Page 1

107th Year - Week 51

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

PM 40007014

By Alicia Bridges Smithers/Interior News

OUR TOWN/A15

A photograph taken by a bystander during the alleged incident.

Smithers/Interior News

INSIDE LETTERS A6 COMMUNITY A9 OUR TOWN A15 SPORTS B1 THREE RIVERS C1 CLASSIFIEDS C4

See RESPOND on A4

First Nations sign LNG deals By Chris Gareau

THREE RIVERS/C3

A Smithers police officer is being investigated over an accusation he used excessive force to try to handcuff a 61-year-old woman outside Mark’s clothing store on Dec. 6. Irene Joseph made a formal complaint to the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission (CRCC) for the RCMP about an officer she claims used excessive force when he allegedly knocked her to the ground. The CRCC is the federal government’s independent investigator for complaints

about the conduct of RCMP officers. The B.C. Civil Liberties Association is also investigating. Joseph claims the officer hurt her knees and chest and damaged her walker and glasses when he tried to handcuff her. She said the incident occurred when the officer was questioning her about a suspect in a theft at the store. Joseph said she became confused and upset about why she was being questioned and she tried to get away. She said there was a shouting match before the officer tried to handcuff her. When she resisted, she claims he knocked her to the ground

Contributed photo

SPORTS/B4

FIRST PUNCHES Hazeltons boxers fight their first tournament.

Single Copy • $1.30 ($1.24 + 6¢ GST)

Smithers RCMP officer investigated after incident with elder

SELFLESS STARTER Young Smithers sisters make cards for cancer.

OLYMPICS BOUND Former Otter qualifies for trials.

www.interior-news.com

Three First Nations signed LNG pipeline benefit agreements with the province the last two weeks, moving forward the process of building the Coastal GasLink pipeline south of the Bulkley Valley. The pipeline was issued an environmental assessment certificate this fall. The Wet’suwet’en, Skin Tyee and Nee Tahi Buhn are the first three to sign agreements with the province. There are 20 First Nations along the route who need to sign agreements. Wet’suwet’en Chief Karen Ogen, who was the latest to sign the deal last week, said a separate industry benefit agreement has also been signed with Shell Canada, who will be using the TransCanadabuilt pipeline to bring liquified natural gas from northeast B.C. to an export facility in Kitimat. Ogen said the details of that deal cannot be released due to

bulkleyvalleywholesale.com

a confidentiality agreement. The deal with the province will give the Wet’suwet’en $2.8 million over three stages: $464,000 upon signing the agreement, $1.16 million when pipeline construction begins, and $1.16 million when the pipeline is in service. Another $10 million over three years will be shared by First Nations along the route. How that money will be divided is expected to be figured out early in the new year. The Skin Tyee First Nation will receive approximately $2.8 million from the province: $466,000 upon signing the agreement, $1.15 million when pipeline construction begins, and $1.15 million when the pipeline is in service. The Nee Tahi Buhn Indian Band will receive approximately $2.5 million: $420,000 upon signing the agreement, $1.05 million when construction begins, and $1.05 million when the pipeline is operating. Chief Ogen said a meeting was scheduled for last night

Wet’suwet’en First Nation signs an LNG pipeline benefits agreement with Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation John Rustad.

Contributed photo

to explain the benefits to members of the Wet’suwet’en, including the share of the $10 million that would go towards economic development. “As far as I’m concerned it’ss what’s more meaningful

Enter into our 12 Days of Christmas Draw. You could win a GIANT pallet of groceries!

No purchase necessary for tickets BUT if you make a donation to the BC Children’s Hospital, we’ll give you an extra entry! Start entering Dec.1, final draw is Christmas Eve.

to our nation is meaningful job opportunities and training opportunities,” said Ogen, who gave the example of heavy equipment operation (HEO). See HEREDITARY on A8


A2

www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

N EWS Roi TheaTRe Councillors learn roles at 1st meeting I

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

By Chris Gareau

Greg Brown has three appointments: the advisory planning commission, Chandler Park Field upgrade advisory, and Airshed Management Society. “The soccer fields are not a very good playing field. Now we have the money from the regional district. (The committee) is to find the best solution for the least amount of money,” said Brown.

Smithers/Interior News

Councillors elected Nov. 15 were sworn in and appointed to their committee posts at an inaugural meeting last Tuesday. The swearing in ceremony was a gallant affair that included Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, violinists, Judge Christine Birnie, and outgoing Regional District of BulkleyNechako director Stoney Stoltenberg in a top hat. Newly-elected councillor Gladys Atrill was appointed deputy mayor. “It’s quite an honour. I feel humbled. I would be lying if I said I didn’t feel a little daunted facing four years, my first term. But it’s a community I love and I’m looking forward to it,” said

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs watch inaugural proceedings as the three new councillors wait to take their seats. Chris Gareau photo Atrill. The new deputy mayor was also appointed to the Access Smithers committee. “It’s a chance to work with people who have been facing challenges: mobility and access challenges. There’s a bit I have some background in, and that’s accessible tourism,” said Atrill. Re-elected

councillor Phil Brienesse was appointed to the important position of finance chair and is the representative for the Smithers Regional Pool. Long-serving councillor Bill Goodacre is on the Fall Fair Management committee and the Chamber of Commerce.

Re-elected councillor Frank Wray will serve on the Smithers & District Transit Service and library board. New councillor Shelley Browne was appointed by Mayor Taylor Bachrach to serve with the Omineca Beetle Action Coalition and the Bulkley Valley Museum. New councillor

II

Exodus: Gods and Kings

Wed. & Thurs. – 7:30 • Fri. & Sat. – 7 & 9 Sun. - Tues. – 7:30 • PG

In 3-D

1175 Main Street, Smithers

Visit our website at: www.calderwoodrealty.com calderwoodrealty@telus.net

N PR EW IC E

CALDERWOOD REALTY 250-847-9222

Arena board problem The new council has its first new problem. It was revealed at the meeting that the new arena boards were not designed properly to have ads attached. That revenue is intended to go to the figure skating club. Bachrach said council is meeting to figure out what “finishing touches” still need to be done on the arena.

Wed. & Thurs. – 8 • Fri. & Sat. – 7:30 & 9:30 Sun. - Tues. – 8 • PG

7115 Boundary Road

Great affordable country living! 4 bd, 3 bth, well set up. Pad 250/m, includes up to 20 acres.

MLS N233522

$119,500

2143 Riverside Drive

2.62 Acres at the end of Main St. on the Bulkley River. Zoned for campground and house.

MLS N237614

$119,500

7470 Hwy 16

Family dream on 80 acres 45 km east of Smithers. Large pole barn (40x60), fenced + 4bd & 3bath.

MLS N224477

$349,500

Lot 3 Telkwa High Road

53 acres on East side of Call Mountain – fully treed – private – zoned H2, not in ALR.

MLS N234903 $89,500 +GST

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

1120 Highland Rd

Great 5 acre hobby farm or horse property. Solid 1368 sf house, barn, fencing & more.

MLS N238311

$315,000

Dawson’s Lane

Beautiful building lots, close to Smithers. 4.94 – 7.19 Acres in size. Drilled wells on each parcel. Sewage approval.

MLS N234515, N234516, N234517 $139,500 each

John Butler - Owner Cell 250-877-2141

Casda Thomas - Manager Cell 250-877-9366

Until December 19th Calderwood is accepting donations of gently used blankets, scarfs, sweaters, jackets and mittens etc. OR new toiletry items to be distributed to local shelters. For more information check out our Facebook page or contact the office.

#6 2123 Riverside Dr

2011, 2 bed, 2 bath manufactured home. 7 years of structural warranty. Open Concept.

MLS N240078

Jeremy Penninga - Sales Cell. 250-847-0830

Niomi Mio - Sales Cell 250-877-9040

$94,500

DJ Mio - Sales Cell 250-877-3677

18445 Gratham Road

Cheaper than Renting! 1200sf on 5 ac between Houston & Telkwa. $750/m with 5% down payment.

MLS N231453

Jesse Butler - Sales Cell. 250-877-2471

$165,000

Dan Hansma - Houston Cell 250-845-8234

III

Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb Fri. & Sat. – 7:15 & 9:15 Sun. - Tues. – 7:45 • PG

9054 Horlings Rd

Practical 4 bed, 2 bath house on 5 acres, close to Smithers. Lots of upgrades.

MLS N240403

$279,500

3692 1st Ave

Solid character 4-5 bdrm home on commercial corner lot. Great investment possibilities

MLS N238361

Kelly Mattson - Hazelton Cell 250-842-8176

David Webster - Sales Cell 250-877-3447

$219,000

Laurel Borrett - Sales Cell 250-877-9444

TUESDAYS: ALL SEATS $7.00 250-847-2440


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

N EWS

No shuttle bus for Highway 16

The Ministry for Transportation has quashed hopes for a shuttle bus along the Highway of Tears by confirming it has abandoned the concept, saying any further public transit expansion would be up to local governments. Calls for a shuttle bus have been at the forefront of a campaign to improve safety along Highway 16 since the service was recommended in the Highway of Tears Symposium Recommendations Report, released in 2006.  The Missing Women Commission of Inquiry (MWCI), prepared by commissioner Wally Oppal in 2012, also urged the provincial government to “implement an enhanced public transit system to provide a safer travel option connecting the Northern communities, particularly along Highway 16.”  On Dec. 4 the B.C. government released its final update report on its progress implementing the recommendations of the MWCI.  Funding for a highway bus service was not included in the report.  The ministry last

week confirmed it had decided a shuttle bus was a “one-sizefits-all” approach that would not work. “Simply running a bus along the length of the highway won’t address the transportation challenges these communities face,” the spokesperson said.  “Instead, we are focusing on finding practical solutions to solve the challenges residents living along the corridor face.”  These solutions included a new web portal that consolidates information about transit, intercity buses, medical transportation, rail, and community-based transportation services into one place.  The ministry also cited $75,000 for increased training for access to driver education, safe driver, and driver licensing programs for First Nations.  The spokesperson also said local governments were responsible for any expansion or route alterations to the existing system. Some leaders in communities along Highway 16 expressed disappointment. Stikine MLA Doug Donaldson said the decision was “disgraceful.” He said the government should take a leadership role

Wishing you all a Most Merry Holiday Season!

Smithers Office 250-877-4140 100 - 3891 1st Avenue

cullen@parl.gc.ca www.nathancullen.com

to help communities link up their existing public transit services. “I think what needs to be done is the communities along the highway that have many independent and small shuttle bus services at this time need to be consulted around how best to link that up,” he said. “They should get a transportation expert from the Ministry of Transportation involved, you could get the communities involved, you could get the First Nations villages involved.” Ron Mitchell, a Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief and house director at Moricetown Health, agreed there should be more consultation with communities. Although the ministry said its priorities were based on community consultations last summer, Mitchell said he was not aware of any consultations with Moricetown representatives. “As a community, one of the major issues is transportation,” Mitchell said. “I think that they should have had more input from communities.  “We’re not asking them to run the shuttle bus every day, that’s not what we’re asking, and I think that if there is a schedule, [it could work] to have a

pilot project, but those area when several of [ideas] weren’t even our communities are entertained.” quite a distance off the Smithers Mayor main highway,” Lowry Taylor Bachrach, said. who has been an  “Until we can get outspoken advocate young people (and for improving public in particular young transport along girls) to be aware Highway 16, said he of the dangers of was disappointed hitchhiking, it will the Ministry had continue to be a not funded any concern.” improvement to  Hazelton Mayor the existing public Alice Maitland said transport system as villages like Hazelton recommended by the did not have enough MWCI. money to support  “I don’t think more extensive anyone was expecting transportation. an announcement  She believes the that there would measures in the final be a shuttle bus update report would running multiple help improve safety. times a day between “It is good to at every community in last have the ear of the North but there the ministry, a bit was an expectation of their money and that there would seemingly they will be something to keep working substantive,” he said. toward mitigating  Bachrach said a situation that will although he had last until those of us seen the MWCI who must hitchhike recommendations find a different way to as the region’s best travel.” chance to see the system improved, he did not expect regional ir leaders would give up on the issue. Local government leaders in the Hazeltons were more supportive of the ministry approach. New Hazelton Mayor Gail Lowry does not believe a shuttle bus service would work.  “It just isn’t very practical on such a large stretch of highway and particularly in our

Let us take your kid’s order 1314 Main St, Smithers

250-847-2828

Hours: Mon-Thurs 11-8 • Fri-Sat 11–9 • Sun 10-8

SM I L E F OR T H E WE E K Never put both feet in your mouth at the same time. You won’t have a leg to stand on.

Tracey Turko, RD

1142 Main Street, Smithers • 847-5318

First Impressions Count

Smithers This Christmas, give a gift of health.

FREE

Any Six Inch Sandwich With every $25 cash card load. Open for breakfast at 7 AM

Sunday, January 18, 2015

2014/2015

Smithers/Interior News

a new season

By Alicia Bridges

A3

Wolak Donnelly Duo

Armed with a clarinet, a piano and their personable stage presence, they present a remarkable blend of classical and jazz music. Brought to you by

3772 - 4th Avenue, Smithers 250-847-4612

THANK YOU 2015 General Meeting of Council Dates Please Note Tuesday Meetings with ** January 12th and 26th February 10th** and 23rd March 9th and 23rd April 13th and 27th May 11th and 25th June 8th and 22nd July 13th August 17th September 14th October 13th ** and 26th November 9th and 23rd December 14th

General Council Meetings are at 7 p.m. at the Village of Telkwa Council Chambers, 1415 Hankin Ave, Telkwa, B.C. For more information: 250-846-5212, www.telkwa.com

Alpine Cut and Esthetics

As of January 1st, 2015 I will be closing the doors. I wish to thank all my loyal clients for your support and remind you that your gift certificates should be used before that time. Jenny

Alpine Centre 250-847-2944


A4

www.interior-news.com

N EWS RCMP, B.C. Civil Liberties respond to public complaint From RCMP on Front “He knocked me down, I was trying to get my walker and by then he knocked me down and he was just on my back,” she said. “He had his leg on my back and he had the other leg in my side where he was trying to reach my arm. “Knocking me to the ground and stuff like that, it wasn’t necessary.” Joseph said the officer did not handcuff her after the scuffle and he did not take her to the station. RCMP staff Sgt. Kirsten Marshall said Joseph was detained because she did not comply with verbal directions from the officer. “During the detention, the police officer restrained the person when they resisted and called for a second officer,” she said. “Despite the officer’s attempts,

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

the individual failed to comply with commands and was eventually restrained and arrested. “The officer asked if the individual required medical

B.C. Civil Liberties Association executive director Josh Paterson said his organization was looking into the claim and it would assist Joseph wherever possible, although

“Our role is as a public watchdog to basically ensure that the public are made aware of what happened” -Josh Paterson B.C. Civil Liberties Association attention, which was refused.” Marshall said no criminal charges had been made regarding the initial theft and that the investigation was ongoing. She said the detachment helped Joseph with her request to make a formal complaint with CRCC. The officer will continue to work while the investigation is underway.

the association does not provide legal representation. “Our interest is that police forces, wherever they are in the province, be held accountable for the excessive use of force and from everything that we have heard about this case, it certainly seems that there has been an excessive use of force here,” Paterson said. “We were not there on the scene

but from what we can glean at the moment, it is difficult to imagine any set of circumstances in which taking a 61-year-old Wet’suwet’en elder to the ground would have been necessary in this situation. “Our role is as a public watchdog to basically ensure that the public are made aware of what happened.” Mayor Taylor Bachrach was at a community food drive in the Safeway parking lot when someone told him about an incident outside the nearby Mark’s. He said Joseph was “distraught” when he saw her outside the store and he arranged for her to be taken to a hospital when she told him she needed to go. The manager at Mark’s declined to comment.

Alpine Physiotherapy ....keeping you in motion

Massage Therapy Caelum Ellis Registered Massage Therapist

In our continued effort to provide the most comprehensive rehabilitation and treatment we are excited to announce the addition of a Registered Massage Therapist to our team. Caelum will work closely with the rest of our therapy team and be available for appointments Monday through Saturday. 1268 Main Street, Smithers: 250-877 6966 www.alpinephysiotherapy.com

Opened Monday through Saturday

Footprints lead to theft suspect By Alicia Bridges Smithers/Interior News

Footprints in the snow led police to a suspect in the theft of more than $800 worth of alcohol from a Smithers liquor store on Dec. 6. Smithers RCMP were alerted to the crime when they received a call about a burglar alarm

at the Liquor Warehouse at 4.28 a.m. Officers at the scene noticed footprints in the freshly fallen snow leaving the rear door. They followed the footprints to an address on Second Avenue, where they identified an 18-year-old male suspect who will appear in court early next year. The majority of the stolen liquor, which was valued at about $860, was later recovered.

Community Calendar

To list your nonprofit coming events please drop off your listing at The Interior News, 3764 Broadway Ave., fax us at 250-847-2995, or email laura@interior-news.com. More information is available through our Online Community Calendar at www.interior-news.com. Deadline for submissions is Fridays at noon. Maximum 25 words. Limited space is available. We regret we cannot accept items over the phone. One of a Kind: Artisan Christmas Gift Shop Dec. 2-20, Smithers Art Gallery. The place in the Bulkley Valley to shop for beawutiful, unique gifts handmade by local and regional artisans. Kissing Frogs Calling All Teens! Alisha Sevigny will read from her new novel Kissing Frogs at Smithers Public Library, Saturday, Dec. 20, 1-2 p.m. Chat, Q&A & book signing after. Follow Alisha to Two Sisters Restaurant for more reading at 2:30. Smithers Christmas Bird Count Sunday, Dec. 28, dawn to dusk. Participants must register to be assigned a count area by Dec. 20 at 250-847-9429 or rpojar@gmail.com. New birders welcome. Community Ladies’ Coffee Break Bible Study. Tuesday: 9:30 a.m. OR evening 7:30 p.m. at 1471 Columbia Drive, ongoing till May. ONLY morning has Childcare. Morning: Fruits of the Spirit. Evening: Beth Moore DVD. 250-8472333. Free Computer Tutoring at Smithers Public Library. Lost on the Information Highway? Book a free one on one appointment ongoing to March 2015: Wednesday to

Fridays 1-5 p.m., Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. (subject to change). Call 250-847-3043. Ground 2 Griddle Neighbourhood Kitchen every Tuesday 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. James Anglican Church Hall. Call SCSA 250-847-9515 to join this free life skills literacy program. Childcare provided. Evelyn Community Association meetings first Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at Evelyn Hall. New members welcome. Scrabble at the Smithers Library, 7 p.m. Every Wednesday except the third Wednesday of the month October to May. Everyone welcome. Free Adult On-on-One Tutoring for Math, English, GED, driving and more. Visit SCSA located at the train station or call 250-847-9515. BV Genealogical Society meets the last Tuesday every month, Sunshine Inn meeting room, 7 p.m. Guest speakers and programs are presented to assist family root researchers. All welcome. BV Hospital Auxiliary AGM Tuesday, Jan. 20, 7 p.m. at the Healthy Living Centre on Main St. Everyone welcome.

M E R R Y C H R I S T M A S

Schimmel’s will be closed from Thursday, Dec. 25, 2014 to Tuesday, January 20, 2015 for the holiday season. We look forward to serving you in the New Year. Sincerely Staff & Management


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Santa’s Meal FOR KIDS

The Salvation Army would like to thank everyone who was involved in the 15th Annual

Santa’s Meal for Kids

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Bulkley Valley CREDIT UNION

InteriorNEWS THE

• B&T Wagon & Sleigh Rides • Dixie Land Band • Creative Roots Dancers • Bulkley Valley Fiddlers • Sweet Harmony Volunteers with Sheriffs, Cadets, and all the wonderful volunteers from throughout the community.

A5


A6

www.interior-news.com

2010

POINT O F V IEW

O PINION

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2012

CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013

Holistic lens needed to foster hope

Those familiar with Christian tradition know lighting of the first Advent wreath candle on the initial Sunday in December is done so in the name of hope. We all need hope in order to overcome individual, family, community and societal challenges. And the healthier an individual or family is — mentally, physically, spiritually, emotionally — the better able to embrace and hold hope. Holding hope translates into heightened interest about your community’s future and respectful engagement. The question of how government can foster conditions for hope came to my mind often during the course of this fall’s legislative sitting in Victoria. The key for government is recognizing that hope depends on individual well-being related to environmental, economic, social and cultural factors influenced by government decisions. An example from earlier in the fall session was a report released by the independent Representative for Children and Youth office that gave the B.C. Liberals a failing grade when it came to dealing with the fact that more than 169,000 children in the province live in poverty, despite eight years of recommendations on the topic from the representative Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond. The number of children in poverty is growing and B.C. remains the only province in Canada without a poverty reduction plan — a plan which could be a template for fostering hope if it considered environmental, economic, social and cultural policies in unison. Late in the fall session the Select Standing Committee on Children and Youth released a report on youth mental health in B.C. One in five in the province personally experience mental health issues in their lifetime and a conservative estimate is $6 billion annually in societal costs in B.C. as a result. Many mental health issues in our region are trauma-related with residential school experiences, direct and indirect, as the source. Holistic solutions are required involving change to government environmental, economic, social and cultural policies as a whole — policy changes that can foster hope. If it has the desire, a provincial government can create conditions for enabling hope by ensuring all of its environmental, economic, social and cultural laws and policies, together, are viewed through the lens of ‘how do they improve the well-being of the people most directly impacted?’. The prospect of that gives me hope. -Doug Donaldson MLA Stikine

Mental health for children and youth: how to get the help you need

Fear Not – there is help for children and youth with anxiety. Everyone has times of feeling anxious, scared or fearful. In fact, without our body’s innate ability to sense and respond to pending danger, we would never have survived as humans. These days, however, anxiety disorders are like a car alarm repeatedly sounding when there is no real threat. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health concern for children in B.C., affecting an estimated four per cent of all children, impacting their day-to-day life, their friendships, their school performance, their physical health and their sense of well-being. My colleagues and I in the mental health field are concerned that in this modern, fast-paced, wired world, anxiety disorders in children are greatly increasing. We are seeing more children than ever before who are constrained and made miserable by their fears when they should be feeling safe, secure, confident and happy.

Anxious feelings include a rapid heartbeat, difficulty catching one’s breath, a sense of doom, sweaty palms, an upset stomach or stomach ache, even nausea and vomiting. Focusing on the feelings can cause them to intensify, a vicious cycle. Anxious symptoms become a true anxiety disorder when the anxiety leads to avoidance of the situation that is causing the anxiety and causes significant physical distress and disruption of daily life and functioning. An unresolved anxiety disorder can often lead to depression or substance use problems. Anxiety, however, exists on a spectrum. A certain amount of anxiety is normal and beneficial. It keeps our children safe and conscientious; it motivates them to perform well. Children who tend to be anxious are often model students: high achieving, diligent, analytical, sensitive, alert, creative and imaginative. Too little anxiety and a child or teenager may take foolish risks or lack motivation to succeed.

But too much anxiety and children become so paralyzed by fear they may be unable to leave their parent’s side or the house, go to school, make friends or participate in normal life. The good news is that anxiety can be very successfully managed or treated. Regular exercise and reliable routines are often all it takes to quell mild cases. Mild and moderate anxiety is very responsive to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), a process of addressing the unhelpful thoughts and actions that underlie anxiety. Thought stopping, talking back to negative thoughts, not believing everything you think, relaxation techniques like calming breathing, mindfulness meditation, and gradual safe exposure to the things you fear are all examples of types of CBT. All children — and adults — could benefit from learning simple CBT techniques to turn off their body alarms sounding unnecessarily. In more long term or severe cases of anxi-

InteriorNEWS THE

Serving Smithers, the Bulkley Valley, the Hazeltons and District, Houston and District, and published on Wednesday of each week at 3764 Broadway Avenue, Smithers, B.C. Copyright number 321634. Stories, photographs, illustrations, designs and type styles in The Interior News are the property of the copyright holders, its illustrations repo services and advertising agencies. Reproduction in whole or in part, without written permission, is specifically prohibited. Authorized as second-class mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. PM40007014

ety — such as panic disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder — treatment may include a period of anti-anxiety medication in addition to teaching CBT techniques, an approach called “pills plus skills.” Many online resources and books are available to give information about anxiety and step-by-step instructions for CBT techniques. The FORCE Society, in partnership with MCFD’s FRIENDS Program, offers an online program for parents of children ages 4-13 years. Anxiety BC (anxietybc. ca ) is another great site. Other sites include mindcheck.ca and keltymentalhealth.ca. If you feel your child needs professional help, see your family doctor or call Service BC at 1-800-6618773 and ask for the MCFD Child and Youth Mental Health office in your community. Dr. David Smith is an adolescent and adult psychiatrist and medical director of the Okanagan Psychiatric services for Interior Health

• ESTABLISHED APRIL 13, 1907 • MEMBER OF THE B.C. PRESS COUNCIL

MEMBER: B.C. and Yukon Community Newspaper Association Canadian Community Newspapers Association International Newspaper Promotion Association B.C. Press Council THE INTERIOR NEWS IS A POLITICALLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY BLACK PRESS GROUP LTD.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES including GST: Local – $40.50 per year Seniors – $30.00 per year Out of Area – $55.00 per year USA – $230.62 per year

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

The Interior News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, PO Box 1356, Ladysmith,B.C. V9G 1A9. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

L ETTERS Social license is a scheme Editor: Re: editorial “When is social licence given?”, Dec. 3. Right. Parties deliver platforms. Voters chose a government. Subject to regulations, the government then governs. Reaps rewards/ consequences in the next election, but meanwhile have the licence to govern. This is democracy. But crusading judges on the top court make voting an exercise in futility. They have an agenda, and they impose it. The new invention of “social licence” works similarly. The stop everything crowd has an agenda, and is in the process of imposing it. The agenda is to make Canadian resource industries– not only oil– uncompetitive. Dozens of foreign entities compete with Canada. Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Russia, China, U.S., are some of those (then there is Hollywood.) Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the W&F Hewlett foundation and others, mostly based in California, finance the Canadian anti-development groups. Over the past decade, Tides Canada received more than $100 million U.S. out of its U.S. office. Tides has paid more than $25 million U.S. to more than 75 environmental and native groups. Large parts of these grants go to organizations that operate on the north coast of B.C. (Parallel development: NDP MP Cullen is engaged in a campaign to ban Canadian tankers on the West Coast. However, he doesn’t oppose U.S./Alaskan tankers, which operated there for years.) Bottom line: Lots of money for frivolous lawsuits to tie Canadian companies in court, while foreigners develop their resources unimpeded. Lots of money for crude propaganda, eagerly amplified by the media. Recent example: The CBC, always scrupulously impartial, brought to us Burnaby anti-pipeline activists. D. Suzuki, who displayed his renowned wisdom by

TOWN RECOGNIZES THE CHAIR Ed Hinchliffe receives a plaque at town hall from Anita Tomayer and Mayor Taylor Bachrach in appreciation for his 11 years of service as the Fall Fair Management Committee chair. Chris Gareau photo

declaring “this is nuts!” An Indian chief, who came to get arrested, and made a speech about it. Some very young females, who agreed that “enough is enough”. In other words: you’ll never get a social licence, because I’m opposed, and I’m used to having my way. Lot of noise in the background, and no wonder. Social licence is a scheme to replace rule of law with rule of noise. One can’t but wonder the “progressives” would sustain their enthusiasm for it if the noise were coming from the opposite direction. Jerry Mencl Telkwa

Fines should not be a source of revenue Editor: I received my first post-election mail from the Village of Telkwa recently. Dated Nov. 17 (the first business day after the election), it wasn’t a letter of congratulations. It was a property tax bill. I had paid my property taxes and utility charges in full ($4,176) well before the deadline. I am certain that on the same day, I submitted my Homeowners Grant

Your

Grant Harris Publisher

TO:

T HE E DITOR

Letters to the editor policy

Letters are welcomed up to a maximum of 250 words. Letters are subject to editing for clarity, brevity and legality. All letters must include the writer’s name, daytime telephone number and hometown for verification purposes. Anonymous, or pen names will not be permitted. Not all submissions will be published. Letters may be e-mailed to: editor@ interior-news.com.

application (by mail). I have never filed late taxes or homeowners grant applications in any previous year. Upon returning home from an extended absence, I was shocked to find a notice in my mail stating that I had not claimed the grant. I immediately called the village and was told that I could check online and if it was not registered, I could then file for the grant online. At no time was I notified that there was a penalty, and that I would be required to make an additional payment. (I would have immediately tried to appeal, based on my certainty that I had sent it in the mail on time.) Nearly five months after paying my taxes, I received a bill of $77 for ‘unpaid utilities and property taxes.’ Upon further questioning, it was revealed that this was due to a ‘10% Penalty’ for not claiming my Homeowner’s Grant on time. I wondered if other residents might be sharing my

TEAM

Chris Gareau Editor

Laura Botten Front Office

experience, so I did a little research. In reviewing the village’s financial updates as posted in August council meeting minutes, I found that in 2012 the Village had already collected 159 per cent of the forecasted ‘10% Penalty on Taxes’. By August 2013; 160 per cent. Over $20,000 each year in a Village with about 500 tax bills. In 2014, instead of taking steps to address the recurring problem of Telkwa’s overtaxed residents being punished with additional penalties, the village instead upped their target quota for penalties by nearly 40 per cent. The amount collected had already exceeded 100 per cent of this new target by August. Unfortunately, for a resident such as myself who has a valid reason to appeal, my research shows that the only appeal process available is in regard to property assessments. There is no appeal process for unfair penalties.

The Village of Telkwa should not be counting on property tax fines as a source of revenue. It should be doing everything it can to reduce those fines by educating residents about tax deferment options, and by taking new measures to remind residents of the deadlines for payment. The Village of Telkwa already collects more than enough in property taxes from its residents. The new goal for property taxation penalties should be zero dollars! Darcy Repen Telkwa

Thank-you Jack Editor: Jack Talstra, Terrace’s former mayor of 23 years, left us on Sinterklaass, a Dutch family holiday celebrating Saint Nicholas, “the good saint”. Jack gave us the gift of himself, and he definitely was one of northwest B.C.’s good saints. In the days after Terrace’s 2008 municipal elections, when I asked Jack if he would be interested in being on the Board of SNCIRE, he said that since he wasn’t mayor anymore, Hilda, his wife, had told him it was time to “do

A7

nothing” for a while. Plus, times were still tough, and he had things to attend to at his law firm. But he still signed on, and Jack was on the board of SNCIRE from its inception in 2009. He was chair until just last year, and he stayed on, even through his illness. Jack did this because, regardless of whether he was in the mayor’s chair, simply a citizen, the chair of a non-profit, or a business owner, he believed in the people of Terrace, Kitselas, Kitsumkalum, Thornhill, and the entire Northwest. He believed that we deserved to have a real say in our destiny, and to be active participants in shaping our future. Jack knew that we needed economic activity to support the services and facilities we need, and the arts and culture we deserve. He believed that our natural resources, especially our forests, were key to that future. He often said what we needed was more research and innovation in the Northwest. He believed that working together, as a region, we were stronger. Someone once told me that Jack was incredibly shy but he still did what he did because he believed the community of Terrace and the entire Northwest needed a voice – and he was willing to help. He was a champion for us all, though he would never have used that word. Jack was a friend, but I still didn’t get to know him half as well as I would have liked – and I’ll bet that many people feel the same way. I know he was quietly proud of his family. He was a strategic thinker. He believed everyone had a right to speak, and was always genuinely interested in what they had to say. And I know this: he believed in the strength and potential of the people of northwest BC. And because of his belief, so do many other people. And so do I. Thank you, Jack. Rick Brouwer Executive Director Skeena Nass Centre for Innovation in Resource Economics

THE INTERIOR NEWS, P.O. Box 2560, Smithers, B.C. 3764 Broadway Ave. • Phone 847-3266 Fax 847-2995 NEWS: editor@interior-news.com • ADVERTISING: advertising@interior-news.com

Jill Boland Production

Judy McIntosh Office Assistant

Nick Briere Sales Representative

Alicia Bridges Reporter

Kendra Wong Reporter


A8

www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

N EWS

Hereditary chiefs oppose pipelines From FIRST NATIONS on Front “Before pipelines came along, if said Ogen. we have four of them who have signed Ridsdale said ministers from the any of our members wanted to take “We’re looking at liquified natural our protocol. The door’s still open province have met with the hereditary heavy equipment operator training, the gas not only being a huge benefit and to the three chiefs that want to work chiefs, to no avail. tuition can range between $14,000 and a legacy for the province of British with us. There’s no hidden agenda, no “We reiterated that fact to them many $20,000. Our nation is small, we have Columbia, but also for First Nations. motive other than to work together, to times. They keep coming back to us 241 members, and our revenue that These types of agreement in particular, be accountable and transparent to both saying this is a business decision, and comes from Aboriginal and Northern for the Wet’suwet’en, helps to provide governing system and to our people,” we say it’s not a business decision it’s an Development is very minimal. that revenue stream that they could use said Ogen. infringement decision on your behalf “So whatever funding pockets we to drive investment and to help build an Hereditary Chief John Ridsdale and for industry. Any work to be done on received for education, that would economy,” said Minister of Aboriginal (Namoks) said the chiefs of the Office Wet’suwet’en territory, remember we do probably eat up half of our budget to pay Relations and Reconciliation John of the Wet’suwet’en, based in Smithers, have 22,000 square kilometres, any work for somebody to take the HEO training,” banned construction of the planned on that without informed consent is an said Ogen. pipelines on June 20, 2013. infringement,” said Ridsdale, pointing The chief said since the Pacific “They’re signing on behalf of their to past court decisions that give B.C. “...it’s not a business decision, small reserve, not the Wet’suwet’en Trail Pipeline deal signed before she First Nations a more defined say on it’s an infringement decision” chiefs nor our membership as a whole,” development on their territory. was elected, members have taken the training and gotten jobs with HEO, explained Ridsdale. The project still requires various -Hereditary Chief John Ridsdale welding, and environmental monitoring. It is the location of the planned federal, provincial and local government Wet’suwet’en “The opportunities are endless, it’s pipeline route that has Ridsdale permits to proceed. not just a money grab situation. We’re and others thinking long term,” said Ogen, who strongly also stressed the importance of the opposed. environmental stewardship projects that Rustad. “We’ll use are part of the deal. “It’s really also a way that we as a every avenue “We are expecting the highest province work respectively with First at our disposal environmental standard. We’re not Nations to make sure that as resources to prevent going to just nilly-willy sign on to any are developed, and as the impact of the these proposed agreement that’s going to impact our territories of First Nations they are really pipelines within territory in a devastating way... Our able to see the benefits that come from the Morice choice is today we maintain the status that kind of development.” watershed,” said quo, continue to live off government The First Nation will also be bidding Ridsdale. funds and hand outs that are minimal on contracts according to the chief, Camps from Indian and Northern Affairs, or including camp services, security, and meant to block we see it as an economic opportunity clearing the route. construction that’s going to employ our people with All three of the First Nation have been set up meaningful training under their belt signatories are elected band councils by aboriginal that’s going to be long-lasting beyond from the Burns Lake area. groups along the construction of the pipeline, and it’s “They have asserted their territories the Coastal going to empower and encourage our and we work with the elected chief and GasLink and people to get into some form of training councils,” said Rustad. Pacific Trail The proposed route of the Coastal GasLink pipeline. that’s going to sustain their livelihood,” “We have seven hereditary chiefs, and pipeline routes. Contributed photo

Help support your local food bank and SCSA to save up to 20% • Bring 1 non perishable food item • Bring 2 non perishable food items • Bring 3 non perishable food items

SAVE 10% SAVE 15% SAVE 20%

December 17 - 21st

Gift Certificates Available Christmas Packages

Dancer

Essential Manicure & Essential Pedicure ......................

Prancer

Cloud 9 Manicure & Cloud 9 Pedicure ....................

$108

Swedish Massage & Dermalogica Facial ................

$123

Cupid

Rudolph

Swedish Massage, Power Regeneration Facial, Cloud 9 Manicure & Pedicure ....

Monday – Friday 9 am – 9 pm Saturday 9 am – 6 pm • Sunday & Holidays 10 am – 5 pm Seniors’ Day every day • 10% OFF (some exclusions may apply) 3752 4th Avenue • Smithers

$90

Dasher

Body Wrap, Body Scrub, & Dermalogica Facial ................

Donner

De-Stressor (Neck & Shoulder Release) & Swedish Massage .........

Blitzen

Facial Rejuvenation (Acupressure Facial) & Swedish Massage

$253 $99

Head to Toe Perfection Bulkley Village Shopping Centre

250-847-4474

$167

3830 - 2nd Avenue • 250-847-4621

Open Monday – Thursday 9–5, Friday 9–8, Saturday 9–5

$99


The Interior News

C OMMUNITY Wednesday, December 17, 2014

www.interior-news.com

A9

newsroom@interior-news.com

Caring for baby Kelel By Chris Gareau Smithers/Interior News

Four-month-old Kelel’s home has been turned into a triage centre. Equipment just to keep the boy named after Superman breathing and feeding fills the Smithers home dad Joe Bramsleven describes as a “bubble,” quarantined from illnesses from visitors that would be fatal. Kelel has a rare genetic disorder: spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). He has Type 1, the harshest diagnosis that carries with it a life expectancy of one to two years. Survival beyond the third year is very rare. It takes 24-hour care to keep Kelel alive. “We are the only ones north of Hope, in the whole of British Columbia, that have it,” said Bramsleven. He pointed out that both parents need to be carriers of the gene. There was no way to know he and mother Tammy Wilson had it, and both parents have unaffected children from previous relationships. Born on July 31 at BC Children’s and Women’s Hospital, Kelel immediately had to be brought back to life. After doctors saved him, tests had to be done to figure out why Kelel was “floppy.” Six weeks later, the genetic test results came back. Also known as infantile progressive spinal muscular atrophy, according to Muscular Dystrophy Canada it is rare but still considered to be the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. The disease causes paralysis by disconnecting the muscles from the spinal cord. The effects on the family have been devastating emotionally, physically and financially. “It’s like being tortured 24/7,” said Bramsleven. “I would not wish this upon my worst enemy, no matter what.” “No way,” concurred Wilson. Kelel is home after spending nearly the first four months of his life at the Children’s Hospital in Vancouver. His parents’ lives are still on hold in many ways; nurses provide some respite but the work that goes into caring for the infant is constant. “You can’t just get up and go to the store. You can’t do anything; you have to be with him,” said Wilson. “It’s a scary disease because you have to monitor his stats every time he gets mucus plugs. You have to suction him out all the time, you get mucus plugs 24/7... chest physio all the time. We could both write our RN exam right now,” said Bramsleven. Kelel cannot get more than two to three hours of sleep in a row, needing those suctions at least that often. His parents say they can not really even hold him anymore. “It tugs at you every minute of every day

spiritually,” said Bramsleven. Help has come from the community, something the parents kept stressing as they gave high words of praise to the people who have kept them fed and housed in Vancouver and Smithers. Pastor Ken Vander Horst from Smithers Christian Reformed Church, who has been helping with meals and prayers. Suzy Vandervick from a B.C. SMA support group. Easter Seals, Ronald McDonald House, Canuck Place staff, Fred and Teresa Reitsma at the Sausage Factory, and everyone at Bulkley Valley Christian School were on the long list of people Kelel’s parents wanted to thank. The highest praise was for Dr. Clarence George Moisey, pediatrician in Smithers. “His heart is massive. He’s just a wonderful, wonderful man. We love him to pieces,” said Bramsleven. Having a pediatrician in town is important for everyone according to Kelel’s parents. “If Dr. Moisey decides to retire, this town needs and must advocate for a pediatrician... this man takes care of all the children in the district aound Smithers and inside Smithers. This man needs to be recognized as well. “The pediatrician is so important in this community,” said Bramsleven. “We can’t just pick our kid up and drive to Terrace for two hours; it’s impossible,” said Wilson. “We can not be transported. The only type of transportation is emergency evac and ambulance, and you’re taking an awful chance with an ambulance,” said Bramsleven. Kelel with parents Tammy Wilson and Joe Bramsleven, who Kelel has already been medevaced four described the financial impact of their baby’s illness as ‘devastating.’ Contributed photo times by the Infant Transport Team based in Vancouver. His parents are doing their best to stay strong. “We just tell each other that we love each other every day and that we’ll get through this,” explained Bramsleven. Being constantly in emergency mode has devastated the family’s financial situation. Bramsleven said after spending so much time in Vancouver, they are “playing catchup.” Rent and electricity bills need to be paid or the lights will be turned off soon. Bramsleven’s company Dynamic Cleaning Services and its eight employees need janitorial contracts. Account number 430447 at Bulkley Valley Credit Union has been set up by friends of the family to accept contributions. The Facebook group ‘Auction event for baby Kelel’ will be Kelel with his big brother Dominick. Kelel has already been medevaced four times. open until Dec. 31. Contributed photo

Imagine your New Car ! See us today. • The Hazeltons • Smithers • Houston & District • Lakes District •


A10 www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

The Interior News

O S

D L


A&E

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

www.interior-news.com

A11

newsroom@interior-news.com

Alex Cuba, along with Jake Jenne and Ian Olmstead, perform songs from his new album called Healer at St. Joseph’s Elementary School on Friday night.

Kendra Wong photos

By Kendra Wong Smithers/Interior News

Smithers artist Alex Cuba rocked the house at St. Joseph’s Elementary School to kick off a fundraising effort to build a new playground for the school last week. Cuba, along Jake Jenne and Ian Olmstead, performed songs from his newest album called Healer. “I’m really excited about my new album, it’s been an exciting journey for me,” said Cuba, who travelled to New York to record it. “It’s been amazing, I think it’s a really beautiful album,” he said. “Lots of new music, lots of healing touches to the music, very peaceful, happy, bright and uplifting.” Unlike previous albums, Cuba called on the public’s help to record it through an online fundraising campaign

called PledgeMusic. “I released a campaign online to allow the funds to contribute in the recording process. This means they basically funded my album by pre-ordering the album,” said Cuba, adding that the campaign was very successful with the album being 69 per cent funded on the first day, and fully-funded within a month. He wrote the album over the past year from places all around the world including, Mexico, Miami, California and, of course, Smithers. More than 60 people got a taste of Cuba’s newest album at the school last Friday. The performance also kicked off fundraising efforts for the school’s field restoration and equipment replacement project. Trevor Bruintjes, co-chair of St. Joseph’s School council, said the $250,000-project will be

used to give the current playground a complete face lift. They plan to resurface the current field and implement proper drainage, replace playground equipment, provide picnic tables, install lights on the basketball court and fencing that encircles the whole outdoor area. “About a year ago, I decided that this was a project that really needed to get completed, not just for the good of the school, but also the community,” said Bruintjes, adding that some of the equipment has been there for 40 years. Two of Cuba’s children also attend the school. “I couldn’t say no, I love this community,” said Cuba. Proceeds from the album will also be donated to SkeenaWild. To donate to the project, email trevorbruintjes@ hotmail.com.

SMITHERS STUDENTS GIVE’ER Jamie Donald (centre) plays the Giver, while Steven Tworrow gives his portrayal of Jonas experiencing a broken leg in Smithers Secondary School’s version of The Giver at the Della Herman Theatre on Friday. Chris Gareau photo

Having trouble, hire another hand Call today for a free quote

1.855.678.7833


A12

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

A&E

Kitimat author tours Kissing Frogs novel

By Alicia Bridges Smithers/Interior News

A Kitimat-raised author is touring Smithers this week to read from her new novel, Kissing Frogs. Alisha Sevigny launched her new novel for young adults, a modern re-imagining of The Frog Prince, in Toronto in November. Having grown up in the area, the author has returned to northern B.C. for a second book launch in Kitimat and readings in Smithers and Terrace.

The novel follows the story of nerd-turned-cool kid Jessica Stone, who is relishing her life of high school popularity until she finds out she is failing her biology class. To make up the grade, she is forced to interrupt her spring break plans and join a conservation club in Panama to save an endangered frog. Sevigny will be at the Smithers Public Library for a reading and Q&A from 1 - 2 p.m., and at Two Sisters Cafe for a reading and booking signing from 2:30 - 4 p.m. this Saturday, Dec. 20.

The Interior News

GRENDEL READING Valerie Laub and Barri Blix read from the Dylan Thomas story A Child’s Christmas in Wales at a fundraiser for the Grendel Group, a local organization for people with cognitive and physical disabilites. The event was held last Thursday night.

Chris Gareau photo

CHRISTMAS THE MEDIEVAL WAY Hundreds of people filled the immaculately decorated hall at Bulkley Valley Christian School for the Madrigal Dinner Feast of Lord and Lady Dudley last week. Students performed renditions of carols throughout the three course dinner. Alicia Bridges photos

The New To You Thrift Store in Smithers has Skates (various sizes), Hockey Equipment, Downhill Skis and some Boots, Cross Country Skis and some Boots For Sale. Proceeds will go to the Smithers Hospital for needed equipment.

3688 Broadway Street 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Saturday

In partnership with

SAVE ANYWHERE. In partnership with In partnership with

SAVE SAVE ANYWHERE. ANYWHERE. ANYWHERE. In partnership with

Introducing the New Save.ca Mobile Cash-Back Feature. With exclusive offers for the brands you love & $5 cash-out minimums through PayPal, you’ll never go shopping without your smart phone again!

Introducing the New Save.ca Mobile Cash-Back Feature. Introducing the New Mobile Feature. With exclusive offers for theSave.ca brands you loveCash-Back & $5 cash-out minimums With exclusive offersnever for thegobrands youwithout love & $5 cash-out minimums through PayPal, you’ll shopping your smart phone again! Introducing the New Save.ca Mobile Cash-Back Feature. through PayPal, neverBack go shopping yourSteps smart phone again! Getyou’ll Cash in 3without Easy With exclusive offers for the brands you love & $5 cash-out minimums through PayPal, you’ll never go shopping without your smart phone again!

Cash Back inReceipt 3 Easy Steps 1. Browse &Get Shop 2. Upload 3. Get Cash Back!

Get Cash Back in 3 Easy Steps

Browse the mobile app Take a photo of your Once you reach just $5, 1. Browse & Shop 2. Upload Receipt Get Cashyou Back! for your favourite brand’s andin submit it 3.the money save will Get Cash receipt Back 3 Easy Steps mobile app 2.Take a photo ofapp your Once youCash reach just $5,your 1.Browse Browse & Shop Upload Receipt 3. Get Back! offers, andthe purchase through the be transferred into for your favourite receipt and submit it the money you save them at any storebrand’s PayPal wallet Browse the mobile app Take a photo of your Once you reach justwill $5, offers, and through the app 1. Browse &purchase Shop Upload Receipt for your favourite brand’s 2. receipt and submit it

them at any store offers, purchase Browse theand mobile app at anybrand’s store for yourthem favourite offers, and purchase them at any store

Advertising space donated by The Interior News

through the of app Take a photo your receipt and submit it through the app

be into your 3.transferred Get Cash the money you saveBack! will PayPal wallet beOnce transferred into your you reach just $5, PayPal wallet the money you save will be transferred into your PayPal wallet

Visit save.ca/cashback to Learn More Visit save.ca/cashback to Learn More Visit save.ca/cashback to Learn More

Visit save.ca/cashback to Learn More


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

C OMMUNITY

Caroling an nd Cariing

A13

Saturdday, Decembber 20 6:30ppm

B l Squuare Stagge Bovil CLIMBING HIGH

Support the Broadwaay Shelter with yoour donation off cash, chequee, or warm stufff:

The iCount High School in Moricetown celebrated the launch of its new ice-climbing tower with demonstrations, fireworks and a craft fair last Saturday. About 150 people attended. Dale Cutler photo

Winter coats, gloves, toques, scarvess, blankets, and sleeping bags will w be gratefullyy accepted.

Standing a little taller

VIEW FROM THE PORCH Lorraine Doiron Attended the inaugural meeting where the oaths of office were administered by Judge C. Birnie. Mayor Bachrach was elected by acclamation; councillors are Gladys Atrill, Phillip Brienesse, Greg Brown, Shelley Browne, Bill Goodacre and Frank Wray. It was a wonderful ceremony. Wet’suwet’en Chiefs were in attendance, Chief Na’Moks – John Ridsdale, Chief Madeek, Jeff Brown (speaking on behalf of Gitdumden), Chief T’sek’ot – Ron Austin and Chief Mali – Fred Tom. Also there was Stoney Stoltenberg, outgoing Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako, Area A director, Town Freemen Jim Davidson and Gordon Williams Sr. As well I spotted Mark Fisher, the new Area A director and Darcy Repen, newly-

elected mayor for Telkwa in the audience. Constables Spier and Niazi stood near the flags at the front of the room, adding a note of solemnity. Kiri Daust provided music for O Canada and later was joined by Stefan Bichimaier for a wonderful violin duet. Outgoing councillors Norm Adomeit, Mark Bandstra and Charlie Northrup had their years of service noted and appreciated. Altogether the event was wonderful and the town staff are to be commended for putting together something that made me proud to be a community member and, I think, had us all who attended stand a little taller. You are invited to attend Nathan Cullen’s Christmas Open House, Wednesday Dec. 17, noon – 2 p.m. at the constituency office, 3891 First Ave. (directly across from the credit union). Everyone is welcome, drop in and share the Christmas spirit. Upcoming webinar: Abuse of Older women. Jan. 22, 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Deadline to register Jan. 20, www. vawlearningnetwork. ca/webinar-abuseolder-women. You will be better able to understand

the nature of abuse experienced by older women, barriers to reporting or seeking assistance, consequences of abuse and learn about “It’s Not Right Campaign.” Hosted by the Learning Network Team, Western Education and the Centre for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children. Attended the Elk’s Dinner for Seniors. Such good food, served by smiling ladies and gentlemen. So nice to be surrounded by people enjoying themselves, sharing laughter and stories. After our great meal we were entertained by The Pretenders who did a lovely medley of Christmas tunes. No better way to gain the Christmas spirit! Don’t forget, Smithers Community Radio tapes the entire council meeting. Items pulled from that meeting are saved on www.soundcloud.com/ smithersradio where you can listen to some of the excerpts directly from council available for your listening pleasure! Closing with: Moral excellence comes about as a result of habit… we become just by doing just acts, temperate by doing temperate acts, brave by doing brave acts. –Aristotle

Support the N Northwest Animal Shelter with your gift of cashh, cheque, or ddonations in kindd: Make M a donation oof food, supplies aand other o items that w we need to help thee animals, a either dirrectly or indirectly. These T include: Caat and dog food, booth dried d and canned,, unopened. Cat/ dog beds, b heating padds, crates, collars, leads, l scratching pposts and boards,, toys.

InteriorNEWS THE

Bringing the NEWS home!

Subscribe today!

40 for 52 weeks $

50

including GST

local area

Online, Senior and Out of Area rates available

250-847-3266


A14

www.interior-news.com

C OMMUNITY

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

New BV school district board holds its first meeting By Alicia Bridges Smithers/Interior News

Three new faces were among six trustees sworn in at the Bulkley Valley School District board’s inaugural meeting last Tuesday. New trustees Dawn Hanson (Smithers), Billie Jean Beaubien (Telkwa) and Jennifer Williams (Houston) took the oath with returning board members Frank Farrell (Smithers), Les Kearns (Houston) and Priscilla Michell (Lake Kathlyn). Lara Collingwood, who was also re-elected at last month’s election, was sworn in at an earlier date because she could not attend. Before the meeting started, the new board voted to re-elect Kearns and Farrell as chair and

vice chair respectively, with Collingwood voting by text message. Kearns was also re-elected to represent the board on the B.C. Public School Employers Association, while new trustee Beaubien was voted into the role of B.C. School Trustee Association representative. Williams, who told the board she was a literacy worker before the final vote commenced, will represent the district with the Aboriginal Education Council. The new trustees had recently returned from Vancouver, where they underwent training for their new roles. The next Bulkley Valley School District The new Bulkley Valley School District board celebrates after they were sworn in at the inaugural meeting last board meeting will Tuesday. take place on Jan. 20, Alicia Bridges photo 2015.

Breaking News? Let us know

! w e

N

250-847-3266 Email editor@interior-news.com Find us on Facebook at Smithers Interior News

Alpine Physiotherapy ....keeping you in motion NEW PHYSIOTHERAPIST We are pleased to announce the arrival of our latest team member - Jack Garland

Jack graduated from Kings College, London, in 2009. He has worked in specialist spinal clinics in England and has volunteered on Physiotherapy projects in Tanzania. More recently he started a Scoliosis Rehabilitation organization in England. Jack is available for appointments Tuesday through Saturday. See him for all your back and neck pain. 1268 Main Street, Smithers: 250-877 6966 www.alpinephysiotherapy.com

Opened Monday through Saturday

All mats & props provided. Small, intimate studio environment. • • • •

Yoga Fitness Class Yoga for Round Bodies Class Mom & Daughter Class Teen Yoga Fitness Class

Shannon Gorbahn, your Instructor welcomes you!

Register online: www.TheYogaLoft.ca 3835 1 Ave, Smithers (located above Heavenly Grinds) Call: 250.877.0563


The Interior News

O UR T OWN

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

A15

newsroom@interior-news.com

Sisters help raise money for kids with cancer By Kendra Wong Smithers/Interior News

Sitting next to Chloë Williston, she radiates a certain selflessness that is hard to find. The nine-year-old is happy, charming and is obviously excited when asked about one of her newest ventures. For the past three years, Chloë and her seven-year-old sister Wren have been drawing anything from butterflies and birds playing hockey to giraffes fishing and a moose tightrope walking. They print the drawings on cards as part of Chloë and Wren’s Cards for Kids with Cancer and the money raised is donated to help support kids with cancer. “I was drawing them and we chose our favourites and we put them on cards,” she said. “I like drawing funny things like a blue moose on a tightrope. It’s not supposed to be realistic.” Around Christmas time, the Smithers sisters start their project and can be found at most of the local craft fairs. “I just wanted to help,” said Chloë. For the Willistons, the project hits close to home. When Wren was only two years old, she was diagnosed with neuroblastoma after doctors found a large tumour in her stomach. “We went into the hospital for an ultrasound and the doctor diagnosed her . . . he felt her stomach and knew right

Chloë (right) and Wren Williston have created Chloë and Wren’s Cards for Kids with Cancer. They sell the cards at local craft fairs over the holidays. The money raised goes to kids fighting cancer.

Chris Gareau photo

away,” said their father Patrick. “It’s certainly a lifechanging experience. It had a profound affect on all four of us and it’s certainly the hardest thing that we’ve had to confront.” That night, they flew to B.C. Children’s Hospital in Vancouver and Wren started chemotherapy two short days later. “It was really scary for me because I was just turning four and I didn’t really understand what was going on,” said Chloë.

“It was scary when all of the sudden Wreny was in Vancouver and I was

financial assistance from the B.C. Childhood Cancer Parents

“This is our way to help the kids we saw down there at B.C. Children’s Hospital,” -Paula Williston Chloë and Wren’s mother

going to be leaving the next day for nine months.” The family received

Association (BCCCPA), a non-profit charitable society that helps families

Enter into our 12 Days of Christmas Draw. You could win a GIANT pallet of groceries! bulkleyvalleywholesale.com

No purchase necessary for tickets BUT if you make a donation to the BC Children’s Hospital, we’ll give you an extra entry! Start entering Dec.1, final draw Christmas Eve

who have children who are struggling with cancer and who are struggling financially. For the next year, the family would live in an apartment in a Vancouver home. Chloë would miss roughly 68 classes of her first year of kindergarden to be with her sister. Chloë would spend a lot of time in the hospital visiting with her sister and other patients. “I would spend a lot of time there and I played a lot in the playroom at the hospital,” said Chloë, who

made many friends with many of the children who were also in the hospital. “I think she wanted to help all those kids that we got to know,” said Patrick. “This was one way to support those families.” This isn’t the first time the little girl with a big heart has wanted to help others. Over the summer, she also cut off eight inches of her hair to donate to Wigs for Kids, a group that raises money to provide custom wigs for children with serious illnesses in Vancouver. “Chloë is a pretty remarkable person. She grew up in quite a big hurry when we got down there and we had to ask a lot of her when she was very young,” said Patrick. “She rose to the challenge immediately and she’s always been like that. We’re very proud of her.” At the craft fairs, their mother Paula said people are very positive and encouraging of the duo’s cards. Over the past few years, they’ve raised close to $3,000 to donate to the BCCCPA. “We had tremendous community support,” said Paula. “This is our way to help the kids that we saw down there at B.C. Children’s Hospital.” Each year, their goal is to raise roughly $1,200 to give to the association or donate to families with kids with cancer. This week marks five years since Wren was diagnosed and she is healthy and happy.


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

C OMMUNITY

A16

Happy 75Th Birthday Grammie! Kisses & Hugs Anthony, Jodi, Dennis & Jimmy Kevin, Justin, Adam, Lindsey, Tanner, Bradey & Cooper

CHRISTMAS AT THE LODGE Family members travelled from as far away as Victoria to enjoy a Christmas dinner with their loved ones at the Bulkley Lodge in Smithers last Thursday. About 190 people, including 73 residents, attended the annual celebration. Alicia Bridges photos

First Nations sign to pursue LNG ownership Wet’suwet’en and Gitxsan chiefs have signed an agreement to work together to pursue a stake in natural resource projects after they signed an agreement on Dec. 5. Elected and hereditary chiefs from about 10 First Nations signed a memorandum of understanding to explore an equity ownership stake in resource developments, including LNG projects. As a group, they will consider approaching the federal government to request a loan guarantee to access the required capital. Chief Martin Louie of Nadleh Whut’en First Nation, who hosted the meeting, said the agreement was about ensuring a prosperous future for First Nations groups. “First Nations that have signed this document recognize that we must become owners of projects if we are to successfully secure the future for our children by affirming our traditional standards on environmental protection,” said

End of Life Care WHAT IS HOSPICE? The Bulkley Valley Hospice Society supports loved ones and their families during the last stages of life and bereavement.

Bulkley Valley Hospice Society Toll Free Phone 1-877-335-2233 Local Phone 250-877-7451 3862 Broadway Drop-in Hours 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. Mon. – Fri.

Louie. “We also recognize that our First Nations Rights and Title to land must be respected, but at the end of the day, what we are after is a business deal so that our communities can benefit from being owners of resource projects.” Under the MOU, a steering committee will be established comprising chiefs who are mandated to explore ownership in natural resource projects. The committee’s findings will be available to help inform First Nations who are negotiating impact benefit agreements with industry and governments. The Gitxsan Development Corporation, which is in negotiations with the B.C. government and TransCanada over LNG deals, said it was not involved with the MOU. Wet’suwet’en chief Theresa Tait Day (Wihaliyte) said the MOU was a historic moment for First Nations in B.C.

Happy Ads “Moments to Remember” “Happy Birthday” “Happy Anniversary” “Congratulations...”

33

00

plus GST for a 2x3

or 00

66

plus GST for a 2x6 or 3x4 Ask about prices for adding colour!

Advertising space donated by The Interior News

laura@interior-news.com

Riley Tendall

November No Cavity Club Winner Riley receives 2 movie passes for his perfect dental checkup.

Smithers Plaza

For appointments 250.847.2722

Beautiful Babies of 2014 special Edition

Entry deadline is Friday, January 16

This will be a very popular edition and your child or grandchild can be included for only $25.00 including GST. So start looking for that special photo now. If you would like your photo returned, include a stamped, self-addressed envelope or pick up at our office after Feb. 1st. Photos unclaimed by Feb. 28/15 will be destroyed.

2014 BaBy Edition thE intErior nEws Baby’s Last Name ____________________ Baby’s 1st Name _____________________ Baby’s Birth Date_____________________ Age of Baby when photo taken _________ Mom’s Name ________________________ Dad’s Name _________________________ Address _____________________________ ____________________________________ Telephone ___________________________ Fill out this form and return it along with a photo of your baby born between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2014.

Digital photos may be emailed to laura@interior-news.com

3764 Broadway Avenue, Box 2560, Smithers, B.C., V0J 2N0

You Could Win!

250-847-3266 or email

Congratulations

$100 Gift Certificate from

$100 bank account for your child from

Bulkley Valley CREDIT UNION

$100 photo package from

Holiday

Season AD DEADLINES Tuesday, Dec. 23, noon

All Display Ads and All Line Ads For the December 31 Edition

Friday, Jan. 2, noon

All Display Ads and All Line Ads For the January 7 Edition

Merry Christmas!!

We wish you a happy 2015! CLOSED Dec. 25, 26 & Jan. 1


A17

www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

C OMMUNITY

Have a Story? Let us know

250-847-3266 Email editor@interior-news.com Find us on Facebook at Smithers Interior News

Smithers Men’s Oldtimer Hockey League sign up

CHRISTMAS KINSHIP The smell of roast meat wafting from the kitchen attracted long lines when the Bulkley Valley Kinettes held a free Christmas dinner at the Telkwa Community Hall last Wednesday. Food bank donations were also collected at the event. Alicia Bridges photo

Clark on climate, clawbacks, credit cards By Tom Fletcher Black Press

A year-end interview with Premier Christy Clark. For an extended version see the opinion section at interiornews.com. TF: Are you still confident that we’re going to see a major LNG project approved by the end of 2014? PCC: We’re still in negotiations with Petronas and Shell, so I don’t know if it will be by the end of 2014, but I’m hoping in the next few months. [Days after this interview, Petronas announced a delay in their investment decision until 2015.] TF: I talked to a couple of SFU climate mitigation specialists, and they agreed that it’s unlikely to the point of impossible to have a major LNG industry and still meet Gordon Campbell’s ambitious greenhouse gas target of a 33 per cent

reduction by 2020. What do you think? PCC: I think that we may prove them wrong. Many of these facilities, not all of them, will be partly or fully electrically powered up, so that reduces those impacts, and there’s going to be a real incentive to invest in new technology to minimize that as well. I think the bigger picture is what really matters, which is that in shipping 82 million tonnes of liquefied natural gas to Asia, we help them get off coal and other dirtier sources of oil, and that is the biggest contribution that we’ve ever made to reducing climate change. TF: Ontario and Quebec have taken a page from your book. They have seven conditions for an oil pipeline, Energy East, which involves conversion of gas pipelines and taking Alberta oil to the East Coast. What do you think? PCC: I think they took our five conditions and

Coalmine RV & Mini Storage Coalmine Road, Telkwa, B.C

elaborated on them. So you’ve got British Columbia, Alberta, now Ontario and Quebec, all signed on to some version of the five conditions. And of course Enbridge and Kinder Morgan as well. TF: What about the conditions they have added? PCC: One of the things they say they want to protect against is a shortage of natural gas coming to Ontario and Quebec. These are the same two provinces that have put a moratorium on extracting natural gas. They want to make sure that we do it here, good enough for us to do, and send it to them, but they won’t do that themselves. I look at their last two conditions, and I roll my eyes a little bit. TF: All the way to New Brunswick, they’ve basically bought the anti-hydraulic fracturing myth? PCC: Yes. Somehow they all watched an American mockumentary or whatever

you call it, and believed it. Here in British Columbia we do fracking better than anywhere in the world. It is the gold standard. TF: Finance Minister Mike de Jong says we have a surplus estimated at more than $400 million for this fiscal year, and he suggested that much of that would have to go to pay off deficits from previous years. Of course the opposition is interested in welfare rates and in particular ending child support clawbacks. What’s your view? PCC: Like any family that’s been through tough times, the first thing you need to do when you get back to finding a job and making an income again, is to pay off your credit cards. And that’s what we’re going to do. We are going to see if we can find ways to improve some of the programs over time, but can’t do that until we can afford it. It’s typical, the NDP want us to spend the money before we have it.

Smithers Old-timers Hockey League is taking registrations for the second half of the season. The Cost for 1/2 season is $260. The game times are 7:45 and 9:30 pm Tuesday, Friday and Sunday.

please contact: Scott Martin 250-877-9720 to register or for more information. “A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES WITHIN OUR REGION”

37, 3RD Avenue, PH: 250-692-3195 PO Box 820, TF: 800-320-3339 Burns Lake, BC V0J 1E0 FX: 250-692-3305 www.rdbn.bc.ca E-MAIL:inquiries@rdbn.bc.ca

The Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako will be closed on

December 25th and 26th and January 1st and 2nd

Season’s Greetings! We’re hoping your holiday is full of laughter and friends, health and happiness.

Your Valley Ranches

Covered RV storage, individual units for boats, campers, RV’s!

Mini Storage: Brand New, completed Nov. 2014 • Smooth roll-up doors for easy use • Variety of sizes, gated & well lit As low as • Accept major credit cards $99 /mo • Best Value with competitive price Book Now! 250-877-9235

Enjoy stories of our local Cattle Ranching operators whose work over the decades has helped build the Bulkley Valley. Look for these near the end of each month in the Interior News. Proudly brought to you by Smithers Feed, BV Home Centre, Sausage Factory, B.V. Cattlemen’s Association and the Interior News.


A18

www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

BOXING DAY STARTS SATURDAY

20

60

% OFF

% TO

ENTIRE STORE†

ON SALE

OUR ORIGINAL TICKET PRICE.

MEN’S IMPACT X 14/15 SKI BOOTS

MEN’S TRANSFER BLACK OR WOMEN’S TRANSFER WHITE SNOWBOARD BOOTS

PROCESS 3D 2014 SNOWBOARD

229

99

19999

129

99 EA.

SAVE

SAVE $

50%

90

BRAZUCA WORLD CUP 2014 OFFICIAL OR GOLD MEDAL FINAL MATCH BALL

OUR REG. PRICE 129.99

7999

7499

BRAZUCA WORLD CUP 2014 COMPETITION BALL OUR REG. PRICE 49.99 24.99 OFFICIAL MATCH BALL SHOWN. SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION. SAVE %

SAVE $

50

COLOUR SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

VOLTRIC

SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

3999

60

50%

25%

OFF OUR ORIGINAL PRICE. MEN’S MISSION INSULATED JACKET

10499

1499 EA.

MEN’S CANADA FULL ZIP OR PULLOVER HOODY 29.99 EA.

SAVE

40% COLOUR SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

COLOUR SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

MEN’S OR WOMEN’S REALFLEX SPEED 3.0 RUNNING SHOE

MEN’S REEBOK ONE TRAINER 2.0 OR ADIDAS CLIMA COOL CHILL TRAINING SHOE

OUR REG. PRICE 109.99

43

99

OUR REG. PRICE 109.98

54

98

EA.

60

EA.

SAVE %

50

SAVE %

11999 EA.

CLEARANCE

SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

STEALTH 55S II SENIOR HOCKEY GLOVES

BAUER VAPOR, EASTON XTREME, REEBOK SC87-6 OR WARRIOR DYNASTY AX3 HOCKEY CARRY BAG

OUR REG. PRICE 59.99

29

99

BAUER OR REEBOK. OUR REG. PRICE 59.99 EASTON OR WARRIOR. OUR REG. PRICE 49.99

2999

STYLE SELECTION WILL VARY BY LOCATION.

MEN’S BLUE JAYS REPLICA JERSEY

OUR REG. PRICE 109.99

4399

EA.

SAVE UP TO %

MEN’S CANADA SHORT OR LONG SLEEVE TEE

OUR REG. PRICE 174.99

WAS/NOW

CLEARANCE

MEN’S OR WOMEN’S ULTIMATE PULLOVER HOODIES

29

COLOUR SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

50

AVAILABLE AT SELECT LOCATIONS. COLOUR SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

MEN’S GEL NIMBUS 15 RUNNING SHOE

79

99

OUR REG. PRICE 189.99

9499

MEN’S OWN THE GAME BASKETBALL SHOE

EA.

SAVE $

50

OUR REG. PRICE 109.99

59

99

STYLE SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

OUR REG. PRICE 139.99

6999

SAVE

OUR REG. PRICE 129.99

99

MEN’S LARCHMONT CHUKKA BOOT

50%

MEN’S ROSE 733 III BASKETBALL SHOE

MEN’S. OUR REG. PRICE 119.99 WOMEN’S. OUR REG. PRICE 129.99

SAVE MIN. %

44

99

SAVE

40%

MEN’S 1490 OR WOMEN’S 730 V2 RUNNING SHOE

59

OUR REG. PRICE 89.99

99

GREAT DEAL

COLOUR SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

MEN’S PERFORMANCE DRI-FIT 1/2 ZIP TOP

OUR REG. PRICE 49.99

EA.

60%

50%

MEN’S SANTE FE VOLLEY SHORT

2999

SAVE

SAVE

50

SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

70

COVERT DT1. OUR ORIGINAL PRICE 259.99 MAKO II. OUR ORIGINAL PRICE 269.99 STEALTH RS II. OUR ORIGINAL 299.99 20K SICKICK4. OUR ORIGINAL 249.99

EA.

SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

SAVE $

WARRIOR COVERT DT1, EASTON MAKO II, STEALTH RS II, REEBOK 20K SICKICK4 OR 20K SICKICK4 PRO STOCK SENIOR COMPOSITE STICK

9999

EA.

OFF OUR ORIGINAL PRICE.

COLOUR & SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

AVAILABLE AT SELECT LOCATIONS.

WAS/NOW

50

MEN’S SELECT SONIC COMPRESSION SOLID TOPS & BOTTOMS CLEARANCE*

SAVE

100

$

WARRIOR. OUR ORIGINAL PRICE 199.99 BAUER OR EASTON. OUR ORIGINAL PRICE 229.99

& MORE!

BRAND & GENDER AVAILABILITY MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

SAVE UP TO %

WARRIOR DYNASTY AX2, BAUER SUPREME ONE.8 OR EASTON STEALTH 85S II SENIOR COMPOSITE STICK

INT. OUR REG. PRICE 99.99 49.99

MEN’S, WOMEN’S & KIDS’ SELECT WINTER OUTERWEAR CLEARANCE*

14999

EA.

BLADE

SAVE UP TO %

SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION. INT. AVAILABLE AT SELECT LOCATIONS.

OUR REG. PRICE 219.99

7999

4799

99

SAVE

UFC OCTEK TRAINING STATION

OUR REG. PRICE 179.99

YOUR CHOICE

YOUR CHOICE

44

SAVE

50%

GRAPHENE XENON FLARE 135 SQUASH RACQUET

SELECTION MAY VARY BY LOCATION.

EASTON. OUR REG. PRICE 89.99 WARRIOR. OUR REG. PRICE 79.99

OUR REG. PRICE 89.99

SAVE

120

$

YONEX. OUR REG. PRICE 109.99 WILSON. OUR REG. PRICE 119.99

EA.

EASTON MAKO II M2, STEALTH 65S II OR WARRIOR COVERT DT4 JUNIOR COMPOSITE STICK

T7000 SENIOR COMPOSITE STICK

55%

40

12499

SAVE

YONEX VOLTRIC PEGASUS OR WILSON BLADE BADMINTON RACQUET

1799

SAVE UP TO %

9999

OUR REG. PRICE 249.99

OUR REG. PRICE 219.99

180

INSTALLATION $ INCLUDED.

YOUR CHOICE

50

MEN’S CINCH CTS 14/15 SNOWBOARD BINDINGS

269

NIKE GOLF. OUR REG. PRICE 29.99 TAYLORMADE. OUR REG. PRICE 23.99

EA.

DOOM BLACK BRONZE GOGGLES

98

SAVE

NIKE VAPOR BLACK 2.0 OR TAYLORMADE RBZ URETHANE 12-PACK GOLF BALLS

STARTS DEC. 20

OUR REG. PRICE 449.98

200

$

GRAPHICS MAY VARY BY SIZE.

TURTLE SHELL BLUETOOTH SPEAKER

OUR REG. PRICE 149.99

WOMEN’S ESSENZA ADORA 14/15 SKIS WITH 3MOTION TP LT 10.0 BINDINGS

OUR REG. PRICE 429.99

OUR REG. PRICE 399.99

OUR REG. PRICE 219.99

OR CLEARANCE* PRICED

SAVE

50%

SAVE

50%

ADVERTISED COLOUR ONLY.

MEN’S OR WOMEN’S 646 WALKING SHOE

OUR REG. PRICE 109.99

5499 EA.

MEN’S GEL CUMULUS 15 RUNNING SHOE

OUR REG. PRICE 149.99

ADVERTISED COLOUR ONLY.

74

SAVE

99

50%

*NOT ALL CLEARANCE PRICED ITEMS OR PRICE POINTS AVAILABLE AT ALL LOCATIONS.

SALE DATES: DEC 20 - 29, 2014

TWITTER.COM/SPORTCHEK

FACEBOOK.COM/SPORTCHEKOFFICIAL

SPORTCHEK.CA

†ENTIRE STORE DISCOUNT EXCLUDES PREVIOUS PURCHASES, LAYAWAYS, SERVICE SHOP SERVICES, GIFT CARDS AND 3RD PARTY OFFERS. THIS 10 DAY EVENT STARTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2014. PRICES IN THIS FLYER ARE IN EFFECT DECEMBER 20 TO DECEMBER 29, 2014. IF ANY ADVERTISING ERROR OR OMISSION IS DISCOVERED, SPORT CHEK WILL MAKE THE APPROPRIATE CORRECTIONS AND NOTIFY CUSTOMERS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. QUANTITIES MAY BE LIMITED. SELECTION (STYLES, COLOURS, SIZES AND MODELS) MAY VARY BY STORE. PRODUCT AND OFFERS IN THIS FLYER MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE AT METROPOLIS, BURNABY, BC; SALMON ARM, BC; TERRACE, BC; CRANBROOK, BC; WILLIAMS LAKE, BC; SMITHERS, BC; STEPHEN AVE, CALGARY, AB; MARKET MALL, CALGARY, AB; COCHRANE, AB; WETASKIWIN, AB; COLD LAKE, AB; CAMROSE, AB; OKOTOKS, AB; WEST EDMONTON MALL, EDMONTON, AB; NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK; ESTEVAN, SK; STEINBACH, MB; ALLISTON , ON; LINDSAY , ON; HUNTSVILLE, ON; SIMCOE, ON; MAPLE LEAF SQUARE, TORONTO , ON; 2529 YONGE STREET, TORONTO, ON; YARMOUTH, NS; TRURO, NS; BRIDGEWATER, NS; MIRAMICHI, NB; SUMMERSIDE, PEI; GRAND FALLS-WINDSOR, NFLD; AND GANDER, NFLD LOCATIONS. JUNIOR APPAREL, OUTERWEAR & FOOTWEAR IS NOT AVAILABLE AT STEPHEN AVE, CALGARY, AB; PACIFIC CENTRE, VANCOUVER, BC; HYLANDS, LONDON, ON AND EATON CENTRE, TORONTO, ON LOCATIONS. SKI IS NOT AVAILABLE AT THE STEPHEN AVE, CALGARY, AB; SOUTHLAND MALL, REGINA, SK; NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK; ESTEVAN, SK; GATEWAY MALL, PRINCE ALBERT, SK; TOWN AND COUNTRY MALL, MOOSE JAW, SK; NORTHGATE CENTRE, WINNIPEG, MB; KILDONAN, WINNIPEG, MB; ST. VITAL , WINNIPEG, MB; STEINBACH, MB; FESTIVAL MARKETPLACE, STRATFORD, ON; MAPLE LEAF SQUARE, TORONTO, ON; YARMOUTH, NS; MIRAMICHI, NB; SUMMERSIDE, PEI; AND GRAND FALLS-WINDSOR, NFLD LOCATIONS . SNOWBOARD IS NOT AVAILABLE AT THE STEPHEN AVE, CALGARY, AB; ESTEVAN, SK; TOWN AND COUNTRY MALL, MOOSE JAW, SK; GATEWAY MALL, PRINCE ALBERT, SK; NORTHGATE CENTRE, WINNIPEG, MB; STEINBACH, MB; MAPLE LEAF SQUARE, TORONTO, ON; YARMOUTH, NS; SUMMERSIDE, PEI; AND GRAND FALLS-WINDSOR, NFLD LOCATIONS. HOCKEY EQUIPMENT IS NOT AVAILABLE AT THE 2529 YONGE STREET, TORONTO, ON AND MAPLE LEAF SQUARE, TORONTO; ON LOCATIONS . JUNIOR HOCKEY EQUIPMENT AND SKATES ARE NOT AVAILABLE AT THE STEPHEN AVE, CALGARY, AB LOCATION. ORION GATE , BRAMPTON, ON LOCATION IS EXCLUDED FROM THIS NATIONAL FLYER. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED. *NOT ALL CLEARANCE PRICED ITEMS OR PRICE POINTS AVAILABLE AT ALL LOCATIONS. SELECTION WILL VARY. PRODUCT SHOWN ON MODELS IN THE LIFESTYLE IMAGES PRESENTED IN THIS ADVERTISEMENT MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE. **THE INFORMATION PROVIDED HEREIN IS NOT INTENDED TO BE MEDICAL ADVICE. INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE PREGNANT OR HAVE OTHER MEDICAL CONDITIONS SHOULD ALWAYS CONSULT A DOCTOR BEFORE ENGAGING IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES. ®REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF FGL SPORTS LTD. AND ALL OTHER TRADEMARKS ARE THE PROPERTY OF THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNER(S).


The Interior News

C OMMUNITY

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

www.interior-news.com

Blue Christmas Service FUN ON THE ICE Dozens of people participate in this year’s Skate with Santa at the Smithers Civic Arena on Friday. The event was put on by the Smithers Lion’s Club. To skate, people brought cash or non-perishable food items, which will be donated to the local food bank.

Date: Time:

Smithers United Church of Canada 3889—8th Ave. “You will lose someone you can’t live without, and your heart will be badly broken, and the bad news is that you never completely get over the loss of your beloved. But this is also the good news. They live forever in your broken heart that doesn’t seal back up. And you come through. It’s like having a broken leg that never heals perfectly—that still hurts when the weather gets cold, but you learn to dance with the limp.” ― Anne Lamott

By Kendra Wong Smithers/Interior News

Skeena-Bulkley Valley MP Nathan Cullen is setting his sights on helping small businesses flourish in the northwest in the new year. “We’ve got some ideas about helping small businesses and creating new energy projects. The federal government still stands in the way, it’s not even that they’re not helping, they’re actually hindering,” said Cullen. “So getting the federal government turned towards creating small and medium businesses in Canada would be fantastic, particularly for the northwest because there’s such a strong entrepreneurial spirit.” Cullen specifically hopes to bring back the small business hiring tax credit, a program the Conservatives cancelled a few years ago. When small businesses hire new employees, they will see a “benefit on their taxes.” “If we were able to get the government to see the wisdom in this and bring it back that would be a great benefit,” he said. Cullen also hopes to put an emphasis on

creating clean energy jobs. “The government should drop its subsidies of dirty fuels and look at different ways that they can help the clean energy sector which produces a lot more jobs, by the way,” he added. “We know we have a lot of potential for green energy (in the northwest).” When it comes to pipelines however, Cullen said he doesn’t believe the controversial Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline will disappear. “Ideally, I’d love to see the Enbridge Northern Gateway go away, so we can focus on the positive things that are going on in the northwest,” he said. “I don’t think that’s going to happen in 2015, I think the company just has too much Chinese money backing its commercials and desire to keep arguing for this pipeline.” Cullen already has a busy schedule heading into the new year. He plans to continue touring Skeena and B.C. to garner support for his bill to ban supertankers from transporting oil across the north coast of B.C. So far, he’s visited 30 communities and aims to get 100,000 signatures in 100 days.

The Christmas season is a time of joy and celebration… but not for everyone! If you are experiencing grief, loss, or loneliness, and wonder where is God in all

of this, come and join us for a quiet and reflective Christmas service. For more information Contact Rev. Alyssa Anderson at

Kendra Wong photo

Cullen sets resolutions for new year

A19

our stylish restaurant Modern grill & lounge

Breakfast & Brunch • Burgers & sandwiches german & seafood dishes

is unparalleled in ambiance, quality and service. Satisfy your palette with our innovative menu that combines the finest and the freshest ingredients available. daily SpecialS: Monday: Steak Sandwich Lunch in Zoers Warmers $6.25 & Pints of Canadian $5 Tuesday: Wing Night in Fireside Lounge House wine $5 Hudson Bay Lager $4.50 Wednesday: Screwdrivers $5 Sleemans Honey Brown $4.50 Thursday: Okanagan Springs Cloudy Amber Ale $4.50

Best of the Season to you and yours. For for dinner reservations,

call 250-847-4581 View our menu online at

www.hudsonbaylodge.com/restaurant-pub/

Friday: Fish & Chip Lunch in Zoer’s Schnitzel Night - 3 course meal, great prices! HBL Lager Pitchers $15.50 Saturday: Prime Rib Dinner Night High Balls $4.50 Ciders & Coolers $5.50 Jagerbombs $5.50 Sunday: Caesars $4.50

located in the Hudson Bay lodge 3251 Highway 16, Smithers, Bc open Monday to Sunday: 6:00 am - 10:00 pm phone 250.847.4581 • email reservations@hudsonbaylodge.com www.hudsonbaylodge.com/restaurant-pub/


A20

www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Dec 17 - Dec 31, 2014

NO MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED!

Your Pantry Fill Specialists

PR O D U C E

.49

Prime Rib Roast

Coca Cola or Pepsi

Yams

12x355 ml

lb

3 for

Bone in, 14.53 / kg

6

9

59

99

Plus Deposit, Plus Eco-Fee

Cracker Barrel Cheese

Potatoes 10lb bag

3

9

99

Ocean Spray Fresh Cranberries

9

99

Limit 2 per family purchase 907g

99

Island Farms Salted Butter 454g 2 for

each

/lb

Western Family Chicken Wings

Assorted Varieties

99

1

M E AT

F E ATU R E D

908g

Western Family Garlic Sausage 750g

6

98

4

99

Limit 4 per family purchase

each

G R E AT BA R G A I N S Western Family Chips Assorted sizes Assorted varieties

10

$ 5 for

Christie Snacking Crackers Assorted varieties 160-168g

10

$ 5 for

Western Family Cranberry Jelly or wholeberry 348ml

$ 4 for

5

Minute Maid Orange Juice 6x295ml

999 Charmin Ultra Bathroom Tissue 36 roll

19

99

Western Family Chip Dips Assorted varieties

2 for

$

4

Dare Variety Pack Crackers

Stoned Wheat Thins

899

699

1.17kg

Western Family Smoked Oysters

Gold Seal Cocktail Shrimp

3

$ 2 for

3x85g

88

Stovetop Stuffing 2 varieties 120g

.99

Cuisine Adventures Spanakopita 1.36kg

1199 Cuisinart Kitchen Products

20

% off

106g

5

Bake-King Foil Roasters

1

49

Everyday Low Price

Original 1.8kg

Western Classic Antipasto 750g

7

99

Nabob K-Cup Coffee Pods Assorted Varieties 12’s

699

Western Family Vegetables 2kg

Western Family Shrimp Rings 50-60 count

4

2 for

Assorted Varieties

47

Duracell AA Batteries 48’s

21

99

227g

9

$

Western Family Laundry Soap

Liquid or Powder 4.43L

1499

Mon. to Thurs. 8 am - 7 pm • Fri. 8 am - 8 pm • Sat. 8 am - 6 pm • Sun. 9 am - 6 pm 3302 Highway 16 Smithers, BC • (250) 847-3313 • 1 (800) 579-3313 • bulkleyvalleywholesale.com


S PORTS

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

www.interior-news.com

B1

sports@interior-news.com

Smithers Steelheads

5

VS. Kitimat Ice Demons

4

Photos left to right: Smithers Steelhead defenceman Spencer Brooks tries to get one past the Lac La Hache netminder during Sunday’s game. Lane Perry delivers a hip check in the second period.

Kendra Wong photos

Steelheads pick up back-to-back wins

7

VS. Lac La Hache

4

By Kendra Wong Smithers/Interior News

The Smithers Steelheads picked up back-to-back wins against the Kitimat Ice Demons and the Lac La Hache Tomahawks in their push for the playoffs this weekend at the Smithers Civic Arena. The Steelheads have done well this season with home ice advantage, heading into the weekend with a 3-0 record on familiar ice. First up, the Steelheads took on the Kitimat Ice Demons for the first of three games this season. The Ice Demons have struggled to put up wins this season with a 1-3-1 record on the road. Brendan DeVries opened the scoring just 35 seconds into the first to give the Steelheads an early lead. But the Ice Demons answered right back with a goal of their own from forward Ben Rumley a few minutes later. At the end of the first, after a scramble in front of the net, DeVries

would bury a rebound for his second of the night. In the second, the Ice Demons seemed to find their feet with Rumley slipping one by netminder David Little. Near the end of the middle frame, defenceman Ian Smith got called for roughing in his own zone resulting in a 5-on-3 powerplay. Ice Demon Jordan Goncalves wasted no time capitalizing on the advantage with a shot directly off the faceoff win at 6:20. In the final frame, Greg Sabey whistled a slapshot past Little from the blueline to put the road team up 4-2. But just when it looked like the Steelheads would drop the game, Spencer Brooks and Adam DeVries evened it up with two goals just minutes apart. With two minutes left, defenceman Eric Smith would score on a weird backhand flip towards the net, lifting the team to a narrow 5-4 victory over their west division foe.

“I just got a pass from [Josh Aspenlind] and heard some guys yelling ‘throw it on net’, so I threw it on net and good thing it happened,” said Smith. “It was pretty quick.” Mark Arnold, who had two assists on the night, said playing hard for the full 60 minutes helped lead the team to a come-frombehind win. On Sunday, the Steelheads faced off against the Lac La Hache Tomahawks for the final time in the regular season. Again, Brendan DeVries would open the scoring at 7:11. Tomahawk forward Walter Schmidt’s slapshot from the point would squeak by Hazelton’s Keano Wilson, who made his debut in net with the Steelheads. In the second and third periods, Ian Smith, Spencere Brooks, captain Darryl Young and Lane Perry would all find the back of the net to defeat the Tomahawks 7-4. “We had a couple of good games this weekend to show that we still have some oomph left in our game

to win,” said head coach Tom DeVries. Shots on net were 46-29 in favour of the Steelheads. “The d-men let me see everything well. It wasn’t my best game, but I did alright,” said Wilson. “I was just doing my job to try and help out the team.” After the weekend wins, the Steelheads are now 5-0 at home and have won three games in a row. The team hopes to continue their winning steak at home against the Terrace River Kings after the Christmas break. “They’re a fairly aggressive team on the forecheck, so we have to control the puck so that they can’t do that,” said DeVries, admitting that they won’t have a practice before taking on the top team in the west division. “We might be a little rusty,” he said. With only five games left in the season, the team will make its final push for a playoff spot.

Peppermint PeppermintMocha Mochaoror Peppermint Deluxe Peppermint Deluxe Hot Chocolate Hot Chocolate

reareal wh l wh ippe ipped d cream cream

Smithers Steelheads

Shane & Sasha Doodson, Owner Operator (Restaurant 3720 Hwy 16,Address) Smithers

(Restaurant Address)

For a limited time only. At participating McDonald’s® restaurants in Canada. For a limited time only. ©2014 McDonald’s At participating McDonald’s® restaurants in Canada. ©2014 McDonald’s

See KINGS on B8


B2 www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

S PORTS

Northern Health hands out grants to five local programs By Kendra Wong Smithers/Interior News

Five local community groups will be receiving funding from Northern Health to improve health and fitness programs in Smithers and Telkwa. The Bulkley Valley Cross Country Ski Club, the Bulkley Valley Learning Centre, the Kyah Wiget Education Society, Smithers Secondary School and the Treehouse Housing Association have been selected to receive grants as part of this year’s Imagine: Legacy grants program with Northern Health. “The Legacy Grants reflect a commitment to supporting the long-term health of British Columbians and will help communities build on the spirit of the games as they work to achieve the goal of healthy populations,” said Health Minister Terry Lake in a press release. In total, just over $99,000 in grants will be handed out

to regional community-based projects across northwest B.C. The ski club’s grant will go toward their biathlon program and replacing mats. Peter Tweedie, the biathlon’s program coach, said a parent with the club applied for the grant over the summer. They received a $2,500-grant which covered just over half the cost to purchase 16 new biathlon mats. “When you go to shoot, you lay down on a mat that’s on the firing line,” said Tweedie. “We were using carpet for years so these mats are proper biathlon mats.” The club would normally hang the carpets inside the cabin to allow them to dry after practice. But over the last few years, they were not drying properly between practices because of the wet weather, leading to health concerns. “It was getting problematic and we were also concerned about mould,” he said, adding that the new mats are lighter, easier to handle and can be

stored outside, freeing up cabin space. The other half of the $4,400-project came from club fundraising efforts. “It’s nice when an athlete can get used to training on a specific surface and when they go to an actual race, they’re on the same surface,” said Tweedie. “They’re more familiar with everything.” With the Canada Winter Games in February, Northern Health hopes the event will encourage communities in the North to improve the health and well-being of its residents. “We want groups in northern communities to think about how they can leverage the Games, and all that they bring, to create sustainable projects around physical activity that will help make their community healthier,” said Kelsey Yarmish, regional manager, Population Health. Hazelton, Terrace, Prince Rupert, Kitimat, Houston and Dease Lake also received grants.

Coo

kies for Cau se

All our December cookie proceeds are going to the Bulkley Valley Health Foundation for funding a Broda Chair for the Bulkley Valley District Hospital. Please show your support and help our community. TM

1323 Main Street, Smithers, BC

250-847-4771

We would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas!

We will be closed from December 25th to January 1st. We look forward to seeing you in the new year.

Smithers Lumber Yard Ltd.

3528 Yellowhead Hwy 16, Smithers, B.C. 250-847-2246 Toll Free 1-877-847-2230


The Interior News

S PORTS

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

B3

Northern Saddle Club celebrates 50 years By Kendra Wong

in the back country to hosting major competitions drawing riders from all over the 3 5/16 x 5 Lorna Motz northwest as well as remembers a time when organizing the popular the Northern Saddle horse show during the Club consisted of just annual fall fair. a handful of families This year, the club who would get together and its more than and ride on trails in 100 members are their backyard. celebrating its 50th “We used to ride anniversary. out in the old airport Leah Germain, a in Telkwa. My dad had director with the club, property up here on has been a member Tatlow Road and we since she was six years used that for a couple old and said being of years,” said Motz, involved with horses whose parents Betty has become a family and Gordon Chapman tradition. helped found the club “I basically feel in the early ‘60s. like I grew up at the “They’d organize fairgrounds,” she gymkhanas and said. “My sister Erin everyone would know Rowsell has been a where it was and they’d member since she was show up and just six and she’s been the Your family depends on you participate. It’s kind treasurer for over 15 of to the drive same thing that years and was always safely. Plan ahead itand people do now.” my mom Brenda drive foreight the conditions. Roughly Drescher before that, families founded the it’s kind of a family club back in 1964, you go. club for us.” Know before mostly from a passion As part of its forDriveBC.ca riding and a need anniversary, the club to bring together revamped the rings and ShiftIntoWinter.ca equestrian enthusiasts. added 16 new sets of The club has come stadium jumps at the aBusiness long way from card size riding 3.5 x 2 club’s facilities located Smithers/Interior News

Your family depends on you to drive safely. Plan ahead and drive for the conditions. Know before you go. DriveBC.ca ShiftIntoWinter.ca

Jen Atkins clears a fence in a showjumping competition earlier this year.

Contributed photo

at the fairgrounds. The club is responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of the facilities, which include the indoor riding arena, stables and riding rings.

The construction of the roughly $150,000-facility back in the 1990s was one of the club’s largest projects in its history, with most of the money coming from

club fundraising efforts. Its construction put Smithers on the map as a town with one of the best equestrian facilities in the northwest. “It meant that we weren’t bound

seasonally. We could actually ride throughout the winter if we could stand the cold . . . It really is an enviable facility,” said Jane Lloyd-Smith, who was president of the club through its construction. The next closest equestrian facility is in Prince George, but is run by the town not a club. Jill O’Neill, an equestrian coach who has been with the club since 1981, said it provides members an opportunity to get together with likeminded people. “The club was the place where everyone met to ride,” said O’Neill. “The club was the centre of the horse industry in the valley. They’ve evolved over the years from one little ring to quite a facility.” One of the most recent challenges the club has faced is a decline in young riders interested in joining the club. “One of our

main focuses is to encourage the sport of equestrianism in the valley and over the last several years, we’ve noticed a decline of kids,” said Germain. “There’s so many activities in this town and horses are a big commitment, but our goal is to encourage more kids to be involved with horses.” Looking to the future, the club is hoping to upgrade its current facilities as well as extend the indoor arena and build a cover over the round pen to allow more people access during the winter months. “The challenge is trying to maintain a cheap membership but provide top notch facilities. We’re getting to the point where our barns are going to need replacing and the footing is expensive for each ring,” added Germain. For more information about the club, visit www. northernsaddleclub. com.


B4 www.interior-news.com

S PORTS Former Otter eyes Olympics By Kendra Wong Smithers/Interior News

A former Bulkley Valley Otter could be on his way to joining Team Canada to compete in the 2016 Summer Olympics. Smithers’ Brett Zollen recently qualified for the Olympics trials after swimming the 50-metre freestyle in 23.10 seconds at the first competition of the season at the PCS Christmas Cracker invitational meet from Dec. 9-11 in Victoria. “It feels like part of the process. It’s one of those things where I want to get better and I want to do well and that’s just one of the stepping stones. Getting better is getting to the Olympic trials,” said Zollen, who swims with the University of Victoria Vikes.

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

With his time, Zollen will head to Toronto in April 2016 for Olympic trials where he will compete in four individual swims. “I’ll definitely swim the 50 free and most likely the 100, 200 freestyle, but the

year. “[The Olympic trial] will be the biggest meet that I’ve ever swam up until that point in my career,” he said. “You have to come first or you probably won’t make the team.”

“It feels like part of the process,” -Brett Zollen University of Victoria student

fourth event could change. I still have a lot of time to figure that out and find a different race,” he said. If Zollen comes first in any of the races, he would make the Olympic swim team and represent Canada in the Games in Brazil later that

Zollen currently sits in 11th place in university rankings in the 50 free. Peter Vizsolyi, head coach of the Vikes, wasn’t surprised by Zollen’s swim. “To me, he’s just on a path of progress. If you make the Olympic trials now,

you’re basically in the top 100 swimmers in Canada,” said Vizsolyi. “He’s a really good all around swimmer but it took him a while to realize which events he’s really good in . . . I think he’s got quite a bit of talent.” Competing in the Olympics is a dream for many athletes, but the 20-year-old has always had high aspirations when it comes to swimming. Zollen started swimming when he was roughly six or seven years old, excelled quickly and soon after joined the Bulkley Valley Otters, a club he would swim with for the next 11 years. Ali Howard was his coach in grades 10 and 11 and has kept in contact with Zollen over the years.

Like Us

~ www.facebook.com/SmithersInteriorNews ~ Get up-to-date news, event info, classifieds & more!

Smithers

Spotlight

WIN

Footlong Combo Meal A footlong with a 21oz drink & choice of cookies.

Solve

the word puzzle & be the first to post the correct answer by commenting on this ad at /SmithersInteriorNews

Follow these clues & create a sentence. • • • • •

A9, 1st paragraph, 10th word A14, 5th paragraph, 17th word C3, 21st paragraph, 5th word B6, 2nd paragraph, 11th word B3, 11th paragraph, 27th word

See ZOLLEN on B5

For the Hunter and Outdoors Person this Christmas

Peace of mind beyond the reach of cellular. Offering the latest in Satellite communication. Ask about the special offer on Spot

Hunting and Camping Accessories

Petzl lights • Optics •Hand warmers • Can Cookers Everything you need for the outdoor enthusiast

Rifles10% Off

Optics 20%Off

CHECK US OUT ON facebook

1217 MAIN STREET 250-877-7744


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

S PORTS

For news items or advertising The Interior News • 250-847-3266

Zollen hopes to inspire local athletes

From OTTER on B4 “I’m so proud of him. It shows just how hard he’s working,” said Howard. “It gives the current crop of kids something to aspire to. They can see that someone from Smithers can work really hard and can do that.” Howard noted that even though Zollen hasn’t had the same training as other varsity athletes, it shows his true talent in the water. “He’s really carved out a little niche for himself and he’s doing so well and he hasn’t had the coaching that other people have had for years,” she said. “He just likes to go fast . . . regardless of how many more gains, he’s done something really exceptional.” For the thirdyear English major, the sport isn’t about competing against other athletes in the pool, but rather competing against yourself. “When you’re

Smithers’ Brett Zollen swam the 50-metre freestyle in 23.10 seconds.

Contributed photo

swimming it’s just you against the clock. There might be other people that you’re racing against, but really it’s just you against yourself,” he said. “I like that challenge that every time you dive into the pool, you’re trying to

better yourself.” After graduating from Smithers Secondary School, Zollen started his first year of university. He was a walkon with the team, and admitted that making the transition from club to varsity

swimming was a challenge. When he left Smithers, the 6-foottwo-inch athlete weighed 230 pounds, but with constant training and being in the pool eight times a week, he dropped down to 185 pounds in his first year with the team. “That led to a lot of initial success because I wasn’t carrying so much weight in the water and just dedicating myself to my sport,” he said. “The dedication level definitely went up and the results were starting to pay off.” With the Olympics potentially on the horizon, Zollen hopes his success will inspire other local athletes. “In Smithers it’s really all about the hockey. A lot of kids have no idea about swimming and how to get into it,” he said. “It’s good to give the kids a bit of motivation to show that you can leave Smithers and be successful in your sport.”

B5

Derek Alexander

HANDBAGS

30% OFF!

S. Nielsen

PHOTOS & PRINTS

15% OFF!

3827 - 2nd Ave., Smithers 250·847·0070

nielsenart.ca

115 - 4716 Lazelle Ave., Terrace 250.615.3125

No Plans for New Year’s Eve?

We’ve Got You Covered! The Royal Canadian Legion NEW YEAR’S EVE DANCE With Axes

Free Champagne & Midnight buffet Doors open at 8pm Dancing from 9:30 to 1:30

of Egos

Dress to Impress! Tickets Now On Sale Only $25

Tickets available at Hetherington & Hooper & The Legion

NO MINORS bona fide guests welcome Designated Drivers available

FOR A LIMITED TIME,

HSS724TCD model ($3,499 plus freight and PDI)

STARTING FROM

1,869

$

HSS622TC MODEL PLUS FREIGHT AND PDI

Ditch the shovel and the trouble by visiting your local Honda Power Equipment Dealer.

tnp trails north powersports

3334 Hwy 16, SmitHerS www.trailSnortH.ca 250-847-2287 1-800-667-0497

Honda Motorcycles & ATVs Canada

@HondaPowerCA

Honda’s “It’s About Time” offers apply to eligible retail purchase agreements of select models for a limited time, while supplies last. “For a limited time” prices shown are only available to eligible retail customers on cash purchases, and include a discount that is deducted from the manufacturer’s suggested retail price before taxes. All prices shown do not include freight and PDI or applicable sales taxes and are not applicable in Quebec. Actual savings may vary by dealer. Promotional prices in effect until November 30, 2014. All offers/prices/specifications are subject to change, extension or cancellation without notice. Dealer order or trade may be necessary. Dealers may sell for less. At participating Canadian Honda Power Equipment dealers only (excluding Quebec). Models and colours may not be exactly as shown. Errors and omissions excepted. See your Honda Power Equipment dealer or honda.ca/snowblowerevent for full details and eligible models.

honda.ca/snowblowerevent

Dual Stage - Low Price


B6 www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

S PORTS

Last Minute Christmas Ideas FOR THE BIKER… Crank Bros. Multi 17 Tool

Shimano AM41 Freeride Shoe

159.95

$

Reg. $34.95

sale

Topeak Race sale Rocket Pump $

30.00

$

Reg. $37.95 -

Rock Shox Reverb Dropper Post

32.00 2015 Norco Bigfoot 6.3 Fat Bike

Perfect for snow & sand & any soft terrain. 3.8” tires

Reg. $430.00

sale $399.00

1045

$

FOR THE SKIER & SNOWBOARDER… Purchase a Helmet & Goggles… & Get

GOOD HUNTING BIKE!

FOR FISHING & OUTDOOR PEOPLE... Wasp StackCam-JakD On - 2” LCD touch screen - 5 mega pixel 8-Gun - Waterproof to 35 ft. Cabinet $

20% Off

the Goggles!

Combyn

Edit

The Smithers Secondary junior boys’ basketball team finished the tournament 1-2 at home over the weekend.

Kendra Wong photo

Gryphons soar into fourth place in tourney By Kendra Wong Smithers/Interior News

The Smithers Secondary junior boys’ basketball team finished fourth in a tournament at home over the weekend. Despite losing back-to-back games on Saturday, the team is showing promise, having only had two practices together since the season started. The Gryphons started the tournament strong with a come-frombehind win against Centennial Christian School on Friday night. In the first half, the team had trouble finding the hoop and heading into halftime, the visiting team had a 16-point lead. “By halftime, we were down 32-16,” said co-coach Kalum Wittke. “In the third and fourth quarter, we came out and had awesome defence and came out with a win and really shut them

down.” The Gryphons managed to scrape by Centennial winning 46-42. “We were just super stoked to come out with a win, which at halftime, we weren’t expecting to,” said Wittke. Heading into Saturday’s games, the team struggled to keep the momentum going playing against Charles Hayes Secondary’s Rainmakers. “We started off the Prince Rupert game pretty good, but we just started to fade away,” said Wittke. And the scoreboard reflected it. In the third, the Gryphons were down by 25 points. There were a handful of turnovers and an even bigger amount of players being called for travelling. But it was the team’s defence that kept them in the game. “Their defence really stepped up but we still need to work on finishing at the

hoop,” he said. In the final match, the Gryphons took on Port Simpson and dropped that game 58-48 with 21 points coming from Justin Dejong and 22 from Quin Fraser. “I felt like I really contributed,” said Fraser. “I was just in the winning spirit, I wanted the win for the team.” Dejong was also feeling good on the court over the weekend. “I felt really comfortable on the court, I had some good and bad moments,” he said. “I played well on defence, I passed the ball well and just got open and that helped us out a lot.” According to Wittke, they’ve only had two practices because many players were wrapping up the volleyball season. “For having two practices, they played superbly,” said Wittke, adding they need to practice not travelling with the ball.

Flight Deck Airbrake

…and g n Stocki rs Stuffe !!!

149.95

Reg. $219.00

sale

Berkley 7” Fillet Knife Reg. sale $16.95

Kershaw 175.00 Fire Starter $14.95 Leatherman Wingman $

13.95

$

MAIN ST. SMITHERS 250.847.5009 WWW.MCBIKE.BC.CA

37.95

$

Storewide Power Tool Sale !

Dewalt palm sander D26451

Sale $59.99 reg price $110

Sale ends December 24th

BV Home Centre Hwy 16 – Telkwa 250-846-5856

Hwy 16 – Houston

250-845-7606


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

S PORTS

B7

Merry Christmas Thank you for your patronage We’re closed December 25 th & 26 th & January 1 st & 2 nd

READY, AIM, FIRE Terry Close takes aim during the Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club’s annual turkey shoot on Sunday. Seven people participated in 10 events, where the winners received turkeys. Kendra Wong photo

The Smithers Secondary wrestling team is starting off the season strong with two gold-medal wins at their first tournament of the year in Prince George. Senior and and former two-time provincial champion Alex Schell brought home a gold medal in the 47 kilogram weight class, defeating two opponents from Prince George and Vanderhoof in the Prince George Icebreaker Tournament on Dec. 6. “She’s so dominant in her weight class in the North; she’s wrestled now for five years and been on the B.C. team to the summer games,” said head coach Don Roy. “In the North here, none of her opponents really challenge her, she just has to take it easy on them and go gentle.” According to Roy, Schell uses her stature to her advantage. “She’s only 47 kilos, but she’s quite tall and lanky and she uses that to her advantage,” he said. Roy added that Schell will also make the trip down to Vancouver this week to compete in a tournament called War on the Floor. “We don’t normally go down there, but Alex needs to get to some better competition,” said Roy, adding that she’ll travel with the Prince George team.

One of the team’s newest wrestlers, Amanda Holland also won gold in her weight class, defeating both her Prince George and Mackenzie opponents by 10-0 scores. “For a first-year wrestler, that’s very good,” he said. “She had good defence, she sprawled really well and got behind the girls . . . she would push them down and get around behind and she did a really good job of that.” Last weekend, three junior players hit the mat in Vanderhoof for a tournament as well. Brothers Alex and Micah Weme both won the 60 and 40 kilogram weight classes, respectively. While Holland went undefeated. While the season just kicked off, Roy said many junior wrestlers have lots of potential heading into the new year. “[Amanda] is learning fast. She comes to practice and she works hard and she’s focused. I see a lot of potential. But the first year, they’ll lose some matches that they wish they hadn’t lost, but that’s just the way it goes,” said Roy. “I hope everybody gets better. That’s my only goal, I just want them to improve.” The tournament over the weekend was the team’s last chance to compete before the Christmas break. They will be back on the mat in January for a tournament in Prince George.

• MARtiNi SetS • wiLDLY DeLiCiOuS • ApRONS • FieStA • KitCheN AiD •

Smithers/Interior News

CANDY MOLDS • SuShi • RieDeL • GOOD GRipS • bODuM

Lots of gift ideas for everyone on your list

KitchenWorKs WorKs Kitchen 1230 Main Street • Smithers • 250-847-9507 eMiLe heNRY • pOLiSh teA pOtS • COFFee MAKeRS • ApRONS

FONDueS • DiNNeRwARe • CASt iRON • heNKeLS KNiveS • ROASteRS •

By Kendra Wong

1314 Main Street • 250-847-2828 •

SSS wrestlers kick off the season strong


B8 www.interior-news.com

S PORTS

Steelheads prepare for Kings From WINS on Front “Our focus is to play as a team and hopefully we can make a good run at the playoffs,” said DeVries, adding that they’ll need to put as many bodies out as they can in the form of three solid lines. “These two wins will probably put us

in the playoffs.” Defenceman Devon Hayhurst said the team must continue to put as many shots on net as they can. “We’re just going to keep doing what we’re doing — shooting the puck lots and playing well as a team. It’s fun hockey for everyone,” he said.

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH Candlelight Service Sunday, Dec. 21 • 6 pm Christmas Day Service Thursday, Dec. 25 • 10 am New Year’s Eve Service Wednesday, Dec. 31 • 7 pm Pastor Ken Vander Horst 250-847-2333 1471 Columbia Dr. Smithers

SMITHERS UNITED CHURCH Wednesday, Dec 17 – 7 p.m. Blue Christmas Service Wednesday, Dec 24 – Christmas Eve 4:30 pm Children’s Service 7 pm Traditional Service At the corner of Queen St. & 8th

Rev. Alyssa Anderson

250-847-3333

Christmas Eve Service

The Interior News Your family depends on you to drive safely. PlanFollow ahead and Us drive for the conditions. @SmithersNews

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

SKATING WITH THE CANUCKS Your family depends on you to arriveSix-year-old Nicole Bateman safely. Plan ahead. Check weather and road skates with Vancouver Canuck conditions, make sure your vehicle ismascot winterFin as part of the First Strides ready and drive for the conditions. Initiation Program Know before you go. DriveBC.ca | ShiftIntoWinter.ca

with the Canucks over the weekend. Bateman also met fowards Zack Kassian and Linden Vey.

Know before you go. This week’s feature: ure:

DriveBC.ca ShiftIntoWinter.ca

Singing praises....

Sonata!!

Business card size 3.5 x 2 drivewaycanada.ca

Your family depends on you to drive safely. Plan ahead and drive for the conditions. Know before you go.

Contributed photo

BETHEL REFORMED CHURCH Christmas Day Service Thursday December 25 • 10 am 3115 Gould Place

Pastor Lou Slagter

Smithers

Canadian Reformed Church Christmas Day Service Thursday, Dec 25 10 am Short Christmas Program Following Pastor James Slaa 2788 Upper Viewmont south Rd. 250-847-5879

DriveBC.ca ShiftIntoWinter.ca

ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC CHURCH

Wednesday, Dec 24 6:00 pm Children's Christmas Mass (Smithers) 8:30 pm Christmas Mass, St. Anthony’s Parish (Houston) 11:00 pm Midnight Mass, St. Joseph’s Parish (Smithers) Thursday, Dec 25 10 am Mass (Smithers) Wednesday, Dec 31 6:15 pm New Years Eve Mass (Smithers) Thursday, Jan 1, 2015 9 am Mass (Smithers) 11:30 am Mass (Houston)

C hristmas 250-847-2080

Church Services

Wednesday, Dec 24 - 7-8 Corner of Viewmount Rd & Hwy 16 250-847-2466

ST. JAMES ANGLICAN CHURCH

Sunday, Dec 21 10 am Morning Prayer at St. James Monday, Dec 22 2:30 pm Holy Eucharist at The Meadows Wednesday, Dec 24 Christmas Eve 5:30 pm Holy Eucharist at St. John the Divine in Quick 8 pm Holy Eucharist at St. Clements in Houston 10 pm Holy Eucharist at St. James Thursday, Dec 25 Christmas Day 10 am Holy Eucharist at St. James Sunday, Dec 28 10 am Lessons and Carols at St. James

1636 Princess Street Rev. Daphne Moser

Rev. Pier Pandolfo

2014


Three Rivers

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Proudly serving Hazelton, New Hazelton, South Hazelton, Gitsequkla, Kispiox and Glen Vowell

www.interior-news.com

Hazeltons boxers Tera Brooks and Mayenda Jones travelled to Kitimat to fight in an exhibition match at their first tournament, the KMP Bragging Rights Boxing Tournament, on Dec. 6. Story, Page 3.

Clarence Jones photo

Christmas Gift Subscription

My little brother needs your help

Are you still having difficulty finding something for that hard-to-buy-for person on your Christmas list? Subscription prices: Wouldn’t a Gift Subscription to (GST included) The Interior News be the ideal gift? Local areas – $40.50 The Interior News, 3764 Broadway Ave., Box 2560, Smithers, B.C., V0J 2N0

65 years plus – $30.00 Anywhere in Canada – $55.00

SPECIAL Online Only Around The World

$40.50

To: Name ______________________________________________ Mailing _____________________________________________ City ________________________________________________ P. Code _____________________________________________ Telephone ___________________________________________ From: Name ___________________________________ Mailing __________________________________ City _____________________________________ P. Code __________________________________ Telephone ________________________________

Check/Money Order enclosed: Yes No Visa/MC # _________________________________ Expiry Date __________ Online Only_________

Just mail in, or drop off, the handy form or call us at 847-3266.

My brother Kelel Bramsleven, yes that is superman’s name was born this July. He has a bad disease, spinal muscular atrophy level one. He needs 24/7 care. He’s already had four med evac.s to BC Children’s Hospital and our parents need financial help. If you can, please make a contribution to BV Credit Union account #430447. Thank you for your help. For news items or advertising The Interior News • 250-847-3266


C2

www.interior-news.com

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

It takes a community to

Stop Drinking anD Driving!

Don’t Drink and Drive

Drinking Driving CounterattaCk McDonald’s Store Ltd. Have a wonderful and safe holiday season.

www.bvcu.com

email: infosmi@bvcu.com

A

email: infolakes@bvcu.com

PO

BI

email: infohous@bvcu.com

3894 1st Avenue Smithers, BC Ph. (250) 847-3255

OR

Lakeview Mall Burns Lake, BC Ph. (250) 692-7761

NEW HA Z

INC

email: infohaz@bvcu.com

2365 Copeland Avenue Houston, BC Ph. (250) 845-7117

OF ICT

ON ELT

Don’t Drink & Drive

Have a safe and happy holiday.

District of New Hazelton ICBC & Driver Licensing Services

M

CREDIT UNION Consider the cost,

Drinking and Driving don’t mix. Be responsible.

It’s not just you in DANGER when you Drink and Drive.

RA TED

OL

U

Bulkley Valley

4646 10th Avenue New Hazelton, BC Ph. (250) 842-2255

Don’t Drink and Drive! Hagwilget Village 250-842-6258

250-842-5558

Don’t Drink and Drive

Please,

DIST R

Do your part to keep our roads safe......

Everyone likes a good story. Your friends would love to tell their stories to you, not about you. From the Gitxsan Government Commission

1 9 8 0 - B RITIS

HC

Gitsegukla Health Centre 849-5231


The Interior News

T HREE R IVERS R EPORT

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

www.interior-news.com

New to the Community? New Baby?

C3

Contact Welcome Wagon Today! It’s absolutely FREE!

Bringing Local Community information & gifts

Laura 250-643-3237 or 250-846-5742

*Babies 9 months or younger *New within a year *Covering Smithers & Area

Advertising space donated by The Interior News

Reminder to Parents everywhere! Summer brings out the kids on wheels! Please ensure that your children wear a helmet when biking or skateboarding! ONE brain and ONE brain only, forever. It has to last. Please, uncrack your skull by wearing a helmet! Mayenda Jones and Tera Brooks at their debut tournament in Kitimat on Dec. 6.

And to all you adults out there... please, set a good example by wearing one yourself... at all times!

Clarence Jones photo

Powerful start for local boxers By Alicia Bridges and Cameron Orr

B.C. Cafe in Old Hazelton about four years ago. Hazeltons/Interior News “When I moved home it was perfect timing because (coach Wanda Leask) had just Two Hazelton boxers moved here as well, she’s been braved harsh road conditions a boxing coach everywhere so and a few nerves to take part she started a club and I got in their first tournament at the right into it,” she said. Kitimat Boxing Club on Dec. Preparation for the 6. exhibition involved a lot of Tera Brooks and Mayenda training and a disciplined diet. Jones travelled to the port city In addition to her usual in an exhibition match at the biweekly practices, Brooks KMP Bragging Rights Boxing increased her personal regime Tournament, their first fight in by training more at home and front of a crowd. in her spare time. Both boxers are members To improve her fitness, she of the Hazelton Boxing Club, focused on doing weights for where they train under coach her upper body and endurance Wenda Leask. cardio work such as walking, Brooks said her father was a running and snowshoeing. boxer so the sport had always She said training in winter Valley Credit Union been a part of herBulkley life, but her had its challenges but she had EPS Logos to be supplied to Newspapers interest had grown in the past found ways to overcome them. three years. “Just even to go for a walk, Pantone colours: Pantone 287 Blue “We always had a boxing when there’s snow it takes a lot Pantone 356 Green bag and speed bags in the longer,” she said. Pantone 139 Harvest basement and we always used “You’re feet are falling in to work with our dad, me and and it is a better workout but my brother and then I took it the downfall is that it gets up again three years ago,” she dark so early so literally I get said. off work and I’m out with a Originally from the headlamp and my dog has a Hazeltons, BrooksBlack/Grey moved Logo file collar that is LED and we are away to study in Kamloops, out in the dark trying to do it.” where she stayed until she Brooks said she had been returned to open the Historic nervous about the exhibition

Bulkley Valley CREDIT UNION

Bulkley Valley

INSURANCE SERVICES The only locally owned Insurance Brokerage in the Valley. www.bvis.ca

Bulkley 1139 Main Street, Smithers | Valley 250-847-2405 FINANCIAL SERVICES

match, primarily because it was her first formal fight in a ring with referees. She said the nerves fell away once the fight started. “Once I was in the ring you just block it off and you just do what you know how to do,” she said. “The fight went extremely well, I think we both pushed ourselves to a whole new level ... she got a lot of good hits in, so did I. “We got the crowd going, which was great.” Brooks said the exhibition match, for which there was no winner, had whet her appetite for competition and driven her to train harder. “We’re hoping there are other tournaments that are 2007 coming up andJuly there are a few of us now that are at that level where we can start going to them,” “Hopefully in the new year there will be some more that we can go to and actually have a real fight.” Jones, 13, said she too had been nervous until she stepped into the ring. “It wasLogo fun ... Colour Fileit felt like it was like a movie,” she said. She said she was eager to compete again in the future.

(A message from the Bulkley Valley Brain Injury Association)

Advertising space donated by The Interior News

Hazelton Bakery Cardboard Bins To Be Removed The Regional District Kitimat-Stikine would like to advise residents of the Hazelton Area that effective January 1st, 2015 the cardboard bins located at the Hazelton Bakery will be removed. The Hazelton Bottle Depot has become a registered Multi-Material British Columbia (MMBC) Depot. This program is part of the provincial network of Extended Producer Responsibility Programs (EPR) where industry is responsible for end-of-life management of their products. Cardboard and paper are both covered under the MMBC program, and can be dropped off by residential users at the Bottle Depot. The MMBC Depot located at the Hazelton Bottle Depot takes the following products: • Printed Paper • Paper Packaging (containing dry items when sold) – including card board and boxboard • Paper Packaging (containing liquids when sold) • Plastic Containers • Aluminum Containers • Steel Containers • Glass (bottles & jars) • Plastic Bags and Overwrap • Plastic Foam Packaging (white and coloured) For further information on the MMBC program including a full list of acceptable materials please visit recyclinginbc.ca/. If you have any further questions please contact the Regional District office at 1-250-615-6100.

Bulkley Valley CREDIT UNION

Business Directory Bulkley Valley • ICBC Express Repair Facility • Experienced Staff

INSURANCE SERVICES • •

All Makes & Models Hoskins Ford Body Shop

WWW.HOSKINSFORD.COM HOSKINS FORD SALES LTD Hwy 16, Smithers 250-847-2237 1-800-663-7765

Bulkley Valley

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Authorized Telus & Shaw Dealer

1215 Main St. Smithers | Phone: 250.847.4499 Email: inventory@GVSBC.ca


The Interior News

T HREE R IVERS R EPORT

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Santa parked his sled in Old Town for Christmas in Hazelton last week. Holiday crafts and free treats were among the festivities.

Festivities in old Hazelton

Chris Gareau photos

PRE-CHRISTMAS

SALE!

By Alicia Bridges Hazeltons/Interior News

The sound of clip-clopping hooves from horse and cart rides could be heard among the historic buildings at the Christmas in Hazelton event on Dec. 6. A range of activities were held for revellers young and old when the village was transformed into a winter wonderland for the community celebration. Warmer weather made for a big crowd at the festive gathering, where Santa arrived to pose for photographs under the tree. Wreaths and preserves were for sale at the the Storytellers’ Foundation and Christmas movie, The Polar Express, was screened at the Gitanmaax Tri-Town Theatre.

Coil Top Range

Top Load Washer

Dryer

• Self-clean Oven Racks

• Energy Star

• 6.0 cu.ft. Capacity

• True Temp. Oven System

• Stainless Steel Wash Basket

• Up-front Lint Filter

• True Hidden Bake Element

• Dual Action Agitator

• 90’ Venting Capability

$599.00

$499.00

Bottom Freezer Fridge

Dishwasher • Three only

$399.00 Over the Range Microwave

• Frost Guard Technology

• Energy Star

• 1.6 cu.ft. Capacity

• Never Clean Condenser

• Stainless Steel Interior

• 1100 Watts

• Bottom Freezer Drawer

$899.00 French Door Fridge • 22.1 cu.ft. / 33” wide

$349.00 Smooth Top Range

• 300 cfm Exhaust Fan

$249.00 Dishwasher • Full Stainless Steel Interior

• Internal Water Dispenser

• Steam Clean

• Piranha Hard Food Disposer

• Built-in Ice Maker

• Warming Drawer

• Quiet Wash System 48 dBA

• “New Slate Colour!”

• Convection Bake

• “New Slate Colour!”

• “New Slate Colour!”

$1499.00

$899.00

$749.00

SALE ENDS DECEMBER 24 TH Some models limited quantities

Where the deals are! FLAME GAMES Hazeltons resident Dominique Melanson receives the Canada Winter Games torch at a relay event in Terrace on Dec. 6. Terrace Standard photo

C5

1656 Hwy 16E, Telkwa B.C. 250.846.5529 • Mon. to Sat. 10 - 6 www.allforless.ca


C6 www.interior-news.com

DrivewayCanada.ca |

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Welcome to the driver’s seat

Visit the Sonata gallery at DrivewayCanada.ca

Hyundai composes a memorable new Sonata Hyundai is a company that pushes the Inside envelope in terms of styling, vehicle As with the outside, the interior has content, engine choices and value, makbeen given a total refresh, no basic ing others carmakers take notice. tweaking here. The same, more muted The last generation Hyundai Sonata, design is at work here too, now the allreleased in 2011, is a perfect example. new centre console is wider and flatter The “Fluidic Sculpture” design language than the last car. This makes the car really set the pace for the mid-size class feel more open and airy, the brushed Hyundai has done aluminum surround is bright and the of cars. The competitors that followed, like the Ford Fusion, Toyota Camry and it again, delivering a way the buttons and dials are fitted is Honda Accord, all took styling chances to none. Fit and finish is one very attractive car, full second after that Sonata was introduced. The area that Hyundai does as well, if not same too for the engine development, of features and at an better than most. Even on the base including smaller turbocharged 4-cyl$23,999 GL model, the Sonata comes attractive price. inder engines and fuel saving direct with standard heated front seats, backZack Spencer injection technology; compared with up camera, Bluetooth, 5-inch radio/ the competition all this technology was backup screen, satellite radio and USB ahead of the curve. Now, just a few years later, the connectivity. The $26,299 GLS adds a power driver’s Sonata gets another refresh, making this car more seat, heated leather steering wheel and heated rear compelling than ever. seats, and these are just the two entry-level cars. All cars now come with additional 2.5 cm of rear Looks legroom and a very useful trunk that is expandable, As dynamic as the Fluidic Sculpture design was, it thanks to a 60/40 split rear seat. didn’t age well. Cars that are heavily styled can date

‘‘

’’

quickly. With this in mind, Hyundai has backed away from the fluid approach to a more sculpted design that shares some styling cues from the top-of-range Hyundai Genesis. The front features a squarer grille opening, edgier bumper and front chin-spoiler. The base model is fitted with the 2.4L 4-cylinder engine has and 16-inch or 17-inch alloy wheels with LED daytime running lights, halogen headlamps or HID lights on the limited trim. The performance oriented 2.0 Turbo Sport model, seen above, comes with a two-toned front spoiler, 18-inch wheels, standard HID headlamps, quad exhaust tips and a lower diffuser on the rear bumper. The top trim levels of both the 2.4L and 2.0 Sport have a blacked-out section of the front grille which signifies the car comes with adaptive cruise control and a forward collision warning system.

Drive Both the 2.4L 4-cylinder engine and the 2.0L turbo have been carried over from the last model but they have been modified to produce better torque delivery and fuel economy. Hyundai has dropped the horsepower output from 198hp to 185hp in the 2.4L and limited the torque to 178hp. The 2.0L turbo also receives a horsepower drop from 274hp to 245hp and the torque drops from 268 lb.-ft to 160 lb.-ft. Hyundai claims that the torque is lower in the RPM range and the fuel consumption is improved. The experience behind the wheel of the turbo is still very invigorating but not as hectic as the last model, it delivers a more usable driving experience. Power is smooth and refined; the turbo feels like a V6 without the accompanying fuel bill.

Verdict Hyundai has done it again, delivering a very attractive car, full of features, at an attractive price. 2.4L models range from $23,999 to $32,999 in the top Limited trim. This model has most of the features found in the top 2.0L turbo but without the added power. The base 2.0L turbo starts at $30,999 and the top Ultimate model, seen here, is $34,799. Both the Limited and Ultimate get the forward collision warning system and lane departure safety features, plus they also get adaptive cruise control. For 2015, the Sonata is a big step foreword in design. The added safety features will be attractive and the constant pushing-of-the-envelope from Hyundai is welcome. The Lowdown Power: 2.4L 185hp or 2.0L Turbo with 245hp Fill-up: 9.8L/6.7L/100km (city/highway) Sticker price: $23.999-$34,799 zack.spencer@drivewaybc.ca

Question of the Week This week’s ICBC Safety Tip concerns Operation Red Nose, which provides free rides for impaired or tired drivers. Will you plan a safe ride home for family and friends this festive season? Go to DrivewayCanada.ca to submit your answer.

Safety Tip: Operation Red Nose provides free rides to drivers and their passengers who are impaired or too tired to drive home during the holiday season in about 25 B.C. communities. Call 1-877-604-NOSE and a team of volunteers will get you and your vehicle home safely. OperationRedNose.com.

follow us… /Driveway @DrivewayCanada

Support the businesses who support you, shop local. Brought to you by the Interior News


The rain and windstorms have started and it won’t be long before the temperatures start to dip. Northern BC and the Interior have already experienced the cold. At the coast, it seems every year the first snowfall creates chaos and adjusting to the conditions is a big challenge for many people. That said; driving in the winter season generally presents more problems than driving in other seasons wherever you call home. The vehicle and the driver must be prepared as well as possible to cope with these kinds of driving conditions. In winter driving, braking and stopping the vehicle, of course, cause the most difficult moments. The tires play a critical role in stopping the vehicle, and they need even more care and attention than in the other seasons. Most SUVs have a passenger car tire classification with M+S stamped on the sidewall, for Mud and Snow and are considered all-season tires. If it is not, your vehicle must be fitted with tires suitable for any type of climate, even the most severe ones. In winter the pressure of the tire must also be controlled more frequently. This is because a reduction of the outside temperature causes a contraction of the air inside the tire, accelerating the normal and gradual pressure loss process by a value around 1-2 PSI for each 5° C decrease in temperature. Contrary to popular opinion, a lower inflation pressure than normal does not improve tire traction on snow. It makes them much more liable to damage. Always remember that in any season and with any temperature, insufficient pressure is always the main cause of tire damage. Here is some advice to always bear in mind it is during winter driving conditions: Use brakes carefully. Brake early. Brake correctly. It takes more time and distance to stop in icy conditions. Watch for slippery bridge decks, even when the rest of the pavement is in good condition. Bridge decks will ice up sooner than the pavement. Do not use the cruise control in winter conditions. Even roads that appear clear can have sudden slippery spots and the short touch of your brakes to deactivate the cruise control feature can cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Don’t get overconfident in your 4x4 vehicle. Remember that your four-wheel drive vehicle may help you get going quicker than other vehicles but it won’t help you stop any faster. Many 4x4 vehicles are heavier than passenger vehicles and actually may take longer to stop. Don’t get overconfident in your 4x4 vehicle’s traction. Your 4x4 can lose traction as quickly as a two-wheel drive vehicle. If your vehicle is equipped with anti-lock brakes, do not pump them in attempting to stop. The right way is to step on the brake pedal and steer against the slide. Look further ahead in traffic than you normally do. Actions by cars and trucks will alert you more quickly to problems and give you a split second extra time to react safely.

ian.harwood@drivewaybc.ca

Drives-U-Crazy

When the snow falls, watch out for drivers who couldn’t be bothered to sweep the white stuff from the roof of their car before setting out in the morning. They are a danger to themselves and other road users. When the car heats up that snow generally slides down in a block over their windshield causing one-car white out conditions, long enough for them to collide with you!

What drives-u-crazy? keith.morgan@drivewaybc.ca

PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until January 2, 2015. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2015 Corolla CE 6M Manual BURCEM-A MSRP is $17,540 and includes $1,545 freight and pre-delivery inspection and tire levy. *Lease example: 2015 Corolla CE 6M with a vehicle price of $17,540, includes $1,545 freight/PDI leased at 0.99% over 40 months with $1,350 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $88 with a total lease obligation of $8,366. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. **Finance example: 0.99% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2015 Corolla CE 6M Manual BURCEM-A. Applicable taxes are extra. 2015 RAV4 FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A MSRP is $25,820 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy and air conditioning charge. ††Lease example: 2015 RAV4 FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A with a vehicle price of $25,820 includes $1,815 freight/PDI leased at 0.99% over 40 months with $1,495 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $135 with a total lease obligation of $12,288. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. †Finance example: 0.99% finance for 36 months, upon credit approval, available on 2015 RAV4 FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A. Applicable taxes are extra. 2015 Tundra Double Cab SR5 4.6L SR5 Plus 4x4 Automatic UM5F1T-6A MSRP is $37,300 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning charge. ‡‡Lease example: 2015 Tundra Double Cab SR5 4.6L SR5 Plus 4x4 Automatic UM5F1T-6A with a vehicle price of $37,300 includes $1,815 freight/PDI leased at 0.99% over 40 months with $3,625 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $188 with a total lease obligation of $18,656. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.15. ‡Finance example: 0.99% finance for 36 months, upon credit approval, available on 2015 Tundra Double Cab SR5 4.6L SR5 Plus 4x4 Automatic UM5F1T-6A. Applicable taxes are extra. ¥NOTE: Limited availability on 2014 models and suffixes, see dealer for details. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may be January 2, 2015. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. ¥¥“The Freedom 40 Lease delivers a lower monthly payment by extending standard terms by four months without a rate increase and without a corresponding reduction in Lease-end Value”. As an example, standard term of 36 months can be stretched to 40 months. Freedom 40 Lease offer is valid until January 2, 2015. ¥¥¥Semi-monthly lease offer available through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit to qualified retail customers on most 24, 28, 36, 40, 48, 52, 60 and 64 month leases of new and demonstrator Toyota vehicles. First semi-monthly payment due at lease inception and next monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final payment. Semi-monthly lease offer can be combined with most other offers excluding the First Payment Free and Encore offers. First Payment Free offer is valid for eligible TFS Lease Renewal customers only. Toyota semi-monthly lease program based on 24 payments per year, on a 40-month lease, equals 80 payments, with the final 80th payment waived by Toyota Financial Services. Not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Some conditions apply. See your Toyota dealer for complete details. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

The Interior News Wednesday, December 17, 2014

$

40

FREEDOM

L E A S E

For a Limited Time

www.interior-news.com

Hello winter, my old friend ‘‘

Actions by cars and trucks will alert you more quickly to problems and give you a split second extra time to react safely.

Ian Harwood

’’

2015 TUNDRA

DBL CAB SR MODEL SHOWN

2015 DBL CAB SR 4.6L SR5 Plus 4x4 Auto $37,300 MSRP includes F+PDI

$

LIMITED MODEL SHOWN

2015 RAV4 FWD LE Auto $25,820 MSRP includes F+PDI

2015 RAV4

135 0.99 LEASE FROM †

OR FINANCE FROM ††

semi-monthly/40 mos. 36 mos.

%

THE EVOLUTION OF LEASING CASH BACK

188 0.99% $ 2,000

LEASE FROM ‡ OR FINANCE FROM ‡‡

semi-monthly/40 mos.

36 mos.

OR GET UP TO ‡‡‡

2015 is Here Now. 2015 COROLLA You Should be Too. $88 0.99%

CE MODEL SHOWN

2015 CE 6M $17,540 MSRP includes F+PDI

LEASE FROM *

OR FINANCE FROM **

semi-monthly/40 mos.

48 mos.

¥¥

With our new Freedom 40 Lease you can ease into a brand new vehicle after just over 3 years, and enjoy lower monthly payments while doing it! Learn more at: ToyotaBC.ca

Toyot aBC .c a

006287_7.31x9.64_BCI_wk1

C7

drivewayBC.ca


Wise customers read the fine print: *, •, ★, ≥, ‡, †, §, ≈ The Be Your Own Santa Holiday Sales Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after December 2, 2014. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,695) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees, other dealer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select new 2014/2015 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. •$500 Holiday Bonus Cash is available on select new 2015 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Fiat or Ram models at participating dealers from December 2-31, 2014 only. Excludes 2015 Jeep Patriot/2015 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package/2015 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package. Bonus Cash will be deducted from the negotiated purchase/lease price after taxes. See dealer for complete details and exclusions. ★The Make No Payments for 90 Days is a limited time offer which applies to retail customers who finance a new 2014/2015 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicle (except 2014 Dodge Avenger SE and 2014/2015 Dodge Viper) at a special fixed rate on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, TD Auto Finance or Scotiabank. Offer does not apply to Scotiabank special rate financing contracts longer than 90 months. Monthly/bi-weekly/weekly payments will be deferred for 60 days and contracts will be extended accordingly. Interest charges will not accrue during the first 60 days of the contract. Customers will be responsible for any required down payment, license, registration and insurance costs at time of contract. Some conditions apply. See your dealer for complete details. ≥3.49% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2015 Jeep Cherokee FWD through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2015 Jeep Cherokee Sport FWD with a Purchase Price of $23,498 financed at 3.49% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 416 weekly payments of $65 with a cost of borrowing of $3,441 and a total obligation of $26,939. ‡3.99% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo/2015 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4x4 models to qualified customers on approved credit through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Examples: 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo/2015 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4x4 with a Purchase Price of $38,498/$20,498 (including applicable Consumer Cash Discounts) financed at 3.99% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 416 weekly payments of $108/$58 with a cost of borrowing of $6,485/$3,453 and a total obligation of $44,983/$23,951. †0.0% purchase financing for 36 months available on the 2015 Jeep Cherokee models through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2015 Jeep Cherokee with a Purchase Price of $23,498, with a $0 down payment, financed at 0.0% for 36 months equals 156 weekly payments of $150; cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $23,498. §Starting from prices for vehicles shown include Consumer Cash Discounts and do not include upgrades (e.g. paint). Upgrades available for additional cost. ≈Sub-prime financing available on approved credit. Financing example: 2015 Jeep Cherokee Sport with a purchase price of $23,498 financed at 4.99% over 60 months, equals 260 weekly payments of $90 for a total obligation of $26,939. Some conditions apply. Down payment is required. See your dealer for complete details. √Based on 2014 Ward’s Small Sport Utility segmentation. »Jeep Grand Cherokee has received more awards over its lifetime than any other SUV. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

C8 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, December 17, 2014

drivewayBC.ca

$

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

500

$

23,498

FINANCE FOR

$

65 3.49 @

WEEKLY≥ FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDES $500 HOLIDAY BONUS CASH • AND FREIGHT.

OR O

FOR 36 MONTHS ALSO AVAILABLE

$

38,498

2015 JEEP WRANGLER 2-DOOR SPORT 4X4

PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDES $2,500 CONSUMER CASH,* $500 HOLIDAY BONUS CASH • AND FREIGHT.

20,498 0

2015 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

FINANCE FOR

PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDES $500 HOLIDAY BONUS CASH • AND FREIGHT.

FINANCE FOR T:13.5”

$ %

HOLIDAY &

BONUS CASH ASH…

The Interior News

T:10.25”

H O L I D AY S A L E S E V E N T

NOPAYMENTS DAYS D A AYS FOR R

LEGENDARY JEEP CAPABILITY

2014 JEEP CHEROKEE CANADIAN UTILITY VEHICLE OF THE YEAR

WEEKLY‡

FOR 96 MONTHS NTHS S WITH $0 DOWN OWN

108 @ 3.99

58 @ 3.99

FOR 96 MONTHS S WITH $0 DOWN N

90

2015 JEEP CHEROKEE SPORT

%†

Starting g from price p for 2015 Jeep Cherokee Limited shown: $32,490.§

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

CANADA’S MOST AWARDED SUV EVER »

$

%

Starting from price for 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee § , Overland shown: $62,840.

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

THE MOST CAPABLE OFF-ROAD VEHICLE IN ITS CLASS √

$

WEEKLY‡

%

Starting from price for 2015 Jeep Wrangler Sport S shown: $28,640.§

4 99% OAC≈ REBUILDING YOUR CREDIT? SUB-PRIMEE RATES FROM ONLY 4.99%


The Interior News

www.interior-news.com

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

C11

Real Estate

Email: remaxbv@telus.net Located in the Log Office at 3568 Hwy. 16 Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

Bulkley Valley Real Estate

250-847-5999

Pick up your FREE copy of our Real Estate Flyer and our map of the Bulkley Valley. View more of our listings online at www.remaxsmithersbc.ca or on Facebook.

$239,500

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

$385,500

NEW LISTING

$369,000

$384,000

NEW PRICE

$379,000

NEW PRICE

“Hang Your Stockings Here”

“I Wonder as I Wander”

“Sleighrider’s Paradise”

“String the Lights”

“Carolers At Your Door”

• 7 acres, river front • Partially fenced for horses • 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 18x24 shop • www.realestatesmithers.com

• Kispiox 125 acres, privacy and views • Beautiful 4 bdrm open concept home • Close to river over crown land • Fences, barn and pasture for horses

• 3 bdrm, 3 bath rancher, fenced yard • 2810 sf of quality living space • Many features, oak hardwood floors • Spacious 20x30 attached garage

• 4 bdrm, 3 bath, immaculate home • Double garage, deck, fenced yard • Teak hardwood, many updates • New high eff furnace & HW tank

• Immaculate, 2 bdrm, 2½ bathroom • Vaulted ceilings, huge 2 car garage • Lake access, mountain views • www.smithershomes.com

Leo Lubbers

Ron & Charlie

Charlie McClary

Karen Benson

Ron Lapadat

mls n241358

mls n

$419,000

mls n241322

mls n237672

mls n238376

$47,500

$279,500

“Candy Cane Lane” • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms • Lots of recent upgrades • Fenced backyard, 66x125 lot • Parking for RV, near arena & school

Donna Grudgfield

$79,500

mls n240979

$545,000

“Up on the Rooftop”

“Deck the Hall”

“Made by Santa’s Helpers”

“Holly Jolly Investment”

• New “saferhome”, 1 level rancher • 2/3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms • Tile and hardwood flooring • Ridge location, garage, concrete dw

• 3 bedroom, 14’ wide mobile home • Metal snow roof, extra insulation • Freshly painted, 5 appliances incl • 2 storage sheds, private patio area

• 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms • Carport, sundeck, woodstove • Eating area in kitchen + dining room • 90x100 landscaped lot

• 5 bedroom, 2 bathroom residence • 4 room detached office/studio • 4000 sf workshop space • 3 phase power, fenced & gated

Donna Grudgfield

Donna Grudgfield

Donna Grudgfield

Donna Grudgfield

mls n240572

$319,000

mls n238987

$489,000

mls n240135

$169,000

mls n241290

$246,500

“Kringle Classic”

“Snow Place Like Home”

“Christmas Special”

“A Cozy Christmas”

• 4 bdrm home, quiet area • 4.94 acres, nicely landscaped • Lots of upgrades, recreational area • www.realestatesmithers.com

• 9.6 acres, cross fenced • 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, large rec room • Fully landscaped, workshop, shed • www.realestatesmithers.com

• 2.5 acres, 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom • Community water & sewer • Nat gas forced air heat, paved road • www.realestatesmithers.com

• Ground level, 2 bdrm, 2 bath condo • 1164 sf, spacious, open design • Includes modern appliances • www.smithershomes.com

Leo Lubbers

Leo Lubbers

Leo Lubbers

Ron Lapadat

mls n239358

$415,000

mls n239476

mls n240242

$167,500

$349,500

D D L L SO SO

“Baby, It’s Cold Outside”

“Santa’s Hideaway”

“For Good Girls & Boys”

• Quality 3 bdrm, 3 bath + full bsmt • Vaulted ceilings, climate control • Gorgeous views, lake access • www.smithershomes.com

• Ski cabin with private deeded lot • 3 bdrm, sauna room, fully outfitted • Generator power, hydro available • www.smithershomes.com

• Immaculate 5 bedroom home • Many upgrades, windows, doors • Roof, siding, flooring & paint • Large fenced yard & gardens

Ron Lapadat

Ron Lapadat

Peter Lund

mls n241008

$249,900

mls n241248

mls n237276

$119,000

mls n240488

$309,500

“Jingle Bells” • One owner, 5 bdrm, 2½ bathroom • Beautiful 99x125 fenced/hedged yd • Vaulted ceiling, hardwood, fireplace • www.smithershomes.com

Ron Lapadat

$629,500

mls n240649

$399,900

“Home for Christmas”

“Santa’s Hideout”

“The Perfect Gift”

“Winter Wonderland”

• Updated 4 bdrm, 2 bathroom home • Great location near shopping centre • High eff furnace, low heating costs • www.smithershomes.com

• Rustic/solid cabin, privacy/seclusion • 120 acres, crown land on 3 sides • Near Hankin Evelyn ski area • www.smithershomes.com

• Sunny 6 acres, Bulkley Riverfront • 6 bdrm, 5 bathroom updated home • King size master, gorgeous ensuite • www.smithershomes.com

• 2.5% 5 year mortgage, OAC • Landscaping, 5 appliances included • Bright design, 10’ ceilings • www.smithershomes.com

Ron Lapadat

Ron Lapadat

Ron Lapadat

Ron Lapadat

mls n240761

From $123,500

mls n240335

$159,000

$145,000

mls n239597

$282,000

$466,000

mls n233232

$499,000

“Frosty’s Ski Paradise”

“Trim Your Tree Here”

“Put Me On Your Wishlist”

“Mrs. Claus’ Favorite”

“North Pole Special”

“Reindeer Retreat”

• 6 lots and 1 chalet • Fully serviced • Full time residence & suite allowed • Ski in, ski out

• Cute starter home • 2 bedrooms, fenced yard • High eff furnace, detached garage • Great value

• 5.23 acres, Babine Mountain view • Cute 1 bedroom cabin • Hydro, shallow well, outhouse • Picturesque treed lot, close to town

• Updated heritage home • Energy efficient • Private landscaped yard • Detached garage

• Enjoy lakefront living • 5 bdrm, 4 bathroom, vaulted ceilings • Large sundeck, double garage • Mountain and lake views

• Private 105 acre retreat • Off the gird home & 5 cabins • Beautiful views, short walk to lake • www.smithershomes.com

Sandra Hinchliffe

Sandra Hinchliffe

Sandra Hinchliffe

Sandra Hinchliffe

Sandra Hinchliffe

Ron & Charlie

$575,000

mls n240086

$329,000

mls n240031

$85,000

mls n238773

$425,000

mls n238238

$69,000

mls n234968

$152,000

“Elves at Work”

“A Neat Little Package”

“Mistletoe Central”

“Hear those Sleighbells Jingling”

“Gingerbread House”

“Rudolph’s Landing Zone”

• Far west building, prime location • C-3 zoned, ½ acre lot • 10,500 square ft divided into 3 units • Shop bays, 2 storeys of office space,

• Private parklike 5.115 acres • New shake roof, glacier view • Wired shop, garage, equipment shed • 3 bdrm, 2 bathroom log home

• Well maintained & looked after • Newer roof, furnace &hotwater tank • 3 bdrm upstairs, lg rec room in bsmt • Garage, beautifully landscaped, deck

• 158.46 acres, south facing slope • Breathtaking views of the valley • Mobile home pad, water, lagoon • Driveway, electricity, fenced

• Clean & bright 3 bedroom home • New elec furnace, newer windows • Large master bdrm w/ large ensuite • Strawberry&saskatoon plants, shed

• Affordable country living, 4.6 acres • 1995 2 bdrm mobile, mud room • Minutes to Smithers, trail to river • Partially fenced, vaulted ceilings

Ron & Charlie

Karen Benson

Jantina Meints

Jantina Meints

Jantina Meints

Jantina Meints

mls n4507093

Peter Lund Res. 847-3435

Donna Grudgfield Cell. 847-1228

mls n238290

Leo Lubbers Cell. 847-1292

Ron Lapadat Cell. 847-0335

mls n239364

Sandra Hinchliffe Cell. 847-0725

Charlie McClary Cell. 877-1770

mls n230911

Karen Benson Cell. 847-0548

mls n234369

Jantina Meints Cell. 847-3144

Kiesha Matthews Cell. 876-8420

mls n234999


C12

www.interior-news.com

T HREE R IVERS R EPORT

The Interior News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Funding boost for Hazeltons area health and sporting initiatives

The Hazeltons will be among 36 communities to receive funding for sports and health initatives from Northern Health: Imagine Legacy Grants. Hazelton Secondary School will receive grants for its Gitxsan Dance and Clean Living Youth Program, while Majageleehl Gali Aks (formerley John Field) Elementary school will get funding for the Building School and Community

Connections program and Smoke Signals Drifting over the Seven Sisters Mountain Range. The Starting Smart Pregnancy Outreach Program, run through the United Church Health Services Society and Population Health, will also receive a grant from the $99,619 funding pool, which is tied to the 2015 Canada Winter Games.

A big deal. With a little price.

Police Beat New Hazelton RCMP responded to 61 calls between Dec. 3-10

Get a full year of TELUS Satellite TV from just $15/mo. when you bundle with home phone.

Dec. 3 — Police responded to a break and enter that occurred overnight at the Hazelton Arena. Suspect(s) entered the arena and stole some confectionary.

$15/mo. TELUS Satellite TV

Dec. 4 — A storage shed on the 4800 block of Cottonwood Drive in Gitanmaax village was broken into during the night. A hunting rifle was reported stolen.

for the first year when you sign up for a 3 year home bundle.*

Dec.5 — Several decommissioned BC Hydro power poles were reported as having been cut down along the Gitsegukla Reserve.

Save over

$260 on TELUS Satellite TV over 3 years.

Dec. 6 — Police were called to attend the Subway in New Hazelton which had been broken into 10 minutes earlier. Cash was stolen and damage was sustained to the front door. Dec. 9 — It was reported that overnight a vehicle parked in the complainant’s driveway on the 4200 block of Field Street in Hazelton, had been entered and items stolen.

Call 310-MYTV (6988), go to telus.com/gettv or visit your TELUS store.

TELUS STORES OR AUTHORIZED DEALERS 100 Mile House

Burns Lake

Fort St. James

Fraser Lake

Houston

Lillooet

Smithers

916 Alpine St.

117 Hwy 16

140 Stuart Dr.

111 Chowsunket St.

3433 9th St.

657 Main St.

1215 Main St.

Vanderhoof 1276 Main St. 4086

149A West Stewart St.

*Offer includes TELUS Satellite TV Basic Package and is available until December 31, 2014, with a 3 year service agreement, where access and line of sight permit, to residential customers who have not subscribed to TELUS TV or Internet in the past 90 days. Cannot be combined with other offers. TELUS Satellite TV is not available to residents of multi-dwelling units. Regular price (currently $36.95/month) applies at the end of the promotional period. Rates include a $5/mo. discount for bundled services and a $3/mo. digital service fee. TELUS reserves the right to modify channel lineups and packaging, and regular pricing without notice. HDTV-input-equipped television required to watch HD. Minimum system requirements apply. The service agreement includes a free PVR rental and 2 free digital box rentals; current rental rates apply at the end of the term. A cancellation fee applies to the early termination of a service agreement and will be $10 multiplied by the number of months remaining in the service agreement. Rental equipment must be returned in good condition upon cancellation of service, otherwise the replacement cost will be charged to the account. TELUS, the TELUS logo, TELUS Satellite TV, telus.com and the future is friendly are trademarks of TELUS Corporation, used under licence. © 2014 TELUS. TEL059B_HWW100006_R3_Smithers_InteriorNews_R1.indd 1

11/21/14 5:02 PM

Smithers Interior News, December 17, 2014  

December 17, 2014 edition of the Smithers Interior News

Smithers Interior News, December 17, 2014  

December 17, 2014 edition of the Smithers Interior News