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Vision NANAIMO 2014

An annual update on economic progress

Arts & culture contribution Sector injects $150 million into local economy

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Nanaimo’s changing waterfront Plans in the works to build Hilton hotel

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Composite image shows approximate location of proposed Hilton hotel, based on architect’s renderings. comPosIte Image


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Hilton hotel adds luxury to Nanaimo Insight Holdings aims to build 30-storey tower on waterfront

An artist’s rendering suggests how a 30-storey hotel might look perched on Nanaimo’s waterfront. Image contrIbuted

By Tamara Cunningham

International tourists could soon be lured to a $100-million luxury hotel in downtown Nanaimo. Insight Holdings is looking to build a 30-storey Hilton Hotel overlooking Maffeo Sutton Park and the Nanaimo harbour on what’s been called one of the last great sites for waterfront hotel development. The project, which is currently going through rezoning for setback and height, would have 303 rooms, restaurants, conference space and indoor public access to the city’s Harbourfront walkway from its site on 10 and 28 Front Street. Rooms will be available to purchase in a strata arrangement and then operated by a hotel management company, but no condominium or residential living is proposed for the site, according to John Steil, senior planner with Stantec, an architectural and consulting firm involved in the project. He calls it a move to provide high-quality accommodation to a certain sector of the travelling public, most of which is anticipated to come from Asia. The goal of the hotel will be to create its own market demand among international tourists. “This isn’t going to be competing

directly with a lot of the existing hotel and motel space,” he said. “A lot of those will still have their current market, for example say sport teams coming to town … so this is seen as an addition.” The Hilton, the second luxury hotel proposed for downtown Nanaimo, follows on the heels of SSS Manhao, which intends to build a $50-million conference centre hotel on Gordon Street. Denise Tacon, general manager of the Vancouver Island Conference Centre, calls the Hilton addition “a great catapult in the right direction.” It

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could not only drive traffic based on recognition of its name brand alone, but also give delegates more options to stay close to the conference centre. Mayor John Ruttan has long advocated for increasing Nanaimo’s stock of quality hotel rooms and voted for the city’s new 10-year tax exemption bylaw, which gives new hotels and motels a break on investments of more than $2 million. He says two upscale hotels will be important in helping the conference centre move closer to reaching its poten-

tial to attract delegates, which previously had a pick of fewer than 400 “first class” rooms close to the conference venue. “What we want to do is reduce as much as possible the subsidy we are paying every year to support the conference centre and I think the best way … to achieve that is to have … more upscale hotel rooms available to incent people to come to conferences in Nanaimo,” he said. The Hilton project is going through rezoning and could take up to four years to build.

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Paris Gaudet, Innovation Island executive director, checks out what will be her new office in Square One, a co-working space for startup technology companies being created on Victoria Crescent by the Nanaimo Economic Development Corporation. cHrIs busH/tHe news bulletIn

Working together A trio of new spaces aims to connect professionals in the creative and technology industries

By Tamara Cunningham

B.C. Robotics owner Chris Caswell looks around 2221 McGarrigle Rd. and sees the makings of a tech dream. The building in the heart of a central Nanaimo industrial park is home to the city’s first Makerspace – a community lab of shared tools and skill sets that allows hobbyists and entrepreneurs to tinker, repair and innovate without the cost of buying equipment. “There are a lot of people here who dreamed of this being in Nanaimo,” said Caswell. “[The maker movement is] taking off in all sorts of places where you’d expect, like the Silicon Valley and New York ... but it will work here as well. It’s really good to see.” Makerspace is part of new momentum in the Harbour City

It will be playful and engaging and interesting ... it’s not a competitive or typical corporate environment. that’s offering entrepreneurs opportunities to get out of the isolation of their homes and into creative co-working hives, where they get the perks of an office without long-term commitments or high overhead costs.

Nanaimo Economic Development Corporation and Innovation Island are partnering on Square One, a 24-hour co-working hub and technology incubator for start-up businesses while the Nanaimo Design Nerds are set to open The Intersection for creative professionals this fall. It’s an exciting time for the Harbour City, according to Rebecca Kirk, the founder of Makerspace Nanaimo, who says the opening of the new spaces is helping to build and support a creative culture. “I don’t know why this synergy is all coming together right now ... it’s serendipitous. It’s kind of magic,” she said, adding the city is the perfect size to support the co-working movement. “I don’t think it’s going to go away anytime soon. I think it’s going to grow.” Nanaimo is set to see three

co-working spaces with different offerings from the Makerspace workshop where people can use shared tools for woodworking, welding and electronic work for $40 a month to Square One, where entrepreneurs pay to work and tap into programs and services to help grow their business. In the downtown core, there will be the less-structured co-working space, The Intersection, which is set to offer creative professionals temporary hot desks, diner-like booths to meet in and activities like yoga at lunch and barbecues in the courtyard. “It will be playful and engaging and interesting ... it’s not a competitive or typical corporate environment,” said Jackie Duys-Kelly, with the Nanaimo Design Nerds. All the co-working spaces are anticipated to open before the end of the year.


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Tueday, May 27, 2014

Nanaimo News Bulletin

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Organization supports new business Startup Nanaimo part of national network to grow entrepreneurs By Tamara Cunningham

Nanaimo entrepreneurs have a new champion. Startup Nanaimo, a grassroots not-for-profit, launched last March with a mission to support and grow a community of entrepreneurs in the Harbour City. The organization, which is coming in on a wave of efforts to attract new business, got its start earlier this year when Startup Canada announced Nanaimo as one of five cities allowed to join its national network. It means the city can promote its entrepreneurs on a national Top cop Supt. Mark Fisher takes over leadership of city’s police force. award winners Nanaimo honours contributions to arts and culture. Learning play Parks and rec program aims to increase activity.

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Fighting for playoff lives

Page 11 Page 30

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Celebrating

1988

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VOL. 25, NO. 98

Strike action will depend on bargaining I

ed pen. emu that escap out for pet team. on the look ners baseball Community

Mari Lucy looseSpring training begins for VIBI Vancouver auto show. found at C&S Batter up stteachers otive news automvote SION 89 per cent TRANSMIS ay Late in infavour of backing contract B8 Drivew

Page 3 Page 18 Page

Violinist on solo path

By KarL yu

Daniel Bossart frames up the view from the back deck of his home after a section of thursday. No one was injured. the city has prohibited occupancy of the house.

While a recent vote by B.C. teachers saw a majority favouring a strike, job action will be tied to the negotiating table, according to teachers’ union executives. About 89 per cent – 26,053 teachers out of 29,301 who voted – said yes to strike action. The result gives teachers a 90-day window to CHRIS BUSH/THe NewS BUlleTIN activate a strike, but no timeline has been set his next door neighbour’s house collapsed for when, or if, it will begin. Shannon Iverson, first vice-president with Nanaimo District Teachers Association, said the strike vote was a strategy to apply pressure on the government at the bargaining table VOL. and negotiations would be the determining factor. If necessary, the strike plan would see in to investigate whether the house three phases: refusal of communication with should be condemned. n.com administrators (unless an emergency situation Randy Churchill, city bylaws ser- ulleti imob involved students), rotating strikes across the vices manager, said thenana city has now www. province and finally a full strike, if mandated posted a notice prohibiting occupation of the house on the property. by another strike vote. “We’re in contact with the owner,” “We’re hoping that we don’t have to even go Churchill said. “What happens then to the first phase,” said Iverson. is they have to come to the city. Phase 1, if it were to be implemented, would There’s going to be a requirement not occur until spring break concluded across for a structural engineering report the province, she said. to establish what the issues are and In a teleconference, Education Minister Peter we will work with the owner to make Fassbender said he respected that the strike a determination on how to move forvote was one of the tools of collective bargainward.” ing and that the government’s position is to An engineering report will help continue the negotiations. He said the provdetermine whether the portion of ince tabled a preliminary offer but has yet to the house that remains standing can see a comprehensive offer from the teachers’ be salvaged. union.

No one injured after house partially collapses

2013

there and then the walls started to buckle.” Bossard said he called the fire Firefighters and paramedics rushed department when the section of to the scene of a home that had par- the house finally sagged in on itself tially collapsed in Nanaimo’s Brechin Thursday. 20, 2014 H of Capt. BillMARC Nanaimo Fire Hill neighbourhood Thursday. SDAY,saidEggers, THUR Rescue, firefighters did an iniThe incident happened shortly after 3 p.m. when nearly half of a tial investigation and found no one inside, but were unable to determine home at 1950 Estevan Rd. caved in. Daniel Bossart, who has lived next immediately if anyone might have door since 2004, said he watched his been trapped in the collapsed porneighbour’s house deteriorate for a tion of the house. Tips from neighbours suggested no number of years, and the section that collapsed had been visibly sag- one was home. “We’re fairly confident at this point ging for about the last 18 months. “It started with the deck,” Bossart no one was in there,” Eggers said. B.C. Hydro was called in to cut said. “It started to sag and then some holes formed in the roof and power to the building and Nanaimo you could see the water getting in city bylaw inspectors were brought

1988

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level and tap into resources to help create a system of support for the city’s entrepreneurs and start-up businesses. According to directors, more home-based businesses are looking to connect outside the home, baby boomers are building succession plans and local agencies are coming up with new initiatives like co-working spaces to attract and retain creative professionals. The city seems to be in a transition period, with lots of buzz and activities – the timing is right for this kind of momentum, according to director Kelsey Wolff, who says it could be a group goal to turn this city into the entrepreneurial capital of Canada. “All these different activities and projects people are working on ... we’ve been able to showcase all the potential here and the talent and I think with everyone combined we can

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We’ve been able to showcase all the potential here and the talent and I think with everyone combined we can really move the town forward. really move the town forward,” Wolff said. Startup Nanaimo, run by volunteers, is focused on efforts that bring entrepreneurs together, promote business

activities and help organizations, like the Nanaimo Economic Development Corporation and the Young Professionals of Nanaimo, collaborate. “The greatest strength [of Startup Nanaimo] is connectivity, which is like a word that everyone says all the time as being lacking in Nanaimo and probably lots of communities,” said Monica Shore, another director of the not-for-profit. “I think our goal is to bring all the information into one place and to be like the cheerleading force behind what’s going on.” Startup Nanaimo has already launched several initiatives, from a new website that promotes local events, to an ‘unconference’ that brought people together to talk about business. In the fall it plans to partner with Innovation Island on start-up weekends, which are tech-focused conference events.


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Nanaimo News Bulletin Tuesday, May 27, 2014

2014 VISION NANAIMO

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In the

win

column Sport tourism continues to expand with hockey, soccer tournaments, plus B.C. Summer Games in July By greg saKaKi

A lot of the time, visitors aren’t coming to Nanaimo just to check out Vancouver Island’s scenery. They’re coming here because they want to see their team win. Sport represents a major share of the tourism sector in the Harbour City. Every year there are hockey tournaments, basketball playoffs, curling bonspiels and the like, bringing in busloads of

youths, plus proud parents and grandparents. Nanaimo is sufficiently large enough to host major events, too, such as the B.C. Summer Games coming up this July. The multi-sport event will be held over four days, bringing in 4,000 athletes and sparking some $2.5 million in spending just that week. “It’s a huge opportunity for Nanaimo to showcase what it has and a huge opportunity to promote tourism,” said Bruce Hunter,

vice-president of the 2014 Summer Games. “We’ve already heard from a number of sporting groups that a lot of the athletes’ families are going to be combining the Games in with a holiday.” Hunter is also the athletic director at Vancouver Island University, which hosts provincial or national championships in at least one sport almost every year. “We have tons of people that come here for championships and they’re struck by the beauty of the Island and they become repeat visitors…” he said. “So there’s a lot of economic benefits to bringing people into your community. You show them a great time and they want to come back

and the benefits snowball from there.” Economic spinoffs from sporting events can be difficult to measure. Kyle Anderson was tasked with studying the subject last spring, after the Nanaimo Clippers hosted the Western Canada Cup junior A hockey tournament. Anderson, the tourney’s director of fan experience, put together a Sport Tourism Economic Assessment Model report and found that spectators spent approximately 50 per cent of their tourism dollars on lodging and meals and 25 per cent on travel. He said it’s important, especially with major events, to engage fans in complementary activities.


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B.C. Minister of Social Development Don McRae lights the torch to mark the countdown to the B.C. Summer Games in Nanaimo in July. The four-day event is expected to inject $2.5 million into the city’s economy during that week alone.

“The sport tourism model is a lot more than just looking at a tournament. It’s looking at absolutely everything that’s involved, the whole fan experience, from the moment they arrive in a community to the moment they leave,” Anderson said. Any large-scale sporting events will generate some tourism spending, but that doesn’t always mean they will be wholly successful. It can take a lot of work, so there

should be care and thought beforehand. “Even hosting a minor soccer tournament with 20 teams you can probably create a lot of economic impact and a lot of economic spinoffs just from running a good tournament just with the amount of families that come out,” Anderson said. “There’s a lot of things you can host and it’s just a matter of focusing on what identity you want in your community.”

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Nanaimo News Bulletin Tuesday, May 27, 2014

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Cultural community

Impact of arts in Nanaimo measured in more than dollars and cents Darren Waldal, left, George Ewing and Roger Tarry hang a painting depicting the history of Chinese culture in Nanaimo at the top of the China Steps in downtown Nanaimo. The painting, by Nadine Wiepning, is part of renovation work being carried out at the steps and in Lois Lane by the Downtown Nanaimo Business Improvement Association. cHrIs busH tHe news bulletIn

By niCholas PesCod

The economic output of the arts and culture sector in Nanaimo rivals that of Victoria, according to Nanaimo’s authority on economic development. Last November the Nanaimo Economic Development Corporation released a cultural impact study, which looked at the overall health and economic impact of the arts and culture industry. The study, which cost $19,000, was done by Roslyn Kunin and Associates and suggested that the arts and culture sector in Nanaimo supports more than 1,300 jobs and generates $154.5 million in economic activity. Sasha Angus, chief executive officer for economic development, said the study painted a clear picture of the economic impact of arts and culture in the Harbour City and the benefits that nearly rival that of Victoria. “It was interesting to see the prevalence of the arts and culture

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sector in the community, on a per capita basis,” Angus said. “I know Victoria has gone through a similar study and they had a total economic impact of about $170 million and ours was at $154 million.” The report took into account various other creative workers such as graphic designers and news media outlets as contributors to the arts and culture sector. However, according to Angus, each profession is captured in a way that accurately reflects their economic output from an arts and culture standpoint. “It’s creative workers, too. Not each of them is captured [in the study] to the same degree. So when you look at things like the Port Theatre and the Nanaimo Theatre Group, a lot more, typically 100 per cent of the economic output would be captured,” Angus said. “But when you look at other sectors, like graphic design, there are contributions that they make to arts and culture and other creative industries in town but they wouldn’t be at the same rate as those more prominent players.”

NICHOLAS PESCOD/THE NEwS BuLLETIN

Brooklyn Moir admires Ian Garrioch’s Reflections on the Cosmic Self at the Nanaimo Art Gallery’s downtown location during its grand re-opening celebration in early May.

Since the report was issued last year, there have been some complaints from residents, who felt the study was a waste of taxpayers money. However, Angus argues that people need to look beyond their current definition of arts and culture and understand the industry intersects with other sectors

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in the community. Angus also noted that not only is the study important for the city to gauge how vibrant the arts and culture industry is, but it also provides important information to help attract new businesses and the film industry to the community.

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“When you have a better understanding of film and how it supports arts and culture and how it supports creative industries in town, what it tends to show is that obviously you’re a bit of a hub for that activity and from a practical standpoint, they can see the impact that film has on the community,” Angus said. “They know that they can likely get the crews that they need and that the rest of the infrastructure is in place to support their project, if they were to come to our town.”

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It was interesting to see the prevalence of the arts and culture sector in the community, on a per capita basis.

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Nanaimo News Bulletin Tuesday, May 27, 2014

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Hospital continues to expand New operating rooms slated for regional facility in Nanaimo By Chris Bush

More surgical staff can start working regular day shifts and patients will have shorter wait times for elective surgeries thanks to two new operating theatres at Nanaimo Regional General Hospital. The additions to NRGH’s surgical wing were announced in April when the Nanaimo and District Hospital Foundation kicked off its fundraising campaign by pledging to raise half of the $3-million bill to build the rooms and install surgical equipment. As of May 1, the foundation had already hit 20 per cent of its fundraising goal. Island Health is financing $900,000 and the Regional District of Nanaimo is chipping in $600,000. When complete in September, the project will bring the hospital’s surgical wing, which was built in 2005 with eight operating theatres, to 10 operating rooms. One room is designated for emergency surgeries, while the other will be used as a “swing room,” which can be used while other surgical rooms are being prepared for new cases. Suzanne Vinden, operating room manager, said the operating the-

cHrIs busH/tHe news bulletIn

Lisa Beeston, operating room nurse in charge, left, Suzanne Vinden, operating room manager and Paul Gear, anaesthesia assistant, celebrate the campaign kickoff for two new operating rooms for Nanaimo Regional General Hospital in April.

atres aren’t intended to increase numbers of procedures, but will get patients into surgery more quickly and home sooner. The hospital performs about 14,000 operations per year. “I think the swing room will actually help us get our existing elective surgeries through in a more timely and efficient manner

because in the swing room you can start to get one surgery ready while the other room’s being finished and cleaned,” Vinden said. Lisa Beeston, operating room charge nurse, said the added facilities will help prevent staff burnout by allowing surgeons, nurses and patients to have surgeries performed during daytime hours.

“The surgeon’s been operating for 16 hours and now, you as a patient, have been waiting, but time has run out, you have to wait another day to get your surgery,” Beeston said. “This just means the proper operations will be happening at the proper times by the proper trained staff who are not tired.”

The Nanaimo & District Hospital Foundation is proud to support your healthy community. The Foundation strives to ensure that our community has access to exceptional healthcare close to home. We have just announced a goal to raise $1.5 million for equipment for 2 New Operating Rooms at Nanaimo Regional General Hospital. Your business can help by donating today! Donate Securely online at: www.nanaimohospitalfoundation.com

102-1801 Bowen Rd. Nanaimo, BC V9S 1H1 250-755-7690


Invite the whole 2014 VISION NANAIMO Tueday, May 27, 2014 Nanaimo News Bulletin 11 comm your meet game eveni the greatest of care to ensure that If you’ve never been to Flying Fish your shopping experience is both fun on Commercial Street in downtown Today coupl association is about more than and rewarding. Nanaimo, you’re in for quite a treat. Their goal is to make you feel Drop in to this 6,400 square foot just representing business interests welcome each and every time you furniture, kitchen, home decor and Add y visit – and they want you to visit gift store located in a 110-yearagain, and again, and again. old, refurbished building that’s just even Take a drive or a stroll ‘bursting at the seams’ www.nanaimobulletin.com

Chamber marks 125 years

By Karl yu

The Greater Nanaimo Chamber of Commerce has meant business in Nanaimo the past 125 years, figuratively and literally. Established as a board of trade in 1889, the early days saw an old boys’ club-like environment, with smoky rooms and men talking about the affairs of business and commerce, according to Kim Smythe, chamInvite berthe CEO. whole “Back then in the minutes of the first meeting, the debate was comm whether or not Nanaimo needed more than two paid firefighters, so the yourissues that we’re dealing with today are significantly larger and more complex than they were 125 years ago,” Smythe said. meet Smythe said a lot of the chamber’s contemporary work focuses on government advocacy and lobbying for a better community. game

Flying Fish offers home decor and much more downtown

and make with everything you’ll ADVERTISING downtown your way to the corner of ever want. Bastion and Commercial From an ‘edgy’ greeting fEATuRE streets in the heart card that will make of downtown Nanaimo for some you laugh out loud to a beautiful, shopping, food and fun. You’ll wish custom-made sofa that will become you’d done it sooner. the focal point of your home and Open seven days a week, Monday entertaining area – they have to Thursday and Saturday from 9:30 something to fit every taste and a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sundays and most budget. holidays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Late The atmosphere is welcoming, the night shopping on Friday nights until products understated, yet elegant, 9 p.m. but they’re not above offering the For more information, please call occasional ‘off-beat’ or wacky item 250-754-2104 or visit http://www. as well. flyingfishnanaimo.com. Their warm and friendly staff take

Continued/ 12

eveni coupl

Add y even Invite thethere’s whole comm your meet game eveni coupl

events

more online »

NanaimoBulletin.com &

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PQBNews.com events

When you events want to see what’s happening or »have friends coming there’s more online there’s over more onlineor »just the weekend... for holidays it’s NanaimoBulletin all just a click away..com &

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12

Nanaimo News Bulletin Tuesday, May 27, 2014

2014 VISION NANAIMO

www.nanaimobulletin.com

Continued from /11

“Today we do a lot of work with municipal, provincial and federal government in trying to ensure that the interests of the community are reflected in policies towards the business community,” said Smythe. In addition, the chamber works with partner groups – the Nanaimo Economic Development Corporation and Innovation Island, for instance – and the CEO sees more of that in the chamber’s future. “I know I’ve pushed more in that area and it allows us to create a lot more impact because now, instead of advocating on what the chamber of commerce thinks is right, we’re advocating on what a group of community partners thinks is right. “Working in partnership with these other important local organizations creates more effective change more quickly,” Smythe said. While the chamber’s slogan is “Better community through better business,” Smythe said it’s not business at the cost of

Working in partnership with these other important local organizations creates more effective change more quickly.

Karl Yu/tHe news bulletIn

Kim Smythe, Greater Nanaimo Chamber of Commerce CEO, peruses some archived material. The chamber is celebrating its 125 anniversary this year.

everything else, pointing to the situation with the garbage incinerator. “You didn’t see us up in front of city council pounding the pulpit for the waste-to-energy facility because it was a $500-million investment, and we must forego

everything else because we need that $500 million investment,” said Smythe. He said the chamber is more about looking at what’s best for the entire community and how member businesses can benefit from the pursuit of what’s best.

“Our mission statement says that the chamber strives to enhance the quality of life by providing opportunities for business to succeed but we’re kind of morphing away from that focus on business and more into community wellness, community health, community satisfaction,” said Smythe. The chamber currently consists of about 800 members.

Entrepreneurial spirit thriving in downtown Nanaimo Secrets to Success profiled business owners about experiences in Harbour City The entrepreneurial spirit is not only alive and well in Nanaimo, it’s thriving. Over the past year, the Downtown Nanaimo Business Improvement Association created Secrets of Success, a series which profiled 22 local businesses that together have amassed more than 383 years in operation in downtown Nanaimo. Each of the companies profiled was selected because they had demonstrated longevity, great business practices and growth. What quickly came to light was each owner’s passion for excellence and customer service. The association also discovered some interesting stories and surprising characteristics about our downtown entrepreneurs along the way. The series opened with the Painted

providing flowers for Queen Elizabeth’s Turtle Guest House. For Angie room during the 1994 Commonwealth and Bruce Barnard, establishing Games. The bouquet was supposed their business in Nanaimo was to have white flowers and they had serendipitous. none on hand, so Jim simply stopped During a two-hour stop over at along the side of the road in Saanich, Swy-a-lana Lagoon during a round-thepicked a handful of Queen Anne’s world adventure, the couple realized, Lace and filled out the bouquet. He “there was something magical about credits their success with always Nanaimo.” being able to think outside the box. That magic translated into a In addition to running successful nationally recognized unique hostel/ businesses downtown, hotel accommodation ADVERTISING many of Nanaimo’s which has been going business owners have strong for 10 years. fEATuRE other claims to fame. Eric Angie credits the McLean, the owner of community with being the McLean’s Specialty Foods which has driving force behind the success of been open for 22 years in Nanaimo, her business – a sentiment that was could have led a very different life. expressed repeatedly by everyone As a 16-year-old, his R&B band The interviewed. Boots opened for the Yardbirds and Turley’s Florist had the longest the Kinks during a tour of Scotland. operating business, opening its doors Fortunately for Nanaimo, he followed in 1962. Jim and his wife Marianne a new path and became “The Big have been running the business for Cheese.” 30 years and when asked to provide Eric’s secret to success was evident an anecdote that summarized what he during the interview. He stopped to was all about, Jim told a story about

personally greet every single person who came through his door. When asked Eric about it he replied, “When people feel they are being attended to and appreciated they feel good. This concept of selling has been lost over the years. It really is about trust and respect.” Everyone profiled in the series repeated this mantra of customer service and not surprisingly, “be willing to work hard, really hard.” Just ask Penny and Franz Mutschler, owners of Penny’s Palapa, a floating dockside Mexican eatery about hard work. The couple’s seasonal restaurant is open seven days a week and you will find the owners in the kitchen every day – squeezing up to three 50-pound boxes of limes to make their signature margaritas. With nearly 400 years of combined experience under their belts, these downtown Nanaimo entrepreneurs know what it takes to be successful. Want to read more? Please visit our website at www.dnbia.ca.


www.nanaimobulletin.com

2014 VISION NANAIMO

Tueday, May 27, 2014

Nanaimo News Bulletin

13

Michael Pizzitelli joins wave of distillers from across the country creating hard liquor By Chris Bush

Nanaimo’s first distillery is profiting from the spirit world. Arbutus Distillery, a grain-based micro distillery built around a German-made, 1,000-litre still on Boxwood Road, is selling its first batches of vodka. The distillery was built in 2013 by Michael Pizzitelli, 28, originally from Ontario, who holds degrees in biochemistry, cellular biology and brewing and distillery, plus several years experience in the brewing and distilling industry. “I did my master’s [degree] in cell biology and afterward I wasn’t quite sure if wanted to carry on with that,” Pizzitelli said. “I heard you could do a master’s in brewing distillery, so I figured I’d do that and once I did that I just started getting jobs.” Pizzitelli said he built a distillery instead of a brewery because he finds the final processes of distilling spirits more enjoyable and interesting. But why build a distillery in Nanaimo when you can build one anywhere? Pizzitelli liked the idea of living on Vancouver Island and had family in B.C., where legislation has shifted favourably for liquor production and sales. The first of Arbutus Distillery’s products, Coven vodka, went on sale in mid-May. Empiric gin and Baba Yaga absinthe will follow as production ramps up. Coven vodka will appear on shelves in a white, frosted bottle with simple red text and a cap hand-dipped in red sealing wax, but when the lights go down the bottle’s white coating glows bright green with images of a gathering of witches. The label designs, created by Nanaimo design firm Hired Guns Creative, created a stir in the commercial design world with write-ups and commentary from various publications. Pre-launch attention like that has generated plenty of local interest that should help get the distillery, Pizzitelli’s first venture into his own business, off to a strong start. “You wouldn’t do it if you didn’t think it would work, but you’re also not doing it for another reason other than that’s what you want to do,” Pizzitelli said. “There’s certainly trends in general across North America that are in my favour. I’m not the only one who’s doing it. There’s a whole bunch of people that are starting up.” To find out more, please visit the distillery website at www.arbutus-distillery.com.

Raising local

spirits cHrIs busH/tHe news bulletIn

Michael Pizzitelli has been moved by the spirit, so to speak, to build Nanaimo’s first micro distillery. The facility on Boxwood Road will produce vodka, gin and absinthe with first batches scheduled to be on local retailers’ shelves by late spring or early summer.


14

2014 VISION NANAIMO

Nanaimo News Bulletin Tuesday, May 27, 2014

the

www.nanaimobulletin.com

116 years

Honour Roll Business longevity and sustainability are based on factors that range from management and leadership skills through to flexibility in servicing our rapidly changing marketplace. Today global sevices are not unique even in the smallest firms and creativity is essential in all companies, even the largest of corporations. Attracting and maintaining customers was once the greatest priority, now it partners with the need to attract and retain skilled and loyal employees. Join us in celebrating Nanaimo businesses who have stood the test of time. It takes determination and hard work to succeed in business.

52 years

35 years

73 years

EST 1898

Providing insurance for: Business • Home • Tenants • Condominiums • Travel • Construction • Boats & PWC • Autos • Campers • Trailers & Mobile Homes

www.lenhartinsurance.ca

T: 250-758-2484

BONDED LOCKSMITHS FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1941 Residential & Commercial

250-754-5671

101-3150 Island Highway, Nanaimo

75 Nicol Street, Nanaimo www.gallazinlock.ca

30 years

29 years

cvims.org

Turley’s is the local Florist that Nanaimo and the world has trusted and depended on for over 50 years.

60 Terminal Ave 250-754-6344 www.turleysflorists.com 21 years

Job Search • English Classes • Settlement Proudly Celebrating

Merit Home Furniture

our

Central Vancouver Island Multicultural Society

101-319 Selby St, Nanaimo BC Funded by:

(250) 753-6911

Citizenship and Citoyenneté et Immigration Canada Immigration Canada

20 years

Vancouver Island’s choice for high-quality furniture and appliances. 3230 Norwell Drive, Nanaimo, BC

(250) 756-1153

www.merithomefurniture.ca

14 years

“Creative edibles & drinkables at reasonable prices in a not-so-boring atmosphere!”

250-753-8311

199 Frazer Street, Nanaimo www.mrsriches.ca

14 years

Tiah M. Workman Notary Public

DOWNTOWN NANAIMO BIA

102–6551 Aulds Rd., (HSBC Bank Building) Nanaimo, BC V9T 6K2 tiah@nanaimonotary.ca www.nanaimonotary.ca

250-390-7681

1910 NORTHFIELD RD

Ph: 250-751-1727 Fx: 250-751-8172

www.mazzeielectric.com

Restaurant    pub    brewery

250.729.8225  

5775  Turner  Road,  Nanaimo  BC

longwoodbrewpub.com

A10 Victoria Cres. Nanaimo

250 754 8141 www.dnbia.ca


2014 VISION NANAIMO

www.nanaimobulletin.com

Tueday, May 27, 2014

Nanaimo News Bulletin

15

Conference centre hosts delegates Events estimated to inject $2.4 million into local economy Three conferences are set to inject more than $2.4 million into Nanaimo’s economy this spring. Inclusion B.C., formerly known as the B.C. Association for Community Living, picked the Vancouver Island Conference Centre in downtown Nanaimo for its annual conference. More than 500 delegates from across the province will discuss topics related to justice, diversity and inclusion for all. Inclusion B.C.’s conference, booked for June 9-14, alone is expected to generate $1.26 million in economic benefit, according to officials at the conference centre. In late May, members of the Government Finance Officers of B.C. will be in the Harbour City

with a conference and trade show at the Nanaimo facility. The not-for-profit organization represents local government finance officers in B.C. The Government Finance Officers of B.C.’s mission is to promote excellence in local governments by focusing on training and development in financial professionals. The Nanaimo conference is estimated to attract 230 delegates and generate $435,000 in economic benefit. A third conference, also in late May, will bring a youth forum and tradeshow component as the annual general meeting of the United Church of Canada is set in the Harbour City. More than 400 delegates are expected to account for a $756,000 impact on the economy during the four-day event. The Vancouver Island Conference Centre supports groups of up to 1,300 within the 38,000 square feet of flexible, functional

A FOOD LOVER’S

PARADISE

CELEBRATING 22 Years in Business! • • • •

www.mcleansfoods.com

Exotic Cheese & Chutneys Truffles, Olives & Pates Gourmet Oils & Vinegars British, European & South African Imported Food

DID WE MISS YOU? Vision NANAIMO

To ensure your ad is published in our next issue, please give us a call 250-753-3707

2014

te on economic An annual upda

Arts & culture contribution s Sector inject into $150 million local economy

progress

Nanaimo’s changing waterfront

Plans in the works hotel to build Hilton

page 3

page 8

ate shows approxim Composite image Hilton hotel, based location of proposed s. rendering on architect’s comPosIte

Image

www.nanaimobulletin.com 777 Poplar Street

news bulletIn fIle

The Vancouver Island Conference Centre was built in 2005 and is located in downtown Nanaimo.

convention and meeting space. The conference centre has nine multipurpose meeting rooms with

full audio/visual capabilities. For more information, please visit www.viconference.com.

Proud to support the

NANAIMO COMMUNITY

Michelle Stilwell MLA Parksville-Qualicum

Parliamentary Secretary for Healthy Living

www.michellestilwellmla.ca Office: 2B-1209 Island Highway East Parksville, B.C. V9P 1RS 250-248-2625 • Email: Michelle.Stilwell.MLA@leg.bc.ca

Start Your Job Search Here! www.gthiringsolutions.ca

255-2000 Island Hwy North Nanaimo, BC V9S 5W3 Phone: 250.729.5627

101-155 Skinner Street Nanaimo, BC V9R 5E8 Phone: 250.714.0085

The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.


2014 VISION NANAIMO

Nanaimo News Bulletin Tuesday, May 27, 2014

They can’t leap tall buildings in a single bound, but there are plenty of reasons the Fit, Civic and CR-V are best-sellers† in BC.

- WEE EKKL YL Y BBI -IW T S T E S W E O L W L O A Y MNETNETV E RV EORN H O NAD A P APYNMAE N E W OA N E W H O N D

www.nanaimobulletin.com

2014 FIT DX Lease for

67

$

£

0.99% APR €

0 down

$

freight and PDI included. Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $16,130** includes freight and PDI Model shown: GE8G2EEX

# 2014 CIVIC DX Lease for

79

$

*

1

S E L L I N GB C CAR IN

0.99% APR #

0 down

$

freight and PDI included. Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $17,185** includes freight and PDI Model shown: FB2E2EEX

2014 CR-V LX

#

Lease for

135

$

Ω

1.99% APR ¥

0 down

$

1

S E L L I N PGA C T COM BC SUV IN †

freight and PDI included. Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $27,685** includes freight and PDI Model shown: RM3H3EES

bchonda.com bchonda.com †The Fit, Civic and CR-V were the #1 selling retail subcompact car, car, and compact SUV respectively in BC in 2013 based on Polk 2013 Dec YTD report. ‡In order to achieve $0 down payment, dealer will cover the cost of tire/battery tax, air conditioning tax (where applicable), environmental fees and levies on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only on behalf of the customer. £Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX. €0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $66.59 based on applying $1,250.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes) and $1,000 consumer incentive dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $8,656.70. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. *Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX. #0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $78.54 based on applying $800.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $10,210.20. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. ΩLimited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. ¥1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $134.80 based on applying $1,250.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $17,524.03. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. **MSRP is $16,130 / $17,185 / $27,685 including freight and PDI of $1,495 / $1,495 / $1,695 based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX / new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX / 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. License, insurance, registration and taxes are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* Prices and/or payments shown do not include a PPSA lien registration fee of $30.31 and lien registering agent's fee of $5.25, which are both due at time of delivery and covered by the dealer on behalf of the customer on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only. ‡/#/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** Offers valid from May 1st through June 2nd, 2014 at participating Honda retailers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

BCHD-May-FitCivicCRV-4CPD-8x11.786

†The Fit, Civic and CR-V were the #1 selling retail subcompact car, car, and compact SUV respectively in BC in 2013 based on Polk 2013 Dec YTD report. ‡In order to achieve $0 down payment, dealer will cover the cost of tire/battery tax, air conditioning tax (where applicable), environmental fees and levies on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only on behalf of the customer. £Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX. €0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $66.59 based on applying $1,250.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes) and $1,000 consumer incentive dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes). Down payment of $0.00, frst bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $8,656.70. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. *Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX. #0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $78.54 based on applying $800.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, frst bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $10,210.20. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. ΩLimited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. ¥1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $134.80 based on applying $1,250.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, frst bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $17,524.03. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. **MSRP is $16,130 / $17,185 / $27,685 including freight and PDI of $1,495 / $1,495 / $1,695 based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX / new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX / 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. License, insurance, registration and taxes are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* Prices and/or payments shown do not include a PPSA lien registration fee of $30.31 and lien registering agent's fee of $5.25, which are both due at time of delivery and covered by the dealer on behalf of the customer on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only. ‡/#/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** Offers valid from May 1st through June 2nd, 2014 at participating Honda retailers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

16


May 27, 2014  

Section Z of the May 27, 2014 edition of the Nanaimo News Bulletin

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