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Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014

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$1.00 + GST

Vol. 30 | No. 4 Thursday, February 27, 2014

Community Forests working together

Serving the Bella Coola Valley and the Chilcotin

Page 3

CoastMountainNews.com

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Jessi Hans of the SAMS Grizzlies faces off against the Burns Lake Lakers

Michael Wigle photos

SAMS Girls perform well in Senior Girls North Central Zone Championship BY JEREMY BAILLIE After months of preparation the 2014 Single ‘A’ Girls Basketball Tournament was held at Sir Alexander Mackenzie School last week from February 20-22. Basketball action kept the throngs of local and out-of-town fans entertained from morning until dusk each day. Teams from all over the North Central Zone came to Bella Coola to compete: Fort Nelson, Cedars Christian (Prince George), Fraser Lake, Fort St. James, Valemount, Northside Christian (Vanderhoof), Burns Lake, Tumbler Ridge along with SAMS. Day One action saw SAMS in tough against the Burns Lake team. The entire game the score was close with Burns Lake tying the game with about a minute left but the SAMS Girls kept their composure and marched down the floor scoring the winning basket with just seventeen seconds left to nail down the victory! The victory secured a spot for SAMS to compete against the number one team in the zone, Cedars Christian for the right to carry on to the final.

The girls fought valiantly against a great team and bravely competed through injuries but ultimately fell short. In late action on Friday, again before a full house of rabid local fans, SAMS played Fort St. James for the right to move on to compete for third place and the last berth in the Provincials. Going into the half SAMS was down by one point and came out firing on all cylinders early in the second half leading by as much as five points at one point in time. Unfortunately, the Fort St. James Falcons proved to be a little stronger than our local girls ultimately winning the game 58-51. On the final day of zone basketball action SAMS took to the court against the Tumbler Ridge Kodiaks defeating them 77-59 to secure fifth place overall in the tournament. Sir Alexander Mackenzie School is very proud of its girls’ team. The complete tournament results saw Cedars Christian School finish first and earn a berth in the provincials defeating Fraser Lake 103-59 in the final. Fort St. James finished third and took the last provincial berth by defeating Northside Christian 65-41. As mentioned earlier, SAMS and

Tumbler Ridge finished fifth and sixth respectively. Burns Lake defeated Mountain Christian School 77-34 in the game to decide seventh and eighth. Finally, Fort Nelson lost 61-39 to Valemount in the game deciding ninth and tenth. Overall, the Zone Tournament was such a success because of the hard work, organization and dedication of tournament organizers Abra Silver and Melanie Kloss. Thanks to all their time and effort the entire tournament from games to banquet to final award ceremonies went off without a hitch. There are so many others to thank. A big thank you to Coach Lori George for her endless hours running practices. Without her skill in teaching the girls how to play a team game we would not have had the success we did. Thanks also to Lorrein Gurr and her huge team of concession volunteers. All the proceeds from the concession went to the help defray the costs of hosting the tournament. Thanks to James Mack Jr. and the community volunteers who ran the scorekeepers table, Caroline Granander for her help with everything from the door to

The SAMS Grizzlies finished an impressive fifth place in the tournament the banquet set-up, to Marshall Hans for his help at the scorekeepers table and for stepping in to referee two of the games. Thanks to Acwsalcta School staff for making all of the arrangements for the two games that were held at Acwsalcta School. An event of this magnitude would not have been possible without the help of our commu-

nity from those who came out to watch and support our girls to those who volunteered their time to help run the tournament! Finally, a big thanks goes out to the referees and the all teams, their coaches, managers and the parents that came out to support them. We hope they all enjoyed their time spent in our communities!


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Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014

Bella Coola Valley Tourism

BellaCoola Coola Bella Seventh-Day Seventh-Day AdventistChurch Church Adventist SaturdayService Service Saturday Song BibleStudy Study Song &&Bible forAdults Adults & & For Children Children 9:30am amSabbath Sabbath 9:30 School SchoolProgram Program 1010am amBible BibleStudy Study

Church ChurchService Service 1111am am Bella BellaCoola Coola Adventist AdventistAcademy Academy Offers offers a Christian a Learning Christian Learning Environment Environmentfor for Grades KK-9 -9 Grades Grades 1010-12 - 12 Grades Distance DistanceLearning Learning through throughWest WestCoast Coast Adventist AdventistSchool School

Holy Name Holy Name of Mary of Mary Catholic Catholic Church Church

Sunday Communion Communion Suspended Service Until10:30AM Mid-March

Principal Principal Rebecca RebeccaLandry Landry 799-5910 799-5910

Services of the Services of the United Church United Church of Canada of Canada

The Church of Jesus ChristLatter-Day Saints

Augsburg Church Augsburg Church Hwy. 20 Hagensborg Hwy. 20 Hagensborg Sunday: Sunday: RegularServices Services Regular && Sunday School 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am

Chilcotin Highway 20, Hagensborg, B.C. 250-982-2458

Emmanuel Church

Minister Minister Cynthia Breadner Cynthia Breadner EveryoneWelcome Welcome Everyone Ecological EcologicalVideo/Book Video/Book Study Study Augsburg/McKenzie Augsburg/McKenzie United UnitedChurch Church Begins Oct 7, 2013 Begins Oct. 7:00 PM7, 2013

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Formore moreinformation information For 250-799-5388 250 799 5388

All welcome

Roses to the Legion for their wonderful Valentine’s Day Dinner. It was superb. Roses to Sandy Van Horn and Holly Willgress for the Valentine’s Day Couple’s Yoga at the Bella Coola Mountain Lodge. Roses to Brent Cole for plowing Christine Sollid’s driveway when it snowed so heavily. Thank you.

28th Annual Tweedsmuir X-Country Ski Race

Monthly Mass MonthlyEvening Mass Saturday Saturday Evening 6 pm 6:00PM For more info on Mass Schedule Call Susan CalltoKathy conMoore rm 250-799-5975 250-799-5618

Emmanuel Church BellaCoola Coola Bella SundayService Service7pm 7 pm Sunday

Wednesday, March 5 - 7pm Norwegian Heritage House Hagensborg

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Modern Duplex for Rent! 2000sq.ft. 2 bdrm, 1 bthrm, large rooms, deck, storage, well insulated, propane heat Smith Subdivison - Hagensborg ONLY $600 month plus utilities. Call 250 982 2273

Sponsored by Tweedsmuir Ski Club

Branch President: Denis Tippie 250-982-2495 Meeting Times:

The 28th Annual Tweedsmuir Cross Country Ski Race will be held at East Branch on Sunday, March 2, 2014. The registration can be done online at: https://sites.google.com/ site/27thannualxcountryskirace/home The entry fee is free for kids and students while adults are charged $5. There are four age divisions for both men and women with course options of 3, 7, 14 and 21 kilometres. There will be a Treasure Hunt on the 3km route for the kids! This race is suitable for all levels of skiers. Whatever your motivation, it is a good time to come out and participate in cross country skiing! There will be a potluck chili lunch, so please bring something to share, and there will be hotdogs for the kids. See you there!

CoastMountainNews.com

Priesthood and Relief Society10:00 am Sunday School and Primary 11:00 am Sacrament 12:00 pm

SUN RUN

5KM WALK / RUN MOOSE HALL TO WHARF RETURN SATURDAY MARCH 8 - 9AM (NOTE NEW TIME)

Black Press in association with The Coast Mountain News are very excited to announce the newest arrival to their online family.

WE ARE SO EXCITED! EARN A FREE WATER BOTTLE!

We invite the many readers of the Coast Mountain News newspaper to visit the online component of our news and information services. You will find current and late breaking news stories, community links, web polls, archived stories, contacts and more focused on your communities.

CREATE YOUR OWN TEAM AND WIN $100! • LARGEST TEAM (UNDER 18) • LARGEST ADULT TEAM

Memorial for Ken Corbould Saturday the 1st of March, 2014 at 4:00 pm, in the Legion in Hagensborg. Family and friends will gather to remember Ken’s best moments and to share our stories. Please join us to help celebrate Ken’s life and his impact on our Valley.

PRE- REGISTER AT: NEW LEAF LEARNING CENTRE: THURSDAY MARCH 6, 10 - NOON FRIDAY MARCH 7, 12 - 3PM. OR REGISTER RACE DAY BY 8:45AM. (PAR-Q & WAIVER) INFO CALL: MONICA 250 799-5811 OR JANICE 250 799-5822.

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Annual General Meeting


Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014 A3

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Between the two companies, they are able to harvest up to 50,000 cubic metres annually.

Local bucker Otis Mecham on the job

Nuxalk, Bella Coola Community Forests collaborate to increase economic opportunities By Caitlin Thompson Common interests have prevailed with the collaboration of the Nuxalk Forestry Ltd. Partnership and the Bella Coola Community Forest at the Clayton Falls dry land sort. The two companies have been operating independently of one another for over five years, but have recently come together to increase productivity and business opportunities in the Valley. “We are two small companies facing the same challenges,” said Bella Coola Community Forest Manager Hans Granander. “But we also have the same goals: to create more local economic opportunities and employment from our forestry operations.” The Bella Coola Community Forest (BCCF) has been operational since 2007, when it was first issued a five-year probationary license to harvest up to 30,000 cubic metres per year from six different areas around the Valley. Now operating under a 25-year renewable license, most of their operation has been based in the Nusatsum and Saloompt areas, and the company employs

about twenty local people in different positions throughout the year. The Nuxalk Forestry Ltd. Partnership (NFLP) is but one of many divisions of the Nuxalk Development Corporation, an independent forprofit company with interests in forestry, sawmilling, commercial fishing, and eco-tourism. The company has a 25-year renewable Community Forest License centred in South Bentinck Arm and has been logging there since 2009, with an allowable cut of 20,000 cubic metres per year. “Most of our activity has been conventional ground-based logging in South Bentinck’s Camp Two area, but we also did some heli-logging in the Ickna River in 2012,” said Randy Hart, CEO of the Nuxalk Development Corporation. “In the 2012/2013 fiscal year NFLP generated just over $3.4 million in gross revenue and employed 48 Nuxalk people during that time. This is a huge boost to the Central Coast and Valley economies.” Both Granander and Hart stated that the BCCF and NFLP are committed to growing the local

economy by purchasing supplies and services from within the Valley whenever feasible. Hart admits that there are some members within the Nuxalk community that oppose the logging, but he remains confident that the employment and economic activity generated is beneficial, not only to the Nuxalkmc, but also to the wider community. “We have been employing about a quarter of our workers year-round while the remainder are seasonally employed,” said Hart. “The operation is selective patch cutting and it’s very sustainable. Our intention is to harvest timber in a manner that respects the culture and traditions of the Nuxalkmc as well as protect the important values and features of the Great Bear Rainforest.” The two companies have come together at the dry land sort where they jointly process logs from both operations. While both companies use Vancouverbased company A&A Trading Ltd. to market their logs, there is desire on both sides to see the wood processed locally first. “The dry land sort is where the logs are scaled

and processed,” said Granander. “Previously, this work was done in Howe Sound, and we were missing out on this opportunity.” A&A Trading owns the dry land sort, but the BCCF manages the day-to-day operations, contracts the required equipment such as the tug and boom boat and loaders, and deals with any issues that may arise. NFLP is now supplying the workers, including the logbuckers, log-scalers and log-bundlers as well as equipment and supplies. This has taken the processing capabilities of the sort to a whole new level and both forestry companies are now hopeful that their new working relationship will enable them to attract even more business from the Central Coast and even the Chilcotin plateau. “There are numerous advantages to this new relationship,” explained Hart. “For one, we need to be competitive within the industry, and this increased capability at the dry land sort is essential. Another is the community advantage. The trim ends from the processed logs are now available to the community for building,

carving wood or as firewood. Obviously this can’t occur when the wood is processed out of town.” Granander is confident that the

collaboration is just the beginning of increased productivity for both companies. “Overall we are very pleased with how it’s coming

together,” he said. “It’s a really good example of two entities working together with a common goal and enjoying a successful outcome.”

SCHOOL DISTRICT 49 AMENDED DRAFT 2014/2015 CALENDAR JULY S

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Instructional Non-instructional Vacation period Statutory holiday Non-instructional days include professional development and administrative days. Please email sdishkin@sd49.bc.ca with input by March 7th. Final version will be published online in April 2014.


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Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Johnston Creek land slide a natural event Dear Editor, The February 13, 2014 issue of the Coast Mountain News tried to report on a straight forward natural event, but totally got it wrong. The article titled ‘Major landslide occurs near Rivers Inlet logging operation’ describes a land slide event that occurred in the Johnston Creek drainage during a rain-on-snow deluge in December, 2013.

This land slide started high on the mountain in very steep and inaccessible terrain and tore downhill through the forest more than a thousand meters before settling on the valley bottom in a jumble of trees, soil and rocks. Some of this debris ended up in the main creek channel. It just so happens that the lower part of the landslide also swept through

an active logging block (operations were shut down at the time due to weather) and guess who gets blamed in the media? You got it, the loggers. Even though it is blatantly obvious that logging activity had nothing to do with the cause of this event, the first line in the Coast Mountain News article states “A logging operation located in the Johnston Creek drainage in Rivers

Inlet has resulted in a major landslide”. Poppycock, this land slide would have happened whether loggers were there or not. Johnston Creek is in Wuikinuxv territory and the Nation feels a great sense of responsibility for the careful stewardship of the environmental values there, especially the salmon. Johnston creek also presents one of the few economic devel-

opment opportunities available to the Wuikinuxv and they zoned this area for harvesting. To balance these values, a forestry plan that meets the test of Ecosystem Based Management was produced and the Wuikinuxv logging company, Kvamua Forestry LP, is managing the operation. The land slide was very unfortunate and investigations are under way to deter-

mine if there are ways to mitigate any impact to Johnston creek and salmon habitat. Events like this demonstrate the natural forces that shape the central coast environment and I had hoped that we were beyond the half-truth rhetoric of single minded agendas, but it still crops up and stalls true understanding of the inter-relation between environment and economy.

The Coast Mountain News is a great little paper, but sometimes more care is needed to accurately report on events that affect the environment and our livelihoods. Thank you for your consideration. Hans Granander, RPF Director, Kvamu Enterprises Limited Partnership Acting CEO, Wuikinuxv Economic Development Corporation

What does the Discovery Coast Ferry have to do with Ecosystem Based Management? Dear Editor, The last issue of the CM News contained some very interesting articles dealing with the cancellation of the Discovery Coast ferry and milestone achievements in conservation and ecosystem based management in the Great Bear Rainforest. These The Bella Coola Valley Ridge Riders would like to thank the following generous sponsors of our 2014 Valentine’s Day Basket Raffle: Bella Coola Tea Company, Bella Coola Valley Restaurant, Bella Coola Vehicle Rentals, Cindy Evans Printing, Coast Mountain News, Creekside Gallery, Bella Coola Music Festival, Moore’s Market, Rose’s Salon, Studio 2340, TLV Artistry, Townsite Tru Hardware, Tse Tse Fly Gift Shop And, if course thanks to all of you who purchased tickets!

were reported on as separate, unrelated stories but there is an important connection that needs to be brought into the effort to get the Discovery Coast ferry service restored. The land mark Great Bear Rainforest agreements ushered in an enhanced system

CENTRAL COAST REGIONAL DISTRICT

Do you have something you need to sell!

Summer Employment Opportunities

Why not put it in the Coast Mountain News classifieds

POOL MANAGER

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Centennial Pool Commission

Application Deadline: March 31, 2014 Please submit your letter of application with a resume, references and current certifications to:

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For a full Job Description go to our home page www.ccrd-bc.ca

188N 1ST AVE. WILLIAMS LAKE B.C. V2G 1Y8

Call Caitlin at 250-982-2696 or email us at

Central Coast Regional District Box 186 Bella Coola, BC V0T 1C0 Phone: 799-5291 Fax: 799-5750 Email: info@ccrd-bc.ca

The Lucky Winner was: Leah Moody

of land management termed Ecosystem Based Management (EBM). This system is unique in that it not only aims at maintaining healthy ecosystems but also at improving human wellbeing. To date, most of the work in implementing EBM has been on the environmental front as recently announced

250-982-2696 • Hagensborg

by government, environmentalists and forestry companies. While these achievements are notable, not much has been done on improving human wellbeing in the Great Bear Rainforest and those involved in implementing EBM are struggling to find ways to improve the socioeconomic condition in local communities. As part of the Great Bear Rainforest agreements, an unprecedented amount of land was set aside in Conservancies with the message that the future for central coast communities was not in logging, but tourism. Not long after making these agreements, what does the government do? It cancels the main service that brings tourists to the region! This is a betrayal to local communities, small business investors and the spirit of EBM and the Great Bear Rainforest

Yearly Subscriptions In Canada $47.25 USA $78.75 (Cdn Funds) Foreign $121.87 (Cdn Funds) (includes GST) Send to: Coast Mountain News 188 North 1st Ave., Williams Lake, BC V2G 1Y8 PLEASE MAKE CHEQUES PAYABLE TO "BLACK PRESS LTD" 250-392-2331 • Fax: 250-392-7253 Published every other week

agreements. As has been pointed out in many articles in the CM News, the Discovery Coast ferry is unique in that it is not just a transportation service, it is a basic element that is enabling the tourism industry to grow. It is exactly the kind of government involvement that leads to private investment and jobs as envisioned by the authors of EBM as they were contemplating the integration of human wellbeing in natural, fully functioning ecosystems. But without tourism, the high aspirations of EBM will not be reached. The Great Bear Rainforest agreements shone a spot light on the central coast that was seen around the world, it is time we brought that spotlight to bear on the on the whole ferry debacle. Sincerely, Hans Granander (Local logger that likes tourists)

STAFF: Editor: Caitlin Thompson Contributors: Ernest Hall, Sandie MacLaurin, Jeremy Baillie, Bella Coola Harbour Authority, Simon Schopman Consultant: Angela Hall


Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014 A5

local news

Carey Price leads Team Canada to gold in Olympic Men’s Hockey

Jean Levac/Postmedia News photo

Carey Price of Anahim Lake is congratulated by Henrik Lundqvist of Sweden after Canada’s gold-medal victory on February 23 in Sochi. we would like to see what we can do to help protect our language and culture for future generations.”

Barge partially sinks at Clayton Falls dry land sort

A sunken barge at the Clayton Falls dry land sort is proving to be a challenge to remove. inquired about whom he needed to contact to find out if he could use the old B.C. packers property and I shared that information with him,” said Carney “I heard later that the barge was going to be moored over by the log sort.” Knott apparently had an agreement with the Elspeth Bay Development Corporation in which they would look after the barge in exchange for use of Knott’s tug, the Royal Two, which

sunk in Elspeth Bay December last year. Carney first heard of the trouble with the barge on February 7. “I went down to survey the situation and the barges stern was awash and a sheen was on the water, at that time I didn’t see anyone around,” said Carney. “I reported this to the Coast Guard and met them the next day and assisted them with transportation to the site.” Community Forest

Land Act: Notice of Intention to Apply for a Disposition of Crown Land

operations were initially shut down but have since restarted. Take notice that Capacity Forest Management of Campbell River, BC on The Coast Guard has behalf of Kitasoo Forestry Limited Partnership intends to make applicacome in on several tion to the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations occasions to moni(FLNR), North Island – Central Coast District for a Permit for the purpose tor the situation, but exactly how they will of Log Handling, file #1414195, situated on un-surveyed provincial crown deal with the barge land covered by water located in Oscar Passage, Wallace Bight, Watson has not been deterBay and Jackson Passage. mined. The barge For more information or to make written comments, please contact: Wesley is three-quarters sunk and the stern Cutting of CFM at (250) 287-2120, WesCutting@capfor.ca, Sheldon Marramps are most likely tell, MFLNRO, Lands Officer: (250) 956-5032, Sheldon.Martell@gov.bc.ca. tangled in anchor The review and comment period will last 30 days from February 27th, lines and submerged debris. 2014. Comments will be received until March 28th, 2014. FLNR office It is rumoured may not be able to consider comments received after this date. Comments that there is some can also be posted at: http://www.arfd.gov.bc.ca/ApplicationPosting/index. Bunker C fuel oil on jsp?PrimaryStatus=pending board, estimated at anywhere from 300 to Please be sure to cite the Applicant’s name and the location of the pro3000 gallons. At this posed activity and File Number for reference. time it is believed that oil is in the forward Be advised that any response to this advertisement will be considered part hold that is above of the public record. For information, contact the Freedom of Information water and is not leaking into the environAdvisor at FLNR ment. However, if it RODERICK APPLICATION AREAS was to be releasedKlemtu it Passage ISLAND APPLICATION AREAS would certainly make JACK SO N an impact on the local PASS AG E environment. RODERICK ISLAND “The Harbour has offered assistance and supplies to supNowish APPLICATION AREAS Inlet port this effort,” said Wats APPLICATION AREAS on Carney, “but at the SUSAN Bay ISLAND moment all we can E G PASSA do is wait for the next C AR OS development." Wallace Bight

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A barge remains partially sunk at the Clayton Falls dry land sort area. Outflow winds about two weeks ago apparently caused the vessel to come loose and drifted west towards Clayton Falls, where it now is posing a problem for local community operations. The barge belongs to the owner of Central Coast Power Corporation, Tony Knott. Knott’s had owned the hydro operation at Ocean Falls, which is now owned by Boralex and supplies power to that community and neighbouring Bella Bella. According to Bella Coola Harbour Authority Manager Tom Carney, Knott had requested to tie up the barge at the harbour last fall, but was informed that it wasn’t possible as the vessel was so large. “I told him that our facility did not have room for a vessel that large, as the barge is 145’ by 26’ wide. He

Price was also lauded for his humble, down-toearth demeanour and obvious respect

healthy role model, and he’s actually made it quite far,” said Brar. The school has been the hub of hockey action during the Olympics, with people piling in to watch the games on big-screen TV each time Price takes to the ice. Brar said the phone has been ringing off the hook asking for updates since the men's ice hockey competition started. But, before the Olympics, few people in the community even followed the sport. Brar said the tournament brought the community together. “You know I’ve never had so many calls from the community in a short little time. Like, that’s all you hear in community, everywhere you go,” she said. “You go to the store, people go, ‘hey did you watch the game?’”

PAS S

younger generation don’t speak it fluently. Carey’s interest and ours is to protect our language and

for his teammates. Price thanked his family for all their support and praised the efforts of his teammates. “I can’t say enough about that team in front of me – that group of forwards and that defensive line. That was a real pleasure to play behind,” said Price. “There’s no question, their work ethic was second to none this whole tournament.” The community of Anahim Lake was united in their support of Price, gathering at the Ulkatcho First Nation's Nagwuntl’oo School to him cheer on. School administrator Joanne Brar says the 26-year-old has given the community something to be proud of. “That’s the biggest thing, because I think you know every community does have their challenges, but you know, Carey’s a

FINLAYSON CHANNEL

both of whom were undefeated before they played the Canadians. According to Team Canada’s Olympic coach Mike Babcock, Price “is one of those guys, with his talent base, can be a real difference-maker in the National Hockey League and in international hockey, if he chooses to and if he has the fire to do it. It appears to me that he does.” According to Carey’s mother, Lynda Price, it is his connection to his culture, both Nuxalk and Ulkatcho, which keeps him grounded. “Our great grandfather was Chief Domas Squinas who was Nuxalk from the Wolf Clan at Stuie and his wife Christine was Carrier from the north,” said Price. “My mom of course went to Residential School.  Although she speaks Carrier fluently, the

FINLAYSON CHANNEL

The Ulkatcho Nation’s hometown hero Carey Price has reached a new high point in his career. The 26-year-old from Anahim Lake, B.C., led the men’s hockey team to a gold medal victory over Sweden on the last day of the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi. Thousands of Canadians rose early to watch the final game, which saw Price earn his second shutout of the games, beating the Swedes 3 – 0. There was even a Twitter hashtag #ThePriceIsRight#. Price was chosen as the starting goalie based on his season with the Montreal Canadiens. His efforts were extraordinary. He didn’t give up a goal over the final 164 minutes and 19 seconds of tournament play, and posted back-to-back shutouts over the United States and Sweden,


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Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014

local news

Bella Coola Rod and Gun Club holds annual fundraiser By Sandie MacLaurin On Saturday February 15th the Bella Coola Rod and Gun Club held their annual Dinner/Dance Fundraiser at Lobelco Hall. It was a full house and guests enjoyed a delicious buffet featuring an impressive selection of meat from local hunters and food producers that included elk, moose, white tail deer, mule

deer, caribou, cougar, beaver, turkey, lamb, winter caught rainbow from up top and Spring salmon! While waiting for dinner folks got to “join” (by projector and screen) several hunts and outdoor excursions from the past year and share stories of their own memorable outings. As well there was a very interesting display of antlers, taxidermy mounts and fir pelts to admire.

Bella Coola Valley Arts Council Call for Tender Two Tenders are being called for

1) Interior Renovations 2) Electrical Wiring of the Valley Gallery, 1961 Highway 20 (SD #49), Hagensborg On-site viewing/assessment 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 4

Jim Knudsen and Mitch Moren won first and second place in the Annual Buck Derby. up the Saloompt River Road and to cover insurance and other costs. Members (well over 100) are proud of the fact that they own the range and have a long term lease on the adjacent land – and that they achieved

this without government grants. The club celebrates its 62nd birthday this year and continues to advocate firearm and bow safety, hunter training, ethical hunting and an appreciation for the outdoors.

Memberships can be obtained by contacting the membership chair, Sandie MacLaurin at 250-9822670 or randy_sandie@ xplornet.com. Family memberships are $45, Individuals $35, Seniors $25 and

Juniors $20. The club would like to thank local businesses and individuals for their generous donations of items and services to our annual fundraiser. Your help makes this event a yearly success!

School Districts given the go-ahead to create own calendar year

Closing date: 4:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 11

Caitlin Thompson

WorkSafeBC coverage required Telephone: 982-2735 or 799-5977

Leon Barnett, Realtor 250-982-2704

Awards given out this year were to Jim Knudsen for first place and to Mitch Moren for second place in the Annual Buck Derby. Dinner was followed by a dance with music from AKA and many took to the floor to shake it up to the great blend of rock and roll, rockabilly and pop tunes. The fund raising portion of the evening included a silent auction with items from local artists including painting and jewellery, tools for the home and yard, construction materials such as lumber and gravel and services such as backhoe time. There was also a raffle with two awesome prizes, a 20-minute helicopter ride won by Mitch Moren and a Go Pro Hero 3+ Silver edition action camera won by David Kopas. Funds raised at this event help pay for improvements to the new gun range located

Year-round schooling? It’s now an option. Two years ago, the Ministry of Education passed

Vera Robson, Realtor 250-982-2553

Get a Free Market Analysis on your property!

$89,000, MLS N222722, East of town, 13.2 Acre Parcel Zoned I1, Heavy Industrial. $119,000, MLS N229000, 38.49 Acres Oceanfront view property, Big Timber! $125,000, MLS N212053, 40 Acres Hammer Road. Half cleared, Construction Mobile. $159,000, MLS N230915, Furnished 1386SF, 3 Bedroom, .57 acres, Fruit Trees, wired shop! Recently renovated with newer kitchen Cabinets, floors and appliances. $159,000, MLS N220585, 80 Acres in two Separate 40 Acre Parcels! Great setting, above floodplain, New access road, Awesome views with Creeks. Open to offers! $170,000, MLS N4505666, Why work for Wages? 7 0 Seat Restaurant, 2300SF Building, Recent equipment upgrade, Waiting for creative chef, lots of potential. $179,000, MLS N221387, 2036SF total area, 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Fenced yard. $179,000, MLS N231518, 31 Acres, R2 zoned 1 acre Subdivision potential! Great investment or country estate. Mostly level, nicely wooded and close to town. $190,000, MLS N212966, 1163 Mack Road Beauty! Wonderful 2249SF, 2, poss. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Stackwall Masonry construction, Many Upgrades. $240,000, MLS N231149, Beautiful 2 bedroom home on 2.93 acres Nimpo Lake Front. $369,000, MLS N231806 , 80 acre fenced pasture at Burnt Bridge! Highway and River Frontage, Great sun exposure, awesome views, near Tweedsmuir Park! $450,000, MLS N221666, Wilderness Elegance at 1747 Hwy 20, 2850SF plus 4 Bedrooms, 4 Bath, Solarium, Fireplace, Fantastic Kitchen on 27plus acres! $569,000, MLS N229033, 8.12 Beautiful Acres on Awesome 3055SF total area Home, Best location in the valley atop the Nusatsum Plateau, Max Sun and Views. $679,000. MLS N227286 , Immaculate 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home on over 37 acres, pristine pastures, creeks, river and huge classic Norwegian barn, Awesome setting!

“Always working for you”

171 Oliver Street Williams Lake, BC. V0T 1H0 250-392-4422

Bill 36, which allows districts to determine their own school calendar and paves the way for what the government refers to as ‘personalized learning.’ All districts must ensure that certain requirements are met, such as a minimum number of instructional hours. However, districts may now determine the number and dates of days in session, the number of dates of each day of instruction, the dates of vacation periods and the dates of each noninstructional day (e.g., professional development days). The Ministry has stated that the changes will allow for a more flexible, student-based approach to learning, and more choice in terms of where, when and how students learn. Before any amendments are made, however, school districts are required to consult

with their community before they submit their calendars on March 7. Locally, School District 49 VicePrincipal Steve Dishkin has started the consultation process, but he says that so far he hasn’t received any request for major changes. “We have had very little feedback so far and no direct requests to change the calendar from the status quo,” said Dishkin. “At present, we are already adapting to a multitude of changes in instruction techniques, graduation requirements, and the like.” Dishkin said that, in the face of all these changes, the Board has decided to remain with the traditional calendar and focus on educating the public about the options for change in the future. The calendar is advertised on page three of this newspaper. “The consultation

process is still underway and will last until March 7,” said Dishkin. “There probably will not be any changes this year, but now we do have the option, as a community, to decide if want to tweak our calendar in the future to better suit our area.” Personalized learning, now a focus of the governments BC Education Plan, is a new approach based on ‘recognizing each student as individual learner, with his or her own learning style.’ Provincial curriculum will need to be reviewed and renewed in order to adhere to this new standard of teaching and learning. Dishkin said that, due to the small size of our district, personalized learning has already been taking place in the Bella Coola Valley. However, there are many opportunities to expand on this new frontier. “For example, we

may engage different levels of students on a personalized learning experience based on the ecosystem of the Bella Coola River,” said Dishkin. “Each level would receive a different credit for their work, such as Science 9 outcome, or a credit towards Biology 11, even a credit for community-based learning outcome.” Dishkin is also looking forward to facilitating personalized learning in the community by focusing on getting students more engaged with the community, and by having the community be part of the assessment process. Regarding amendments to the calendar, the public is invited to make submissions and direct comments and questions to District Vice-Principal Steve Dishkin. He can be reached at 250 982 2355 or by email at sdishkin@ sd49.bc.ca


Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014

A7

LOCAL NEWS

Central Coast First Nations premiere “Bear Witness” in Bella Coola BY SIMON SCHOPMAN The Central Coast First Nations Bear Working Group (CCFN BWG) made a presentation of their film “Bear Witness” (Visit www.BearsForever. ca for the website and video link) on February 18 for a crowd of 40 locals at Lobelco Hall. A brief introduction from the presenters; Megan Moody (Nuxalk Nation Resource Stewardship Director), Jason Moody (Nuxalk Nation Stewardship Office), Jen Walkus (Wuikinuxv Nation Bear Working Group Researcher and Representative), Cindy Hanuse (Wuikinuxv Nation Stream Enhancement), Douglas Neasloss (Kitasoo/Xai’xais Spirit Bear Lodge, Klemtu), and Kai Nagata (University of Victoria and Producer of film) preceded the 25 minute film. (The Heiltsuk Nation was unable to send a representative and sent their regrets.) In September 2012 the CCFN announced a ban on trophy hunting for bears within the unceded territory of their member nations, which closely correspond to the area known as the Great Bear Rainforest. Gathering data is one of the most

important focuses of the group. “The Government bases its wildlife management on numbers of bears only, and does not take into account the data on declining fish populations” said Walkus. “In the Wuikinuxv Nation we have noticed salmon runs drop from 300,000 fish one year to just 3,000 the next. Bears are starving and last year alone, we were forced to euthanize 15 bears. They were emaciated, it was very sad; it was devastating to the community. We do not agree with the way that the government develops their numbers. First Nations traditions do not believe in a single species management program. We need to be looking at the ecosystem as a whole, and the data we are collecting will continue to help us move forward with a more comprehensive management plan.” In the last year alone, 1500-1600 samples were taken and DNA analyzed. This shows data such as movement between territories, hormone and stress levels, genders, and dietary issues. As well as being able to identify individual bears, and gain a more accurate number of the existing populations. At more

Doug Neasloss photo

A grizzly mom and cub in a Central Coast field than $100 per sample, the BWG has been collaborating with UVic and Hakai Research Institute for students’ studies, which drastically cuts costs and provides further data for research papers and further studies in comprehensive Wildlife Management. “There is a fear in the hunting community that we will lose our access, or rights, or that one area/group of the province will dictate hunting policy for everyone else.” said Nagata “There is a fear that hunters are going to lose their social

licence to hunt. What is there to say to that? We are going to lose all sorts of rights to hunt, if we do not do speak up about trophy hunting now. We need to draw a clear moral line on what kinds of hunting we accept as a community, and what we do not. Anytime that we can promote these types of conversations is appreciated and healthy. Many of us hunters may enjoy sitting around a campfire cleaning weapons, but we are not really good at having these conversations about the deep meanings of

life. So any conversations are appreciated.” A September 2013 poll from McAllister Opinion Research conducted on behalf of the CCFN showed that “95 percent of B.C. hunters agree that people should not be hunting if they’re not prepared to eat what they kill.” A further 91 percent agree that their fellow hunters should respect

First Nations laws and customs on First Nations territory. By the numbers: A recent Tourism BC exit survey found that 79% of tourists came to BC to view bears. Stanford Centre for Responsible Travel (CREST) did an analysis and comparison of the tourism draw of hunting vs. viewing and found that four guiding business-

es employ 11 people and serve 186 people. License fees are worth about $1.2 million to the Government coffers. Viewing on the other hand, employs 510 people directly, and countless others indirectly, services approximately 11,369 visitors a year, and garners $15 million in direct contributions to BC.

CONGRATULATIONS!

136 athletes from Cariboo - North East competed at the 2014 BC Winter Games bringing home 34 medals. Thank you to the coaches, officials, volunteers, and families who support these growing champions. See photos, videos and results at

BCGAMES.ORG

Doug Neasloss chats with Deborah Nelson at the screening of Bears Forever at Acwsalcta School


A8

Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014

LOCAL NEWS

Save the Discovery Coast Ferry rally planned for March 15 BY ERNEST HALL Bella Coola Valley residents are urged to make their voices heard at a Saturday March 15 rally to “Save the Discovery Coast Ferry”. Bella Coola Valley Tourism (BCVT) is planning a noon-hour event that day – coinciding with rallies in communities from Haida Gwai to the Sunshine Coast. Part of the strategy of the newly formed Coastal Mainland Alliance opposing massive changes to BC Ferries operations, the March 15 simultaneous rally follows on the heels of a massive demonstration planned for the legislature lawn in Victoria on the previous Tuesday, March 11. That day, people from ferry-dependent communities on the Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Island, the Northern Gulf

Islands, and the Lower Mainland are busing from as far away as Powell River and Northern Vancouver Island to make their opposition heard. Three main thrusts of the Legislature rally are to tell the government to stop the service cuts and fare increases, conduct open consultation with ferryimpacted communities, and bring BC Ferries back under government control to ensure it operates as a public transportation service. The Alliance has also pledged to give front-and-centre attention to the government plan to kill the Discovery Coast Circle Tour by replacing the Queen of Chilliwack with the Nimpkish – a decision predicted to wipe out the tourist traffic to the Bella Coola Valley and Chilcotin. Alliance

Michael Wigle photo

A local rally is planned to show solidarity with the rest of the province at noon on March 15 organizers see the cut that affects Bella Coola as “the most egregious” cut of all being planned by the government. (This route is the only one on the entire coast to be eliminated.) The BCVTsponsored rally in Bella Coola is

intended to bring the community together to show the rest of the province and the government how opposed Valley residents are to the cancellation of Route 40 – the summer ferry service between Bella Coola and Port Hardy, the marine

Hired Equipment Registration Cariboo District

The Cariboo District of the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure is creating its list of registered Equipment for Hire in the Cariboo Service Area for the fiscal year 2014/2015, which begins April 1, 2014. All individuals or companies registered this past year through the District Office in Williams Lake will be receiving invitations to re-register their equipment for the coming fiscal year by mail. Any individuals or companies who were not registered in 2013, but wish to have their equipment listed, are hereby invited to contact the District Office, either in person or by phone, to obtain the appropriate registration forms. Note that while you do not need to have Commercial (Comprehensive) General Liability Insurance, or up-to-date WorkSafeBC coverage to register, you will have to meet these requirements prior to working on any ministry projects. Only owned or lease-to-own equipment is eligible for registration. Equipment can only be registered in one area in any given year. Seniority is not transferable from area to area. The deadline for new registrations is 4:30 p.m. on Friday March 14, 2014. Late registrations will be accepted, but may appear at the bottom of the open list. Note there is no charge for registering new equipment or for changing or removing equipment information already listed.

Register through the Williams Lake District Office at: 640 Borland Street, Suite 301, Williams Lake, B.C. You can also phone 250 398-4510 or send a fax to 250 398-4454 to have the forms mailed or faxed to you, or register on-line at www.bcbid.ca.

link in the Circle Route that makes it possible for tourists to travel through the Valley. All Valley residents are urged to step up and help with the rally planning and to get to the wharf on March 15 to show solidarity in the Bella Coola-Chilcotin community and with the other coastal communities that are taking the Discovery Coast cause to Victoria. Locally, the abolition of Route 40 has sparked a chain of opposition from

Vancouver Island, the Central Coast, and the Cariboo. Headed by Petrus Rykes of the West Chilcotin Tourism Association and BCVT President Leonard Ellis, the “Save the Discovery Coast Ferry” campaign recently launched www. savethediscoverycoastferry.ca as a way to inform BC residents of the economic value of retaining Route 40. Opponents of the cuts are urged to send a letter through the website and to provide comments on website

postings. “By cancelling this route, BC Ferries hopes to save $725,000 per year. But the route helps bring in $2.5 million each year in tourism revenue just in the Cariboo Chilcotin Coast,” said Ellis, the campaign’s vicechair. “It may be an easy choice for BC Ferries to make, but it’s the wrong choice for British Columbia.” Updates on rally plans will be posted on the campaign website and on Facebook.

Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Invasive Plant Committee Society is offering an Industrial Vegetation and Weed MoTINoxious Ad # 1032 A Pesticide Applicator Certification Course. Hired Equipment April 14-17th,Cariboo 2014 Lip’alhayc Learning Centre, Bella Coola District

ToTribune Register Contact: Lawrence Northeast: Williams Lake Coordinator, Lip’alhayc Learning Centre

Bella Coola Valley Coast lgnortheast@gmail.com 250-799-0038 Mountain News

This course teaches the core knowledge required for certification as a pesticide applicator in BC. It is also a valuable resource for anybodyCache-Creek applying pesticides. The course introduces the practices Ashcroft of Integrated Pest Management and the foundational knowledge to Journal prevent and control pests while having the least impact on the Cariboo AdvisorA ‘commitment fee’ of $25.00 is payable upon environment. registration. All other course fees are covered by CCCIPC. 100 Mile House Free Press

5.81” x 6.79” 4 columns x 95 lines


Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014 A9

Chartered Accountants Business Advisors LLP

171 Oliver St, Williams Lake, BC, V2G 1L9

201-35 South Second Avenue Williams Lake, BC, V2G 3W3

“Crosina Realty offers you over 30 years experience and success”

For an appointment call toll-free:

Vera Robson

“Your Highway 20 Realtor”

1 877 392 2911

Jennifer Rice, MLA North Coast Constituency

Phone: 778-412-4200 Fax: 778-412-4199 E-mail: kane@fbbcpa.ca E-mail: angela@fbbcpa.ca

I’M BACK!

Hair Studio 2340

Past and present customers please stop by to say hi.

at 2340 Hwy 20 Hagensborg Call Lloyd for an appointment at 250 982 2622 Open Tuesday - Saturday

Ask me about our out-of-town buyers program

Cathy Hoy-Poole

DL#5683

250-392-7185

370 S Mackenzie Avenue, Williams Lake, BC V2G 1C7

D. Kane Fraser, CPA, CA Angela Adler, CPA, CGA, CAFM 301-19 First Avenue North Williams Lake, B.C. V2G 4T6

BU S I N E S S D I R E C T O RY

Home: 250 982 2553 Office: 250 392 4422 Fax: 250 982 2553 Cell: 250 267 7507 Email: vera.robson@yahoo.com

Ladies & Mens Haircuts

Fax 250-392-4703 1-855-GO-4-CHEV Cell 250-267-2715 www.cariboogm.ca cathyhoypoole@cariboogm.ca

Colours • Highlights • Foil & Cap • Perms

John Cameron 250.392.6999 EMAIL

250.392.4792 cameronco@telus.net

FAX

#5 - 65 First Avenue South • Williams Lake, BC V2G 1H4

Bella Coola Recycling Depot Open: Friday & Saturday 9:30 - 5:30 Sunday 9:30 - 4:30 (250) 982 2798

At the corner of Walker Island Road and Hwy 20

Don’t forget to get your subscription! Only 50 for a years worth of local news! $

.40*

Call 250-982-2696 and get your paper delivered.

$1.00 + HST

Vol. 27 Thursday, January | No. 1 6, 2011

Ph: 250.395.8830 Fax: 250.395.8998 angela@100milecga.com An aerial shot

of the Valley taken

September 22,

2010 - this is perhaps

the last 2010 for many picture before September's

massive flood Bella Coola residents - certainly the defining moment ‘Operation Santa’ of delivers some Christm as cheer to flood In addition to the affected families of Transportatio Ministry Associates donated n’s ity, other BCGEU generosA joint effort by the Flood Relief $4,000 to at the Williams numerous employees Bank Michael Wigle

photo

SUBMITTED BY COLEEN FRASER

agencies resulted from various provincial minisChristmas for manyin an early tries including last fall’s tremendousvictims of Branch, Client the Corrections Services Branch, At the Ministry flood. Ministry of Environment, Transportation of Ministry of Forests and and Range, Infrastructure office Ministry of Agriculture and Lake, Leanna Illinickiin Williams Lands, and the Integrated Land and Loreen Russell Management Bureau organized project that substituted a part in the project, took as did their usual staff gift exchange their union. in favour of buying Interior Roads, gifts affected families. for flood- Construction, Dawson Triton Environmental and Binnie

to be used for firewood,account also sent gifts Lake hospital to the valley via furnace Beeline fuel and hay. Courier. Many people purchased Earlier that week specific items that Bazille (CEO of Michel indicated their families had Hospital), and the Bella Coola children some of the hosappreciate including would pital staff delivered gift blankets mets, skates, board bikes, hel- that had been donated games and clothing. affected households, to flood been donated by which had Leanna loaded trucks with the two pick-up Coastal Health Vancouver gifts ered them to Bella and deliv- Vancouver. employees in volunteers used Coola where The Bella Coola the Mormon Flood Church Hall to Restoration Committee organize and distribute them. also able to organize was Employees unteer work crews two volthat assisted

local householders October through in from mid November and December. The first group to arrive was a six-person crew from the Mennonite Disaster Service. Hosed at the Community Church in Hagensborg these men helped fourteen householders with cleanup and reconstructio n during the nine days were in the valley. that they In mid-Novemb er volunSEE MANY ON PAGE 3

*Price iinclu includes l des d HST HSTand T andd Canadi CCanadian ddian andel ddeli del delivery livery iveryy only only.l

HODGSON FREIGHTWAYS LTD. Refrigerated service, General Freight,Freight, Flat Decks, B Trains Refrigerated service, General B Trains Vancouver, Williams Lake, Chilcotin & Bella Coola Surrey

Phone 604-888-7515 Fax 604-888-1611 Williams Lake: Phone 250-398-5645 Bella Coola: Phone 250-799-5644

Toll Free: 1-866-321-0889 Email: hodgsonfreightways@telus.net We take a load off your mind

ANGELA BINNS, CGA


A10 A10

250.982.2696

Thursday, FebruaryNews 27, 2014 CoastFebruary Mountain Coast Mountain Thursday, 27,News 2014

Your community. Your classifieds.

bcclassified.com fax 250.982.2512 email classifieds@caribooadvisor.com

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS TRAVEL CHILDREN EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SERVICES PETS & LIVESTOCK MERCHANDISE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE RENTALS AUTOMOTIVE MARINE

AGREEMENT

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. bcclassified.com cannot be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. bcclassified.com reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisment and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassified.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisment and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

Announcements

Information Denied Long-Term Disability Benefits or Other Insurance? If YES, call or email for your

FREE LEGAL CONSULTATION

and protect your right to compensation. 778.588.7049 Toll Free: 1.888.988.7052 Julie@LawyersWest.ca www.LawyersWest.ca

Lost & Found LOST Jan. 26 at Deni House. 3 distinctive rings, very sentimental. 2 gold wedding rings & 1 silver ring. Reward offered. Call Colleen (250)392-1969 LOST on Hodgson Rd between the Pioneer Complex and Dog Creek Rd, Feb. 11/14 between 3:30-4:20pm Wooden sleigh with an 8” gas powered (bright red) ice auger strapped to it. Also on the sleigh was a portable propane catalytic heater and 2 green propane canisters in a red plastic pop case. A substantial reward is offered for the return of the above items. Phone: (778)412-4669

Travel

Skiing Sun Peaks condo, sleeps 7, hot tub, ski in ski out. (250)305-2913

Employment

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. NO Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. SignUp online! iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853

COPYRIGHT

North Enderby Timber is looking to hire for various positions including Millwright and/or Fabricator, Heavy Duty Mechanic and Electrician. We offer competitive wages along with a comprehensive benefit package. Please fax resume to 250-838-9637. Part-time Merchandiser wanted for retail visits. Approx 5 hours month. Hourly rate $12 to start send resumes to: resumes@devrew.com

ON THE WEB:

Announcements

Information ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca

Community Newspapers We’re at the heart of things™

Pets & Livestock

Help Wanted WE have an immediate opening for a dynamic fireplace salesperson for our busy store in Vernon. The successful candidate will have a minimum of 5 years experience in the fireplace industry, in either the retail or building sector, be comfortable in dealing with homeowners and contractors alike,and possess the drive and determination needed to excel in a fast paced environment. We offer an excellent starting salary and commission structure,as well as benefits and RRSP plan. If interested in this position please reply in confidence to Bob.anderson@hbcvernon.ca

Help Wanted

Traffic Control Flagger Training 100 Mile Feb. 22/23, WL Mar. 1/2 for info and cost call 1-866-737-2389 roadsafteytcs.com Lowest Prices!

Merchandise for Sale

Real Estate

Feed & Hay

Misc. for Sale

For Sale By Owner

Excellent quality cow & horse hay, large round & large square bales. Phone early a.m. & evenings. Deliveries available (250)398-2805

Brand new Acorn Slim Line complete stairlift system. Ideal for 12 stair application. $2206. Gym inversion table w/video & book. $378. Both still in box. Best offer accepted. 250-3923750 Bill.

Fox Mtn Ranch. Round/1580 lbs bales, Alf/Grass/Med/1000 lbs. 3’x3’x8’ Alf/Grass. Cell 1(250)305-9931 Horse Hay. Tim. Alf. small round bales 4’X4’ barn stored. Springhouse. Can deliver. Cow Hay 4’x5’ bales $120/ton. (250)392-9706 Tracy Hubner you are the lucky winner of a Panago Pizza. Please contact the Tribune office by Wed, Feb. 26/14 to collect your gift certificate.

Livestock Medical/Dental Resource Ability is hiring RNs, LPNs in the Williams Lake area to work nights 11pm to 07am, with a medically fragile infant. Pediatric experience preferred. Union wages, benefits, full training and support provided. If you want to make a difference in a child’s life please fax your resume with cover letter to Debra Leverrier at 1-250-762-9898 or email: dleverrier@western.ca

3 Black Angus Bulls and 1 York/Landrace X Boar for sale. (250)546-9766

Pets Chihuahua female puppies, assorted colors, 8wks old, 1st shots, Ready to go. $550. (250)398-2802 Shih-TzuX Puppies. Fall in love with a Puppy. 8 weeks old. Vet checked, 1st shots, absolutely adorable. Asking $349. (250)398-7801

Merchandise for Sale

Trades, Technical

Appliances

MECHANIC

RECONDITIONED Washer/dryers, electric stoves, etc. 6 Month Guarantee Will deliver in town 250-305-6344 days 250-392-7064 evenings

Education/Trade Schools

Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved. Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

Employment

Required F/T for Vancouver Outboard. Primary duties will include maintenance troubleshooting and repair of diesel & gas marine engines. Knowledgeable in vessel electrical systems is an asset. Must have own tools and a valid drivers license. Exc. Compensation Based On Experience. Please forward resume: vancouveroutboard@ telus.net

Services

Financial Services GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

$100 & Under Maytag dryer in great working order. $100 250-398-7008 Tonneau cover for 2008 Ford Ranger extra cab. $100. (250)296-3289

$300 & Under Set of 4 Snowmark winter radial tires. 195/65R15 $225. obo (250)398-7515

Firewood/Fuel Firewood For Sale $280 per 320 cubic foot trailer load. (250)398-0641

Dollar Deals

ClassiÀ C lassiÀe ed d Specials Specials One item under $100 One item under $200 One item under $300 One item under $400

for 1 week = $1 for 1 week = $2 for 1 week = $3 for 1 week = $4 maximum 3 lines per ad

Call Caitlin 250-982-2696 or Julie 1-250-398-5516 or email classiÀeds@caribooadvisor.com

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper?

Misc. Wanted Coin Collector Looking to Buy Collections, Estates, Gold & Silver Coins + 778-281-0030

Real Estate For Sale By Owner FOR Sale by Owner 3 Bdr 2 Bath 1550 sq ft Rancher. This house has many extra features and is perfect for someone looking to downsize. Phone 250-392-1196 price $239,900

3243 English Company Rd. Borland Valley, 150 Mile House, BC www.propertyguys.com Listing #68915 New list price $449,900 7.5 year old Macon Construction home (remaining home warranty). 2800 sqft, 5.9 acres (cross fenced) (250)296-9156

Gorgeous Lake View On one acre, five bedroom, two bathrooms. Completely renovated. $175,000. (250)305-6154


Coast Thursday, February February 27, 27, 2014 A11 2014 A11 Coast Mountain Mountain News News Thursday,

Real Estate

Transportation

Real Estate

Cars - Domestic

Care Free Living with electric stair chairs, walk in tub, large garage, 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, located at Westridge above Golf Course. 1720 sqft of space on two levels with lots of storage and all appliances including N/G BBQ. $199,950. Call for more information or a viewing. (250)392-2670

1999 FIREFLY 3 cyl. 5 speed, Very good mechanical condition. 180,000 kms, 50 plus MPG. Has crack in windshield, needs nothing. Good commuter car. Reduced-must sell. $1650 (250)303-0941

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent Lovely 3bdrm condo with 5 appliances. $950/month 250392-4086

Cottages / Cabins

Attention: Cabin Owners Summer Vacationers Booking Now - List With Us Turn Vacancy Into Income

www.bccabinandcottage.com

250-517-8546

Fight Back. Volunteer your time, energy and skills today.

,W WaNes 31 mXscles Wo Iold Xp WKis QeZspaper.

Duplex / 4 Plex 2bdrm in 4-plex, avail immed n/g heat/hotwater $800/mo + utilities. (250)305-4946 or (250)296-3377. Avail. Mar 1st. 6bdrm duplex, 2 1/2 baths, w/d, n/s n/p $1100/mo +util. r/r Call Carol at (250)392-2201 Quiet 1bdrm bsmt suite, util. incl. shared w/d $700./month (250)855-8243

Homes for Rent 1 bdrm, 1 bath, $600/ mth. Small house in Commodore Heights. Suitable for single or couple. On bus route to mine. Pictures @ Tribune online. Fridge, stove, washer, dryer. NP, NS. ejbjb@shaw.ca or 778-464-4633. 2 and 3 bdrm. houses. F/S natural gas heat. Please call (250)392-7617. 2bdrm mobile, with addition on private property. Fenced yard, storage shed. No Pets. $900/mo (250)989-2100. 4-bdrm. upstairs, 2 baths, nice big yard and quiet neighborhood. Available March 1st. (250)305-7478 809 Midnight Dr. 3bdrm house, upstairs, working people, quiet, N/P N/S $900 +75% Utilities. Avail. immed (250)392-6338

Suites, Lower 1 Lrge bdrm bsmt suite, close to schools $650 n/s, n/p, Utilities incl. (250)305-1213 2bdrm daylight bsmt suite $850 +30% hydro. Recently updated, bright open, concept, close to town, lg storage area, W/D, lg yard, two parking spots. N/S R/R Pets Neg. (250)302-9613 3bdrm separate gas/electric heat N/P N/S fenced yard. Child Dev. Centre/Nesika Sch area. $700 +util. (250)3988182 Large 2bdrm suite, n/p n/s Quiet working person preferred $650/mnth incl util. Avail March 1st (250)392-4642 Modern daylight bsmt suite with a view, 7mins from downtown. On site storage, carport, N/P N/S, F/S W/D, utilities incl. $900/mo. Ideal for Prof. working couple or individual. Call (250)398-7610 Appointments only.

Transportation

Auto Accessories/Parts Two 400 Ford motors, one has 70,000k & one is new. Plus Edelbrock Intakes. (250)392-3859

Snowmobiles 2003 Ski-Doo Summit 600, 144� track, approx. 2150 kms, has reverse. Asking $4000. OBO Please leave message @ (250)398-8822

Trucks & Vans

2004 Ford Ranger XLT 4x4, 99,000kms, A/C, cruise, CD, auto, New front brakes. Runs Great! $7500. obo Call Ryan (250)398-5664

2007 Ford 150 XLT

4WD SuperCab, 4dr, Short Box with liner, 8 cyl, 5.4L automatic, 167,770 kms, tow pkg, power windows, mirrors, locks, ext. blue, interior grey cloth. Well maintained.

$14,950. (250)398-9803

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A12

Coast Mountain News Thursday, February 27, 2014

Toyota Tops All Competition With The Most Canadian Black Book Retained Value Award Tacoma

Tundra

Sequoia

$62,825

$22,350

Starting from

$26,750

Starting from

$22,185

$38,700

Starting from

Highlander

Prius

Starting from

$36,355

Starting from

Prius C

Avalon

FJ Cruiser

Start $27,850

Starting from

$37,740

ing from

Starting from

· Toyota Avalon – ALG two consecutive years and CBB this year (Full-size Car) · Toyota Prius – CBB two consecutive years (Compact Car) · Toyota Prius c – ALG this year (Alternative Fuel Vehicle) · Toyota Highlander – ALG this year (Midsize Utility: Three Row)

· Toyota Tundra – ALG five consecutive years and CBB five consecutive years (Full-size Pick-up) · Toyota Tacoma – CBB five consecutive years (Small Pick-up) and ALG four consecutive year (Mid-size Pick-up) · Toyota Sequoia – CBB four consecutive years and ALG two consecutive years (Full-size SUV) · Toyota FJ Cruiser – CBB four consecutive year (Mid-size SUV) and ALG four consecutive years (Off-Road Utility)

Simply the best vehicles your hardworking money can buy!

take five and see why

NO HYPE! NO BALLOONS! NO HIDDEN SURPRISES!

*ON APPROVED CREDIT. PRICE DOES NOT INCLUDE APPLICABLE TAXES, INSURANCE AND FEES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS OR VISIT WWW.TOYOTABC.CA

Home Is Where The Heart Is. DL#30406

Gerald Overton

John Tate

Mike Fochuk

Hank Adams

Rolt Hagedorn

General Manager

Sales Manager

Product Advisor

Product Advisor

Product Advisor

Toll Free 1-866-934-2386 • 106 N. Broadway Ave, Williams Lake •

HEARTLAND TOYOTA

SPRING

07 Honda Civic LX STK#WC777

save

FWD, 1.8L, Auto

$960

$9,928

TRUCKS

11 Ram 1500 Sport STK#WT1284

save

4x4, 5.7L,

save

AWD, 3.5L, Auto

$1089

$31,811

FWD, 4 dr,

save

$2576

4x4, 5.7L, Auto

$29,924

07 Dodge Gr.Caravan STK#WT1262

save

$2909

09 Toyota Matrix STK#WC768

$1955 3.5L, Auto $15,545

10 Toyota Tundra SR5 STK#WT1292

$1622 Auto, 4 dr $32,318

12 Toyota Sienna LE STK#WT1250

save

FWD, 3.3L, Auto

$7,591

www.heartlandtoyota.ca

MELTDOWN SALES EVENT

08 HondaAccord EX-L STK#WC729

CARS

Renee Rogers Financial Serv. Mngr.

save

$1050

FWD, 1.8L, Auto

save

4x4, 5.4L, Auto

04 GMC Yukon XL STK#WT1249

save

$2336

4x4, 5.3L, Auto

save

$11,890

09 Ford F150 XLT STK#WT1274

$1666

10 Prius Hatchback STK#WC758

FWD, 1.8L, Auto

$2186

$23,340

98 Ford F150 XL STK#WT1291

save

$22,174

$1000

3 dr., 4x4, 4.6L Auto

$7,995

01 Dodge Caravan SE STK#WT1255 NEW DIESEL TRUCKS ARRIVING DAILY

$9,564 SUVs

save

$1319

FWD, 3.3L, Auto

$4,561

*ON APPROVED CREDIT. PRICE DOES NOT INCLUDE APPLICABLE TAXES, INSURANCE AND FEES.

Home Is Where The Heart Is. DL#30406

Gerald Overton

John Tate

Mike Fochuk

Hank Adams

Rolt Hagedorn

General Manager

Sales Manager

Product Advisor

Product Advisor

Product Advisor

Toll Free 1-866-934-2386 • 106 N. Broadway Ave, Williams Lake •

Renee Rogers Financial Serv. Mngr.

www.heartlandtoyota.ca


Coast Mountain News, February 27, 2014