealjones.com

165

WORK WANTED

MIND BODY SPIRIT

CHANEL SPA Top Quality Services... 604-746-6777

2459 McCallum Rd. Abby.

182

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Are You $10K Or More In Debt? DebtGo can help reduce a significant portion of your debt load. Call now and see if you qualify. 1-800-351-1783 IF YOU own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

LARGE FUND Borrowers Wanted Start saving hundreds of dollars today! We can easily approve you by phone. 1st, 2nd or 3rd mortgage money is available right now. Rates start at Prime. Equity counts. We don’t rely on credit, age or income. Call Anytime 1-800-639-2274 or 604-430-1498. Apply online www.capitaldirect.ca

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES 287

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

PRECISION EXTERIORS, roofing, siding, windows, doors and more. WCB insured. Call (604)750-8025 Full Service Plumbing from Parker Dean. Fast, reliable, 24/7 service. Take $50 off your next job if you present this ad. Vancouver area. 1-800-573-2928

300

LANDSCAPING

GLEN TRAUN LANDSCAPING, Commercial & Residential yard maintenance. Call 604-869-2767

320

MOVING & STORAGE

INTEGRITY MOVERS, moving & delivery services, New to Hope. Call (604)860-5277

1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING

HELP WANTED

377

UPHOLSTERY

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE 551

604.339.1989 Lower Mainland 604.996.8128 Fraser Valley Running this ad for 10yrs

GARAGE SALES

ABBOTSFORD

FLEA MARKET Abbotsford Exhibition Park TRETHEWEY @ MACLURE AVE

ROGER’S UPHOLSTERY, furniture, windows, fabric, in-home & online estimates. Call 604-860-0939

~ SUNDAYS ONLY ~ 6 am to 4 pm Phone 604-859-7540

387

FRASER CANYON GLASS, for all your glass repairs, windshields domestic & imports. (604)869-9514

PETS 474

PET SERVICES

560

3 rooms for $299, 2 coats any colour

The Hope Standard

Need CA$H Today? Own a vehicle? Borrow up to $25,000. Snapcarcash.com 604-777-5046

The Hope Standard, a once a week, award winning community newspaper has an opening for an editor/reporter. Reporting to the publisher, the editor/reporter will be instrumental in guiding the overall strategic direction of the Hope Standard. The successful candidate will possess above average leadership skills, will be a strong communicator, pay attention to detail and can work under pressure in a deadline driven environment. This person will have the ability to perform editorial tasks and contribute to the editorial content both in print and online. Strong design skills with knowledge of InDesign, Photoshop and iMovie are required. The editor will have a passion for, and is comfortable with, all aspects of multimedia journalism including diverse writing capabilities and advanced photography and video skills. You have a track record of turning around well-written, fact-based, concise, well-produced content quickly, for posting online immediately—with collateral (text, photos and video). You have demonstrable skills in all aspects of web journalism and a strong grasp of social media best practices (Twitter, Facebook, etc.). Candidates should have a diploma/degree in journalism, or a related field. The Hope Standard is part of Black Press, Canada’s largest privately held, independent newspaper company with more than 150 community, daily and urban newspapers in B.C., Alberta, Washington State, Ohio and Hawaii. Those interested should email a resume, writing samples and a cover letter to: Carly Ferguson publisher@hopestandard.com Deadline for applications is 5:00pm January 18, 2015. Thank you to all who apply. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES 245

CONTRACTORS

BARCLAY FLETCHER CONTRACTING, complete home reno’s, additions & more. (604)869-1686

260

ELECTRICAL

KENLIN ELECTRIC, residential, rural, commercial, new construction, reno’s. Call (604)860-8605

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Cloverdale Premium quality paint. NO PAYMENT until Job is completed. Ask us about our Laminate Flooring & Maid Services.

338

PLUMBING

BRO MARV PLUMBING 24/7 Plumbing, heating, clogged drains BBB. (604)582-1598, bromarv.com DAVE’S PLUMBING, licensed, insured, gas fitter, for all your plumbing needs. Call (604)869-4566

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

275

FLOOR REFINISHING/ INSTALLATIONS

CANYON CARPETS, 549 Wallace St., Hope. For all your floor covering needs! Call 604-869-2727

S.N.Y.P. (Spay or Neuter Your Pets) can help. We are a local, registered charity providing financial assistance to people in need for spaying and neutering dogs/ cats. S.N.Y.P. works in partnership with Dr. Madsen at Coquihalla Veterinary Services. Please call 604-869-9474 for details or drop in to 591-C Walllace St. to pick up an application.

STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca.

LLOYD’S UTILITIES, gas, oil & propane furnaces, class A gas fitter. (604)869-1111 or (604)869-6544

139

MEDICAL/DENTAL

139

MEDICAL/DENTAL

RECEPTIONIST

required for busy Medical Office Approx. 18 hrs/week Must be friendly, efficient and able to work in a fast paced environment. Basic computer skills necessary. Previous experience an asset. Resumes to be brought to HOPE MEDICAL CENTRE 735 - 4th Ave., Hope, BC ATT: OFFICE MANAGER Closing Date: January 20, 2015

1/15W_CP7

3 bedroom townhouse, 5 appl., soundproof, radiant heat, blinds, fenced yard, patio, 658 Coquihalla St., sunny side of town, N/S, no pets, D/D & Ref’s req. Available now. Call (604)869-6599

CATS OF ALL DESCRIPTION in need of caring homes! All cats are spayed, neutered, vaccinated and dewormed. Visit us at:

fraservalleyhumanesociety.com or call 1 (604)820-2977 GOLDEN DOODLE puppies. Born Nov. 22. Mom small reg. Golden x Dad small Std Poodle (both 50 lbs). We have bred this litter special to create ideal family companions (intelligent, gentle, easy to train, people pleasers, happy indoors/out, good w/kids/animals, low/no shed) Our dogs are part of our home and life and we wish the same for our puppies. Please consider the time & commitment needed to raise a dog and you will have our support/guidance for life. 1st shots/deworm, $1200, 604-820-4827 Mission

NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND PUPS Ready Feb. 15. Reg’d. Vet checked http://vigelandkennels.ca 604-823-2259

Browse through bcclassified.com’s career and employment listings in the 100’s.

627

721

HALLS

HALL RENTAL for your Birthdays, Anniversaries, Weddings or Meetings Hope Curling Club 1055 6th Ave 604-869-9344 or 604-869-5119

733 MOBILE HOMES & PADS

HOMES WANTED

HOPE, 2 vacant pads for rent in senior’s community. First 3 months free pad rent. Call Gordon 604-240-3464

WE BUY HOMES BC • All Prices • All Situations • • All Conditions • www.webuyhomesbc.com 604-626-9647

HOPE, Silver Hope Mobile Park. Cabin, Mobile homes, and R/V pads for monthly rentals, cable included. Call (604)869-1203 or (604)860-0652

633 MOBILE HOMES & PARKS 736

HOMES FOR RENT

KAWKAWA LAKE, cute 2 bdrm cottage for rent, 66556 Kawkawa Lake Rd. F/S, W/D, with view of lake, front porch, large yard, N/S, N/P, ref’s & lease required, $675/mo. Avail. immed. Call 604505-1077

9mo old PIT BULL MALE PUPPY. All shots, neutered, licensed. Comes with dog house, bed, food, treats. $700. 778-869-6023 CATS GALORE, TLC has for adoption spayed & neutered adult cats. 604-309-5388 / 604-856-4866

Look Who’s Hiring!

REAL ESTATE

PETS

NEED A GOOD HOME for a good dog or a good dog for a good home? We adopt dogs! Call 604856-3647 or www.856-dogs.com

284 HEAT, AIR, REFRIGERATION

APARTMENT/CONDO

HOPE

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper?

STEEL BUILDINGS...”REALLY BIG SALE!” All steel building models and sizes. Plus extra savings. Buy now and we will store until spring. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422 www.pioneersteel.ca

477

706

MISC. FOR SALE

PAINT SPECIAL

Editor

RENTALS

WINDOWS

Is your pet in need of spaying or neutering?

www.paintspecial.com

130

TREE SERVICES

329 PAINTING & DECORATING

.CAN-PRO Paint and Drywall. Over 25 yrs of quality service. 3 ROOMS, $250. Insured. 604-771-7052

HELP WANTED

374

PHILLIPS TREE SERVICES, Removals, Toppings. Free estimates & Fully Insured. Call 604-702-8247

Across the street - across the world Real Professionals, Reas. Rates. Best in every way! 604-721-4555.

AVAILABLE for home care, customer service, sales & pet sitting. Call (604)869-2040

130

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

SILVER CREEK New SRI *1296 sq/ft Double wide $97,888. *New SRI 14’ wide $72,888. Repossessed mobile homes, manufactured homes & modulars. Chuck 604-830-1960.

636

1 bdrm mobile home in Senior’s Community, furnished or unfurnished.

CALL GORDON (604)240-3464

MORTGAGES

PRIVATE MORTGAGE Lender. Funding smaller - 2nd, 3rd, & interim mortgages. No fees! Pls email: grpacific@telus.net Courtesy to agents.

TRANSPORTATION 812

AUTO SERVICES

HOPE AUTO BODY, complete collision repair & restoration. www.hopeautobody.ca Call (604)869-5244

This week’s puzzle answers!


Thursday, January 8, 2015, Hope Standard A19 TRANSPORTATION 845

TRANSPORTATION

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

SCRAP CARS & METALS - CA$H for CARS Up to $300. No Wheels - No Problem! Friendly &

851

TRANSPORTATION

TRUCKS & VANS NOTICE OF DISPOSITION

Professional Service. Servicing the Fraser Valley 1-855-771-2855

KEY TRACK AUTO SALES Abbotsford

To: Ms. Beverley Lesley Fisher formerly of #6, 65367 Kawkawa Lake Road Hope, B.C., V0X 1L1 (the “Mobile Home”).

30255 Cedar Lane DL# 31038 604-855-0666

Take notice that the landlord of the pad site on which the Mobile Home is located, CRYSTAL RIVER COURT LTD., intends to dispose of the personal property abandoned by you consisting of the single wide mobile home with addition, Registration No. 014913, the free standing shed and all remaining contents, including various personal items at the Mobile Home (the “Property”) 30 days after the publication date of this notice, unless:

1998 HONDA CIVIC 2 dr, auto Aircared. STK#652. $2,495. 2007 DODGE CARAVAN 7 psgr, auto, fully loaded. Only this week! STK#546. $3,900. 2002 HONDA CIVIC 4 dr auto, fully loaded. STK#547. $4,900. 2003 HONDA ACCORD 4 dr, auto, full load. Aircared STK#656 $5,900. 2007 DODGE CALIBER, 4 dr, auto. STK#602. $5,900. 2007 JEEP COMPASS, 4 dr, auto, full load, STK#603 $7,900. 2008 HONDA CIVIC, 2 dr, auto, sunroof, fully loaded. STK#642. $9,900. 2009 JEEP COMPASS, 4 dr, auto. STK#606. $10,900. 2009 KIA SPORTAGE, 4 dr, auto, full load, runs good. STK# 624 $10,900. 2012 NISSAN SENTRA, 4 dr auto, sedan, full load, black. STK#614 $12,900. 2011 NISSAN ALTIMA. 4 dr, auto, sedan, fully loaded, sunroof. STK#641. $14,900. 2013 TOYOTA COROLLA, 4 dr, auto, fully loaded, standard STK#639. $15,500. 2008 CHEV 1500 LT. Crew cab, 4 X 4, auto, short box, fully loaded. STK#600. $16,900.

- You take possession of the Property. - You establish a right to possession of the Property, or - You make an application to the Supreme Court to establish such a right, and remove it from Crystal River Court. After the expiration of the 30 day period, the Property will be disposed of with no further notice to you.

The Hope Standard

Office Hours:

Tuesday-Friday 9:00am-5:00pm

Published Thursday

Landlord: CRYSTAL RIVER COURT LTD. #2300 - 1066 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C., V6E 3X2 Phone: 604-684-8880

33166 South Fraser Way DL# 40083 778-908-5888 1998 ACCURA 1.6 EL. 4 dr, auto, loaded. STK#651 $2,900. 2003 FORD FOCUS 4 dr, auto, Aircared, STK#545, $3,900. 2002 FORD EXPLORER 4X4, auto, full load. ST#585 $5,900. 2007 DODGE Caravan 7 psgr, Aircared, STK#524 $5,900. 2003 HONDA ACCORD 2 dr, auto, full load, ST#586 $6,900. 2007 FORD Fusion 4 dr auto, loaded A/cared ST#321 $6,900 2007 KIA RONDO 4 dr, auto, 7 psgr, leather, runs good, STK#424. $10,900. 2009 TOYOTA COROLLA 4 dr sedan, loaded. No trade. STK#504. $10,900. 2006 FORD F350 XLT quad cab, 4X4, auto, diesel, only 156K STK#17. $12,900. 2010 DODGE JOURNEY 4 dr, auto, loaded, 7 psgr STK#428. $13,900. 2007 FORD F350 XLT Crew cab, diesel, 4X4, auto, short box only 162K. STK#126. $14,900. 2007 FORD F350 LARIAT crew cab, diesel, 4 X 4, auto short box. STK#275. $16,900.

pick a part

The Scrapper

CHECK CLASSIFIEDS bcclassified.com 604-869-2421

2014 FESTIVE E FAVOURITES S are still available e at The Hope Standard office

FRASER VALLEY REGIONAL DISTRICT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING RESCHEDULED NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to Section 892 of the Local Government Act, the Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD) will conduct a Public Hearing with respect to FVRD Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 1281, 2014 [hereinafter referred to as Bylaw 1281] and FVRD Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 1282, 2014 [hereinafter referred to as Bylaw 1282]. The rescheduled Public Hearing will be held Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 7:00pm at the Hope & District Rec Centre, 1005 6 Ave, Hope. The purpose of Bylaw 1282 is to amend the Official Community Plan designation of a portion of the property from Limited Use to Rural, and the purpose of Bylaw 1281 is to amend the Zoning Bylaw to introduce a new Commercial Camping Resort zone which would apply to the entire subject property, in order to facilitate a campground and cabin development.

PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY!

Financing Available www.keytrackautosales.ca

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS #2-15

PROVISION OF JANITORIAL SERVICES FOR CITY PUBLIC FACILITIES The City of Merritt is seeking Requests for Proposals from qualified proponents for the provision of janitorial services for some of the City owned public facilities for a two-year contract for the term of March 1, 2015 to February 28, 2017. RFP documents are available on the City's website: www.merritt.ca Completed proposals must be received in a sealed envelope and labelled: RFP#2-15 - Provision of Janitorial Services by 4:00pm Monday, February 2nd, 2015 at: City of Merritt P.O. Box 189, 2185 Voght St., Merritt, BC VIK IB8 Attn. Leisure Services Manager Any and all inquiries regarding this RFP must be submitted in writing to: Larry Plotnikoff Leisure Services Manager, City of Merritt lplotnikoff@merritt.ca

The City of Merritt reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals, modify the terms of the proposal at any time, to waive defects in any proposal document and to accept the proposal which it may consider to be in the best interests of the City. The lowest cost proposal or any proposal will not necessarily be accepted.

The public hearing is to be held by a delegate of the FVRD Board. Copies of the Board resolution making the delegation and copies of Bylaws 1281 and 1282 are available for public inspection until Jan 22, 2015 at the FVRD office: 45950 Cheam Avenue in Chilliwack (8:30am to 4:30pm Monday - Friday). For further information, please contact the Planning Department at 604-702-5000, toll free 1-800-528-0061, or by email at planning@fvrd.bc.ca. Information is available at: http://www.fvrd.bc.ca/InsidetheFVRD/DevelopmentApprovals/Pages/Bylaws-1281--12.aspx At this public hearing, all persons who believe that their interest in property is affected by the proposed Bylaws will be afforded an opportunity to be heard or to present written submissions respecting matters contained in the Bylaws which are the subject of the hearing. Written submission may also be submitted to FVRD in advance of the hearing, but must be received no later than 2:00 pm January 22, 2015. Written comments received before the public hearing will be added to the public hearing record. An informal public information meeting to be facilitated by FVRD staff regarding the Bylaw will be held at 7:00pm immediately preceding the Public Hearing. Dated this 6th day of January 2015 Paul Gipps, Chief Administrative Officer


HOLIDAY EVENT ELIGIBLE OWNERS RECEIVE UP TO

UP TO

2 $ ,

IN TOTAL CASH CREDITS ON SELECT MODELS.* INCLUDES $4,250

CASH CREDITS & 750 HOLIDAY CASH* FOR ELIGIBLE OWNERS.

5000

YEARS/40,000KM COMPLIMENTARY OIL CHANGES^

ALL 2014s COME WITH CHEVROLET COMPLETE CARE:

5

$ ,

OFFERS END JANUARY 11TH

31 MPG HIGHWAY

9.0 L/100 KM HWY | 12.6 L/100 KM CITYź

YEARS/160,000 KM POWERTRAIN WARRANTY ^^

8 000

2014 NORTH AMERICAN TRUCK OF THE YEAR

UP TO

1500 DOUBLE CAB LTZ 4X4 SHOWN

- BEST-IN-CLASS SAFETY WITH 10 AIRBAGS + - POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS WITH REMOTE ENTRY - SIRIUS XM RADIO™

~

UP TO

IN TOTAL CASH CREDITS ON SELECT MODELS. INCLUDES $2,000

50 MPG HIGHWAY

5.7 L/100 KM HWY | 7.8 L/100 KM CITY

LTZ MODEL SHOWN

5

YEARS/160,000 KM ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE ^^

$ ,

- 1.4 L TURBOCHARGED ENGINE - AIR CONDITIONING - STABILITRAK ELECTRONIC STABILITY CONTROL SYSTEM

ON SELECT 2014 MODELS‡

2014 SILVERADO 1500 DOUBLE CAB

$ ,

IN TOTAL CASH CREDITS ON SELECT MODELS.‡ INCLUDES $7,000 CASH CREDITS & 1,000 HOLIDAY CASH* FOR ELIGIBLE OWNERS.

8000

- BEST-IN-CLASS TOWING, UP TO 12,000 LBS †† - BEST V8 FUEL EFFICIENCY, BETTER THAN F-150’S ECOBOOST V6 ‡‡ - BEST PICKUP WARRANTY COVERAGE IN CANADA - 160,000 KM. 60,000 KM MORE THAN F-150 AND RAM ++

2014 CRUZE *^

5-Star Safety Ratings More Stars. Safer Cars.

LTZ MODEL SHOWN

52 MPG HIGHWAY

5.4 L/100 KM HWY | 8.2 L/100 KM CITYź

2014 TRAX

CASH CREDITS & 750 HOLIDAY CASH* FOR ELIGIBLE OWNERS.

2 750

- CRUISE CONTROL - ONSTAR® - SIRIUS XM RADIO™ - BLUETOOTH®

CHEVROLET.CA

HOLIDAY EVENT ENDS JAN 11TH

Call Gardner Chevrolet Buick GMC at 604-869-9511, or visit us at 945 Water Avenue, Hope. [License #7287]

ON NOW AT YOUR BC CHEVROLET DEALERS. Chevrolet.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. Chevrolet is a brand of General Motors of Canada. Offers apply to the purchase, finance and lease of a 2014 Chevrolet Trax, Silverado or Cruze. Freight ($1,600/$1695/$1,600) and PDI included. License, insurance, registration, administration & dealer fees, PPSA and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in BC Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer trade may be required. *Offer applies to eligible current owners or lessees of any model year 1999 or newer car that has been registered and insured in Canada in the customer’s name for the previous consecutive six (6) months. Credit valid towards the retail purchase or lease of one eligible 2013, 2014, 2015 model year Chevrolet car, SUV, crossover and pickups models delivered in Canada between January 3, 2015 and January 11, 2015. Credit is a manufacturer to consumer incentive (tax inclusive) and credit value depends on model purchased: $750 credit available on all eligible Chevrolet vehicles. Offer applies to eligible current owners or lessees of any Pontiac/Saturn/SAAB/Hummer/Oldsmobile model year 1999 or newer vehicle or Chevrolet Cobalt or HHR that has been registered and insured in Canada in the customer’s name for the previous consecutive six (6) months. Credit valid towards the retail purchase or lease of one eligible 2013, 2014, 2015 model year Chevrolet car, SUV, crossover and pickups models delivered in Canada between January 3, 2015 and January 11, 2015. Credit is a manufacturer to consumer incentive (tax inclusive) and credit value depends on model purchased: $1,500 credit available on all eligible Chevrolet vehicles. Offer applies to eligible current owners or lessees of any model year 1999 or newer pick-up truck that has been registered and insured in Canada in the customer’s name for the previous consecutive six (6) months. Credit is a manufacturer to consumer incentive (tax inclusive): $1,000 credit available towards the retail purchase, cash purchase or lease of one eligible 2013, 2014 or 2015 model year Chevrolet light or heavy duty pickup(except Colorado); delivered in Canada between January 3, 2015 and January 11, 2015. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. Certain limitations or conditions apply. Void where prohibited by law. See your GMCL dealer for details. GMCL reserves the right to amend or terminate offers for any reason in whole or in part at any time without prior notice. †$2,750 is a combined total credit consisting of a $750 Holiday Cash (tax inclusive) and a $2,000 manufacturer to dealer cash credit (tax exclusive) for 2014 Trax which is available for cash purchases only and cannot be combined with special lease and finance rates. By selecting lease or finance offers, consumers are foregoing this $2,000 credit which will result in higher effective interest rates. Discounts vary by model. ‡$8,000 is a combined total credit consisting of a $4,000 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit (tax exclusive) for 2014 Silverado Light Duty Double Cab, $1,000 Holiday Cash for Truck Owners (tax inclusive) and a $3,000 manufacturer to dealer cash credit (tax exclusive) for 2014 Chevrolet Silverado Light Duty (1500) Double Cab, which is available for cash purchases only and cannot be combined with special lease and finance rates. By selecting lease or finance offers, consumers are foregoing this $3,000 credit which will result in higher effective interest rates. Discounts vary by model. *†$5,000 is a combined total credit consisting of a $1,000 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit (tax exclusive) on 2014 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ, a $750 Holiday Cash (tax inclusive) and a $3,250 manufacturer to dealer cash credit (tax exclusive) for 2014 Cruze LTZ which is available for cash purchases only and cannot be combined with special lease and finance rates. By selecting lease or finance offers, consumers are foregoing this $3,250 credit which will result in higher effective interest rates. Discounts vary by model. ~Visit onstar.ca for coverage map, details and system limitations. Services vary by model and conditions. OnStar acts as a link to existing emergency service providers. After complimentary trial period, an active OnStar service plan is required. ††Based on Wardsauto.com 2013 Large Pickup segment and last available information at the time of posting. Excludes other GM vehicles. Maximum trailer weight ratings are calculated assuming base vehicle, except for any option(s) necessary to achieve the rating, plus driver. The weight of other optional equipment, passengers and cargo will reduce the maximum trailer weight your vehicle can tow. See your dealer for additional details. ‡‡2014 Silverado 1500 with the available 5.3L EcoTec3 V8 engine equipped with a 6-speed automatic transmission has a fuel-consumption rating of 13.0L/100 km city and 8.7L/100 km hwy 2WD and 13.3L/100 km city and 9.0L/100 km hwy 4WD. Ford F-150 with the 3.5L EcoBoost V6 engine has a fuel consumption rating of 12.9L/100 km city and 9.0L/100 km hwy 2WD and 14.1L/100 km city and 9.6L/100 km hwy 4WD. Fuel consumption based on GM testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. ++Whichever comes first. See dealer/manufacturer for details. Based on Wardsauto.com 2013 Large Pickup segment and last available information at the time of posting. +Based on WardsAuto.com 2012 Upper Small segment, excluding Hybrid and Diesel powertrains. Standard 10 airbags, ABS, traction control and StabiliTrak. WBased on GM Testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. *^Government 5-Star Safety Ratings are part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (www.SaferCar.gov). ^Whichever comes first. Limit of four ACDelco Lube-Oil-Filter services in total. Fluid top-offs, inspections, tire rotations, wheel alignments and balancing, etc., are not covered. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. ^^Whichever comes first. See dealer for details.

A20 Hope Standard Thursday, January 8, 2015

Hope Standard, January 08, 2015  

January 08, 2015 edition of the Hope Standard

Hope Standard, January 08, 2015  

January 08, 2015 edition of the Hope Standard