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THURSDAY February 27, 2014 Vol. 29• No. 17 ••• $1.25 inc. G.S.T.

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Her voice back, Irish singer Mary Murphy launches her latest CD next month at the Little Red Church. page B1

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SHARKS ON ICE Despite school closures, Sharks were in full swim training Monday — until coach Kris loosened the training reins. The senior squads hopped out of the pool and went for a quick break in the snow! From left, Michael Jung, Josh Dolman, Ben Neufeld, Jarod Thereault, Juliana Bartemucci, Brooke Lamoureux, Emma Neufeld, Jordyn Ryan, Gabrielle Wolfe and Amelia Elder.  PHOTO BY TARA RYAN

Teachers casting ballots in strike vote next week Renee Andor Record Staff

B.C. teachers will cast ballots next week in a strike vote, but if job action happens it will be a phased-in process, according to Comox District Teachers’ Association president Steve Stanley. The BC Teachers’ Federation announced the strike vote will be held Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, with results announced Thursday evening. If teachers vote in favour of a strike, the union has

90 days to start some parts of the province on sort of job action. days,” continued Before we went to the third stage or different Stanley said if job Stanley. action is taken, it would a full closure of the whole school district “Before we went to the not affect student learn- across the province, that would require third stage or a full cloing initially. sure of the whole school another vote. Steve Stanley district across the prov“The first stage … would be just where ince, that would require we don’t do staff meetings, and things,” Stanley explained. another vote — so there would those kinds of things, where we This stage could last a month, have to be another strike vote take away some services, but they but it’s hard to say, he added. before we went on a full strike.” don’t impact … students at all, “The plan that we have right According to the BCTF, the BC and we’ll continue to do report now calls for the second stage to Public School Employers’ Assocards and coaching extracurricu- be rotating strikes so there could ciation has tabled “unreasonable” lar activities and those kinds of be minor disruptions to different proposals that include new lan-

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guage that again removes class size, composition and staffing levels from the contract. The BCTF also says the proposed salary increases are less than the 3.5 to four per cent other public sector workers have received under the government’s “co-operative gains mandate.” The current round of bargaining talks with teachers has been going on for a year, with more than 40 sessions at the bargaining table.

writer@comoxvalleyrecord.com


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Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Ciaran’s ride delayed A cruise for a 16-year-old Comox Valley friend, student, colleague and son “wise beyond his years” who died January in a longboard accident has been postponed to April 12. The Cruise for Ciaran originally was scheduled Feb. 23, but was rescheduled until April due to the weekend snowstorm, explained committee member Dawn McQuinn. “The cruise is about safety and awareness, and we wanted to ensure a safe cruise,” she added. McQuinn said the idea for the cruise began shortly after the passing of Ciaran Martin, a Grade 11 student at G.P. Vanier school who succumbed to his injuries Jan. 5 after he was struck by a vehicle Jan. 2. He was travelling northbound on a longboard on Macaulay Road in Black Creek. He was not wearing a helmet. His family donated his organs, which has given six people the gift of life. “(The cruise) all stems from his death … to make sense of

his passing, to bring awareness to both drivers and longboarders and to bring awareness to organ donation,” noted McQuinn. She added there is a perception that some longboarders can be rude to drivers, “but they’re not all like that. The irony is that Ciaran was so kind, so sweet, so caring.” McQuinn said the cruise is scheduled to begin at Vanier school, head down Headquarters Road, loop into Courtenay over the 17th Street bridge, up Cliffe Avenue to the Fifth Street bridge, ending at Lewis Park. All participants are encouraged to ride “anything with wheels” and helmets will be mandatory, McQuinn added. She explained the cruise — which will become an annual tradition — also serves a larger purpose. “We are doing this also in hopes to have the laws around helmet use changed. It would be wonderful to see a law making helmets mandatory for longboarders.” For more information about the cruise, search for the Cruise for Ciaran Facebook page.

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Prestigious award for former Record publisher

Sales for radio, Yellow Pages preceded career in newspapers

Earle Couper, Scott Stanfield

Record Staff

Former Comox Valley Record publisher Grant Lawrence has been named the recipient of a prestigious B.C. community newspaper award. At the Ma Murray Awards on April 26, Lawrence will be presented at the River Rock Casino

MA MURRAY FINALISTS The Comox Valley Record is a finalist in three other Ma Murray award categories. Erin Haluschak is one of three people in the running for the TD Feature Photo Award in the Record’s circulation class for her aerial picture publicizing the 2013 Comox Air Show. The Record has a chance to receive a Special Publications Award for the winter issue of Trio magazine. As well, the Record is a finalist for the Safeway Ma Murray Community Service Award for work to publicize the Boys and Girls Clubs’ Christmas Village. Ma Murray Awards are presented annually by the B.C. and Yukon Community Newspaper Association.

in Richmond with the BC Housing Eric Dunning Award for Dedication and

SNOWY PLAY DAY Comox Valley MLA Don McRae, Mayor Leslie Baird and every Cumberland councillor braved snowy weather Saturday morning. It was the official grand opening of the new play facility in Village Park. PHOTO BY ERIN HALUSCHAK

Service to the Community Newspaper Industry. “It was a real surprise and it’s certainly appreciated,” Lawrence said Tuesday. From red On Air signs, to the Yellow Pages, to the Green Sheet (Comox District Free Press), to Black Press – Lawrence’s 47 years in the media industry have been colourful indeed. It began in the early 1960s at a radio station in Weyburn, Sask., where he was an announcer. A move to Vancouver Island in 1963 included stints with radio stations in Courtenay and Campbell River. In the mid-’60s Lawrence left the radio station in Campbell River to take a job in sales at the Campbell River Courier newspaper. In 1970 Lawrence moved to the Lower Mainland, where his career in newspaper sales continued and he also added a job with the Yellow Pages to his resume. A return to the Island in 1975 saw Lawrence work at the Arrowsmith Star in Parksville before coming to Courtenay to lead the sales department at the Comox District Free Press, dubbed The Green Sheet for the colour of its front and back pages. After the Green Sheet closed, Lawrence joined the Comox Valley Record, a Black Press publication, in 1993. After two years

as sales manager, he was named publisher, a post he held until semi-retiring in late-2008. After working for Black Press from home for a year, he officially retired in 2010, putting an exclamation point on a successful career of media and community involvement. Record publisher Zena Williams says Lawrence was an “invaluable adviser” for the 18 years she worked at the Record’s sister paper in Campbell River. “When I was given the opportunity to move to the Record this past July, I was confident that the foundation set by Grant was well-entrenched and on firm ground,” Williams said. “I have no doubt that this award is well-earned, and will be forever grateful to him for always showing integrity and sharing his wisdom.” Sales manager Joanna Ross, who preceded Williams as publisher, has known Lawrence for upwards of 30 years, 22 of them in the newspaper industry. “I was fortunate enough to have Grant as both a friend and mentor,” Ross said. “His honesty, reliability and fairness both in business and life were qualities that I have throughout my career, aspired to live up to. ‘Doing the right thing even when no one is looking’ are words that I think best describe Grant, as a publisher and as a person.” Black Press owner and founder David Black congratulated Lawrence this week for being named the Dunning Award recipient. Lawrence’s notable newspaper achievements include guiding the Record and the Courier to numerous provincial and national awards, including a 2010 BCYCNA Ma Murray award for General Excellence to the Record. “It’s been a great 40-plus

GRANT LAWRENCE, SEEN with his wife Kathie, is capping 47 years in the media industry with the BC Housing Eric Dunning Award for Dedication and Service to the Community Newspaper Industry. years to have worked in this industry, and to have seen all of the changes, especially the production changes from when I started when they were still working with hot type,” Lawrence said. “Seeing that progress to where we are today — absolutely amazing. “But I am a very strong believer that community newspapers are here to stay for a very long time,” added Lawrence, a longtime Kinsmen (now in Kinsmen K-40) and a member of the Courtenay Rotary Club. He also has a long asso-

ciation with volunteering to assist law enforcement agencies. His many years with Comox Valley Crime Stoppers include several terms as president. “He’s always been very involved in the community,” his wife Kathie says. Now 70 years old, Lawrence has not taken up fishing or golfing in his golden years. However, Kathie notes he took flying lessons when he lived in Campbell River. Could the wild blue yonder be the next hue on Lawrence’s palette?

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

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Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

Liquor changes worry pub owner Renee Andor Record Staff

Some of the recommendations to loosen B.C.’s liquor laws worry Whistle Stop Pub owner Barry Van Dusen not only as a pub owner, but also simply as a member of society. He’s written a letter to Premier Christy Clark outlining his concerns around reinstating happy hour, relaxing food-service requirements, allowing kids in pubs, selling liquor in grocery stores and doing away with

beer garden fencing at festivals and events. “I honestly don’t believe the benefits of relaxing the liquor laws will do anything for the greater good,” says Van Dusen. “I hope you will rethink the impact of this new line of thinking as it pertains to alcohol laws in the province. “The only reason I can think of for the government’s relaxation of the liquor laws is to gather more revenue for the government coffers through taxation and fines and penalties for impaired drivers.”

GRACE HOWARD IS withdrawing from the Miss World Canada pageant.

The Province announced earlier this month it would accept the 73 recommendations listed in MLA John Yap’s Liquor Policy Review final report. The premier had already announced in December her government’s support for changes to allow happy hour offers and kids in pubs. Van Dusen says happy hour offers encourage more alcohol consumption in a short amount of time, as customers want to take advantage of the happy hour pric-

ing, and he’s concerned more people will drive impaired. “The very issues that were at the heart of happy hours when they were outlawed

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Comox resident Grace Howard has decided to step out of the Miss World Canada pageant. The 20-year-old was among 40 finalists for the competition that is part of the Miss World movement, which in turn is partnering with the Children’s Charity that raises funds for special-needs children. “I want to keep my commitment to them,” she said, explaining why she will not partake in the May 11 pageant in Vancouver. Grace will continue to fundraise for the Children’s Charity. She has so far raised $1,345. Her goal is to reach $7,000 by her birthday on April 7. To help her fundraising efforts, visit www.gifttool.com/athon/MyFundraisingPag e?ID=1277&AID=2251&PID=404586.

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WHISTLE STOP PUB owner Barry Van Dusen is against some of the recommendations in the Liquor Policy Review. PHOTO BY RENEE ANDOR

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

A5

‘Short-period drinking binges’ a worry Continued from A4

hours,” he says as he points out the various fines and expenses impaired drivers face when caught. “Is the intent of allowing happy hours simply to add to the provincial budget through fees and fines associated with drinking-and-driving infractions? If not, what other ‘good’ comes out of again allowing these short-period drinking binges?” Van Dusen also points out he could receive a $10,000 fine for over-serving a patron at his pub. Allowing children in pubs is another one of the recommendations Van Dusen takes issue with. This recommendation suggests pubs would be able to choose whether or not they allow families into

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD

their establishments, be exposed to adult bringing their kids to and Van Dusen says behaviour and lan- a pub. the Whistle Stop Pub guage like profanAs well, he points out will remain 19-plus, ity and may be more allowing underage peoespecially after hear- tempted to try alcohol ple into pubs doesn’t ing from his mean simcustomers. ply allowIs the intent of allowing happy ing kids in “I have surveyed my hours simply to add to the provinwith their customers parents; it and there’s cial budget through fees and fines also means not a single, associated with drinking-and-drivallowing solitary one ing infractions? teens in, that said and that Barry Van Dusen means more they wanted to see stress and children in a pub,” he themselves if they’re responsibility for servsays, noting most of his around it more. He ing staff. customers come in to adds many family“Say a 20-year-old unwind after work and friendly restaurants brings a couple of his 13.K&JQ&AAd_13.K&JQ&AAd 13-08-19 Page 1 13.K&JQ&AAd 7/29/13 9:07 PM Page18-year-old 18:02 PM buddies serve alcohol so parwant an adult-oriented ents can have a drink in, he orders a beer, place to relax. He adds kids would with dinner without I’m going to have to be

watching that table all the time they’re there to make sure he’s not trying to slip them a drink,” says Van Dusen. “They’re just increasing my liability, No. 1, and my responsibility.” He adds he could increase his food business from families but the risks aren’t worth the possible benefit. Van Dusen’s letter also outlined concerns around removal of beer garden fencing, liquor sales in grocery stores and relaxing food service requirements. Van Dusen is a past Comox councillor.

writer@comoxvalleyrecord.com

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A6 Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

New principal good start Change does not satisfy every Denman parent Jan Wilderom Record Staff

Parents of students at Denman Island Elementary got a new principal, but they are still far from satisfied. A 100-per-cent teacher turnover rate made a substantial impact on students, said Kathrina Meglic, whose daughter was led by a new teacher halfway through the school year. “She was basically lying awake at night crying because she didn’t know what was happening,” Meglic said. “After a number of conversations about her anxiety, we as a family decided to allow her to study at home until she was comfortable with going back to school.” Jennifer Turner is the new principal at the school, which has been a blessing, according to Meglic. “We consider this an excellent beginning for the school. Since Jen Turner has come to the school she (Meglic’s daughter) has agreed to try school again.” Other parents aren’t as forgiving. Lisa Lundy pulled her son from the 2013 school year after bringing three of her children through the elementary school. “It’s really affected

the kids. My experi- relevance of what they Meglic wants to see ence is that a lot of the read and heard.” some more change in energy ends up being “Parents seem to be the school and said spent between adults, left in the dark and we most parents are still and having a struggle all need to know what’s troubled by everything between adults. that has happened. I think it’s highWe really don’t know ly unfortunate “I would say the needs of the anything. The other teachers a large number children have (formerly at Denman) are of parents would been comprolike to see the essentially on leave and we mised.” teachers that Once Turner don’t really know the reason left return to replaced Dr. for them so doing, or if they the school when Shelly Robinthat’s possible. son as principal would be able to return. Certainly in Sepat the Denman Kathrina Meglic tember. “If it were posschool, Robinson moved to Navigate going on,” said Meglic. sible to get the teachers (North Island Distance “We really don’t know back that we started anything. “The other the year with I think Education School). At the beginning of teachers (formerly at that would be a reason the school year, Lundy Denman) are essential- for celebration.” moved her son to ly on leave and we don’t Turner and School NIDES. Once parents really know the reason District 71 superintenheard about the Den- for them so doing, or if dent Sherry Elwood man turnover rate and they would be able to were not available for learned Robinson was return.” comment. coming to their children’s school, it caused some worry. “There has been a lot www.bcferries.com of concern and activity VANCOUVER to NANAIMO NANAIMO to VANCOUVER on the Facebook page,” Horseshoe Bay to Departure Bay Departure Bay to Horseshoe Bay Lundy said. “Parents Effective Until March 31, 2014 had seen and heard the 6:30 am Daily 6:30 am Daily concern on Denman 8:30 am Daily 8:30 am Daily Island so they were 10:30 am Daily 10:30 am Daily concerned about the 12:30 pm Daily 12:30 pm Daily

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Week of February 18-24, 2014

On February 18th police received a report of a break and enter to a residence on the 500 block of Hobson Place in Courtenay. The investigation revealed that the culprit entered via an unlocked garage door and then gained entry inside the home. (2014-1984) A residence was entered on February 18th after culprits smashed a window with a rock. This occurred at a residence on the 2900 block of Back Road in Courtenay. Nothing appears to have been taken in this break in. (2014-1986) A report of vandalism was called into police on February 19th. Two buildings were spray painted, one of them being a church. This occurred on the 1600 block of Burgess road in Courtenay. (2014-2015) Police have been receiving several complaints of thefts from inside lockers and around the parking lot of the Comox Valley Aquatic Center located at 377 Lerwick road in Courtenay. (20142022) On February 19th police received a report of a theft from an outdoor shed located at a residence on the 6500 block of Tsolum River Road in the Courtenay area. The thief stole 3 5 gallon Gerry cans of gasoline. (2014-2028) On February 21st police received a report of a break, enter and theft from a business on the 2900 block of Moray Avenue in Courtenay. Four tires were stolen in this break in. This investigation is continuing. (2014-2105) Police attended a two vehicle collision that happened on highway 19 just North of the Cumberland turn off. The investigation revealed that a vehicle was attempting to pass a large truck and collided with a rear tire when it lost control on the

slushy road surface. The vehicle then flipped and left the roadway. Luckily there were no injuries.(20142165) On February 23 rd police were called to a residence on the 300 block of Church street in Comox for a report of a break and enter. The thief stole a guitar once inside. (2014-2169) Police received a call for service from the homeowner of a residence located on the 2000 block of Cummings Road in Courtenay. The homeowner reported several males with masks and guns on his porch attempting to get in the house. Police attended with the police dog and located two males and a weapon. A third male is still being sought by police. (2014-2197) On February 24th police attended to a residence on the 4300 block of Dove Creek Road in Courtenay for a report of a break, enter and theft. The culprit gained entry to the residence by smashing through an interior door and once inside stole a large sum of cash. (2014-2216) If anyone has any information with regards to any of these investigation or other crimes, please call the Comox Valley RCMP at 250-338-1321. Should you wish to remain anonymous, please call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

TOTAL STATISTICS FOR Feb 17-24, 2014

CATEGORY Assaults Thefts (All excluding vehicles) B&E (All types) Cause a Disturbance Impaired Driving Related Total Calls for Service

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WA N T E D Patrick James BELLE-ISLE DOB: 1993-04-09 160 cms, 59 kgs, Brown hair, Brown eyes

Warrants for:

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www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

CVRD parks scrutinized

ERVIN CROSS (LEFT), a retired RCAF pilot and member of the Royal Military College of Canada’s graduating class of 1957, finally receives his degree from Dr. Joseph Buckley, RMCC’s dean of graduate studies and vice-principal, research.

Degree finally received Wait of more than 50 years ends for former pilot

Comox resident Ervin Cross was presented with his Bachelor of Science degree from the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) in a Feb. 24 ceremony in Courtenay. He graduated from RMCC in 1957 in chemical engineering, two years before the college was empowered to grant degrees. In recognition of the full university program he completed, he was granted a degree retroactively at the RMCC convocation in November 2013, but was unable to attend the

ial

ceremony in Kingston, Ont.  As a representative of the Senate of RMCC, Dr. Joseph Buckley, dean of graduate studies and vice-principal, research, came to Comox for the presentation. He brought words of congratulation from Brig.-Gen. Al Meinzinger, commandant of RMCC, and Dr. Harry Kowal, principal of RMCC, then gave Cross his degree and gifts from the commandant and principal. “Mr. Cross is actually a member of the RMC class of 1957. He did not receive a degree back then, because it was only in 1959 that RMC was empowered by the Ontario legislature to confer degrees in arts, science and

Advisor

engineering,” Kowal noted in a statement. Local members of the “Old Brigade” — RMCC alumni from classes at least 50 years ago — were also in attendance. Following the presentations, Cross addressed the audience of family and friends with words of reminiscence and thanks. Cross was a pilot in the RCAF and flew the F86, Buffalo, Twin Otter and Harvard during his career. He retired from the Canadian Armed Forces in 1987. In the 1990s, RMCC began tracking down past students to present them degrees they had earned, but who had never received a degree certificate. – 19 Wing Comox

since

The Comox Valley Regional District’s CVRD parks department is conducting an assessment of its parks and trails — inspecting for downed trees, snow levels, blocked roads, etc. Please remain out of the parks until further notice. We hope to have the “boots on the ground” assessment done by Wednesday afternoon and will be able to provide further information then. After a power outage due to the bad weather Monday caused the CVRD’s sports centre to shut down in the afternoon, everything is back to normal in both the sports and aquatic centres. Power is on, programs on as scheduled, and the parking lots are clear. And again a reminder, Emcon, not the

BRUCE LANGLANDS Serving BUYERS and SELLERS in the Comox Valley for 30 Years.

CVRD, has jurisdiction and authority for snow clearing and road maintenance in the rural areas of the Comox Valley. Emcon’s number in the Comox Valley is 250-336-8897. — Comox Valley Regional District

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD drivewayBC.ca |

Welcome to the driver’s seat

Can Toyota’s Tundra ride alongside heavyweight brands like Ford, GM or Ram?

Tugging at the tails of top selling trucks If there is one segment of the auto business that takes dynamite to get people to change brands, it’s the full-size pickup truck category, I’m sure most of us know of someone who is a “Ford guy” or The Tundra is “Chevy diehard” owner, even as capable as and getting him or her to move to a new many of the domestic truck would be almost brands but in some impossible. ways it still has a way It wasn’t until the last to go to truly be an Toyota Tundra was introduced in 2007 that alternative to Ford, Toyota was a real conGM and Ram. tender. That 2007 Tundra and this refreshed 2014 Zack Spencer model are designed, engineered and even built in America, helping to pull loyal domestic buyers away. The Tundra is even as capable as many of the domestic brands but in some ways it still has a way to go to truly be an alternative to Ford, GM and Ram.

‘‘

is a step up from the lower trims but not nearly as supple and luxurious as the new batch of interiors from Ram and GM. Those trucks, in particular, have almost luxury-sedan interiors that make the driver forget they are in a truck. The Tundra, in comparison, is a bit stark, featuring a hard, simple plastic dash and door pieces that don’t compare. The centre screen is smaller than many competitors are, and the screen embedded in the instrument cluster is small. What has been improved is the overall layout of the centre console. The back seat is massive and flips up with just one hand to make room for interior storage. I found the last Tundra to have a very high seating position that limited headroom. This new 2014 seems to have a better seating position, no longer crimping headroom for taller drivers. Drive Powering the Tundra are two V8 gasoline engines. The base model has a 4.6L V8 with 310hp and 327 lb.-ft. of torque. The larger 5.7L has 381hp and 401 lb.-ft. of torque. This is one area that the Toyota cannot compete; there is no V6 offered and no diesel (Ram only), which the domestic makers do offer. By limiting the available engine options and not having a heavy-duty model that will certainly diminish the

Are you loyal to one brand of vehicle when you purchase and if so which?

Verdict The Tundra is a capable truck. When equipped it can tow up to 4760 kg, which is on the high side in this class. What surprised me the most was the real “trucky” ride. I have had extensive seat time in all three domestic brands over the past year and I have to say that they are best sellers for a reason – the refinement is rather dramatic. The Lowdown Power: 4.6L V8 with 310hp or 5.7L V8 with 381hp Fill-up: 15.8L/11.0L/100km (city/highway 5.6L) Sticker price: $26,750-$54,000 zack.spencer@drivewaybc.ca

Please explain why you have made that decision.

?

QUESTION OF THE WEEK!

Go to drivewayBC.ca to submit your answer.

Safety Tip: Every day brings us closer to more favourable spring weather but remember we still have plenty of rain ahead of us. It’s a good time of year to consider whether you need to change your wiper blades and to top up your windshield washer fluid.

Find more online at

drivewayBC.ca

Visit the 2014 Tundra gallery at DrivewayBC.ca

HAVE YOUR SAY … Have an opinion? Feel strongly about an issue? Share something special …

OF THE WEEK:

number of domestic buyers willing to give Tundra a try. On the road, I was surprised at just how rough the ride is in comparison to the all-new GM trucks, which really are like driving a big sedan. I would also place the Ford F-150 and Ram 1500 a very close second in ride comfort. The Tundra is choppy on rough roads and the noise level is on the high side. Toyota claims to have improved ride quality on this refreshed 2014 model but I am not a fan of the ride.

Looks As part of the 2014 redesign, Toyota went about setting up a slightly different look for each of its trim levels. Sold as an SR5, Limited and Platinum, each has a variation of the oversized front grille. The wheel openings are now larger and squarer, framing wheel sizes ranging from 18-inches on the SR5 and Limited and 20-inches on the Platinum. The Tailgate has a soft open feature, stopping it from slamming down, that is fantastic but there is no side step or ladder into the bed the way Ford and the new GM trucks have. Sold as a regular car, double cab or Crew Cab, there is a model for most buyers. Inside Just as the outside was redesigned to have a unique character for each trim, the inside mimics this idea. The Platinum model I tested is covered with a diamond pattern, or quilted look used on the leather seatbacks, side door inserts and dash front panel. It

Question

Send us your comments, views, concerns to editor@comoxvalleyrecord.com, 765 McPhee Avenue, Courtenay or by fax at 250-338-5568. (Please include name and contact information - this will not be published and is for verification only.)

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

Picture of the week

Futuristic Kia with butterfly wings

Drives-U-Crazy

The Kia Niro concept is a futuristic, upscale and performance-inspired hybrid electric drive car designed for urban dwellers. Entry into the vehicle is by way of dihedral “butterfly” doors with flush door handles that swing up high into the roof. Mounted directly onto the side windows are milled “Plexiglas®1” door mirrors with built-in cameras. And at the rear, the large hatch opens to reveal an expansive carbon-fibre-clad cargo deck ready to swallow large quantities of equipment, gadgets, gear or luggage. This concept comes with a variant of Kia’s turbocharged 1.6-liter ‘Gamma’ engine, capable of 160 horsepower. The engine and a seven-speed, dual-clutch transmission serve the front wheels while an electric hybrid system powered by regenerative braking delivers up to 45 horsepower to the rear wheels – when road conditions require extra grip. T:8.5"

A11

Snow way to drive

The recent snowstorms have brought out the best and the worst in B.C. drivers. I would be a millionaire if I had a dollar for every person I’ve watched over-rev a car in a futile bid to escape the combined clutches of snow and ice. If your car is not shod for the winter weather, then stay home or take a cab. Otherwise, take off slowly in a higher gear than you would in dry weather. You will stand a lot more chance of gaining traction and less reliant on those good people who dig you out! What drives-u-crazy? keith.morgan@drivewaybc.ca

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K200_PALR_FEB_AP_W1

Offer(s) available on select new 2013/2014 models through participating dealers to qualified customers who take delivery by February 28, 2014. Dealers may sell or lease for less. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. All offers are subject to change without notice. Vehicles shown may include optional accessories and upgrades available at extra cost. All pricing includes delivery and destination fees up to $1,665, other fees and ROUND certain levies (including tire levies) and $100 A/C charge (where applicable) and excludes licensing, registration, insurance, other taxes and variable dealer administration fees (up to $699). Other dealer charges may be required at the time of purchase. Other lease and financing options also available. ≠Throwback Pricing available O.A.C. on financing offers on new 2013/2014 models. 0%/1.49% financing for 84 months example: 2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E)/2014 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551E) with a purchase price of $23,582/$24,782 (including $1,665 freight/PDI) financed at 0%/1.49% for 84-month period equals 32 reduced bi-weekly payments of $85/$96 followed by 150 bi-weekly payments of $125/$143. Cost of borrowing is $0/$1,321.94 and total obligation is $23,582/$26,104. Throwback Pricing Incentive varies by model and trim level and may be taken as a lump sum or to reduce the financed amount. The Throwback Pricing incentive for the 2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E)/2014 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551E) shown is $1,280/$1,504 (a $40/$47 reduction in 32 bi-weekly payments). Limited time offer. See retailer for complete details. Throwback Pricing is a trademark of Kia Canada Inc. 60/84 Amortization Financing Example: 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE) with a purchase price of $28,482 (including $1,665 freight/PDI) financed at 0% for 60 months amortized over an 84-month period equals 32 reduced bi-weekly payments of $121 followed by 98 bi-weekly payments of $156 with a principal balance of $8,138 plus applicable taxes due after 60 months. Cost of borrowing is $0 and total obligation is $28,482. Throwback Pricing Incentive varies by model and trim level and may be taken as a lump sum or to reduce the financed amount. The Throwback Pricing Incentive for the 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE) shown is $1,120 (a $35 reduction in 32 bi-weekly payments). Limited time offer. Offer excludes taxes. See retailer for complete details. ‡Loan credit for 2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E) is $750 and is available on purchase financing only on approved credit (OAC). Loan savings vary by model and trim and are deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes. 0% purchase financing is available on select new 2013/2014 Kia models O.A.C. Terms vary by model and trim, see dealer for complete details. ΔModel shown Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for 2014 Sorento SX V6 AWD (SR75YE)/2014 Sportage SX AT Luxury AWD (SP759E)/2014 Rondo EX Luxury (RN756E) is $40,595/$38,295/$32,195. Highway/city fuel consumption is based on the 2014 Sorento LX 2.4L GDI 4-cyl (A/T)/2014 Sportage 2.4L 4-cyl (A/T)/2014 Rondo 2.0L GDI 4-cyl (M/T). These updated estimates are based on the Government of Canada’s approved criteria and testing methods. Refer to the EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on driving habits and other factors. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of printing. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. Kia is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation.

[ JOB INFO ]

Job #

K13_Q1_PR_AL_1005

[ MECHANICAL SPECS ] Live

None

[ APPROVALS ] _____ Art Director

Chris Rezner

[ ACTION ]

_____ Producer

2012 FORD

Focus

Titanium Edition

SALE PRICE

16,500

$

RN2128A

Sante Fe LIMITED

OFFER ENDS FEBRUARY 28 www.COURTENAYKIA.com

K200_PALR_FEB_AP_W1.indd 1

3

S02135B

financing

Includes Variable Throwback Pricing Incentive. $85 bi-weekly payments include $1,280 Throwback Pricing Incentive. Payments are based on 2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E), financing for

*5-year/100,000 km worry-free comprehensive warranty.

SALE PRICE

7,500

$

2007 HYUNDAI ≠

‡ Offer(s) available on select new 2013/2014 models through participating dealers to qualified customers who take delivery by February 28, 2014. Dealers may sell or lease for less. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete All offers are subject toincludes change without$750 notice. Vehicles may include optional15 accessories and upgrades available at extrapayments cost. All pricing includes delivery andto destination fees up to $1,665, other fees and After months, bi-weekly increase 84 details. months. Offer loanshown credit. ≠ certain levies (including tire levies) and $100 A/C charge (where applicable) and excludes licensing, registration, insurance, other taxes and variable dealer administration fees (up to $699). Other dealer charges may be required at theThrowback time of purchase. Other lease and fiIncentive nancing options also available. O.A.C. on financing offers on new 2013/2014 models. 0%/1.49% financing≠ for 84 months example: 2014 Rondo LX MT $125. Pricing may be Throwback takenPricing as aavailable lump sum or to reduce financed amount. Rondo EX Luxury shown (RN551E)/2014 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551E) with a purchase price of $23,582/$24,782 (including $1,665 freight/PDI) financed at 0%/1.49% for 84-month period equals 32 reduced bi-weekly payments of $85/$96 followed by 150 bi-weekly payments of $125/$143. Cost of borrowing is $0/$1,321.94 and total obligation is $23,582/$26,104. Throwback Pricing Incentive varies by model and trim level and may be taken as a lump sum or to reduce the financed amount. The Throwback Pricing incentive for the 2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E)/2014 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551E) shown is $1,280/$1,504 (a $40/$47 reduction in 32 bi-weekly payments). Limited time offer. See retailer for complete details. Throwback Pricing is a trademark of Kia Canada Inc. 60/84 Amortization Financing Example: 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE) with a purchase price of $28,482 (including $1,665 freight/PDI) financed at 0% for 60 months amortized over an 84-month period equals 32 reduced bi-weekly payments of $121 followed by 98 bi-weekly payments of $156 with a principal balance of $8,138 plus applicable taxes due after 60 months. Cost of borrowing is $0 and total obligation is $28,482. Throwback Pricing Incentive varies by model and trim level and may be taken as a lump sum or to reduce the financed amount. The Throwback Pricing Incentive for the 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE) shown is $1,120 (a $35 reduction in 32 bi-weekly payments). Limited time offer. Offer excludes taxes. See retailer for complete details. ‡Loan credit for 2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E) is $750 and is available on purchase financing only on approved credit (OAC). Loan savings vary by model and trim and are deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes. 0% purchase financing is available on select new 2013/2014 Kia models O.A.C. Terms vary by model and trim, see dealer for complete details. ΔModel shown Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for 2014 Sorento SX V6 AWD (SR75YE)/2014 Sportage SX AT Luxury AWD (SP759E)/2014 Rondo EX Luxury (RN756E) is $40,595/$38,295/$32,195. Highway/city fuel consumption is based on the 2014 Sorento LX 2.4L GDI 4-cyl (A/T)/2014 Sportage 2.4L 4-cyl (A/T)/2014 Rondo 2.0L GDI 4-cyl (M/T). These updated estimates are based on the Government of Canada’s approved criteria and testing methods. Refer to the EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on driving habits and other factors. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of printing. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. Kia is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation.

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

2005 VW

T:11"

WAS

F01770A

Passatt

7.0L/10.0L

THROWBACK PRICING

143 96 125 $85

Rondo EX Luxury shown

hwy / city 100km

THE ALL-NEW 2014

$ $

%

SALE PRICE

24,995

$

financing

BI-WEEKLY for the Includes Variable Throwback Pricing Incentive. $121 bi-weekly first 15 MONTHS. payments include $1,120 Throwback Pricing Incentive. Payments are based on 2014 Sorento 2.4 LX AT FWD (SR75BE), 60-month financing amortized over 84 months. After 15 months, bi-weekly payments increase financing to $156. Principal balance of $8,138 due after 60 months. Throwback Pricing Incentive may be taken as a lump sum or to reduce financed amount. ≠ Includes Variable Throwback Pricing Incentive. $96 bi-weekly payments include $1,504 Throwback Pricing Incentive. Payments are based on 2014 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551E), financing for 84 months. After 15 months, bi-weekly payments increase to $143. Throwback Pricing Incentive may be taken as a lump sum or to reduce financed amount.≠

THE NEW 2014

Sportage SX Luxury shown

0 1.49 % 7.0L/10.0L

≠  hwy / city 100km

T:11"

WAS 2014 THE NEW

Sportage SX Luxury shown

A0420A

2013 FORD

7.1L/10.4L

Sorento SX shown

SALE PRICE

$

financing

6-SPEED AUTOMATIC

BEST NEW SUV

Delia Zaharelos

_____ Ship to Publication

SALE PRICE

14,500

$

SR2270A

$500 MILITARY DISCOUNT ON NEW 2013 & 2014 Kia Vehicles 1025A Comox Road 5th St.

17th St.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • 1025A COMOX RD TOLL FREE from ANYWHERE in BC:

1-877-398-2375

www.COURTENAYKIA.com

All photos of vehicles are illustrative and may not be exact vehicle advertised; *If you have never had a car loan before. See dealer for details.


A12 Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014 A13

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

driveway

driveway

Volvo circles the wagon

A hooker’s cold weather fun on four wheels

for success

Las Vegas, Nevada – Volvo is hitching some of its revival hopes to a wagon – the 2015 Volvo V60 Sportswagon. Its grille is clearly all-Volvo but those typically boxy looks that characterized the make from your dad’s day are gone. In looks it’s a design variation of the S60 sedan and it will be a welcome sight for loyalists of the Swedish brand, having witnessed the demise here of the V50 and midsize V70 wagons. The wagon featured recently along with the S60 and XC60 crossover at a launch event in the Nevada desert. The Volvo execs present proudly talked about their new Drive-E powertrains, developed thanks to the megabucks available now that the company is owned by the Chinese Geely Automotive. Ford ownership may now be retreating in Volvo’s rearview The T5mirror but it is still beholden to the US equipped wagon is manufacturer for the platforms upon a smooth operator which these three 2015 models ride. That will change later this year when in performance and the full-size XC90 crossover is set to sit ride … while you atop Volvo’s so-called Scalable Product won’t burn rubber Architecture platform. at the green light, it Model year 2014 saw a refresh of all three midsize Volvo models showing in will take off when the desert so this was truly about the necessary. new engines. The Drive-E family of gas, diesel and hybrid (the latter not yet, Keith Morgan but soon) engines are built around a single, 2.0-litre four-cylinder powerplant. It’s a brave gamble, worthy of Vegas, when you ponder the XC90 relying on such a small engine. Asked if this were a safe bet, the Swedes just smiled and promised the performance of the four-cylinder configuration will equal their big brothers by using such technologies as direct fuel injection, turbocharging, supercharging and . . . electrification. Here in the Great White North, just the two gas engines will be offered initially – the new turbocharged T5 pumps out 240 horsepower, while the turbo’ed and supercharged T6 adds another 62 horses. The base front-wheel-drive V60 T5, with a new eight-speed automatic transmission, will set you back $39,800. Volvos have never been cheap. The other three Sportswagons will continue to use existing powerplants, six-speed automatic transmissions and Haldex all-wheeldrive systems. Did a little shopping off the strip in the XC60, which came into its own, its cavernous rear swallowing up my bulky purchases. I’ll reserve comments on the crossover until I’ve had a chance to put it through its paces in BC. However, I got much more seat time in the V60 and S60 (S60 with T5 $37,750. T6 $42,850), taking in the awe-inspiring beauty of the Valley of Fire state park and Red Rock Canyon.

Alexandra Straub puts her BMW through the paces as she learns car control at the ICAR track in Mirabel, Quebec.

Volvo S60, V60, XC60.

‘‘

‘‘

’’

Volvo S60

Volvo XC60

The T5-equipped wagon is a smooth operator in performance and ride. And while you won’t burn rubber at the green light, it will take off when necessary . . . not that we got any chance to pass in the low speed limit state park! Volvo says it will hit 100 km/h in 6.3 seconds if given the lead foot treatment. (The T6 in sedan tells a slightly racier story. Ok, maybe I’m exaggerating but only a little and I look forward pressing the pedal to the metal where I can legally do so.) The T5 fuel economy ratings fare well in comparison with the market competition – 9.4/6.3/8.1 L/100km (city/hwy/combined). These 2015 Volvo V60 numbers are squeezed out of the Sportwagon T5 FWD power plant with the help of the Base Sticker Price: $39,800 standard engine stop/start system Power: 2.0L, 16-valve, 240 hp, and the efficient new eight-speed turbocharged DOHC I-4, mated transmission, which slips into a to eight-speed automatic neutral coasting mode when you Fuel Consumption: lift your foot off the gas. Inside, the instrument panel 9.4/6.3/8.1 L/100km (city/ stretches the span of the car and hwy/combined) features an attractive floating centre console, which mixes good looks with functionality. Swedes are safety conscious, of course, and that means lane change, cross traffic, blind spot warnings and alerts. The front seating is comfortable if a little soft on a long drive. Rear seating ditto and headroom is good despite the coupe-style slope of the rear. And a good view of the road fore, fore aft and side is enjoyed by all. Great stowage room in the rear. The 40/20/40 split second row folds flat to provide enough space to move a small apartment’s furniture. Just kidding but you get the picture.

relatively short so we have more drive time. It’s mentioned that we’ll be practising manouevres with and without electronic help, to put both power and performance to the test. Oh yeah. Proper seating position is outlined when we initially get behind the wheel. Then we’re off. You might ask what is the point behind putting one of BMW’s latest products sideways on an ice track in subzero temperatures. My initial answer is only three letters long and to the point: fun. But that’s only a byproduct of what the impetus behind the program is; a program that started back in 1977 and is now offered in 35 countries. The main goal is safety. It’s to introduce drivers to techniques that might help correct the car if it is not doing what you want it to. For example, if your wheels are pointed in one direction, but your car is going in another, what should you do? Or, if you feel the back end of the car breaking loose, how do you wrangle it in? Putting yourself and the 435i through the paces in a safe and controlled environment is the best place to learn. If you spin out, you’re not going to go into oncoming traffic. You just stop, turn the car around, and keep going. You’ll probably giggle a little in the process and tell yourself you’ll “get it next time.” For more information, visit: http://tinyurl.com/nw54b8p alexandra.straub@drivewaybc.ca

The man from BMW once called me a hooker. Surprisingly, I wasn’t that offended. I actually laughed at such a descriptor, as did everyone else around me. I didn’t feel so bad because I wasn’t the only one in the group labelled thusly at the Be careful where brand’s Driver Training; a you put your hands full day of driving 3 Series so as to not lose sedans (back then) to improve our own car control. I control. didn’t have too many years Alexandra Straub of driving experience back then but I unfortunately I had picked up a few bad habits on the road. What’s a ‘hooker’, according to the instructors at the German automaker’s training? Someone who hooks his or her hand into the steering wheel when making a turn. It’s a big boo-boo and not an effective way to drive. It’s also totally unsafe should an accident occur in the process. Needless to say, pointing out the ‘hooker’ in me caused me to change my habits for the better. In other words, be careful where you put our hands so as to not lose control! And in the most recent installment of learning car control with BMW, no such noun was used when relating to my technique. Thank goodness. It’s minus 15 degrees at the ICAR track in Mirabel, Quebec. The sun is out and there’s a lineup of all-new 435i coupes just begging to be driven. Some are equipped with the brand’s all-wheel drive system. Some are rear-wheel drive. Regardless, I’ll have my way with both configurations by the end of the day, so to speak. The adventure is better known as the Winter Driver Training program, offered exclusively at the ICAR location. That said, you don’t need to own a BMW to participate. Learning car control in less than perfect circumstances is available to all who have $795. In my opinion, it’s money extremely well spent. The day starts out with an in-class session that goes over theory and what will be executed throughout the various exercises. It’s kept

Volvo XC60

Instrument cluster.

’’

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2008 Toyota Avalon

2008 Lexus GS460

Only 80,000 kms Loaded Beautiful Car!

2010 Toyota Tacoma TRD Package Hard Tonneau Only 80,000 kms

$

Bi-weekly $196.81

3

18,998

$

2012 Toyota Sienna

Bi-weekly $292.041

28,998

Bi-weekly $303.994

Bi-weekly $198.558

25,998

29,998

$

2010 Mazda3 GT Loaded Automatic

Only 24,000 kms Loaded Automatic

$

2011 Toyota Venza

8 Spd, Auto 350 HP V8 Loaded 88,000 kms

Bi-weekly $176.319

19,998

$

4 Cyl, FWD, Only 46,000 kms

Bi-weekly $176.655

$

22,998

2 TO CHOOSE

Bi-weekly $157.846

Bi-weekly $198.5511

25,998

2012 Toyota Venza

70 /MPG Loaded

Loaded Touring Package Only 4,947 kms Automatic, AWD

14,998

$

Bi-weekly $241.82

10

31,998

$

Bi-weekly $221.1712

21,498

$

Bi-weekly $188.78

9

Clean!

$

15,998

13,998

21,498

$

$

5.7 l Hemi, Loaded, Sport Model, Clean!

Bi-weekly $255.8714

25,998

Less than 44,000 Kms Fully Loaded 50+ MPG

Bi-weekly $198.5513

2011 Toyota Tundra Crew Max

2010 Dodge Ram 1500

$

2011 Toyota Camry Hybrid

Only 43,000 kms Auto

Low Kms Sunroof, AWD

V8, 4x4

Off Road Package Low Kms Automatic

2003 Infiniti G35

2010 Toyota RAV4 Sport

2005 Toyota 4Runner

2008 Toyota FJ Cruiser

2012 Toyota RAV4 V6 AWD Less than 24,000 kms Automatic

$

2009 Toyota Prius

Bi-weekly $284.9715

4WD , Auto Tow the Boat & Haul the Kids

8 Passenger SUV

1 $292.04 Bi weekly 5.99% 60 Months TP $37,965.17; 2 $334.91 Bi Weekly 4.99% 72 Months TP $52,245.59; 3 $196.81 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $25,585.30; 4 $303.99 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $39,518.70; 5 $176.65 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $32,150.30; 6 $157.84 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $20,519.20; 7$198.55 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $36,136.10; 8 $176.31 Bi Weekly 4.99% 72 Months TP $27,504.36, 9 $188.78 Bi Weekly 4.99% 72 Months TP $29,449.68; 10 $241.82 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $44,011.24; 11 $198.55 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $36,136.10; 12 $221.17 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $28,752.10; 13 $198.55 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $36,136.10; 14 $255.87 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $33,263.33; 15 $284.97 4.99% 72 Months TP $44,455.66. TP= Total Payment, Bi Weekly Payments total 26 Payments/ Year ON APPROVED CREDIT See Dealer for Details. Payments Include Documentation fee of $195.00

Dlr#7478

www.courtenaytoyota.com 445 Crown Isle Boulevard • Call 250-338-6761

2011 Dodge Ram 3500 Diesel! Only 80,000 kms Crew Cab Long Box

2001 Toyota Sequoia

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33,998

$

25,998

$

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11,498 39,998

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$


A12 Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014 A13

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

driveway

driveway

Volvo circles the wagon

A hooker’s cold weather fun on four wheels

for success

Las Vegas, Nevada – Volvo is hitching some of its revival hopes to a wagon – the 2015 Volvo V60 Sportswagon. Its grille is clearly all-Volvo but those typically boxy looks that characterized the make from your dad’s day are gone. In looks it’s a design variation of the S60 sedan and it will be a welcome sight for loyalists of the Swedish brand, having witnessed the demise here of the V50 and midsize V70 wagons. The wagon featured recently along with the S60 and XC60 crossover at a launch event in the Nevada desert. The Volvo execs present proudly talked about their new Drive-E powertrains, developed thanks to the megabucks available now that the company is owned by the Chinese Geely Automotive. Ford ownership may now be retreating in Volvo’s rearview The T5mirror but it is still beholden to the US equipped wagon is manufacturer for the platforms upon a smooth operator which these three 2015 models ride. That will change later this year when in performance and the full-size XC90 crossover is set to sit ride … while you atop Volvo’s so-called Scalable Product won’t burn rubber Architecture platform. at the green light, it Model year 2014 saw a refresh of all three midsize Volvo models showing in will take off when the desert so this was truly about the necessary. new engines. The Drive-E family of gas, diesel and hybrid (the latter not yet, Keith Morgan but soon) engines are built around a single, 2.0-litre four-cylinder powerplant. It’s a brave gamble, worthy of Vegas, when you ponder the XC90 relying on such a small engine. Asked if this were a safe bet, the Swedes just smiled and promised the performance of the four-cylinder configuration will equal their big brothers by using such technologies as direct fuel injection, turbocharging, supercharging and . . . electrification. Here in the Great White North, just the two gas engines will be offered initially – the new turbocharged T5 pumps out 240 horsepower, while the turbo’ed and supercharged T6 adds another 62 horses. The base front-wheel-drive V60 T5, with a new eight-speed automatic transmission, will set you back $39,800. Volvos have never been cheap. The other three Sportswagons will continue to use existing powerplants, six-speed automatic transmissions and Haldex all-wheeldrive systems. Did a little shopping off the strip in the XC60, which came into its own, its cavernous rear swallowing up my bulky purchases. I’ll reserve comments on the crossover until I’ve had a chance to put it through its paces in BC. However, I got much more seat time in the V60 and S60 (S60 with T5 $37,750. T6 $42,850), taking in the awe-inspiring beauty of the Valley of Fire state park and Red Rock Canyon.

Alexandra Straub puts her BMW through the paces as she learns car control at the ICAR track in Mirabel, Quebec.

Volvo S60, V60, XC60.

‘‘

‘‘

’’

Volvo S60

Volvo XC60

The T5-equipped wagon is a smooth operator in performance and ride. And while you won’t burn rubber at the green light, it will take off when necessary . . . not that we got any chance to pass in the low speed limit state park! Volvo says it will hit 100 km/h in 6.3 seconds if given the lead foot treatment. (The T6 in sedan tells a slightly racier story. Ok, maybe I’m exaggerating but only a little and I look forward pressing the pedal to the metal where I can legally do so.) The T5 fuel economy ratings fare well in comparison with the market competition – 9.4/6.3/8.1 L/100km (city/hwy/combined). These 2015 Volvo V60 numbers are squeezed out of the Sportwagon T5 FWD power plant with the help of the Base Sticker Price: $39,800 standard engine stop/start system Power: 2.0L, 16-valve, 240 hp, and the efficient new eight-speed turbocharged DOHC I-4, mated transmission, which slips into a to eight-speed automatic neutral coasting mode when you Fuel Consumption: lift your foot off the gas. Inside, the instrument panel 9.4/6.3/8.1 L/100km (city/ stretches the span of the car and hwy/combined) features an attractive floating centre console, which mixes good looks with functionality. Swedes are safety conscious, of course, and that means lane change, cross traffic, blind spot warnings and alerts. The front seating is comfortable if a little soft on a long drive. Rear seating ditto and headroom is good despite the coupe-style slope of the rear. And a good view of the road fore, fore aft and side is enjoyed by all. Great stowage room in the rear. The 40/20/40 split second row folds flat to provide enough space to move a small apartment’s furniture. Just kidding but you get the picture.

relatively short so we have more drive time. It’s mentioned that we’ll be practising manouevres with and without electronic help, to put both power and performance to the test. Oh yeah. Proper seating position is outlined when we initially get behind the wheel. Then we’re off. You might ask what is the point behind putting one of BMW’s latest products sideways on an ice track in subzero temperatures. My initial answer is only three letters long and to the point: fun. But that’s only a byproduct of what the impetus behind the program is; a program that started back in 1977 and is now offered in 35 countries. The main goal is safety. It’s to introduce drivers to techniques that might help correct the car if it is not doing what you want it to. For example, if your wheels are pointed in one direction, but your car is going in another, what should you do? Or, if you feel the back end of the car breaking loose, how do you wrangle it in? Putting yourself and the 435i through the paces in a safe and controlled environment is the best place to learn. If you spin out, you’re not going to go into oncoming traffic. You just stop, turn the car around, and keep going. You’ll probably giggle a little in the process and tell yourself you’ll “get it next time.” For more information, visit: http://tinyurl.com/nw54b8p alexandra.straub@drivewaybc.ca

The man from BMW once called me a hooker. Surprisingly, I wasn’t that offended. I actually laughed at such a descriptor, as did everyone else around me. I didn’t feel so bad because I wasn’t the only one in the group labelled thusly at the Be careful where brand’s Driver Training; a you put your hands full day of driving 3 Series so as to not lose sedans (back then) to improve our own car control. I control. didn’t have too many years Alexandra Straub of driving experience back then but I unfortunately I had picked up a few bad habits on the road. What’s a ‘hooker’, according to the instructors at the German automaker’s training? Someone who hooks his or her hand into the steering wheel when making a turn. It’s a big boo-boo and not an effective way to drive. It’s also totally unsafe should an accident occur in the process. Needless to say, pointing out the ‘hooker’ in me caused me to change my habits for the better. In other words, be careful where you put our hands so as to not lose control! And in the most recent installment of learning car control with BMW, no such noun was used when relating to my technique. Thank goodness. It’s minus 15 degrees at the ICAR track in Mirabel, Quebec. The sun is out and there’s a lineup of all-new 435i coupes just begging to be driven. Some are equipped with the brand’s all-wheel drive system. Some are rear-wheel drive. Regardless, I’ll have my way with both configurations by the end of the day, so to speak. The adventure is better known as the Winter Driver Training program, offered exclusively at the ICAR location. That said, you don’t need to own a BMW to participate. Learning car control in less than perfect circumstances is available to all who have $795. In my opinion, it’s money extremely well spent. The day starts out with an in-class session that goes over theory and what will be executed throughout the various exercises. It’s kept

Volvo XC60

Instrument cluster.

’’

Vancouver Island’s Largest Boat Dealer UP TO

$7500

FACTORY REBA TES on Selected Boat Packages

BOATSHOW SPECIALS ON NOW!

*

99

From

2014’S ARE

IN STOCK NOW

$

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NEW & USED SALES • FULL BOAT BROKERAGE

Official Dealer For

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1300 Spring Hill Road, Parksville

WE CAN FINANCE YOUR PRE-OWNED VEHICLE PURCHASE!

2008 Toyota Avalon

2008 Lexus GS460

Only 80,000 kms Loaded Beautiful Car!

2010 Toyota Tacoma TRD Package Hard Tonneau Only 80,000 kms

$

Bi-weekly $196.81

3

18,998

$

2012 Toyota Sienna

Bi-weekly $292.041

28,998

Bi-weekly $303.994

Bi-weekly $198.558

25,998

29,998

$

2010 Mazda3 GT Loaded Automatic

Only 24,000 kms Loaded Automatic

$

2011 Toyota Venza

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Bi-weekly $176.319

19,998

$

4 Cyl, FWD, Only 46,000 kms

Bi-weekly $176.655

$

22,998

2 TO CHOOSE

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25,998

2012 Toyota Venza

70 /MPG Loaded

Loaded Touring Package Only 4,947 kms Automatic, AWD

14,998

$

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10

31,998

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21,498

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9

Clean!

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15,998

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$

5.7 l Hemi, Loaded, Sport Model, Clean!

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2011 Toyota Tundra Crew Max

2010 Dodge Ram 1500

$

2011 Toyota Camry Hybrid

Only 43,000 kms Auto

Low Kms Sunroof, AWD

V8, 4x4

Off Road Package Low Kms Automatic

2003 Infiniti G35

2010 Toyota RAV4 Sport

2005 Toyota 4Runner

2008 Toyota FJ Cruiser

2012 Toyota RAV4 V6 AWD Less than 24,000 kms Automatic

$

2009 Toyota Prius

Bi-weekly $284.9715

4WD , Auto Tow the Boat & Haul the Kids

8 Passenger SUV

1 $292.04 Bi weekly 5.99% 60 Months TP $37,965.17; 2 $334.91 Bi Weekly 4.99% 72 Months TP $52,245.59; 3 $196.81 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $25,585.30; 4 $303.99 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $39,518.70; 5 $176.65 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $32,150.30; 6 $157.84 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $20,519.20; 7$198.55 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $36,136.10; 8 $176.31 Bi Weekly 4.99% 72 Months TP $27,504.36, 9 $188.78 Bi Weekly 4.99% 72 Months TP $29,449.68; 10 $241.82 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $44,011.24; 11 $198.55 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $36,136.10; 12 $221.17 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $28,752.10; 13 $198.55 Bi Weekly 4.99% 84 Months TP $36,136.10; 14 $255.87 Bi Weekly 4.99% 60 Months TP $33,263.33; 15 $284.97 4.99% 72 Months TP $44,455.66. TP= Total Payment, Bi Weekly Payments total 26 Payments/ Year ON APPROVED CREDIT See Dealer for Details. Payments Include Documentation fee of $195.00

Dlr#7478

www.courtenaytoyota.com 445 Crown Isle Boulevard • Call 250-338-6761

2011 Dodge Ram 3500 Diesel! Only 80,000 kms Crew Cab Long Box

2001 Toyota Sequoia

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33,998

$

25,998

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Bi-weekly $334.912

11,498 39,998

$

$


A14



Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

driveway

Where the rubber hits the road

matters in tire selection Tires are one of the most important features of the truck when it comes to improving its ride. It is vital to make the right choice and then maintain them so they last for a long time. Before you choose the best tire for your truck, it If you only drive is essential to understand on the street then the terms of the truck tire a low profile truck world. Tires for example are tire will be fine, but specified in this form if you go off-roading 265/75R/16. The first numthen you are going ber is the width of the truck to want more tire in tire, the second number is between your rim and the aspect ratio or height of the sidewall and the the ground. third number is the wheel diameter or rim size. Ian Harwood The height of your sidewall is important and should be chosen based on the conditions where you drive your truck most often. If you only drive on the street then a low profile truck tire will be fine, but if you go off-roading then you are going to want more tire in between your rim and the ground. That way you will not bottom out on the rims when the tires encounter rough terrain off-road. Wider tires have more contact area with the ground, thus giving your truck a better grip, both on and off road. Your truck’s handling becomes easier because of the bigger tire width. On the other hand, the same wider truck tire will make more noise and may decrease the fuel efficiency of the truck. Wider tires can also slip more when it rains, not that it rains much in Vancouver. The size of the rim is Off-road tire a personal preference. The larger sized rims are popular today. Just make sure that the rim and truck tire you choose will fit inside the wheel well of the truck, and don’t forget to upgrade your brakes to help stop this increase in weight. The wheel rim width varies from truck to truck. It can be custom made to suit both on and off road driving conditions. The wheel rim width is rounded off to the nearest half inch of the tire. Usually, the best choice is to have the rim width at about 90 per cent of the tread width of the tire. The most important safety aspect of maintenance on your truck is to keep its tires intact and in good shape. A blown tire can cause an accident in an instant. The number one cause of the tire wear and tear is incorrect tire pressure. All the tires on the truck should have consistent air pressure to carry the weight equally. Adequate air pressure is important for a good tire life, handling, and traction. Look through your owner’s manual, on the sticker inside the

‘‘

9/6/13

4:14:09 PM

Island Honda thank the Comox Valley and the CIVIC ISwants THE toBEST-SELLING ISCANADA. THE BEST-SELLING NorthCIVIC IslandIN for making Island Honda the Number 1 CAR Honda Dealer on Vancouver Island. CAR IN CANADA. ian.harwood@drivewaybc.ca

Toyota FJ Cruiser off road

! u o y k n a h T

AND THE BEST JUST GOT BETTER. AND THE BEST JUST GOT BETTER. Over 40 Fits & Civics to choose #1 selling from!

car inThanks Canada Canada! Thanks Canada! 16 years running

To thank you Island Honda now has: 0% for the first time EVER Now save up to on Honda Civic & Fit OR 2014 CIVIC DX $2,000 on Fit or Civics AVAILABLE NEW 2014 FEATURES INCLUDE: 2014 CIVIC Payments from $85DX B/W+tax AVAILABLE NEWSPOT 2014 FEATURES INCLUDE: • LANEWATCH BLIND DISPLAY $ $ • CONTINUOUSLY VARIABLE TRANSMISSION (CVT) WITH IMPROVED FUEL ECONOMY BLIND SPOT DISPLAY 0 down •• LANEWATCH $ $ DISPLAY AUDIO SYSTEM WITH HONDALINK Lease for

88 0 down 88

Lease for

*

2.99% APR#

*

2.99% APR#

for 60 months. MSRP** $17,185 includes freight & PDI. for 60 months. $17,185 includes freight & PDI. MSRP**shown: Model FB2E2EEX

• CONTINUOUSLY VARIABLE TRANSMISSION (CVT) WITH IMPROVED FUEL ECONOMY PROXIMITY KEY ENTRY WITH PUSH™BUTTON START • DISPLAY AUDIO SYSTEMSYSTEM WITH HONDALINK • PROXIMITY KEY ENTRY SYSTEM WITH PUSH BUTTON START

Model shown: FB2E2EEX

17430 incl. freight & pDI - $1500 cash Fit DX-A $15930 2014 CR-V CR-V LX LX 5 Speed 2014 $ - 500 consumer incentive $$ $ 15430 $$+00feesdown & taxes down $

Lease for Lease for

140

Ω Ω

1.99% APR¥ 1.99% APR¥

for 60 months. for 60 months. ** includes freight freight & & PDI. PDI. MSRP $27,685 $27,685** includes MSRP

19740 incl. freight & pDI - $1500 cash Civic LX $18240 2014 ODYSSEY ODYSSEY LX LX 5 Speed 2014 $ - 500 consumer incentive $$ $ 17740$$00+down fees & taxes down $

Lease for Lease for

185

£ £

3.99% APR 3.99% APR€

for 60 months. for 60 months. ** includes freight freight & & PDI. PDI. MSRP $31,685 $31,685** includes MSRP

* 0% for maximum term of 48 months . . 0% in lieu $500 CID, 500 CID to buy. Rate from 0.99%, 0 payments subject to finance approval. Dealer may choose not to buy down rate Model shown: shown: RM3H3EES RM3H3EES Model shown: shown: RL5H2EE RL5H2EE in lieu of discount. Model Model

www.islandhonda.ca

1025 bchonda.com

Comox Road, Courtenay 1-877-398-2373

CRA

from Campbell River

Lewis Park

Superstore

Highway 19A

Comox Road

from Comox

Comox Road

Island Honda 5th Street Bridge

17th Street Bridge

DLR # 30592

Mud tire

’’

driver’s door, or look on the tire itself to find the correct air pressure that you need to maintain them. Rotating the tires, keeps the tread wear balanced and can really help when slippery and wet conditions occur. BCHD-September-AllLine-4CPD-8x11.786.pdf

#Limited time lease offer based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX. *2.99% lease APR for 60 months O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $87.64. Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $11,393.20. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are are extra. extra. 120,000 120,000 kilometre kilometre allowance; allowance; charge charge of of $0.12/km $0.12/km for for excess excess kilometer. kilometer. Ω Ω Limited Limited time time lease lease offer offer based based on on aa new new 2014 2014 CR-V CR-V LX LX 2WD 2WD RM3H3EES. RM3H3EES. ¥1.99% ¥1.99% lease lease APR APR for for 60 60 months months O.A.C. O.A.C. Bi-weekly Bi-weekly payment, payment, including including freight freight and and PDI, PDI, isis $140.01. $140.01. Downpayment Downpayment of of $0.00, $0.00, first first bi-weekly bi-weekly payment, payment, environmental environmental fees fees and and $0 $0 security security deposit deposit due due at at lease lease inception. inception. Total Total lease lease obligation obligation isis $18,201.30. $18,201.30. Taxes, Taxes, license, license, insurance insurance and and registration registration are are extra. extra. 120,000 120,000 kilometre kilometre allowance; allowance; charge charge of of $0.12/km $0.12/km for for excess excess kilometer. kilometer. £Limited £Limited time time lease lease offer offer based based on on aa new new 2014 2014 Odyssey Odyssey LX LX model model RL5H2EE. RL5H2EE. €3.99% €3.99% lease lease APR APR for for 60 60 months months O.A.C. O.A.C. Bi-weekly Bi-weekly payment, payment, including including freight freight and and PDI, PDI, isis $185.30. $185.30. Downpayment Downpayment of of $0.00, $0.00, first first bi-weekly bi-weekly payment, payment, environmental environmental fees fees and and $0 $0 security security deposit deposit due due at at lease lease inception. inception. Total Total lease lease obligation obligation isis $24,089.00. $24,089.00. Taxes, Taxes, license, license, insurance insurance and and registration registration are are extra. extra. 120,000 120,000 kilometre kilometre allowance; allowance; charge charge of of $0.12/km $0.12/km for for excess excess kilometer. kilometer. **MSRP **MSRP isis $17,185 $17,185 // $27,685 $27,685 // $31,685 $31,685 including including freight freight and and PDI PDI of of $1,495 $1,495 // $1,695 $1,695 // $1,695 $1,695 based based on on aa new new aa 2014 2014 Civic Civic DX DX model model FB2E2EEX FB2E2EEX // 2014 2014 CR-V CR-V LX LX 2WD 2WD RM3H3EES RM3H3EES // 2014 2014 Odyssey Odyssey LX LX model model RL5H2EE. RL5H2EE. PPSA, PPSA, license, license, insurance, insurance, taxes, taxes, and and other other dealer dealer charges charges are are extra extra and and may may be be required required at at the the time time of of purchase. purchase. ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* Prices Prices and/or and/or payments payments shown shown do do not not include include aa PPSA PPSA lien lien registration registration fee fee of of $30.31 $30.31 and and lien lien registering registering agent's agent's fee fee of of $5.25, $5.25, which which are are both both due due at at time time of of delivery. delivery. #/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** #/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** Offers Offers valid valid from from February February 1st 1st through through 28th, 28th, 2014 2014 at at participating participating Honda Honda retailers. retailers. Dealer Dealer may may sell sell for for less. less. Dealer Dealer trade trade may may be be necessary necessary on on certain certain vehicles. vehicles. Offers Offers valid valid only only for for British British Columbia Columbia residents residents at at BC BC Honda Honda Dealers Dealers locations. locations. Offers Offers subject subject to to change change or or cancellation cancellation without without notice. notice. Terms Terms and and conditions conditions apply. apply. Visit Visit www.bchonda. www.bchonda. com com or or see see your your Honda Honda retailer retailer for for full full details. details.


www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

A15

Gone in a flash: four quickest automotive failures Ireland) to construct another gullwing-door sports car named after its founder. Rob Sass is the vice-president of content for Hagerty Insurance. Hagerty is the world’s leading specialist provider of classic car and boat insurance.

superstar John Z. DeLorean stole a page from the Bricklin playbook. Just five years later, he convinced another gullible government (this time, the UK Labour Party) to build a factory in another high unemployment area (troubled Belfast, Northern

1948 Tucker

MY NISSAN

’’

Hundred-year anniversaries in the automotive world are nearly as common as new reality TV shows (General Motors, Aston Martin and Alfa Romeo all turned 100 recently). The car companies on this list weren’t as fortunate. Davis (1947-48): The Davis Car Company was founded in 1947 in Van Nuys, Calif., by entrepreneur Gary Davis, who for reasons best known to himself decided that America was ready for a tiny three-wheeled car with just 47 hp. Like the next car company on the list, Davis also took advantage of a surplus WW2 defense plant as his base of operations. With the fast-developing freeway culture in Southern California (the car’s introduction coincided with the adoption of a comprehensive freeway plan for the region), there was little demand for an underpowered three-wheeler wholly unsuited for freeway use. The company collapsed in 1948 under the weight of unpaid employees and suppliers. Tucker (1948): The Tucker story is probably the least comical of the bunch. Preston Tucker conceived a car with some truly innovative safety and performance features. Its merits were considerable and it deserved to succeed. Sadly, it wasn’t to be. Negative publicity — and, many say, a conspiracy among the legacy automakers — coupled with an SEC investigation put a quick end to Tucker. About 50 cars were built in an ex-defense plant in Chicago before Tucker folded in early 1949, and 1948 was the only model year for the car known as the Tucker 48. Tuckers have brought as much as $2 million at classic car auctions. Bricklin (1974-76): Malcolm Bricklin just can’t stay out of the automotive industry. An early investor in Subaru of North America, he sold his stake to finance his dream — a “safety” sports

WITH OUR GREAT ALL WHEEL DRIVE LINEUP:

SL model shownV Platinum model shownV

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ALL NEW 2014 PATHFINDER HYBRID NOW AVAILABLE

The Totally Redesigned 2014 ROGUE • BETTER FUEL ECONOMY (HWY) THAN ESCAPE AND CR-V*

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LEASE FROM

138 3.9%

$ SL AWD Premium model shown with Accessory Roof Rail CrossbarsV

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OFFERS END FEBRUARY 28

TH

FIND YOURS AT CHOOSENISSAN.CA OR YOUR LOCAL RETAILER COMOX VALLEY NISSAN 535 Silverdale Crescent, Courtenay, BC Tel: (250) 338-1988

Finance offers are now available on new 2014 Murano S, AWD (L6RG14 AA00), CVT transmission/2014 Pathfinder S 4X2 (5XRG14 AA00), CVT transmission. Selling Price is $36,248/$31,558 financed at 0%/2.9% APR equals 130/182 bi-weekly payments of $260/$192 for a 60/84 month term. $2,500/$0 down payment required. Cost of borrowing is $0/$3,349.04 for a total obligation of $36,248/$34,907. This offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Conditions apply. †Representative semi-monthly lease offer based on new 2014 Rogue S FWD (Y6RG14 AA00), CVT transmission. 3.9% lease APR for a 60 month term equals 120 semi-monthly payments of $138 with $1,850 down payment, and $0 security deposit. First semi-monthly payment, down payment and $0 security deposit are due at lease inception. Prices include freight and fees. Lease based on a maximum of 20,000 km/year with excess charged at $0.10/km. Total lease obligation is $18,289. Conditions apply. ‡$4,000 Cash Discount is based on non-stackable trading dollars and is applicable to all 2014 Murano models, except 2014 Murano S, AWD (L6RG14 AA00), CVT transmission. The $4,000 cash purchaser’s discounts is only available on the cash purchase of select new 2014 Murano models (excluding the L6RG14 AA00 trim model). The cash purchaser’s discounts will be deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease or finance rates. This offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Offer valid February 1-28th, 2014. Conditions apply. X $36,248/$31,558 for a new 2014 Murano S, AWD (L6RG14 AA00), CVT transmission/2014 Pathfinder S 4X2 (5XRG14 AA00), CVT transmission. Conditions apply. V Models shown $42,598/$43,658/$34,728 Selling Price for a 2014 Murano SL (L6TG14 AA00), CVT transmission/2014 Pathfinder Platinum 4X4 (5XEG14 AA00), CVT transmission/2014 Rogue SL AWD Premium model (Y6DG14 BK00), CVT transmission. ±≠‡XVFreight and PDE charges ($1,750/$1,560/$1,630), certain fees, manufacturer’s rebate and dealer participation where applicable are included. License, registration, air-conditioning levy ($100) where applicable, insurance and applicable taxes are extra. Finance and lease offers are available on approved credit through Nissan Finance for a limited time, may change without notice and cannot be combined with any other offers except stackable trading dollars. Retailers are free to set individual prices. Offers valid between February 1-28th, 2014. ∞Ward’s Large Cross/Utility segment. MY14 Pathfinder vs. 2013 Large Cross/Utility Class. 2014 Pathfinder S 2WD with CVT transmission fuel consumption estimate is 10.5L/100 KM CITY | 7.7L/100 KM HWY | 9.3L/100 KM combined. Actual mileage will vary with driving conditions. Use for comparison purposes only. Based on 2012 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. 2014 Pathfinder Platinum model shown. ^Association of International Automobile Manufacturers of Canada (AIAMC) Mid SUV segment, AWD/4WD, 7-passenger, V6 gasoline models only. Cargo and load capacity limited by weight and distribution. Always secure all cargo. See Nissan Towing Guide and Owner's Manual for proper use. *All information compiled from third-party sources including manufacturer websites. Not responsible for errors for errors in data on third party websites. 12/17/2013. Offers subject to change, continuation or cancellation without notice. Offers have no cash alternative value. See your participating Nissan retailer for complete details. ©1998-2014 Nissan Canada Inc. and Nissan Financial Services Inc. a division of Nissan Canada Inc.

Rob Sass

Canada, from 1974-76. Poor quality control — the gullwing doors were famous for trapping occupants inside — and low demand sunk Bricklin, leaving the Canadian government to foot the bills. DeLorean (1981-83): Ex-GM

±

‘‘

The DeLorean DMC-12 had a number of striking features, including its high-end appliancelike stainless steel body panels and unique doors.

car bearing his name. Sports cars and safety have never gone hand in hand, and some would even argue that an element of danger is part of their raffish charm. Bricklins were built by a largely inexperienced workforce in New Brunswick,


Less Fuel. More Power. Great Value is a comparison between the 2014 and the 2013 Chrysler Canada product lineups. 40 MPG or greater claim (7.0 L/100 km) based on 2014 EnerGuide highway fuel consumption ratings. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption may vary based on driving habits and other factors. Ask your dealer for the EnerGuide information. ¤2014 Dodge Grand Caravan – Hwy: 7.9 L/100 km (36 MPG) and City: 12.2 L/100 km (23 MPG). 2014 Dodge Journey SE 2.4 L 4-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.7 L/100 km (37 MPG) and City: 11.2 L/100 km (25 MPG). 2013 Dodge Dart AERO – Hwy: 4.8 L/100 km (59 MPG) and City: 7.3 L/100 km (39 MPG). 2013 Civic Touring 1.8 L 16-valve, SOHC, i-VTEC® 4-cylinder Automatic – Hwy: 5.0 L/100 km (56 MPG) and City: 6.2 L/100 km (45 MPG). 2013 Elantra L 1.8 L Dual CVVT DOHC 16V Engine Automatic – Hwy: 5.2 L/100 km (54 MPG) and City: 7.2 L/100 km (39 MPG). 2013 Corolla 1.8 L 4-Cylinder DOHC 16V VVT-i DIS ETCS-I Engine Manual – Hwy: 5.6 L/100 km (50 MPG) and City: 7.4 L/100 km (38 MPG). 2013 Focus SE with optional Super Fuel Economy package and 2.0 L I4 Direct Injection engine with 6-speed automatic– Hwy: 4.8 L/100 km (59 MPG) and City: 7.2 L/100 km (39 MPG). Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ‡, », €, >, †, § The First Big Deal Sales Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after February 1, 2014. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,695) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees, other dealer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. •$19,998 Purchase Price applies to 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E) only and includes $8,100 Consumer Cash Discount. $19,998 Purchase Price applies to the new 2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F+CLE) only and includes $2,000 Consumer Cash Discount. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select new 2014 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. ‡4.29% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Ultimate Family Package/2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Examples: 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Ultimate Family Package/2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package with a Purchase Price of $27,888/$19,998 (including applicable Consumer Cash Discounts) financed at 4.29% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $159/$114 with a cost of borrowing of $5,082/$3,644 and a total obligation of $32,970/$23,642. »Ultimate Family Package Discounts available at participating dealers on the purchase of a new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT with Ultimate Family Package (RTKH5329G/JCDP4928K). Discount consists of: (i) $2,500 in Bonus Cash that will be deducted from the negotiated price after taxes; and (ii) $850 in no-cost options that will be deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Some conditions apply. See your dealer for complete details. €$10,350 in Total Discounts is available on new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT models with Ultimate Family Package (RTKH5329G/JCDP4928K) and consists of $7,000 in Consumer Cash Discounts and $3,350 in Ultimate Family Package Discounts. >4.19% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) with a Purchase Price of $16,880 financed at 4.19% over 96 months with $0 down payment, equals 416 weekly payments of $47 with a cost of borrowing of $2,905 and a total obligation of $19,285. †0.0% purchase financing for 36 months available on the new 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance on 2012/2013 Jeep Compass, Patriot and 2013 Dodge Dart models. Example: 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) with a Purchase Price of $16,880, with a $0 down payment, financed at 0.0% for 36 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $217.69; cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $16,880. §Starting from prices for vehicles shown include Consumer Cash Discounts and do not include upgrades (e.g. paint). Upgrades available for additional cost. ♦Based on R. L. Polk Canada Inc. sales data. Calendar year to date retail vehicle registrations. ^Based on 2014 Ward’s Middle Cross Utility segmentation. **Based on 2014 Ward’s upper small sedan costing under $25,000. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

A16

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

$

19,998 •

• Air conditioning with Tri-zone Temperature Control • SiriusXM TM Satellite Radio (includes one year of service) • Hands-free® connectivity with UconnectTM Voice Command with Bluetooth® • Includes second row power windows

$

$

WEEKLY>

BASED ON PURCHASE PRICE OF $16,880.



GET TOTAL DISCOUNTS UP TO $10,350€

2ND ROW OVERHEAD 9-INCH VIDEO SCREEN

CANADA’S #1-SELLING CROSSOVER^

19,998 •

FINANCE FOR

47 4.19 0

@

FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN FINANCE FOR

PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDES $2,000 CONSUMER CASH* AND FREIGHT.

%

%

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

T:10.25”

T HE ♦

BIG DEAL EVENT

PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDES $8,100 CONSUMER CASH* AND FREIGHT.

PREMIUM INTERIOR

† 2ND ROW SUPER STOW ’N GO®

$

2014 DODGE JOURNEY CANADA VALUE PACKAGE

FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN

114@ 4.29 BI-WEEKLY‡

BEING B.C.’S #1-SELLING AUTOMAKER IS A VERY, VERY BIG DEAL.

2014 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CANADA VALUE PACKAGE KAGE

CANADA’S BEST-SELLING MINIVAN FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS AS GOOD OD AS

36 6 MPG PG HIGHWAY WAY 7.9 L/100 KM M HWY ¤

OR STEP UP TO THE 2014 ULTIMATE FAMILY MILY PACKAGE Starting from price for 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew Plus shown: $32,990.§

INCLUDES $3,350 IN PACKAGE SAVINGS INGS »

$

FINANCE FOR

% FOR 96 MONTHS

PARKVIEW® REAR BACK-UP CAMERA

LESS FUEL. MORE POWER. GREAT VALUE.

15 VEHICLES WITH 40 MPG HWY OR BETTER.

159 @ 4.29 BI-WEEKLY‡

FINANCING INANCING INCLUDES $7,000 CONSUMER CASH*, $2,500 $2 500 BONUS CASH» AND FREIGHT.

WIT WITH $0 DOWN

37 3 MPG M AS A GOOD AS

HIGHWAY H. L/100 KM HWY 7.7 7.7 ¤

%

Starting from price for 2014 Dodge Journey R/T AWD shown: $32,390.§

2013 DODGE DART

THE MOST TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED VEHICLE IN ITS CLASS**

59 MPG

AS GOOD AS

OR

HIGHWAY 4.8 L/100 KM HWY

¤

FOR 36 MONTHS

INCLUDES FREIGHT.

ALSO AVAILABLE

Starting from price for 2013 Dodge Dart GT shown: $25,690.§


OPINION

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

A17

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JUST LIKE TO say a few words

concerning the driver of the snow plow who must have been on contract for plowing Merville Road during the recent snowfall on Saturday the 22nd. While we are very grateful to have our road plowed, we do not wish to witness an accident or be victims ourselves of this snowplow zipping back and forth along our road at least four times at 100 km/h or more. There was no warning it was coming; it screamed like a jet plane when it passed, and streaked by so fast that we could barely get a glimpse of it; but from the flash we could see, it was a truck with some red on it, a grey tank of some sort on the back, and a big blade on the front. This part of Merville Road is a narrow, windy road with blind curves and driveways, and during the day we saw several cyclists go by as well as someone walking along the road with a child. Had any of these been on the road when this machine flew by they would not even have had time to scramble into the snowy ditch and would have been flattened and buried. Had any of us been venturing out of our driveways in cars or on foot at the time we would have been flattened and buried. Given the terrible conditions, it’s hard to imagine such wanton recklessness of a driver of any vehicle, let alone a big machine. Like I say, we’re certainly grateful for our road being plowed to make it safer, but it was far more dangerous with this maniac on the loose at the wheel of a big machine.

CUPS OF WARM Irish cocoa for

the snow removal team at the public works department, City of Courtenay and City executive assistant Susie. Yes, you were “just doing your jobs” during this recent round of white stuff, but you should know you are appreciated.

IT IS UNBELIEVABLE that more

than four days after the snow started i.e. 4 a.m. Saturday, that we are still waiting for a snow plow. It is getting pretty close to noon Tuesday. Is there no one supervising the contract for

anderson

Real Estate Agent

Phone: 250-339-2021 Toll Free: 1-888-829-7205 margie-remax@shaw.ca www.margie.pcspro.com

Each office is independently owned and operated

THANK YOU AND much luck to the gentleman at the end of the road who had the kindness to shovel the long driveway. What a great neighbour you are! AT APPROXIMATELY 11:45 a.m. on Sunday, Feb. 23, we were headed up Ryan Road toward Costco so I could go to work. Given the horrible snowfall and rain mix we had, we were very aware of our speed. We were going around 50 to 55 km/h. We were in the left lane. A balding man driving a white SUV type vehicle came speeding up from behind us in the right lane and proceeded to cut us off as the hill started to level off before the turnoff to NIC. He barely left us one foot between bumpers. The sudden cutoff covered our windshield with slush, leaving us blinded. Had there been a car behind us, we would have been rear-ended. Had there been a car in the right lane, we would have been hit. My husband had to hit the brakes and move over to the shoulder in order to regain control of the vehicle. The worst part is my two young children were in the back seat. The driver did not gain anywhere in line from cutting us off and risking our lives. He turned left towards the Veterans Memorial Parkway as we went straight through after the light changed. We were stopped beside each other at the light. If you know this man, the RCMP would love to have a chat. I’ve already called them with the licence plate number. If this man is reading this, How dare you risk

HAVE YOUR SAY…

margie

Specializing in Retirement Lifestyles

road clearance? Are our tax dollars being spent keeping the rich folks on Mount Washington happy? Does the contractor not have enough equipment for the contract they bid on? We as the taxpayers deserve some answers. This is by far the worst service we have ever received and we haven’t  received much in the past. Get a grip, Ministry of Transportation, and do your job. (Editor’s note: Private contractor Emcon is responsible for clearing snow from Comox Valley rural roads).

ocean pacific realty

Have an opinion? Feel strongly about an issue? Share something special …

250-897-1010

www.sunriselearningcentre.com

THIS YEAR I decided to do my in-

come tax online for the first time. It didn’t take long before I needed help, so I phoned the toll-free number. A woman answered. She sounded like she was from India. India! Great! Just what I needed at that time! She said her name was Manisha. We had some communication issues where she didn’t understand me, and some where I didn’t understand her. There were a few times she asked if she could put me on hold while she asked someone else. Forty-five minutes later I reached the point where I could save my work, and log off. I thanked the woman for her help. Then before I was able to hang up, I was asked if she could send me a survey about the service I had received. “Survey,” I thought. “I hate surveys.” And so I replied, “Yes, thank you for sending it to me.” During my meal preparation I thought about the ordeal I had just gone through. I began to think of this woman. It was very likely that English wasn’t her first language, and I admire anyone who can communicate using a second language. Regarding the times I was placed on hold while she asked for some help, I wouldn’t know if she had had adequate training, or if even this was her first day on the job. I knew I couldn’t respond to the survey and say anything that might put her employment in jeopardy. Might she have been a single mom? Might her wages have been just enough to get by – or perhaps even less? And all through our session she was very polite. I decided I would complete the survey, and I did just that. I spoke well of Manisha and of the help I received on the phone. And afterward, I said a prayer for Manisha. I knew this was

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ROSES TO MR. Pineau, the presi-

dent of the Highland-Glen Strata Corporation. Having been flooded by the heavy rains hit on Feb. 16, I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude for his prompt responses to take proactive measures aimed at avoiding potential future flooding. Firstly, despite the pouring rain, his presence to observe the situation demonstrated not only his guardianship and diligence but also his leadership. Most importantly, as he mentioned when observing the flood situation on Feb. 16, it is absolutely essential to install drainage, which can prevent disastrous water damage in the future. Mr. Pineau deserves to be recognized and highly praised for his voluntary contributions to ensure that the properties of the strata corporation are well-maintained and managed both physically and financially. He is our true hero. Thank you, Mr. Pineau.

I JUST RECEIVED some Conser-

vative propaganda in the mail, sent by our MP John Duncan to everyone in my neighbourhood at taxpayers’ expense. The mailing boasts that the Conservatives are good at managing our money. I find it ironic that these great fiscal managers spend millions of taxpayer dollars on partisan propaganda every year, but they can’t find an extra penny to help our struggling veterans.

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THIS BOUQUET GOES to the fella in the white and turquoise truck who did pull over and allowed me to use his cellphone. Thank you! Thank you! I was getting worried and you were the only one (besides the red-headed fella in the little white car who had to back up a long ways - thank you as well) who actually did stop to see if I was OK. I would have put my hood up but the guy at the garage slammed it down so hard, it won’t open. And the same kinda karma to those who almost ran me over and the cop who didn’t stop.

CERTIFICATE

(Please include name and contact information - this wil not be published and is for verification only.)

In Home Assistance

the Catholic thing to do.

GIFT

Send us your comments, views, concerns to editor@comoxvalleyrecord.com,765 McPhee Avenue, Courtenay or by fax at 250-338-5568.

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the lives of two young children? Are the lives of four people less important than what you rushed meaninglessly for? You could have merged behind us like you legally should do. You could have merged farther ahead. There were no other vehicles in your way, only one truck in the right lane farther ahead. Shame on you.

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A18

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Seedy Saturday back Toward a GE Free Comox Valley on March 1 offers something for everyone interested in gardening, growing food, saving seeds, building soil and having fun. The Community Seed Exchange and Horticultural Trade Show starts at 10 a.m. at the Florence Filberg Centre in Courtenay. More than 45 vendors and exhibitors will have what you need to stop dreaming about the garden and really get your hands dirty.  Comox Valley Growers and Seed Savers will have thousands of locally grown and saved open-pollinated seeds to trade and buy.  Keynote speakers at 1:30 p.m. are Dirk Becker and Nicole Shaw, well-known for their urban farming battle to grow food in Lantzville and for creating the successful Bowen Road Farmers’ Market in Nanaimo. They also published Synergy Magazine for 10 years and hosted a radio program — both of which were

JUDY ATKINSON, NENA Bill, Marianne Dufresne and Teresa Phillips (from left) have organized a Bollywood-themed fundraiser to help Gayle Bates.

Bollywood evening for Gayle

Finding a rickshaw to transport a group of women to Bollywood on April 4 would be difficult. Finding tickets to the event — not so tough. Ticket sales have been brisk and women who want to attend this amazing event are advised to pick their tickets up at Level 10

Eurospa on Cliffe or Secret Drawers Lingerie on Fifth Street in Courtenay before the March 5 deadline. An authentic Indian meal that includes saffron chicken and spicy lemon pilaf are but a few of the delicacies to be presented by Gourmet Girls. Combine great food with a quick bhangra dance

lesson, music created especially for the event by JPrime, and lots of dance demos — and it will prove to be a night of fun. Never mind the rickshaw — use what transport is available and get yourself down to the ticket venues. The event is a fundraiser to assist popular Comox Valley resident

International students here G.P. Vanier Secondary School with support from the Comox Valley International Student Program (a division of School District 71) will welcome 33 high school students and three teachers from Italy. The group — from Instituto Lorenzo Cobianchi, a high school in Verbenia — will visit March 3 to 17. This international exchange program will return 20 G.P. Vanier students to Verbenia in October 2014 . “The Vanier school community is thrilled and excited to have an exchange opportunity with Instituto Lorenzo Cobianchi. The exchange of ideas, educational items and culture

will have a positive impact on our school community and the Comox Valley community,” said G.P. Vanier vice-principal Brian McAskill. The group will experience Mount Washington Alpine Resort, a trip to Tofino, and a warm school-wide G.P. Vanier welcome at 9 a.m. on March 4 in the G.P. Vanier front lobby. For more information on the Comox Valley International Student Program, including information on becoming a host family, visit www.studyinbritishcolumbia.com or e-mail isponline@sd71.bc.ca. — Comox Valley International Student Program

TOSCANOS PASTA SPECIALS PASTA

SPECIALS ARE BACK

1 until May 3 from Jan 17

& MON, TUES S WED NIGHT

CAESAR SALAD, MINESTRONE SOUP OR SPINACH GORGONZOLA SOUP ****

PESTO CON POLLO with chicken, mushrooms & sundried tomatoes in a pesto cream sauce FETTUCCINE con curry with shrimp, chicken and julienne of vegetables in a curry brandy cream sauce PENNE AL ARRABBAITA with Italian sausage, mushrooms & red peppers in a spicy tomato sauce LINGUINE with shrimp,spinach & artichokes in a chipotle cream sauce

**** CHEESECAKE OR AMARETTO CRÉME BRULEE

Gayle Bates, who is receiving treatment for breast cancer.

C O N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N

DOZENS OF COURSES STARTING SOON at the Comox Valley Campus

COURSE

CODE

DATES

DAYS, TIMES

Occupational First Aid Level 3

OFA-030

Mar 3-14

Mon-Fri: 8:30-4:30 pm

10/$710

Coaching Out of the Box

GENI-5330

Mar 7

Fri: 8:30 am-5 pm

$325.00

Health Care Provider CPR Level HCP

HRT-015

Mar 8

Sat : 08:30 am-3:30 pm

$70.00

Occupational First Aid Level 3 Renew

OFA-032

Mar 10-14

Mon-Fri: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

5/$585

CPR Level C with AED

HRT-011

Mar 15

Sat : 8:30 am-2:30 pm

$60.00

Marine Basic Frst Aid & CPR C

FAC-082

Mar 17 & 18

Mon & Tue: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

2/$165

Occupational First Aid Level 1

OFA-010

Mar 22

Sat: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

$90.00

FoodSafe Level I

TFS-010

Mar 22

Sat : 8 am-4:30 pm

$95.00

Marine Advanced First Aid & CPR C

FAC-084

Mar 24-28

Mon-Fri: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

5/$560

Intermediate Digital Photography

GENI-2725

Mar 25-Apr 22

Tue: 6:30-9:30 pm

5/$215

Red Cross Emergency Medical Responder- EMR AET-020

Mar 31-Apr 11

Mon-Fri: 8 am-5 pm

10/$795

Red Cross SFA with CPR Level C

FAC-021

Aor 12 & 13

Sat & Sun: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

2/$150

Emergency Child First Aid / CPR Level B

FAC-010

Apr 26

Sat & Sun: 8 am-5 pm

$90.00

FoodSafe Level I

TFS-010

Apr 26

Sat : 8 am-4:30 pm

$95.00

Occupational First Aid Level 1

OFA-010

May 1

Thu: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

$90.00

OFA Transportation Endorsement

OFA-015

May 2

Fri: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

$100.00

CPR Level C with AED

HRT-011

May 3

Sat : 08:30 pm-2:30 pm

$60.00

Sage-50 (formerly Simply Accounting)

CPA-015

May 3 & 4

Sat & Sun: 9 am-4:30 pm

2/$295

Occupational First Aid Level 3

OFA-030

May 5-16

Mon-Fri: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

10/$710

Occupational First Aid Level 3 Renew

OFA-032

May 12-16

Mon-Fri: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

5/$585

Marine Basic Frst Aid & CPR C

FAC-082

May 24 & 25

Sat & Sun: 8:30 am-4:30 pm

2/$165

DINE IN ONLY $2095 250.890.7575

140 Port Augusta, Comox

dedicated to living more consciously. Friday night, in the Lower Native Sons Hall in Courtenay, Coun. Harold Steves of Richmond will present his personal and professional story at 7 p.m.  The event is supported by LUSH Valley, GE Watch Comox Valley and Eatmore Sprouts. Harold will speak about his participation in the creation of Richmond as a GE-Free Zone — the challenges, the steps and the accrued benefits to the city and her farmers and residents. The admission fee for Friday night includes Seedy Saturday the next day. Seedy Saturday is CVGSS’ primary fundraiser for the year so they can offer ongoing education and information to the community. Visit www.cvgss.org for a full list of speakers, vendors & exhibitors, and activities. — Seedy Saturday

For more information, call 250-334-5005 or visit www.nic.bc.ca/continuingeducation

# OF CLASSES/COST


BUSINESS

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

A19

ALAN FLETCHER, ABOVE, was among the attendees at the Vancouver Island Construction Association meeting for industry professionals Tuesday at the Old House Hotel. A panel spoke about issues and opportunities related to mega-projects and the local construction industry. The panel members included Greg Baynton, CEO, Vancouver Island Construction Association; Ross McLean, chair of the BCCA, managing partner Houle Electric; Tom Sparrow, chief project officer, Island Health, North Island Hospital Project; and Steven Watson, community relations, BC Hydro, John Hart Dam Project. PHOTOS BY ERIN HALUSCHAK

BBB lists accredited businesses Laura Lavin Black Press

The Better Business Bureau serving Vancouver Island’s 2014 Directory is being greeted with enthusiasm by dependable business owners and discerning residents. Published by Black Press, the BBB presents a comprehensive list of accredited businesses on Vancouver Island annually. More

than 135,000 of the 36-page directories are being distributed from Victoria to Port Alberni this week. “These are the businesses you want to do business with,” said president and CEO Rosalind Scott. “Put it right next to your phone book. It’s like a little Bible.” In order to become an accredited business that gets listed in the directory, a busi-

ness must have been in operation for at least a year, have no unresolved complaints lodged against it, have established a positive presence in the marketplace and have a good rating with the BBB, based on specific criteria. “Not just any business can become a BBB accredited business. Only businesses that meet our Code of Business Practices and

Standards of Trust are eligible,” said Scott. “We hold our accredited businesses accountable. This directory is your comprehensive guide to local companies you can trust.” Go to  bbb.org/ vancouver-island  for more information and look for your copy of the BBB serving Vancouver Island’s 2014 Directory in the  Feb. 28 News. llavin@vicnews.com

Five openings on Chamber board

The Comox Valley Chamber of Commerce hosts a networking lunch that will include elections to its board, March 19 from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Westerly, 1590 Cliffe Ave. in Courtenay. The volunteer board is comprised of 12 business leaders who provide governance on behalf of Chamber members.  They typically serve a twoyear term, elected by the membership in March.  There are five director positions available.

Tickets are $25 for chamber members and $35 for prospective members. Only members can vote. •The Coastal Community Credit Union hosts a business mixer March 11 from 5:307:30 p.m. Monthly Chamber mixers are designed to help members meet potential customers, clients and vendors and generate new business leads. Attendees are encouraged to exchange business cards, introduce staff

and bring guests. Members can bring a door prize for added exposure for your business.  The event is free for Chamber members,

and $10 for non-members. The Fourth Street branch of the Credit Union is at 291 Fourth St.

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.

Market Report TSX Composite DJIA Gold Cdn$ EFTs & Global Investments Claymore BRIC (CBQ) BHP Billiton ADR (BHP) Power Shrs. QQQ (Nasdaq 100) Aberdeen Asia Pacific (FAP) S&P TSX 60 (XIU) Government Bonds 5 year (CDN) 10 year (CDN) 30 year (CDN) 30 year Treasury bonds (US) Fixed Income GICs Home Trust Company Home Trust Company Homequity Bank

14188.98 16179.66 1325.2 0.9003 US$ 21.94 69.56 US$ 90.29 US$ 5.31 20.56 1.68% 2.49% 3.00% 3.66% 1yr: 1.550% 3 yr: 2.050% 5 yr: 2.600%

Stock Watch Royal Bank TD Bank Bank of Nova Scotia BCE Potash Corp. of Sask. Suncor Energy Inc. Crescent Point Energy Cdn. Oil Sands Husky Energy Pembina Pipe Line Transcanada Corp. Teck Resources Ltd. Cameco

72.70 49.40 63.42 47.86 36.73 36.90 38.84 21.01 33.34 39.89 48.93 24.49 25.42

Investment Trusts Brookfield Renewable Energy Partners Morgard Real Estate Inv. Tr. Cdn. Real Estate Inv. Tr. Riocan Investment Tr.

30.59 16.45 43.91 26.23

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250-334-5611 There’s Wealth in Our Approach.™ Commissions, trailing commissions, management fees and expenses all may be associated with mutual fund investments. Please read the prospectus before investing. Mutual funds are not guaranteed, their values change frequently and past performance may not be repeated. Rates and prices as of February 25/14. Rates and prices subject to change and availability. RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member–Canadian Investor Protection Fund. RBC Dominion Securities Inc. is a member company of RBC Wealth Management, a business segment of Royal Bank of Canada. ®Registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. © 2013 Royal Bank of Canada. All rights reserved.

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A20

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

EDITORIAL

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD

COMOX VALLEY’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Publisher: Zena Williams : publisher@comoxvalleyrecord.com Editor: Mark Allan : editor@comoxvalleyrecord.com Business Development: Joanna Ross : sales@comoxvalleyrecord.com Ph: 250-338-5811 / Fax: 250-338-5568 / Classified: 1-855-310-3535 A division of Black Press Ltd. 765 McPhee Avenue, Courtenay, B.C. V9N 2Z7 www.comoxvalleyrecord.com editor@comoxvalleyrecord.com The Comox Valley Record is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

Dark days at Safeway These are difficult days for employees at the Safeway in Courtenay. Working for a company that suddenly has a new owner is unsettling, as people at Thrifty Foods learned when the Island grocer was purchased by Sobeys in 2007. Workers at Safeway learned in June that Nova Scotia-based Sobeys had agreed to buy Safeway’s 213 Canadian stores for $5.8 billion. Learning the new owner will close your store is a bigger shock. Earlier this month, Sobeys announced it will close the Safeway store in Courtenay on May 10. The store, which has operated in the Comox Valley for 75 years, has 120 employees — 50 full-time and 70 part-time. With its 75 new Safeway locations in B.C. and as well as existing IGA and Thrifty Foods brands, Sobeys will have 107 grocery outlets in this province. That is more than the 101 for Overwaitea Food Group, 84 Loblaws, 25 Walmarts and 14 Costcos. To prevent undue concentration of ownership, the Competition Bureau ordered Sobeys Inc. to sell 23 stores in Western Canada before it would approve the Safeway purchase. The Courtenay store wasn’t on that list with three Greater Victoria stores and two on the Lower Mainland. Apparently it was on another list. One issue for Sobeys, which succinctly cited financial viability for the decision to close Safeway in Courtenay, is that it already had one Thrifty location downtown, then it opened a new one at Ryan and Lerwick. Three stores in a market this size compete against each other. The local grocery war intensified when Costco came to the market and Walmart added a significant grocery component. People buying food in the Comox Valley have plenty of choice. Just don’t tell that to the people who liked shopping at Safeway, who appreciate Air Miles points and who have developed a friendly relationship with Safeway staff. Don’t tell it to the people who are losing their jobs. Don’t tell it to Safeway employees who love the Comox Valley, but who will have to leave to find work. editor@comoxvalleyrecord.com Record Question of the Week This week: Twenty-seven per cent of respondents said they would do something to support Pink Shirt Day. Next week: Would you be affected by a BC Teachers’ Federation strike? Visit www.comoxvalleyrecord.com and vote on the mainpage. “An amazing amount of warm clothing” was donated in the Comox Valley to the annual Turn Down the Heat campaign.

The latest salvo in a never-ending war between Victoria and the BCTF is the union’s announcement of a strike vote.

Solutions obvious for ferries Dear editor, It was probably no surprise to most people that B.C. Transportation Minister Stone announced that the service cuts would go ahead for BC Ferries, totally ignoring passenger and resident concerns. Making seniors pay half of the passenger fare will not save as much as they forecast because some seniors will cut back on how often they travel. Talking about seniors, will these fare increases and service cuts reduce seniors from the Prairies who may have been planning to retire on Vancouver Island or the nearby smaller islands?  Of course there are obvious solutions. Having over 600 mangers (including 12 vice-presidents)

and administrative staff is excessive, very inefficient and unnecessary, particularly when compared to Washington State ferries. Washington ferries have one manager for every 40 workers. B.C. has one manager for every eight workers. In 2010, about half of BC Ferries’ 4,200 workers earned over $75,000. (More recent figures are hard to come by). Eliminating half of those managers/admin staff could produce $30 million in savings. Also, eliminating free employee and retiree passes — another $9 million.  What about the union workers with a 100-per-cent fully funded benefits plan? A gift shop cashier earns $24.49 per hour, ticket attendant at boarding booth,

$24.85 per hour, coffee shop attendant, $23.35 per hour, and a third cook $27.51 per hour, with pay raises coming April 1, 2014, and April 1, 2015. No doubt with so many employees, a number of union positions could be cut as well. BC Ferries has lost ridership of some one million passengers and half a million vehicles, compared to about three years ago, in a period when the economy and population has been recovering and growing. Properly managing employee costs would result in reduced future fare increases and reinstating some of the service cuts recently announced and reverse the decline in ridership. Ed Zirkwitz, Royston

Dear editor, I must apologize because it is true that you cannot believe everything you read. According to the school board, the head-lice policy on their website is false because it has not been updated since 2008, but they are working on it, I am told. On Feb. 6 I had requested that head lice be on the agenda for the next board meeting because we have an outbreak in our schools. I was told that meetings have taken place and that we might see it on the agenda in March, a little late in my opinion. I was also told that I could phone Island Health myself and set something up with our school because they would be more than willing, but they will not check for head lice. As I see it, that is not my job. All I have been asking for is for more education to be put into the schools, not just the wet combing pamphlets, and not one

person has said that’s a good idea. From my e-mails I have come to the conclusion that the school board and Island Health do not care. It might not be a disease, but our children are not happy and I always thought that schools were

supposed to be safe and make children feel welcome. To me it seems they would just like me to go away, but I’m not going to. I will be at school board meetings because unhappy kids make an unhappy mom. Gillian Hastings, Comox Valley

Dear editor, I would like to offer a solution to the CVRD for rural residents having to pay tipping fees for small amounts of garbage at our garbage dump. Put a coin-operated garbage bin beside the CVRD composting centre on Headquarters Road. Pay for the pickup of said bin with the coins collected. Charge $2, and limit the size of the catchment container to ensure small amounts of garbage are dumped per fee. Set up recycling bins beside the garbage

bin to encourage recycling and provide a composting bin beside the compost centre for those who choose not to compost at home. Surround the whole thing with a fence, put a camera on it to catch vandals and/or illegal dumpers, and keep it open during daylight hours. This could certainly save many people a long drive to the landfill to dump a very small amount of trash. Seems like a logical fix to me. Valerie McCormick, Area B

She’ll be persistent like head lice A fix for tipping fees


opinion

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

A21

Grizzly hunt isn’t going away in this province VICTORIA – A little-noticed protest tent sprouted up on the rain-soaked B.C. legislature grounds earlier this month. Green Party MLA Andrew Weaver spoke, asking whether B.C. residents would tolerate trophy hunting of killer whales. That would be a federal matter, but the point is vividly made about the onset of B.C.’s traditional spring grizzly bear hunt. It’s bigger this year, with Kootenay and Chilcotin wildlife management regions reopened after closures were enacted to preserve grizzly populations. In all, more than 1,000 grizzly bears are up for grabs. As with limited-entry hunts

for deer and other animals, only about a third of those hunts are successful in an average year. The rally was sponsored by the Coastal First Nations Great Bear Initiative, the partnership with U.S.-directed environment groups Sierra Club, Greenpeace and ForestEthics that has become so influential in B.C. affairs. It produced a survey showing that 88 per cent of B.C. residents oppose trophy hunting, and its California experts calculate a 10-fold increase in value when bear hunting gives way to bear watching. The Raincoast Conservation Society has bought up half a dozen guiding territories on

Politics

Tom

Fletcher the remote B.C. coast. Combined with government restrictions, more than half the coast is now off limits to bear hunting. Naturally, activists want the whole province shut down. Wildlife management is the responsibility of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson. He’s heard plenty from all sides and he maintains that bear watching and bear hunting will continue to coexist in B.C.

Thomson has just introduced legislation to permit hunting guide territories to be operated by corporations as well as individuals. This is a long-sought change, allowing First Nations companies and others access to bank loans to expand the industry. Non-resident hunters are required to hire a licensed guideoutfitter. Hunting in general is making a comeback in B.C. Ministry data show hunting licenses had declined to 85,633 in 2006, but recovered to reach 97,828 by 2013. Thomson credits the work of the B.C. Wildlife Federation, which runs hunter training courses. Another program, Becoming an

Trade deal needs public scrutiny Dear editor, When did we, as Canadian citizens and members of a B.C. community, agree to give corporations from other countries the power to challenge, to sue and to strike down our municipal, provin-

cial and federal laws? I, personally, don’t remember any politician promising to do this at any time over the last couple of decades. Nor do I remember any discussion about the value of keeping

‘A bunch of nuts’ Dear editor, In a letter to the editor (Record, Feb. 13), Rick Neveaux minces no words — he wants rid of post office brass. Recently, I wanted to mail a small parcel from Courtenay to Buckley Bay, a distance of roughly 25 kilometres. The parcel, a small cylinder, consisted of a photo rolled into three joined toilet roll tubes. With its length of fewer than 30 centimetres, and weighing a little fewer than 50 grams, the cost was believed to hover around $1.50. How wrong I was! Eleven dollars was the charge. Needless to say, Canada Post lost itself one customer. The suspicion inevitably grows that Canada Post, with ridiculous charges and tardy deliveries, deliberately is making itself redundant, no doubt aided and abetted by unpublished policies of the Canadian government. Staff on the ground appear similarly disgusted. The postal clerk, confronted by my objections, called postal executives “a bunch of nuts.” “Let the employ-

ees run Canada Post. First then will postal services succeed,” she firmly held. Perhaps. But an experiment worth the candle. It cannot be much worse than is currently the case.  Finn Schultz-Lorentzen, Courtenay

our participation in huge international agreements secret, without public debate or decision-making at any level of government. Challenges to our sovereignty and this secrecy are both things that I do not support, and would have argued strenuously against them, had I been given an opportunity. We all need that opportunity now. The B.C. government will be asked to ratify the CanadaEuropean Union Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA), likely

within the next year. The public has not seen the full text of the agreement, nor have many provincial officials. No municipal governments have been allowed to see it, even though the BC Union of Municipalities has passed several motions expressing their concerns about the inclusion of their spending and regulations for the first time in a large trade agreement. We need assurance from the B.C. government that it will not ratify this agreement without a full public review. Alice de Wolff, Courtenay

QUESTIONS ABOUT COMOX VALLEY REGIONAL DISTRICT BUDGET? You can ask those questions and get answers in several ways this year. ■ In person Thursday March 6, 4 to 7 p.m. CVRD boardroom 550B Comox Road, Courtenay ■ Through email via administration@comoxvalleyrd.ca ■ Through CVRD’s Facebook or Twitter sites, via www.facebook.com/comoxvalleyrd or www.twitter.com/comoxvalleyrd The questions and answers will all be made public on the CVRD website after March 6. To see the proposed 2014-2018 budget, visit www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/budgetbinder For more information, call 334-6000 or email administration@comoxvalleyrd.ca

Follow comoxvalleyrd

Outdoor Woman, has helped revive hunting and camping as a family activity, he said. Growing up hunting in northeastern B.C., I was taught not to shoot anything I’m not prepared to eat. I also remember the struggles to protect caribou and other endangered prey species that at one time had B.C. biologists resorting to shooting wolves from helicopters. The reopening of grizzly bear territories is marketed to urban residents as a horrible crime against nature.

In fact, it’s a sign of increasing population. Problems in B.C. wildlife these days include the fragile mountain caribou herds of the Kootenays, which have been subject to intensive management including relocation of animals. Vancouver media recently highlighted a grizzly hunt by NHL journeyman Clayton Stoner. Typically, U.S. enviros promoted the deceased bear by name, Cheeky, and photos showed its carcass stripped to the skeleton by scavengers

after Stoner left with the hide, paws and head. They don’t mention that the same fate awaits animals that die of starvation or other natural causes, which increase when animals overpopulate. As with many B.C. issues, there’s a cartoon version sold to impressionable city dwellers, and then there’s the truth. Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press.

Twitter: @tomfletcherbc. E-mail: tfletcher@blackpress.ca.

Fifth Anniversary of the

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the Comox Valley is happening right now!

Serving up a side dish of ‘Winter 2.0’ at Mount Washington Alpine Resort Dine Around The Comox Valley is celebrating its fifth anniversary from Feb. 19 to March 16, 2014, with 18 restaurants offering an extraordinary array of dishes from both regional farms and the ocean. A popular annual event, Dine Around in the Comox Valley separates itself from other Canadian city culinary events by being able to bring to the plate a fresh-from-field winter harvest. This, combined with local wineries and breweries and diverse restaurants and excellent chefs, has put the Comox Valley region on the maps of food lovers everywhere. “One can expect to see dishes that incorporate fresh seasonal produce such as root vegetables,” says Marcus Aartsen, owner and chef, Martine’s Bistro. “But Dine Around also showcases a variety of preparation styles of dishes – for example, we’re serving smoked salmon crêpe, bacon wrapped beef tenderloin and white chocolate crème brûlée – plus the enormous talent, experience and passion brought to every plate by the team of people both in the kitchen and at the front of the restaurant.” In recent years, the Comox Valley has risen in culinary circles as a food destination – thanks in part to the great number of agricultural and aquaculture products produced in the surrounding region. “The local climate, soils and water make it possible to grow a wide range of agrifood products”, says Gary Rolston, Comox Valley Economic Development & Tourism agricultural development officer. “In 2001, there were 445 farms producing $26.6 million but successful marketing and promotion of the Comox Valley as an agrifood destination has resulted in 34% growth and a significant increase in product diversity. Investors are increasingly recognizing the untapped potential of the agrifood industry in the Comox Valley – case and point with the recent purchase of Beaufort Winery by

James Cameron.” And, with the kick off of this annual celebratory food event, the announcement of the re-opening of Mount Washington Alpine Resort means the fifth anniversary just got even sweeter. Locals and visitors alike now have the opportunity to stretch their legs on the mountain, either through Nordic or alpine skiing, and return to the Comox Valley for a three-course, prix fixe meal, each available for $17, $27, or $37 per person. “We’ve received over a metre of snow in the last couple of days and the conditions couldn’t be better,” says Brent Curtain, spokesperson for Mount Washington Alpine Resort. “Getting some turns in pre-dinner and playing in our winter wonderland will definitely help build your appetite!” In addition to the Dine Around The Comox Valley restaurant offerings, a collection of Comox Valley hotels are offering ‘stay-the-night’ rates. The properties are either in walking distance or a short taxi cab ride away, so food lovers can further pamper themselves by taking advantage of special discounts to make it a real ‘night out.’ Accommodation partners include The Travelodge Courtenay ($79 Cdn per night) and the Best Western PLUS: The Westerly Hotel & Convention Centre ($99 Cdn per night). Dine Around The Comox Valley is a partnership of participating restaurant and accommodation providers, sponsorship from Gordon Food Service, Coastal Black Estate Winery, the Comox Valley Record, the Eagle 97.3FM, and supported by Comox Valley Economic Development and Tourism. For more information, visit www. comoxvalleydinearound.com, call 1-855-4002882 or drop into the Vancouver Island Visitor Centre. One can also join the conversation using #DineAroundCVon Facebook or Twitter.

www.discovercomoxvalley.com


A22

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Cultures fusing at festival The Immigrant Welcome Centre is hosting Global Fusion Fest, a free, family-friendly and inclusive event that will take place March 8 from 10 a.m. till 4 p.m. at the Filberg Centre in Courtenay. “In celebration of the diversity in the community, the event features a variety of traditional music, dance, global food, art and handson crafts,” said Rachel Blaney, the executive director of the Immigrant Welcome Centre. Music and dance planned for the day includes performances from the Kumugwe Cultural Group (K’ómoks First Nation), Uzume Taiko (Japan), Mary Murphy (Irish music), and Esencia Flamenca (Latin music and flamenco dance). The day ends with a dance showcase featuring Iranian, African, Ukrainian and more. Global Fusion Fest also features hands on table workshops and crafts from NIC international students and local workshop facilitators including the NIC International Program and Restless Raven Art Lab. Learn about unique craft traditions and participate in a community art project to express the spirit of the day. Local organizations and cultural

Dance Friday

groups will have interactive exhibits to share knowledge and traditions. Be sure to come hungry. There will be local restaurants and caterers serving bite-sized tastes of Thai, Japanese, Greek, Mexican, Lebanese, Colombian, and Irish food. Tasting tickets will be on sale to purchase food samples for as little as $1. Community Partners for this one-day event include North Island College, School District 71 International Program, Community Justice Centre, Volunteer Comox Valley and the Comox Valley Multicultural and Immigrant Support Society. Bring the family to

the heart of Courtenay for a fun-filled celebration of community. If you want to be

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The third Norton’s High School Dance will happen Feb. 28 at the Little Red Church in Comox from 7 to 11 p.m. Open to all secondary school students to develop a sense of community for our youth, the event will feature music by Victoria DJ Max Davies. Ciaran Martin’s mother Jacquie will sell T-shirts supporting safety awareness. Ciaran Martin is a Comox Valley teen who was struck by a vehicle and killed recently while on a longboard in Black Creek. Contact school reps in advance for a cheaper ticket. All backpacks and outerware will be checked at the door and student ID is required.  Anyone under the influence will be denied entry (no refunds). — Norton’s High School Dance

DANCER CATHY STOYKO illustrates what you might find at Global Fusion Fest.

involved, there are still opportunities to get involved as workshop leaders and volunteers. Contact Jessica.Potter@ImmigrantWelcome.ca for details. For information about the event, look for Global Fusion Fest on Facebook. The Immigrant Welcome Centre serves the Comox Valley, Campbell River and North Island. They provide services to immigrants to help them integrate and settle into Canada. Over 600 clients have been served in the past year as immigration continues to bring innovative and skilled newcomers to the community. — Immigrant Welcome Centre

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www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

A23

OF PICTURETHE WEEK Earth Day linchpin sought

FUN WITH SNOW Mary and Erika take a break from snowshoeing with Girl Guides on Mount Washington. The resort has received nothing but more snow since this photo was taken earlier this month. E-mail your Picture of the Week submissions to editor@comoxvalleyrecord.com. PHOTO BY LISA GRANT

Financial aid for students

Community Drug Strategy Committee offering $500 each to pair

For the third year in a row, the Community Drug Strategy Committee is offering financial aid awards of $500 each to two graduating students attending schools in the Comox Valley. In the past two years, students from Mark R. Isfeld Secondary and G.P. Vanier Secondary have been recipients. As the mandate of the committee is to educate the public, including youth, about the dangers of substance use, the purpose of these awards is to celebrate two youth who have made the decision to stay drug- and alcohol-free throughout their years in high school. The two students receiving this financial aid award must pursue a post-secondary edu-

cation. To apply for Smart Choice Awards, each student will be required to submit an application form including providing two references, as well as to complete a brief, one-page essay outlining their choice to stay drug- and alcohol-free. The deadline for applications this year is April 15. If students are interested in applying for the Smart Choice Award, an application form can be obtained from the counselling centre at their school or they can contact the Community Drug Strategy Committee directly at drugstrategy@hotmail. com (attention: Karen Rushton). For details, Karen can be contacted at the same e-mail address or by phone at 250-3393603. — Community Drug Strategy Committee

Would you like to be at the heart of the sustainability movement in the Comox Valley? A co-ordinator is being sought by the Earth Week 2014 Planning Group to help coordinate a program of activities to show how each and every day can be a day to honour the Earth. Based on the successful World Food Week Comox Valley festival last fall, a week of events will run between April 22 (official Earth Day) culminating in a community festival April 26. The outcomes based, contract coordinator

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A24



Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD

THE ARTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2014

COURTENAY, B.C.

Murphy’s an optimist about launching her CD Paula Wild

Record Arts “Patience is not one of my virtues,” admits Mary Murphy. Last April, the Irish singersongwriter’s voice disappeared just as her new CD was coming out. Under strict orders to not sing — or even talk — for six weeks, Murphy was forced to put the launch on hold. But her voice is back and Murphy’s ready to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with the release of Honey From Heather at the Little Red Church in Comox on March 15.    One of the songs on the CD, the

I was diagnosed with ❝ a hyper swollen larynx and developed severe bronchitis on top of that. One of my sisters died, too, so there was a lot of grief in my life.

❞ Mary Murphy

Road to Lisdoonvarna, is nominated for Best World Music Song of 2013 at the Vancouver Island Music Awards. Murphy, along with guitarist Paul Keim and Will Millar (founder of the Irish Rovers), will perform the song at the VIMA awards ceremony in Victoria on March 22. “Honey From Heather is my ninth release and my favourite for many reasons,” says Murphy. “It includes some of my best songwriting and I’m really excited about the arrangements and instrumentation.” Almost a year ago, Murphy literally found herself speechless. “I was diagnosed with a hyper swollen larynx and developed severe bronchitis on top of that. One of my sisters died, too, so there was a lot of grief in my life.” On one of Murphy’s visits to a throat specialist the doctor told her, “There’s a reason you’re all

choked up. Grief goes straight to the throat.” “Not being able to talk is such a challenge,” says Murphy, who is also an award-winning writer. “I learned a lot. “I focused on my writing for children and, as my voice got stronger, organized a children’s literary event at the library. That helped lighten my spirit immensely.” But Murphy’s singing again and can’t wait to perform at the Little Red Church. “I kept hearing lovely things about the venue,” she says. “It’s a beautiful space with great acoustics and as a former church a lot of people have been in the building over the years. “It feels like there is a lot of joy there. I couldn’t ask for a better place to launch Honey From Heather.” The CD was recorded at Dove Creek Studios, which is owned and operated by Murphy and her partner Paul Keim. Murphy is centre stage with vocals and whistles. Other musicians are Keim on guitar and laúd (Spanish stringed instrument), John Hyde on upright bass, Corwin Fox on banjo, Adrian Dolan on accordion, John May on percussion and drums and Christina Zaenker on cello. “Most of the songs are in English but there are a few Irish ones just for fun,” says Murphy. “I’m so lucky to have Paul as producer and engineer. “Watching him work is like watching a gourmet cook using a variety of different ingredients to create a perfect feast.” The Little Red Church concert — complete with most of the musicians from the CD — will include songs from Honey From Heather, some old-time favourites and, of course, Irish stories.  Tickets are available at Laughing Oyster Books, Marigold Pharmacy and Curves in Courtenay, Blue Heron Books and Red Carpet See CONCERT, B2

HER VOICE BACK, Mary Murphy (seen here back home in Wexford, Ireland) launches her newest CD Honey From Heather on March 15 at the Little Red Church.

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B2

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Great Plains chooses great charity for Tuesday Only the name has changed — the music is as great as ever. The Great Plains will be in concert at the Mex Pub on March 4 as featured guests of the 1st Tuesday Fundraisers. Many may also know them as Darrel and Saskia Delaronde, a dynamic duo that has toured extensively across Canada, sharing their Prairie roots music with themes of Canadian places, lifestyle, history and heroes. To receive the 1st Tuesday donations from the door this month, the duo has chosen Lilli House. Lilli is an outreach for women and children who are escaping domestic violence and abusive situations. Darrel and Saskia were each building their own musical career as solo artists when their paths first crossed. Saskia is a selfproclaimed New-Age, alto-soprano, Celtic, folk, roots, singer, who happens to be Dutch and has been known to yodel. Darrel is a Métis songwriter pursuing a lifelong passion of surrounding himself with guitars, and who has spent many years on the road as a lead guitarist.

Concert in Comox Continued from B1

in Comox, from Murphy’s website (www. marymurphy.ca) and at the door. Pre-purchased tickets will be entered into a draw for three prizes. Doors open at 7 p.m. with the concert beginning at 7:30. Tea, coffee and goodies will be served before the show and during intermission by the Comox Valley Multicultural and Immigrant Support Society. All proceeds go to CVMISS. Donations of non-perishable food items will be donated to those in need. For a preview of the CD and to see the musicians at work, watch a short video by Fine Tippery Productions (Trent Freeman) at www.dovecreekstudios.com. Paula Wild is a published author and regular contributor to the Comox Valley Record’s arts and entertainment section. www.paulawild.ca.

THE GREAT PLAINS (Darrel and Saskia Delaronde) will raise funds for Lilli House on Tuesday at the Mex Pub. The merging of their musical talents has been a delight to their fans and supporters, weaving their distinct musical styles, friendship, and enthusiasm. Darrel and Saskia’s albums include Laura’s Kitchen, Burlap and Binder Twine, Sailing Saskatchewan and their latest release, Songbirds. They have been nominated for Album of the Year, Aboriginal Artist of the Year (times three), as well as Songwriter of the Year in Saskatchewan. Over the past several years, they have toured

extensively with Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame inductee Gary Fjellgaard and are polished performers who genuinely enjoy their audiences and the connections they make along the way. “We were very pleased to find a date, as Darrel and Saskia are on the road so much,” says organizer Judy Wing. “People may not realize it, but we have Darrel and Saskia to thank for planting the seed to host these monthly fundraising events. Years ago, they had

recorded a compilation Christmas album with other artists from the B.C. Interior. “Each year, the participating artists put on a concert wherever they happen to be and sell the CD to raise money for their local food bank. The year we met Darrel and Saskia, they asked Bruce (Wing) and I to join them in their annual concert. “We were very inspired by that initiative. The following December we approached Roy Tai, owner of the Mex Pub, about hosting our own

events. “The support of the Mex sponsorship, the talent of local musicians, and the generosity of the audience members has helped it to evolve into a monthly series that supports a wide variety of local charities.” This month, the charity being supported is Lilli House, a resource funded through the Comox Valley Transition Society (CVTS) that offers a wide range of support programs to Comox Valley women as they take steps to have healthier lives. These programs include support for detox and recovery from addiction, recovery from violence, women’s counselling, and parenting support as well as shelter and nutritious meals.  It offers a place of safety for women and children to make the transition from harmful circumstances to more peaceful, balanced lives. The evening on March 4 starts at 7:30 with a short opening set by Judy and Bruce Wing, with The Great Plains to follow. Admis-

sion is by donation at the Mex Pub on Ryan Road. For more information about the Great Plains, visit www.

thegreatplains.ca. To learn more about Lilli House, visit www.cvts. ca/lilli-house. — 1st Tuesday Fundraisers

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

B3

W hat’s

HAPPENING

THE SOULFUL NIGHTCRAWLERS come up from Vancouver to play the Avalanche Bar and Grill on March 2.

Have fun with ‘gritty, soulful music’

Band led by acclaimed drummer Jesse Cahill

Dave Sikula on guitar and Chris Gestrin behind keys and the Hammond organ. The band has been having great success with their recording projects in the past few years, garnering an Album of the Year Award at the 2009 National Jazz Awards, and a Western Canada Music Award for Best

ticity, from mixing the recorded digital files on two–inch tape to sweltering performances of material by Big John Patton, Jack McDuff and Horace Silver. The Jazz with attitude! NightCrawlers play That’s what Vanlike a decades-old orgacouver-based band the nization, possessing NightCrawlers delivthe swagger, muscle ers. and greasy swing feel This group will of yesteryear’s greats.” appeal to jazz fans, With a combination fans of soul and of grit and soul, fans of rock and plus successful The NightCrawlers play roll. They’re collaborations fun, they’re cre- like a decades-old organization, with music ative and they legends such possessing the swagger, muscle will be live at as Red Holthe Avalanche and greasy swing feel of yester- loway, David on March 2, year’s greats. NewKen Micallef (Fathead) presented by man and Jim the Georgia Byrnes, the Jazz Recording of the NightCrawlers have Straight Jazz Society. Inspired by the Year in 2011. been making fans all The album Down at across the country. music of Brother Jack McDuff, “The Mighty the Bottom reached Don’t miss this presenBurner” Charles Ear- No. 11 on the U.S. Jazz- tation of the Georgia land, Big John Patton, Week charts. Straight Jazz Society Downbeat Maga- this Sunday. Showtime and Booker T and the MGs, the Night Crawl- zine’s Ken Micallef is 7:30 at the Avaers play gritty, soulful wrote glowingly about lanche Bar and Grill in music that’s all about Presenting, the band’s downtown Courtenay. live album, “The having a good time. Tickets are available This Vancouver operative word on on Thursday Night Quintet is led by criti- Presenting is authen- Jazz at the Avalanche cally acclaimed drummer Jesse Cahill and the features the who’s-who of the Vancouver jazz Presents scene with Cory Weeds on alto sax, Steve KaldFeatures Showing: Feb 28–March 6th estad on tenor sax,

Rialto

and at Bop City in Courtenay and Red Carpet in Comox. For more information, check out www.

georgiastraightjazz. com or find us on Facebook. — Georgia Straight Jazz Society

Limited Spaces Available

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Saturday, March 1st, 9:00 am. Doors open at 8:30. Approx. 4 hours, 30 minutes; 2 intermissions. 300: Rise of an Empire18A: Explicit violence. Pass restricted until March 21st. Thursday, March 6th: 9:30. Romeo and Juliet Broadway Stage Production, starring Orlando Bloom. Thursday, March 6th: 7:00. Non-Stop PG: Violence, coarse lang. Pass restricted until March 14th. Nightly: 7:00 & 9:35. Saturday & Sunday Matinees: 12:50 & 3:20. Son of God PG: Violence. Nightly: 6:40 & 9:40. Saturday & Sunday Matinees: 12:30 & 3:30. Pompeii 3D14A: Violence. Friday to Wednesday: 6:50 & 9:25. Thursday, March 6th: 6:50. Saturday Matinees: 2D 3:25. Sunday Matinees: 3D 12:40 & 2D 3:25. Lego Movie 3D G: No warning. Friday to Wednesday: 7:10 & 9:30. Thursday, March 6th: 10:10. Sat & Sun Mats: 3D 1:00 & 2D 3:40. www.landmarkcinemas.com Driftwood Mall 250-338-5550

AVALANCHE BAR & GRILL presents House Ten85 DJs live music starting Saturdays at 9 p.m. FMI: 250-331-0334 or www.georgiastraightjazz.com. BILLY D’S PUB offers music by Jilli Martini on Friday nights from 8 to 11. COMOX VALLEY ART GALLERY offers three exhibits — the Big Foldy Painting of Death, Rhythm in Blue and Artistic Dreams. Rhythm in Blue by Art Group of the Comox Valley until March 8. FMI: www.comoxvalleyartgallery.com or 250-3386211. COURTENAY LITTLE THEATRE presents On Golden Pond from April 10 to 17. FMI: www.courtenaylittletheatre.com. DENMAN READERS’ AND WRITERS’ FESTIVAL July 17 to 20. FMI: www.denmanislandwritersfestival.com. FLYING CANOE WEST COAST PUB has jam nights Thursdays, a DJ and dance Friday nights and karaoke Sundays at 9 p.m. GRIFFIN PUB north of CFB Comox hosts Jazztet on Sundays from 5 to 9 p.m. JOE’S GARAGE features Comox Valley Uke Jam on second Tuesdays of each month. Ukulele instruction at 7 p.m., jam at 8 p.m. KING GEORGE HOTEL has open jam with Pete and Jamie from the Jagsters every Saturday from 3 to 6 p.m. MARTINE’S BISTRO in Comox displays art by Marianne Enhörning until midMarch. MEX PUB has a Rock ‘n Country Jam ‘n Dance hosted by Outlaw Fever on Tuesdays (except the first Tuesday of the month), starting at 9 p.m. MUDSHARKS COFFEE BAR has show and sale of photos by Lisa Graham until Feb. 28. NORTH ISLAND FESTIVAL OF PERFORMING ARTS musical theatre and dance at Sid Williams Theatre until March 3. Tickets at Sid Williams box office or www. sidwilliamstheatre.com. PEARL ELLIS GALLERY presents show and sale by Ablaze Metal Art and Brenda Chalifoux-Luscombe until March 9. Rescheduled opening March 1, 1 to 4 p.m. Demos by ChalifouxLuscombe on March 1 and 8, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free admission at 1729 Comox Ave. FMI: www.pearlellisgallery.com or Facebook. PLEASURE CRAFT THEATRE presents an improvised soap opera every Monday in February and March at Cumberland United Church at 7 p.m. POTTERS PLACE features work by Alan Burgess in February at 180B Fifth St. in Courtenay. FMI: 250-3344613 or  www.thepottersplace.ca. WAVERLEY HOTEL jam night with Brodie Dawson and friends Thursdays. Bluegrass Brunch on Sundays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. FMI: www. waverleyhotel.ca. WHYTE’S FRAMING AND GALLERY showing art by Sue Pyper until March 1. FMI: 250-339-3366 or www. whytesframing.com.

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CUMBERLAND MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL at Riding Fool Hostel, 7 p.m. Tickets available starting Feb. 1 at Wandering Moose Café. SHARON BUTALA reads in Stan Hagen Theatre, 7:30 p.m. FMI: Susan Auchterlonie at 250-334-5271.

Friday, Feb. 28 KUTAPIRA at Waverley Hotel. Tickets at Bop City, Waverley, 250-336-8322 or cumberlandvillageworks. com. CUMBERLAND MOUNTAIN

FILM FESTIVAL at Riding Fool Hostel, 5:30 p.m. Tickets available starting Feb. 1 at Wandering Moose Café.

Saturday, March 1 BONNIE KILROE presents Country Queens at Bridge Lounge, 8 p.m. METROPOLITAN OPERA shown at Rialto Theatre, 9 a.m. FMI: 250-338-5502. RANGERS at Mex Pub.

Sunday, March 2 NIGHTCRAWLERS at Avalanche Bar & Grill, 7:30 p.m. FMI: www.georgiastraightjazz.com.

Tuesday, March 4 GREAT PLAINS in 1st Tuesday Fundraiser at Mex Pub. Judy and Bruce Wing open at 7:30 p.m. Admission by donation. WORLD COMMUNITY presents film Status Quo? The Unfinished Business of Feminism in Canada, Stan Hagen Theatre, 7 p.m. FMI: 250-337-5412 and http:// worldcommunity.ca.

Thursday, March 6 JESSE COOK at Sid Williams Theatre. Tickets at theatre Tuesdays to Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., by phoning 250-338-2430 or online at sidwilliamstheatre.com.

Saturday, March 8 REAL MCKENZIES and BOIDS at Waverley Hotel. Tickets at Bop City, Waverley, 250-336-8322 or cumberlandvillageworks.com.

Monday, March 10 SARAH HAGEN and OTO CARRILLO in Mattina Musica concert at Sid Williams Theatre, 10:30 a.m. FMI: 250-338-2430 or sidwilliamstheatre.com.

Tuesday, March 11 LE VENT DU NORD at Cumberland Hotel. FMI: www. islandmusicfest.com.

Thursday, March 13 LUCAS MYERS in one-man show called Hello Baby! at Sid Williams Theatre, 7:30 p.m. FMI: 250-338-2430 or sidwilliamstheatre.com.

Friday, March 14 LUCAS MYERS in one-man show called Deck at Sid Williams Theatre, 7:30 p.m. FMI: 250-338-2430 or sidwilliamstheatre.com. WAKE OWL with LYON at Avalanche Bar. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets at Bop City Records, Avalanche or online at ticketzone.com.

Saturday, March 15 RADICAL REELS TOUR at Sid Williams Theatre, 7:30 p.m. FMI: 250-338-2430 or sidwilliamstheatre.com. MARY MURPHY at Little Red Church to launch CD, 7:30 p.m. Tickets at Laughing Oyster, Marigold Pharmacy, Courtenay Curves, Blue Heron, Red Carpet, www.marymurphy.ca and at door.

Saturday, March 22 COMOX VALLEY CAMERA CLUB holds Imagefest at Sid Williams Theatre. FMI: www.comoxvalleycameraclub.org or www.sidwilliamstheatre.com/events. JOHN MANN at Cumberland Hotel. FMI: www. islandmusicfest.com.

Sunday, March 23 LAURA GILLESPIE presents Snowbird (songs of Anne Murray) at Sid Williams Theatre, 7 p.m. FMI: 250-3382430 or sidwilliamstheatre. com.

Wednesday, March 26 STEVE DAWSON at Cumberland Hotel. FMI: www. islandmusicfest.com.


B4

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

Film about feminism

Sense, wonder in books

North Island College’s Write Here Readers Series welcomes best-selling author Sharon Butala to its Campbell River and Comox Valley campuses this week. One of Canada’s true visionaries, Butala will read from The Girl in Saskatoon: A Meditation of Friendship, Memory and Murder. Butala returns to 1961 to reconstruct the haunting unsolved murder of a friend, while also telling a nostalgic coming of age story of a young country girl. This powerful read also explores the nature of good and evil, and the true meaning of life. Butala’s work speaks to the collision of geography and spirituality, blending myth and truth with the Canadian landscapes that she loves. Always interested in the stories of women, she endeavours to represent new viewpoints as she reinterprets Western society, and her stories don’t hesitate to use the brutal, the unpleasant, or the shocking to peel away the layers of rural life. “Butala’s work is full of sense and wonder,� writes Alexis Kienlen of the Daily Herald Tribune. Neil Besner, in Perspectives of Saskatchewan, adds “...(a) major work ...monumental ...

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

BEST-SELLING AUTHOR SHARON Butala will read this Thursday in the Stan Hagen Theatre at the North Island College campus in Courtenay.

I do not think there is another â?? writer in Canada with the vision to

bring this kinds of story so fully into being. Neil Besner

â?ž

I do not think there is another writer in Canada with the vision  to bring this kind of story so fully into being.� Butala is the recipient of the Marian Engel Award, and has twice been nominated for the Governor-General’s Award. She has Bachelor of Arts and education degrees from the University of Saskatchewan, and has received

three honourary doctorates. To date she has authored 16 books and produced five plays. After appearing Wednesday in Campbell River, Butala will read at the Stan Hagen Theatre on NIC’s Comox Valley campus on Thursday, Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. These events are free to attend and open to the community. Seating is on a first-come,

first-seated basis. The Write Here Readers Series began in 2010 and continues to showcase Canadian authors for NIC students and members of our communities to experience. For more information about the Sharon Butala reading or the Write Here Readers Series, contact Susan Auchterlonie at 250334-5271. — North Island College

World Community continues its film series with Status Quo? The Unfinished Business of Feminism in Canada. This powerful documentary will screen March 4 at 7 p.m. in the Stan Hagen Theatre at North Island College in Courtenay. Feminism has shaped the society we live in. But just how far has it brought us, and how relevant is it today? This feature documentary zeroes in on key concerns such as violence against women, access to abortion, and universal child care, asking how much progress we have truly made on these issues. Rich with archival material and startling contemporary stories, Status Quo uncovers answers that are provocative and at times shocking. Film director Karen Cho has stated that when she was approached by producer Ravida Din, she didn’t know much about feminism and thought that most of the battles had already been won. In making the film, she was

For details, contact 250-337-5412. The film is presented by World Community, a non-profit society focused on social justice, community development and education. See more at http:// worldcommunity.ca. — World Community

FILM SERIES shocked that “so many of the issues are still around today.� The film was named best documentary at the Whistler Film Festival. Admission is by donation and everyone is welcome.

                  

  



   

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

B5

Igor visits Rialto

The Metropolitan Opera presents Prince Igor at the Rialto Theatre on Saturday, March 1 at 9 a.m. Alexander Borodin’s defining Russian epic, famous for its Polovtsian Dances, comes to the Met for the first time in nearly 100 years. Dmitri Tcherniakov’s new production is a brilliant psychological journey through the mind of its conflicted hero, with the founding of the Russian nation as the backdrop. Star bass-baritone Ildar Abdrazakov takes on the monumental title role, with Gianandrea Noseda conducting. Tickets are on sale now at the Rialto. For more information, call 250-338-5502. — Rialto Theatre

Put Life Back in Your Life

The Real McKenzies St. Paddy’s Day Tour and CD release of Westwinds comes to the Waverley Hotel on March 8. Joining them are Montreal’s BOIDS.

These McKenzies are the real deal

The Real McKenzies are not just a band. They are an unstoppable touring machine. A roadhardened crew of travelling minstrels, entertainers and vagabonds on a never-ending quest for good times. Their St. Paddy’s Day Tour and CD release of Westwinds visits the Waverley Hotel on March 8. For the past 20 years, this ferocious gang of miscreants has been captivating audiences around the globe with their addictive, uncompromising and undeniably heartfelt music. Featuring a diverse and insanely talented roster of musicians, the Real McKenzies draw on acoustic and

electric instruments to blend a potent concoction of classic punk, rock ‘n roll, hard folk and traditional Celtic influence. Anthemic guitars and soaring bagpipes play off each other as Paul McKenzie spins yarns of times long past and regales with tales of endless drunken revelries. Blistering punk rock bootstompers stand alongside passionate singalong ballads while good times and joyous camaraderie are all the order of the day. Fuelled by an insatiable need to share the McKenzies’ gospel with the world, the boys are equally at home playing to 20,000 screaming football fans in the heart of Germany

as they are to a few hundred punks in the dirtiest, darkest, most disreputable clubs of the Canadian wilderness. After more than two decades, eight full-length albums, countless compilation appearances and singles, the Real McKenzies have earned a reputation that is second to none. They’ve shared the stage with Rancid, NOFX, Flogging Molly, The Misfits, Pennywise, Shane McGowan and Metallica just to name a few, all the while garnering new friends and fans along the way. Joining them at the Waverley are Montreal’s BOIDS. Loitering in strictly the most illoiterable locations, these handsome shyboys channel love, heartache, cos-

mic frustration and inspiration into a sweaty mess of punk, thrash, and old-school hardcore. With the release of their first album Feb. 25, BOIDS are set to rock some faces. With influences such as the Ramones, NoMeansNo, D.R.I., One Man Army, U.S. Bombs, Dead Kennedys, Descendents, OFF!, you know the drill -BOIDS come to destroy. For more about the bands, visit http://therealmckenzies. com and www.unionlabelgroup.com/bands/97/boids. Tickets are available at Bop City, the Waverley, at 250-3368322 or at cumberlandvillageworks.com. — Cumberland Village Works

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250-338-0725 COMOX VALLEY RECORD Your community. Your newspaper.


B6 Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

CROSSWORD

GINGER ROOTS 38 39 41 42 43 44 47 51 53 54 55 57 58 60 61

ACROSS 1 Like a game-ending homer 8 Fireplace residue 13 Armani of fashion 20 Raw metal for smelting 21 Davis who played Thelma 22 Caligula, e.g. 23 She was one of the Spice Girls 25 Arranged, as articles for display 26 “Milk” director Gus Van — 27 Kid in diapers 28 “CSI: Miami” star 30 Sea fed by the Volga 34 Jail cell resident 35 Perfect diving score 36 “Turn On the Radio” singer 40 More cagey 45 Oil-catching receptacle 46 Mileage rating org. 47 — gras (goose-liver paste) 48 Eon subunit 49 “Oh yeah? — who?!” 50 Q-U queue 52 Grandson of Elizabeth II 56 Actress Jessica 59 Kennel cry 62 Hen product 63 “Red” or “White” team 64 Comic known for her Tarzan yell 68 Advanced study group 72 George Jetson’s son 73 Items needed to make something 76 Take flight to unite 77 Record label since 1950 79 “Always on My Mind” singer 81 Me, in Marne 82 Pres. on a 1970s dollar 84 Suffix with Senegal 85 As curious as — 86 Big name in late-night talk 91 It aired “Moesha” 93 — Nabisco (old corporation) 96 Band of two 97 Pleasures

98 101 104 107 109 110 112 113 118 119 123 124 128 129 130 131 132 133

Moist mo. Impersonate Writer Upton Grammy-winning diva Oreck offering, briefly Draw upon Flies of Botswana Scientology founder Golfer’s goal Femur, e.g. Make passé Bolshevism founder “Sweet” lady of song Duck variety Visual acuity exam Workers going to blazes Animal trap Trait shared by 10 people featured in this puzzle

DOWN 1 British judges’ wear 2 Atlas statistic 3 Forsaken, old-style 4 Ski mask or tuque 5 Partner of “aah” 6 Italian monk’s title 7 Sharpie and Flair products 8 Rile up 9 Use stitches 10 Obey 11 Interweave 12 Loud salute 13 Neuter, as a horse 14 Apple choice 15 Codeine, e.g. 16 Sketched again 17 Alternative to a fly ball 18 Debt slips 19 “— put it another way ...” 24 Pork — 29 Tuneful way to celebrate something 31 Current unit 32 Beetle type 33 Itsy-bitsy bite 36 Lines on city maps: Abbr. 37 Sooner than, poetically

64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 74 75 78 80 82 83 86 87 88 89 90 92 94 95 99 100 102 103 105 106 107 108 111 113 114 115 116 117 120 121 122 125 126 127

Grotesque Jay-Z music Sound from a lush See 61-Down Act humanly Light shaft Source of Eve’s leaves Banks on a runway Fix a mosaic on, e.g. Class using a fridge Armpit, anatomically “No hands!” preceder Kids’ author Enid Cupboard pest With 42-Down, Hall-of-Fame Dodgers shortstop Middle mark 100 percent Thurman of films More than biWind dir. Afrin target Mil. address Nutty TV dog Two racing Unsers In — of Spanish table wine Kerrigan and Sinatra Marinade alternative Bad-mouth PC inserts Yves’ “yes” Election abstainer “Sk8er —” (2002 Avril Lavigne hit) No, to Burns More trifling I-M link Lo- — screen GI rank Breathe China’s Lao- — “Millennium” series heroine Salander Vigil light “To life!” toast City divided until 1990 Staples unit Socks away Loll around Designer Gernreich — Reader (magazine) “I’ve — had!” Baby’s pop Most draft-eligible Not yet final, at law —’acte — Spiegel Seedy bread Steered

Answer to Previous Puzzle

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Puzzling… Fun by the Numbers: Here’s how it works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLES

MAR. 2 to MAR. 8, 2014 The luckiest signs this week: Leo, Virgo and Libra

ARIES You are surrounded by lots of people or your friends are constantly inviting you here, there, and everywhere. You are extremely popular this week! TAURUS It is important to weigh the pros and cons before reaching a decision. You may feel that you’re being pressured into making a choice. Give yourself all the time you need. GEMINI This is the time to recharge your bat­ teries. You have the impression that you’ve reached your limit profes­ sionally or that someone is throwing a wrench in your spokes. You’ll soon put a stop to that. CANCER Family is important to you, and you won’t put up with messy surroun­ dings for very long. You do a big spring cleaning, at the office and at home.

LEO If you’re trying to find your way pro­ fessionally, you may find the nec­ essary inspiration to take on a new challenge. You are drawn to make many changes. VIRGO You may be thinking more and more seriously of taking some kind of training course or apprenticeship. To do so will broaden your horizons considerably, perhaps even at a spir­ itual level. LIBRA This is a good week to request a loan or even to renegotiate your mort­ gage. You find a great solution to put an end to all your financial problems once and for all. SCORPIO You find yourself with a record number of clients to attend to at work. Your friends impose a certain amount of stress on you by asking you to organize a large gathering.

SAGITTARIUS Whether at work or elsewhere, it is preferable to delay some projects. At least take the time to negotiate conditions that are more favourable to you. CAPRICORN If you intend to move house in the near future, don’t forget that this has to be planned a long time in advance. You’re sure to take some necessary steps now in moving towards this goal. AQUARIUS Health is the most important thing in life. You’re sure to discover a new diet that transforms the quality of your life in a positive way. PISCES You are surrounded by critics. You won’t have any choice but to build a solid argument in order to confront them. Your comments could earn you a lot of respect.

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Pirates, gypsies doing improv

Pleasure Craft Theatre’s live improvised soap opera is at the midpoint of its fourth season. This year’s theme is Pirates of the Cascadian, a zany, swashbuckling epic adventure that unfolds Monday evenings at Cumberland United Church. Pirates, gypsies, mermaids, wenches, privateers, unicorns and cannibals comprise the cast of this ever-growing and changing show, with improvised music and special effects. “It’s by turns hilarious, tragic and romantic,” director Kevin Flesher said. “Nobody knows what’s going to happen from week to week as they search for Ginger’s booty.” Music is provided by a three-piece band featuring Vig Schulman on bass, Tom Walton on guitar and violinist Blaine Dunaway. New cast members are encouraged to drop by and join the fun. The church is at First and Penrith. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. Mondays. Remaining sessions are March 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31. Admission is by donation. All ages are welcome. Partial proceeds benefit the Cumberland Community Forest Society. — Pleasure Craft Theatre

BRENDA CHALIFOUX-LUSCOMBE WILL demonstrate Scratch Board technique at the Pearl Ellis Gallery.

Pearl has demos

Diversity in Action, appearing at the Pearl Ellis Gallery, features Brenda Chalifoux-Luscombe and Ablaze MetalArt and Design. There will be an opening celebration held March 1 from 1 to 4 p.m. A special event of Scratch Board technique will be demonstrated by Brenda between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. that will provide visitors with deeper insight to this medium. There will be an opportunity for participation by the public (space permitting). Materials will be provided for participants. Brenda will offer these demonstrations/mini workshop in the Comox gallery this Saturday and again on Saturday, March 8 between 11 a.m. and — Pearl Ellis Gallery 2 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

B7

KEVIN FLESHER AND his wife Yaya get into the spirit of Pleasure Craft Theatre’s soap opera improvised live Monday evenings until March 31 at Cumberland United Church. New cast members are encouraged to drop by and join the fun, which includes live music.


B8

LIFESTYLES

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

The List: Great plants for the Pacific Northwest Many plant species are nominated for trial each year

My rosemary plants are kept in pots and given winter protection ... either moved into the greenhouse or at the very least under the eave on my front porch out of the weather. Rosemary plants aside, I rely heavily on the lists of Great Plant Picks that are put out every year. Each plant on the list has some quick facts noted about it, notes on how to grow it and its outstanding qualities exposed for your reading enjoyment.

T

he List is out! This year’s outstanding plants for growing in the maritime Pacific Northwest. Every year since 2001, the Elizabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden in Seattle has sponsored a trial of plant varieties with the purpose of determining which ones grow well in our particular climate. This covers an area west of the Cascade Mountains from Eugene, Ore., to Vancouver ... and I would argue even farther north. Numerous plants species and cultivars are nominated for trial each year. Not all are selected for scrutiny but the number that are is impressive. This year alone, the committee of very knowledgeable plant specialists have selected a total of 142 plants for The List. Each plant in the trial is evaluated for its overall performance in Zone 7 and 8 for growth, flower and fruit production, pest and disease resistance, drought tolerance, soil type ... all with an eye to our Pacific Northwest climate. The plants selected this year had to also comply with this year’s theme: Plants That Make SCENTS. So they were evaluated for floral and foliage scent ... and broken down into whether the scent was spicy, woodsy or “fresh.” I like that a theme is chosen each year. It provides a focus on plants that perform under certain conditions or have a particularly outstanding feature. For instance, the theme for 2013 was Plants for Small Spaces; 2012 was Plants Made for the Shade; 2010 was Fantastic Foliage. Running down the 2014 list, I spotted about two dozen species that we have in our own garden. Fothergilla gardenii (dwarf witch alder), Osmanthus x burkwoodii (hybrid sweet olive), O. delavayi (sweet olive), Philadelphus coronaria ‘Aureus’ (golden mock orange), Ribes sanguineum ‘King Edward VII’ (flowering

And even though we live outside of the specified testing region, you can be fairly certain that most of the plants on their lists will do just fine in your garden. Visit www.greatplantpicks.org for the complete list. Leslie Cox co-owns Growing Concern Cottage Garden in Black Creek. Her website is at www.duchessofdirt. ca and her column appears every second Thursday in the Record.

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DAPHNE CNEORUM (ROCK daphne) is no slouch when it comes to finding nice plants for your Pacific Northwest garden. PHOTO BY JOHN COX

I like that a theme is chosen each year. It provides a focus on plants that perform under certain conditions or have a particularly outstanding feature.

❞Leslie Cox

currant) and Rosa ‘Hansa’ (double pink old-fashioned rose) to name just a few. Daphne x burkwoodii ‘Carol Mackie’

and Daphne tangutica were also noted and we have them both. But I question why these two were in the trial and not Daphne odorata, the most fragrant daphne of them all. Its intoxicating scent fills a substantial area of our garden from early spring almost straight into April and well into May. Heavenly. And Daphne cneorum (rock daphne) is no slouch either. A neighbour of mine from my Gold River years had three specimens of this daphne species draped down their 12-foot-high concrete retaining wall.

DUCHESS OF DIRT

LESLIE COX Spectacular! And the scent! Truly a delight to walk by. For obvious reasons there are a number of evergreens on the list for their fragrant foliage. The coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) and mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana), four species of cedar, a juniper and a pine are all on the list. Some cranesbills,

or hardy geraniums, are also noted for their fragrant foliage. A couple of Russian sages (Perovskia spp.) and four cultivars of Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) are flagged for their scented foliage and garden performance. However, I would dispute the last one for hardiness in a Zone 7 garden as rosemary is not reliably perennial in our garden.

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

B9

Allowance issue pertains to your family values M

y son keeps asking for an allowance. He says that all the other kids get allowances. My wife and I did not receive allowances as children and we think that he is too young to handle money. We pay for things he needs, but we worry that giving him allowance would teach him to expect money for nothing; we want him to have a strong work ethic. We are older parents and wonder if our views are outdated. What do you think about children and allowance? Several issues are raised with this question: giving allowance, raising hard-working children, and individual family values. Let me begin by addressing family values. Families are different! They have different ways of working, relating, teaching, and

different values. It is important to teach children according to the values that exist for your family. The values that you have developed as parents will have been influenced to a large degree by cultural, generational, and social norms. It is true that parenting changes across cultures and through time. Talking to other parents and asking questions like the one you have posed here is important in making decisions about how to raise your children. Before you take advice or make decisions, you must measure information against your own values and decide what fits for your family. Children universally assert “all the other kids. . .” or “all the other parents. . .” as they set about bolstering arguments to gain

parental compliance in all manner of wishes. Just as universally, these statements are untrue. As I said before, all families are different and it is unlikely that all other families are making identical decisions. You might want to think about the purpose of giving allowance. For some families, allowances are linked to household chores; children receive the allowance in return for completing daily and weekly chores. If the chores are not done, allowance is withheld or docked.

The rationale for this is sometimes that it teaches children to work for their money. This does address your wish for your son to learn that he doesn’t get money for nothing. It isn’t exactly a real world approach, though. Adults don’t usually get paid for working around the house especially for the tasks associated with daily living. Kids have chores because they need to learn basic life skills essential to living on their own. Being part of a family, they also need to learn how to contribute and work together. Chores are a great way to teach these two important life lessons. Another reason to give allowance is to teach children how to handle money. If they are to live in this society, our children will need to know

trian. The only condition is that the pedestrian must not move in front of a vehicle when a driver would be unable to yield to them. For more information about this topic, visit www.drivesmart-

bc.ca. Questions or comments are welcome by e-mail to comments@drivesmartbc. ca. Tim Schewe is a retired RCMP constable with many years of traffic law enforcement experience. His column appears Thursdays.

Consult a Counsellor

Leslie Wells

Crosswalk or a speed bump? A

reader observes “I was crossing West Mall at UBC over a speed hump towards the bus stop. “A car was driving on West Mall and did not stop. When I showed the driver the white arrows on the pavement, he said that these were speed hump marks, not a crosswalk. “I recognize that I might have been wrong assuming it was a pedestrian crosswalk, but then I started thinking, who should have the right of way?” Properly marked crosswalks in British Columbia consist of either two parallel lines extending across the road from curb to curb at a signalized intersection or elsewhere by a zebra crossing. A zebra crossing is a series of rectangles with the long sides parallel to the road edges marking the path for pedestrians to cross. Examples of both are found in the Pedestrian Crossing Manual for British Columbia. Speed humps, different from the speed bumps usually found in parking lots, are not yet common in this province. They are traffic-calming devices intended to slow vehicle speeds and help make neighbourhoods more livable for all road users. Arrowheads are painted on the

Behind the Wheel

Tim

Schewe approach side of the hump, indicating the direction of travel and making them more visible to drivers. Right of way generally belongs to the driver outside of crosswalks. Pedestrians must yield or may be forbidden to cross outside of a crosswalk by a municipal bylaw. If a crosswalk is present, marked or unmarked, right of way belongs to the pedes-

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how to handle money. Money management is a fairly complex set of skills and children need to learn these long before they will be required to use them when they are living on their own. Allowance is one way that parents can help children to learn about buying, receiving change, opening a bank account, making a budget and living within it, short-term and longterm saving, balancing a bank statement, donating to charities. Kids can begin learn-

ing these things early, When kids have before they are old their own money, they enough to hold down a can then be responsible job, if they have allow- for some of their own ance. expenses. To ask a question of Actually, they can start learning rudi- the counsellors, for a mentary money skills response in future colas soon as they are old umns, e-mail  info@ enough that they won’t pacifictherapy.ca. Consult a Counsellor is eat their money. There is no set provided by registered counsellors amount for allowance; clinical that must be deter- Nancy Bock, Diane mined within budgets Davies Leslie Wells, that vary amongst Andrew Lochhead and families. Sara-Lynn Kang at Even with small pacific therapy & conWisdom teeth aresulting like volcanoes; you inc. It appears amounts of money, children can learn valu- every second Thursday able money skills.  in the Record.

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B10

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD ♦ SPORTS EDITOR: EARLE COUPER ♦ THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Glacier Kings sweep Braves; Panthers next Earle Couper Record Staff

MAJA NYMANN WON gold and silver in the slalom event at the B.C. championships in Prince George.

Skiers compete well at B.C.s Mt. Washington Ski Club took five racers to Prince George to compete at the Teck U16 B.C. championships: Calvin Cotton and Kole Harle (Mount Washington), Liam Gilchrist (Nanaimo), Maja Nymann (Campbell River) and Keegan McCooey (Cumberland). “The drive to Prince George didn’t seem that long,” commented one of the racers. “We brought this new video game and played the whole way there.”  Now that is one way to combat the fatigue of such a long trip. Thanks goes to the head coach John Trimmer who spent the time behind the wheel. This event was a qualifier for many future events, so the pressure was high for the athletes. There were six different races: Super G, where the gates are farther apart

and the speed is higher; Giant Slalom, where the gates are medium distance apart; and  Slalom, where the gates are closer together and the turns are more technical.

events were two Giant Slalom races. Again, racers were allowed to inspect the course and then given one opportunity to race it. The racers from the Island skied

This event was a qualifier for many ❝ future events, so the pressure was high for the athletes. ❞ The first two events were Super G. Both of these races were a onerun result. Skiers were given an opportunity to inspect the course, and then they had one run to show how fast they could get through it. The Mount Washington racers placed: Maja 25th and 17th, Keegan 32nd and 32nd, Kole 8th and 14th, Liam 14th and 11th, Calvin 49th and 47th. The third and fourth

it very aggressively and the results were: Maja 23rd and 17th, Keegan 18th and 18th, Kole won bronze and 9th, Liam 6th and did not finish (DNF), Calvin DNF and 31st. The fifth and sixth events were Slalom. Each one of these results were a combination of two races. After an inspection, racers sped through the course for their first result. The course was then reset, follow by an inspec-

tion, and then another race. The final result was a combination of both race times: Maja won gold and silver, Keegan 18th and 19th, Kole won bronze and 6th, Liam DNF and 24th, and Calvin 30th and 31st. Four of the five racers are also members of Podium of Life Snow Sports Academy. These students will be back up on Mount Washington, continuing to hone their racing skills as part of their daily school curriculum. “It is great that they can get courses done on the road through eBlend, a distance learning program out of SD72. It takes a lot of maturity for these students to navigate their school in a couple weeks,” said Podium of Life cofounder Shane Harle. – Podium of Life Snow Sports Academy

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The Comox Valley Glacier Kings are through to the second round of the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League playoffs. Duncan Pernal’s goal at 2:44 of the first overtime period Monday night in Saanich gave the Yetis a 3-2 win over the Braves and a sweep of their bestof-seven series. The Icemen will have home-ice advantage in the next round of post-season play when they meet the Peninsula Panthers. The locals have booked ice time on Tuesday, March 4 (7 p.m.) for Game 1, Saturday March 8 (7:30 p.m.) for Game 3 and if necessary Wednesday, March 12 (7 p.m.) for Game 5 and Saturday, March 15 (7:30 p.m.) for Game 7. Unconfirmed dates in Peninsula are Game 2 Friday, March 7, Game 4 Monday March 10 and if necessary Game 6 Friday, March 14. The winner of Comox Valley (North Division #1) vs. Peninsula (South Division #2) will meet the winner of Victoria Cougars (South Division #1) vs. Campbell River Storm (North Division #2) or Nanaimo Buccaneers (North Division #3) in the VIJHL playoff championships. The Yetis played catchup most of the way Monday night at George Pearkes Arena. The Braves led 1-0 after one period, with the visitors pulling even at 3:17 of the second on Jonas Horvath’s power-play goal. Former Glacier King

Sasha Hahn put the Braves back on top at 16:38 of the second, and things looked bleak for the G-Kings as the clock ticked down in the third as they could not beat Saanich goalie Eric Palliser. But with just 1:30 to play and Comox Valley goalie Blake Pearson pulled for the extra attacker, Derian Hamilton hammered home a loose puck from a goalcrease scramble to send the game into OT, where another scramble in front of Palliser allowed Pernal to jam home the game winner and series clincher. The Glacier Kings outshot the Braves 35-31 and went 1-for-3 on the power play. They will welcome some time off before locking horns with the Panthers. They lost three players due to injury Monday (Eric Margo, Wil Finlay and Quinlan Moore) and are hoping to have goalie Michael Hails (who hurt his knee in the first game of the Saanich series) healthy for the second round. ICE CHIPS The Yetis have two players in the top 10 of playoff scoring; Liam Shaw (3g, 5a) is tied for third while Dallas Maxwell (4g, 1a) is sixth … the fourth game of the Campbell River-Nanaimo series set for Feb. 23 was cancelled due to highway weather conditions and was played Wednesday night, with result unavailable at press time … the Panthers knocked off the Westshore Wolves 4-1 in their opening round series … playoff updates are at www.vijhl. com ...

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

Mission accomplished for locals at Winter Games Earle Couper Record Staff

Comox Valley athletes helped Zone 6 (Vancouver Island-Central Coast) to a fifthplace finish at the 2014 BC Winter Games, which ran Feb. 20-23 in Mission. Zone 6 finished with 44 medals (12 gold, 16 silver, 16 bronze). Zone 3 (Fraser Valley was the runaway win-

Island skiers medal

Mount Washington Freestyle Club sent five athletes to the 2014 BC Winter Games in Mission: Mei Pond and Hannah Benischeck from Whistler, Todd Heard from Duncan, James Dunn from Nanaimo, and Erin Sketchley from Campbell River. Skiers competed in two different events: moguls and slopestyle. Now that Canada has a number of Olympic medal in these events, Canadians are familiar with them. Moguls are scored with 50 per cent for the turns, 25 per cent for the jumps, and 25 per cent for speed. After the first day of moguls, Island skiers finished with excellent results: Mei won a gold with a score of 16.32, Todd a silver with a score of 17.70, Hanna a bronze with a score of 14.99, Erin a fourth with a score of 13.56, and James an eighth with a score of 7.39. The second day of competition was slopestyle. After sliding on rails and hitting a number of jumps, Island freestylers finished strong: Erin won gold with a score of 26.6, Hannah also won gold with a score of 23, Mei scored 17.6 to win a bronze, Todd earned a silver with a score of 62, and James did not have a clean run and finished tenth with a score of 16.6. The next competition is in Silver Star in March. So some of the kids will be training with a special guest coach, Mike Richards, at the Podium of Life Snow Sports Academy on Mount Washington over the next couple of weeks. – Podium of Life Snow Sports Academy

ner with 103 medals (30 gold, 33 silver, 40 bronze). The Zone 6 girls karate team won silver in kata. Locals on the team included head coach Todd Robertson (Courtenay), assistant

coach P a m Ross (Courtenay), a n d a t h letes Natalie BridgesMcInnes (Courtenay)

and Sophia MacIntrye (Comox). Among the other local podium performers was curler Jordan Koster (Courtenay) who was on the Zone 6 girls team that won bronze.

Also earning bronze was the Zone 6 female gymnastics team with head coach Toni Vance (Courtenay) and athlete Kaylee Guignard (Courtenay). Cross-country skier Tallon Noble (Courte-

nay) won gold in sprint and bronze in individual start. Over 1,800 participants – including 38 from the Comox Valley – took part in the Winter Games. A total of 1,344 athletes were

b11

supported by 346 coaches and 156 officials during the fourday event. For more Winter Games coverage, visit bclocalnews.com or bcgames.org.

sports@comoxvalleyrecord.com

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B12

SPORTS

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

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Ice senior girls off to first-ever B.C.s A second-place finish at the Island championships earned the Isfeld Ice their school’s firstever trip to the B.C. senior girls basketball championships. The Ice hosted the Islands Feb. 20-22 and beat Brentwood 71-23 in their first game. They then faced Pacific Christian. The first two quarters were close and Isfeld led by two at the half. In the third quarter, Isfeld exploded their offence when Pacific Christian switched from playing zone to man-to-man

MICHAELA ASHLEE DRIBBLES the ball in game against Brentwood.

defence. Sharp passing by Avery Snider and Michaela Ashlee, onfire shooting by Danielle Vanbergen, along with great rebounding and defence by Leah Cicon and Malia Irvine, plus solid play from the rest of the team resulted in a 75-52 victory, guaranteeing the team a berth to the Provincials in Langley. In the final the girls played a hard-fought battle against Wellington. It was a tight game from start to finish with Isfeld leading until midway through

the third quarter when the team got into some foul trouble and also were having trouble getting the ball into the net. Wellington capitalized on these opportunities and took a slight lead. Isfeld continued to play hard and were only down by one with four minutes left. Unfortunately two key players fouled out and  Wellington ended up winning by six. As disappointing as the loss was, the coaches are extremely proud of the girls for the solid

Isfeld junior girls to Provincials They did it the hard way, but do it they did. The Mark Isfeld Ice junior girls basketball team advanced to the Provincial championships at the Langley Events Centre, winning three games at the Vancouver Island championships this past weekend.  The girls defeated Claremont (Victoria) in the opening game by a close score, then defeated a very tough G.P. Vanier team on Friday morning and closed out the tournament upsetting Victoria #1 seed St. Michaels University

School. The three tough wins gave the Ice the second Island berth to the B.C.s.  “This is a tremendous accomplishment,” said coach Hugh MacKinnon, “because in juniors there is no division splitting of schools  according to student population like there is in senior high school competition, which splits schools into four tiers (A, AA, AAA, AAAA). “In juniors all schools battle for only two Vancouver Island berths for the one Provincials championship, so to earn a berth is very special

indeed! The character, poise and determination of the girls was special to witness,” added MacKinnon. In the final game, SMU led by as many as 12 points but the Isfeld girls  never gave up, inspired by the Canadian women’s hockey team to keep battling.  In the fourth quarter, the Ice  pressed the SMU girls, creating havoc and turnovers which led to  Isfeld taking their first lead of the game with less than a minute left.  The  composed Ice held on

team work and skilled play shown throughout the weekend and  for being the first senior girls basketball team from Isfeld to qualify for

the  Provincials.  Also, the coaches thank the fans for their awesome cheering throughout the tourney. – Isfeld Ice

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to complete the upset of Victoria’s  #1 seed and to acquire the provincial berth. Contributions were made by many and Aleah Ashlee was selected to the all-star team.  Other team members include: Jairynn Kuruez, Kyla DeWitt, Maggie Snyder-Harris, Sydney Kuhnert, Sabine Rankin, Sylvie Stewart-Grantham, Delaynee Pedersen-Skene, Chelsea Lachapelle, Maddi Eaton, assistant coach Grant Ashlee and team manager Wayne Kuhnert. – Isfeld Ice

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

b13

score board HOCKEY VANCOUVER ISLAND JUNIOR LEAGUE 2013-14 Playoffs (best-of-seven series) Round One Feb. 18 (Game 1) Saanich 1 @ Comox Valley 4 Feb. 20 (Game 2) Comox Valley 7 @ Saanich 2 Feb. 22 (Game 3) Saanich 1 @ Comox Valley 5 Feb. 24 (Game 4) Comox Valley 3 @ Saanich 2 OT Comox Valley wins best-of-seven 4-0 Round Two Tuesday, March 4 (Game 1) Peninsula @ Comox Valley 7 p.m. Sports Centre #1 Friday, March 7 (Game 2) Comox Valley @ Peninsula Saturday, March 8 (Game 3) Peninsula @ Comox Valley 7:30 p.m. Sports Centre #1 Monday, March 10 (Game 4) Comox Valley @ Peninsula If Needed Wednesday, March 12 (Game 5) Peninsula @ Comox Valley 7 p.m. Sports Centre #1 Friday, March 14 (Game 6) Comox Valley @ Peninsula Saturday, March 15 (Game 7) Peninsula @ Comox Valley 7:30 p.m. Sports Centre #1

HOCKEY

DARTS

SCORING

Top Ten Player Avg. Joe McNeil 60.90 Bill Durant 59.73 Ernie Linden 56.49 Glen Litchfield 55.78 Daniel Leaman 54.35 Mark Wyatt 54.13 Jack Ethier 53.98 John Chequis 53.88 Bill MacPherson 52.55 Stuart Wills 52.47 Games Won This Week Team W Comox Legion B 7 Comox Legion C 12 Courtenay Legion A 17 Courtenay Legion B bye Courtenay Legion C 17 Griffin Pub 7 Griffin Pub Flyers 12 High Chekout Joe McNeil 118 High Score Bill MacPherson, Jack Ethier, Terry Hills 177 180s Terry Hills 2; Chuck Smith, Jamie Deith, Jack Ethier, Bill MacPherson, Hap Hanson, John Chequis, Mark Wyatt, Ralph Brydon, Glen Litchfield 1

VIJHL Playoffs Top 10 Player Tm G A Pt C. Peterson WS 4 8 12 M. Fretz Vic 4 5 9 R. Ball Pen 4 5 9 A. Milligan Pen 2 7 9 K. Richter WS 5 3 8 L. Shaw Com 3 5 8 J. Skerratt Pen 6 1 7 C. Krupa WS 5 2 7 B. Lervold WS 1 5 6 D. Maxwell Com 4 1 5

SOCCER VANCOUVER ISLAND MEN

Div. 2 Team W L T PT Saanich Fusion 12 3 3 39 Comox Valley 10 2 5 35 Westcastle 9 3 5 32 Cowichan 7 7 3 24 Gordon Head 6 6 5 23 Lakehill 6 8 4 22 Nanaimo 4 8 5 17 Gorge United 3 8 6 15 Vic West 3 8 6 15 Prospect Lake 4 11 2 14 Feb. 15 (Jackson Cup) Comox Valley United D2 0 Bays Liquor Plus D1 2 March 1 Comox Valley United @ Prospect Lake

8-BALL C.V. POOL LEAGUE

Team RW PT GW Breaking Bad 70 2655 186 Misspent Youth 68 2727 201 Scratch 67 2773 208 Rack-No-Phobia 67 2727 207 Drive By 67 2708 203 Chalk-A-Holics 63 2689 204 Choc-O-Lot 61 2670 194 4 Men & A Lady 59 2537 168 Team Cuddles 58 2657 188 Classics 57 2635 182 Who’s Counting? 52 2395 146 Chalk-N-Awe 50 2515 170 Balls In Hand 46 2476 161 The Breakers 38 2343 139 Chalk One Up! 38 2337 134 Cue-Tease 37 2308 126 Mex Hookers 24 2165 104 Darn Winians 23 2040 103 RW-rounds won; PT-points; GWgames won Player of Year Standings Player GP Pts Ostwald, Werner 52 100.0 Horton, Rob 62 87.3 Douglas, Ron 44 84.1 Caton, Bernie 80 84.0 Kellogg, Jim 44 79.7 Stewart, Wayne 76 79.4 Laramee, Bill 74 77.7 Ferguson, Brian 72 74.7 Robinson, Shane 67 73.3 Mynott, Kris 28 71.4

DARTS C.V. MEN’S ASSOCIATION Team Standings Team Pts Courtenay Legion A 279 Courtenay Legion C 248 Courtenay Legion B 222 Griffin Pub Flyers 206 Comox Legion C 200 Comox Legion B 152 Griffin Pub A 136

BASKETBALL ISLAND BOYS 4A Poll #11 - Feb. 16 1. Claremont, Victoria 2. Mt. Douglas, Victoria 3. Oak Bay, Victoria 4. Cowichan, Duncan 5. Dover Bay, Nanaimo 6. G.P. Vanier, Courtenay 7. Alberni, Port Alberni 8. Belmont, Victoria 9. Spectrum, Victoria

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (7) (6) (8) (9)

ISLAND BOYS 3A Poll #11- Feb. 16 1. Mark Isfeld, Courtenay (1) 2. Wellington, Nanaimo (2) 3. Nanaimo District (3) 4. Carihi, Campbell River (4) 5. Edward Milne, Sooke (5) 6. Pacific Christian, Vic. (6) 7. Reynolds, Victoria (7) 8. Parkland, Sidney (NR) 9. Stelly’s, Saanichton (8) 10. Esquimalt, Victoria (NR) ISLAND BOYS 2A Poll #11 - Feb. 16 1. Lambrick Park, Victoria 2. SMU, Victoria 3. Brentwood, Mill Bay Highland, Comox 5. John Barsby, Nanaimo 6. Kwalikum, Qualicum 7. Gulf Islands, Ganges 8. Shawnigan Lake 9. Woodlands, Nanaimo 10. Cedar, Nanaimo

(1) (2) (T3) (T3) (6) (5) (7) (8) (9) (10)

10-PIN BOWLING Tuesday Night Mixed Team QTR YTD The B.U.F.F.’S 68 201 King Pins* 72 193 Screaming Eagles* 45 183 EZDUZIT 56 181 U.K. Plus 42 168 Buckin Awesome 50 165 Ryan’s Pizzeria 42 145 Team 8 13 13 *quarter winners Team High Scratch Game Screaming Eagles 833 High Hcp. Game Screaming Eagles 1109 High

Scratch Series Bucking Awesome 2292 High Hcp. Series EZDUZIT 3164 Individual High Scratch Game Robert Rodgers 215, Linda Anderson 181 High Hcp. Game Robert Hansen 268, Linda Anderson 236 High Scratch Series Robert Rodgers 564, Linda Anderson 492 High Hcp. Series Robert Hansen 670, Taylor Tipper 677 Congratulations Edd Andrews bowled a Seniors 50 POA Game (193), Seniors 180 Game (193) ... 50+ Seniors Team QTR YTD Limeys 43 237 Quinsam Auto 42 211 Class Act 34 236 Flyers 31 250 Hopefuls 28 242 Spare Shooters 25 237.5 Amigos 24 235.5 Happy Wanderers 24 239 King Pins 22 216.5 Strikers 12 175.5 Team High Game Score Amigos 656 High Game Hcp. Quinsam Auto 909 High Series Score Amigos 1800 High Series Hcp. Flyers 2546 Men High Game Score Hank Modras 222 High Game Hcp. Hank Modras 264 High Series Score Hank Modras 592 High Series Hcp. Hank Modras 718 Ladies High Game Score Karen Lannan 190 High Game Hcp. Anette Jones 254 High Series Score Claire Brown 502 High Series Hcp. Claire Brown 661

C.V. SPORTS & SOCIAL CLUB

Do you know someone who has made an impact in our community? These awards honor people who have made significant contributions through a unique achievement or outstanding service within the voluntary sector. Nominate someone today.

Life Time Achievement—The Life-Time Achievement Award celebrates the impacts made by an extraordinary volunteer who continually goes above and beyond in their dedication and service to others. This is a person devoted to making a difference. They inspire by their example.

Under 24—This award recognizes the impacts of a volunteer under the age of 24. This extraordinary individual is engaged, involved and exhibits leadership skills locally, nationally or globally. This award acknowledges the power and potential of young people taking action to make a difference.

Volunteer Administrator of the Year—This award honors a Not-for-Profit Volunteer Administrator who has demonstrated outstanding innovation, dedication and perseverance in the profession of volunteer administration. They exhibit outstanding volunteer administration skills and "model the way, inspire a shared vision, challenge the process, enable others, and encourage the heart."

Social Justice—The Social Justice award recognizes the impacts made by a volunteer working towards creating a society based on the principles of equality, the values of human rights and the dignity of every human being. These volunteers are seen working toward ensuring all members of our society have food, clothing, shelter, and access to the benefits of our society.

DODGEBALL

Sports and Recreation—This award recognizes and celebrates the significant achieve-

Recreational - Monday A Tier Team W L T Pt Young Guns 4 0 0 8 CV Marine Misfits 3 1 0 6 The Fighting Amish 3 1 0 6 10 Phat Kids 1 3 0 2 Chuck ‘N’ Duckers 1 3 0 2 Blazing Balls 0 4 0 0 B Tier Team W L T Pt Vicious & Delicious 4 0 0 8 Not In The Face 3 1 0 6 Shoot to Thrill 3 1 0 6 Team Excellence 3 1 0 6 Ball Busters 2 2 0 4 Chocolate Thunder 1 3 0 2 Firing Squad 1 3 0 2 Mount Then Wash 1 3 0 2 The 5 D’s 1 3 0 2 Thorns & Roses 1 3 0 2

ments of volunteers in the areas of sports and recreation. Nominees devote their time and effort to the development of sport and recreation opportunities and are outstanding role models who inspire others at the recreational or competitive level.

Intermediate - Wednesday Team W L T Pt Those Guys 6 0 0 12 Lightning Dogs 5 1 0 10 Piggy Back Attack 4 2 0 8 Thundercats 4 2 0 8 Dodge Fathers 2 4 0 4 Grease Balls 2 4 0 4 The Ballistics 1 5 0 2 Super Attack Squad 0 6 0 0

things such as (training, tutoring, mentorship, apprenticeship, or higher education) or informal, such as peer counseling. It not only enhances social inclusion, active citizenship and personal development, but also competitiveness and employability. This award recognizes the dedication of an individual to support learning programs locally, nationally or globally.

FLOOR HOCKEY Tuesday Team W L T Pt EDS Trashers 5 0 1 11 Lockout All-Stars 5 0 1 11 Dekes of Hazzard 5 1 0 10 The Jets 3 2 1 7 Flying Squirrels 3 3 0 6 Shut Your 5-Hole 2 3 1 5 No Regretzkies 2 4 0 4 Puck Offs 2 4 0 4 Puck Hunt 0 5 1 1 U Puck On Me? 0 5 1 1

CRIBBAGE NORTH ISLAND LEAGUE Doubles Team W L T PT Elks 9 6 2 20 Comox Golf 8 6 3 19 CR Eagles 7 8 2 16 Comox Legion 6 10 1 13 Singles Team W L T PT Comox Legion 12 1 4 28 CR Eagles 6 4 7 19 Comox Golf 5 11 1 11 Elks 3 10 4 10 Comox Legion wins the year’s singles

Furry, Finned, Feathered & other Friends—This award recognizes exceptional achievements and contributions to the advancement of animal welfare. It's open to volunteers who bring awareness to the plight of our world's furry, finned, feathered and other species of friends through education, service and advocacy.

Health, Safety, and Emergency Services—Volunteers work globally and locally to provide service and information to help ensure the health and well-being of our citizens. This award recognizes a humanitarian who has dedicated themselves to serving those less fortunate, those in crisis and those in need of support to ensure their quality of life.

Education and Lifelong Learning—Education and Lifelong Learning can be formal

Arts and Culture—The arts influence and affect one or more of the senses, emotions and intellect. They encompass a diverse range of human activities, creations, and modes of expression, including music, literature, film, photography, sculpture, theatre, dance and painting. This category recognizes outstanding public service in support of arts and culture.

Environmental Protection & Enhancement—This award recognizes a volunteer dedicated to supporting this interconnected web through education and/or actions that support existing in harmony and sharing earths limited resources with all living creatures. Please use this as an opportunity to recognize and thank an individual for their voluntary contributions to our community. Write brief, and compelling reasons to explain:

What has motivated you to nominate this person? What is it that makes the actions of this individual unique amongst Volunteers? And what impacts are felt due to this persons actions?

Nominations close at end of day, March 14th, 2014 Nominate Online: www.volunteercomoxvalley.ca Nominate by Email: nominate@volunteercomoxvalley.ca Nominate in Person: Unit C1—450 Eighth Street, Courtenay Brought to you by Volunteer Comox Valley

Sponsored in part by the COMOX VALLEY RECORD A division of Black Press


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SPORTS

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COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

Unique Raiders squad off to B.C. championships The Highland Raiders punched their ticket to the provincials on the weekend by finishing third at the Island AA boys basketball championships at Lambrick Park in Victoria. The top two Island teams, Lambrick and Saint Michaels, are also the No. 1 and No. 2 seeds in B.C., making the Island AA division possibly the toughest division of AA, AAA and AAAA hoops on the Island. Highland has played and beaten some of the top-ranked AAA and AAAA teams this season in tournament play. They opened the Islands with a 57-35 win over Shawnigan Lake. Nick Tancon led the scoring with 26 points and Trenton Cameron added 16. Highland gave Island champions SMU a battle in their second game. The Raiders were up by as many as seven and were within six at the end of the third quarter before running out of steam and falling 84-65. Sam Lewis scored 23 points (including seven threepointers) and Tancon added 14). The Raiders then beat John Barsby 74-71 behind Tancon (38) and Lewis (14). In the match for third and a berth to the B.C.s, Highland defeated Brentwood in a backand-forth battle 62-58 (Tancon 34, Jared Collin 14) and earned themselves a trip to Langley for provincials for the first time in over a decade for Highland. This group of boys is unique to B.C. high school sports. Where many teams in the province don’t allow their athletes to compete in multiple sports and many coaches feel that by the senior level players should be choosing one sport to focus on, these Highland athletes seem to want to do it all. They somehow manage to pull it all off and do it well. This year the senior volleyball team was top six in the province and five of the boys on the volleyball team also make up the core of the basketball team. Sam Lewis, Chris Dodd, Trenton Cameron, Spencer McDougall and Jared Collin were all starters on the Island No. 1 volleyball team and transferred over to comprise the basketball team. Aaron Simmonds,

Trenton Cameron and John Nwokoro also played on the school soccer team that won North Islands this year. The team also boasts four hockey players in Chris Dodd, Liam Shaw, Spencer McDougall and Conor Luty. It makes attendance at games and practices a juggle, but the Raiders make it work. Many of the boys are also honour roll students and Cameron is in the IB program. This team has been together since Grade 8 and since that time, the numbers have dwindled with three key players moving. (Alec Molander and Bryce Marinus who had moved last year were both at Islands supporting the team.) The third of these players was 6’7” star Nick Tancon who left in Grade 11 to play in Denmark. Since coming back to his former teammates and friends at Highland, Tancon has led the team to the highly ranked position they are in now. He is a force to be reckoned with and the compe-

THE HIGHLAND RAIDERS senior boys basketball team is off to the provincial championships. From left to right: Back row — Bruce Lewis, Adam Erickson, Trenton Cameron, Sam Lewis, Nick Tancon, Aaron Simmonds, Conor Luty, Alec Molander, Spencer McDougall, Noah Lewis, Murray Erickson. Front row — Chris Dodd, Bryce Marinus, Jared Collin. tition does not have an answer for him. He’s not just tall, he’s talented. Nick has received offers from numerous CIS schools for next year. The backcourt of the Raiders’ team has been tough for opponents to match. The starting backcourt, consisting

PROGRAMS

FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

of Lewis, Cameron and Collin, complement Tancon’s unstoppable inside game. As soon as the defence collapses on Tancon, the three shooters step in. The three each contribute consistently. Each has had games where individually they have

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scored six, seven or eight three-pointers. When one cools off, the others heat up. All three are able to shoot, but are not afraid to mix it up inside as well. The ball handling of Lewis, the consistency and defence of Cameron, and Collin’s uncanny knack for

drawing fouls is crucial to this team’s success. McDougall, Luty and Simmonds all step into the tough centre position and shake things up themselves — Simmonds and Luty with inside presence and McDougall with his finesse under the basket. Liam Shaw

B15

always shakes things up when he’s on the floor, using his physical play to his advantage. Adding to this is the unbelievably quick, tenacious defence of Chris Dodd. The volleyball Island MVP and hockey player doesn’t claim to be a shooter (he says he gets more goals in a hockey game than points in a basketball game) but his defence has proven to be one of Highland’s other secret weapons. His role is to muzzle the opponents’ stars and he does that in spades. Coming to the team this year were new players to Highland, Quentin Bouchard and John Nwokoro who have given quality minutes. Bouchard used his court time well, adding four threepointers this season. The team was lucky to get coach Murray Erickson back to Highland this year. He coached most of the boys in their junior year and they were happy that he could give them another year and a trip to Islands and now provincials. – Highland Raiders


B16

SPORTS

Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Many ways to learn to play in the outdoors A

s I write this Huckleberry Finn, The OUTDOORS column on Feb. Yearling and Old Yell24 it has been er are case histories declared a “Snow Day” of children allowed to in School District grow up in the world 71 due to excessive of nature with its hard ALPH amounts of snow on morality and real-life HAW the roads and problems situations. with buses etc. on local Listed below are roads. a few of the outdoor For many children, sure time. adventures we surPlay that has in the vived and learned from. such a situation means an extra day to go ski- background the rules Some of the simple ing and snowboarding of proper behaviour rules of our freedom on Mount Washington leads to responsible were to always tell our – which is fine if you behaviour for the par- parents where we were can afford it. For chil- ticipants without the going, and be home for dren who cannot go on firm directions of ref- supper. an organized hill it is erees or coaches who Our early childhood also a great adventures opportunity took place on We and our dogs learned for a play day. and near Cold The differ- early in the game that the rear Lake (1935 ence is that it to 1939) and end of a skunk can create a is a creative Lake Wabaopportunity smelly mess and the rear end of a mun (1939 where all porcupine can produce a painful to 1941). As I kinds of sleds, recall our Cold t o b o g g a n s , mess. Our encounters with bears Lake advenc a r d b o a r d were always at a distance thanks tures, we boxes and were always to our dogs. anything that accompanied will slide on by a good dog, a small hill becomes set and manage the (probably parental an exciting toy to play limits. In these types of insurance). with on the slopes. play children certainBoating – We learned Other forms of creat- ly need the guidance early about how to ing play include mak- and moral directions of row a superb 14-foot ing snowmen and forts. adults; but they also clinker-built boat our The example of the learn through their grandpa Nadeau had snow day is a tiny freedom the expecta- built for us. We also fraction of the broad tions of following the learned to fish jackfish field of opportunities rules. from this boat. My brother Warren to learn from unsuperHunting – Huntvised play in the out- (who passed away last ing was a part of our doors throughout the week just short of 89 family’s culture. Food years) and I are two was a major objective year. This column is pri- examples from millions we applied in hunting. marily about nature, of cases of children who From an early age we fishing and hunting were allowed to play in learned to shoot grouse and associated sports. nature and carry the through the head with Learning through childhood skills into a single-shot Cooey undirected play in adulthood and life- .22 rifle. Our dog was these creative ventures long enjoyment that trained to bark at a can become a lifelong is without end. Books treed grouse so we hobby in a person’s lei- such as Tom Sawyer, could get a clear shot

R S

LEARNING LIFELONG LESSONS, these two little anglers concentrate on landing a trout. PHOTO BY RALPH SHAW at its head – the only acceptable place to aim for in our family. Simple nature lessons – We and our dogs learned early in the

game that the rear end of a skunk can create a smelly mess and the rear end of a porcupine can produce a painful mess. Our encounters

with bears were always at a distance thanks to our dogs. Trapping – From early childhood trapping was a family busi-

ness with our father and uncle. We learned the important skills of this pioneer industry. Berry Picking – We learned how to pick wild strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, cranberries, saskatoons, pin cherries, and choke cherries. We also learned that if we wanted pies and jam what came home had to be clean. A five-pound lard pail of wild berries was sure to win some privileged rewards. We acquired lifelong scars from knife cuts and animal bites. Somehow our mother always dealt with the crisis in an efficient manner that was part of being a pioneer family. In the process we learned the value and hazards of sharp tools. Fly fishing came early in our trout fishing adventures. Our first eastern brook trout were caught with snelled flies with simple lines and willow poles, in a small stream called Merry Weather Creek. Thus began lifelong careers of fly fishing. The moral of this column is – Let your children experience the joys of play. Ralph Shaw is a master fly fisherman who was awarded the Order of Canada in 1984 for his conservation efforts. In 20 years of writing a column in the Comox Valley Record it has won several awards.

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Jeffrey Kenneth Beebe November 19, 1957 - February 13, 2014 With sadness we announce the passing of Jeff Beebe in Courtenay, BC. Jeff has lived in the Comox Valley for over 30 years and worked as an auto mechanic, a tree trimmer for power lines and most recently as a lineman for BC Hydro for many years. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends. Survived by parents Ken and Eileen (Lena) Beebe of Comox, brothers Kevin (Sandra) Beebe of Virginia and Greg (Kathlene) Beebe of Courtenay, sister Karen (Dan) Bennett of Vancouver, daughter Linda (Mark) Radford of Vancouver, grandson Sawyer Radford, many nieces and nephews, Joanne and Prindy. Memorial service at Crown Isle March 8 at 10:00 am. In lieu of flowers if desired a donation can be made to the SPCA.

Kevin Cosby

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August 16, 1933- February 24, 2014 It is with great sorrow that we announce the passing of Kevin Anthony Cosby after a quick but ferocious battle with cancer. He passed away peacefully at home with his loving family by his side. Kevin was born August 16, 1933 in London, England to parents Mary and William Lysaght. When he was 7 years of age his parents were killed in an air raid during WW2 and he became one of many child war evacutees. He was then taken to Kettering, England to live in an orphanage then he was happily adopted by Gertrude and Percy Cosby. In his teenage years he went to work for the British Postal Service after leaving school in grade 8. At the young age of 18 he joined the Royal Air Force and spent the next two years serving in Egypt and Cyprus. After coming back to England he met and fell in love with his first wife Shirley Cosby (nee Panter) and they married in 1955. He then joined up with the Royal Canadian Air Force as an airframe technician. They enjoyed their next few years with different postings around Europe. They had a short posting to Saskatoon then were happy to hear they had been posted back to Europe. In 1964, in Marville, France they welcomed their only child, daughter Susan. They spent three wonderful years in Marville. Kevin’s last posting was in 1967 to Comox and when they landed here they knew they had found their paradise. After 32 consecutive years of service in the Air Force, Kevin retired in 1983 to concentrate on his and Shirley’s business and continue with his passion of collection militaria. Regretfully, Shirley passed away in 1994. After a few years Kevin met and fell in love with his second wife Patricia Cosby (nee Somers). He then spent the rest of his retirement years with Pat in their house on Mission Hill visiting with his grandchildren and continuing to enjoy his collecting of militaria. Kevin is survived by his loving daughter Susan Margetts, son in law Wayne Margetts, grandchildren Jessica and Garrett Margetts. As well as his loving and caring wife, Patricia Cosby, stepdaughter Debra Shepley, step-grandchildren, Briane Shepley, Brady Shepley, Mason Wood and Hunter Wood, stepdaughter Karen Bezaire (Tom), step-grandchildren Mackenzie Haynes Ham and Graden Bezaire, as well as many family and friends from all over the world. The family would like to thank everybody who helped in Kevin’s last months especially the home support workers and nurses (special thank you to Barb), the ladies at the Coastal Community Credit Union (special thank you to Kathryn), Dr. Swanson and his staff and the staff at St. Joseph’s and the paramedics who were all so kind and professional. There will be a small family gathering at a later date. Kevin was a very sociable person so to honor his memory please take the time to listen to other people’s stories as it would please him so.

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Dorothy Margaret Youds (born Harrington) 1929- 2014 Dorothy Youds passed away peacefully February 24, at her home in Comox. Dot was born June 7 in Renown, Saskatchewan, where she and her four sisters grew up on their parents’ farm. In 1945 she moved with most of her family to Vancouver and, after completing high school, trained and worked as an infants’ nurse. She married William Alan Youds of Burnaby in 1949 and together they raised six sons in North Vancouver before retiring in 1981 to Denman Island where she was predeceased by her husband in 1984. Nevertheless, she stayed on Denman and was actively involved with her community, particularly the United Church. When her health began to fail, Dot moved to Comox in 2006. Throughout her life she was a wonderful and caring wife and mother who was friend to many and enjoyed gardening, sharing her flowers, oil painting, creating ceramic sculptures and baking - especially bread! Dorothy is survived by her sisters Helen, Viola (Bill), Joyce and Ernestine (Ted); her sons Richard (Susan), Ken (Jan), Rob (Christine), John (Janice), Mike and Chris (Barb); nine grandchildren and one great grandchild. According to Dot’s wishes, a memorial service with lots of blossoms will be held on a date to be determined at the Denman United Church when spring arrives. In Dorothy’s name, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke foundation.

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Sylvia Mae Slater Passed away peacefully at Glacierview Lodge on Feb. 9, 2014 with her family at her side. She was predeceased by her husband, Joseph Henry Slater and sisters Ruth Chesko and Alice Eide. She is survived and will be greatly missed by son Timothy Glen (Sharon) Slater in Merville, BC, daughter Audrey Elaine (Trevor M.) Cook in Chemainus, BC, grandchildren Kaileen Slater, Adam Slater, Angela Zumbo and Brad Cook, great grandchildren Emily Mae Ellen Slater, Wyatt McDowell, Mickayla Slater and Joseph Slater, as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Sylvia belonged to the Gospel Sisters and Evergreen Choristers for many years. In her leisure time she enjoyed family, knitting, gardening, walking, music and playing piano. Sylvia was a loving mother, grandmother and loved camping, singing and being with family. She travelled many years with her husband while he was in the military. Flowers gratefully declined, but if friends so wish, donations in her memory made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Diabetes Association would be greatly appreciated. A Celebration of Sylvia’s life was held on Saturday, February 22nd, 2014 from Comox Valley Funeral Home, Cremation and Reception Centre, 1101 Ryan Rd., Courtenay.

250-334-0707

www. comoxvalleyfuneralhome.com

Carole Anne Martin (nee Cossar) September 20, 1937 February 1, 2014 In loving memory of Carole Anne Martin (nee Cossar). Mom left us too early and too suddenly. She was a beautiful lady who lived for her family. Mom was an animal lover and took great pleasure in watching ‘her’ little birdies at the backyard feeder as well as the deer and assorted wildlife who graced her backyard regularly. As an active Avon lady, Mom was well known to many. She loved being involved and cherished her ‘people’ dearly. It was not unusual to get a hug with your order! She was never one to sit with hands still either. If she wasn’t knitting or crocheting hats and blankets for various charities, she was making jewelry for family and friends with her sparkly beads! A true crafter at heart. Mom was truly a young spirit. She loved sparkles, rainbows, twinkly lights and decorating. Too many lights? NEVER!! Each spring she looked forward to getting all her outdoor lights set up in her other love, her garden. Spring was her favorite time of year...the time her flower babies would come back to life and grant her the riot of colour she loved so dearly. This spring will be a tough one for us. Carole is survived by her loving husband, Brian; her daughter Roberta Lacroix (nee Fredrickson) and her son David Fredrickson, grandson Damian Stevenson, sister Roberta Pritchard (Robert), her niece Cara Koehler (nee Pritchard) (Darren) and nephew Bruce Pritchard (Katy). According to her wishes, a Celebration of Life will be held at their home on March 8th. To confirm attendance and address, please email roberta@youroasis.ca

Doreen G. Henderson September 14, 1921- February 18, 2014 Doreen passed away peacefully at the Comox Valley Senior Village. The daughter of Grace and William (Bill) Henderson, Doreen was born, raised and educated in Cumberland. In 1944 Doreen graduated from St. Joseph’s Hospital School of Nursing in Victoria. She started her nursing career in Victoria specializing in the operating room. Doreen followed her urge to travel and went to England, where she furthered her OR experience and took holidays in Europe. She returned to Cumberland when her mother died suddenly in the early 1950s. She began work at the Cumberland General Hospital and in 1954 Doreen became the Nursing Matron at the hospital. Doreen served the community in this position until her retirement in 1977. Even though she moved to Courtenay after retirement Cumberland always stayed special in her heart. Doreen leaves behind her cousin Mildred Calnan and family, who called her Auntie, also special local friends of many decades; Robert Nash, Dan (Barbara) MacKenzie, Ray (Donna) Northrup, Valda Gibson and son Kevin, and cousins in BC, Washington and California. There will be an afternoon tea in celebration of Doreen’s life at a date that will be published in a future edition of this paper.

Funeral Services 250 338 4463 www.tonefffunerals.com

“where your family comes first�




b18www.comoxvalleyrecord.com Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD B18 FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

DEATHS

DEATHS

CELEBRATIONS

COMING EVENTS

Margaret Mary Millard Margaret Mary Millard passed away after a lengthy illness on Feb. 19, 2014 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Comox, BC. Margaret is predeceased by her parents Edward and Margaret Westwood and is survived by her husband of 55 years, Morley Edward Millard, sons David (Jennifer) and Keith (Shirley), grandchildren Rachel (Jesse), Ashley (Travis), Kayla and Justin. In Margaret’s leisure time she enjoyed dressmaking and collecting antiques.

sewing,

THE FAMILY of Lilian Whitehead invites you to the Comox Legion, March 22, 2-4 pm for refreshments and to wish Lilian a happy 90th birthday. No gifts. Donations may be made to the S.P.C.A.

CALL FOR ENTRIES 12TH ANNUAL Kitty Coleman Woodland Art & Bloom Festival. Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show. Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting May 17, 18 and 19 Applications for Artisans are available at woodlandgardens.ca 250-338-6901

IN MEMORIAM In Loving Memory of DOTT CASAVANT March 2, 1999

INFORMATION

Donations in Margaret’s memory made to Comox Valley Hospice Society (St. Joseph’s Hospital), 2137 Comox Ave., Comox, BC, V9M 1P2 would be appreciated.

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

250-334-0707

www. comoxvalleyfuneralhome.com

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@blackpress.ca

“Gone but not forgotten.� THE FAMILY

CELEBRATIONS

CELEBRATIONS

• Birthdays • Weddings • Special Occasions •

FamilyAlbum

IN MEMORIAM JAMES (VAUGHN)

Ph. 250-338-5811 features@comoxvalleyrecord.com Deadlines: Tues. 12 noon and Fri. 12 noon

DID YOU KNOW? BBB Accredited Businesses must pass a comprehensive screening process. Look for the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory E-edition on your Black Press Community Newspaper website at www.blackpress.ca. You can also go to http://vi.bbb.org/directory/ and click on the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory

Thu, Feb 27, 2014,www.comoxvalleyrecord.com Comox Valley Record COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS PERSONALS AL-ANON/ALATEEN - Concerned about someone’s drinking? Contact 1-8884ALANON (1-888-425-2666). www.al-anon.alateen.org ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS If you want to drink, it is your business, if you want to Stop it is ours. Ph: A.A 250-338-8042 Call Any Time 24/7 AVAILABLE in Comox. Incall sensuous massage for men. Details and contact info at www.CVmassage.com AWARE SENIOR vegetarian wishes to correspond with a conscientious lady. An interest in spiritual growth, and holistic healing a plus. Please reply to Drawer # 4556 C/O Comox Valley Record 765 McPhee Ave. Courtenay. Nar-Anon are you affected by someone’s use of drugs, we can help. Wed. Group 7:30pm at 280-4th St. Eureka Support Society contact Jack 3343485. Fri. Group 7:30pm, Komok’s Health Centre, 3322 Comox Rd. Call Rene 334-2392.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING FOR POSITION IN MANAGEMENT for First Choice Hair Cutters in their Courtenay location. Guaranteed $12/hour, 25% profit sharing, paid overtime, benefits, paid birthday, vacation pay, annual advanced training and advancement opportunities. Phone 1-866472-4339 today for an interview or send a resume to careers@fchsk.ca

NEWSPAPER

MAN’S wedding ring, silver, row of seven small diamonds, lost in/near Home Depot, if found call 250-338-1229

TRAVEL

250-338-0725 Carriers Needed Substitute Carrier Needed

NOW HIRING FOR STYLIST & MANAGEMENT POSITIONS for First Choice Hair Cutters in their Courtenay location. Guaranteed $12/hour, 25% profit sharing, paid overtime, benefits, paid birthday, vacation pay, annual advanced training and advancement opportunities. Phone 1-866-472-4339 for an interview or send resume to careers@fchsk.ca.

COURTENAY RTE #106 Leighton, McPhee, 3rd St, & 6th St. RTE #111 5th St. RTE #396 Stephens, Zerkee, Aston, Hobson, Robertson & 6th St. E. RTE # 410 Valleyview, Trumpeter & Swan Cres RTE #301 Alderwood Pl & Muir Rd

LOST AND FOUND 7FT Rowboat, Baynes Sound, owner call Transport Canada 604-775-8867

CARRIERS NEEDED IMMEDIATELY

COMOX School District 71 (Comox Valley) 607 Cumberland Road, Courtenay B.C. V9N 7G5 WE ARE CURRENTLY SEARCHING FOR: SUMMER STUDENTS

RTE #653 Forester, Mason, Gardener, Slater, Painter, & Coach Pl. CUMBERLAND RTE #713 Ulverston, Windemere, 4th, 5th & 7th St

.

LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ. Winter Special. 2 nights $239 or 3 nights $299 Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

For more details about this job opportunity and how to apply, please visit our website at sd71.bc.ca and click on jobs. Note that only complete application packages received through the makeafuture.ca website no later than 13:00 hrs on the closing date will be considered.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD

LOOKING TO hire and train 3 new Realtors. Apply to Earl Costello or Gregg Hart - Royal LePage in the Comox Valley. 250-334-3124

OSAKA SUSHI & Domo Japan (Courtenay) looking for a P/T Server and Cashier. Drop off resumes to Domo Japan, #209-444 Lerwick Rd.

GETAWAYS

March 2nd, 2014

40 th ARLENE Love from Your Family xo Quality Foods Cake Winner of

February 27, 2014

Arlene COMING EVENTS

ANDERSON February 12, 1935 February 28, 2013 Gone are the days we used to share But in our hearts you are always there The gates of memory will never close We miss you more than anyone knows With tender love and deep regret We who love you will never forget Each day you are gone is one day closer to seeing you again â?‰With love from your family

ADULTS & SENIORS WELCOME NO COLLECTIONS GREAT WAY TO EXERCISE AND MAKE MONEY AT THE SAME TIME

Comox Valley Record

HELP WANTED CUSTOMER SERVICE Rep needed. Computer & office skills req’d. Also clean driving abstract & ability to clean cars. Wage neg. 30-35 hrs/wk to start. Email resume to dgee247@live.ca

COMING EVENTS

HELP HELPWANTED WANTED

circulation@comoxvalleyrecord.com

HELP WANTED

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

#,!33)&)%$3Ă–7/2+

Ă–Ă– UPQMBDFZPVSBEUPEBZ

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

TRADE JOURNEYMAN BRIDGEWORKER Emcon Services Inc., the Road and Bridge Maintenance Contractor for the Island Division is accepting resumes for the position of Trade Journeyman Bridge worker based at the Cumberland Yard location. This position requires a competent, energetic and highly self-motivated individual with a valid CertiďŹ cate of QualiďŹ cations issued by the B.C. Ministry of Labour or the Industry Training Authority. Must hold a valid BC Driver’s License, Class 3 with Air Brakes. Competitive wage and beneďŹ ts package as per Union Contract. Division Manager Emcon Services Inc. Box 1300 Cumberland, BC V0R 1S0 Email: dinman@emconservices.ca Fax: 250-336-8892

Hours: MONDAY TO FRIDAY 8:30AM-5:00PM 765 MCPHEE AVE. COURTENAY

NOW HIRING Western Forest Products Inc. is an integrated Canadian forest products company located on Vancouver Island that is committed the safety of employees, the culture of performance and the discipline to achieve results.

HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC (Northern Vancouver Island)

AREA FORESTER

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS www. localwork.ca

,OOKINGĂ– FORĂ–AĂ– .%7Ă– CAREER

(Mainland Coast Forest Operations) Detailed job postings can be viewed at

www.westernforest.com/business-value/our-people-employment/careers

We offer a competitive salary and a comprehensive beneĂ°ts package. If you believe that you have the skills and qualiĂ°cations, and want to experience the special West Coast lifestyle reply in conĂ°dence to: Human Resources Department Facsimile: 1.866.840.9611 Email: resumes@westernforest.com

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE

www. bcclassiďŹ ed.com

250-388-3535




www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Comox Valley Record Thu, Feb 27, 2014

TRADES, TECHNICAL

PERSONAL SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

FINANCIAL SERVICES

GARDENING

GARAGE SALES

HOUSES FOR SALE

LEEMAR EXCAVATOR Components Requires a Red Seal certified Heavy Duty Mechanic for in house and offsite repairs for a variety of West Coast Equipment. Successful applicants will have a minimum of 2 years work experience, be able to work independently as well as part of a team. Applicants must hold a valid driver’s license with an air endorsement ticket. Welding experience is an asset. Leemar is located in Parksville and services Vancouver Island. We offer a competitive benefits package dependent on experience. Please fax resumes to 250-248-4404 Attn: Shop foreman or by email to danielle@leemar.ca

KIWANIS CLUB of COURTENAY “Gigantic Junktique Sale� Fri. Feb. 28th 6pm-8pm Sat. Mar. 1st 8am-11am at St. George’s United Church Hall corner of 6th Street & Fitzgerald, Courtenay

MEDICAL SUPPLIES ELECTRIC HANDICAP lift chair with massage feature, light beige, like new hardly used. Asking $1300. Call (250)339-3766.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

PERSONAL SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

CARPENTRY

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

250-650-1333 SKILLED carpenter. Licensed & certified. Free estimates, Call Doug www.suncrestholdings.ca

#,!33)&)%$Ă–!$3Ă–7/2+ $BMM

CAREER SERVICES/ JOB SEARCH

GARDENING A.C.L. YARD WORKS. Offering Fall Clean-up specials. Hedges, fruit trees+ gutters. Pat, 250-218-4597.

CAREER SERVICES/ JOB SEARCH

jobshop

HANDYPERSONS SKILLED CARPENTER kitchen/bath,interior/exterior. Free Estimates - Seniors Discounts No job too small.250-898-4585 raefriesen@hotmail.com

HOME REPAIRS RON’S RENO’S home repairs plus additions. Free estimates. ronsytnick@live.com or call 250-218-2558

LANDSCAPING Preco Bobcat + Trucking Full yard install, grade rough or final, drainage, Driveways “gravel�, concrete prep. Sky Rocket soil. Call 250-336-8006 or cell 250-338-3052

the

MISC SERVICES

THE RESOURCE FOR JOB SEEKERS

Need training to get back to work? If you have been unsuccessful in finding work with your current skills and meet program eligibility, training services may be available. 250-334-3119

www.thejobshop.ca The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.

GOLDSMITH Custom Designed & Handcrafted Jewellery. Full repair service. Ring sizing while you wait. Engraving Women’s Fashions SIMPLY TIMELESS. 379 4th Street, Courtenay. 250-871-0606

PETS POULTRY YOUNGER LAYING hens. Most are laying still. $5/bird Peace & Carrots Farm. Call (250)337-4030.

HELP WANTED

b19 www.comoxvalleyrecord.com. B19

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

HELP WANTED

ANTIQUES Antique round solid wood coffee table 33� diam. Antique gramma-phone; Victrola tall cabinet type, 2 oak bar stools, bar fridge, oil lamp 18�h, Antique oak cabinet 44�w x 18�d and misc items. Call 250757-2007. HITACHI 2-TON electric hoist $1500.obo. Inglis programmable stove $350.obo. Frigidaire 16.5 cu.ft. fridge w/freezer $200.obo Kenwood over/under w/d $250.obo. All white. Wood stove + two pipes $450. 250-890-1071 HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper? LARGE BASEBALL hat collection for sale - best offer. Briggs & Stratton Log splitter, 38 ton capacity $1500 O.B.O. Please call 250-338-1242

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED WANTED. COLT Anaconda, Diamond Back, Python or King Cobra. Call (250)334-3604. Looking for any of the above.

REAL ESTATE APARTMENT/CONDOS

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

FOOD PRODUCTS REAL FREE range eggs. Brown tasty eggs at Peace & Carrots Farm. (250)337-4030

HOMES FOR RENT

(Property Mgmt Division) #121 - 750 Comox Road Courtenay, BC V9N 3P6 Phone (250) 897-1300 Fax (250) 897-1330 Interior viewings for the following vacancies are by approved application and appointment only. APARTMENTS 303-1912 Comox Ave 2 Bed 2 Bath 6 Appliances $1200/mth Avail Jan 1st Duplex/Townhouse 1130A 2nd St 3 Bed 1 Bath N/S N/P 4 Appliances $1000/mth Avail immed 2105A Urquhart 2 Bed 2 Bath N/S 5 Appliances $1050/mth Avail Jan 1st 7-158 Back Rd 2 Bed 2 Bath N/S N/P 4 Appliances $775/mth Avail Jan 1st 8-1720 13th St 2 Bed 1 Bath N/S N/P 5 Appliances $775/mth Avail Feb 1st HOUSES

VICTORIA 2 BDRM CONDO 1380 sq ft. Quiet 55+ bldg near Hillside Mall & Jubilee Hospital. No-step entry. $195,000. Call Claire 1-250858-6775.

FOR SALE BY OWNER

MOBILE HOME 1510 Anderton Rd 3 Bed 2 Bath N/S 5 Appliances $1100/mth Avail Jan 1st

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

FUEL/FIREWOOD ACCOUNTING/ BOOKKEEPING

ACCOUNTING/ BOOKKEEPING

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

SEASONED FIREWOOD full dry cords. Fir or mixed Fir/Hem. 250-702-3959 or 250-898-8896.

FURNITURE

HUU-AY-AHT GROUP OF BUSINESSES

CHESTERFIELD SET $300. 6 piece kitchen set $100. Bookcase $50. Cell: 250-609-2307 Phone: 250-331-4180

Duties Reporting to the CEO, the Financial Controller carries out the following general tasks: investments, management of internal accounting, budget preparation and management, and other duties as assigned.

ROXTON MAPLE dinning room set; round table with 2 leaves, 4 chairs with glass door hutch on buffet. Excellent condition. Asking $900. Call (250)722-3204.

How to apply View the full job description on our website: http://hfndevelopmentlp.org/job-board/ Written submissions must be made by March 20, 2014 to: Mr. Stan Coleman, RPF CEO managing the Huu-ay-aht group of businesses Address: 2533 Port Alberni Highway Port Alberni, BC, V9Y 8P2 Canada Fax: (778) 421-2664 Email: sarah.j@huuayaht.com

WILLIS & COMPANY piano, beautiful condition, $1000. Lazy-boy chair, good condition. $300. Glass-top coffee table $150. No reasonable offer refused. (250)338-1970 after 6pm

GARAGE SALES COURTENAY - 6220 Tsolum River Rd, Sat Mar. 1st, 9-2. Estate Sale: Antiques, collectable’s, records & more. COURTENAY/COMOXEstate Garage Sale- Foxx Wood Estates- 815 Kelsey Court, 9-1pm, Mar 1 & 2. New items added daily.

1478 SQ.FT. RANCHER. 6 yrs young. 3bdrm, 2.5bath. Dbl + attached garage, heat pump, 14x40 deck. Bowser/ Deep Bay area. 250-757-8757.

ROYSTON - 4347 Briardale Rd. 1816 sqft (main floor: 1066 spft). 3 bdrm/1 bath up, 1 bdrm/1 bath down. Ph: 250871-5222 Earl or Jeanette

HOUSES FOR SALE 636 NICHOLS RD. To be moved. New shake roof house in good shape. Contact Calvin. 250-202-8621

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE

bcclassiďŹ ed.com

RENTALS

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL

HOMES FOR RENT

900SQ FT shop ideal for storage or business, private and secure. Call (250)898-7228.

MERVILE 4bdrm, 2bath woodstove. Horse/Pets ok. $1700 /mo incl. util. 250-871-3971

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

VACANCIES www.totalconcept.ca 250-871-4427 407A-5th Street

1905 Coleman Rd 3 Bed 2 Bath N/S 5 Appliances $1300/mth Avail Nov 15th

AUCTIONS NEW Restaurant Equipment Dispersal Auction - New Stainless Steel Equipment, Sinks, Tables, Shelving, Appliances, Campbell River Auctions www.CRAuctions.ca - Thursday, March 6th @6pm

REDUCED! 2896 Apple Dr. Located in the heart of Willow Point. This 1478 sqft rancher offers 4bdrms, 2bths, newer kitchen, roof & flooring. Private fenced yard, RV parking. $249,900. Kim: 250-923-6503 http://sites.google.com/site/ 2896appledrive

RENTALS

Do you care about where you live? Do high standards of maintenance, service and cleanliness matter to you? Do you prefer quiet, mature neighbours? If yes, please give us a call and discover how the quality of ownership and management makes all the difference. We have the best managed, finest apartments in the most convenient locations in the Comox Valley. Locally owned, we own and manage our own buildings only. THERE IS A DIFFERENCE! Please refer to available apartments listed below. TELEPHONE 250-703-2264 | 250-338-0267 | 250-339-1222

SANDPIPER VILLAGE 1650 Comox Ave. TWO BEDROOM bright and spacious south facing unit. Unique floor plan with cross ventilation. Huge, private deck overlooking garden. Recently renovated. Very attractive. Quiet, mature adult building just two blocks from Comox Mall and services. ALSO ONE BEDROOM. Call Greg @ 250-339-1222.

TRADEWINDS 1600 Comox Ave. TWO BEDROOM nicely renovated suite - spacious and modern. Excellent location in central Comox walking distance to everything. In suite storage. New designer kitchen. Large dining room. Resident social room. Elevator and security entry. Well maintained and managed, mature adult building. Call Greg @ 250-339-1222.

WESTWATER 60 Anderton Ave. TWO BEDROOM renovated suite. Ensuite, Jacuzzi tub, fireplace, in suite washer/dryer. New appliances. Walking distance to downtown. Well maintained and managed quiet, mature adult building. Resident social room. Indoor scooter parking. Elevator. Call John @ 250-703-2264.

BRANDYWINE 675 Cumberland Rd. LUXURY TWO BEDROOM CONDO. Very spacious corner suite. Unique floor plan. Nicely appointed with in suite washer/dryer, full sized appliances. Very well maintained, mature adult building. Security entry. One of Courtenay’s finest. Three blocks from downtown. No pets. Call David @ 250-338-0267 or John @ 250-703-2264.

HYCROFT 1835 Cliffe Ave. CUSTOM BUILT Cedar Mobile Home - 10’ x 36’ plus sunroom & deck, new bath with soaker tub, 4 appliances included. Land NOT for sale. Mobile must be moved from Oyster River. $20,000. Call Don 250-339-7447; or email: dvbarr@telus.net

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO MOUNTAIN VIEW Manor- 125 Centennial Dr, Courtenay. 1 & 2 bdrms, secure entrance, ELEVATOR. 250-334-2800.

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LARGE ONE BEDROOM bright and spacious. Recent renovation. Very attractive. Quiet, mature adult building. Central Courtenay. Security entry. Call David @ 250-338-0267.

BERKSHIRE MANOR 825 Harmston Ave. CORNER TWO BEDROOM spacious and recently renovated. Unique floor plan. Full sized appliances. Private deck. In suite storage. Security entry. Quiet, well maintained mature adult building. Call David @ 250-338-0267.

FAIRMONT 432-11th Street A VERY SPECIAL TWO BEDROOM in mature adult building three blocks from downtown. Fresh, recent renovation. All new appliances. Unique, bright corner layout. Security entry. Large private deck. This is a very attractive and unique suite. Call David @ 250338-0267 or John @ 250-703-2264.

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com




b20www.comoxvalleyrecord.com Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD B20

Thu, Feb 27, 2014,www.comoxvalleyrecord.com Comox Valley Record

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

HOMES FOR RENT

HOMES FOR RENT

HOMES FOR RENT

HOMES FOR RENT

HOMES FOR RENT

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

SUITES, LOWER

AUTO FINANCING

COURTENAY- 1 bdrm furnished suite with separate ground level entrance. Hydro, Wifi, cable incl’d. NS/NP. References req’d. $750/mo. Call 250-338-7937. NORTH NANAIMO: 1bdrm private suite. New floors & paint. Shared laundry. Secure, covered parking. FREE hydro, cable & wifi. N/S, No Partiers. $775/mo. 250-756-9746.

“YOUR Apartment, Condo and Townhouse Rental Experts�

www.meicorproperty.com APARTMENTS

PARK PLACE

ARRAN HOUSE APARTMENTS

1970 Fitzgerald Ave, Courtenay

1015 Cumberland Rd., Courtenay TWO BEDROOM SUITE available in well-

2 AND 3 BEDROOM available. Quiet complex with on-site management. Reasonable rates. Some completely renovated units with new appliances. Sorry no pets. Security deposit and 2 rental reference required.

250-334-3078

respected, adult-oriented building. Close to downtown, and ideal for seniors with bus stop out front. Arran House is well managed and maintained, and offers a friendly and secure atmosphere. House cat is accepted with pet deposit. Non-smoking building.

250-334-9717

ANDERTON ARMS

HOLLYRIDGE MANOR 200 Back Road, Courtenay

426 Anderton Ave, Courtenay

1 and 2 Bedroom suites available. One of the best values in Courtenay. Unique oor plans. California kitchens. These bright, modern suites are available in quiet, secure building.

Cozy 1 Bdrm. in a great location! Overlooks Puntledge River and Lewis Park. Short walk to downtown. 2 rental references required. Sorry no pets.

Call Sharon 250-338-7449

Call 250-334-9717

WILLOW ARMS APARTMENTS 1252-9th St., Courtenay Spacious 2 & 3 bedroom suite in a quiet family oriented building with secure entry and manager on site. Walking distance to schools, bus stops, and downtown. Reasonable rent includes heat, hot water, stove, fridge, carpet and drapes. No pets, two rental references and security deposit required.

For viewing please call Donna 250-334-9667

CONDOS VANRIDGE MANOR

BEECHER MANOR

123 Back Road, Courtenay

1045 Cumberland Road

Features 5 appliances, wall-to-wall carpet, blinds, gas ďŹ replaces - gas included in rent. Low hydro. Children welcome. Quiet, well-maintained 2 bedroom condos. Ideal location, walking distance to Superstore and North Island College. No pets.

BRIGHT AND SPACIOUS 1 & 2 bedroom condos available close to downtown. 2 bedroom unit features 1.5 baths. This quiet, well maintained building suits mature adults. Bus stop is conveniently located out front. Small dogs accepted with pet deposit.

Call 250-703-2570

Call 250-334-9717 to view

RUTHERFORD MANOR

ST. BRELADES

1075 Edgett Road, Courtenay

146 Back Road, Courtenay

1 & 2 bdrm suites available. Reasonable rent includes stove, fridge, dishwasher, carpet, blinds and storage room in suite. N/P, security deposit and 2 rental references req’d.

call Donna 250-334-9667 to view

FEATURES: Fridge/stove, dishwasher, washer/ dryer, Quiet, clean building. Pet friendly. 2 bedroom condos. Ideal location, walking distance to SuperStore and NIC.

Call 250-338-7449

250-897-1611 Licensed Professionals

TOWNHOUSES

www.pennylane.bc.ca

CLOSE TO DRIFTWOOD MALL 3 bdrm, 1 bath rancher, 5 appls, fenced yard with sheds, garage, laminate floors, newly renovated, N/S, small pet neg. w/ref, Avail Immed. – $1,175/mth COMOX CLASSIC 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 5 appls, gas F/P, wood floors, coved ceilings, mountain & partial water views, landscaping incld., Avail. Immed. - $1,300/mth BEAUTIFUL OCEANFRONT HOME 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 appls, gas F/P, hot tub, sauna, 2 decks, N/S, pet neg. w/ref. Avail. Immed. $1,700/mth PUNTLEDGE PARK 3 bdrm, 2 1/2 bath, 6 appls, gas F/P, woodstove, garage, fenced yrd, N/S, small pet neg. w/ref. Avail. Mar. 1 $1,250/mth

250-897-1611 Licensed Professionals www.pennylane.bc.ca

ABBEYFIELD HOUSE offers affordable, supportive seniors accommodation in a home-like setting. All meals provided. Call 250-338-7136 for tour.

BRAIDWOOD MANOR ground flr 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 3 appls, patio, res. pkg., N/S, cat ok. Avail. Immed. $725/mth BRAND NEW 1 & 2 bdrm suites above commercial, 1 bath, F/S/W/D/micro, res. pkg., N/S, No pets. Avail. Immed. - $700 & $850/mth PARKSIDE 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 appls, undergrd pkg, balcony overlooking the river, hardwood floors, N/S, No pets, Avail Mar 1 $1,200/mth WALK TO COLLEGE 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 5 appls, patio, res. pkg. N/S, No pets. Avail. Mar. 1 - $850/mth TRUMPETER’S LANDING 1 bdrm & den, 1 1/2 bath, 6 appls, balcony, underground pkg, storage, N/S, No pets. Avail. Mar. 1 - $900/mth. ROSEWOOD TOWNHOUSES 2 bdrm, 1 bath townhouse, F & S, coin laundry, basic cable incl., N/S, No pets. Avail. Immed. $725/mth. Call Res. Mgr. 250-334-8602. PIERCY CREEK ESTATES 3 bdrm, 2 1/2 bath townhouse, 5 appls, garage, fenced yrd, N/S, No pets. Avail. Apr. 1 - $1,200/mth CAMELOT COURT 2 bdrm, 1 bath townhouse, 5 appls, gas F/P, res. pkg, storage, N/S, small dog neg. w/ref. Avail. Mar. 10 - $800/mth SOUTHPOINT ESTATES 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 appls, gas F/P, heat pump, double garage, N/S, No pets. Avail. Apr. 1 - $1,250/mth TRUMPETER’S LANDING 1 bdrm & den “penthouse� unit, 2 bath, 6 appls, 2 balconies, underground pkg, storage, N/S, No pets. Avail. Apr. 1 - $1,200/mth

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

RECREATION

RV RESORT ON THE LAKE

Spots available at Great Rates. Daily, weekly, monthly. Pool, Hot tub, exercise room, laundry, putting green, hiking, fishing, Pickle Ball Court. Free coffee in one of the best clubhouses on the island. Nanaimo area. www.resortonthelake.com 250-754-1975 or admin@resortonthelake.com

OFFICE/RETAIL 910 Fitzgerald Avenue Corner Fitzgerald & Eighth Prime space available 1,825 sq. ft. available now. Street level. Excellent downtown location near Court House. On a highly visible site. Modern, well maintained professional building. Air conditioned. Ample parking. Suitable for retail or office. One of the finest professional buildings in the Comox Valley. For details phone 339-1222 or 339-0490

SENIOR ASSISTED LIVING

PACIFIC COURT 1520/1540 Piercy Ave, Courtenay Available immediately 1 & 2 bedrooms available in clean, quiet building with on-site manager, close to town, schools, and bus. Stove, fridge, blinds and carpet. In-suite storage with washer and dryer. Small pets welcome. Rental references and security deposit required. To View, Call 250-871-3431

TOWNHOUSES TORRY PINES 1560-13th Street, Courtenay Attractive 2 and 3 bedroom townhouses have been completely renovated – enjoy new appliances, ooring and bathroom ďŹ ttings in these spacious units. Friendly and quiet atmosphere make it ideal for family or working couple. Large, private patio area allows great access for your pet. Small dogs accepted with pet deposit. Call 250-334-9717

Your Community, Your ClassiďŹ eds.

Call 1-855-310-3535

CARS

1981 CHEVROLET 2WD long box on propane. Dual tanks, good mechanical condition, ready to drive. Reg. cab, trailer brake wiring $1500 obo, 250702-6250 canopy available.

1989 BUICK Lesabre. Good 3.8 engine, newer battery, 4 good tires. $1000 O.B.O. For more information please call 250-339-3512

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

1997 MAZDA, 7 passenger 4wd automatic. 298000 km. 4 snow tires on rims, well maintained, runs well, back up camera. Good work horse. Asking $2300. Phone 250-752-2249

2005 PT CRUISER Gold. Like new. Lots of speed. Automatic. Have car history. $5500. 250-202-1297

TRUCKS & VANS

www.advancedpm.ca 250-338-2472

CONDOS / SUITES / APARTMENTS CHERRYWOOD MANOR Spacious 1 bdrm apts in secured entrance bldg include master bdrms w/walk-in closets, 2 appl, & large patio areas; on site laundry; rents starting from $625 with FREE HEAT & HOT WATER; N/S; N/P; available now ULVERSTON MANOR Established, secured entrance bldg in Cumberland located near Hospital & downtown core features 2 bdrms w/ 2 appl & on site laundry; $675/month; available now

TOWNHOUSES / DUPLEXES

PINE PLACE Fresh & bright 2 bdrm, 1 bath townhome offers great living space & excellent proximity to College, recreation & shopping; inc. 4 appl & storage; small pet may be considered w/deposit; $775/month; available now

1991 FORD AEROSTAR V6 3.0 L, For Sale, New Heater Core, New Water Pump, New Housing Gasket, New Muffler 1200 OBO. Call 250-337-8169

2003 GMC Sierra 4x4 Pick-up - blue. Good mechanical cond. 240,000 KM. $3500.00 Firm. Please call 250-338-1242.

4&--:063 $"3'"45 XJUIBDMBTTJmFEBE 


SPORTS

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

B21

JumpCamp this weekend

COMOX VALLEY ROAD RUNNERS (seen here from left: Kevin Park, Roger Plamondon, Wayne Crowe) turned in strong performances at the Cedar 12K. See story online at www.comoxvalleyrecord.com; click on ‘Sports.’

Shred dawgs, take notice! The 2014 JumpCamp sessions are rapidly approaching with the first camp taking place March 1-2 up on Forbidden Plateau – the birthplace of Vancouver Island shredding. With the latest dump of snow in the hills the crew at JumpCamp couldn’t be happier. JumpCamp is an all ages and abilities snowboard camp for riders who want to have fun and progress their skills, especially in the park and backcountry. “JumpCamp provides coaching in the slopestyle discipline as well as freeriding,” said coach Patrick Kitto. “Our campers are typically recreational snow-

boarders who want to strengthen their freeriding. Riders vary in skill from beginners who want to learn how to jib their first rail or hit their first jump, to more experienced riders who want to learn and perfect new tricks,” he added. JumpCamp’s location on Forbidden Plateau is an ideal setting to improve your skills with its rolling natural terrain along with JumpCamp’s man-made, private terrain park with jumps and rails that vary in size so you can start small and work your way up. JumpCamp sessions are kept small to maximize the camper’s fun, progression and provide

coaching on a personal oneon-one level. Whether you’re a beginner or just want to learn some new tricks, JumpCamp is the place to take your skills to the next level. The camps run from March 1 through to April 19 (on weekends and during spring break). Camps include professional instruction from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and product giveaways. The cost for the weekend is $275 (taxes included). Information and registration is available at Onethirtythree board shop, online at www.jumpcamp. com or by phoning Patrick at the JumpCamp headquarters 250-898-8891. – JumpCamp

COMOX VALLEY WORSHIP DIRECTORY Church of Our Lord

BAHÁ’Í FAITH

Holy Communion 10:00 am each Sunday

It’s Ayyám-i-Há – a time in the Bahá’í calendar to celebrate with gift-giving and hospitality. ~~~

at Berwick, 1700 Comox Ave. Comox, BC All Welcome Tel: 250-941-0332

www.coolcomox.ca Anglican Church in North America

“Consort with all men, O people of Bahá, in a spirit of friendliness and fellowship.” Bahá’u’lláh www.bahaisofcomox.org 250.702.3041…†250.702.0574 www.courtenaybahai.org

Comox Valley Unitarian Fellowship Where Do Unitarians Fit in the Canadian Spiritual Landscape? (Mar 2) Co-leaders: Rev Meg Roberts & Heather Kennedy-MacNeil

Jim Lyster, Rector 218 Church St., Comox • 250-339-2925

We meet 1 & 3 Sundays at 4pm 250 Beach Drive, Comox

250-890-9262 cvuf.ca

www.stpeterscomox.ca

rd

(at Comox United Church)

RESONATE BAPTIST CHURCH

RIVER HEIGHTS CHURCH

“Sounding forth the Supremacy of Christ in all things”

Sunday Celebration

10:00AM at Brooklyn Elementary School

Hosts of “Comox Valley School of Supernatural Ministry”

Everyone Welcome www.resonatechurch.ca

1290 Guthrie Rd., Comox

An Affirming Ministry

Comox Avenue at 250 Beach Dr.

Sunday Worship and Children & Youth Program 10 am Saturday Service 5 pm Rev. Maggie Enwright Email: cxunited@telus.net

Full Wheelchair Access

Hearing Assistance

www.comoxunitedchurch.com | 250-339-3966

Comox Valley Parishes Welcome You!

St. Peter

10:30 am

Community Church

Meeting in the Stan Hagen Theatre

COMOX UNITED

St. John the Divine

Rev. Anthony Divinagracia, Rector 579 - 5th Street, Courtenay

SUNDAY SERVICE 8:30-9:15am,10:00-11:15 am and 4-5 pm WEDNESDAY SERVICE 10-10:45 am

250-334-4331

email: patmos@shaw.ca http://stjohnthedivinecourtenay.bc.anglican.ca

Bay Community Church

Comox Valley

WELCOMES YOU TO SERVICES AT:

ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA

SATURDAY 5:40 Express Contemporary Worship SUNDAY 8:00 am & 10:00 am Worship

st

THE UNITED CHURCH OF CANADA

Congregational Christian Churches of Canada

Join us this Sunday

@ 10:30 am

Faith Family Friends

of the North Island College at 10 am Sunday Morning

~ A Place to Discover Your Life Purpose ~

Sundays 10 am

www.centralchurchefc.com

Pastors Darryl & Kim Burry

Pastor Dave Koleba Associate Pastor: Jeremy Boehm

1580 Fitzgerald Ave. Courtenay 250-338-8221 www.cvsalarmy.ca church@cvsalarmy.ca

Val 250-338-7727 (office)

We’ve Got Some Space For You!

living hope

Nursery - Kid Jam Youth Group 1105 Pritchard Rd., Comox www.baychurch.net 250-339-7527

PRESBYTERIAN

real people living real life

COMOX VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN

experiencing real change

725 Aspen Rd., Comox

Worship Services

Services

10am Sundays Mark Isfeld School 1551 Lerwick Road, Courtenay

to place your ad here

250-338-5811

E-Mail: features@comoxvalleyrecord.com

Sunday 10:30am

Minister: Rev. Jenn Geddes

250.334.9777

Tel/Fax 250-339-2882 e-mail:cvpc@shaw.ca comoxvalleypresbyterian.ca

Full Wheelchair Access

livinghope@shaw.ca

www.livinghopeonline.ca

Hearing Assistance

LIVING A VISION FOR CHRIST AND COMMUNITY

LUTHERAN Full Gospel Christian Fellowship

Shepherd Of The Valley Lutheran Church (ELCIC)

Sunday

11:00 am & 7:00 pm

Comox Recreation 1855 Noel Ave

There is Hope!

“A place for you: John 14:2

2201 Robert Lang Drive

10 am Sunday Worship

Jesus has a plan and a purpose for your life. Come, let Him show You the Way!

250-334-8424

250-334-0616

2946 Kilpatrick Ave. 250-338-1312

(Old Fish and Game Building)

COURTENAY FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH

Begins March 4th, 7pm Free of charge 7 week course which explores who Jesus is, why He came and what it means to follow Him. 2963 Lake Trail Road, Courtenay (across from Arden Elementary) 250-334-3432 www.courtenaybaptist.com

We’ve Got Some Space For You! to place your ad here

250-338-5811

E-Mail: features@comoxvalleyrecord.com


b22



Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

meet the ProFessionals FOR THE BEST IN QUALITY, SERVICE & PRODUCTS CALL OR VISIT THESE FINE BUSINESSES!

Tupper Home Health Care Ltd. • • • • •

Scooters Wheelchairs Walkers Lift Chairs Stair Lifts

WALK INS WELCOME “A Cut Above the Rest!”

Inspired to create memories in your home.

Creative, Up-to-Date Techniques Where Pleasing YOU is Important!

Washington Park Walk-In & Urgent Care Clinic 2nd Floor of the Superstore

250-334-9241

Brenda Sandi Christine Diana

Reasonable Prices The New Generation

250-338-8873

2300 Cousins Ave., Courtenay

True Dimension Hair Design

757 Ryan Road, Courtenay Mon to Thurs: 8am - 9pm Fridays: 8am - 6pm, Saturdays: 9am - 6pm Sundays & Holidays: 9am - 5pm

1935 Cliffe Ave. Courtenay 250-334-1906

www.walkinmedicalclinic.com

Tupper Home Health Care Ltd.

COMOX ROOFING

A Division of Steve Hawkins Home Improvements

Free Estimates • Residential Re-roofing Over 32 Years Experience

Steve Hawkins • Joe Short

698 Woodland Dr, Comox • www.comoxroofing.ca

Call Today 250-339-4788

250-897-7463

Custom Remodelling Gems Appraisals Repairs

www.waynemackenziegoldsmith.com

Young Drivers is the first BC Driving School approved for E- Learning Program Includes 4 hours of E- learning, reducing classroom time from 20 to 16 hours

Enroll today for Spring Break March 18, 19, 20

Easy NO FEES Payment Plan

www.yd.com 250-331-0404 JJohnson@yd.com

ISLAND

DE N T U R E S Full Service Denture Centre

Dentures on Implants Immediate Dentures Partial Dentures Same Day Relines & Repairs NOW OPEN 519B-5th St. at Fitzgerald Now Taking Appointments

Call 250-897-1884

Jason Kirouac, RD

When You Smile, We Smile

Learn to use social media to effectively promote your business. 4 Sessions = $250

• Scooters • Wheelchairs • Walkers • Lift Chairs • Stair Lifts

Prepare for the Road Ahead

INTRODUCING OUR NEW ICBC approved GLP course

Visit our new location #J-2703 Kilpatrick Ave., Courtenay 250-897-1124 Hours: Mon-Fri 9 - 4 • Sat By appointment only www.inspiredspacesandmore.com

Social Media Coaching

Designer Goldsmith 105 - 1995 Cliffe Ave., Courtenay

Murphy Wall Beds by Inspired Spaces

Let’s Get Started. 250-400-0115 info@TheUpdateCompany.com

The New Generation

250-338-8873

2300 Cousins Ave., Courtenay

HOURS!!!

Monday - Friday 8-4:30 PM Saturday 9-2 PM Decking Fencing Siding Roofing

Ask about our Specials 3837 Piercy Rd. Courtenay WWW.DOVECREEK.CA | 250 338 8744

ABOVE & BEYOND TREE SERVICE

“I worry about my mother everyday because I don’t have enough time to get her the help she needs as I live in a different city.” “My caregiving responsibilities are taking over my life, what can I do?”

Sound familiar?

Keystone Eldercare Solutions can help you care for your aging relative

Free Consultation • 250.650.2359

www.keystoneeldercare.com

“Mom is getting so forgetful, I’m not sure

AttEntion ~ CELEBRATING OUR 30TH YEAR IN BUSINESS ~

safe for herGrinders to live on her own.” ▲ Complete Tree Careif it’s▲ 2 Stump ▲ 60’ Bucket Truck ▲ Mini Excavator “My caregiving responsibilities are taking ▲ 2 Chip Trucks ▲ 2 Diesel 12” Chippers over my life, what can I do?”

▲ Insured & Licensed ▲ Free QuotesSound familiar?

Keystone Eldercare Solutions can help ▲ Valley Owned & Operated you care for your aging relative ▲ 3 - I.S.A. Certified Arborists

Chad 250-703-0371 Free 250.650.2359 orConsultation 250-897-5254

Naturally white teeth whitening system for better oral hygiene

call for monthly specials and gift certificates

101-389 12th St., Courtenay 250-338-5011 | www.orcadental.ca www.keystoneeldercare.com www.aboveandbeyondtreeservice.ca

DEnturE WEArErs!

Wire Rope & Fittings • Splicing Facilities Chains • Industrial Supplies • Hydro Testing Fire Extinguisher Recharging Go AHEAD... bitE into tHAt App

Mini259 Dental implants will hold the denture in pl Puntledge Road, Courtenay Call250-334-3707 for your complimentary consultati Phone: • Fax: 250-334-3721 2860 North Island Hwy, Campbell River 250-338-5011 • Dr. Kenneth McCracken I Phone: 250-286-1027 • Fax: 250-286-1024 101-389 12th St., Courtenay • www.orcadental


sports

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Snipers, Royals tie 3-3

The last game of the regular season for the PeeWee  C Ives  Burger Snipers was a hardfought, back-and-forth battle with the Preferred Custom Woodfinishing Royals. Good pressure by both teams early in the first period did not produce any results and the score at the end of the first remained 0-0. The beginning of the second period saw shots and saves at both ends of the ice. Savannah Piket finally got the Snipers on the board at 14:05 of the second, scoring on an end-to-end rush with a shot from the top of the left face-off circle. The Snipers tried to build on their lead but shots by Jack  Klobchar, Nolan  Piket and Kyle  Sheehan were all turned away by Royals’ goalie Nicholas Mitchell. The Royals answered with a goal by Thomas Virtue at 6:24 which was soon followed by goals by Sniper Michael  Wharram and by Royal Harley Zolner. Score at the end of the second: Snipers 2, Royals 2. An early third period goal by Jordan  Hesselink put the Snipers up 3-2 but the lead was short-lived as Kayne  Hansen answered for the Royals just two minutes later. The rest of the period saw action at both ends with shots from five different Snipers including two by Camryn Hockley and one by Owen Watt. The Royals missed on a chance to score with less than a minute left and were denied again by Snipers’ goalie Evan  Barker as the buzzer sounded to end the game. Final score: Snipers 3, Royals 3. A tie seems a fitting end to what has been a competitive season for the six Peewee house league teams, a spokesperson said. As we look forward to the playoffs, the Ives Burger  Snipers would like to thank coaches Kent Hockley, Mark  Burger, Carl  Sheehan, Ron  Hesselink and Andy  Moorhead for their time and expertise. Thanks also go to all of the officials and volunteers with the Comox  Valley  Minor  Hockey Association. – Ives Burger Snipers



COMOX VALLEY RECORD • Thursday, February 27, 2014

b23

United one point away from promotion Earle Couper Record Staff

Promotion to Div. 1 of the Vancouver Island Soccer League will be on the line Saturday when Comox Valley United heads south to

take on the Prospect Lake Lakers. A win or a tie in their final league match and United will take second place outright in Div. 2 and earn a spot in Div. 1 next season. The locals are cur-

rently in second place, but third-place Westcastle lurks just three points back and also play their final league game this weekend. On Feb. 15 United was in Victoria to play Div. 1 Bays Liquor Plus in a play-in

match for the single-knockout Jackson Cup. “We lost 2-0 but we held our own,” said United’s Rob Caya. “We created a lot of chances,” including hitting a crossbar in the opening five minutes. “Our back-up goalie Jake

Sutton played fantastic, he made some unbelievable saves. They are a very good team but it was nice for us to see that we could keep up with the big boys next year if we are promoted.”

sports@comoxvalleyrecord.com

Move the TV and restyle your room. Debbie Travis CELEB DESIGNER

Only with the Optik TV wireless digital box.* Now you can free the TV from the TV outlet and create the room you’ve always wanted. ™

Get started with a FREE 42" LG Smart TV with Optik TV and Internet for 3 years.†

Call 310-MYTV (6988), go to telus.com/optik or visit your TELUS Store or Authorized Dealer.

®

TELUS STORE OR AUTHORIZED DEALER Courtenay 795 Ryan Rd.

1599 Cliffe Ave.

2885 Cliffe Ave.

*Wireless signal range can be affected by conditions in the home. Wireless access point required, charged separately. †Offer available until May 5, 2014, to residential customers who have not subscribed to Optik TV or Internet in the past 90 days. Minimum system requirements apply. Final eligibility for the services will be determined by a TELUS representative. TELUS reserves the right to modify channel lineups and packaging and regular pricing without notice. Cannot be combined with other offers. Offer not available with TELUS Internet 6. HDTV-input-equipped television required to watch HD. 42" LG Smart TV offer available while quantities last and cannot be combined with promotional prices. TELUS reserves the right to substitute an equivalent or better product without notice. Manufacturer’s suggested retail price of a 42" LG Smart TV is $899. Cancellation fee for early termination of a service agreement will be $24/mo. for the 42" LG Smart TV and $10/mo. for the HD PVR and digital boxes multiplied by the number of months remaining in the term. Current rental rates apply at the end of the term. Rental equipment must be returned in good condition upon cancellation of service, otherwise the replacement cost will be charged to the account. TELUS, the TELUS logo, Optik, Optik TV, telus.com and the future is friendly are trademarks of TELUS Corporation, used under licence. © LG Electronics Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. “LG Life’s Good” is a registered trademark of LG Corp. © 2014 TELUS.


b24



Thursday, February 27, 2014 • COMOX VALLEY RECORD

For your traveling pleasure

www.comoxvalleyrecord.com

Use Your CAR to go CAMPING 2014 ProLites Are Here!

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■ Ideal for compact cars ■ Sleeps 2 people ■ One Slide Out ■ Radio am/fm/cd/mp3 ■ Quality appliances ■ Spacious model

■ For small SUVs ■ Sleeps 2 people ■ Toilet with shower ■ Multiple storage areas ■ Long bench seating ■ Lightest in its category

PRO-LITE PROFILE

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Your Exclusive ProLite Dealer on Vancouver Island

RV Centre

Celebrating 28 Years in Business in the Comox Valley!

1-250-338-5355

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#1 DEALER

for Arctic Fox Campers & Nash Travel Trailers

2800 Cliffe Avenue | Courtenay Across from Driftwood Mall • Open Sundays

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Comox Valley Record, February 27, 2014