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FREE

WEDNESDAYS • 11 am - 7 pm 7 oz New York $ 99 Strip Steak Sandwich

11

C/W fries, salad, garlic toast

THURDAYS • 6 Pm - CLOSE Prawn Night $ 99 Cajun or Garlic, 1 Dozen

Prawns with Salad and Garlic Toast

Vol: 41 No: 9

Serving the Shuswap and Salmon Arm, BC • 250 832-9461 • www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca • Established in 1975

INDEX

Breaktime Anytime ......................A2 & A23 Seniors’ Wellness.......................................A4 Sidewalk........................................................A6 Mall Arkey ....................................................A7 Service Directory ........................... A16-A17 Community Calendar.................. A17, A22

Madison Cox...................................... A3

Symphony ........................................A10

Winter activities .............................A13

Classifieds ......................................... A19-A21

3 $ 49 10

Friday, February 28, 2014

Look for these flyers • SA Recreation Fun Guide • Unilever • Case Furniture • Flora • M&M Meat Shops* • Canada Safeway* • Sears Canada* *Not in all locations • Walmart*

Blanche Marshall ends up with a handful of trophies as she is presented with awards for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place for her baking at the Heritage Week pie contest, held at the Mall at Piccadilly on Saturday. Howard Vangool photos

School District #83

Come check out the wonderful works of art created by the children of our school district. February 28 - March 7 1121 25 St NE, Salmon Arm, BC • (250) 832-4246

10 St. & 10 Ave. SW | Salmon Arm | 250.832.0441 | piccadillymall.com


Breaktime Anytime

Feb. 28th -Mar. 6th

A2 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

Drink Green Tea

Movie Info 250.832.2263 playing at the GRAND 100 Hudson Avenue

SON OF GOD

Daily 6:30 and 9:10 PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:00 PM

THE LEGO MOVIE 2D

Daily 6:30 PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:00 PM

THAT AWKWARD MOMENT Daily 9:00 PM

NON-STOP

Daily 6:40 and 9:00 PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:10 PM

RIDE ALONG

Daily 6:50 and 9:00 PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:10 PM

at the CLASSIC 360 Alexander

MARCH 2 - 6 12 YEARS A SLAVE Daily 7:30PM

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Royal Winnipeg Ballet MOULIN ROUGE featuring ERIC NIPP

Sunday, March 2nd, 1PM

Feb. 28th - Mar. 6th SALMARTHEATRE.COM

CROSSWORD

Hot or iced, green tea can help rev up your workout. Its catechins, antioxidants, and caffeine help increase the metabolic generation of heat. Drink a cup about 10 minutes before exercising. ACROSS

Crypto Fun

Solve the code to discover words related to beauty. Each number corresponds to a different letter. (Hint: 21=a) A. 22 21 20 15 21 16 Clue: Of the face B. 7 21 16 11 5 Clue: Beauty parlor C. 9 13 14 21 9 4 14 5 9 Clue: Procedure

28 FRIDAY

DAYS ONLY! 3FEBRUARY

1

SATURDAY

3MARC DAYS H ONLY! CLUB PRICE

2

SUNDAY

3MAR DAYCHS ONL CLUB PRIC Y! E

lb 13.21/kg

LY! 3 DAYSICEON CLUB PR

Gemini

CANCER

June 22- July 22

Cancer, find a routine that works for you and then stick with it. There is no need to reinvent the wheel, and when actions become automatic, you can focus on other things.

Cancer

LEO

A need for attention could get the better of you, Leo. A little humility goes a long way and can alter others’ perceptions of you. You may end up being seen in a more positive light.

VIRGO

Virgo, you can differentiate between right and wrong, but your judgement might be off this week. Rely on your intuition, but don’t make any big decisions without first thinking carefully.

Virgo

LIBRA

Sept. 23-Oct. 22

Libra, it may seem like you are being led astray by one thing after another, when all you want is to focus on one task at a time. Find a way to block out any and all distractions.

Libra

SUDOKU

PUZZLE NO. SU142250

HOW TO PLAY:

ACNE ACUPUNCTURE ALLERGIC ALOE BEAUTY BLACKHEADS BLOWOUT BODY BOTANICAL BRONZER CELLULITE CERAMIDES CHEMICALS COENZYME COLLAGEN COMBINATION COSMETICS DERMATITIS DERMATOLOGIST DIMETHICONE

What’s Where When

Your Guide to Entertainment, Nightlife & Restaurants in the Shuswap SUNDAY & Appie Specials $6.95 2 till 5 MONDAY TUESDAY - Burger & Pint $6.99 All Day THURSDAY - Steak Sandwich $11.95 All Day SATURDAY - Prime Rib Night $17.95

Scorpio, work on a creative project with a sweetheart or friend early in the week. Ideas will flow easily and your imaginations will soar together. It is a productive pairing.

Scorpio

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each ANSWER TO PUZZLE NO. SU142250 number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

EPILATION EXFOLIATE GLYCERIN HAIRSTYLE HUMECTANTS MICRODERMABRASION NONCOMEDOGENIC HIGHLIGHTS LASER MEDICAL MINERALS NATURAL PEPTIDES PORES SPA TONER

SCORPIO

Oct. 23-Nov. 21

251 Harbourfront Dr. NE, Salmon Arm (at the Prestige Inn) 250-833-1154

“All Winter Long”

SAGITTARIUS

Nov. 22-Dec. 21

Sagittarius

This is not your week to mix love and money, Sagittarius. In fact, keep the two as separate as possible, and exercise caution before lending anyone money.

Friday & Sat. Night Buffets - 4 pm Seniors - 13.99 WS142400

200 TransCanada Hwy, Salmon Arm

250-832-2280

Spooners Pizza

Thursday Nights Buy 1 get one at 50% off. (eat in only) A comedy by Lisa Loomer and directed by Adele Kuyek

THIS WEEK’S SPECIALS FEB. 28 TO MARCH 6, 2014

Kellogg’s Jumbo Cereal Select varieties. 700 to 1350 g. LIMIT TEN Combined varieties.

20 99 ea.

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Gemini, it’s unlike you to slow down, so don’t be surprised when friends start looking at you curiously after you take your foot off the gas. Your free spirited nature will soon return.

Aug. 23-Sept. 22

Club P

CQ142400

GEMINI

May 21-June 21

Leo

10 kg. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT FOUR.

5

CLUB PRICE

D. 20 11 16 11 13 Clue: Hue

Taurus, make a concerted effort to improve your focus in the weeks ahead. There is much to lose if you cannot tackle the tasks at hand, particularly at the workplace.

July 23-Aug. 22

Rogers Granulated Sugar PLUS SEE IN-STORE FOR MORE 3 DAY SALE SPECIALS!

258 Shuswap St. NE • 250-832-9121

TAURUS

Taurus

99

WORD SEARCH

Aries, you want more than you can acquire this week and your desires may lead you astray. It is important to exercise self-restraint, even if you get a thrill from living on the edge.

Apr.20-May20

100%

Salmon Arm Custom Upholstery

ARIES

Aries

FARMED by CANADIANS

For all your foam needs call...

Pisces, you may need to sacrifice some security for a chance to have a memorable experience. Do something out of the ordinary.

Mar. 21-Apr. 19

T-Bone Steak Cut from 100% Canadian beef. LIMIT TWO.

We cut to any size

PISCES

Pisces

ANSWER TO PUZZLE NO. CW142410

Mattresses & Covers (any size) Cushions - home, boat, RV Topping Pads • Wedges • Neck Pillows

You don’t always have the patience to stick with the same routine, Aquarius. That means others cannot expect you to conform to their whims if they want you as a friend.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

1. Respect 2. Azotemia 3. Exhausting 4. Accumulation 5. Lack of moral standards in a society 6. A rascal 7. X100 = 1 tala 9. River of Haikou, China 10. Lout 12. Stockings 13. Capital of Chile 15. Spanish for river 18. 12th month (abbr.) 19. Skilled nurse 21. Unit of precipitation 22. Corpuscle count (abbr.) 23. Sweet potato 26. God of fields & woods 27. Dream sleep 28. Polish or stroke 29. Kilo yard (abbr.) 30. Member of U.S. Navy 31. Express pleasure 32. Written acknowledgment (abbr.) 33. Neptune’s closest satellite 34. O’Neill play "The ____

Try a FOAM mattress

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

DOWN

Tossing & Turning at Night?

Capricorn, you want to play outside of the rules this week. You normally like to follow a relatively traditional course, so this catches others off guard.

Jan. 20-Feb. 18

Cometh" 35. Homegrown 36. Goalkeeper 37. __ Island, U.S. State 40. Far East nursemaid 41. Food grain 44. 2 stripe rank (abbr.)

Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A23

CAPRICORN

Capricorn

49. Born of

1. Boring routine 4. Back talk 8. Emerald Isle 10. Snow leopard 11. 1/20 of an ancient shekel 13. Language of Apia 14. Relating to NH2 15. British Air Aces 16. Woman (French) 17. Cheese skins 18. Deafening noise 19. Cheeky talk 20. Early photograph 24. Basics 25. 007’s Flemming 26. Photograph (slang) 27. Male sheep 28. Norse sea goddess 29. Small cask 30. Ch. Osgood hosts 37. Confederate soldier 38. Radioactivity unit 39. Chocolate tree 40. Express surprise 41. Express delight 42. Mary mourning Jesus 43. 18th century indoor cap 45. Thanjavur University 46. Skilled 47. Hindu mother goddess 48. Follow by one’s foot

HOROSCOPES

Dec. 22-Jan. 19

PUZZLE NO. CW142410

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

100 9 9.

BUYMI5LESEArewRNards miles AIR

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5

Royale Bath Tissue Double 12 Roll Mega 9 Roll. SAVE EVEN MORE WITH

eMailDirect

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Centenoka Park Mall

250-832-8086

50 BUYLES2 EArewRN ards miles AIRMI

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Club P

Evenings Feb 28 - Mar 1, 6 - 8 7:30pm Sunday Matinee Mar. 2 - 1:30 PM: No shows Mon., Tues., or Wed.

Tickets at the door or Intwined Fibre Arts - 141C Hudson Ave. NE 41 Hudson Ave. NW, Salmon Arm, BC 250-832-9283 | www.shuswaptheatre.com

Answers: A. Facial B. Salon C. Treatment D. Color


Seeking a better life for Madison friends&neighbours

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Brent Cox was going from store to store last week handing out flyers. On the front is the picture of a happy little girl. On the top in large print it says simply: Madison CDG1A. Madison is his daughter and C D G 1 A (Congential Disorders of Glycosylation) is a rare disease. He and his wife, Melissa, are trying to raise funds for testing and treatment. CDG affects a process – glycosylation – that underpins the normal growth and function of all tissues and organs. There are 19 identified types of this disease with only 500 documented cases worldwide. The disease is so rare, there are no specialists in Canada, and the Canadian medical system doesn’t pay for treatments in other countries. “We want to see Dr. Eva Morava-Kozicz in New Orleans,” says Melissa. “She contacted me and said they can do this as research and we can have the testing

Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A3

free. We can go as soon as we get the money to travel and stay there. Hudson Freeze is from California but he works with Dr. Eva and they’re going to work together on com-

ing up with some possible therapies.” So Brent and Melissa are having a bake sale and silent auction at the Mall at Piccadilly this afternoon (Friday, February 28th). A high percentage of children with CDG don’t survive childhood, but Melissa is hopeful that with more information Madison

won’t only survive, but thrive. “The best-case scenario is knowing what we can do to help her live a better life through mobility and communication.” She is hoping that they will find ways of helping Madison’s immune system and liver function, as well as

better overall progress. Recalling those first days and months, Melissa says she had realized right away that Madison wasn’t like

MLAs battle over family budgets

By Tom Fletcher, Black Press VICTORIA – Opposition politicians called out Premier Christy Clark Thursday on her assurances that the province’s budget would not be balanced by asking more from taxpayers. “Look, it’s the premier herself who yesterday said she would not be going out to taxpayers and asking them for more money,” NDP finance critic Mike Farnworth told the legislature. He estimated fee increases of $900 a year for thousands of B.C. families, including a sixth consecutive increase in Medical Services Plan fees. “They’re going to be paying more for MSP. They’re going to pay more for hydro. They’re going to pay more for ferry trips,” Farnworth said. “They’re going to pay more for car insurance, and if they live south of the Fraser, they’re definitely going to be paying more in tolls [on the Port Mann bridge].” Finance Minister Mike de Jong replied that the four per cent increase in MSP fees is the latest of a series signalled in the last three B.C. budgets. Premiums, many paid by employers, account for 12 per cent of a health care budget that has grown from $8 billion to $17 billion since 2001, de Jong said.

MSP premiums increase by up to $5.50 a month for families earning more than $30,000 a year, effective with the start of a new fiscal year April 1. On the same date, a nine per cent increase in BC Hydro rates takes effect, adding $8 a month to the average residential electricity bill. De Jong cited assistance for families in the 2014-15 budget, including a $1,200 payment into a Registered Education Savings Plan for children born in 2007 or later. A tax credit of up to $55 a month for children under age six is to take effect in 2015. The biggest priority for new program spending in this week’s budget is an extra $243 million over three years for Community Living B.C. for services to developmentally disabled adults. Another $15 million is allocated to the Ministry of Children and Family Development for special needs children. An extra $15 million over three years is directed to RCMP policing costs and $6 million is allocated for legal aid services. The budget also directs $29 million to support development of a liquefied natural gas industry in B.C., including attracting investment and providing permits and environmental protection.

their other children, Kayedance and Braydon. “I noticed right off the bat that something was wrong but the paediatrician said everything was fine. There was something I noticed with her eyes – there was uncontrolled eye movement. She couldn’t hold her head up, period. She didn’t like any movement of any kind, and she would cry for hours on end.” Melissa did her own research based on M a d i s o n ’s symptoms; and eventually her daughter was officially diagnosed with CDG1A. Madison, who is now four years old, has already come a long way. Now she can hold her head up, grab onto objects, and pull herself up to a stand. “She has loose ligaments, so in order to stand she has to hold onto something or she will just fall. She can drink now – she gets it

all over herself but she can drink and sort of feed herself. She is getting better control. She can say certain words.” Madison goes to daycare with her little brother Lyndon, 3. “They’re very close and Lyndon looks after his sister. When he goes to get his snack, he’ll grab hers too.” Madison is a very happy and loving little girl, says her mother. “She loves animals. We have two dogs and one

by Leah Blain

will always come in and sit on her. Madison is an animal fanatic.” Melissa and Brent are hoping that they can raise enough funds so they can go to the US as soon as possible. “We want to do what we can to give her a better life,” says Melissa. The bake sale and silent auction take place Friday, February 28 at

the Mall at Piccadilly beginning at 2:30 p.m. Any donation is greatly appreciated. You can also help by contributing to TD Bank account #93660-004-6331161 which is under Melissa’s name. For more information call Brent or Melissa at 250833-8608 or 250-4633681.

NOTICE STEAK NIGHT Always

Wednesdays 11 am - 7 pm

7 oz New York Strip Steak Sandwich Comes with Fries, Salad, Garlic Toast

11

$

Windshield cracks kind of grow on you. NOW GET FREE WIPERS with every windshield repair or replacement for the month of March

Chris Lynd #1, 1050 - 10 Ave SW Salmon Arm V1E 1T2

250.832.3644

99


A4 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

HEALTH & BEAUTY Shuswap First Aid Services Ltd. 739 Abbington Lane, Tappen

250-832-4557

Occupational First Aid Level III

2 WEEK COURSE March 10 - March 21 To register Mon - Fri or for more info, 8 am - 4 pm

call Kevin 250-832-4557 250-833-6354 email: info@shuswapfirstaid.com “Training you to help others”

Chiropractic may help the following... ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Colic Asthma Constipation Allergies Sleep Issues ADHD Troubles Latching On Bed Wetting Ear Infections Spitting Up

*RESULTS VARY FROM PATIENT TO PATIENT.

Harbourfront Family DR. WARREN GAGE D.C., F.I.C.P.A.

250.803.0224

www.wellnesschiro.net

Ask your Cosmetician Caldrea (Black Coriander Lime)

NEW T N SCE

Open Air and Moonlit

This light midnight scent takes you on a journey. It begins at cool twilight - where dewy ferns and fresh limes gently deepen into more exotic hints of fennel and caraway, koa woods and peppercorn spice. Wanderlust rewarded. Available in countertop and linen and room spray

See you soon, Judi & Andrea Downtown Salmon Arm • 250.832.2111

Seated Qi Gong classes offered

familychiropractic COURTESY OF HARBOURFRONT FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC

by Dr. Warren Gage

Breast cancer prevention

If you listen to radio stations such as the CBC you will have undoubtedly heard much discussion about the article published in the British Medical Journal in early February 2014 which concluded “annual mammography in women 40-59 years of age does not reduce mortality above physical examination,” and that mammography attributes to over-diagnosis of breast cancers. To add to this controversy, in June 2013 the Cochrane Commission (one of the most highly-respected scientific medical panels in the world) looked at all of the latest, least-biased research, and they arrived at a similar conclusion. These evidence-based recommendations definitely surprised practitioners and the public and have caused more women to question current breast cancer screening protocols. While I am sure the two sides “for” and “against” mammography will argue back and forth quoting medical studies to support their stance, the most important fact is that breast cancer continues to be a serious health challenge faced by Canadian women. Whatever method a woman chooses for screening for breast cancer, the most important fact is that these are tests generally used to detect cancer once you already have it. I believe what makes more sense is to do everything possible on a preventative basis so that such diseases do not arise in the first place. There are many pro-active lifestyle habits that will greatly reduce your risks of developing breast cancer. One of the most significant steps to preventing breast cancer is to radically reduce your sugar and fructose intake. Normalizing your insulin levels by reducing consumption of sugars is one of the best ways to decrease your risk of cancer. Ensure you have a sufficient level of Vitamin D through safe sun exposure. If this is not an option, supplementing with a good quality Vitamin D3 should be done to maintain a blood level of over 100nmol/L. It is important to maintain a healthy weight as excess estrogen is produced in fat tissue, consume plenty of high quality Omega-3 fish oils, and limit alcohol consumption. Regular exercise is also extremely beneficial to good health. While the “powers that be” argue about the best practices for early detection of illness, when it comes to breast cancer or any other health challenge, wellness and prevention should always be the main goal. Clean up your diet by eliminating processed foods/sugars/sugar substitutes and be sure to include plenty of purified water and fresh organic vegetables. As usual, everyone should incorporate regular exercise into their daily routine. These are terrific ways to improve your health, reduce inflammation in your tissues, and prevent disease. If you would like further help in leading a healthier lifestyle, call Dr. Gage at Harbourfront Family Chiropractic at (250) 803-0224 for an assessment today.

Seated Qi Gong is gentle physical and mental exercise based on principles of Chinese medicine. It consists of gentle, low-impact exercises that are easy on the joints and can be done seated or standing. Qi Gong is an efficient and powerful health maintenance exercise and is well-documented in helping the elderly take control of their health and well-being and prevent or mitigate chronic illness. Qi Gong can help with stress management, pain, depression, posture, balance, coordination, endurance, and

flexibility. It is a method of developing body awareness, physical relaxation, structural alignment and body unity. Seated Qi Gong classes start Monday, March 3, 7:00 p.m. at Piccadilly Terrace. This is a 45 minute class for 6 weeks, at $5 per class, and is appropriate for the elderly with limited mobility. For information and registration (required), call Lynne Ozone, Registered Acupuncturist, at 250-515-5966.

★★★★★★★★★★★★ A heap of stars for Sharon Dyck – a very special lady. - Audrey & Keith

★★★★★★★★★★★★ A star to Lydia for ensuring that I had the best vacation ever. - M. P.

★★★★★★★★★★★★ seniorswellness by Kosha Vaidya

Chamomile

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) is widely used for relaxing, and many use chamomile tea for getting a good night’s sleep. The active component apigenin has been shown to bind to exert an anxiolytic and mild sedative effect in mice. Apigenin also has been shown to reversibly inhibit irritant-induced skin inflammation in animals and to exert antispasmodic effects in the intestines. It also contains coumarin, which contributes to its antispasmodic activity. Says well-known herbalist David Hoffmann, “It is probably the most widely-used relaxing nervine herb in the western world. It relaxes and tones the nervous system, and is especially valuable where anxiety and tension produce digestive symptoms such as gas, colic pains or even ulcers. This ability to focus on physical symptoms as well as underlying psychological tension is one of the great benefits of herbal remedies in

stress and anxiety problems. Safe in all types of stress and anxiety related problems, it makes a wonderful late night tea to ensure restful sleep.” Moreover, it is useful in insomnia, anxiety, menopausal depression, loss of appetite, dyspepsia, diarrhea, colic, aches and pains of flu, migraine, neuralgia, vertigo, motion sickness, conjunctivitis, inflamed and itchy skin. As an anticatarrhal, it helps the body remove excess mucus buildup in the sinus area. It may be used in head colds and allergy reactions such as hay fever. Essential oil can be added to bath to prevent or ease cramps and aches in the body as it relaxes the body after a hard day of work and eases the mind. This herb is usually safe but may cause an allergic reaction in some people. Readers with enquiries may contact Kosha Vaidya via email at koshahealing@gmail.com.

Available at: Powerful Bug Busting Solution! Powerful Bug

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Expires March 13, 2014

Proudly Canadian

Centenoka Park Mall • 250-833-0144

Monika

Visit www.nutters35.com online ordering. Facebook ‘Nutters Bulk&Natural Foods, Salmon Arm’ Also follow us on pinterest.com


www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Coldest Night walk well attended

At the Salmon Arm City Hall, participants ready themselves for a walk in the brisk evening air during the third annual Coldest Night of the Year walk to support the less fortunate, an event that happened in 63 communities across Canada on Saturday, February 22nd. Walkers could choose a 5 or 10 kilometre route winding through town, with stops at Starbucks and the Lighthouse Shelter. There were 28 teams with a total of 200 walkers. At press time, about $32,400 had been raised for the Salvation Army and Second Harvest food banks along with the Lighthouse Shelter. Photo by Craig Pulsifer Photography.

Fundraiser dinner held by MacKenzie Camp

Mackenzie Campers Zera McMyn & Cassidy McEwon help out at the Fundraiser on Saturday, Feb 22nd. Photo by Les Ellenor.

By Jazmyn McMyn The Enderby Seniors’ Centre was filled with MacKenzie Camp supporters on Saturday evening for their fundraising dinner and live auction. A fantastic group of volunteers including past campers and counsellors, along with board members, provided a tasty dinner of baked ham and scalloped potatoes, followed by a delicious selection of desserts by donation. MacKenzie Camp supporters, members, local artists and businesses donated items for the live auction led by Noel Tarzwell. The bidding was active and many funds were raised to help with the completion of the floor in Alice Large hall. A huge thank you to all who came out and supported, donated and helped.

Spelling bee

Pilgrimage talk

Please join members of the Literacy Alliance of the Shuswap (LASS) on May 2nd from 7:30–9:00 a.m. at the Prestige Harbourfront Resort & Hotel in Salmon Arm for the inaugural Team Spelling Bee, an exciting fundraising event for literacy programs in the North Okanagan-Shuswap. This fundraising event will give your team a fun way to work together as a group. Nobody spells alone. • Treat your staff to a delicious breakfast and a fun team-building challenge while supporting literacy in the North Okanagan-Shuswap. • Challenge other businesses or organizations to participate in the Spelling Bee as friendly competition. It’s all about teamwork. • Sponsor a high school student or a table of students to participate in the Spelling Bee. Registration is easy: Contact Jennifer Findlay at 250-833-2095 or visit the LASS website at www.shuswapliteracy. ca to choose your level of sponsorship. Your support is vital for Local Literacy Programs in the North Okanagan-Shuswap: Books for Babies, Preschool PALS, One to One Children’s Literacy Program, Unplug & Play Family Literacy Week, Jam the GM Children’s Book Drive, Coyote Café/Club After School Literacy Program, Save/Share/Spend Financial Literacy Program, Soup & Stories, Pawsitive Reading, Program Cyber Seniors Computer Tutoring Program, Spread the Word Community Book Exchange, Adult Literacy Book Clubs, Adult Literacy Advocacy.

Do you have a

‘Pilgrimage to Palestine and Israel: A journey of contradictions’ takes place on Sunday, March 16, 2:30 p.m. at St. John’s Anglican Church (170 Shuswap Street) in Salmon Arm. Rev. Juanita Austin will give an illustrated talk about her visit last November to Palestine and Israel, where she participated in a conference at the Sabeel Ecumenical Liberation Theology Centre in Jerusalem. Sabeel is an organization working for justice, peace, and reconciliation in Palestine-Israel. The conference brought together about 230 people from a variety of different countries. Following the conference, Rev. Austin and about 20 others visited a number of communities including Nazareth, Joppa (Jaffa), Bethlehem, the Palestinian village of Jayyous, and Hebron. “To go to the Holy Land has always been on my list,” she says. “But I knew I wanted to go as more than just a tourist, and even more than a pilgrim. I wanted to have my heart and mind opened. This journey gave me that opportunity. For that I am deeply grateful, and compelled to share what I experienced.” Rev. Juanita Austin served for four years as minister at First United Church, Salmon Arm. Currently, she is the Minister at Sicamous United Church, and will give her talk as part of the church service there on March 23rd at 10:00 a.m. The March 16 event is a free public program sponsored by the Salmon Arm Ecumenical KAIROS Committee, a chapter of the national organization, KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives, which unites eleven churches and religious organizations in faithful action for ecological justice and human rights. Everyone is welcome. For more information, call Anne or Ray Morris at 250-833-5773.

newsworthy or

unique photo you would like published? Email it to: editorial@lakeshorenews.bc.ca with relevant info.

Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A5

www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org

..

WE NOW CARRY.

Optical Frames

and Yes, we still have the Sunglasses too! Free Sight Testing - by appointment

Joy

Jackie

Anne

250-833-1980 • 171 The Mall at Piccadilly Proudly Locally Owned & Operated *Some restrictions may apply.

EXTENDED OFFICE OFFICEHOURS HOURS EXTENDED

During the current income tax season, our office will During current income season, be open onthe weekdays from 8:30 AM tax to 6:00 PM and Saturdays beginning March 1, 2014 from our office will be open on weekdays from 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM until April 30, 2014.

8:30 AM to 6:00 PM and Saturdays

Vernon ➠ 250-542-4432 • Enderby ➠ 250-838-7337 beginning March 1, 2014 from Armstrong ➠ 250-546-8665 • Salmon Arm ➠ 250-832-5129

9:00 AM to 2:00 until April 30, 2014 Or Toll FreePM 1-888-818-3276 Vernon ➠250-542-4432 Enderby ➠250-838-7337 Armstrong School➠250-546-8665 District #83 Salmon Arm ➠ 250-832-5129 North Okanagan/Shuswap or Toll free 1-888-818-3276 PARENT INFORMATION MEETINGS

& Possible Registration for School District #83 French Immersion Programs Please note there is a change in registration practice from previous years for both EARLY and LATE immersion. Please read carefully! To find out more about French Immersion opportunities in our schools, and to possibly register your child for French Immersion, it is essential to attend the information meeting which pertains to your student! The meetings will be held on Tuesday, March 4th at 7 p.m. at École Élémentaire Bastion Elementary (early immersion) and L’École Intermédiare Shuswap Middle School (late immersion). It is essential for all parents interested in the French Immersion programs to attend the information meeting on March 4th at 7 p.m. If the numbers work out than registration will be taken at this meeting. If the numbers do not work out, we will continue with registration on Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014, from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Registration will take place at the District Education Centre (DEC) located at #110 2960 Okanagan Avenue S.E., Salmon Arm on a first come first served basis. SIBLING ENROLMENT - District practice provides opportunity for pre-registration of students who already have siblings in the French Immersion Programs. Sibling registration forms will be mailed directly to all parents/guardians of students enrolled in French Immersion programs and must be completed and received at School District No. 83, P.O. Box 129, 220 Shuswap St. NE, Salmon Arm, V1E 4N2 by 4 p.m. Friday, February 21st, 2014.

Please Note: Transportation to and from the French Immersion programs is the responsibility of the parent. It may be possible to ride the bus but it is not an absolute. Questions about the meetings? Please call the education office at 250-804-7826.


A6 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

NATURAL LIVING FAIR IN ENDERBY TOMORROW

The 20th annual seed swap by the Shuswap Seed Savers will be held tomorrow, Saturday, March 1, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at A. L. Fortune School in Enderby. There will be over 50 vendors, seed swap table, heritage seeds, vegetables, honey, baking, information on sustainable living, guest speakers, etc. Bring two reusable shopping bags. This year’s seed swap will be dedicated to pioneer seed saver and founder of the Enderby Seed Swap, June Griswold, who passed away suddenly this past December. There will be special display highlighting her life and accomplishments.

OTHER PEOPLE CAN USE YOUR REUSABLE STUFF

A woman wrote to say her husband returned from the Skimikin garbage transfer station with a beautiful full colour wildlife book for her. He said that someone had tossed a whole raft of books into the bin and they all looked in good condition. Perfectly good items are often thrown into garbage bins, and the large green bins at Bill’s Bottle Depot and the landfill site near the airport. Place them in a covered share shack at Skimikin or the green Reuse building by the landfill, or take them to a thrift store. Let someone else enjoy your unwanted items.

DO NOT SPIT ON YOUR ROLL-UP-THE-RIM TAB

A former Tim Hortons’ employee in BC came up with seven reasons why she hated the Roll-Up-The-Rim promotion. Here are two: People who don’t tell you about their winning tab until they get to the drive-thru window. Cups still so fresh that cold coffee and customer saliva are still all over the winning tab. Read the other five on the web by googling: 7 reasons to hate roll up the rim. Tim Hortons has dropped 24 products from its menu to tackle long wait times, according to the Globe & Mail. One is the cruller. It is also winding down its partnership with an ice-cream seller.

THANK YOU, TIM HORTONS, FOR FREE COFFEE

On nights when Citizens’ Patrol volunteers drive around Salmon Arm and Canoe in pairs, looking for bad guys and stolen vehicles by checking licence plates, they stop for coffee at Tim Hortons on the hill. If there are two teams, they agree to meet at a certain time and have a visit. By wearing yellow jackets, they are served free coffee, tea or hot chocolate. Thank you, owner Kelly Moores.

STARBUCKS HAD FREE BEVERAGE FOR WALKERS

The Coldest Night of the Year was a fundraiser for the homeless last Friday evening. It had many sponsors, one being Starbucks. During the five- and ten-kilometre walk, the route included a stop at Starbucks in Piccadilly for a selfserve cup of coffee or hot chocolate. Members of Citizens

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Patrol in yellow jackets were doing traffic control at intersections, and they enjoyed a free beverage, too. Many businesses donated food for the light supper at 5th Avenue Seniors’ Centre. The chili made in a school was delicious!

ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD BOY CHOOSES TO DIE

While we in BC and Canada debate euthanasia or doctor-assisted suicide, an 11-year-old boy in Kent, England, has decided to stop taking drugs that may prolong his life and spend most of his final days at home with his family. He is tired of battling cancer of the nervous system for over half his life. Reece Puddington expressed his momentous message on Facebook. His updates on his condition on Facebook have attracted a growing following. He told friends via the website that he could no longer face the demands of gruelling treatment and wished to let nature take its course. His mother, Kay Puddington, who helps write his blog, said: “Reece has been so good, he never moans. He just got tired of the whole regime. So the rest of the family took on board how he felt and we made the decision to end his treatment.” She added: “The decision has been a breath of fresh air for Reece. Not to have to go to the hospital means a lot to him.”

SMART CENTRES HAS 31 POTENTIAL SITES

A faithful reader of this column is as excited at having Walmart in Salmon Arm as I am. I visited with him in one of the grocery aisles shortly after the store opened, and his wife joined us. They drive to Salmon Arm to shop. He checks Smart Centres’ website frequently and reports that the next three businesses will be Bulk Barn, Lube-X, and a Telus Mobility store. He sent the address for the website, with the site plan that shows a potential 31 spots. Have a look: www.smartcentres.com/locations/salmon-arm-bc

WILL SALMON ARM BE ONE OF 16 IN HOCKEYVILLE?

Next weekend we will know if Salmon Arm will be one of eight communities in western Canada selected for the next voting from our keyboards. Check http://krafthockeyville. cbc.ca on March 8. Voting will take place March 8, 9 and 10.

HAPPINESS WAS WATCHING CANADA WIN GOLD

The Olympics at Sochi, Russia, captured my interest last week. I watched Team Canada win gold in women’s curling, women’s hockey and men’s hockey, missing only men’s curling. What a great haul of gold medals for Canadian athletes!

UKRAINE’S PROTESTORS SUFFERED LOSSES BUT GOT RID OF THE CORRUPT PRESIDENT

My heart bled for the families of the 82 people who were

killed during protests in Ukraine, because I am 100 per cent Ukrainian. I have relatives in Lviv. I hoped the country could become more like Europe, but knew that it was in Russia’s grip. After three months of protests, president Viktor Yanukovych had his power reduced and he fled Kiev one night. The interim government has indicted him for mass murder over the shooting of demonstrators. The fugitive tried to escape to Russia but was stopped at the border. Financial help for cash-strapped Ukraine may come from European countries, United States and the International Monetary Fund. Russia is angry over the new government in Ukraine and does not recognize it. President Barack Obama cautioned Russian President Vladimir Putin that sending forces to Ukraine would be a grave mistake.

GARDEN CLUBS ATTEND GARDENER’S DAY

The Shuswap Garden Club invited members from garden clubs in Enderby, Armstrong, Vernon, Kelowna and North Shuswap to come to hear speakers and see displays at Gardener’s Day on Sat., Feb. 15 at 5th Ave. Seniors Centre in Salmon Arm, and 150 came. Membership to the local club is $15 for single and $25 for a couple. If you’d like more information call Larry at 250832-6342 or Kathy at 250-832-2028.

MAMMOGRAMS WILL NOT BE PROMOTED HERE

After I had the one and only mammogram in a mobile screening trailer on Centenoka’s parking lot about 25 years ago, I vowed I would never have another. If I had a suspicious capsule in a breast, the intense pressure for an X-ray might burst it, spreading cancer cells. Mammography was painful. I wished men could have a similar cancer test of their testicles! It has now been proven that benefits of mammography have been greatly exaggerated. Regular mammograms do not save lives, according to an article in the Globe and Mail and reprinted by Dr. Adam McLeod, ND through www. dreamhealer.com. One of the largest and most meticulous studies of mammography ever done, involving 90,000 women in England and lasting a quarter-century, has added powerful new doubts about the value of the screening test for women of any age. Many studies report that screening mammography is leading to over-diagnosis of breast cancer. Several state that the benefit of screening 2,000 women regularly for 10 years is that one woman may have her life prolonged. Of the other 1,999 women, at least 200 will have false positive mammograms leading to biopsies and surgery, and at least 10 women will be falsely diagnosed with breast cancer and consequently subjected to unnecessary surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. sallys1@telus.net • 250-832-4831

Letters to the Editor

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of Sally Scales and do not necessarily represent those of Lakeshore News and its staff.

Two hour parking hurts merchants, parkade needed

Re: Two hour parking in downtown Salmon Arm Parking is a problem in the downtown area and rather than clog up parking with longer time periods, why are we not following the examples of Nelson, Vernon, and Vancouver? Install one hour parking meters and vigilantly police them. Surveys were done asking about two hour parking for Downtown Salmon Arm and

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reports from the moccasin telegraph indicate that longer parking is what customers want. Of course it is! If customers were asked if they wanted free products, the answer would also be yes! How will the merchants and services survive when customer flow is diminished? The problem: Parking in downtown Salmon Arm is an issue for business owners – and needs to be addressed by increasing

lsn@lakeshorenews.bc.ca classifieds@lakeshorenews.bc.ca editorial@lakeshorenews.bc.ca Subscription: $70.00 plus HST per year outside the distribution area. Second Class Mail Registration #5600

Chris Faltin Sales

Letters to the Editor: Letters to the Editor are welcome, provided they are about a local issue. Name and phone number required. Lakeshore News reserves the right to edit or refuse any submissions.

Jeff Morrison Publisher

Letters to the editor are welcome, providing they are about

Jeff Morrison Publisher

the customer traffic flow. Longer parking times fail to increase traffic flow. The solution: install (maximum) one hour parking meters throughout the downtown area. This places the onus of responsibility on the customer to know how much time is available. Two hour parking is available on the Ross Street parking lot. We desperately need a parkade. The inner core parking lot is a grand location.

Michelle Weisinger Editor

Email: a local issue. Name and phone number required. Lakeshore News reserves the right to edit or refuse any submissions. lsn@lakeshorenews.bc.ca classifieds@lakeshorenews.bc.ca editorial@lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Denise Buffie Reception

Howard Vangool Photography

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Rather than regressing to a system popular twenty-five years ago, why not apply the solution that the larger commercial centers have used for this very same problem. I trust you will consider this input when you make your decision regarding free twohour downtown parking throughout downtown. Yours truly, Margaret Davidson, Spirit Quest Books

ERRORS AND OMISSIONS OMISSIONS Advertising is accepted accepted on on the the condition condition that, in the event of of aa typographical typographical error, error, the portion of the advertising advertising space space occuoccupied by the error will will not not be be charged charged for, for, but the balance of of the the advertisement advertisement will will be paid for at the the applicable applicable rate. rate. InIn the the event of a typographical typographical error, error, advertised advertised goods or services at at aa wrong wrong price price need need not be sold. Advertising Advertising isis an an offer offer to to sell sell and the offer may may be be withdrawn withdrawn at at any any time. Lakeshore News News will will not not be be responresponsible for more than than one one incorrect incorrect insertion. insertion. The Lakeshore News News isis aa member member of of the the British Columbia Press Press Council, Council, aa self-regself-regulatory body governing governing the the province’s province’s newspaper industry. industry. The The council council considers considers complaints from the the public public about about the the concon-

duct duct ofof member member newspapers. newspapers. Directors Directors oversee overseethe themediation mediationofofcomplaints, complaints,with with input input from from both both the the newspaper newspaperand andthe the complaint complaintholder. holder.IfIftalking talkingwith withthe theeditor editor oror publisher publisher does does not notresolve resolveyour yourcomcomplaint plaint about aboutcoverage coverageororstory storytreatment, treatment, you you may may contact contact the theB.C. B.C.Press PressCouncil. Council. Your Yourwritten writtenconcern, concern,with withdocumentation, documentation, should shouldbe besent sentwithin within4545days daystotoB.C. B.C.Press Press Council, Council,201 201Selby, Selby,St. St.Nanaimo, Nanaimo,BC. BC.V9R V9R 2R2. 2R2.For Forinformation, information,phone phone888-687-2213 888-687-2213 ororgo gototowww.bcpresscouncil.org www.bcpresscouncil.org Distributed Distributed to: to: Salmon Salmon Arm, Arm, Canoe, Canoe, Sicamous, Sicamous, Malakwa, Malakwa, Enderby, Enderby, Mara, Mara, Grindrod, Grindrod, Tappen, Tappen,Sorrento, Sorrento,Blind Blind Bay, Bay,Eagle Eagle Bay, Bay, Chase, Chase, Celista/ Celista/ Scotch ScotchCreek, Creek,Anglemont, Anglemont, and Revelstoke Armstrong. (2nd Revelstoke issue of(2nd eachissue month). of each month).


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Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A7

mallarkey

by Daron Mayes

Olympic update

From left, Sue Doray, Volunteer One to One School Coordinator at South Broadview and Jackie Graham, South Broadview PAC President, donate $250 to the Literary Alliance of the Shuswap, represented by Jennifer Findlay, Literacy Outreach Coordinator and Terra Redwood, Children’s Literacy Facilitator.

Donation honours principal

The South Broadview PAC generously donated $250.00 to LASS to purchase books for the One to One Children’s Literacy program in honour of former principal, Barry Dearing. The following was included in a letter to LASS from Jackie Graham, South Broadview’s PAC President: “The parents of South Broadview wish to show their appreciation of Mr. Dearing by way of this donation...Mr. Dearing was a wonderful principal at South Broadview and he

touched the lives of so many students and families. He was not only our principal, but a courageous leader, a trusted friend, and, to many, he was like family. Mr. Dearing always wanted to give back to the community and to the students...this is one small way in which we can help him continue to do so.” LASS has purchased the books for South Broadview’s One to One program and will be placing a sticker in each one to honour Barry and his passion for helping kids.

Snow of support Roy and Charleen Gillberg of Blind Bay showed their support for the Olympics last week with a Canadian flag painted on the snow.

Foundation launches new campaign Contributed by the Shuswap Community Foundation Did you know there are 191 community foundations across Canada? The local Shuswap Community Foundation is part of something much bigger. Established in 1992 to connect and support this growing network of community foundations, the Community Foundations of Canada (CFC) is launching its first ever national campaign. The goal is to raise awareness and encourage participation in local foundations across Canada. The “Your Community Makes You. You Make Your Community” campaign launches on March 5th.To learn more about the campaign, visit www.communityfoundations.ca. Every one of us is a product of our community. The causes we care about, the time we invest, the people we bring together – all shape our commu-

nities now and for future generations. Giving back is how the cycle of a vibrant and sustainable community continually renews itself. With an intimate understanding of local needs and opportunities, community foundations champion issues that matter by directing grants and other investments towards everything from shelter, education, and care for those in need, to the arts, environment and recreation. Our local Shuswap Community Foundation contributes time, leadership and financial support to initiatives that benefit our community in all of these areas. To learn more about your local Shuswap Community Foundation, go to www.shuswapfoundation.ca, call them at 250-832-5428, or drop into the office and visit Paulette and Amber at 450 Lakeshore Drive NE, Salmon Arm.

Whenever the Olympics roll around, I write an article about how Canada performs in comparison to other countries. I started looking at this back in 2004 because I was getting tired of hearing how disappointed people were with the results of our athletes. At that time, many questions were being raised about whether the results were because of poor coaching, a lack of funding, or perhaps poor leadership. It seemed everyone was ready to press the panic button. To be fair, the 2004 Summer Games in Athens are our lowest medal total in the last ten Olympic Games with only 12 medals. However, we should be reminded that we only had 7 medals in the 1992 Winter Games and 5 medals in the 1988 Winter Olympics; despite both being Winter Games and one on our home soil. Back in 2004, I challenged the idea that our results were in fact poor when compared to other nations. I mean, is it fair to compare us directly with countries like China or the United States that have much larger populations? So seeing as the Sochi Games just finished; let’s drag up the data again so we can be reminded that we are, in fact, a great sports nation. In looking at the last ten Olympics going back to Atlanta in 1996 (five summer and five winter games), Canada sits in 9th place for total medals won (191 medals). With the exception of Australia (5th in total medals), most of the countries ahead of us have populations of at least double that of Canada. We even have more medals than Japan over that time frame despite having only a quarter of the population. If we take the total medals over the last 10 Olympics divide it by the number of games (10) and then divide it by population (in millions); we actually move up to fifth spot behind Norway, Australia, Cuba and the Netherlands. An interesting thing to note when looking at these countries is the fact that these countries tend to narrow their focus on excelling at specific sports, and as a result are not nearly as balanced as Canada. An example of just how narrow the focus of some countries has become was seen in 2014 with the Netherlands winning 23 of their 24 medals in speed skating. So why do we sometimes question our success? The biggest reason is we often compare ourselves to our neighbour – the US. Yet compared to the United States, which has 10 times the population and probably spends a thousand times the money; they have only won 3.5 times the medals that Canada has won over the past ten games. Using our medals by population calculation, we perform around 2.76 times better than the US. Though there is always room for improvement, I think it is pretty clear that our athletes are giving us far more bang for the buck than most nations. So once again, Mall Arkey Junior has proven the fact we’re continuing to overachieve at the Olympic Games. Ain’t it great being Canadian, eh?

LOST... &FOUND

Lost doesn’t have to mean gone forever. Bring home your wayward wanderer with the classifieds’ free Lost and found listings. Call Lakeshore News 250-832-9461

Letters to the Editor ~ maximum 300-400 words ~ give name, ph.# & address ~ editorial@lakeshorenews.bc.ca

SORRENTO

TAXI

IS UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT SAME NUMBER

250.803.8445

Darlene would like to thank all

her customers for their patronage, and wish Avery the best for the future!

Northern Lights Lights Chamber Choir

Chamber Choir Choir Chamber presents presents

Reflections Reflections

Conductor: Steve Guidone

Accompanist: Jim Johnston

Conductor: Steve Guidone

Accompanist: Jim Johnston

Salmon Arm: Friday March 7th —7:30 pm & Sunday March 16th—2:30 pm, St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Vernon: Sunday March 9th—2:30 pm, Trinity United Church Tickets $15.00 Tickets available online at:

n o r t h e r n l i g Tickets h t s c $15.00 h a m b e r c h o i r. c a

Tickets available online at: As well as from choir members, Acorn Music (Salmon Arm) or at the door

Arm Art Gallery n o r t h e r n Student l i gtickets h available t s cat thehSalmon am b e r c h o i r. c a

As well as from choir members, Acorn Music (Salmon Arm) or at the door Student tickets available at the Salmon Arm Art Gallery

Mall Arkey Investments This Week Where the serious invest their money A small change to our shop-for-the-best interest rates this week. Have you bought your TFSA yet? Do you need travel or mortgage insurance? Pile your money in a wheelbarrow and bring it on in. You want to make Mall Arkey happy, don’t you?

Savings Account Cashable GIC 1 year 2 years 3 years 4 years 5 years

1.55% 1.20% 2.15% 2.20% 2.25% 2.35% 2.75%

No change No change No change No change No change No change Up 0.20%

Mall Arkey FINANCIAL LTD.

Centenoka Park Mall • 250-832-5000 Email: daron@mallarkey.ca Website: www.mallarky.com


A8 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

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Community Calendar

Display aD DeaDline Tuesday• 12 noon

Meetings and events that are free of charge will be listed at no charge in Community Calendar. Dances, bingos, and other paid/ for-profit events are required to pay the normal classified rate. Community garage sales, bazaars and craft sales are run for one week at no charge in the classified section; additional weeks are charged the normal classified rate.

Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING The Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce Greg Kyllo, MLA Shuswap will be our guest speaker for the evening. Date: Venue: Time:

Friday, March 14, 2014

Prestige Harbourfront Resort 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 pm

RSVP: Before Friday, March 7, 2014 to: Corryn Grayston E-mail: admin@sachamber.bc.ca Phone: (250) 832-6247

editorial@ lakeshorenews.bc.ca 250-832-9461

Schaffer Residence at Oakside Proud to be Serving the Community since 1965

visit us at www.schafferresidences.com

Serving - Armstrong, Enderby, Salmon Arm, Vernon Revelstoke, Golden.

Complex Care, Memory Care, Alzheimer’s, Respite Residents health status improves mentally & physically when they feel connected, engaged and happy in small residential settings. SO.....COME ON IN AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!! We offer: Secure facility, Single / Double rooms with a beautiful country view, 24-hour nursing care, nutritious meals, Housekeeping, Laundry & Linen services Our Bus is available for residents to all “Essential Services”. Come...visit, take a tour and discuss your options and affordability!

Contact: Nihal Maligaspe (Director of Care) 250-832-6767 250-819-1451 (Cell) 9455 Firehall Frontage Rd, Enderby, BC nmaligaspe@schafferresidences.com

DesignDilemmas by Linda Erlam

Colour schemes, 2014

No way around it, current design plans are obvious in their lack of pattern. Take a stroll through Houzz or any shelter magazine on the racks and you will not see much pattern in a room. Very little in fact, and if there is any pattern it is muted, used in small amounts and acts as a support for the main pieces in the room. For example: no pattern on the sofa, chairs, ottoman or bed coverings. Texture is what it’s all about. Low-contrast is a concept some of us in the business have believed in for years, but it is finally becoming a buzzword concept in design. If you’ve read this column much in the past, you know that I believe that contrast is what makes a room feel small and cluttered. I also believe that calm rooms start with calm colours, and while some designers insist only warm colours can be calming, I believe that any colour can be calming if used muted, at a low-value and in a scheme of low-contrast. Huh? Translation: soft, almost pastel grey-blue, used with slightly darker grey and soft white for trim, for example. Blue is a cool colour, but if the textures in this room are nubbly linen or cotton, maybe some chenille or velvet, a shag rug, some rocks and wood, it becomes a cozy, calm room. Short story: A few years ago I was asked to help a gal update her living room. The colour scheme was beige, peach and blue. Yup, hadn’t been touched since the early 90‘s. Blue sofa, beige walls, blue and beige carpet, peach, blue and beige throw pillows and peach lamp shades. The fix was so simple: we removed all the peach components. The room looked fantastic, the client was pleased as punch because she really didn’t want to start all over anyway, and her husband loved the fact that all we did was buy four new lampshades. The way to pick a new colour scheme starts with a good understanding of how colours make us feel. Colours in our rooms do, indeed, affect how we feel, how we perceive our surroundings, how we sleep, and how we get along with others. It’s not an accident that pink – a colour which calms and soothes – has found its way onto the walls of jails. Next column I’ll explain a step-by-step process to pick a colour that works for your home. Visit my website Designsewlutions.ca for some more info on colour, and some news about Home Fashions University and me...

Emails for Lakeshore News Classifieds: classifieds@lakeshorenews.bc.ca Display ads: lsn@lakeshorenews.bc.ca Editorial: editorial@lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Dedication recognized

Brother Ron Clark has been a member of the Elks Branch #455 in Salmon Arm for 60 years. Ron received a 60 year certificate/letter in recognition of his membership with the Elks of Canada. The Salmon Arm Elks would like to thank Ron for his dedication to the organization. Photo contributed.

‘Food for Thought’ forum

Due to overw h e l m i n g r e s p o n s e , Shuswap Food Action Co-op’s first Shuswap Food Forum on Tuesday, March 11th has been moved to the First United Church , 450 Okanagan Avenue SE, Salmon Arm. Doors open at 4:15 p.m. and the forum will run from 5:00–8:00 p.m. An informative evening is planned that will bring together community residents and groups to listen, learn and talk about how to strengthen our local food economy from the ‘ground up.’ The forum will also include dinner prepared with local food! The keynote speaker, Laura Kalina RD, M.Ad. Ed has many years’ experience in food security and community development. Don’t miss this opportunity to contribute towards growing a sustainable local food system. Your input is very important. There is no cost to attend; however, space is limited so please RSVP (deadline March 4) by email to Margaret Hardy, margaret@mlhardy.ca or John McLeod, johnwmac@ telus.net, or call 250-832-7518.

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Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A9

A fine day for snowshoeing

Someone do a good deed for you? Place a free star in the Lakeshore News.

Come to office in person to place ad. 161 Hudson Ave. No business names can be mentioned.

The Shuswap Lady Striders head to the hills every Monday to snowshoe. On the first outing of the season, a record 40 members snowshoed on Grandview Bench. Trips this winter have included the trails at Larch Hills, Silver Star and Sun Peaks as well as explorations in the Paxton Valley. The club is celebrating 25 years of fitness activities and friendships. New members are always welcome. Email ladystriders@gmail.com for more information. Photo contributed.

At the Mall in Piccadilly

March right into

on Chestor’s House of Cinnam a with this coupon and buy for regular cinnamon roll or twist

1/2 PRICE!

(One per person per day) Expires: March 30, 2014

NEWSPAPER ROLL ENDS Great for table covers, pets, crafts, packing or colouring paper for the kids

Heritage fun at Piccadilly Above: “Foursome Time,” a barbershop quartet formed by (from left) Paul Gunning, Ron Long, Kris Koenig and Scott Adderson sing to mallgoers during Family Day at the Mall at Piccadilly last Saturday. Above right: Amanda Steiner works as a volunteer at the pie contest and sale. Howard Vangool photos.

Letters to the Editor

Youths commit random acts of kindness

Hillcrest Elementary School students Chris, Kayden, and Brad are performing ‘Random Acts of Kindness’ throughout the Salmon Arm community. The Shuswap Hospital Foundation office is located near the entrance to the Shuswap Lake General Hospital. I was sitting in my office and I heard a young voice saying “Thank you for volunteering

your time to help people who come to the hospital.” When I went out to learn more, I discovered three young students who were thanking Shuswap Lake Health Care Auxiliary Volunteer Ruth Dynes for giving her time to help others. This brought tears to Ruth’s eyes and to my eyes. Many patients in the waiting area were also very moved by this unexpected appreciation. What a wonderful idea. The young boys in the photo told us they were on their way after this to play crib with Bastion Place residents, and they thought they might get beaten in the game by the seniors! We certainly live in a wonderful community, and our day was brightened by this Random Act of Kindness. Thank you, Chris, Kayden and Brad of Hillcrest School for making our day! Diana Walker, Office Manager, Shuswap Hospital Foundation, Salmon Arm

Phone

DISTRIBUTION • 250-832-2131

Stop by the Lakeshore News office at 161 Hudson Ave. NE Salmon Arm, BC

DISTRICT OF SICAMOUS 2014 UTILITY BILLS HAVE BEEN MAILED Property Owners (especially new owners) who have not received their utility notice should contact the District of Sicamous Office at 250-836-2477. WHETHER OR NOT YOU RECEIVE A UTILITY NOTICE, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY AS THE PROPERTY OWNER TO PAY YOUR UTILITIES BY THE DUE DATE IN ORDER TO AVOID A PENALTY. FLAT RATED BILLING • A 10% discount is available on payments received on or before March 3, 2014 • A 10% penalty will be applied to outstanding balances at the close of business on July 2, 2014 JANUARY METERED BILLING • January metered billing payments are due on or before March 3, 2014 • A 1% penalty per month will be applied to outstanding balances at the close of business on March 3, 2014 • Meters are read twice a year June 30th and December 31st, with billings processed the following month PAYMENT OPTIONS • To avoid waiting at the Municipal Office, you are encouraged to pay your Utility Bill early • Post-dated cheques and partial payments are welcome • Payment is accepted at the Municipal Office, 446 Main Street, Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., except Statutory Holidays • Payment may be cash, cheque, debit card, or your bank’s telebanking online bill payment service • A drop box is located beside the door of the Municipal Office, Main Street entrance • Payments can be mailed to PO Box 219, Sicamous, BC V0E 2V0. Please note that postmarks are not accepted as proof of payment

If you have any questions, please contact the District office at 250-8362477. DISTRICT OF SICAMOUS 446 Main Street P.O. Box 219, Sicamous, B.C. V0E 2V0


A10 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Quilt, fibre art workshops Cellist brings British works to life The quilters are coming! Registrations are already coming in for the 2014 Sorrento Centre Quilt Week that takes place each spring in Sorrento. This year’s dates are Friday, April 25th to Thursday, May 1st. If you have never attended a quilting retreat this is one for you to consider. There are three concurrent workshops offered, including two traditional quilt workshops and one that is contemporary fibre art. You choose the workshop that most appeals to you and you will have five days of great instruction and free time to work on your project while spending time with a fun group of quilters. The workshops are in three separate venues at the Sorrento Conference and Retreat Centre but everyone gets together for meals and for the occasional evening event or outing ... and you can quilt all night if you want to! The three workshops this year are led by Dianne Jansson, Kathy Kinsella, and Lynn Knox. Diane Jansson will be teaching “Quilts: Connecting Women Around the World,” where you will experience five relaxing days exploring designs from a different country each day. These designs can be used to create a row quilt or a series of small home decor items. Lynn Knox will teach the “Dresden Plate Log Cabin Quilt” that

can be made using scraps or fresh new fabrics with a wedge ruler to make it easy for beginners or experienced quilters. Kathy Kinsella will be leading a workshop on “Creating Inspirational Flags and Buntings,” where participants will create small flags (pictured) and buntings using a variety of surface design techniques including fabric painting, stamping, thermofax silk screens, adding text, creating monoprints and more. She will talk about traditional prayer flags and how they might influence the flags you create from recycled or crisp new fabric. One of the special things about Sorrento Centre’s Quilt Week is that it is open to anyone who would like to come and quilt; there is no need to belong to a particular guild or group, and everyone has the opportunity to see what the other groups are working on. Sorrento Centre has comfortable private accommodation and good meals and snacks to keep you going. If you live nearby and would like to come as a day student and return home to sleep in your own bed at night, you are welcome to do so. For more information or to register, please phone Sorrento Centre at 250675-2421; or visit www.sorrento-centre.bc.ca.

SHUSWAP

VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

The Kamloops Symphony, with cello soloist David Eggert, brings you Made in Britain on Friday, March 7th at the SASCU Recreation Centre. Discover music from the golden era of British composers – Gustav Holst, Edward Elgar, Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gerald Finzi. Tickets are on sale at Wearabouts, 350A Alexander St NE, or online at www.kamloopslive. ca. Tickets may also be purchased at the door. Soloist David Eggert is a young Canadian cellist with a blossoming international performing career. Known for a dominating stage presence and imaginative interpretation, he has an inventive approach to the traditional repertoire while fostering a strong commitment to musical creation of our time. Eggert’s spellbinding performance of the Dvorak cello concerto two years ago left audiences in Kamloops and Salmon Arm wanting more. Kamloops Symphony Music Director Bruce Dunn immediately invited him back to play Elgar’s cello concerto and, with the addition of other British music, and this program is the result. The following pieces will be performed: Vaughan Williams Overture, “The Wasps;” Elgar Cello Concerto; Finzi, “Romance in E flat;” and Holst Symphony in F major, “The Cotswolds.” In 1909, Ralph Vaughan Williams was asked to write incidental music for a performance of Aristophanes’ great satire “The Wasps” at Cambridge. He composed an entire suite, but only

SHUSWAP Visitors’ G

uide 2013

a few numbers are heard today, with the overture the best known among them. It is full of good spirit and catchy tunes. The Concerto in E minor for Cello and Orchestra (1919) is one of Elgar’s later works and marks a change from the “Pomp and Circumstance” style of his earlier work. The Cello Concerto, said one authority, is “an extremely sensitive recording of the composer’s later mentality.” Elgar himself, when asked the ‘meaning’ of the piece, replied simply, “A man’s attitude to life.” Gerald Finzi, born in London in 1901, became one of the most characteristically “English” composers of his generation. The Romance for Strings was written in 1928. Gustav Holst was an English composer, arranger and teacher. Best known for his orchestral suite The Planets, he composed a large number of works across a range of genres, although none achieved comparable success. His distinctive compositional style was the product of many influences, including the English folksong revival of the early 20th century. Holst worked on his Cotswolds Symphony in 1899 and 1900 and it was first performed in 1902. An interesting sidebar to this performance is the fact that a performing edition of this work only became available in 2006, which means that it may not have been heard for a century. This may be the Canadian premiere. Visit www.kamloopssymphony.com for more information about the Kamloops Symphony.

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Being North

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Salmon Arm Art Gallery is pleased to present “Being North,” a selection of new works by BFA undergraduate students at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops. Fifteen multimedia works by third and fourth year students will be on display. The curatorial theme asks what it means to be Canadian, to be north of the 49th parallel. The works explore how are we different from other developed nations, and whether our culture is unique in its response to weather, politics, environment and business. Co-curated by the students themselves, this exhibition offers viewers a glimpse into artistic process as the emerging artists work through their media and their message. Opening night is on Friday, March 7 at 7:00 p.m. with live music and refreshments. The exhibition runs until March 29, and is sponsored by Acorn Music. Coffee Break is on Thursday, March 20 from 2:00–4:00 p.m., and the Artist Trading Card session is on Tuesday, March 11 from 3:00–4:00 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday to Saturday, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Follow Salmon Arm Arts Centre on Facebook for up-to-date event details. Pictured below: “Full Circle” by Carol Schlosar.

Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A11

Word on the Lake registration opens

Registration opens March 1st for the 2014 Word on the Lake Writers Festival, from Friday, May 16 to Sunday, May 18, in Salmon Arm. Presenters this year are authors Carmen Aguirre, Gail AndersonDargatz, Ann Eriksson, Diana Gabaldon, Gary Geddes, C.C. Humphreys, and Ursula Maxwell-Lewis; musician-songwriter David Essig; editor Shelagh Jamieson;

agent Carolyn Swayze; and publisher Howard White. Pick up a registration form at Bookingham Palace, Hidden Gems Bookstore or The Book Nook, all in Salmon Arm, or register on line at www.saow.ca. For more information, email csosnowsky@ shaw.ca or call Cathy at 250-832-2454. There are still a few days left to sharpen your metaphorical pencils! As part of the

Word on the Lake Writers Festival, the Shuswap Association of Writers invites you to enter the Askew’s Foods’ Word on the Lake Writing Contest, but hurry. The contest closes March 3rd, 2014. There are cash prizes as well as inclusion in the Askew’s Foods Word on the Lake Anthology. Find all the details at www.saow.ca or call Mary-Lou at 778-489-3331.

DISTRICT OF SICAMOUS

PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Act and the Community Charter, NOTICE is hereby given that the Council of the District of Sicamous will hold a PUBLIC HEARING in Council Chambers, District of Sicamous Municipal Office, 446 Main Street, Sicamous, B.C. V0E 2V0 on Wednesday, March 12th, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. to consider the following application to amend the District of Sicamous Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 750, 2009 and the District of Sicamous Zoning Bylaw No. 101, 1993 as follows:

Official Community Plan Amendment 1. Schedule B of the District of Sicamous Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 750, 2009 be amended by re-designating the property located at 524 Dabell Street and legally described as Lot 1, District Lot 496, Plan KAP69652, K.D.Y.D. as shown on Schedule “A” attached to and forming part of this Bylaw No. 869, 2014 from Waterfront Residential to Parks and Community Facilities. 2. Schedule C of the District of Sicamous Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 750, 2009 be amended by removing the Waterfront Development Permit Area designation of the property located at 524 Dabell Street and legally described as Lot 1, District Lot 496, Plan KAP69652, K.D.Y.D. as shown on Schedule “A” attached to and forming part of this Bylaw No. 869, 2014. Schedule “A” Attached to and forming part of Bylaw No. 869, 2014 (524 Dabell Street) cited as “District of Sicamous Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 750, 2009 Amending Bylaw No. 869, 2014 (524 Dabell Street)”

cinemaphile by Emily Garrett

The Right Kind of Wrong

This will be the Shuswap Film Society’s closing night film for our 25th anniversary film festival and will be accompanied by complimentary coffee and chocolates for our audience before the film. In this romantic comedy, The Right Kind of Wrong tells the story of Leo Palamino (Ryan Kwanten), a struggling dishwasher made famous, not by his dream of being a great writer, but by his ex-wife’s successful internet blog entitled “Why You Suck” which broadcasts Leo’s many flaws and failures. However, everything changes for Leo when he falls in love at first sight with Colette (Sara Canning) at a wedding. But the first of many problems, she’s the bride; and when the mother-ofthe-bride, Tess (Catherine O’Hara), shares her doubts that Colette has made the right choice, Leo stops at nothing to win the heart of the girl of his dreams through perseverance and integrity. The Right Kind of Wrong starts at 7:30 p.m. on March 1 at the Salmar Classic Theatre.

School district art fair

You are invited to come to Piccadilly Mall February 28th through March 7th to see some fantastic art from district student artists during the 20th annual school district art fair. Thank you to each of the coordinators who organize the panels for their schools. The community enjoys the display each year! Come watch as talented local artists teach on Wednesday, March 5, between 9:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. These artists share their time and talent and bring new and exciting art opportunities to the district’s students.

Zoning Bylaw Amendment: 1. Schedule “A” of Zoning Bylaw No. 101, 1993 be amended by rezoning property located at 524 Dabell Street and legally described as Lot 1, District Lot 496, Plan KAP69652, K.D.Y.D. as shown on Schedule “A” attached to and forming part of Bylaw No. 870, 2014 from R.1 & 2 Single and Two Family Residential to S.3 – Civic Use. Schedule “A” Attached to and forming part of Bylaw No. 870, 2014 (524 Dabell Street) cited as “District of Sicamous Zoning Bylaw No. 101, 1993 Amending Bylaw No. 870, 2014 (524 Dabell Street)

A copy of the proposed bylaws to amend the Official Community Plan and to rezone the subject property may be viewed at the District Office or alternatively, may be viewed on the District’s website: www.sicamous.ca under “Bylaws” – click on the proposed amendments to the Official Community Plan and proposed amendments to the Zoning Bylaw. Further, a copy of the proposed bylaws to amend the Official Community Plan and Zoning Bylaw may be inspected between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, from February 28th, 2014 to March 12th, 2014 inclusive, at the office of the Municipal Clerk, District of Sicamous, 446 Main Street, Sicamous, B.C. V0E 2V0. Please present written submissions to the District Office no later than 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 11th, 2014. This is your only opportunity to express comments or concerns regarding this application as Council is not permitted to receive further submissions after the close of the Public Hearing. The District of Sicamous assumes no responsibility for correspondence or emails not received by the District office prior to the Public Hearing. Heidi Frank, Chief Administrative Officer District of Sicamous PO Box 219, Sicamous, B.C. V0E 2V0 Email: hfrank@sicamous.ca


A12 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

New pot law stinks

In the spring of 1997, four days before his 20th birthday, my new friend Bob Raven was goofing around at Pioneer Park in Kamloops playing volleyball and having fun with his buddies when he decided to join some of them in the lake. Without thinking, the college student ran down the dock and dove in to what he later found out was less than three feet of water. He felt his neck break instantly. Lying face down, motionless, he wondered how long it would take his friends to notice he was paralyzed. Not wanting to be moved for fear his situation could get worse, he was supported in the cold water for over an hour before the ambulance finally arrived. By then the local newspaper was already there, and he was their front page story the next day. He spent the next two months at Vancouver General Hospital before being admitted into GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre, where he would begin learning to live his life as a quadriplegic. After plummeting from 160 lbs down to 105, he started using marijuana to help regain his appetite and dull his pain and spasms in order to get through the day and sleep through the night. “It was a natural way for me to get off most of the heavy prescription pills I was on,” he said. “Before my accident I had always been healthy and I wanted to keep living as well as I could. I didn’t want to be addicted to drugs like morphine.”

OnaBrighterNote by Lori Welbourne Four years ago he attained a license to cultivate his own cannabis, and with the aid of his helpers he’s been able to medicate himself sufficiently by grinding it down and either vaporizing it, putting it in capsules or using it in his baking so he reaps the healing benefits without getting high. New regulations that the Canadian government is about to implement will change all of that. As of this April people like Bob, who are legally allowed to produce their own pot for medicinal purposes, will now have to buy it from a federally-approved supplier at a much higher cost. “It won’t just be more expensive,” he said. “It will be an inferior product delivered dry through Canada Post.” That means patients unable to smoke or requiring healthier extract treatments such as edibles, topicals, juices, tinctures and infused food items won’t be able to use it at all. “I can’t imagine they’ll be able to keep up with the demand or retain our privacy,” he added. “People will be forced to break the law by continuing to grow their own, or they’ll buy from illegal suppliers willing to sell it cheaper and more discreetly.” Frustrated there’s still such a stigma regarding marijuana, despite its proven therapeutic impact, Bob believes these new regulations come down to politics and money.

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Good lookin’ shirts, great cause

Lakeshore News staff (from left) Michelle Weisinger, Denise Buffie, Chris Faltin, and Jeff Morrison sport pink tops for the seventh annual Pink Shirt Day, a national event marking a stand against bullying. Howard Vangool photo.

“The only people happy with this change in law are the ones who will monetarily profit from it,” he said. “It will only hurt people like me.” Recognizing there is a crime element that needs to be controlled, Bob thinks the government should simply limit the number of plants per person. “With my prescription I only have access for enough to grow my own medicine,” he said. “But there are doctors out there willing to write up prescriptions for way more plants than one person actually requires.” He isn’t against federally-approved suppliers, he just wants to see a combination of options so people who aren’t abusing the system can continue to safely grow their own, and those who aren’t able

will have access as well. “Big illegal grow-ops on the news have much of society thinking pot gardens are dangerous,” he said. “It takes the same electrical equipment to grow tomatoes that it does marijuana, and with my intent and limited supply, there’s nothing unsafe or corrupt about it.” Bob is now hoping B.C. lawyer John Conroy’s class action lawsuit against Health Canada has these new changes declared unconstitutional, and the new regulations will be overturned. I am hoping the same. For more info: JohnConroy.com/mmarcoalition Lori Welbourne is a syndicated columnist. She can be contacted at LoriWelbourne.com

Concerns about White Lake

The thunderstorm had let up, with just a smattering of rain on the road ahead. A small figure emerged from under a lone pine tree. The bushy grey hair, khaki shorts, deep tan, and knapsack over his shoulder told me it was him – ‘Nature Boy.’ He was hitchhiking to the Okanagan to pick fruit. In winter he lived in the basement of an old abattoir by the Grasslands Hotel at the top of the hill, in downtown Merritt. I stopped the truck, and he hopped in, brown eyes flashing through a warm smile. We soon were deep in conversation about life in general, as we rolled on down that old highway. Then, he looked up at the large cumulus clouds drifting above, saying some were dirty while other were cleaner. I presumed he was talking about what comes into our environment from Asia and China in trade winds, in the form of pollutants. He was a very intelligent person, who, as a young man, had built large, major buildings in Vancouver. He married, had a family, then had a breakdown of sorts, which set him drifting away from society. As I look back on his words today, and realize just how our universe works, it just might appear that his philosophy on clouds is proving true, right here at home. Pollutants carried over from Europe and Asia settle in the snows. Come spring, particles move in the snowmelt to our rivers, streams, and lakes. As the ozone layer high above opens and lets ultraviolet rays down onto earth, animals, fish, and plant life are affected. This is now effecting shoal beds in local lakes, where trout find aquatic critters to sustain their life cycles, and a prime example of this is White Lake. White Lake has always been a popular angling spot, with a good park for camping, launch facility, and excellent trout fishery. But that started to change a few seasons ago, as the ecology of the lake began to change. Limnology is

shuswapoutdoors by Hank Shelley nature at work in a lake, with a combination of sunlight, aquatic growth, and water quality, all working together to form a balance; and White is changing along with the trout. Too, the population of goldfish are also increasingly affecting growth of trout (which feed on them), along with a dwindling population of aquatic critters. Through calls and comments by experienced anglers to the fishery biologist in Kamloops, on what is taking place in the lake, it has been determined that there is an issue. As well as making phone calls, concerned residents and anglers began a letter-writing campaign to government officials, trying to persuade them to take a serious look into the situation. It was then determined there is a concern about the lake, and its highly-valued trout fishery. Now, working with the biologist, and possibly researchers from Thompson Rivers University into the decline in aquatic vegetation/macro-invertebrate populations, efforts are being made to acquire funding to support the study. According to a letter from the biologist to one of the local proponents, the scientists, too, have seen a decline in the aquatic ecosystems of small lakes in the southern BC interior. (Continued on next page)


Winter activities in the great outdoors and Spa Hills, always paying attention to weather conditions, avalanche warnings and safety concerns. Local snowmobile clubs such as the Salmon Arm Snowblazers, Crowfoot Mountain Snowmobile Club, Eagle Valley Snowmobile Club, Hunter ’s Range Snowmobile Association and Spa Hills

There is no reason to stay inside while winter still holds sway over the Shuswap, although lately there have been hints of the coming of spring. For a couple of hours of enjoyment you can cross-country ski and snowshoe at Larch Hills Nordic Ski area south of Salmon Arm (above), Skmana Lake near Chase, and Skimikin near Tappen. As well, you can make your own trails in parks and along the waterfront. For longer, more epic cross-country journeys, try the Larch Hills Traverse, a 40 km one-way route from Salmon Arm to Sicamous. Be aware that this is a minimum full-day outing. You’ll need food, safety equipment and a head lamp, and don’t do it alone. In the North Shuswap, you can ski to the Crowfoot Meadows and in the South Shuswap there is the Blind Bay to White Lake Trail and also the Reinecker Creek Trail. Snowmobiling is another excellent outdoor winter activity. The Shuswap is home to at least seven excellent sledding areas catering to all ages and skill levels. Check out the Fly Hills, Crowfoot Mountain, Owlhead Mountain, Eagle Pass, Queest Mountain, Hunter’s Range

Snowmobile Club can help you if you are new to this area or sport. If there is an extended cold snap, at times you can play hockey or skate on a frozen pond or lake – a very fun and special Canadian experience. And of course, there is always walking.

nous clouds continue to carry pollutants with just a ray of hope and sunshine into the future, over White Lake.

Here and there in the Shuswap

Sometimes, just sometimes, as hunters and anglers, we wonder how decisions are made in managing our fish/game populations, to give us reasonable opportunity to harvest what nature has given us as surplus. This after allowing for recruitment, what predators take, and natural causes. Kokanee: The introduction of sterile kokanee into Monte Lake, three years ago, created a great and successful fishery. This ice fishing season, however, it was difficult to catch even a few. Because it was successful, the fisheries branch, planted another 20,000 juveniles. They will be 8-10 inches, with too many kokanee for the macro-aquatic food supply. Wolves: a contentious issue, with packs following moose, deer, and elk populations, with a government management plan not implemented. Moose: we are fortunate to have a stable local population. A recent fly-

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localities

by Wendy Clay When the weather is mild and pleasant, there are many trails you can explore, even in the city. Salmon Arm has the foreshore trail along Shuswap Lake (left, centre). McGuire Lake is a short and easy circuit, and Peter Jannink Nature Park, located just past the sewage treatment plant, is a good place for a gentle winter stroll. In Sicamous, try the Riverfront Nature Park at the end of Silver Sands Road, which has several kilometres of pleasant trails. Towards Malakwa, there is the Eagle River Nature Park, with various loops trails near the Eagle River. This park also attracts snowshoers and cross-country skiers, so be on the lookout for them. A great place for a winter walk in Enderby is the Jim Watt Heritage River Walk. Extending along the bank of the Shuswap River the level walkway connects Riverside Park to Belvidere Park (left, below). Many of the South Shuswap trails near Blind Bay are steeper, but if it’s not too icy, the lower section of the Balmoral Bluffs trail has a loop trail that is rated an easy hiking trail. In Sorrento there is a short but easy walk by a creek along the edges of the Sorrento-Blind Bay Community Park. You likely know many other places to take a brisk winter walk, or ski or ride. Just get outside and enjoy our Shuswap winter and be grateful that it’s not nearly as tough as many other places in Canada! Photos by Wendy Clay.

Concerns about White Lake (continued)

The fishery biologist spoke at our recent regional wildlife meeting, and he stated that David Schindler, Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, has suggested that a large hole in the ozone layer is having an adverse effect on many lakes, with the death of carra and marl beds, which hold the invertebrate populations and maintain healthy trout populations. Another issue is the large numbers of new fry coming into the lake from Cedar Creek spawners, come late June, increasing the number of trout growing in the lake, as well as the numbers put in from the hatchery– about 20,000. The theory put forth by the Ministry of Environment is, leave the large beaver dam intact in the creek to reduce spawning. My thought is that then you’ll have spawn-bound trout and still an overwhelming population of goldfish reducing food for the trout. Just sometimes, what goes around, comes around, and as my thoughts go back to my friend Nature Boy, who no doubt passed on years ago, those omi-

Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A13

over count on Larch hills showed 47 animals. Elk: There now is a small herd of elk east of Sicamous, as well as 60-80 animals in the Enderby area. Deer: A high population of coyotes is taking a toll on local deer herds in all of the Shuswap. If you’re inclined to help reduce the coyote population, get your predator call, some white camo, and tune in a few. Remember: as long as enthusiasm lasts, so long is youth still with us; so get out and enjoy our great outdoors!

Notch Hill Hall coffeehouse

On Saturday, February 15th many musical entertainers gathered in Notch Hill Hall for a fun evening. All the tables were decorated with a Valentine’s Day theme. Many thanks to all the participants, supporters and the organizers, especially to Bill for all his patience setting up his technical equipment. Thanks also goes to our sponsors, Blue Canoe Bakery and Canada Safeway Bakery in Salmon Arm, for supplying sweets and cookies. Congratulations to the 50/50 winner, Mrs. Anita Walters! Please mark your calendar and join us for the next coffeehouse at Notch Hill Hall, on Saturday, March 15th, 7:30 p.m., with a St. Patricks’ Day theme. See you there!

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Tuesday, March 11, 2014 - 7:00 pm Comfort Inn and Suites 1090 - 22nd St. NE, Salmon Arm

Guest Speaker: Judy Nicol, the Interior Health lead for the Advance Care Planning Initiative

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Silver Creek Community Association

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A14 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

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SPORTS & LEISURE

Find it in the Lakeshore News Salmon Arm

Eliminators win TORL Cup banner

SilverBacks Junior ‘A’ Hockey Club

FAN APPRECIATION NIGHT @ SHAW CENTRE

WITH GAME WORN JERSEY AUCTION Many Prizes To Be Given Away During Game & Between Periods

By Cole Martin The U14B Shuswap Eliminators had a strong season going 12-0-3 and finished first in their league! They entered the TORL (Thompson Okanagan Ringette League) Cup playoffs with confidence and it showed, going 4 and 0 winning the TORL Cup banner. The Eliminators are now off to Prince George for the Provincials on March 6–9th. The team will be doing a bottle drive on Saturday, March 1st from 10:00 a.m.–2:00

p.m. Thank you for your support and congratulations to all the girls for a great season. The coaches would like to thank

Pony Club fundraiser

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Snowshoe your love for Pony Club on Larch Hills (south of Salmon Arm) on Saturday, March 15. Calling on all Pony Club members, former members, parents, supporters and horse lovers in general. Tour the scenic Larch Hills snowshoe trails on Sat. March 16 and all proceeds from snowshoe rentals go to Armstrong Pony Club. The recently re-started club has 14 members who are fundraising for various riding and educational opportunities. John’s Ski Shack is sponsoring special rental rates of $10/person for rentals on snowshoes from 10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. For information call (250) 832-3457.

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LEAGUE STANDINGS

Standings as of February 26, 2014

ARMSTRONG REGIONAL COOPERATIVE

Sunday Duplicate Bridge Club results for Sunday, February 23rd are as follows: in first place, Geoff Collins & Orville Cooper; in second place, Dan Quality & Gerry Chatelain; in third place, Doreen & Dennis Roberts; and tied for fourth place Carol Jeffery & Ona Bouchard and Peggy Peterson & Nan McAdam. The Sunday Duplicate Club meets every Sunday at 1:00 p.m. at the 5th Avenue Senior’s Centre. For more information call 250-832-6550.

SilverBacks SilverBacks

Boat To

1 km East of Canoe Beach, Across the tracks from Canoe Wharf

Sunday duplicate

Salmon Salmon ArmArm

BCHL

GROCERIES • LIQUOR AGENCY BAKERY • ATM TAKE & BAKE PIZZAS

all the parents for their dedication to getting their daughters regularly to the rink. Photo contributed.

GP 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 55 56 57 58 57 56 56 55

W 36 35 35 34 33 32 30 29 25 26 27 25 20 21 13 9

L 14 13 15 16 15 18 16 22 22 25 27 30 28 29 36 40

T 3 3 2 2 3 4 4 4 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2

OTL 3 5 4 4 5 2 6 1 7 3 2 2 7 4 5 4

Be-Ja Cabinets Inc. Instock Countertops • Cabinets • Hardware

250-832-2552

4921 Auto Rd. SE, Salmon Arm be-ja@shaw.ca

Salmon Arm’s Independent Toy Store!

X-Clinched Playofffs

PTS 78 78 76 74 74 70 70 63 58 57 57 53 49 48 33 24

170 Hudson Ave NE - Salmon Arm

250-832-0539

www.facebook.com/PUZZLEFACTORYTOYS

MUSIC LESSONS

steelstring.ca Ross Houghland - Acoustic / Electric Guitar & Bass

• Birthday Loot Bags 778.489.1010 • 250.515.1585

ross@steelstring.ca

available at


www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A15

Local skiers do well at BC Winter Games

The District of Mission was host to the 2014 BC Winter Games, held from February 20–23. The Games included participants from across BC in 18 sports. Athletes range in age from 9 to 40 years old. This year, four skiers from the Larch Hills Nordic Club qualified to be a part of the games. For the individual sprint race, the team earned three bronze medals. David Bakker took third for the Juvenile boys, Rachel May placed third for the Juvenile girls, and Konrad Van Varseveld placed third for the Midget boys. Aiden Hepburn also raced in the Midget boys category and earned eleventh place. In the individual start race, Larch Hills took three silver medals. David Bakker earned silver for the Juvenile boys, Rachel May earned silver for the Juvenile girls, and Konrad Van Varseveld earned silver for the Midget boys. Aiden Hepburn took ninth place for the Midget boys. And to round out the weekend, the relay team of

David Bakker, Rachel May, Konrad Van Varseveld and Alana Brittin (from the Revelstoke Nordics) won the gold medal. Congratulations to all of the Larch Hills skiers on their excellent results at the BC Winter Games. For more race results visit www.bcgames.org.

AGM

SHUSWAP RINGETTE ASSOCIATION Thursday April 3rd, 2014 Shuswap Ringette will be holding their annual AGM on Thursday, April 3rd, 2014 at Intermissions. Dinner 5:30

This AGM is taking place immediately after our year end banquet. Everyone encouraged to attend. www.shuswapringette.ca

From left, David Bakker, Rachel May, and Konrad Van Varseveld show off their hardware from the BC Winter Games held in Mission last weekend. The Larch Hiils skiers earned a bronze, silver, and gold medal a piece. Photo contributed.

Lakeshore News travels to

Registration open for PeeWee and first year Bantam players only Due to a lack of volunteers, SAMBA is only accepting registrations for the PeeWee U13 (2001/02) and first year Bantams that wish to play down age divisions. SAMBA has had 4 long time board members retire as their children have grown up. Thus, in order to run other divisions, volunteers are needed for:

President Registrar Secretary Uniform Manager (for the league) Umpire Manager Web site and social media Manager Division Coordinators Coaching staff Duties for most positions are in the “forms” section on our website.

Grand Mound, WA

Karen Ashton of Salmon Arm, along with her family Craig, Hailey, and Gavin, traveled to Great Wolf Lodge in Grand Mound, Washington, for the Family Day weekend in February 2014. Hailey and Gavin are pictured here with one of the critters at the popular indoor waterpark resort. Karen receives $10 for having her picture printed and is entered into the Lakeshore News Travels To contest for 2014.

Travels To payments must be picked up in person at Lakeshore News, 161 Hudson Ave NE.

If you would like to see baseball (hard ball) happen for your son or daughter at another division level, please gather other interested families and contact Shirley Deglan (Acting President) for more information visit our website under contacts. This would need to happen ASAP as the season begins in late April. Otherwise, players can seek registration in neighbouring associations (e.g., Vernon, Kamloops, Rutland, etc.). Thanks to those who have volunteered in the past!! PS. If you have a uniform from last year, please email Reta at: markandreta@shaw.ca Website: www.salmonarmbaseball.com


A16 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

SERVICEDIRECTORY

AUTOBODY/WINDSHIELD

42nd Street SW

4130 - 1st Ave. SW

Ben’s Towing

250-832-8947

Fischer’s Funeral Home

1st. Ave. SW

• ICBC Repairs • Glass Replacement • Painting • Sand Blasting • Frame Straightening • Private Insurance Repairs

Trans Canada Hwy.

Mark Pennell owner

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS

FEATURE OF THE WEEK Mur’s Movin’ & Storage, a one stop moving service and the only moving company located in Salmon Arm with a walk-in office, continues to offer great service to their customers. Murray has expanded his servicing area and is now licensed to do moves in and out of Manitoba. Murray and Marie offer a full packing service, and will pack as little or as much as you need. They also sell packing supplies to the do-it-yourselfer. In their 2500 sq foot indoor heated warehouse your belongings can be stored securely. They are fully licensed and insured and do both residential and commercial moves and specialize in piano moves. With two 5-ton trucks and a 45-ft tractor-trailer unit, Mur’s is able to handle any moving challenge. Phone the office at 250-832-9782 to discuss your move, or check them out on their website at: www.mursmovin.com

2 - 320 7th St. SW, Salmon Arm • 250 833-0132

We have the most up-to-date equipment including full diagnostic tools. Our services include: Diagnostics • Transmissions • Injection Pumps • Exhaust systems • Tune-Ups • Clutches • Wheel Alignments/Suspension • Brakes/Steering • Struts/Shocks • Vehicle Inspection (Including out of province) • Electrical Work • Air Conditioning • Tire Changeover 1-877-833-4299 or 250-833-4299 • Bays #1-#4 - 321-7th St. SW, Salmon Arm FLEET RATES AVAILABLE, PLEASE CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION

EXCAVATING & LOGGING Serving the Shuswap since 1972

• Road Building • Site Preparation • Water Lines • Basements • Gravel Products RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL

experienced since 1989 4321 - 45th Street SE, Salmon Arm www.mursmovin.com Give us a call

Friendly, professional automotive repairs

Interior Diesel Performance is now LARGER

Winston Johnson & Chris Johnson

Experienced Mechanics • Diagnostics Preventative Maintenace & Repairs for All Makes & Models, Domestic & Imports Designated Inspection Facility

centerpointauto.ca

DIESEL TRANSMISSIONS

250 832-9782

MURRAY CLARK owner/operator

We sell packing supplies Housecleaning now available

Equipment: 2 John Deere 160-L-C Excavators with Thumbs, 1 with guarding. 580M Case 4WD Backhoe, Tandem & Pup BY THE HOUR OR CONTRACT Cell 250-833-2465 or 250-833-6265

250-832-4678

GRANITE COUNTERTOPS

Owners: Eric & Shelley Hrynyk

Eric

DESIGNATED INSPECTION FACILITY

CUSTOM WOODWORKING

Repairs: 250 832-7543 U-Haul/Fax: 250 832-2310 2560 Trans Canada Hwy. SW, Salmon Arm

Custom Wood Working

CHIMNEYS 38 YEARS EXPERIENCE

EST. 1957

GERRY & SON ROOFING & CHIMNEY SWEEP

100/flue

$ AAA Rating

(plus service call)

• Custom finishing & installation • Custom railings • Custom cabinets & furniture

SHUSWAP MILLWORK & FINISHING

250-832-9556

5351 - 46th Ave. SE, Salmon Arm

www.shuswapmillwork.bc.ca

OUTDOOR EQUIP. REPAIR

WETT Inspections - Level 4

Ron Kenoras

250-832-8267

LOOKING TO ADVERTISE? WOOD & PELLET STOVE SALES

BEST PRICES • Certified chimney sweeping • W.E.T.T. Certified Inspections • 15 years Experience • Installations • Chimney Liners & Repairs 250.833.6256

Call Chris today at Lakeshore News

250-832-9461

• Lawn & Garden: mowers, rototillers, trimmers • Construction: compactors & generators • Forestry: brush saws, chain saws & pumps • ATVs & recreational equipment

Salmon Arm

250-832-4213

MILES KENTEL 24 YEARS LOCALLY

SERVICEDIRECTORY

NOW is the time to start

You will be noticed and

advertising your business.

GET MORE BUSINESS

Lakeshore News has several packages to suit your advertising needs. Each 10-week package booked will receive a picture and article about their business.

Service Directory

For more info call 250-832-9461

by placing an ad in the

Contact Chris today! at Lakeshore News 250-832-9461

Give us your scores!

After your weekend sports event,

provide Lakeshore News with scores and standings and we’ll publish them in the following issue. Deadline: Tuesday noon. Phone, fax or e-mail


www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A17

SERVICEDIRECTORY PLUMBING

J’s PUMPS & PLUMBING • • • • • •

Call Jerry Jones Ph:

water systems water well testing crane for pump pulling plumbing service work BC Certified Pump Installer

832-7922 •

SEPTIC SYSTEMS

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

Fax: 832-7699

North Broadview Plumbing & Heating is owned by Derek and Kristie Nisse and started operation in October, 2005. Derek has been involved in the plumbing industry since 1992. The business provides the following services: drain cleaning, renovations, plumbing repairs, repairing water leaks, furnaces, sewage and water pumps. Derek has been a resident of Salmon Arm since 1976 and graduated from SASS. He grew up playing hockey in Salmon Arm and is still playing and coaching. Derek looks forward to serving the city of Salmon Arm with quality service in plumbing and heating.

SHUSWAP SEPTIC – and Site Preparation –

cell# 250 803 3456 | home# 250 833 5550 Email: s-rogers@live.ca • Registered Onsite Wastewater Practitioner • All types of septic system installed • Engineered plans • Site preparation & general excavating • Type 1 systems from $10K

RENOVATIONS

Got some interesting local news?

RENOVATIONS • FINISHING • DRYWALL • TILING • ETC

Don Batke

Licenced & Bonded

Serving the Okanagan/Shuswap

free estimates Cell:

250.878.4460

SALMON ARM

• Specializing in service & renovations • Hot water tanks • Drain cleaning • Furnace service & repairs • Residential & construction

Call: 250 832-0255

Email Lakeshore News: editorial@ lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Derek Nisse

Find us on the web.... www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca and

facebook

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

‘Distracted’ A comedy written by Lisa Loomer and directed by Guest Director Adele Kuyek, plays Thurs–Sun until Sat. Mar. 8, at Shuswap Theatre. Rated PG13 (some swearing). Tix at Intwined Fibre Arts. Info: www.shuswaptheatre.com or 8329283. Shuswap Writers’ Coffee House, Fri. Feb. 28, at Choices, 40 Lakeshore Dr. Guest author is award winning Patricia Donahue from Vernon. Light supper 5:30 p.m. and open mike readings start at 6:30 p.m. Poets, prose writers, song writers—all welcome. Or, just come to listen. No cover charge. Info: Dorothy at 832-3537. Spring Top-Up for S.A.F.E., Sat. Mar. 1, 11:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m. at the Save-On-Foods parking lot. Donations sought for the women’s shelter. Items needed include toilet paper, Kleenex, toiletries, and items for children’s lunches, etc. Find out more on Facebook at the Random Acts of Kindness-Salmon Arm group. Salmon Arm Army Cadets auto battery drive, Sat. Mar. 1 and Sun. Mar. 2. Scrappy’s Metal Recycling will be buying auto batteries with all profits given to the Army Cadets. Dig out your old batteries. Earn a little extra cash and support community youth at the same time. Abe Zacharias in concert, Sun. Mar. 2, 2:30 p.m. at Branch 62 of the Royal Canadian Legion, 141 Hudson Ave NW. Info: 832-1342. Shuswap Naturalists meeting, Tues. Mar. 4, 7:00 p.m. in the library at SASS, Sullivan campus. Jeremy Ayotte, Provincial Coordinator for B.C. Sheep Separation, will speak on the highrisk situation of bighorn sheep near Clinton. Info: Barb 8324755. Buddhist Meditation Class with nun Kelsang Chenma, Wed. Mar. 5, 7:00–8:30 p.m. at Downtown Activity Centre, 451 Shuswap St. SW (Lib. Rm.). Drop-in class consists of guided meditations and a teaching. Suggested donation $10, special rates for students & seniors. For class topic & info www.dorjechang.ca or 1-558-0952. No fragrance please. Paid listing. World Day of Prayer 2014, Fri. Mar. 7, 1:30 p.m. at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 60 1 St E. Northern Lights Chamber Choir presents ‘Reflections,’ Fri. Mar. 7, 7:30 p.m. & Sun. Mar. 16, 2:30 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church. Tix/info www.northernlightschamberchoir.ca or call 832-4103. Community plan for a public system of integrated early care and learning ($10/Day Plan), Mon. Mar. 10, 2:30 p.m. at the Salmon Arm City Council Meeting, City Hall, 500 2nd Ave NE with a public forum 6:00–8:00 p.m. at the District Education Centre, 2960 Okanagan Ave. Free and open to the public. Retired Teachers’ meeting, Wed. Mar. 12, 10:30 a.m. at the Downtown Activity Centre. Topic: Dave Harper S.A. History Part 2. Info: A. Waters 832-993. BC Govt Retired Employees Assoc. Meeting Wed. Mar. 12, 12 noon luncheon at the Seniors Activity Centre, 175 5th Ave. Marilyn Harford from Finch and Co. Accounts will discuss

Seniors and Taxation. Members, retirees and guests welcome. Shuswap Hospice Society offers a six-week volunteer training program, Sat. Mar. 15, 9:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m. for six weeks. For anyone interested in volunteering with the Shuswap Hospice Society and/or who are struggling with their own grief and who want to learn new approaches; volunteers from outlying areas also wanted. Training follows the BCHPCA standard of training. For information and to register, call Judy at 8327099. Salmon Arm Community Band practices Sundays, 7:00 p.m. at the First United Church, 20 4 SE info: 832-2195. Gospel Coffeehouse, 3rd Sunday/mo, 2:00 p.m. at the Seniors Drop In Centre, 31 Hudson Ave (across from the art gallery). Come to play or just listen. Info: Hank 833-5072 or Lloyd 836-5455. Seated Qi Gong classes Mondays starting Mar. 3, 7:00 p.m. at Piccadilly Terrace. Six week 45 minute class, appropriate for the elderly with limited mobility. Info/registration (required): Lynne Ozone 515-5966. Community Volunteer Income Tax Program, Mon.–Fri. Starting Mar. 3, 9:00 a.m.–2:30 p.m. at Fletcher Park Seniors’ Resource Centre. No appt req’d. Uncomplicated returns only, for low-income folk. Info: 832-7000. Shuswap Bee Club meets first Mon. of the month, 7:00 p.m. at the Askews Uptown Community Room (upstairs on the Broadview side of the building). Next meeting Mar 3. Info: Beckie 679-8861. Scrabble Club, Tuesdays 9:30 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. at Seniors’ Fifth Ave Activity Centre. For info phone Elizabeth 832-7478. Seniors’ Theatre, Tuesday mornings, 9:00–11:00 a.m. at the Shuswap Theatre. The most fun you can have in two hours— standing up or sitting down! No experience necessary. Info: Peter at 675-3004. The Probus Club of Salmon Arm meets monthly on the first Tues./mo, 10:00 a.m. at the Downtown Activity Centre library. Info Dave Reed at 836-3652 or Milford Berger at 804-0977. Salmon Arm Badminton Club, Tuesdays, 7:00–9:00 p.m. at the Gathering Place, King’s Christian School (350 30 St. NE). For ages 16+ yrs, all levels. Info: Tim Goertz 804-7908. Shuswap Quilters Guild meets at 9:30 a.m. on 2nd and 4th Wed. of month in the parish hall of St. Joseph’s Church. Info: Carol 832-4263 or Blanche 832-9045. Weight & See drop-in service for parents with babies 10 days old to 6 mos. Weds 1:30-3 p.m. at S.A. Health Centre, 851 – 16 St. NE. Info: 833-4100. Shuswap Chess Club meets every Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Seniors Centre, 170 – 5th Ave. All chess players welcome regardless of level. Air Cadets 222 Shuswap meet Wednesdays 6:15 p.m. at South Canoe Ctr, 5970 10 Ave SE, Sept-June. For youth 12-18. Info: 832-2807 or info@222air.com. Square Dance classes Wednesdays 6:30 p.m. at Seniors Fifth Ave Activity Ctr. Info: Lori 832-4417. Parents Together drop-in group for parents of teens, Wednesdays 7:00–8:30 p.m. at the Shuswap Family Resource

Centre. Meet other parents, learn more about parenting teens and get support. Susie 833-6406. Salmon Arm Toastmasters meet Thursdays 7:00–9:00 p.m. at the library of SAS Sullivan Campus. Visitors welcome. Info: Walter 833-5802 or visit www.salmonarmtm.com. Salmon Arm Snow Blazers family snowmobiling club meets 2nd Thurs/mo, 7:00 p.m. in the back room of the Hideaway Pub. Info: Robin 540-0841 or Don 675-2420. Coffeehouse for emerging musical artists of all ages, 3rd Fri/ mo until April 18, 7:00 p.m. at SASCU Field of Dreams Clubhouse, 30th St. SE. All welcome. Info: Gerri 250 8334024 or Connie 250 832-8088. Salmon Arm Model Railroad Association’s layout is open Saturdays at Piccadilly Mall from 12 to 4 p.m. & Tuesday eves at 7 p.m. Merv Krull 832-7326. Search for Your Roots at Family History Centre, Tues. 12-3 p.m., 7-9 p.m., Wed. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 7-9 p.m., and Thurs. 12-3 p.m. at 1400 – 20 St. NE (Mormon Church). Info: Kathie 8358264 or Barb 675-4533. Skeptics in the Pub, Stop by for a casual get together and a great selection of micro-brews 2nd Sun/mo, 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. at the Wicked Spoon, 3rd St. SW. Info: facebook.com/groups/ shuswapatheists. Shuswap Lady Striders Year-round Wed. walkers meet at Wearabouts on Alexander St. at 12:15 p.m. for a 45-minute walk; Early Birds meet year-round on Thurs. for a 1-hour walk, 8 a.m. Uptown Askews parking lot. Other activities include hiking, snowshoeing, cross-country & downhill skiing, and cycling. Info: ladystriders@gmail.com. SUNNYBRAE

Shuswap Needle Arts Guild meets 1st/3rd Thurs./mo, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sept.-Jun. at the Sunnybrae Senior Centre. New members always welcome. Info: Marleine 675-2507 or Sharon 832-4588. GLENEDEN

Gleneden Hall: Recreational badminton Tuesdays 9:30– 11:00 a.m. Dennis 804-0917; Beginners’ Line Dancing, Wednesdays 9:30–11:00 a.m. Linda 804-0917. Beginners’ yoga, Thursdays 6:30 p.m. Megan 804-8261. Shuswap 4-H Club, 3rd Monday evening/mo, 6:30 p.m. Sandy 803-4600. NOTCH HILL

Notch Hill Town Hall Association meeting, Mon. Mar. 3, 7:30 p.m. at the Notch Hill Town Hall, 1639 Notch Hill Rd. Drs open at 6:30 p.m. Memberships will be accepted and election of officers scheduled. Notch Hill Coffeehouse, Sat. Mar. 15, 7:30 p.m. at Notch Hill Hall. St. Patrick’s Day theme. SORRENTO/BLIND BAY

Northern Lights Chamber Choir presents ‘Reflections,’ Sun. Mar. 2, 2:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s Anglican Church. Tix/info www.northernlightschamberchoir.ca or call 832-4103. Blind Bay Social Bridge Club meets Mondays 7:00 p.m. at the Blind Bay Hall. Info: 675-4334. Continued on page 18


A18 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

Continued from page 17 Seniors’ Theatre, Tuesday afternoons, 1:00–3:00 p.m. at the Sorrento Memorial Hall, or Wednesdays 1:00– 3:00 p.m. at Cedar Heights Community Centre. Info: Peter at 675-3004. Good Time Quilters meets 1st/3rd/5th Tues/mo, 10:00 a.m. in the Shuswap Lake Estates Lodge in the lower hall. All welcome. Info: Stephanie 6754936. Shuswap Wood Carvers meet every Wed. & Sat. from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Any interested is welcome. Info: Ken

Need help with government services for children, youth or young adults?

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

675-3316 or Norm 675-3764. Carpet bowling Wednesdays 1:30 p.m. at Blind Bay Hall, starting Oct. 2. New bowlers welcome! Info: 6752693. N & S Shuswap Guys and Gals Hikers meet 2nd/4th Wed/mo. Meet at Cedar Heights Centre parking lot. Info & meeting times: gloria16@telus.net or 675-0036. Storytime for ages 2-5, Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. Mar. 5, 12, 26, & Apr. 2; and Saturdays, 11:00 a.m. on Mar. 22 & Mar. 29 at the South Shuswap branch

Want to know your rights?

Feel like you are being treated unfairly or not being heard? In government care or in custody?

We can help

www.rcybc.ca

Moving from youth to adult services?

A New Mandate

The Representative is now able to provide advocacy for young adults (up to age 24) who have developmental disabilities and are eligible for CLBC services. If we can assist you or someone you care for, contact the Rep:

1-800-476-3933

Seniors’ Centres & Halls

Seniors’ 5th Avenue Activity Centre, 170 5th Ave. SE, Salmon Arm. 250832-1065. Fri. Feb. 7 Birthday Lunch 12 noon, Sun. Feb. 2 & 16 Jammers Dance 7:00 p.m., Sun. Feb. 9 Pancake breakfast 8 a.m.–noon. Fri. Feb. 21 4.3”auditorium x 2.6” General meeting 1:30 p.m. 200 seat available for rent. Seniors’ Drop-in Centre, 31 Hudson AveforNE, 832-3015. Created for: Representative Children and Rentals Youth 833-0902. Sun. Spiritualist Church, 10:30 a.m.–1 p.m. Norm Russell 832-0442, Mon. Mt. Ida Painters, 9 a.m.–2 p.m., Al Gates 832-5149, Tues. Painters Group, 9 Reber CreativeChurch, 7–9 p.m., Norm Rusa.m.–2 p.m., Al Gates 832-5149, Spiritualist 250.383.5255 sell 832-0442. Wed. directors’ meeting 3rd Wed. 10–11 a.m., Elder Services Seniors’ Outreach, 12:30–2:30 p.m., Sheila/Dave 833-4136, Potluck dinner last Wed, 5 p.m. Sat. Bingo 5–10 p.m., drs 4 p.m., games start at 6 p.m. Pool every day from 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Gospel music coffeehouse 1st/3rd Sunday, Hank Harder 833-5072. Seniors Resource Centre, 320A - 2nd Ave NE. Mon. Morning Market, seniors’ transport to Askews downtown to shop. Tues. Lunch w/ Friends, 11:15-1:15 at Catholic Church. Wed. Shop & Drop for housebound seniors. Tues/Wed foot care by appt. Thurs./Fri. Day Away – activities, companionship & lunch. Phone 832-7000 for info on any of these activities/programs. Canoe Seniors Br 92: 7330 49 St NE. Coffee Mon. & Fri. 9 a.m.; Cash Crib Tues. & Fri. 7 p.m. Last Wed/mo potluck 12 noon, general meeting 1 p.m. Bible study Thurs. 1 p.m. Pancake breakfast 3rd Sat., 8:30-11 a.m. Church on Sun. 11 a.m., crib 3rd Sun/mo 1 p.m. Hall rentals available 832-2622, 8328215. Silver Creek Seniors Hall: Summer programs: Crib 3rd Saturday/mo. 10:00 a.m. Pancake breakfast 4th Sunday/mo, 8:00 a.m. Footcare every 6 weeks (approx.) - call Pat 832-4174 for appt. Everyone welcome to all events. Sunnybrae Seniors Centre, 3595 Sunnybrae Canoe Pt. Rd. 835-8674, rental 835-8494. Potluck dinner meeting 3rd Tues/mo. 5:30 p.m., other events on notice. Shuswap Needle Arts Guild meets 1st/3rd Thurs. 10 a.m., Gemma 835-8842 or Sandra 832-9972. Sunnybrae Painters meets Tues. 9:30 a.m.– 2:30 p.m. call Jan Scott 835-4625. Quilters 1st/3rd Wed./mo, 10 a.m. call Maddie Welch 835-8255. Foot clinics every 6 weeks, $30, call Linda Adams 835-4470. Sorrento Senior Centre, 1148 Passchendaele Road adjacent to the Memorial Hall. Mon. Glee Club 9:30 a.m. Barb, 675-3835; AA & Al Anon 8:00 p.m.; Tues. Wheels to Meals 12:00 p.m. 2nd & 4th Tues, Louise, 6754871; men’s snooker 1:00 p.m., Rick, 675-2829; crib 1:30 p.m., Jane, 6754117; Wed: T.O.P.S. 8:15 a.m., Gail 675-2849, snooker 6 p.m., Rick, 6752829; Thurs: Weekly foot clinic, appts call Betty Anne 675-4182; Quilting 10 a.m., 675-5358, men’s snooker 1:00 p.m., Rick 675-2829, Sorrento Youth Resource Ctr, 6:30 p.m. Jenn 675-5269. Fri: ladies’ snooker 2:00 p.m. Joyce 675-5097; Bingo drs@6:30 p.m. games@7:00 p.m. Contact Bob 675-4182. Sat: Scottish Country Dancing, 9:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m., Wendy, 675-3518. Hospice, Linda, 675-2568. Sicamous Senior Centre, 1091 Shuswap Ave. www.sicamouseniors.ca, info@sicamouseniors.ca, 836-2446, fax 836-2446. Lunch by donation & a movie every Wed. noon; carpet bowling, 1 p.m. every Tues.; OAPO mtg. 11 a.m. first Fri/mo followed by potluck lunch; bi-monthly mtg. 2nd Fri 11 a.m. followed by potluck lunch; Coffee Tues. 9:00 a.m., Thurs. 9:00 a.m. & Sat. 9:00 a.m. Wii bowling all day every day. Falkland Seniors Hall, 5706 Highway 97 Tues. crafts, games, social, exercising, 1:00-4:00 p.m. Whist, crib, etc. 2:00-4:00 p.m. Drop-in fee $1.

of Okanagan Public Library, 2676 Fairway Hills Road in the Blind Bay Market. Drop-in. Info: 675-4818 or visit www.orl.bc.ca. Probus Copper Island meets at Toad Hall, behind Toby’s Restaurant, beside Curves in Sorrento, on the second Thurs./mo. Coffee at 9:30, meeting at 10:00. Guest speaker at 10:15-10:30. Gary Koo 679-3340 or Tom Wainwright 835-8424 for info. Sorrento Lions meet 1st/3rd Thurs/mo, 7:00 p.m. at the Memorial Hall, 1148 Passchendaele Rd. Open to men and women. Info: sorrentolionsclub@yahoo.ca or visit http://e-clubhouse.org/sites/sorrentobc/ Ladies’ Afternoon Out Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. in the Cedar Centre. All welcomed. This is a social time for the ladies of Cedar Heights and guests. Info Kathleen (675-5452) or Barb (675-5308). You are invited to join the Hiker Ladies on easy to difficult trails in the Sorrento-Blind Bay area on Fridays. Wear good walking shoes, carry water and dress for the weather. Info: joyce@intheshuswap.ca. Sorrento Scottish Country Dancers adult classes Saturdays 9:30 a.m.–noon @ The Sorrento Drop In Society Centre. Info: Wendy 675-3518 or visit www. RDSWeb.net/SSCD. SICAMOUS

Storytime for ages 3 to 6, Saturdays to Apr. 12, 11:00 a.m. Stories, music, puppets and fun at the Sicamous branch of Okanagan Regional Library. More info: www.orl.bc.ca.

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

ENDERBY/ASHTON CREEK

20th annual Shuswap Seed Swap and Natural Living Fair, Sat. Mar. 1 at A. L. Fortune High School. Speakers, DVD showings, over 60 vendors and a memorial display honouring June Griswold and her contribution to the seed saving world. Info: Sue 778443-0035 or Sarah 838-0587. Herr Kutter, the Barbaric Barber, a play by Billy St. John, Thurs. Mar. 6 – Sat. Mar. 8, doors at 7:00 p.m. curtain at 7:30 p.m., and Sun. Mar. 9, doors at 1:30 p.m. curtain at 2:00 p.m. Presented by the Grindrod Players at A. L. Fortune High School Theatre, 500 Bass Ave. Proceeds go towards a scholarship. Info: Clint 307-7488 or Marg 838-7185. Enderby Olde Time Dance Club event Fri. Mar. 7, 8:00 p.m. at the Enderby Drill Hall. Hard times theme. Everyone welcome - bring the kids and grandparents too. Info: 546-6186. Dance Party, second & fourth Saturdays/month, 7:00–11:00 p.m. at the Enderby Legion. Enderby Cliff Quilters meet 1st/3rd/5th Mondays at the Enderby Evangelical Chapel, 708 Mill Ave. New members always welcome. Info: 838-7858. Lego Club at the Enderby library, Wednesdays 2:30–3:30 p.m. at the Enderby branch of ORL, 514 Cliff Ave. For kids 6-12 yrs; please register ahead of time and leave your own bricks at home. Info: 8386488 or visit www.orl.bc.ca. Also: storytime for ages 3 and up, Saturdays 11:00 a.m. until Mar. 29. Dropin, free.

A little magic instead, including a spring bulb

By Ted Kay I have been asked, most politely, to discuss the current condition of honey bee populations and other insect pollinators and how they are affected by the neural toxin pesticides we are hearing so much about. This certainly is a vital subject, as are other planetary events we are surging through. Coincident with the request was the arrival of an industry magazine whose main focus was this very subject, brought up-to-date, First and second scans have proved that here lies only a slight improvement on previous articles all of which have slithered through the morass of ‘maybes’ you commonly find when corporations and parliaments are justifying an issue which will affect profits. Considering the polite request, I tried to buckle down and glean some understandable line which might inform the general reader; but then I glanced up toward a potted hyacinth just beginning to bloom on a sunny window sill. There is an ancient Persian verse which has been translated as ‘If of all your wealth you are bereft, And of all your worldly goods two loaves alone are left, Sell one and with the dole, Buy hyacinths to feed your soul.’ Life is too short to spend forever steeped in the anxieties we are encouraged to maintain, so instead of the original intent of this piece, here is some magic happening in a beehive near you – to feed your soul. It will be clear to anyone who takes a winter walk that bees have no food source outside the hive for a long stretch each year. So, northern bees have selected themselves to collect a massive surplus between May and August and preserve it in such a way that it will last at least until the following year. This winter food is stored in parallel sets of honeycomb, and the bees form a sphere

of clustered layers with several of these hanging combs intersecting the sphere. Unless their sources have been contaminated by us, such is the purity of this food that very little waste by-product remains after its consumption. The bees can hang on for several weeks before nipping out to the privy, even in Saskatchewan. This afternoon in Turtle Valley, the outside air temperature is up

nature’scorner Shuswap Naturalists

t o -14ºC; in unoccupied parts of the hive, it will be several degrees warmer than that but still below freezing. Freezing air will kill a bee, but in the carefully arranged cluster, enough energy is produced that if it were converted to electricity would keep a 20-watt light bulb lit continuously. To do this, some of the bees will fill, with stored honey, the inner container they used to bring in the summer nectar, a blob of honey a bit smaller than a peppercorn. The flight muscles are then uncoupled from the wings and vibrated until the opposing contractions produce a temperature of about 40ºC. These ‘heater bees’ distribute themselves along the combs within the cluster and the remaining bees form insulating layers over them. Each heater bee works for about 30 minutes when another will take over. Thus, the cluster will keep itself at about 37ºC no matter what is happening outside. This tem-

perature is important because it is what newly- developing bees will need. About now, as the days begin to lengthen, some bees will consume stored pollen and create royal jelly, and the queen will then start laying eggs again. Old bees born last fall will die as the winter wanes, and new bees must replace them when spring food sources appear. It has been suggested that bees and other social insects be called super-organisms in distinction from us single organisms. The bee colony acts as a single entity when it reproduces itself by division as other creatures do, but unlike a cow or a crocus, it is made up of infinitely moveable parts. These parts can make decisions, perform tasks and travel extraordinary distances from the main body, for the benefit of the whole. It is one of the most efficient mechanisms for maintaining life, and in the case of bees, done with no cost to the plant community in which they live; quite the reverse in fact, as each would not exist without the other. They have been living in this fashion about ten times longer than we have been living; they have adapted to changing climate and geography and have maintained this balance for 10 million years. A few scattered humans still try to live within a balanced understanding, but not most of us. Homo sapiens – Man, the Wise One; clever, of course, but wise? Well, sometimes; for instance when one of us suggests we trade half our wealth for a hyacinth.


Lakeshore News Friday, February 28, 2014 www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A19 A19

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.832.9461 fax 250.832.5246 email classifieds@lakeshorenews.bc.ca Announcements

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Donations and bequests are requested for equipment to help care for patients and residents of the Hospital and Bastion Place Tax receipts will be issued.

EXPERIENCED PARTS person required for a progressive auto/industrial supplier. Hired applicant will receive top wages, full benefits and RRSP bonuses working 5 day work week, plus moving allowances. Our 26,000ft2 store is located 2.5 hours N.E. of Edmonton, Alberta. See our community online at: LacLaBicheRegion.com. Send resume to: Sapphire Auto, Box 306, Lac La Biche, AB, T0A 2C0. Or by email to: hr@sapphireinc.net.

UP TO $400 cash daily. FT & PT outdoors, Spring/Summer work. Seeking honest, hardworking staff. Visit us online: PropertyStarsJobs.com.

We require long and short haul US capable drivers. We are an Okanagan based company with dedicated suppliers and customers and require drivers to fill their orders. Our short haul drivers primarily service the US northwestern with dedicated runs available and are home regularly, our long hauls drivers service the southwestern US and are home on a weekly basis for resets. We offer: Dedicated Tractors, US Medical Coverage, Company Cell phones, Direct deposit pay with no holdbacks. Dedicated lanes. Rider Policy. All we need from you is US capabilities, border crossing experience and a professional attitude, Class 1 driver’s license and a clean abstract and are physically fit. Please fax or email your resume and abstract with US drivers in subject line to 250-546-0600 or email to parris@ricknickelltrucking.com No phones calls or walk in’s please.

Mail to: Shuswap Hospital Foundation Box 265, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N3 • Ph: 250 803-4546 Donate Online (secure site): www.shuswaphospital foundation.org ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca DANCE AT GLENEDEN HALL Sat Mar 1st, 7:30-11:30pm. Music by Copper Creek Tickets $10 ea. 804-0917

Denied Long-Term Disability Benefits or Other Insurance? If YES, call or email for your

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and protect your right to compensation. 778.588.7049 Toll Free: 1.888.988.7052 Julie@LawyersWest.ca www.LawyersWest.ca

IF YOU and/or YOUR CHILDREN are being abused, call the Women’s Emergency Shelter 250-832-9616. Stopping the Violence Counseling, 250-832-9700. Children who witness abuse program, 250-832-4474. Shuswap Mental Health Intake, 250-833-4102 or RCMP 250-832-6044

There are MANY photos in the Lakeshore News office that have not been picked up. Many of them are for our Travels To promotion but some are for birth announcements, obits, etc. Please come into the office if you would like to have your photo returned to you. 161 Hudson Avenue NE, beside The Candy Vault.

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Career Opportunities PUT YOUR experience to work - The job service for people aged 45 and over across Canada. Free for candidates. Register now online at: www.thirdquarter.ca or Call Toll-Free: 1-855-286-0306.

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Business Opportunities $1000 A week mailing brochures from home! Helping Home-Workers since 2001. No experience required. Start Immediately! Visit us online: www.mailingnetwork.net

J. RYBACHUK & Sons Trucking LTD has an immediate opening for a logging truck driver in the Sparwood/Elko area. Previous quad logger experience required. Fax resume to 250-425-0505 or e-mail to rybtrk@telus.net.

GET FREE Vending machines. Can earn $100,000 + per year. All cash-retire in just 3 years. Protected Territories. Full details call now 1-866668-6629. or www.tcvend.com HELP WANTED - Local people needed! Simple, flexible online work. FT/PT. Internet needed. Very easy. No experience required! Guaranteed income! No fees. Genuine! Start immediately. Visit online at: www.OnlineHelp4Cash.com

Funeral Homes

Veronika Kiesman Grief Facilitator

Births

Hyde – Krista & Tyler Hyde of Sicamous are happy to announce the birth of a daughter, Kienna Ericka on February 5, 2014 at 9:28am in the Shuswap Lake General Hospital weighing 7lbs 14oz. Proud grandparents are Kim & Alan Hyde of Sicamous and Cheryl Hofman of Penticton.

- Pre-arrangements available - All inquiries welcome 24 hours - We accept all pre-arranged funeral policies “Serving bereaved families for over 25 years”

Funeral Homes Maintaining consistency in providing our families with the finest personalized, dignified and professional service possible, while offering options to lessen unwarranted financial grief.

View obituaries & send condolences at www.fischersfuneralservices.com

4060-1st Ave, S.W. Salmon Arm • 250-833-1129

Our bottom line is people, not dollars. Granite & Bronze Memorial Markers Available

Serving Kamloops to Golden • Toll Free 1-888-816-1117

Whether you’re considering pre-planning or have lost a loved one, you can trust our professional and friendly team to support you with meaningful grief services. We provide individualized funeral, memorial and celebration of life services, as well as grief counselling and an aftercare program.

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André Carelse, Funeral Director

250-832-2223

Serving and caring for families in our community since 1947.

440 - 10th Street SW, Salmon Arm, BC (Box 388,V1E 4N5, Fax 250-832-7188) Brandon/Bowers Funeral Home, Revelstoke, BC 250-837-2029 Hindman/Bowers Funeral Home, Golden, BC 250-344-2958

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FUNDRAISER for MADISON COX

PT FRONT DESK /HOUSEKEEPER

Must be available AM/PM and weekends. Must be able to do housekeeping. Wages negotiable. Apply in person with resume 2401 Trans Canada Highway, Salmon Arm.

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca Information

Friday, Feb. 28th at

The Mall at Piccadilly There will be a silent auction and bake sale. Madison is 4 years old and suffers from CDG-1A (Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1a). The funds raised will be used to fly Madison and her Mom to California for specialized evaluation of her rare genetic disorder and hopefully help Madison live a long, healthy life. Look for more information on Madison and CDG-1A in Leah Blain’s “Friends and Neighbours” column in today’s paper.

Information

Information

SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS & HOTLINES Salmon Arm Depression Support Group 1st and 3rd Mondays at 6 p.m. at the Salvation Army. Contact Nan at 832-3733 or ndickie@telus.net. Safe/ confidential gathering of peers living with depression, bi-polar illness and anxiety. Narcotics Anonymous: Mondays 7 p.m. at Crossroads Church basement, 121 Shuswap St. and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. at Shuswap Community Church, 3151 - 6th Ave. NE. Unwanted pregnancy? Need to know all your options? Contact the Pregancy Support Centre of the Shuswap - visit www. pscshuswap.ca, email psc.shuswap.gmail. com or phone 833-9959. Alzheimer Society Caregiver Support Group meets Monday Feb. 17, Mar. 10 & 24, Apr. 14 & 28, 10 a.m. to 12 noon at Seniors Resource Centre, 320A 2nd Ave. NE (under Dr. Chu’s office) Women Living with Cancer Support Group meets at noon, the 1st Monday/mo, SA Cancer office, 111 Lakeshore Dr. NE.

Info: John 832-7518 or Bev 835-4368. Shuswap Parkinson’s Support Group meets every 1st and 3rd Wednesday/mo, 9:50 a.m. at the First United Church, 20 4th St SE. All welcome. Info: MaryLou 832-4785; Doreen 836-2509; Don 838-0794. Grief: are you or someone you know struggling with a terminal illness or the loss of a loved one? The Shuswap Hospice Society is here to help. Call Judy at 250-832-7099. Drop-in Parents Together, Wednesdays 7:00–8:30 p.m. at the Family Resource Centre. Skills, problem-solving and encouragement for parents with teens. Info 832-2170. Shuswap Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Support Group meets the first Thursday/mo, Public Health Unit, 851 – 16th St NE. 6:307:30 p.m. support group (parents/guardians); 7:30-8:30 p.m. guest speaker presentation. Tanja at autism@shuswapchildrens.ca or call 833-0164.

Brain Injury Survivor Support Group meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays, 1-3 p.m. at (new location!) McGuire Lake Congregate Living, Banquet Room.

The FCA (Family Caregiver Alliance) Support Group supports those people who have loved ones that have been afflicted with ABI (Acquired Brain Injury). This groups meets at the NOSBIS office at 364B Ross St. on the 2nd/4th Thurs/mo from 3:30–5 p.m. Info: 833-1140.

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren support network. Help for area grandparents who are raising or contemplating raising their grandchildren. Resources and support including drop-in every 2nd/ 4thTues. 10 a.m.–12 p.m. at Shuswap Family Resource Centre. Info: Jan 832-2170 ext 354.

Hope & Recovery: A supportive and hopeful environment for individuals, family and friends who are living with the effects of brain tumours. This group meets on the 2nd/4th Thursdays from 3:30–5 p.m. at the NOSBIS office at 364B Ross St. Info: 8331140.

If you have an Acquired Brain Injury, please join the 2nd/4th Tuesdays of the month at the McGuire Lake Seniors Lodge from 1–3 p.m. Info: North Okanagan/Shuswap Brain Injury Society at 833-1140.

If you or someone close to you is affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) the Salmon Arm Reaching Out MS Society support group meets at Chestor’s in the Mall at Piccadilly 2nd Thurs. 10 a.m. Office hours in the alley behind Pharmasave are Wed./Fri. 10 a.m.–2 p.m. 250-803-0109.

Brain Injury Caregiver/Family Support Group meets 2nd and 4th Tuesdays, 1-3 p.m. at NOSBIS office. 364B Ross St. NE (ground floor entrance on the side of the Century 21/ EZ Rock office building). Separation & Divorce Care - find help, discover hope, experience healing in a special weekly seminar and support group. Please call 832-3121 to be connected. The SA chapter of The Compassionate Friends meets every 2nd Tues/mo at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church (next to the bowling alley) at 7 p.m. All parents who have lost a child of whatever age are welcome. Cathy 832-2454 or Sandy 675-3793. Grief – are you or someone you know struggling with a terminal illness or the loss of a loved one? The Shuswap Hospice Society is here to help. Call Judy at 832-7099. Community Caregivers Alliance Society no longer meets regularly. Please call 832-0052 or 835-2205 for information, to talk, or to schedule a meeting. Alanon meetings held Wed., 8 p.m. Seniors’ Resource Centre, 320A - 2 Ave. NE, 8322311; or Thurs. noon at First United Church.

Salmon Arm Stroke Recovery Support Group meets 2nd, 3rd and 4th Fri./mo at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church 90 1st Street S.E. 10:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Bring bag lunch. All welcome. Info: Verna 838-7242; Ruth 8326213

GriefShare is a special weekly seminar and support group for people who are grieving the death of someone close to them. Please call 832-3121 to be connected. In the New Year, a new NA group will meet, specifically for Lesbian, Gays and family members wanting to support those individuals. Your feedback, ideas and support would be greatly appreciated. Please contact Christine any day after 6 p.m. 250-463-1513.

Enderby / Ashton Creek Alcoholics Anonymous open discussion meeting Fri evenings at 8 p.m. at St. Andrew’s United Church.1-866-531-7045. SUPPORT PHONE NUMBERS Narcotics Anonymous 250-542-0087. Alanon & Alcoholics Anonymous 1-866-531-7045


A20 Friday, www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca A20 February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

Obituaries

Obituaries

Brian Walter Mackie

January 22, 1959 - February 24, 2014 Brian Walter Mackie passed away peacefully in Shuswap Lake General Hospital, Salmon Arm, BC on Monday, February 24, 2014 at the age of 55 years. Born in Lillooet, BC on January 22, 1959, Brian lived most of his life in the Shuswap. Due to poor health his work was limited, having formerly worked in forestry and as a meat cutter. He is well remembered for his love of life and nature. “He did it his way.” Predeceased by his father Reino in 1988, brother Rick and sister Noranda. Brian leaves his sisters and brothers Jeannette of Valemount, Selma (Del) of Kelowna, Floyd (Doris) of Enderby, Elvina (John) of Kamloops, Ken (Ging) of Salmon Arm, Lucille of Kamloops, Roy (Cyndi) of Edson,  Delores of Salmon Arm; and numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and close friends. A Celebration of Life service will be held from the chapel of Bowers Funeral Home on Saturday, March 1 at 10:00 am with Jack Bowers the funeral celebrant. Tributes will be shared by family and friends. A reception will follow in the Mountainside Room, allowing time for family and friends to continue sharing memories. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Online condolences may be sent to Brian’s obituary at www.bowersfuneralservice.com Arrangements are in the care of Bowers Funeral Home & Crematorium, Salmon Arm.

Frances Joan Holloway 1947-2014 Joan passed away on the evening of February 15, 2014.  She left the same way that she lived, quietly and without a fuss. She was born in Newmarket, Ontario an “air force brat” and grew up in various places around Canada.  After high school she went to Toronto and became an LPN. Working for two years she decided to seek the more challenging profession of a Registered Nurse.   In 1973, in order to satisfy her travel bug, she joined the Canadian Armed Forces and had postings from coast to coast.  One job entailed doing medevacs in primitive conditions and sometimes in vintage aircraft and helicopters.  The work was exciting and one had to rely on wits and intestinal fortitude to get through the day.  Her favorite posting was a one-year stint in Germany where she visited every castle up and down the Rhine River. In civilian life her passion was medical and palliative care. Although Joan was single all her life, for two years in the military she enjoyed the companionship of a charming gentleman from Nova Scotia.  She was almost always cheerful and optimistic even during her final illness. Wherever she moved her first step was to join the local “fat club” and although challenged all her life by weight problems, this was her main social connection and she always made friends. Joan liked to knit, crochet and do jigsaw puzzles.  She loved flowers.  She cherished her feline companions, Pumpkin, Misty, Pepper, Heidi and Maggie who were most likely waiting for her at the pearly gates.  I can see them, tails high, running to the gates to meet her. For the past several years her greatest comfort was the companionship of her friends of Crossroads Methodist Church and her mentor Pastor George. Her favorite place in the world was Hawaii and her ashes will be scattered there at a later date. Joan is survived by her sister Kathy and brothers Allan and Wayne and children, and her two longtime friends Betty and Brenda. We will miss you, Old Friend. A memorial service for Joan will take place on Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm from the Crossroads Free Methodist Church, Salmon Arm, with Pastor George Fleming officiating. A reception will follow the service in the Church Hall. Online condolences may be sent through Joan’s obituary at www.bowersfuneralservice.com Funeral arrangements are in the care of Bowers Funeral Service, Salmon Arm.

Friday, Februarywww.lakeshorenews.bc.ca 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

Obituaries

Obituaries

Cornelia “Corry” Doorn (Smit) 1926 – 2014 Our loving Mom, wife, and Oma, Cornelia “Corry” Doorn (Smit), passed away peacefully February 20, 2014. Corry was born on February 25, 1926 in Heerhugowaard, Noord-Holland and immigrated to Canada in 1959. She married Wilhelmus “Bill” Doorn in Calgary, AB and they had 54 years together. Bill devoted himself tirelessly in her final years as she struggled with dementia. Together they had four children; Pat (Donna), Gerard (Ann), Mary Jane (Mark), and Corine (Bob), ten grandchildren; Danielle (Keegan), Britney (Curtis), Kristen, Kelsey, Billy, Kaitlyn, Courtney, Lindsey, Christopher, and Amy, and two great granddaughters; Chloe and Paxton. Mom was active with the local Girl Guides, 4H-Chic Chicks Sewing Club, and the Catholic Women’s League. She enjoyed time with her family and time in her gardens. The family would like to say a special thank you to the staff at Parkview Place, Dr. Annan and Dr. America. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the BC Alzheimer’s Society (#300-828 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1E2). Prayers will be held for Corry at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, February 28 at St. Ann’s Catholic Church (HWY 97, Enderby, BC) with a Funeral Service at 11:00 am on Saturday, March 1 at St. Ann’s Catholic Church. Expressions of sympathy may be forwarded to the family at www.MyAlternatives.ca Funeral arrangements entrusted to ALTERNATIVES FUNERAL & CREMATION SERVICES®Armstrong 250-546-7237 & Vernon 250-558-0866

Employment

Employment

Help Wanted

Restaurant Supervisor Volunteers Required @ New Bombay Grill & Restaurant

Frontline Traffic Control requires Certified experienced TCP, require own transportation, wages DOE. Reliable people need only apply. 250309-3452 before 6pm or Fax resume: 250-838-0896 North Enderby Timber is looking to hire for various positions including Millwright and/or Fabricator, Heavy Duty Mechanic and Electrician. We offer competitive wages along with a comprehensive benefit package. Please fax resume to 250-838-9637.

Hotel, Restaurant, Food Services SAMARITAN’S Purse is looking for a Working Chef to coordinate the Restaurant Kitchen, maintain a professional rapport within the community and train junior cooks, in Dease, Lake, BC samaritanspurse.ca

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca Trades, Technical LOGGING - Experience Tree Processor Operators Wanted. Sundre, Alberta. Only safety conscious, drug free operators need apply. Benefits. Call Darcy Coleman 403-638-6047

Obituaries

Peggy Amelia Bates (nee Riches)

It is with great sadness that we mark the passing of Peggy Amelia Bates (nee Riches), born May 12, 1929 in Luton, Bedfordshire, just north of London, England.  She passed away peacefully in Salmon Arm on Saturday, February 15 shortly after a visit by her son, daughter-in-law and granddaughters.  She follows closely behind her husband of nearly sixty years, Bill, who passed away less than seven months before her.  She was lost without him, and clearly he was calling for her to join him. Peggy was the eldest of two daughters born to Arthur and Laura Riches.  As a child and young woman, she loved her pets and going for bicycle rides in the English countryside.  She did well in school and found work as a keypunch operator in the early days of the digital revolution.  As a supervisor of a group of keypunch girls, she met a young Bill who came to install a new data processing system in her office.  At first, she didn’t like his eyes, but as he had a motorcycle, she agreed to go out with him.  They fell in love, and were married shortly afterwards in 1955.  The very day after their wedding, Bill and Peggy jumped on a ship to Canada and started their new life together.  For almost sixty years they were rarely apart.   After landing in Montreal, the couple eventually settled in Toronto as Bill stepped-up to better jobs in his rapidly growing field.  Peggy gave birth to two sons and happily took on the role of a loving, doting mother and homemaker.   The house was always shipshape, the meals on time, and the garden her pride and joy.  After the boys left home and Bill retired, they moved to a little waterfront property on the Trent River and enjoyed a busy retirement of more gardening and travel.  In 2004, both at age 75, they sold their property and moved to Salmon Arm to be closer to their grandchildren who were ‘finally’ starting to accrue.  All her life, Peggy loved children, and would just-as-soon get down on the floor and play with the kids as sit and chat with the adults.  She had a special bond with her youngest granddaughter Tessie and when together, the two of them would invariably end up debilitated with the giggles. Peggy will be remembered for her cheerfulness, the joy she found in simple things, and her never-ending, but oft-repeated, funny expressions.  It seemed she could never say enough good things about the people around her.  To use her own words, she herself was a ‘gem’, and ‘as good as gold’.  She was always appreciative and grateful for the care she received during her recent decline, and those around her were sure to have their cotton socks repeatedly blessed.  Many thanks go to the staff at Cottage 5 at Hillside Village for their work, compassion and care for Peggy this past year. Peggy will be sorely missed by her son Alan, Alan’s wife Debbie, their children; Hannah, Rachel and Teslyn, Chilko the dog (thanks for all the biscuits!), and her adopted family here in the West – The Phillips’.  She is survived by her younger sister Jean who emigrated to Australia in 1952.  Although they managed to visit each other only a few times over the years, the bond between them was enduring.  Peggy will also be missed by many other relatives, friends and people she touched all over the world.  She rarely missed sending birthday cards to children she knew, and kept in touch with so many by writing notes in close to a hundred Christmas cards each year. After most any family event, Mum would always say: “I thoroughly enjoyed myself. I wouldn’t have missed it for the world”.   When she passes by St. Peter or whomever she sees on the ‘other side’, I hope she uses those same words to describe her life.  Thanks for everything, Mum.  Give Dad a hug for me.  In lieu of flowers, please support Canadian Alzheimer’s Research. Email condolences may be sent through Peggy’s obituary at www.bowersfuneralservice.com

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Supervise & participate in kitchen SALMON ARM &CITIZEN’S dining area cleaning activities. PATROL Resolve customer complaints Help keep Salmon Arm regarding service. Train workers going on sanitation a 4-hour& insafe foodby prep, service, evening patrol once a safety procedures. Assign duties, month or monitoring a responsibilities & work stations radar speedinboard a few to employees accordance times a month.Inspect with work requirements. If you are 19+ and have a supplies, equipment & areas. Postclean record, call Sally & secondary Education/Diploma Scales experience at 250-832-4831 previous preferred. or write sallys1@telus.net $13.75/hr. Fax: 250-832-2423 Learn more at Email: awatar_k@yahoo.com http://members.shaw.ca/sacp 2, 111 Lakeshore Drive, Salmon Arm Shuswap Lake Health Care Auxiliary

invites you to join our volunteer group. Meetings are the 3rd Monday of each month throughout the year (except July & August). We are an active and dedicated group and have several fundraisers each year, raising money to purchase equipment for the Shuswap Lake General Hospital and Bastion Place. Please call Gerry 250-835-4843 for further info. WE WELCOME NEW MEMBERS.

Our classified ads are on the net! Check it out at www.bcclassified.com

Services

Alternative Health SHEILA Wardman M.H. CHt. Clinical Hypnotherapist working with people to release Stress Related Issues, Fears, Phobias, Anxieties, Weight Loss, Smoking Cessation, Pain Management. Focused work on the Mind can clean your “hard drive” and reinstall a program that works for you! Call to speak with me 250517-9690 www.inperfecthealth.ca sheila@inperfecthealth.ca

Financial Services DROWNING IN debt? Cut debts more than 60% & debt free in half the time! Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1-877-556-3500 BBB Rated A+ GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s that simple. Your credit / age / income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

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Obituaries

Obituaries

Sheila Anne Syme 1959-2014   We regret to announce the passing of Sheila Anne Syme at home in Salmon Arm on February 23, 2014. There will be a celebration of Sheila’s life at Bowers Funeral Chapel on Monday March 3, 2014 at 2:00 pm. Email condolences may be sent through Sheila’s obituary at www.bowerfuneralservice.com

In Memoriam

In Memoriam

Laura Hawley Baird - Oct 31/94 - Mar 2/04 Think of Laura but laugh don’t cry I know she’d want it that way When you think of Laura laugh don’t cry I know she’d want it that way Hey Laura, where are you now Are you far away from here I don’t think so I think you’re here Taking our tears away Miss you every day Mom, Dad & Neil

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Come join our team!

Piccadilly Terrace Retirement Residence is in need of a Permanent Part-Time Dishwasher/Kitchen Aide. • Must be energetic and a team player • Have good time management skills Employment applications will be issued at Front Desk and are to be accompanied with resume. Attn: Kitchen Dept. - 810 10th Street SW (directly across from Canadian Tire)


Lakeshore News Friday, February 28, 2014 www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Services

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A21 A21

Services

Services

Services

Services

Home Care

Legal Services

Hearts-in-Motion Private home care services. Offers in home health care incl. Palliative, Respite, daily maintenance ... I will take care of you. 250-463-1811

Business/Office Service

Misc Services

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

Computer Services

Computer Services

Home & Yard • Renovation • Repair • Maintenance 250

• Fencing • Decks • Patios

-253-4663

Classifieds Get Results! Painting & Decorating

Farm Services

HOME Interior Painting.Quality work for a reasonable price.I will paint one room only or the whole house.Call for a free estimate,Gitta 1-250-832-7125

Farm Services

Telephone Services

FARM SERVICE SHAVINGS * SAWDUST BARK MULCH WE DELIVER

Ph: 250 804-3030 • 250 260-0110

Help Wanted

WELL ROTTED GARDEN manure, top soils & bark mulch. Stanley Bland. 250-832-6615, 250-833-2449

DISCONNECTED PHONE? National Teleconnect Home Phone Service. No one refused! Low monthly rate! Calling features and unlimited long distance available. Call National Teleconnect today! 1866-443-4408. or visit online: www.nationalteleconnect.com

Storage

Storage

Garden & Lawn

AAA MINI-STORAGE-250.832.3558

Bylaw Parking Officer Summer Student The Bylaw Parking Officer is responsible for matters related to the enforcement of municipal traffic control bylaws on behalf of the City of Salmon Arm. The position is responsible for identifying enforcement issues, recommending solutions to their supervisor and responding to complaints related to parking violations within the municipal boundaries. Position requirements are completion of at least one year of post secondary education and enrollment in a post secondary program for the upcoming semester. Candidates must have effective oral communication skills and a demonstrated ability to use tact, diplomacy and courtesy when dealing with the public in stressful conditions. Applicants must possess a valid BC Driver’s licence. This position is 5 days per week; 7 hours per day for three months commencing approximately mid-May. Rate of pay is $15.00 per hour + 14% in lieu of benefits.

Public Works and Parks Summer Student (may be more than one position) Summer student(s) in the Public Works Department and Parks Division performs a variety of different duties including heavy manual labour using broom, pick, shovel, weed eater, mower and other hand operated tools. The incumbent may shovel earth, sand, concrete, gravel or asphalt, as required, and move or carry bricks, blocks, cement, timbers, pipes, tools and other construction material. The position may involve the clean-up of parks including garbage collection, washroom cleaning, flower bed and boulevard weeding, lawn mowing and weed eating, etc. Position requirements are completion of at least one year of post secondary education and enrollment in a post secondary program for the upcoming semester. Applicants must possess a valid BC Driver’s licence. Sufficient physical strength, stamina and coordination to perform manual labour in all types of weather are necessary. Previous experience in a construction environment is an asset. This position is 5 days per week (may involve week-end work); 8 hours per day commencing approximately the beginning of May. Rate of pay is $15.00 per hour + 14% in lieu of benefits. Reply in writing, enclosing resume and cover letter. Human Resources City of Salmon Arm PO Box 40; 500 – 2 Avenue NE Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N2 Fax: 1-250-803-4041 E-mail: humanresources@salmonarm.ca We sincerely thank all candidates for their interest, however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

By shopping local you support local people.

Rentals

Tiling

Free Items

Cottages / Cabins

TILE INSTALLATION

FREE: Barn cat - grey, fullgrown, friendly, good mouser. Please call 250-832-8792

•Bathroom Reno’s •Custom Built Showers •Kitchen Splash

Call Dave 515-1834 30 years experience

Pets & Livestock

Feed & Hay BLAND’S FARM SALES. Extra clean wheat straw. P/U or delivery. 250-832-6615, 250-833-2449. Horse or cow hay, no rain $3.50 & $5/bale. $65 round bale. (250)832-3388

Livestock WANTED TO BUY: sheep, lambs & goats. FOR SALE: grain fed lambs. Call 250-833-2373.

Pets N&T CANINE CARE Daycare, boarding, grooming. Visit our webpage: www.nandtcaninecare.ca 250-835-0136 With Dignity & Understanding. N&T PET CREMATION SERVICES call 250-835-0136

Merchandise for Sale

Help Wanted

SUMMER STUDENTS

Merchandise for Sale

Books, Coins, Stamps

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Canadian stamp collection. Dated 1965 - 2014. Please call 250-832-6071

REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be held in the Board Room of the Regional District of North Okanagan, 9848 Aberdeen Road, Coldstream, B.C. on March 5, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. to hear representations on the following matter:

ZONING TEXT AMENDMENT BYLAW No. 2606, 2013 [Medical Marihuana Production Facilities] The intent of this bylaw is to amend the Regional District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 to establish regulations related to medical marihuana production facilities. In this regard, Bylaw No. 2606 proposes to: • Prohibit medical marihuana production facilities as a Home Occupation; • Prohibit production facilities within all Commercial and Residential Zones, within all Rural Zones outside of the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR), and within the High-Tech Industrial (I.5) Zone; • Permit production facilities on properties that are larger than one (1) ha and are within all other Industrial Zones; • Permit production facilities on properties that are located within the ALR, are larger than eight (8) ha and are within the Country Residential (C.R), Non-Urban (N.U) and Large holding (L.H) Zones; • Establish minimum setback standards for production facilities located on properties within the above noted zones. All persons who believe that their interest in property is affected by the above Bylaw shall be afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard or to present written submissions respecting matters contained in the above Bylaw. Copies of the Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2606 and relevant staff reports may be inspected at the of¿ce of the Regional District of North Okanagan on or after February 26, 2014 and up to and including March 5, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding Statutory holidays.. You may provide input: By e-mail: publichearing@rdno.ca prior to 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, March 5, 2014. By letter: to the address provided below, please ensure that letter is received at the RDNO of¿ce prior to 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, March 5, 2014; or In Person: Attend the Public Hearing to present submissions. Be advised that: 1. Your name and residential address must be included with your submission; and 2. Written submissions are subject to public disclosure. PLANNING DEPARTMENT 9848 Aberdeen Road, Coldstream, BC V1B 2K9 Phone: 250-550-3746 / Fax: 250-550-3701 NO SUBMISSIONS ON THE ABOVE BYLAW WILL BE RECEIVED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOLLOWING THE CONCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC HEARING

Attention: Cabin Owners

Firewood/Fuel

Summer Vacationers Booking Now - List With Us Turn Vacancy Into Income

RUNNING LOW ON WOOD? We’ve got your firewood. Nice dry fir - $155/cord for around Salmon Arm. Phone 250-832-1914 for prompt delivery

We deliver Fir, Larch, Birch, Pine, Spruce. Shuswap Firewood Products (250)804-3216 www.shuswapfirewood.com

Medical Supplies CPAP Machine w/case, $2500 new, asking $500 OBO. Exc. condition. 250-833-4047

Misc. for Sale ERICKSON’S APPLIANCES

www.cabinrentalbc.com

250-517-8546

Homes for Rent 2-bdrm & den on acreage, Grandview Bench area, partially furnished. avail. immed $900/mo+ util. & $400 DD. Refs. req’d. 250-804-5303 or 778-489-2013 Malakwa-3bdrm home $650 +utils. 2bdrm $600.+utils, 250836-2928 or 250-309-0975

Rooms for Rent

Reconditioned Appliances New/Used Parts 90 Day Warranty

Cozy room for rent, DT area, share kitchen & bath, high spd & sat. $500/mo 250-832-4282 Rooms for rent, 1-Ok Ave. 250-832-8712, 1-Canoe 250833-4628. Refs Req’d.

250-832-9968

Suites, Lower

603 - 3rd. Ave. SW Salmon Arm 1-8000 lb electric winch with all attachments, never used. Asking $400 OBO. 832-1914 1 person fold-up ice fishing hut, comes with 1-6” icehogger and fishing rod & reel. $135 OBO. 250-832-1914. 2 older model humminbird fish finders, 1 for ice fishing. Asking $80 for both. 832-1914 HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper? Respironics Everflo Concentrator, 2 yrs old, acc. incl. $500. Respironics Portable Concentrator, acc. incl. $1200. Invocare Electric Wheelchair, battery charger incl. $200. Call Chris 250-833-1142 between 8:30-2:00pm. SAWMILLS FROM only $4,897 - Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info & DVD: www.NorwoodSaw mills.com/400OT or call 1-800566-6899 Ext:400OT. STEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or visit us online: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca STEEL BUILDING. “The big year end clear out!” 20x22 $4,259. 25x24 $4,684. 30x34 $6,895. 35x36 $9,190. 40x48 $12,526. 47x70 $17,200. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422 or visit online: www.pioneersteel.ca

NEW 1Bdrm Priv entrance Gleneden area. NS NP W/D Furn/unfurn ref’s DD $700 250-253-4193 NEW one bedroom basement suite in Sicamous near d/t. W/D, tv, util incld. NS, NP, DD, Ref req. $675. 250-300-6388

Transportation

Auto Financing

Misc. Wanted Coin Collector Looking to Buy Collections, Estates, Gold & Silver Coins + 778-281-0030 PURCHASING old Canadian & American coin collections & accumulations. 250-548-3670

Real Estate Mortgages

Best rate 5yr. - 3.29% OAC Serving the Shuswap since 1979. Rates consistently better than banks.

250-832-8766

Auto Financing - Dream Catcher, Apply Today! Drive Today!

1.800.910.6402

Toll Free 1-800-658-2345

Auto Services

Rentals

Your one Stop Vehicle Repair Facility

Apt/Condo for Rent 2 - 2bdrm apts., cable incl. NP,freshly painted, 1 w/new flooring, discount for seniors $800/mo. 250-803-3108 2 Bdrm in 4-plex. Walk to DT. N/S, N/P. Suit quiet indiv. or couple. Sherry 250-833-4789 Bright, spacious 2 bedroom apartments Close to town, family owned & operated. Includes F/S, DW, A/C, H/W NS, NP. Available Mar 1, 2014 $825/month (250) 803-1694 Ask about Senior’s Discount

250-832-8064 Seniors’ Discount

Brakes 4X4 Servicing Lifetime Warranties (Mufflers & Shocks)

Trailer Hitches & Wiring

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR

Cars - Domestic ‘98 Subaru Outback Wagon $3000 OBO. Auto, AWD, 326,000 km, fully loaded, new winter tires and brakes. Cheap on gas, reliable. 250-835-4788


Less Fuel. More Power. Great Value is a comparison between the 2014 and the 2013 Chrysler Canada product lineups. 40 MPG or greater claim (7.0 L/100 km) based on 2014 EnerGuide highway fuel consumption ratings. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption may vary based on driving habits and other factors. Ask your dealer for the EnerGuide information. ¤2014 Dodge Grand Caravan – Hwy: 7.9 L/100 km (36 MPG) and City: 12.2 L/100 km (23 MPG). 2014 Dodge Journey SE 2.4 L 4-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.7 L/100 km (37 MPG) and City: 11.2 L/100 km (25 MPG). 2013 Dodge Dart AERO – Hwy: 4.8 L/100 km (59 MPG) and City: 7.3 L/100 km (39 MPG). 2013 Civic Touring 1.8 L 16-valve, SOHC, i-VTEC® 4-cylinder Automatic – Hwy: 5.0 L/100 km (56 MPG) and City: 6.2 L/100 km (45 MPG). 2013 Elantra L 1.8 L Dual CVVT DOHC 16V Engine Automatic – Hwy: 5.2 L/100 km (54 MPG) and City: 7.2 L/100 km (39 MPG). 2013 Corolla 1.8 L 4-Cylinder DOHC 16V VVT-i DIS ETCS-I Engine Manual – Hwy: 5.6 L/100 km (50 MPG) and City: 7.4 L/100 km (38 MPG). 2013 Focus SE with optional Super Fuel Economy package and 2.0 L I4 Direct Injection engine with 6-speed automatic– Hwy: 4.8 L/100 km (59 MPG) and City: 7.2 L/100 km (39 MPG). Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ‡, », €, >, †, § The First Big Deal Sales Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after February 1, 2014. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,695) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees, other dealer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. •$19,998 Purchase Price applies to 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E) only and includes $8,100 Consumer Cash Discount. $19,998 Purchase Price applies to the new 2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F+CLE) only and includes $2,000 Consumer Cash Discount. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select new 2014 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. ‡4.29% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Ultimate Family Package/2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Examples: 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Ultimate Family Package/2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package with a Purchase Price of $27,888/$19,998 (including applicable Consumer Cash Discounts) financed at 4.29% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $159/$114 with a cost of borrowing of $5,082/$3,644 and a total obligation of $32,970/$23,642. »Ultimate Family Package Discounts available at participating dealers on the purchase of a new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT with Ultimate Family Package (RTKH5329G/JCDP4928K). Discount consists of: (i) $2,500 in Bonus Cash that will be deducted from the negotiated price after taxes; and (ii) $850 in no-cost options that will be deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Some conditions apply. See your dealer for complete details. €$10,350 in Total Discounts is available on new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT models with Ultimate Family Package (RTKH5329G/JCDP4928K) and consists of $7,000 in Consumer Cash Discounts and $3,350 in Ultimate Family Package Discounts. >4.19% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) with a Purchase Price of $16,880 financed at 4.19% over 96 months with $0 down payment, equals 416 weekly payments of $47 with a cost of borrowing of $2,905 and a total obligation of $19,285. †0.0% purchase financing for 36 months available on the new 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance on 2012/2013 Jeep Compass, Patriot and 2013 Dodge Dart models. Example: 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) with a Purchase Price of $16,880, with a $0 down payment, financed at 0.0% for 36 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $217.69; cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $16,880. §Starting from prices for vehicles shown include Consumer Cash Discounts and do not include upgrades (e.g. paint). Upgrades available for additional cost. ♦Based on R. L. Polk Canada Inc. sales data. Calendar year to date retail vehicle registrations. ^Based on 2014 Ward’s Middle Cross Utility segmentation. **Based on 2014 Ward’s upper small sedan costing under $25,000. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

T:10.25”

A22 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

BIG DEAL EVENT

$

19,998 •

• Air conditioning with Tri-zone Temperature Control • SiriusXM TM Satellite Radio (includes one year of service) • Hands-free® connectivity with UconnectTM Voice Command with Bluetooth® • Includes second row power windows

$

BASED ON PURCHASE PRICE OF $16,880.

PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDES $8,100 CONSUMER CASH* AND FREIGHT.

OR STEP UP TO THE 2014 ULTIMATE FAMILY MILY PACKAGE

GET TOTAL DISCOUNTS UP TO $10,350€ INCLUDES $3,350 IN PACKAGE SAVINGS INGS »

2ND ROW OVERHEAD 9-INCH VIDEO SCREEN

19,998

$

FINANCE FOR

47 @ 4.19 0

FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN PREMIUM INTERIOR

CANADA’S #1-SELLING CROSSOVER^

FINANCE FOR

PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDES $2,000 CONSUMER CASH* AND FREIGHT.

%

%

† 2ND ROW SUPER STOW ’N GO®

$

2014 DODGE JOURNEY CANADA VALUE PACKAGE

FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN

114@ 4.29 BI-WEEKLY‡

$

FINANCE FOR

% FOR 96 MONTHS

PARKVIEW® REAR BACK-UP CAMERA

159 @ 4.29 WIT WITH $0 DOWN

FINANCING INANCING INCLUDES $7,000 CONSUMER CASH*, $2,500 $2 500 BONUS CASH» AND FREIGHT.

37 3 MPG M AS A GOOD AS

HIGHWAY H 7.7 7.7 . L/100 KM HWY ¤

%

Starting from price for 2014 Dodge Journey R/T AWD shown: $32,390.§

2013 DODGE DART

THE MOST TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED VEHICLE IN ITS CLASS**

59 MPG

AS GOOD AS

HIGHWAY 4.8 L/100 KM HWY 4.8L/100

¤

OR

FOR 36 MONTHS

INCLUDES FREIGHT.

ALSO AVAILABLE

Starting from price for 2013 Dodge Dart GT shown: $25,690.§

LESS FUEL. MORE POWER. GREAT VALUE.

15 VEHICLES WITH 40 MPG HWY OR BETTER.

2/19/14 5:00 PM

T:13.5”

DBC_141019_LB_MULTI_DART_FBD.indd 1

WEEKLY>

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

T HE ♦

BEING B.C.’S #1-SELLING AUTOMAKER IS A VERY, VERY BIG DEAL.

2014 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CANADA VALUE PACKAGE KAGE

CANADA’S BEST-SELLING MINIVAN FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS AS GOOD OD AS

36 6 MPG PG HIGHWAY WAY 7.9 L/100 KM M HWY ¤

Starting from price for 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew Plus shown: $32,990.§

BI-WEEKLY‡


Breaktime Anytime

Feb. 28th -Mar. 6th

A2 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

Drink Green Tea

Movie Info 250.832.2263 playing at the GRAND 100 Hudson Avenue

SON OF GOD

Daily 6:30 and 9:10 PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:00 PM

THE LEGO MOVIE 2D

Daily 6:30 PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:00 PM

THAT AWKWARD MOMENT Daily 9:00 PM

NON-STOP

Daily 6:40 and 9:00 PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:10 PM

RIDE ALONG

Daily 6:50 and 9:00 PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:10 PM

at the CLASSIC 360 Alexander

MARCH 2 - 6 12 YEARS A SLAVE Daily 7:30PM

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Royal Winnipeg Ballet MOULIN ROUGE featuring ERIC NIPP

Sunday, March 2nd, 1PM

Feb. 28th - Mar. 6th SALMARTHEATRE.COM

CROSSWORD

Hot or iced, green tea can help rev up your workout. Its catechins, antioxidants, and caffeine help increase the metabolic generation of heat. Drink a cup about 10 minutes before exercising. ACROSS

Crypto Fun

Solve the code to discover words related to beauty. Each number corresponds to a different letter. (Hint: 21=a) A. 22 21 20 15 21 16 Clue: Of the face B. 7 21 16 11 5 Clue: Beauty parlor C. 9 13 14 21 9 4 14 5 9 Clue: Procedure

28 FRIDAY

DAYS ONLY! 3FEBRUARY

1

SATURDAY

3MARC DAYS H ONLY! CLUB PRICE

2

SUNDAY

3MAR DAYCHS ONL CLUB PRIC Y! E

lb 13.21/kg

LY! 3 DAYSICEON CLUB PR

Gemini

CANCER

June 22- July 22

Cancer, find a routine that works for you and then stick with it. There is no need to reinvent the wheel, and when actions become automatic, you can focus on other things.

Cancer

LEO

A need for attention could get the better of you, Leo. A little humility goes a long way and can alter others’ perceptions of you. You may end up being seen in a more positive light.

VIRGO

Virgo, you can differentiate between right and wrong, but your judgement might be off this week. Rely on your intuition, but don’t make any big decisions without first thinking carefully.

Virgo

LIBRA

Sept. 23-Oct. 22

Libra, it may seem like you are being led astray by one thing after another, when all you want is to focus on one task at a time. Find a way to block out any and all distractions.

Libra

SUDOKU

PUZZLE NO. SU142250

HOW TO PLAY:

ACNE ACUPUNCTURE ALLERGIC ALOE BEAUTY BLACKHEADS BLOWOUT BODY BOTANICAL BRONZER CELLULITE CERAMIDES CHEMICALS COENZYME COLLAGEN COMBINATION COSMETICS DERMATITIS DERMATOLOGIST DIMETHICONE

What’s Where When

Your Guide to Entertainment, Nightlife & Restaurants in the Shuswap SUNDAY & Appie Specials $6.95 2 till 5 MONDAY TUESDAY - Burger & Pint $6.99 All Day THURSDAY - Steak Sandwich $11.95 All Day SATURDAY - Prime Rib Night $17.95

Scorpio, work on a creative project with a sweetheart or friend early in the week. Ideas will flow easily and your imaginations will soar together. It is a productive pairing.

Scorpio

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each ANSWER TO PUZZLE NO. SU142250 number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

EPILATION EXFOLIATE GLYCERIN HAIRSTYLE HUMECTANTS MICRODERMABRASION NONCOMEDOGENIC HIGHLIGHTS LASER MEDICAL MINERALS NATURAL PEPTIDES PORES SPA TONER

SCORPIO

Oct. 23-Nov. 21

251 Harbourfront Dr. NE, Salmon Arm (at the Prestige Inn) 250-833-1154

“All Winter Long”

SAGITTARIUS

Nov. 22-Dec. 21

Sagittarius

This is not your week to mix love and money, Sagittarius. In fact, keep the two as separate as possible, and exercise caution before lending anyone money.

Friday & Sat. Night Buffets - 4 pm Seniors - 13.99 WS142400

200 TransCanada Hwy, Salmon Arm

250-832-2280

Spooners Pizza

Thursday Nights Buy 1 get one at 50% off. (eat in only) A comedy by Lisa Loomer and directed by Adele Kuyek

THIS WEEK’S SPECIALS FEB. 28 TO MARCH 6, 2014

Kellogg’s Jumbo Cereal Select varieties. 700 to 1350 g. LIMIT TEN Combined varieties.

20 99 ea.

BUYLES2 EArewRN ards miles AIRMI

®

8

E

EXTREM PRICE

rice

Ingredients for life™

Gemini, it’s unlike you to slow down, so don’t be surprised when friends start looking at you curiously after you take your foot off the gas. Your free spirited nature will soon return.

Aug. 23-Sept. 22

Club P

CQ142400

GEMINI

May 21-June 21

Leo

10 kg. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT FOUR.

5

CLUB PRICE

D. 20 11 16 11 13 Clue: Hue

Taurus, make a concerted effort to improve your focus in the weeks ahead. There is much to lose if you cannot tackle the tasks at hand, particularly at the workplace.

July 23-Aug. 22

Rogers Granulated Sugar PLUS SEE IN-STORE FOR MORE 3 DAY SALE SPECIALS!

258 Shuswap St. NE • 250-832-9121

TAURUS

Taurus

99

WORD SEARCH

Aries, you want more than you can acquire this week and your desires may lead you astray. It is important to exercise self-restraint, even if you get a thrill from living on the edge.

Apr.20-May20

100%

Salmon Arm Custom Upholstery

ARIES

Aries

FARMED by CANADIANS

For all your foam needs call...

Pisces, you may need to sacrifice some security for a chance to have a memorable experience. Do something out of the ordinary.

Mar. 21-Apr. 19

T-Bone Steak Cut from 100% Canadian beef. LIMIT TWO.

We cut to any size

PISCES

Pisces

ANSWER TO PUZZLE NO. CW142410

Mattresses & Covers (any size) Cushions - home, boat, RV Topping Pads • Wedges • Neck Pillows

You don’t always have the patience to stick with the same routine, Aquarius. That means others cannot expect you to conform to their whims if they want you as a friend.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

1. Respect 2. Azotemia 3. Exhausting 4. Accumulation 5. Lack of moral standards in a society 6. A rascal 7. X100 = 1 tala 9. River of Haikou, China 10. Lout 12. Stockings 13. Capital of Chile 15. Spanish for river 18. 12th month (abbr.) 19. Skilled nurse 21. Unit of precipitation 22. Corpuscle count (abbr.) 23. Sweet potato 26. God of fields & woods 27. Dream sleep 28. Polish or stroke 29. Kilo yard (abbr.) 30. Member of U.S. Navy 31. Express pleasure 32. Written acknowledgment (abbr.) 33. Neptune’s closest satellite 34. O’Neill play "The ____

Try a FOAM mattress

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

DOWN

Tossing & Turning at Night?

Capricorn, you want to play outside of the rules this week. You normally like to follow a relatively traditional course, so this catches others off guard.

Jan. 20-Feb. 18

Cometh" 35. Homegrown 36. Goalkeeper 37. __ Island, U.S. State 40. Far East nursemaid 41. Food grain 44. 2 stripe rank (abbr.)

Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News A23

CAPRICORN

Capricorn

49. Born of

1. Boring routine 4. Back talk 8. Emerald Isle 10. Snow leopard 11. 1/20 of an ancient shekel 13. Language of Apia 14. Relating to NH2 15. British Air Aces 16. Woman (French) 17. Cheese skins 18. Deafening noise 19. Cheeky talk 20. Early photograph 24. Basics 25. 007’s Flemming 26. Photograph (slang) 27. Male sheep 28. Norse sea goddess 29. Small cask 30. Ch. Osgood hosts 37. Confederate soldier 38. Radioactivity unit 39. Chocolate tree 40. Express surprise 41. Express delight 42. Mary mourning Jesus 43. 18th century indoor cap 45. Thanjavur University 46. Skilled 47. Hindu mother goddess 48. Follow by one’s foot

HOROSCOPES

Dec. 22-Jan. 19

PUZZLE NO. CW142410

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

100 9 9.

BUYMI5LESEArewRNards miles AIR

®

5

Royale Bath Tissue Double 12 Roll Mega 9 Roll. SAVE EVEN MORE WITH

eMailDirect

ea

rice

Club P

Centenoka Park Mall

250-832-8086

50 BUYLES2 EArewRN ards miles AIRMI

®

599 rice

Club P

Evenings Feb 28 - Mar 1, 6 - 8 7:30pm Sunday Matinee Mar. 2 - 1:30 PM: No shows Mon., Tues., or Wed.

Tickets at the door or Intwined Fibre Arts - 141C Hudson Ave. NE 41 Hudson Ave. NW, Salmon Arm, BC 250-832-9283 | www.shuswaptheatre.com

Answers: A. Facial B. Salon C. Treatment D. Color


A24 Friday, February 28, 2014 Lakeshore News

www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

THERE IS NO DOUBT ABOUT IT! JACOBSON FORD IS

OVERSTOCKED

PRICED!

Remaining 2013’s Must Go – New 2014’s Arriving Daily! ‘13 FORD F150 XLT 4X4

FLEET CANCELLATION!! STX 4X4 0 5 1 F D R O F 2014 10 7 in stock! uise – plus more! Air, SYNC, Cr

$

Priced from just…

24,996

SYNC, remote start, trailer tow pkg., backup sensor. MSRP $49,499

3DT524

$ SAVE 14,895 INCLUDES $1,000 COSTCO

NOW

34,604

$

Or Lease from…

$

/MO.

3DT531

NOW

43,401

$

$ SAVE 5,698 INCLUDES $1,000 COSTCO

‘13 FUSION TITANIUM AWD

3DT554

41,553

$

$ SAVE 5,461 INCLUDES $1,000 COSTCO

‘11 FORD F350 CREW CAB 4X4

NOW

‘11 F150 SUPER CREW 4X4

0P6314

0P6313

ET140A

Sport, leather, moonroof, diesel, Navigation.

EcoBoost, power group, 1 owner, clean local truck.

29,949

‘13 FORD F150 PLATINUM 4X4

ET124A

46,949

‘07 EXPLORER SPORT TRAC 4X4

0P6312

‘13 FORD ESCAPE SE AWD

MyFord Touch, Eco-Boost, 1 owner.

$

26,949

‘10 DODGE CHARGER SXT

P6281A

V8, leather, moonroof, 1 owner unit.

$

46,949

ET147A

EcoBoost, Navigation, leather, SYNC.

$

$

15,949

Leather, 3.5 H.O. V6, Tiptronic transmission, clean unit.

$

$ SAVE 13,907 INCLUDES $1,000 COSTCO

13,949

$

26,949

‘08 HONDA ACCORD

ET114A

Auto., air, 2 sets of wheels, 4 cyl., loaded.

$

12,949

‘10 F150 SUPER CREW 4X4

DT566A

Leather, roof, fully serviced, SYNC.

$

28,949

JACOBSON

NOW

56,492

$

38,755 ‘13 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD

Power windows & locks, SYNC, heated leather seats, sunroof MSRP $43,749 3DC279

$ SAVE 15,348 INCLUDES $1,000 COSTCO

NOW

37,921

$

‘11 FORD FUSION SEL SPORT

35,552 ‘13 FORD F150 FX4 4X4 5.0L V8, Navigation, SYNC, leather, power group. MSRP $56,719

3DT539

‘11 HYUNDAI ELANTRA LIMITED

$

18,949

‘10 FORD RANGER 4X4 SPORT

P6265A

5 speed, air, 4.0L V6, great economy.

$

16,949

‘13 ESCAPE TITANIUM AWD

0P6311

EcoBoost, Navigation, leather, SYNC.

$

34,949

Leather, roof, Navigation, two sets of wheels.

$

15,949

‘09 FORD SPORT TRAC LIMITED

ET083A

SYNC, leather, moonroof, V8, hard tonneau.

$

23,949

‘10 FORD F150 KING RANCH 4X4

ET109A

Navigation, leather, SYNC, local unit.

$

32,987

NOW

40,957

$

$ SAVE 15,762 INCLUDES $1,000 COSTCO

P6301A

SYNC, 2.5L, sport seats, power group, 26,000 kms.

NOW

$

$ SAVE 8,197 INCLUDES $1,000 COSTCO

EcoBoost, Navigation, SYNC, tailgate step. MSRP $53,269

3DT511

NOW

$

$ SAVE 16,064 INCLUDES INCLUDES $1,000 $1,000 COSTCO COSTCO

‘13 FORD F150 XLT 4X4

Loaded! Leather, SYNC, Navigation. MSRP $47,014

Navigation, leather, SYNC, EcoBoost.

$

3DT068

‘13 FORD EDGE LIMITED AWD

Leather, SYNC, Navigation, power group, loaded! MSRP $49,099

3DT521

Limited 4x4. Navigation, power running boards, 8 passenger, loaded. MSRP $70,399

os. $2,999 down (24 m x) ta s plu % .99 @

‘13 FORD EDGE LIMITED AWD

Ex demo, power roof, 20” wheels, remote start. MSRP $54,819

‘13 FORD EXPEDITION

309

Hurry in for best selection!

‘13 FORD F150 FX4 4X4

‘13 FORD FLEX SEL AWD

0P6300

Panoramic roof, MyFord Touch, 7 passenger, power seat.

$

28,949

‘08 FORD F250 SUPERCAB 4X4

P6296A

Diesel, leather, heated seats, only 67,847 km.

$

32,949

2012 F250 SUPERCAB 4X4 XLT

P6285A

Diesel, auto, pwr group, long box. A Great buy!

$

37,949

.COM

BEST SERVICE. BEST SELECTION. LOWEST PRICES. PERIOD.

APPOINTMENTS/INFO HOTLINE: 1-877-603-FORD (3673) SALMON ARM - (250) 832-2101

DL#5171

REVELSTOKE - (250) 837-5284

DL#5172


Lakeshore News, February 28, 2014  

February 28, 2014 edition of the Lakeshore News

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