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INSIDE: Rapist Cameron Leon will spend two more years in jail Pg. 6

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Council finally agrees to install signalized crosswalk sign

BY PAUL J. HENDERSON phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com

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City council approved a rezoning of a portion of this property on industrial land to allow for a hazardous waste recycling facility. Critics say it’s too close to the Fraser River.

Critics of the proposed hazardous waste recycling plant admire the company . . . just not where they want to build

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ne of the most consistent caveats uttered by those opposed to building a hazardous waste recycling facility on the banks of the Fraser River in Chilliwack is that they aren’t opposed to the plant, just the location. World Rivers Day founder Mark Angelo even called Aevitas “a company I admire,” at the public forum held at Evergeen Hall on Saturday to discuss the facility. About 100 people showed up for

PAUL J. HENDERSON @peejayaitch the meeting, a gathering where, essentially, the converted preached to one another. Addressing the audience of opponents to the facility, along with Angelo, were Sto:lo Tribal Council Grand Chief Clarence Pennier, B.C.

Federation of Drift Fishers president Rod Clapton and local activist Glen Thompson. More than a dozen environmental, First Nations and sports fishing organizations have banded together to oppose the Cannor Road facility to recycle, among other things, infectious waste, transformer oil containing PCBs and lamps containing mercury. “Plants like this should not be close to a river like the Fraser,” Angelo told the crowd Saturday. “If you look elsewhere across North Ameri-

ca, that is the usual practice.” The World Rivers Day founder argued that the Fraser River needs a “collaborative plan” to address development on its shores, one that focuses on natural and cultural values. Because no such plan exists, says Angelo, people end up “fighting fires against inappropriate development proposals.” “This is one of those and one I hope will be extinguished.”

ignalized pedestrian crosswalks for Vedder Road that were twice nixed by Chilliwack city council were approved Tuesday. The two $150,000 crosswalk signals will be installed at two dangerous locations: Storey and Alder avenues. The existing crosswalks have seen periodic pedestrian-vehicle collisions, including one a year ago when an elderly woman was seriously injured after being struck on Vedder at Storey. Mayor Sharon Gaetz has supported the crosswalk upgrades all along. She said when she used to work at the church office near Storey, she saw frequent close calls. The item first came to council in October 2013, then again in December, and both times a majority of council was concerned about traffic flow along the busy arterial. Manager of transportation Rod Sanderson said Tuesday a consultant’s report found there would be no reduction in level of service for through traffic if full-stop signals were installed at either or both intersections. In October, Sanderson recommended to council the two locations be upgraded, although a consultant’s report suggested that upgrades were not warranted. That consultant’s report based the decision on low usage of the intersections, something

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CHILLIWACK TIMES CHILLIWACK TIMES

Alert kids called mom after man breaks into house

A man who tried to break into a downtown Chilliwack house while two children were at home alone was arrested near the scene of the crime. Police say a 13-year-old and a 10-year-old were by themselves in a residence in the 46000 block of 3rd Avenue at about 3 p.m. Friday when one of the children noticed a strange man in the backyard. The man removed a window screen and smashed a window to try to gain access to the house, said police, but one of the kids called their mother on the phone. She arrived at the house quickly and confronted the EB IRST man. First reported on He fled chilliwacktimes.com but was picked up a short distance from the scene by the Chilliwack RCMP’s Crime Reduction Unit, which was already in the area investigating another incident when the family’s 9-1-1 call came in. “The two teenage [sic] residents and the mother kept their composure in this incident and did the right thing by calling 9-1-1 immediately,” RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Len vanNieuwenhuizen said in a press release. Charged with one count of break and enter is 49-year-old Bremner Robertson of Chilliwack. Robertson is being held in custody until a court appearance Jan. 27 According to online records, he has a long history of breaking and entering dating back to 1997.

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Cornelia Naylor/TIMES

A Chilliwack Fire Department firefighter mops up a blaze that gutted the top section of a large garage/workshop structure on Estate Drive in the Chilliwack River Valley Tuesday afternoon.

Neighbours heard explosions BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

P

olice and fire officials are being tightlipped about a fire that gutted the top of a large garage/workshop in a Chilliwack River Valley (CRV) subdivision Tuesday afternoon. The Chilliwack River Valley Fire Department got a call about a structure fire at Estate Drive at about 3:30 p.m. They responded with help from two engines from the Chilliwack Fire Department and found the building fully involved. It took 40 minutes to contain the blaze, which demolished a garage in the top part of the structure but didn’t spread to a workshop area below or to the adjoining house. CRV fire chief Keith Morrison said the cause of the fire was

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RCMP not saying much about fire that destroyed workshop unknown. He couldn’t confirm if it was being treated as suspicious but said the RCMP was investigating. RCMP Staff Sgt. Tom Caverly, however, said there was nothing, as of Tuesday evening, to indicate anything suspicious. “We’re just waiting for the final fire investigation report,” he said. Neighbours, meanwhile, said they heard multiple explosions in the building after the fire started. They also claimed the building houses a medical marijuana grow operation, and that firefighters had called out “It’s a grow-op!” when they cut open a part of the wall at the bottom of the building while combating the fire.

Morrison, however, said he couldn’t confirm whether any kind of grow operation had been discovered in the building. “We didn’t cut open the side of the building to get a visible range inside there,” he said. “That was just to vent it . . . . We’ve just been on the top floor. The top floor is completely gutted. There’s no fire in the bottom.” Caverly also declined to talked about whether or not the building was being used the grown medical marijuana. “That’s for privacy,” he told the Times. “Health Canada won’t even tell us those kinds of things. We would know, but I can’t discuss that with you.”

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Stepping up kids4memories fundraising team brings spirit and a whole lot of money BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

T

hree Chilliwack kids who have already raised $20,000 for the Alzheimer Society of B.C. aim to push that figure to over $30,000 by the end of this week. Brothers Gavin and Everett Rutter (11 and nine years old respectively) and 11-year-old Campbell Pitkethly have teamed up to form kids4memories, a fundraising team that will take on the Alzheimer Society’s Walk for Memories at the Landing Sports Centre Sunday afternoon. Despite their tender age, the three elementary school kids are actually veterans of the event, which raises funds to support Alzheimer’s research, education and support. Campbell will be walking for the fifth time. Her inspiration has been her “Papa Don,” who had to stop working at age 58 because of early onset Alzheimer’s. “I did the fundraising the first year, and she just walked with me,” her mom, Sandy Pitkethly told the Times. But Campbell was soon raising her own funds—and inspiring the Rutter brothers along the way.

“I want to find a cure for Alzheimer’s for when I grow up,” Everett said, “so the doctors and scientists can find a cure for everybody.” The Rutters have dedicated their walk to their great grandmother Frances, but their inspiration for getting involved has been their grandmother Jillian Armit, the local Alzheimer Resource Centre’s support and education co-ordinator. “We used to babysit, so oftentimes when I was doing education, the boys were also sitting in and, while they were colouring or whatever they were doing, I hadn’t realized how much they were taking in,” Armit told the Times. “I wanted to do this because she inspired me,” Gavin said, “and I don’t want to have Alzheimer’s when I grow up, like when I’m an old man. And it feels good inside my heart when I’m raising that much money.” This is the first time all three kids will pull for the same fundraising team, and their goal is to raise $10,000. Ambitious as that sounds, it’s not unrealistic. Last year, Campbell and Everett teamed up to raise $13,000—about half of all the money raised at the event, according to Pitkethly. To help kids4memories reach their goal, visit www.walkformemories.com, and search for “kids4memories.” The Walk for Memories at the Landing Sports Centre (45530 Spadina Ave.) runs Jan. 26 from 2 to 4 p.m. with registration at 1 p.m. Get involved and join the fun with entertainment, food, prizes, raffles and activities for kids. ◗ Register online at www.walkformemories. com or call 604-702-4603 or 1-800-667-3742.

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Gavin, 11, and Everett, 9, Rutter lace up in front of their grandparents’ Garrison Crossing home. On Sunday, the brothers will take the B.C. Alzheimer Society of B.C.’s Walk for Memories to raise funds for Alzheimer’s research and support.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TIMES CHILLIWACK

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Two more years for rapist

CROSSWALK, from page 1 that could be attributed to just how dangerous they are. At that time, Lum made a motion to look closer at the matter, refer it to the Transportation Advisory Committee (TAC) and conduct a traffic study. That study was presented to council at the Dec. 3 meeting, after which Gaetz and Coun. Chuck Stam expressed support. But Couns. Ken Huttema, Lum, Ken Popove and Stewart McLean voted them down. (Coun. Sue Attrill was absent.) “I’m still very hesitant to be in favour of adding two stop points on a busy main road,” Huttema said at the time. A suggestion was made to look at one crossing instead of two, sending the matter back to staff and the TAC. After a special TAC meeting held just to discuss the matter, the committee recommended installation of the pedestrian signals. TAC also recommended the signals be programmed for co-ordination so that vehicles can’t be stopped at both signals. The location of the Wells Road crosswalk will move about 45 metres north to Alder Avenue because of the railway crossing. Sanderson said the Storey intersection serves about 200 homes in the area and the Wells one about 40.

very high risk to reoffend if he didn’t get alcohol abuse and sexual offender treatment. Beirne also noted the band council at the Chehalis First Nation, where Leon had grown up, had banned him from the reserve until he completed anger management training, substance abuse counselling, sexual offender counselling and created a wellness plan. “The band is clear that he is a danger to their community,” Beirne said. In handing down his sentence, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Brian Joyce agreed with Crown counsel that the protection of the public was particularly important in Leon’s case. “But that does not mean, in my view, that the principles of rehabilitation cannot also be exhibited in the determination of an appropriate sentence,” he said. “While Mr. Leon has a troubling record with prior assaults on women, he is still a young man.” Joyce said the two-year sentence would give Leon the benefit of the federal system’s high intensity sexual offender programs and leave room for a lengthy probation period during which Leon’s reintegration into society could be guided and monitored.

He had made a similar claim after Street shortly before the bar’s closing a sexual assault in August 2011, when time. During that walk, Leon took her up he pushed another young woman of an alley to a landing by some stairs and his acquaintance into some bushes, pulled down her shorts, pulled out pressed her to have sex with him. When she refused, he became angry, his penis and said he was going to pulled off her clothes and forced her to have sex with her. After both incidents Leon wrote have sex with him. The victim tried to make her apology notes to his victims, saying way out the of alley after the sexual he didn’t remember the attacks. L e o n ’s l a w assault, but Leon y e r, G u r p r e e t dragged her back Gill argued for a toward the stairs clear that he is a danger provincial senand attacked her tence of two again, punching to their community.” years less a day her repeatedly as she lay on the Pat Bieme and a three-year probation term, ground. saying Leon was He ran off only after a man who had heard the com- a person of “very tender years” who lacked the maturity to serve federal motion in the alley called out to him. It took his victim three weeks to time with hardened criminals. “Instead of rehabilitating himself, heal from injuries related to the sexual assault and a month to heal from he may just go the other way.” Crown Counsel, Pat Beirne, howevinjuries related to the assault. “I thought I was going to die,” she er, suggested a prison term between three and a half and five years, argusaid in her victim impact statement. Leon, meanwhile, said he had no ing Leon needed the higher intensity memory of the events because he sexual offender rehabilitation prohad drunk alcohol and smoked mar- grams offered in the federal system. He cited a psychological assessijuana to the point of blacking out ment that concluded Leon was at a before the attack.

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21-year-old Agassiz man who raped a woman in a downtown Chilliwack alley in the fall of 2012 and then punched her repeatedly as she lay on the ground will stay in jail for two more years. Cameron Leon was convicted by a B.C. Supreme Court jury on Aug. 27 of sexual assault causing bodily harm and assault causing bodily harm. He had also been accused of choking his victim before raping her but was acquitted on that charge. Leon, who has been in custody since Oct. 2, 2012, was back in B.C. Supreme Court in Chilliwack for sentencing last Friday. Along with the two-year jail term and three years probation for sexual assault, he was handed another oneyear jail term and three-year probation period, to be served concurrently, for assault causing bodily harm. Leon was 19 and already under a total of three probation and bail orders (including one for sexual assault) when he encountered his victim at a downtown Chilliwack night club on Sept. 28, 2012. Leon was known to his victim, a 19-year-old woman who can’t be identified because of a publication ban, and urged her to leave the bar with him. She refused twice before leaving to go for a walk with him down Main

Cameron Leon was already under probation and bail orders for sexual assault when he attacked and punched a woman he met at a downtown nightclub

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CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A7

News

Short-lived vow to go straight for Van Geel BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

Seriously, teach . . . they stole my homework bag

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Chilliwack man who looked to have turned his life around after a 2011 crime spree is back in custody on weapons charges in Prince George. Bradley Arthur William Van Geel was arrested Friday evening after trying to flee from police when they executed a search warrant on a Prince Submitted photo George motel room. The search uncovered a .22 calibre Cooey rifle Weapons found in Bradley Van Geel’s motel with a tampered serial number and a 7 mm Ruger room in Prince George. rifle, found loaded, unsecured and lying in the a truck. When confronted by the vehicle’s owner, open. “Investigators believe that both firearms may he had brandished a pair of scissors, had hit her, be stolen and not yet reported to police,” Prince and fled in the car he had stolen from the auto George RCMP Cpl. Kent MacNeill said. “The dealer. He had been found later that day in an incoherinvestigators are asking the general public to check their cabins and homes to ensure that their ent state near Popkum Road. In what MacKay described as “a bizarre effort firearms are accounted for.” Van Geel now faces four charges of possession to commit suicide,” Van Geel had urged police to of a firearm and ammunition while prohibited, shoot him. By his sentencing hearing, however, he was a two counts of possession of a firearm while unlicenced, and one count each of careless use of a changed man, His lawyer bore letters testifying to volunteer firearm, tampering with a serial number and failwork with the Chilliwack ing to comply with a probaGiants minor football organition order. “I will respect the zation and at summer Party In October of 2011, Van court’s decision, I will in the Park events and told Geel was let off with a suspended sentence and three not you down one bit.” MacKay that Van Geel was undergoing drug counselling. years probation after pleading “I would just like to be a guilty to two counts of robbery Bradley Van Geel hardworking family man and and theft under $5,000. settle down with my fiancée During his trial, the court had heard police were first called to investigate a and live a wholesome lifestyle,” Van Geel had “spousal altercation” at Van Geel’s Popkum area said. “I will respect the court’s decision, I will not let you down one bit.” home. MacKay had been convinced. Van Geel hadn’t been present when police “Mr. Van Geel has done what many people say arrived and found marijuana plants and firearms. Police later reported a small, three-foot alligator they are going to do,” MacKay had said, “He has done more than merely express remorse . . . he had also been found. The next day, Van Geel had embarked on what has made sufficient changes in his life. This is a Judge Russell MacKay described as a “crime case where actions speak louder than words.” Since then, besides the recent Prince George spree.” Van Geel had first entered a Young Road gas weapons charges, Van Geel was sentenced in station, thrown the attendant to the ground and Vanderhoof in November 2013 to 101 days time made off with $80. He had then proceeded to a served and one year probation for possession of nearby used car lot, from which he had stolen a stolen property. - with files from Tyler Olsen and vehicle. From there, he had continued on to the Mark Nielsen/Prince George Citizen parking lot of Safeway, where he had tried to steal

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yatt Menges had air tight excuse for not getting his homework done Wednesday morning, complete with video surveillance footage. A thief smashed the passenger window of his truck and made off his school bag while the Chilliwack secondary school Grade 12 student was working at the IGA Tuesday night. “We got it on video,” Menges told the Times. “My truck was parked right in front of the camera, so we saw him walk up and everything. I was pretty mad.” The bag contained no money, only Wednesday’s homework and a semester’s worth of notes Menges is going to miss sorely during his upcoming provincial exams. “It’s just really good to go over all the old stuff,” he said. The theft left his mother, Tama Gerdes hopping mad. “He is trying to work his way through school to get good marks this term in order to qualify for scholarships and bursaries, so that he can further a career at BCIT as an electrical engineer,” she wrote in an exasperated email to the Times, “and

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someone has to not only steal his back pack but possibly his career.” Menges too was frustrated by the senseless crime. “He smashed my window for a school bag,” he said. “He’s probably going to go through my stuff, try and scrounge for money, then ditch the bag.” Gerdes hopes the bag will somehow find its way back to her son. Menges, however, would like to see it returned with value added. “I hope he’d do my homework is what I’d like to get out of that,” he said.

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A8 Thursday, January 23, 2014

CHILLIWACK TIMES

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The Chilliwack Times is published by Black Press Group Ltd., every Thursday at 45951 Trethewey Ave., Chilliwack. The Times is a member of the Canadian Circulation’s Audit Board, Canadian Community Newspaper Association, British Columbia and Yukon Newspaper Association and B.C. Press Council.

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Look to steal better ideas

I

t may be wise old King Solomon who is credited with the phrase, “there is nothing new under the sun,” but anyone who has read brochures put out by municipal election candidates can attest to that pearl of wisdom. This November, thousands of candidates will seek office in city halls across British Columbia, looking to serve their fellow taxpayers as a mayor, councillor or director. Their brochures will offer familiar themes: warm, fuzzy pictures of landmarks in their community; and the usual vague promises to spend tax dollars wisely and make their particular city hall more transparent. Taxpayers need more than platitudes. Municipal government in B.C. is a $10.8 billion business—more than the combined budgets of the provincial ministries of aboriginal relations, advanced education, agriculture, children and family development, citizens’ services, energy, environment, finance, forests, jobs, justice, social development and transportation, and the premier’s office. Needless to say, taxpayers deserve more than the same-old, same-old from potential mayors and councillors. We want details and real ideas. And, in a world where “there is nothing new under the sun,” one hopes that a few ideas that have popped up in cities across B.C. might take root everywhere. Candidates looking to hold the line on taxes should look first at labour costs and work by Prince George and Penticton. Penticton set the standard for municipal labour negotiations by negotiating down starting wag-

JORDAN BATEMAN

Be Our Guest es. Three years ago, a core review showed Penticton was paying lifeguards and parks staff $8 more per hour than private operators in the same community. That core review gave Penticton council the ammunition it needed to push for a better deal. Starting wages were slashed by $5 an hour. Meanwhile Penticton found other efficiencies within municipal departments, eliminating overlap of personnel and equipment. The result: a three-year property tax freeze. This month, Prince George council went even further when it settled a four-year contract with its union. The first two years were “net zero”—the same model used by the provincial government to hold the line on its labour costs. After 28 years of annual increases in pay, Prince George stuck to their guns—even in the face of a one-day walkout—and got two years at net zero, followed by two years of very small raises. “[Continual raises are] not sustainable for the taxpayer that has reached a tipping point in their ability to pay,” said Mayor Shari Green. When it comes to consulting taxpayers on large projects, Port Coquitlam broke the mold this year. Instead of putting a major recreation centre renovation—and 1.5 per

cent tax increase—into their budget, Port Coquitlam went to the public with a 0.34 per cent tax cut, and an option to add the rec centre, if the community wants it. Usually cities resist giving taxpayers the facts on what they could save by forgoing flashy projects; this subtle shift to showing what the budget would be without the big project is a major step forward. Annual business licences have long been an annoyance to entrepreneurs. While some jurisdictions have tried to push regional licences, the best solution can be found in the City of Langford, which decided to scrap annual business licences altogether. Instead, Langford businesses will pay the old fee once for a “perpetual” licence. As Mayor Stewart Young pointed out about the old annual system: “What are we going to do [if they don’t pay]? Kick them out? They’re already employing people. We’re happy they’re here in Langford. They give us three times the [property] taxes as residential and then we mess around with these little $50 business licences.” Langford expects to make up most of lost annual revenue through increased business and cutting bureaucracy at city hall. There is nothing new under the sun, Solomon taught us. Hopefully that chestnut holds true and we see many candidates stealing from the playbooks of Penticton, Prince George, Port Coquitlam and Langford this fall. ◗ Jordan Bateman is British Columbia director with the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

o month better highlights the heavy burden consumer debt plays in the lives of Canadians than January. The spending orgy that is the holiday season all comes home to roost during the first month of each new year as bills start clogging up the mail box. Non-mortgage debt will rise more than $1,000 this year to a new high of $28,853 for the average Canadian. A staggering figure to be sure, but one that is simply a part of the new reality for many consumers. For whatever reason, and they are myriad, today’s consumer is less apt to save up for purchases they want, and more likely to borrow money to get what they want—now. For better or worse, people have become complacent about debt. And that’s a dangerous state of mind when it comes to personal finances. The key to keeping one’s financial house in order is knowing where you stand, i.e. what’s coming in and what’s going out. And, in light of our ever-increasing reliance on credit, making sure we know our credit rating is accurate, is more important than ever. Early this week the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Consumer Protection BC’s compliance order against TransUnion of Canada Ltd., a national credit reporting agency. In a nutshell, the company was told to stop certain business practices related to the length of time information can remain on a consumer’s credit report. The law says information detrimental to an individual’s credit standing shouldn’t stay on their rating for more than six years. Fair enough. But how many people even know what their credit rating is, and how important a role it could play in their future? To this end, Consumer Protection BC encourages people to: ◗ Request a free copy of your credit report from both Equifax and TransUnion on an annual basis; ◗ Check your report carefully for the type of information included and the length of time the information has been on your report; ◗ Contact the credit reporting company if you have any concerns; and ◗ If you are unable to resolve issues with the credit reporting company, visit Consumer Protection BC’s online dispute resolution platform at www.resolveyourdispute.ca.

◗ Your view Last week’s question Should former MP Chuck Strahl be allowed to lobby for Enbridge Northern Gateway while serving as the watchdog for Canada’s spy agency (CSIS)? YES NO

18% 82%

This week’s question Do you agree with the province’s Chinese head tax apology process? VOTE NOW: www.chilliwacktimes.com


CHILLIWACK TIMES CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, Thursday, January January 23, 23, 2014 2014 A9 A9

Letters

Fewer fights if body checking were eliminated

Editor: Re: “Dropping the gloves on fighting,” Times opinion column by Paul J. Henderson, Jan. 16. His opinion comes from a person that knows little about hockey as he says, “I don’t watch a lot of hockey on TV.” When there is body contact tempers will flare. For instance, take the Canuck and the players with less skill running at players with good skill. You can’t say, ‘please stop that.’ You have to fight to show your point. I watched my son play hockey up to the Junior A level and the mentality of a lot of players was to check and check you into the ice. Nothing wrong with good checking and body contact but some checking crosses the line. Look at Bobby Orr who was a great player in his time but had to leave hockey because of knee injuries. In my opinion you would have to eliminate body checking to eliminate fighting from the game. I would suggest that Paul buy a season ticket and come out to watch the Chiefs. He will see that a lot of good players are intimidated by those with lower skills. Season ticket holder Bob Richards

Lessons to be learned from spill

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Editor: On Dec. 9, a chemical leak affecting 100,000 homes and businesses in nine counties in the state of West Virginia, contaminated and rendered unfit the public water supply there. Approximately 300,000 people were left without water and told that drinking, bathing or cooking with the contaminated water would result in “burning throat, eye irritation, vomiting, trouble breathing and skin blistering.” A state of emergency was declared. The leak originated at Freedom Industries in a 48,000 gallon storage tank, containing 4-methylcyclohexane methanol (MCHM), which is located above Charleston, West Virginia’s water treatment facility. The substance is used for washing and preparing coal and it is unknown how much of it has entered the Elk River there. U.S. federal prosecutors are investigating. While you may read this and think to yourself, “Oh, we have better regulations in Canada. That couldn’t happen here,” I draw your attention to the recent PCB leak in Pointe-Claire, Que., originating in a facility illegally storing that highly toxic substance. This leaked into the town’s storm drains in unknown quantities, just like in West Virginia. Here in Chilliwack, city council has just unanimously voted to

Send us a letter TO INCLUDE YOUR LETTER, use our online form at www.chilliwacktimes.com, contact us by email at editorial@chilliwacktimes.com, fax 604-792-9300 or mail us at 45951 Trethewey Ave, Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 1K4. Letters must include first and last names and your hometown and should be fewer than 200 words. To view our letters/privacy policy visit our website at www.chilliwacktimes.com. rezone land adjacent to the Fraser River on the Cattermole lands for the treatment and transfer of PCBs, mercury-containing light bulbs and a variety of other materials, including “infectious substances” and “miscellaneous organisms” (as described in a report from city staff dated in November of 2013). Once the application has passed provincial approval, it will return to the city for fourth and final reading. We may then face the presence of a facility, right here in Chilliwack and right on the banks of the iconic Fraser River, which handles large amounts of toxic chemicals and substances. While the proponent of this facility has an impeccable safety record, there is no question that accidents occur and that no safety record remains spotless forever. To believe otherwise is foolish. I urge all who are reading this to contact their city council members, the mayor and their MLAs to demand that this facility be moved to a site more conducive to its proposed use. That site would be as far from the river as possible. There are many other more appropriate locations it might be sited. To be clear, this is a necessary facility. We need to treat and dispose of these materials carefully and safely. What we do not need is to expose our delicate ecosystems (especially the Fraser River, its tributaries and wetlands) to the possibility of a Charleston or a Pointe-Claire. Thank you for taking a stand for the Fraser River. Jennifer Woodroff Chilliwack

Legality of location not the right move Editor: I recently became aware of the approval of the Aevitas hazardous waste recycling facility, and was alarmed at Mayor Sharon Gaetz’s defence of the city’s approval. That “the city followed all that is required of them by legislation under the Local Government Act,” seems like a pretty lukewarm concern for the potential risk to the environment. I am stunned to think that legality

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would be the major consideration in approving this site. To place this kind of operation near the banks of a river, in such a rainy climate is foolish to say the least. We must get past the model in which economic benefits are judged on the basis of how much profit, or how much tax revenue an industry will generate. If we care about the quality of the environment we will leave to our children and grandchildren, we must look beyond minimum legal requirements, and insist that our governments use their power to ensure we minimize the risk to the future of our communities. Richard Hollins Coquitlam

The truth about Tory tax tales Editor: There are several things wrong with the Harper government’s never-ending claims that they are brilliant tax cutters. To start with, it’s untrue. Their first fiscal decision after taking office in 2006 was to increase personal income taxes. Later that fall, they imposed a toxic new Conservative tax on income trusts which obliterated $25-billion from the savings accounts of two million ordinary Canadians. More recently, Mr. Harper has increased the overall federal tax burden in each of his last four budgets—taxing everything from hospital parking fees and cosmetic wigs for cancer patients to local credit unions and job creation. Conservative claims about lower taxes for families need a scrupulous reality check. For example, MP Mark Strahl says they have created “savings of over $3,000 for the average Canadian family of four [Hansard June 3, 2013].” But it all depends on what type of “family” you’re talking about. You can construct an illustration which would fit the Conservative model—with two parents, two children, a six-figure income and consumer spending of more than $50,000 every year (including over a thousand dollars for art lessons). But for most families—in fact, for 70-percent of Canadian families—this is simply not

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their reality The vast majority of middle-class Canadians haven’t seen a significant improvement in their real incomes for the better part of 30 years. But their living costs have gone up and debtloads have ballooned. For every dollar of disposable income, Canadians are carrying $1.64 in household debt. Many are concerned about affording post-secondary education for their kids, or having no pension plan at their place of employment, or finding decent childcare or longterm care for their parents. Nearly three-quarters of Canadians worry that their children will not do as well as they have done. And then there’s Mr. Harper’s new federal debt burden to take into account. He has run six consecutive deficits so far, adding more than $165-billion to Canada’s overall debtload. That works out to $5,000 in new Conservative debt for every man, woman and child in this country, or $20,000 for every family of four. Any tax cuts claimed by Mr. Harper are paid for with borrowed money. So there is no room to be complacent about the needs of Canada’s middle-class and all those striving so hard just to get there. Hon. Ralph Goodale, PC, MP (Wascana) Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada

CSOPA shows are worth the travel Editor: What a show! As grandparents of three members of CSOPA, my wife and I have made the trip over the last several years from our home in Ontario to see their shows. This year’s performance of Shrek the Musical by CSOPA’s Mainstage actors once again demonstrates their outstanding talent and dedication. Thousands of hours of rehearsal and of volunteer and professional production work, as well as generous local sponsorships, have contributed to a highly entertaining family show. Live theatre is very much alive in Chilliwack. Congratulations. Peter Scott Elora, Ont.

Putting too much pressure on kids Editor: Sitting on his father’s knee, a 10-year-old boy cries. Longing for his world to be different so that he doesn’t have to make the decision that many young athletes have to make, which sport to choose. Today “rep” teams request full commitment for four to six days a week for kids who aren’t even out

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of elementary school yet. Children need to just have fun with sports and experience as many as they can. Often kids that are pushed hard in one sport usually end up quitting the sport, because they can’t handle the pressure and expectation to perform. One of the greatest downhill ski racers, Bode Miller, grew up ski racing with no pressure from his parents to perform, he chose to ski race because he loved it. A giggling young boy and his dad walk to the park carrying a soccer ball, baseball glove and a hockey stick; now which story do you prefer. Reece Howden Cultus Lake

Renters should be told about mould

Editor: Once again I sadly watch as another lovely family visits the home across from mine as prospective renters. The last renters stayed less than a month after the woman started getting sick and her eyes started swelling up. Family before that stayed a couple of months, same story—over and over. People go to the expense and trouble of lining up moving trucks, friends, packing up, taking time off work to move households and then find they are living in a former grow op, tons of dangerous mould everywhere (in every vent, every closet, etc.) that is making them and their children sick. Black mould, fuzzy mould. The homeowner just paints over the problem and sucks in another poor unknowing family. Chilliwack should have some authority to ensure that former grow-ops that they are aware of have to undergo hazmat testing/certification to ensure the home is safe and fit for human life before homeowners are allowed to rent it out to tenants. And unscrupulous landlords should have to pay heavy fines if they are caught luring tenants into such predicaments. If home rentals seem too good to be true, there is a good reason they are empty and always turning over tenants. We own our home but if we rented, we would certainly take the time to ring the doorbells of the neighbours in front of and beside a home to make sure the home we were about to rent was a safe, decent place to live. Renter beware. Andrea Dunphy Elliott Avenue Chilliwack

HAVE YOUR SAY ◗ We want to hear your comments. Fax them to 604-792-9300 or email us at editorial@chilliwacktimes.com.


A10 Thursday, January A10 Thursday, January 23, 23, 2014 2014

Faith Today BY VERN TOMPKE Vineyard Community Church

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ecently I went to see the Hobbit in 3D with my family for our annual Christmas movie outing. I noticed that I wasn’t the only one who was taking the special glasses on and off to see what the movie looked like without the glasses on. Needless to say, I discovered along with the rest of the movie patrons that without the glasses, the picture looked distorted, out of focus, and barely recognizable. I find it interesting that when I speak to people who are struggling to make sense of the world, they usually ask their question in two dimensions only. If they are open to spiritual things, they wrestle with God questions such as “Why are my prayers not quickly answered if God is as real as you say?”, or “Why would a good God allow so much suffering in the world

CHILLIWACK TIMES CHILLIWACK TIMES

Seeing the world in 3D around us?” In their musings, they wear their 2D glasses and can’t make sense of what appears to be a distorted or confusing picture of life on this earth and the stubborn refusal of things to play out as they “should.” The book of Job is a great example. Job goes through a considerable time of suffering which causes him and those around him to wrestle with the nature of God and the suffering he is experiencing. At the same time, however, the reader is given a larger picture at the beginning of the book where we see that Satan is actually the source of Job’s suffering. In this book, we are given a rare glimpse behind the curtain where we see the larger spiritual contest that is playing

out in one unique individual’s life. The sixth chapter of Ephesians tells us that our struggle is not with flesh and blood (2D understanding) but we are actually a part of a larger drama playing out that includes larger powers of evil (3D understanding). As I look around the world, I see that despite our institutions and educational efforts, there remains tremendous suffering and injustice. There are more human slaves today than there ever was in the time of African Slave trade. Just this morning I heard about the pictures of 11,000 people in Syria who have died at the hand of torture. On a more local level, the forces of lust, greed, addictive struggles and interpersonal conflicts

You Crown the Year

continue to destabilize any efforts we make to attempt to build bonds of lasting community and family relationships. I have always been surprised at people’s willingness to readily believe in God and angels that are “good,” yet dismiss the idea of there being a force of evil as a medieval superstition. As I look at the facts on the ground, I see at least as many evidences of evil than I do of good. Now some become so overwhelmed by this that they switch their 2D glasses for a different pair. If our focus becomes only on ourselves and the forces of evil arrayed against us, we end up with an even more disabling handicap than when we wear

the first set of glasses. People who are so focused on the evil around them become almost magical in their quest to pray the right incantations to protect themselves and their families. Scriptures don’t lend themselves to this kind of disabling fear. We are told that light overcomes darkness and that greater is the God who is willing to indwell us and walk with us than any “gods who control this world.” Despite what we see on the ground, we are told that by the end of the “trilogy,” God will firmly be in control. Take that Smaug. So folks, here’s to nothing less than a robust confidence as we go into this world. Here’s to living in the 3D movie playing out around us. ◗ Vern Tompke pastors at the Vineyard Community Church and welcomes comments/questions at vtompke@shaw.ca.


CHILLIWACK TIMES CHILLIWACK TIMES

News

‘Tempest in a teapot’ – CEO

New plant could stop incinerator

BY PAUL J. HENDERSON phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com

Submitted artwork

An artist’s rendering of what the advanced material recovery and recycling facility to be built in Coquitlam might look like. al on Jan. 20, but the catch in all of this is that Metro not only has to approve the licence for the facility, the regional district is overtly opposing it, according to Black. He said Metro has “gone to an extreme to quash these types of facilities from competing with their incinerator.” If Belkorp’s name sounds familiar, that’s because it’s the company that owns the Cache Creek Landfill. The company says this is a private venture that won’t affect taxpayers at all. The company will pay to build and operate the plant, which is to be built on land it owns on United Boulevard south of Highway 1. So if more recycling means less landfilling, doesn’t this plant take money out of one pocket and give it to another? “Our contract ends with

Metro Vancouver in 2016,” Black said. “About the same timeline we would like to be in this new business. That is when [Metro] want their incinerators to be up and running.” Hence, also, the public relations push for an advanced recycling technology while criticizing Metro Vancouver. The company says it is also looking to build a similar plant somewhere in the Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD). “The FVRD has been approached by several proponents who are interested in building such a facility in our region and we believe it is an excellent opportunity worth exploring,” Gaetz said. One other reason Belkorp’s name might be familiar to Chilliwack residents is that former Chilliwack MLA John Les registered as a lobbyist for the company in August of last year.

(SIRC), the body that oversees the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS). Not only has CSIS been n the days leading up to Parliament resuming on found to be spying on antiJan. 27, pressure is increas- oil sands activists and co-oring on former Chilliwack-Fra- dinating with the National ser Canyon MP Chuck Strahl Energy Board and oil compato either stop lobbying for oil nies, such as Enbridge, CSIS companies or stop working has also investigated links between Chias the head of nese investCanada’s spy “It’s hard to say on ment and First agency watchone or two scanNations. dog. And Strahl But the dals. A week from registered CEO of a today we could as a lobbyFirst Nationsowned oil have six more. It’s i s t n o t o n ly for Enbridge, company, whackamole in but also for which one the Frog might think Parliament.” L a k e E n e rwould have Nathan Cullen gy Resource concerns, says C o r p . the supposed (FLERC), a controversy is First Nations energy company a “tempest in a teapot.” Allegations of conflict of with oil wells on its land run interest emerged when it was by a Chinese-owned compalearned that Strahl registered ny, Windtalker. But FLERC chairman and as a lobbyist for Enbridge Northern Gateway in Decem- CEO Joe Dion doesn’t see the conflict. ber. “I have no concerns about This as he also holds the part-time job of head of the Chuck’s SIRC duties,” Dion non-partisan Security IntelSee STRAHL, Page 22 ligence Review Committee

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IT’S BACK!

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ayor Sharon Gaetz is hoping a newly announced $30 million “advanced material recovery and recycling facility” in Coquitlam will be one more reason the provincial government should put a stop to Metro Vancouver’s plan to build a waste-to-energy incinerator. The private owner of the facility, Belkorp Environmental Services, has the same hope. “The real fundamental issue is, the province has to decide if Metro Vancouver is subverting or supporting [its] own solid waste plan,” Belkorp vice-president Russ Black told the Times in an interview Tuesday. “The province has the final check to make sure there is no funny stuff going on, i.e. build an incinerator before they maximize recycling and other options.” The proposed plant in Coquitlam will have the capacity to deal with 260,000 tonnes of trash. It will use state-of-theart technology to “break open the garbage” bag to find more recyclables. “The facility and others like it has the ability to negate Metro

Vancouver’s plans to construct a second incinerator as there simply would not be enough garbage to burn, saving taxpayers of that region millions of dollars,” Gaetz told the Times when asked about the proposed plant. Recycling already directs a lot of garbage from landfills, but a lot of what ends up in garbage bags and the end of curbs is still recyclable. Metro Vancouver has a goal of getting the recycling rate to 70 per cent of waste by next year. Black says his proposed plant can get 30 per cent of recyclables out of that last 30 per cent of waste. He adds that if Belkorp’s facility, along with two others—one of which is already planned—in the Lower Mainland, were to be built, those three facilities would ship less solid waste to the landfill than would Metro’s existing and planned incinerator. That’s because even with incineration there is toxic ash that needs to be landfilled. “If we were to build three of these you would send more inert material to landfill than in an incineration scheme.” The City of Coquitlam gave the Belkorp facility its approv-

6324951

BY PAUL J. HENDERSON phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com

Thursday, Thursday, January January 23, 23, 2014 2014 A11 A11

5725 Vedder Road

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Valid at both locations in Chilliwack

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A12 Thursday, January 23, 2014 A12 Thursday, January 23, 2014

Upcoming games: Jan. 24 - Chilliwack @ Langley 7:15 p.m. Jan. 26 - West Kelowna @ Chilliwack 5:00 p.m.

chiefsextra

Mainland Division TEAM GP x - Langley 46 x - Prince George 44 Coquitlam 44 Surrey 45 Chilliwack 45

W 28 25 22 18 10

L T 12 1 15 2 18 1 25 1 31 1

OTL PTS 5 62 2 54 3 48 1 38 3 24

Interior Division TEAM Penticton W. Kelowna Vernon Salmon Arm Merritt Trail

GP 44 42 45 45 43 45

W 27 26 23 22 22 9

L T 11 2 12 2 14 3 17 1 17 3 31 2

OTL PTS 4 60 2 56 5 54 5 50 1 48 3 23

Island Division TEAM Powell River Victoria Nanaimo Cowichan Valley Alberni Valley

GP 43 44 46 45 44

W 29 28 22 17 13

L T 10 2 11 3 22 1 26 1 24 2

OTL PTS 2 62 2 61 1 46 1 36 5 33

Youth movement

x - Clinched playoff spot

Chiefs leading scorers PLAYER GP C. Cochrane 44 M. Tibbet 45 Z. Diamantoni 45 J. Hand 43

G 13 18 5 9

A 22 17 25 15

PTS 35 35 30 24

Paul J. Henderson/TIMES

A reduction in fighting is leading to a more family-friendly product on the ice for the Chilliwack Chiefs. BY PAUL J. HENDERSON phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com

W

BCHL notes Merritt Centennials goalie Devin Kero has been named the BCHL Player of the Week for the week ending Jan. 19, the league announced Monday. Kero backstopped the Cents to important divisional wins over the Vernon Vipers and Penticton Vees. The product of Hancock, Michigan stopped 56 of 58 shots for a .966 save percentage and had a 1.00 goals-against average in the two victories.

hile coach Harvey Smyl and his Chilliwack Chiefs are still looking game to game, searching for a few more wins in the last 13 games of the season, it’s hard not to look to next year. “I can guarantee next year we will be a better team,” team president Glen Ringal told the Times the week Smyl started trading top players. Trading Austin Plevy, Cooper Rush and Shay Laurent for new players and future considerations means the faces wearing red and gold will be different next year. But with the evolution of the sport, there has increasingly been a change in the faces in the stands as well. Hockey is a rough and tumble sport watched predominantly by

Family pack ticket sales Chiefs’ biggest seller young males. Isn’t it? “The 20-year-old macho man, he wants a pretty hard-hitting, tough brand of hockey,” Ringdal told the Times during a mid-season interview. “The moms with their little kiddies? Not so much.” And it’s this latter group, parents with children, that are increasingly forming the audience at Chiefs games. “I can see it in our ticket sales,” Ringdal said. “We are attracting more and more families. Our biggest selling ticket unit is the family pack: two adults, two children, four hot dogs and four pops.” Attend any Chiefs game and it’s hard not to notice the increasing number of kids running around the concourse, cheering on the team, lin-

ing up to ride the “fanboni” between periods and, of course, trying to get on the jumbotron by dancing in the aisles or in front of the band. Whether it’s a chicken or egg thing is hard to determine, but the increasing pressure to crack down on fighting at all levels of hockey means the product on ice is more family friendly. “Fighting is being discouraged at every level, so it is changing the face of the game and that’s not surprising that it would change the face of the audience,” Rindgal said. He gave an anecdote about a woman who was working for the team for a little while. The team gave her four tickets to come to a game, so she brought her husband and their two children. Halfway through the first period, a

fight broke out. The husband said, if they did it again, the family would leave. “Sure as heck, they did it again and he got up and the four of them left,” Ringdal said. “They weren’t going to experience that with their children.” Ringdal doesn’t think fighting will be out of hockey any time soon. But he thinks the consequences will get tougher and tougher and fights will become increasingly rare as coaches can’t sacrifice players to long penalties, ejections and suspensions. And while hockey attendance is shrinking at every level, Ringdal is optimistic that the inevitable move to focus on fast skating and goal scoring will draw a different kind of audience in. That and reduced season ticket prices for the 2014-2015 season could help.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A13


A14 Thursday, January A14 Thursday, January 23, 23, 2014 2014

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Sports

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he Sardis secondary junior girls basketball team was back to its winning ways this week after a couple of tough losses earlier this month. The junior Falcons defeated cross-town rivals Chilliwack secondary 61-32 Monday, earning home-court advantage for their imminent playoff run. Demi Weijdeman led the Falcons offence, scoring 17 points, including three three-pointers. Talia Ferris put up 11 points and Nicole Reid scored 10. Last week Sardis earned wins over Hatzic and Robert Bateman. The 52-16 trouncing of Hatzic Monday, saw Ferris score 14 points while Brynna Kearl added 10.

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Sardis jr. girls double up cross-town rival Storm BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

PRE-OWNED QUALITY

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2012 DODGE CHARGER SXT $Cornelia Naylor/TIMES MOONROOF, 23,000 KMSHelget battle Sardis From left to right, Chilliwack secondary’s Sophia Leidekker and Elizabeth #88-7167 WAS $28,995 secondary’s Talia Ferris and Sofia Biela for a loose rebound during junior girls basketball action at CSS Monday.

Fourth-ranked Falcons league-play record sits at 17-5

SAFETYFOR INSPECTED READY WINTER

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8,495

2012DODGE KIA SOUL 2012 RAM4U 1500 57,000 KMS, HEATED SEATS LARAMIE LONGHORN $$

38,995 29,995 17,495 40,995 $ $$$22,495 12,995 13,995 CARS, VANS & CROSSOVERS12,995 $$

LEATHER, 5.7L HEMI MOONROOF, NAV, #R9-9016 16,871 #99-7692KMS WAS $31,495WAS $43,995

BACKUP CAMERA 45,000 KMS, NAV, 5.7L V8 #99-4490WAS WAS $21,995 #99-6497 $43,995

2010 KIAFOCUS FORTESE 2011 BUICK REGAL CXL 2012 FORD

2010 KIA FORTE

4CYL, LEATHER, MOONROOF, 27,000 KMS AUTO, LEATHER, SUNROOF 53,240 KMS #88-1920 WAS $24,995 #88-8457 WAS $15,495 #88-7907 WAS $14,995

AUTO, LEATHER, SUNROOF #88-7907 WAS $14,995

2013 TAURUS SEL AWD 2012 DODGE 2009 TOYOTA COROLLA 2012 FORD FOCUS SE AUTO, KMS, 4CYL 15,000 SUNROOF, CHARGER SXT 53,240 KMS LEATHER, $$$ #88-8469 NAV, BACKUP CAMERA #88-8469 MOONROOF, 23,000 KMS #88-8457 WAS $15,495 #88-7435 WAS WAS $14,995 #88-7167 WAS $27,495 $28,995

2009 TOYOTA 2011 LINCOLN MKS AWD 2010 KIA COROLLA FORTE

25,995 23,995 13,995 9,995 $

AUTO, 4CYL 37,000 KMS, HEATED/COOLED AUTO, LEATHER, SUNROOF SEATS, #88-8469 NAVIGATION,WAS ADAPTIVE CRUISE CONTROL #88-7907 $14,995 WAS $14,995 #88-2802 WAS $31,495

12,995 29,995 9,995

$$$

2009 TOYOTA COROLLA 2012 FOCUS TITANIUM 2009 HONDA ODYSSEY LX

2012 FOCUS TITANIUM 2012 DODGE 2010 MAZDA CX-7 GX SL 2005 NISSAN ALTIMA 2012 FORD FIESTA SE

18,995 23,995 8,495 12,995

18,995 17,900 9,995

AUTO, 4CYL LEATHER, SUNROOF, SUNROOF, AUTO AUTO FWD, AUTO, 46062 LEATHER, SUNROOF, 24,000KMS $ 41,000 KMS,SUNROOF, AUTO,KMS 77,000 KMS, AUTO 24,000KMS $ CHARGER SXT OnLEATHER, Wednesday, Demi Weijdeman $ #88-8469 $ led the LEATHER, $ $$ #88-1664 #88-1427 2133 FROM #88-1664 #88-1427 MOONROOF, 23,000 KMS 2#99TO CHOOSE #99-5804 WAS $14,995 WAS $20,995 $21,500 Falcons WAS WAS $19,900 WAS $11,995 $21,500 WAS with $11,99512 points as they beat Bateman #88-7167 WAS $15,295 $28,995 #88-2946 WAS 64-28. Marissa Murphy contributed another nine points off of the bench. “It was a team effort, with every player making contributions off the bench,” coach Gina Graves said. “Bateman could not score against our post players, Ryann Cornell, Karissa Mrak and Nicole Reid, who all had multiple rebounds and combined for 22 points. We have been in a scoring 2011 FORD FOCUS SES 2012 FOCUS TITANIUM 2012 FORD FUSION SEL 2011 FOCUS SES 2009 FITALTIMA SPORT 2013 VW JETTA TRENDLINE 2005 NISSAN SL 2012HONDA FUSION SEL drought for aFORD few weeks now, and I am extremeAUTO, 47,000 KMS, LEATHER, AUTO, 47,000 KMS, LEATHER, LEATHER, SUNROOF, 24,000KMS 71,000 KMS, AUTO, ALLOY WHEELS 3400SOUND KMS LEATHER, SUNROOF, AUTO SONY SYSTEM, MOONROOF $ SONY SOUND SYSTEM, MOONROOF ly proud of the girls for playing hard and finding $ $ $ $ $ SUNROOF $$ #88-1664 #88-1427 #88-1308 #88-6917 #88-5239 SUNROOF #88-1308 WAS $17,495 WAS $19,995 #88-9389 WAS $21,500 WAS WAS $11,995 $18,995 $18,995 a way#88-9389 to score the ball this week.” WAS $13,500 WAS $13,500 That scoring drought had led to two of the Falcons three league losses this season against • SAFETY INSPECTED • FINANCING AVAILABLE • TRADES WELCOME the league’s second and third place teams. • SAFETY INSPECTED • FINANCING AVAILABLE • TRADES WELCOME Sardis fell to third-ranked MEI 44-37 Jan. 6 See www.chilliwackford.com for complete See www.chilliwackford.com inventory or for complete inventory or and second-ranked Yale 41-26 Jan.scan 8. this code on your phone scan this code on your phone Talia Ferris led the Sardis offence in both games, scoring 11 points against M.E.I and 10 against Yale.  The fourth-ranked Falcons are now 7-3 in 2011 FORD FOCUS SES 2012 FORD FUSION SEL league play and 17-5 overall. AUTO, 47,000 KMS, LEATHER,

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DLN 30898


CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A15 ®

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Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, January 24 through Sunday, January 26, 2014 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Co. and Safeway. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ. t Offer valid from January 24 - January 30, 2014 at Safeway grocery stores in Canada, excluding Safeway Liquor stores and Safeway Oil & Gas stations. Earn 25 Bonus AIR MILES® reward miles with a purchase of $100 or more made in a single transaction and charged to your Basic or Supplementary American Express®* AIR MILES® Credit Card, American Express®* AIR MILES® Platinum Credit Card, American Express®* AIR MILES® Reserve Credit Card, American Express®* AIR MILES® Business Platinum Credit Card, American Express®* AIR MILES® Business Gold Credit Card. No coupon required. No maximum or minimum number of items as long as it is 1 transaction totaling $100. Limit One (1) Bonus Offer per AIR MILES Collector Account. 25 Bonus reward miles will be credited to your AIR MILES Collector Account up to 90 days after January 30, 2014. Account must be in good standing. AIR MILES reward miles will be earned on the amount of all eligible purchases, less credits and returns. Funds Advances, Finance Charges, Amex Cheques, balance transfers, annual fees (if applicable), other fees, and charges for travelers cheques and foreign currencies are not purchases and do not qualify for reward miles. Safeway is not responsible for the issuance of the 25 Bonus reward miles offer, or the obligations relating to the 25 Bonus reward miles offer.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TIMES CHILLIWACK

A16 Thursday, Thursday, January January 23, 23, 2014 2014 A16

Sports

Back-to-back losses for sagging Chiefs Coquitlam Chilliwack Coquitlam Chilliwack

6 3 4 2

BY PAUL J. HENDERSON phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com

L

ate goals were killers last weekend as the Chilliwack Chiefs were doubled up in back-to-back games against the Coquitlam Express. The Chiefs were at the Poirier Sports and Leisure Centre Friday where they lost 4-2, then back at Prospera Centre Saturday night where they were bested 6-3 by the 22-18-1-3 Express. Friday’s game was a solid backand-forth affair with the Chiefs’ Carter Cochrane opening the scoring at 2:52 of the first from Ben Butcher and Blake Gober. Coquitlam’s Canon Pieper tied things up at 7:39, and 1-1 was how the first ended. One minute into the second the Express made it 2-1, a goal matched by new assistant captain Mathieu Tibbet’s unassisted marker at 4:52. The period again ended even, and after 17:36 of tied hockey into the third, Nicholas Rasovic scored the unassisted winner for Coquitlam.

Ken Goudswaard/TIMES

Chilliwack Chief Zach Diamantoni headmans the puck up ice during Saturday action against Coquitlam at Prospera. They would add an empty netter a minute later.

Josh Halpenny stopped 25 of 29 shots in the loss.

Saturday night back at Prospera Centre was a similarly even affair

with the Chiefs outshooting the Express 14-11 in the first period. Despite the effort, Coquitlam’s Bo Pieper opened the scoring after being left alone in front at 6:56 of the first. Cameron Marks made it 2-0 on a long shot through a crowd, beating Halpenny, who again got the start. The Chiefs got on the board when an Express player put the puck in front of his own net and Kyle Westeringh tapped it in. Jake Hennig made it 3-1 for the visitors after Halpenny couldn’t corral a loose puck in front on an Express power play. The third started hopefully when Butcher put one top shelf on a feed from Gober, making it a one-goal game. The winner, however, came at 9:23 when Pieper scored from Cody Boyd. Tibbet gave the local team hope on a goal from a nice cross-ice feed from Tanner Cochrane at 16:34. Canon Pieper iced things for Coquitlam with shorthanded goals at 18:02 and 19:09, the latter marker on an empty net. The losses further dampen any prospect of catching the Surrey Eagles who lost 5-3 to the league’s last-place Trail Smoke Eaters on Friday but then seized an overtime victory 5-4 against the Langley Rivermen Sunday. At 18-25-1-1, Surrey now sits 14 points ahead of the 10-31-1-3 Chiefs. ◗ The Chiefs’ next game is in Langley Jan. 24 to face the Rivermen.

GRASP YOUR OPPORTUNIT Y TO

M AK E 2014 THE YE AR OF THE CADILL AC 2 014

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PLUS WE PAY YOUR FIRST MONTH’S LEASE PAYMENT cadillac.ca ENDS JAN 31ST #

4-YEAR/80,000-KM NO-CHARGE SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE + CADILLAC SHIELD OWNER BENEFITS

ON NOW AT YOUR BC CADILLAC DEALERS. Cadillac.ca 1-888-446-2000. Cadillac is a brand of General Motors of Canada. *Offers apply to the lease of a new or demonstrator 2014 Cadillac ATS RWD (1SA) or 2014 Cadillac SRX FWD (1SA) equipped as described. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in BC Cadillac Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer order or trade may be required. ‡0.9%/0.9% lease APR available for 48/36 months on a new or demonstrator 2014 Cadillac SRX FWD (1SA)/2014 Cadillac ATS RWD (1SA), O.A.C by GM Financial. Applies only to qualified retail customers in Canada. Annual kilometre limit of 20,000 km, $0.16 per excess kilometre. Down payment or trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payments may vary depending on down payment/trade. Freight & PDI ($1,700) included. License, insurance, dealer fees, excess wear and km charges, applicable taxes, registration fees and other applicable fees not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate offers in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See participating dealer for details. †$750/$500 manufacturer to dealer lease cash available on 2014 Cadillac SRX/2014 Cadillac ATS. Other cash credits available on most models. See your GM dealer for details. 2014 SRX (1SA) offer includes $1,500 in cash delivery allowance. +4-years/80,000km no-charge scheduled maintenance. Whichever comes first. 6-year/110,000km powertrain component limited warranty. Whichever comes first. See Dealer for limited warranty details. ^Full functionality requires compatible Bluetooth® and smartphone. Some Devices require USB connectivy. #Offer valid only to eligible retail lessees in Canada who have obtained credit approval by GM Financial, have entered into a lease agreement with GM Financial, and who accept delivery from January 3, 2014 through February 28, 2014 of a new eligible 2014 model. General Motors of Canada will pay the first month’s lease payment, or first 2 bi-weekly lease payments (inclusive of taxes). After the first month, lessee will be required to make all remaining scheduled payments over the remaining term of the lease agreement. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. General Motors of Canada Limited reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details.

6342155 CDBC.14JF.MEN2.4C.HP.indd

1

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1/22/14 12:11 PM


CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A17

THE ALL-NEW 2014 CHEVY SILVERADO

2014 NORTH AMERICAN

TRUCK OF THE YEAR • BEST V8 FUEL EFFICIENCY. BETTER THAN FORD F-150’S ECOBOOST V6≠

• BEST PICKUP WARRANTY COVERAGE IN CANADA 160,000 KM. 60,000 KM MORE THAN F-150 AND RAM +

2014 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 DOUBLE CAB 2LT Z71 DISCOUNT¥

**

• BEST-IN-CLASS TOWING UP TO 12,000 LB^

ALL OFFERS INCLUDE CHEVROLET COMPLETE CARE: $3,500

• COMPLIMENTARY OIL CHANGES

2YR/40,000 KM†

• BASE WARRANTY

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NO-CHARGE TRUE NORTH EDITION PACKAGE

$2,265

• POWERTRAIN WARRANTY

5YR/160,000 KM†

LEASE CASH¥¥

$1,000

• ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE

5YR/160,000 KM†

TRUCK OWNER BONUS‡

$1,000

• ONSTAR®

TOTAL VALUE

6 MONTHS~

$7,765

T RU E N RTH E D I T I O N PAC K AG E I N C LU D E S : • Z82 TRAILERING PACKAGE • AUTO LOCKING REAR DIFFERENTIAL

• 18” MACHINED ALUMINUM WHEELS • REMOTE VEHICLE STARTER

• REAR VISION CAMERA • FOG LAMPS AND MORE…

CHEVROLET.CA ON NOW AT YOUR BC CHEVROLET DEALERS. Chevrolet.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. Chevrolet is a brand of General Motors of Canada. *Offers apply to the lease of a new or demonstrator 2014 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Double Cab 4x4 (2LT Z71). Freight ($1,650) and PDI included. License, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in BC Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer order or trade may be required. ≠2014 Silverado 1500 with the available 5.3L EcoTec3 V8 engine equipped with a 6-speed automatic transmission has a fuel-consumption rating of 13.0L/100 km city and 8.7L/100 km hwy 2WD and 13.3L/100 km city and 9.0L/100 km hwy 4WD. Ford F-150 with the 3.5L EcoBoost V6 engine has a fuel-consumption rating of 12.9L/100 km city and 9.0L/100 km hwy 2WD and 14.1L/100 km city and 9.6L/100 km hwy 4WD. Fuel consumption based on GM testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. Comparison based on wardsauto.com 2013 Large Pickup segment and latest competitive data available. Excludes other GM vehicles. ^Based on Wardsauto.com 2013 Large Pickup segment and last available information at the time of posting. Maximum trailer weight ratings are calculated assuming base vehicle, except for any option(s) necessary to achieve the rating, plus driver. The weight of other optional equipment, passengers and cargo will reduce the maximum trailer weight your vehicle can tow. See your dealer for additional details. †Whichever comes first. Limit of four ACDelco Lube-Oil-Filter services in total. Fluid top-offs, inspections, tire rotations, wheel alignments and balancing, etc., are not covered. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. ¥For retail customers only. $3,500 manufacturer-to-dealer credit available on cash, finance or lease purchases of 2014 MY Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Double Cab and 1500 Crew Cab. $1000 Lease Cash manufacturer-to-dealer credit available on lease acquisitions of 2014 MY Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Double Cab. Dealers may sell for less. Other cash credits available on most models. See participating dealer or chevrolet.ca for details. Offers end January 31, 2014. True North Edition Package (PDU) includes credit valued at $2,265 MSRP. +Whichever comes first. See dealer/manufacturer for details. Based on Wardsauto.com 2013 Large Pickup segment and last available information at the time of posting. ¥¥$1,000 manufacturer to dealer lease cash available on 2014 Silverado Double Cab. Other cash credits available on most models. See your GM dealer for details. Offer ends January 31, 2014. ‡Offer only valid from January 3, 2014 – January 31, 2014 (the “Program Period”) to retail customers resident in Canada who own or are currently leasing (during the Program Period) a GM or competitor pickup truck to receive a $1,000 credit towards the purchase, finance or lease of an eligible new 2013 or 2014 Model Year Chevrolet Silverado Light Duty, Silverado Heavy Duty, Sierra Light Duty, Sierra Heavy Duty, or 2013 Avalanche. Only one (1) credit may be applied per eligible vehicle sale. Offer is transferable to a family member living in the same household (proof of address required). This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. The $1,000 credit includes HST/GST/PST as applicable by province. As part of the transaction, dealer will request current vehicle registration and/or insurance to prove ownership. GMCL reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See your GM dealer for details. ~Includes 6 months trial of Directions & Connections with Turn-by-Turn Navigation (Turn-by-Turn Navigation not available in certain areas; availability impacted by some geographical/cellular limitations), advisor assisted-routing available; Visit onstar.ca for coverage map, details and system limitations. Services vary by model and conditions. **The 2014 Silverado has been awarded the 2014 North American Truck of the Year. For more information please visit www.northamericancaroftheyear.org

DLN 8692

604-795-9104 Toll Free 1-877-362-8106

6342164

45930 Airport Road


A18 Thursday, January 23, 2014

CHILLIWACK TIMES

Sports

Darren McDonald/UFV

The 2013 National Championship winning men’s and women’s University of the Fraser Valley golf teams and their hardware.

UFV golf #1 in the nation

BY PAUL J. HENDERSON phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com

T

he University of the Fraser Valley golf team has been named best team in Canada by the Golf Coaches Association of Canada (GCAC). “Even as the reigning Canadian national golf champions, it still came as a bit of a surprise, albeit a pleasant one, to be given the number one ranking alongside many of the larger programs in Canada,” said Cascades head coach Chris Bertram. Cascades golfers finished their incredible season in October in Quebec City with national championship titles for both the men and women. Led by Chilliwack’s Aaron Pauls on the men’s side and Kelowna’s Jen Woods on the women’s, the teams dominated the three-round tournament winning by 12 and 24 strokes, respectively, over the second-place teams. What stands out about the number one GCAC ranking is that it includes all golf programs in Canada. Unlike most university sports, it is the

Outdoor Club AGM Jan. 27

The Chilliwack Outdoor Club’s AGM takes place in the multi-purpose room at Mount Slesse Middle School, 5871 Tyson Rd., Chilliwack, at 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 27. Following the presenting of trip information, the winter schedule and some urgent business, there will be a break with refreshments. This month we have a chance to view video and still shots of bouldering and ice climbing in Patagonia. Visit their website at www. chilliwackoutdoorclub.com.

Investors Walk for Memories

The Fraser Valley Investors Group Walk for Memories event will take place Jan. 26 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Landing Sports Centre, 45530 Spadina Ave., indoors. Register online at www. walkformemories.com. The event supports families in the Fraser Valley who are impacted by Alzheimer dis-

CCAA and not the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) body that features the best golf in the country. CIS does not have a golf program, but instead of playing in the CCAA many other top teams, for example, the University of Western Ontario Mustangs, play against U.S. schools. This means that the best of Canadian university golf only compete against on another once a year, at the Golf Canada University Championships in May. The GCAC rankings decide which teams will be invited to play at the championships and, while the Cascades have participated in the tournament before, this is the first time that they have been given the top rank. The Cascades women, still in their inaugural season, ranked fourth on the rankings list behind the University of Montreal Carabins, the University of Victoria Vikes, and the University of Toronto Varsity Blues. The men claimed first by a margin of two points over the University of Western Ontario Mustangs, with the University of Victoria, the University de Laval Rouge, and the University of Toronto rounding out the top five.

On deck ease and other dementias. For more information, contact Ron Angell, volunteer walk chair, at rdangell@ telus.net or 604-792-1156.

Coldest Night of the Year The Coldest Night of the Year will see thousands of Canadians walk between two to 10 kilometres to raise funds for charities that serve the hungry, homeless and hurting on Feb. 22. This year, local teams are raising money for the Chilliwack Salvation Army. The walk starts and finishes at the Salvation Army Church on 46420 Brooks Ave. Registration opens at 4 p.m. and the walk (all distances) begins at 5:15 p.m. Between 6 and 8 p.m. a warm, light meal will be served to walkers and volunteers. Walkers who raise $150 (adults) or $75 (youth aged 13 to 17) do not have to pay the $25 registration fee.

6333287

FRASER HEALTH PUBLIC BOARD MEETING

For more info, visit www. coldestnightoftheyear.org/ location/chilliwack.

When: Wednesday, January 29, 2013 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Public Board Meeting 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Question & Answer Period

Chiefs pay visit to Langley

Where: Delta Town and Country Inn Terrace Room 6005 Hwy 17A Delta, BC V4K 5B8

Chilliwack Chiefs play Langley at the Langley Events Centre on Jan. 24 at 7:15 p.m. The Chiefs then play West Kelowna at Prospera Centre on Jan. 26 at 5 p.m.

You are invited to observe an open meeting of the Board of Directors of Fraser Health. The meeting will include a presentation on health care services offered in Delta, as well as a presentation by Dr. Nigel Murray, CEO of Fraser Health.

UFV basketball hosts UBC-O The University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) Cascades women’s basketball team play University of British Columbia Okanagan (UBC-O) on Jan. 24 at 6 p.m. at Envision Athletics Centre in Abbotsford. The Cascades play UBC-O again on Jan. 25 at 5 p.m. The UFV men’s basketball team also play UBC-O on Jan. 24 and Jan. 25 at Envision Athletics Centre, at 8 p.m. and 7 p.m., respectively. ◗ Compiled by staff

The Question and Answer Period will provide an opportunity for the public to ask questions. This is a valuable opportunity to connect directly with the Fraser Health Board and Executive. Everyone is welcome to attend. For more information, contact us at: feedback@fraserhealth.ca 604-587-4600

6342146


CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A19

EVERY SAT & SUN 10AM-6PM

ALL CHECKOUT LANES

OPEN GUARANTEED† unless we are unable due to unforseen technical difficulties

broccoli buches

Spend $200 and receive a

product of USA 734098 4060

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5.78

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in effect in many locations Please see online for details.

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ea

value using any other purchase method

**Redeem your earned Superbucks value towards the purchase of Merchandise at participating stores (excluding tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets, gas and prescriptions). With each fuel purchase when you use your President’s Choice Financial® MasterCard® or President’s Choice Financial® debit card as payment, you will receive 7 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. When you use any other method of payment, you will receive 3.5 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. Superbucks® value expires 60 days after date of issue. Superbucks® value are not redeemable at third party businesses within participating stores, the gas bar, or on the purchase of tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and prescriptions. Superbucks® value has no cash value and no cash will be returned for any unused portion. Identification may be required at the time of redemption. See Superbucks® receipt for more details. ® Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. ©2014. † MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Bank a licensee of the mark. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial personal banking products are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC.

97

793792 56796000495

in Superbucks® value when you pay with your ®

1.67

1

ea

AFTER LIMIT

3

13.49

AFTER LIMIT

499706 5963175553

LIMIT 4

47

LIMIT 4

LIMIT 12

selected varieties, 35’s

376569/ 943624 5800031186

ea

ea

Lysol disinfecting wipes

Speed Stick Gear antiperspirant/deodorant, 76-85 g, body spray, 113 g, Irish Spring Gear bar soap, 6x90 g or shower gel, 443 mL

Or, get 3.5¢per litre** in Superbucks ®

17.59 /kg

557864 6820086541

AFTER LIMIT

Fuel up at our gas bar and earn

.98

/lb

selected varieties, 700 g

963633 6335001622

EACH

1L

4.48

1 kg

OR

2.67

small

AFTER LIMIT

selected varieties, 100-200 g

98

2/

98

247817

LIMIT 4

Knorr chicken broth mix

179787 6840011270

2

ea

Black DIamond cheese bars

Lipton Yellow Label tea

white or whole wheat, pkg. of 12

SunRype pure apple juice

7

4.14 /kg

Bakeshop dinner tray buns

live Dungeness crab

98

ea

88

/lb

233907 46038302245

88

AFTER LIMIT

87

in-store

701562 33383007472

189278 79878244505

00

baked fresh

product of Canada or USA, extra fancy grade

selected varieties, 567 g

217574 7976325133

3

6 lb bag

EACH

O’Tasty dumplings

200 g

1

Every week, we check our major competitors’ flyers and match prices on hundreds of items*.

201378 6207900001

Six Fortune nama udon noodles

6342192

433187

package of 32, 580 g

809084 69574700246

8

$24.98 value

quarter

Hong Kong Bakery almond cookies

ea

assorted varieties, frozen, 2 kg

fresh chicken leg

00

raw shrimp

88

no name® chicken wings

551065 209662797

white, headless, shell on , frozen, 500 g box

3

ea

product of China, 200 g

714700 33645

.58

CLUB PACK®

Spend $200 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive a free CLUB PACK® no name® chicken wings. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $24.98 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, January 24th until closing Thursday, January 30th, 2014. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 125654 10000 04510 7 4

snow or snap peas

product of China

5/

FREE

®

Redeem Superbucks towards purchases made in-store.**

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

29.98

Prices are in effect until Sunday, January 26, 2014 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2014 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

superstore.ca


A20 Thursday, January 23, 2014

CHILLIWACK TIMES

Test Drive a CX-5 and you’re automatically entered to win 2 Manning Park Resort lift Tickets! See in store for details.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A21

Test Drive a CX-5 and you’re automatically entered to win 2 Manning Park Resort lift Tickets! See in store for details.

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A22 Thursday, January 23, 2014

CHILLIWACK TIMES

Community

STRAHL, from page 11 told the Times in an email “that his consulting and strategic advice for us has nothing to do with ‘security-related’ issues, and that FLERC retains consultants from time to time to help advance their corporate interests, which Chuck is doing for us just fine—it really is a tempest in a teapot.” Opponents are not dropping the matter by any stretch. NDP opposition house leader and MP for Skeena-Bulkley Valley Nathan Cullen said he may bring this up when Parliament resumes but added that there have been so many other scandals he’s not sure this one will stick. “It’s hard to say on one or two scandals,” he told the Times. “A week from today we could have six more. It’s whackamole in Parliament.” Cullen said the government is too cozy with the oil and pipeline industry. “The government plays a role and they are supposed to be the ref. And the ref is pushing for one team only.” Meanwhile, Democracy Watch has called on the ethics commissioner to launch an inquiry into the Strahl-SIRCEnbridge affair. In a letter of complaint, Democracy Watch says the federal Conflict of Interest Act requires public office holders to arrange private affairs to prevent conflicts of interest.

Ethical? “Democracy Watch’s opinion is that Mr. Strahl’s work with Enbridge while being Chair of SIRC while CSIS is investigating opponents of Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline causes conflicts of interest; it does not prevent them,” the organization said in a Jan. 17 press release. Democracy Watch’s spokesperson Duff Conacher said Strahl’s actions violate several rules in the federal conflict of interest law. Given that Enbridge was lobbying Strahl himself back when he was Minister of Indian Affairs until 2010, Democracy Watch says Strahl “must be using secret information he learned as a Cabinet minister, or is learning as Chair of SIRC, when giving advice to Enbridge.” “There is enough clear evidence for ethics commissioner Mary Dawson to launch an inquiry into Mr. Strahl’s activities, so will she act like a watchdog and investigate or will she continue her weak lapdog enforcement record by failing, as she has more than 80 times in the past six years, to investigate and rule publicly about possible violations of the federal ethics law?” Conacher asked in a press release.

So nice to come home to.

CHEER SUPER STARZ Cornelia Naylor/TIMES

Members of Midnight Cheer Athletics and Vancouver All Stars cheerleading teams compete at the All Things Cheer Pacific Starz Cheerleading Championship at Heritage Park earlier this month.

The TheYear Yearofof the theDragon Horse I am the Kaleidoscope of the mind. II am an unquenchable impart light, color andfire, perpetual The center of all energy, motion. The stoutI see, heroic heart. I think, I am moved by electric uidity. I flam truth and light, onlyand in my inconstancy IConstant hold power glory in my sway. IMy ampresence unshackled by mundane holds, Uncheckeddark by sturdy, Disperses clouds.binding goals. run unimpeded I have been chosenthrough virgin paths. Mytame spiritthe unconquered— To Fates. My soul forever free. I AM THE DRAGON. I AM THE HORSE.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A23

6338780

People

Low-fat cooking methods good start to a new year

T

he first month of the year is upon us once again, and the newly grown crowds at the local gym are in abundance. Congratulations on your will power. To assist you, I want to provide you with cooking method options that will hopefully help to add variety and keep some excitement in your meals. Let’s be honest, how many more dry pieces of toast, boiled eggs, or plain salads can you stomach before you lose your faith to the burger and fries that haunt you in your dreams? Included in the top 10 most common New Year’s resolutions are lose weight, exercise more, and eat better. Although I am not a dietician or a personal fitness trainer, I can assist you in the kitchen. Having a backyard barbecue is a popular event during the summer, but year-round it provides a great low-fat cooking method. Grilled meats, fish, and even vegetables always taste great because of the distinctive flame-licked smoky taste and caramelization. Very little fat needs to be added to items to keep them from sticking and there are no pots and pans to clean up. A low-fat cooking spray applied to the cold grill before igniting can also ease the cooking process and help to make those wonderful grill-marks. One of the few health concerns is the amount of carcinogens when food is over-cooked over a flame. The blackened bits ide-

CHEF DEZ

On Cooking ally need to be removed if this is a concern for you. Poaching in a savory broth or wine is a great way to not only infuse flavour but also keep your chicken or fish extremely moist. I find that poaching is very misunderstood. It is not the same as “boiling.” One of the last things I would want to eat is boiled chicken. The culinary definition of poaching is to cook gently in water or other liquid that is hot but not actually bubbling, about 160 to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Wine- poached salmon with a dollop of seasoned no-fat sour cream is amazingly delicious and incredibly moist. Braising meats is another way of reducing the amount of fat in your meal. “Braising” is the process of quickly browning your meat for flavour and then cooking covered with a small amount of liquid. Inexpensive tougher cuts of meat that are cooked using this “moist heat” method over a longer cooking time will become very tender. The liquid (wine, broth, beer, juice, etc.) helps to break down the unpalatable connective tissue found in these bargain provisions at the butcher’s counter. How-

ever, braising also works with leaner products like skinless chicken breast or pork loin— just don’t cook them as long. We have only scratched the culinary surface, but hopefully this will aid you in bringing some enthusiasm to your kitchen adventures. Don’t forget about the abundant number of no-fat bottled dressings in your local supermarket. They are not only ideal on salads, but also use them as marinades, dips, and sauces with certain dishes to help add variety quickly . . . just remember “no fat” doesn’t mean “no calorie”—always read the nutrition labels. Dear Chef Dez: I am on a diet and looking for ways to add flavour to my meals without adding fat or too many calories. Any suggestions? Dawn W. Langley Dear Dawn: Herbs and spices are the way to go. Dry spice rubs and fresh herbs add a ton of flavour without adding a number of calories. Try cooking with fat-free broths. Stay away from condiments like ketchup and barbecue sauce, as they are loaded with sugar. ◗ Chef Dez is a food cColumnist, culinary instructor and cookbook author. Visit him at www.chefdez.com. Write to him at dez@chefdez.com or P.O. Box 2674, Abbotsford, B.C. V2T 6R4.

Read Your

Chilliwack Times online aT

www.chilliwacktimes.com


A24 Thursday, January A24 Thursday, January 23, 23, 2014 2014

CHILLIWACK TIMES CHILLIWACK TIMES

Community

Increase professional skill sets

F

rom conversational Japanese to cutting-edge computer programs, UFV’s latest Continuing Studies term is chock-full of new opportunities while still featuring scores of proven programs and courses. The Winter/Spring 2014 Continuing Studies booklet features nearly 30 new offerings, ranging from GIS Essentials to Blogging 101 to The Formation of the Mennonite Brethren Church. The booklets were distributed with community newspapers recently. You can also find all continuing studies courses and programs online at www.ufv.ca/cs. UFV Continuing Studies (CS) will even teach you how to teach (or teach more effectively) through its new Curriculum Planning for Instructors and Facilitators course. Instructor David Tickner has 40 years of experience in educating and training instructors, and expects his course to appeal to a wide range of people who teach, from university professors to tailgate trainers providing jobsite safety lessons. Tickner’s new seven-module course (ranging from Developing a Course Syllabus to Competency and Outcome-Based Education) benefits instructors at any stage, from revising course outlines to redeveloping syllabuses or starting from scratch after being hired to teach for the very first time. “We’re getting people excited about the importance of preparing good material,” explains Tickner. “This really benefits anyone providing any level of instruction, which in turn benefits their students.” One valuable, longstanding asset offered

Exciting additions and proven performers highlight UFV’s Continuing Studies menu by Continuing Studies continues to be incredible resource behind us,” she says. “Our costs are less, the instructors know Customized Training Services (CTS). Utilized by some of the region’s top employ- our community, and they know our busiers, the CTS model crafts training sessions nesses.” In addition to increasing professional that specifically target the needs of individskill sets, Continuing Studies helps peoual groups or businesses. Potential clients include munici- ple advance within their professions by providing courses that palities requiring satisfy industry-mancomputer training, tradated recertification or ditional media organiongoing professional zations seeking social of the instructors at development for fields media expertise, or earUFV, as well as staff as diverse as dentistly childhood educators expanding their knowlmembers with exper- ry, accounting, early childhood education, edge for schools, private tise in their fields, so criminology, personal businesses, or church we have an incredible training, and childcare. youth groups. “We have a pair of Instructors are resource behind us.” important messages,” sourced from UFV’s stable of highly educated Liana Thompson says Thompson, “the first one is that we’re university instructors, as the place to start, and well as top industry prothe second is once you’ve got the career of fessionals from throughout the region. “We learn what a client wants, and shape your dreams, come back to us and let us training based on their needs,” explains help you improve your skill set and continue up that ladder.” UFV CS director Cheryl Isaac. Continuing Studies, and indeed the “Private-sector workshop providers tend to offer one set of skills, but ours are almost University of the Fraser Valley as a whole, is celebrating its 40th anniversary in unlimited.” It’s that breadth of knowledge that 2014/15. Some of the first courses offered allows CS manager Liana Thompson to when Fraser Valley College was founded meet the needs of such a diverse range of in 1974 were continuing studies courses, referred to as “night school” in those days. clients. “We have access to all of the instruc- ◗ For more information call 604-851-6324, tors at UFV, as well as staff members with email continuingstudies@ufv.ca, or visit expertise in their fields, so we have an www.ufv.ca/cs. 6311368

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CHILLIWACK CHILLIWACK TIMES TIMES

Thursday, Thursday, January January 23, 23, 2014 2014 A25 A25

Community Outdoor Club AGM

Lace Club meets

The Chilliwack Lace Club meets every month on the second and fourth Thursdays (Jan. 23) from noon to 3 p.m. in the Slesse Room of Evergreen Hall. Bring your lunch. Anyone interested in lace is welcome. Lessons in bobbin lace are available. For more information call Hylda Law at 604-858-4953 or Jenny Althoff at 604-823-4705.

Relatives Raising Relatives

A support group for grandparents and other relatives raising children. This monthly support group is an excellent opportunity for peer support as well as education. The group will meet at Chilliwack Community Services, 7112 Vedder Rd., on Jan. 23 from 7 to 9 p.m.

How’s That Made?

Join Susan Barclay-Nichols from Chilliwack Community Services for some fun crafts for teens and tweens. Learn to make paper crafts, fabric art, bodycare products and more. For more information, email Susan at sjbarclay@ telus.net, call 604-799-0624, or visit her blog at www. swiftcraftymonkey.blogspot. com. To take place at the Chilliwack Library Thursdays (Jan. 23) from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Please note that the March 20 class will be held from 2 to 4 p.m.  Registration required.

Video games

The Chilliwack Library hosts the Rated T for Teen video game group the fourth Saturday of each month (Jan. 25) from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. With Mario Kart, Super Smash Bros Brawl, Rock Band, Wii Sports, and many more, bring your A game and the library will supply the rest. Bring your

Nintendo DS for portable multiplayer mayhem. For more information, email Raymond at raynichols@ telus.net.

Storytime      

Introduce children to the love of books and language. Children five years and younger, along with their parents and caregivers, will enjoy stories, songs, rhymes and puppets. Storytime helps prepare children to learn to read. Monday mornings (Jan. 27) from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at Sardis Library.

Wanda’s Tea Dance

The Chilliwack District Senior Resources Society is hosting Wanda’s Tea Dance at Lion’s Hall, 45580 Spadina, on Jan. 27 from 1 to 3 p.m. There will be refreshments, door prizes and a 50/50 draw.Tickets are $6 at the door. Music by Sweet Water.

Family Storytimes

Introduce kids to the love of books and language with Storytime at Yarrow Library on Jan. 28 from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Children and caregivers will enjoy interactive, stories, songs, rhymes and more. Storytime prepares children to learn to read.

Volunteer Training Series

Chilliwack Community Services is presenting a Volunteer Training Workshop Series that will help participants build skills and learn about the volunteer opportunities that Chilliwack has to offer. Register for one or all five of the upcoming workshops held in Chilliwack on Tuesdays Jan. 28 to Feb.18 from 9 a.m. to 1p.m. Light refreshments provided. Space is limited—call Sarah Doyle at Chilliwack Community Services 604-393-3251 ext. 240 to register.   

Free Conversation Circle

Are you an adult trying to improve your spoken English? Would you like to meet new friends in the community? Chilliwack Library in partnership with the Chilliwack Learning Society (604-794-3772) is hosting free conversation circles Mondays (Jan. 27) from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Contact the library at 604-792-1941 for more information. Conversation circles at the Sardis Library will take place Wednesday evenings (Jan. 29) from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Contact the library at 604-858-5503 for more information.

Knit and Knatter    

Pack up your yarn and head to the library. Knitting is fun, relaxing and a great way to connect across the generations. Join knitters of all ages and abilities at the Sardis Library for our warm and welcoming drop-in knitting group.  Children and beginners are welcome. At the Sardis Library Wednesdays (Jan. 29) from 12 to 1:30 p.m.

6325519

Take Off Pounds Sensibly, a non-profit weight loss support group, meets every week at various locations. For more information about chapters in Chilliwack, call Peter at 604-702-8338 or visit www.tops.org to find a meeting.

To include your event, contact Tyler Olsen at tolsen@ chilliwacktimes.com. Put your event on our digital calendar by visiting www.chilliwacktimes.com.

Senior Peer Counsellors

Do you enjoy spending time with seniors? If you do you might like to take a training course from Chilliwack Senior Peer Counsellors which is a volunteer organization that sends trained volunteers to visit seniors. You will learn what is available in our community and also skill to help counsel seniors on issues which they might have. The course will take place in the small board room at 45938 Wellington Ave. during February. It will start with an orientation on Jan. 29 from 9:30 until noon. Phone the office at 604-793-7204 for information or to register.         

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Epilepsy support

The Centre for Epilepsy holds a support group for those living with or affected by epilepsy. Parents, families, colleagues or anyone who may benefit from resources and information regarding epilepsy are welcome. The group meets the last Thursday of every month (Jan. 30) from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Communitas Supportive Care Society, at 18-45966 Yale Rd. West. RSVP to epilepsy.communication@telus.net.

Senior trips

The Chilliwack District Senior Resources Society is hosting a number of events in January and February, including a trip to the Silver Reef Casino on Jan. 30, which includes a free seafood buffet, cost $29; and Bellingham Shopping, Fairhaven area and Trader Vic’s on Feb. 5, cost $42. For more info, visit www.chilliwackdistrictseniorresourcessociety.com. ◗ Compiled by staff

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TOPS meetings

Community events

6331164

The Chilliwack Outdoor Club’s AGM takes place in the multi-purpose room at Mount Slesse middle school, 5871 Tyson Rd., Chilliwack, at 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 27. Chilliwack Outdoor Club works with local government agencies to make known its presence as non-motorized, outdoor enthusiasts. They actively lobby for access to wilderness areas, and also do maintainance of trails to these areas. This promotes tourism in the form of non-motorized activities in our region. Visit their website at: www.chilliwackoutdoorclub.com.


CHILLIWACK TIMES CHILLIWACK TIMES

News

But city hall does not think it inappropriate and has steadfastly stood by the unanimous Dec. 3 city council decision to give second and third reading to approve the rezoning required for the facility. The Aevitas Inc. rezoning, and the subsequent social media storm that followed, led to the formation of the ACT Chilliwack, a supposedly non-partisan group created as a civic engagement tool. (I say supposedly non-partisan because once you are politically connected to a party, it’s hard to forget: The two leading individuals in ACT Chilliwack, Glen Thompson and Jennifer Woodroff, both volunteered and/or worked for NDP candidate and former-MLA Gwen O’Mahony.) A day before the public forum, hosted by ACT Chilliwack, city hall posted on its website a question-and-answer “community fact sheet” on the waste facility rezoning. A couple questions and answers struck me as interesting. First: “Why didn’t you give consideration to the request from a member of the First Nations community to wait?” The fact sheet’s response: “The City of Chilliwack did not receive any formal request from First Nations in this regard.” This left Ernie Crey scratching his head. The outspoken Crey, who introduced himself at the Dec. 3 public hearing as an advisor to the Sto:lo Tribal Council and councillor elect for the Cheam band, specifically asked council to defer the decision to allow for First Nations to respond. In other words, city council received a formal request from First Nations to wait. “The Sto:lo Tribal Council represents eight First Nations,” Crey told the Times. “What’s city hall talking about? Tells you how little they care to get acquainted with local First Nations, with the possible exception of one or two communities. Time for city hall to wake-up and smell the coffee.” I n r e s p o n s e t o C r e y ’s response, Mayor Sharon Gaetz reiterated that the municipality only consults with First Nations on official community plan amendments. “As the fact sheet explained, everyone in attendance at a rezoning public hearing is treated fairly and equally,” she wrote in an email. “All the information is available to the public in advance, and those in attendance have the opportunity to share information with council.” Gaetz added that she would ask staff to remove the reference to a “formal request” as it is “not pertinent to the issue.” This was done, and the fact sheet now says: “The City will refer and receive formal written comments on Official Community Plan amendments from neighbouring First Nations. Rezoning is a different legislative process.” Another question that struck a chord with me was “Why didn’t council give the public more time?”

Aevitas prez stays silent Good question, with an obvious answer: “All rezoning applications are being done in the same manner as per legislated guidelines as outlined in the Local Government Act. The process is followed consistently, and staff and/or Council do not make the decision to give one rezoning application preferential or differential treatment based on the assumption that one application may generate more community interest than another.” But section 131 of the community charter does, in fact, give the mayor the chance to bring something back for reconsideration. Back in 2012, Gaetz took advantage of the rarely used section 131 provision to have council reconsider a simple variance application. The request was to allow for a Chapman Road property owner to build a shop four times the permitted size to store personal vehicles. No one attended the Dec. 4, 2012 public information meeting, no opposition was expressed and council approved the request unanimously. On Dec. 13, Gaetz requested a new meeting to reconsider the application because “on sober second thought, I now believe the impact would be greater than I thought.” Gaetz was alone on that one, and on reconsideration in January a year ago, the variance was approved with only the mayor in opposition. So, could Gaetz and council have reconsidered the rezoning for this hazardous waste facility near the Fraser River if they wanted to? “While it is not used often, the mayor may require council to reconsider a matter within 30 days,” Gaetz explained. “In this situation the vote was unanimous, and based on the completeness of the application and the safeguards put in place, I did not have any lingering reservations that would have compelled me to exercise this authority. Additionally, a member of council may ask for council to vote on reconsideration within 30 days, however, in this situation, no councillors asked.” So on we go. City hall senior staff, six duly elected city councillors and the mayor have no problem with the location chosen by the proponent for recycling hazardous waste materials. A dozen organizations of environmentalists, First Nations and sports anglers are dead set against the location. And never the twain shall meet. Why did the company choose this site or why doesn’t it find a new one given the backlash and optics alone? Who knows. Aevitas president Byron Day has repeatedly declined to respond to requests for an interview.

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47 RONINWITH (PG) MANDELA LONGA WALK TO CLOUDY CHANCE FREEDOM (14A) 29:10(2D) FRI-THUR 7:10(3D), OF MEATBALLS (G) FRI-THUR 8:00 FRI & SAT 3:15(2D), NEBRASKA (PG) 4:50(3D), 7:10(2D) NEBRASKA (PG)7:00 SUN, TUES-THUR 3:15(2D), 4:50(3D) FRI, MON-THUR SAT & THIEF SUNPHILLIPS 12:30 CAPTAIN (PG) BOOK (PG) BOOK THIEF (PG)7:154:55 & 9:20 FRI, MON-THUR FRI-SUN, TUES-THUR FRI-SUN, TUES-THUR 5:30 SAT & SUN 12:35 & 7:15 MONDAY 9:20 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE ABOUT TIME (G) CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) FRI, SAT & MON 7:20 OF 2 (G) & 9:40 SATMEATBALLS & SUN 12:50(3D) SUN, TUES-THUR 2:55, 7:20 & 9:40 SAT 12:50(3D) FREE& SUN BIRDS (G) ESCAPE PLAN (14A) FREE BIRDS (G) FRI-SUN, TUES-THUR 4:50 (3D) FRI-THUR 9:40 FRI-SUN, GRAVITYTUES-THUR 3D (PG) 2:55 PLANES DELIVERY MAN (PG) FRI-THUR (G) 9:35 FRI, TUES-THUR 5:15(PG) (2D) FRI-THUR 9:35 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS SAT & 12:55 (3D)(14A) &3:00 5:15 (2D) FRI-SUN, TUES & THUR OUT OFSUN THE FURNACE PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: LEE DANIELS’ BUTLER (PG) SUNDAY 12:45 THE THE MARKED ONE (14A)(G) SUNDAY 12:30 JUSTIN BIEBER BELIEVE

THE GAMES: THE HUNGERS HUNGERS GAMES: GRAVITY 3D (PG) CATCHING FIRE(PG) (PG)9:00(3D) CATCHING FRI & SAT FIRE 5:00 (2D), FRI, MON-THUR SUN, TUES-THUR 5:00 (2D), FRI-THUR 6:50 6:50 SAT & SUN9:00(3D) 12:30 7:00(3D), PHILOMENA (PG)& 6:50 MONDAY 7:00(3D) 9:00(3D) FRI-SUN, TUES-THUR PHILOMENA (PG) & 5:05 ENDER’ GAME (PG) WALKING WITH DINOSAURS FRI-SUN, TUES-THUR 3:00 & 7:25(G) FRI SAT7:25 9:05 2:45(3D) MONDAY FRI,&TUES-THUR SUN 12:45 & 7:10 SAT & SUNWITH 12:40(2D) & 2:45(3D) WALKING DINOSAURS (G) MON-THUR 12 YEARS A7:10 SLAVE3:15(2D) (14A) & FRI-SUN, TUES-THUR CARRIE (18A) 3:30 & 7:00 5:05(3D) FRI, TUES-THUR SUN-THUR 9:25 SAT & SUN 1:00, (PG) 3:30 & 7:00 GRUDGE MATCH POLAR 3D MONDAYEXPRESS 7:00 FRI-MON, TUES-THUR 4:45(G) FRI-SAT 2:50, 7:00 DALLAS BUYERS CLUB (14A) THOR THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG) SUN, 2:50 MON TUES-THUR 7:20TUES & THUR FRI-SUN, 2:45(3D) & SMURFS (G) FRI-SUN, TUES-THUR 2:50 & 7:20 9:25(3D) FRI-SUN, TUES-THUR 3:05(2D) ANCHORMAN THE LEGEND CHILLIWACK HOSPICE2SOCIETY PRESENTS: CONTINUES (PG) DESPICABLE ME(14A) 2 (G) A LATE QUARTET FRI-THUR& 9:35 FRI-SUN TUES-THUR 5:05(2D) 6311372 WEDNESDAY 2:45

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SENIOR NT DISCOU LE B A IL A V A

Imagine you bring your dog or cat into the clinic to have her spayed. The receptionist greets you as you enter, has you to sign some forms, schedules a discharge time, then whisks your baby into the back for the “procedure”. You come back at the end of the day and are given instructions for her home care, pay the bill and take your pet home. Have you ever wondered just exactly what went on while you were gone? What really is a “spay”? I find it interesting when I ask my clients what they think a spay actually is. While some people know, the others have no idea. “are you tying her tubes?” Are you doing something with her ovaries? “is it an injection? When I have the opportunity, I explain that a spay is an ovario hysterectomy; a complex surgery involving removal of both ovaries as well as the entire uterine tract. I try to explain why intravenous fluids are imperative and how important proper anesthesia techniques and monitoring are. Veterinarians make a mistake when we assume the public knows exactly what we are doing with their pets. It is important to bridge the gap between what is seems so commonplace to us with what may seem so mysterious to you, the pet owner.

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So it is with veterinary dentistry. February is DENTAL MONTH. We are promoting Oral Health for all pets but do you know exactly what is going on back there? How is it any different from having the teeth cleaned at my groomers? What is “scaling and polishing” and why can it only be performed under anesthesia? To help you gain a better understanding, we have recorded an actual dental procedure this year. The purpose is to help you understand the value in removing the tartar from below the gum line so that gingivitis does not develop into periodontal disease and rotten teeth.

75 Plus Taxes Shop Supplies Extra

If you would like to know what exactly does go on “back there” during a dental. Visit our website at www.cottonwoodclinic.ca and click on the link to watch the video. Then when you book your pet’s next dental, you will know exactly what is happening.

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A26 Thursday, January 23, 2014 A26 Thursday, January 23, 2014

6339681

See leading ag experts in your area At FCC Ag Knowledge Exchange events, you get practical advice you can use. Minimize Taxes and Maximize Purchasing Power

Lance Stockbrugger

Abbotsford

Jan. 23

Put Mobile Technology to Work on Your Farm

Peter Gredig

Chilliwack

Feb. 4

Visit our website to submit your free registration, confirm the date, place and time* of upcoming events, and see a full list of what FCC Ag Knowledge Exchange has for you. Everyone is welcome, so register your family members, friends and business partners too. fcc.ca/AgKnowledge 1-888-332-3301 *Dates and locations are subject to change.

6339953


CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A27

Application to Participate in National Energy Board Public Hearing for Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC Trans Mountain Expansion Project The National Energy Board (NEB) has received an application from Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC for approval to construct and operate the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (Project). Description of The Project The Project would expand the existing Trans Mountain pipeline system located between Edmonton, AB and Burnaby, BC. It would include approximately 987 km of new pipeline, new and modified facilities, such as pump stations and tanks, and the reactivation of 193 km of existing pipeline. There would also be an expansion of the Westridge Marine Terminal. New pipeline segments would be added between Edmonton to Hinton, AB, Hargreaves, BC to Darfield, BC and Black Pines, BC to Burnaby, BC. Reactivation of existing pipeline segments would occur between Hinton, AB to Hargreaves, BC and Darfield to Black Pines, BC. The application can be found on the NEB website. Participation in NEB Hearing The NEB will determine if the application is complete and if so, it will hold a public hearing. Those who wish to participate in the NEB hearing must apply to participate. Applicants must clearly describe their interest in relation to the List of Issues for the hearing, which is on the NEB website and included in the application to participate. Those who are directly affected by the proposed project will be allowed to participate in the hearing and those with relevant information or expertise may be allowed to participate. The application to participate is on the NEB’s website at: www.neb-one.gc.ca select Major Applications and Projects then Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC - Trans Mountain Expansion Applications to participate in the NEB Hearing are due on or before noon on 12 February 2014. Individuals and groups applying to participate must provide enough information for the NEB to decide whether participant status should be granted. Trans Mountain ULC has until 19 February 2014 to provide the NEB with comments on Applications to Participate and must provide a copy of its comments to those applicants to whom the comments apply. Applicants who received comments from Trans Mountain ULC about their Application to Participate have until 4 March 2014 to send the Board your response to Trans Mountain’s comments. Comments and Responses should be sent to the Secretary of the Board: www.neb-one.gc.ca, select Regulatory Documents then Submit Documents. CONTACTS Information on NEB hearing processes and participant funding is available at www.neb-one.gc.ca > Major Applications and Projects > Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC - Trans Mountain Expansion. If you require additional information, the NEB has appointed Ms. Reny Chakkalakal as a Process Advisor to provide assistance. Ms. Reny Chakkalakal Process Advisor, NEB E-mail: TransMountainPipeline.Hearing@neb-one.gc.ca Telephone (toll free): 1-800-899-1265

6339948

Ms. Sarah Kiley Communications Officer, NEB E-mail: sarah.kiley@neb-one.gc.ca Telephone: 403-299-3302 Telephone (toll free): 1-800-899-1265


A28 Thursday, January A28 Thursday, January 23, 23, 2014 2014

CHILLIWACK TIMES CHILLIWACK TIMES

People

A

well-known former military officer and local realtor passed away while vacationing in Mexico recently. Wayne Dehnke was born in Barhead, Alta., in 1945. He joined the army in 1964, retiring as lieutenant colonel in 1994. His last assignment was base administration officer at CFB Chilliwack. Wayne served with 2Bn Queens Own Rifles until their disbandment in 1968 when he joined the Canadian Airborne Regiment and became a member of the Canadian Airborne Centre. In 1973, Wayne joined the PPCLI, serving as Platoon Commander, Company Commander and Battalion Second in Command. He was Officer in Charge of

Dehnke dies in Mexico the Canadian Armed Forces Parachute Demonstration Team, “The Sky Hawks,” in 1972-73. Wayne served in Cyprus and was a member of the Canadian delegation to the International Commission of Control and Supervision in Vietnam. He attended the Canadian Forces Land Command Staff College and the Pakistan Army Command and Staff College. He was Canadian Forces Liaison Officer to the US Army Infantry Centre, Fort Benning, Georgia.

In 1983 he became Deputy Commanding Officer 2 Bn. PPCLI in Canada and Germany. In 1985 Wayne joined the Land & Amphibious Section, HQ Allied Forces, Northern Europe and later was appointed as Staff Officer to the Chief of Infrastructure Policy HQ AFNORTH. Wayne is survived by his wife Sandy, son Tony, daughter Jaime and son-in-law Kevin. He is also survived by three brothers and one sister.  Arrangements for a celebration of life in Chilliwack will be announced at a later date.

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Showtime

CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A29

Paul J. Henderson

Phone: 604-792-9117 • Email: phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com • Fax: 604-792-9300

Nothing fancy, everything fun Blacktie Beanfest not about the meal, all about the funds

The meal will be provided by the Chilliwack Bowls of Hope Society. “Supplying beans for this event is a great partnership for the work that we do in this community,” said Mike Csoka of the Chilliwack Bowls of Hope Society. A portion of the ticket sales will go as a his Valentine’s Day, get hypnotized, donation to their society. hear Elvis and enjoy some beans. As RCMP officers, both Dyson and Chilliwack Restorative Justice and Youth Bodner know firsthand the effectiveness Advocacy Association’s of restorative justice in the (CRJYAA) fundraising event community having seen the Blacktie Beanfest will raise program in action over the much-needed funds to conyears in their careers. tinue the great work that they As a hypnotist, Dyson do to keep our community brings a thorough knowledge safe and healthy. of hypnosis to every event The stage will be set for a having been trained with Las variety show featuring “The Vegas headliners and worldMagic of the Mind” hypnotist class authors on the subject. Lee Dyson and “Essence of He has a gregarious personElvis” Jeff Bodner. ality and will have everyone “What a perfect way to celengaged. ebrate Valentine’s Day,” said Bodner has been an Elvis CRJYAA executive director performer since 1987 and Kathy Funk. “We are making over the past few years he Submitted photo has brought his act to a level this event all about giving Local RCMP officer Lee back.” of quality and unmatched Dyson brings his hypnotic professionalism in his field. The inaugural Blacktie powers to Blacktie Bean- Together they promise a Beanfest is exactly what it sounds like: Wear your black- fest Feb. 14 show to remember. and-white best, along with a Tickets for the Feb. 14 pair of jeans, and you’ll get a bowl of Elvis event are on sale now at $50 each or a Presley’s favourite dish, baked beans. table of 10 for $400. Income tax receipts “We want most of your ticket money to will be issued for most of the ticket cost. go to Restorative Justice and not a fancy See BEANFEST, Page 32 meal,” Funk said.

T

Paul J. Henderson/TIMES

Elvis tribute artist and RCMP officer Jeff Bodner will croon his way into the hearts of attendees at the CRJYAA fundraiser on Valentine’s Day.

Submitted photo

Lee Dyson works his hypnotic magic during a recent performance at the Evergreen Hall. Dyson will perform at the Blacktie Beanfest fundraiser Feb. 14.


A30 Thursday, Thursday, January January 23, 23, 2014 2014 A30

CHILLIWACK TIMES TIMES CHILLIWACK

Showtime What’s on To include your event, contact Paul J. Henderson at phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com. Put your event on our digital calendar by visiting www.chilliwacktimes.com.

The Chilliwack School of Performing Arts presents Shrek the Musical continuing Jan. 23 to 26 at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre. Based on the DreamWorks animation motion picture and the book by William Steig, the musical’s book and lyrics are by David Lindsay-Abaire and music by Jeanine Tesori. For tickets call the centre box office at 604-391-SHOW (7469), visit in person or purchase online at www.chilliwackculturalcentre.ca.

Age of Arousal

The University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) theatre program presents Age of Arousal, a new play by Canadian theatre artist, Linda Griffiths in the new year. The play’s script is inspired by George Gissing’s 1893 novel The Odd Women. Age of Arousal continues Jan. 23 to 26 at the UFV Performance Theatre located at the old UFV campus, 45635 Yale Rd. Ticket prices range from $11 to $23 plus service fees and are available online at ufv. ca/theatre or through the UFV Theatre box office at 604-795-2814 and theatre@ ufv.ca.

Oliver Swain

Hailing from Victoria, Canada’s quintessential folk and traditional musician, Oliver Swain, will present his fresh take on old-time folk Saturday, Jan. 25 at 8 p.m. in the historic Harrison Memorial Hall. Tickets for Oliver Swain’s Big Machine are $22 and can be purchased online at www.harrisonfestival.com, by phone at 604-796-3664 or in person at the Ranger Station Art Gallery in Harrison and Agassiz Shoppers Drug Mart on Pioneer Avenue.

Chorus seeks voices

The Chilliwack Symphony Orchestra Chorus has immediate openings and

welcomes committed singers whose voices blend well in a group. All singers are expected to attend weekly rehearsals in preparation for the April 12 performance. The ability to read music is a requirement. The chorus is performing Handel’s “Dixit Dominus.” Call Paula DeWit at 604-795-0521 for information regarding repertoire, auditions, placement and rehearsal details.

January at Branch 280

Branch 280 of the Royal Canadian Legion has special events scheduled this month. Dance from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. with Borderline, Jan. 24 and 25; and Earthmen, Jan. 31.

Blues Brothers

The Official Blues Brothers Revue comes to the Chilliwack Cultural Centre on Jan. 28. The Official Blues Brothers Revue is a live concert show that combines the comedy and hit songs from the original 1980 hit film as well as the five iconic albums released by John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd. For tickets call the centre box office at 604391-SHOW (7469), visit in person or purchase online at www.chilliwackculturalcentre.ca.

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The Comic Strippers

The brilliantly entertaining Roman Danylo returns Jan. 31 to the Chilliwack Cultural Centre with some of the funniest comedians in Canada. Portraying a fictitious male stripper troupe “The Comic Strippers,” the cast consists of some of our country’s best improvisational comedians. For tickets call the centre box office at 604-391-SHOW (7469), visit in person or purchase online at www.chilliwackculturalcentre.ca.

Certain conditions apply *

See WHAT’S ON, Page 34

European acts at Bozzini’s

Birmingham-based singer-songwriter Dan Whitehouse and German-American accordionist and singer-songwriter Anja McCloskey kick off their joint Canadian tour at Bozzini’s in Chilliwack on Jan. 24. The pair have written and recorded a joint EP entitled Still, which was released Jan. 20. Show on Jan. 24 is at 9:30 p.m., tables available from 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 available now at Bozzini’s or call 604792-0744 to reserve.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, January 23, 2014 A31

Shakespeare ballet woos the audience with enchanting dance.

DANCE

“Ballet Jörgen returns to Chilliwack after a triumphant sold out performance last year with Swan Lake.”

“Bengt Jörgen crafts a jewel-box Romeo & Juliet.” - Paula Citron, The Globe and Mail

“A production that looks like a ballet but feels like a play.”

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A32 A32 Thursday, Thursday, January January 23, 23, 2014 2014

CHILLIWACK CHILLIWACK TIMES TIMES

Showtime CULTURAL CENTRE CHRIS WOODS EXHIBIT

Mark it on your Calendar! ROBBIE BURNS SUPPER

January 25th, Served ALL Day!

Haggis - Neeps & Tatties Whiskey Dessert

A number of paintings from Chilliwack artist Chris Woods’ Delacroix-inspired series Sandstorm are currently on display in the lobby of the Chilliwack Cultural Centre. Sandstorm, first displayed at The Reach in Abbotsford last summer, looks at the original Star Wars trilogy through the eyes of Darth Vader.

Monday - Closed Tues & Wed: 10am - 5:30pm Thurs & Fri: 10am - 7:00pm

Sat: 9am - 5:00pm Sun: 10am - 2pm 6341123

Paul J. Henderson/TIMES

Advertising Feature

Signature suits and sunglasses hit the main stage.

Event at Evergreen BEANFEST, from page 29 There will also be fun extras at the event like photo booths and other vignettes along with a no-host bar. Blacktie Beanfest is at Evergreen Hall, doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the community policing office on Wellington Avenue or at Bella Clothing Boutique in The Village at Sardis Park. CRJYAA is a volunteer-based non-profit organization with a mandate to bring offenders and victims together in order to discuss criminal incidents and to find ways to repair the harm caused. Since its inception in 1998, CRYJAA has provided restorative services to more than 2,252 individuals and have recovered more than $108,000 in restitution.

Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi’s creation of Jake and Elwood Blues as the frontmen for a fictitious American blues band captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation with their roguish wit and snappy dress-sense. Since their discovery in Las Vegas, performers Wayne Catania and Kieron Lafferty have amazed audiences with their interpretation of Ackroyd and Belushi’s characters in a live show that bursts with the spirit of 70s soul and blues. Katie Followell of Central Kentucky Entertainment said of The Official Blues Brothers Revue: “As soon as the band started playing my jaw hit the floor. They rounded up an insanely talented group of musicians that blew me away! Catania and Lafferty really studied Ackroyd’s and Belushi’s mannerisms and movements. Sometimes I actually had to remind myself that I WASN’T watching the original Blues Brothers!” This soulful extravaganza features the Intercontinental Rhythm and Blues Revue Band, who pay tribute to the Blues Brothers’ home of Chicago and the city’s diverse musical tapestry of blues, soul and gospel sounds. The eight-piece’s highoctane performance gives those classic tracks the huge sound they deserve, with a delivery that fills this “raucous, fun-filled

evening of great songs” with infectious energy and passion. As Scott Itter of Positively Naperville said, “If you want to smile and clap your hands for nearly two hours, I can’t think of a better way to do it than with The Official Blues Brothers Revue!” Everything you loved about the cheeky duo the first time around is here again to give the most complete Blues Brothers experience today. From the signature suits and sunglasses, their unique wit and charm, and soulful musicianship, Catania and Lafferty have mastered it all: “As Elwood Blues, Kieron Lafferty stole the show with his harmonica solos, while Wayne Catania, as Joliet Jake, brought the crowd to their feet” says Elizabeth Evans of The Battalion. This incredible talent is combined with the production of Dan Ackroyd and Judith Belushi, and with the original Blues Brothers musical director Paul Shaffer on board to bring those unforgettable classics to life The Official Blues Brothers Revue will be as close as you can get to the irreplaceable humor and cool character of the authentic infamous duo.

Don’t miss out when this incredible show stops in Chilliwack for their only performance in Western Canada! Call the Centre Box Office at 604-391-SHOW(7469) or visit www.chilliwackculturalcentre. ca and get your tickets early for this spectacular show. The Official Blues Brothers Revue is generously sponsored by Canadian Tire, Bathe Plumbing, Fortin’s Supply, Canex, Eltec Elevators, Fraser Valley Custom Printers, Kyle Hislop/Royal LePage, The Chilliwack Times, 89.5 The Drive, Chilliwack Best Western and The Department of Canadian Heritage.

Tickets available at THE CENTRE BOX OFFICE

604.391.SHOW

or visit the website at www.chilliwackculturalcentre.ca

6329809

Submitted photo

Local Mountie Jeff Bodner makes a pretty good Elvis.

What would you do to see the original Blues Brothers in action? With the acclaimed The Official Blues Brothers Revue set to bring the suits, sunglasses and hits to the main stage of Chilliwack Cultural Centre on January 28th, the chance to witness this legendary soul and blues sensation come to life in an incredible live show is just around the corner. As the only performance out of many imitations to be officially sanctioned by Dan Ackroyd and Judith Belushi, you can be sure that The Official Blues Brothers Revue will wow you with its ability to recreate the charm and essence of this iconic musical and cultural insitution.


CHILLIWACK TIMES CHILLIWACK TIMES

Thursday, Thursday, January January 23, 23, 2014 2014 A33 A33

Showtime

Romantic classic put on tippy toes Ballet Jörgen dances Romeo and Juliet

C

hilliwack fell in love with Ballet Jörgen when the company came to town last year performing Swan Lake, and the Chilliwack Arts & Cultural Centre Society welcomes them back on Feb. 1 with their newest ballet interpretation, the classic romantic tale of Romeo and Juliet. Treat yourself and that special someone for a pre-Valentine’s Day evening and the enchanting beauty of ballet. One of Shakespeare’s most popular plays, the classic tale of Romeo and Juliet has inspired the imagination of many an artist over the centuries. Ballet Jörgen’s artistic director, Bengt Jörgen, has created a beautiful and emotionally-driven ballet that is inspired by the raw emotion of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The choreography captures the agonizing passion of the young lovers through movement, as dancers express the euphoria of new love, the agony of quarrelling families, and the heartbreaking despair felt by the lovers at the prospect of life with-

out each other. Shifting between comedy and tragedy, heightening the tension, audience members will be drawn into the classic tale of these young star crossed lovers as they struggle to find a solution to their plight. Jörgen’s interpretation of this timeless classic has won international recognition and critical acclaim as the ballet has been showcased in major cities and communities across Canada, the U.S. and China. His engaging perspective on this story of love and the innocence of youth has created an intelligent dance production while still remaining faithful to the characters and storyline of Shakespeare’s play. Recognized by the National Arts Centre for its leadership role in the development of touring classical ballet across Canada, Ballet Jörgen Canada is known for the innovation, warmth, humour and beauty in its works. Continuing to reach out to more communities across the country than any other Canadian dance company, the troupe consistently tours the finest in new and classic productions to every area of the country. ◗ For tickets call the centre box office at 604-391-SHOW (7469), visit in person or purchase online at www. chilliwackculturalcentre.ca.

Submitted photo

Saniya Abilmajineva as Juliet and Hiroto Saito as Romeo in Ballet Jörgen’s production of Romeo and Juliet.

“One of Canada’s top international success stories!”

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MUSIC

The Chilliwack Arts & Cultural Centre Society Presents

An evening with

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Benefiting The Great Blue Heron Nature Reserve

Saturday February 8, 2014 7:00 pm

zzling a d , d n lla sou angements! e p p a c ional a smooth arr t p e c x E ies and n o m r ha

The Rotary Theatre at The Chilliwack Cultural Centre

Tickets will be available at the Theatre box office and online at www.chilliwackculturalcentre.ca General Admission $28 ● Students $20 Dave Nachmanoff is a guitar player and vocalist extraordinaire making his home in Davis California. He continues to accompany Al Stewart of “Year of the Cat” fame in concert and in studio on a regular basis. Dave has recently returned from a European tour playing popular venues including London’s Royal Albert Hall. Please visit davenach.com to learn more 6329836

6336908

604 391.SHOW

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7:30 PM FEBRUARY

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Showtime

Comic strippers get sexy

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oman Danylo returns to Chilliwack with some of the funniest comedians in Canada portraying the fictitious male stripper troupe “The Comic Strippers” on Jan. 31. The cast consists of some of Canada’s best improvisational comedians performing their way through some of the most hilarious improv comedy you’ll ever see. Chip, Chip and Chip will have you howling with laughter as they do their very best to be sexy. Front and centre as Chip Munk is Internet sensation David Milchard, superstar of the hottest new web series of 2013 “Convos with my two-year-old.” His career has had him perform with Second City, the The Vancouver TheatreSports League and most recently appearing in the YouTube Review 2013 and at Disneyland. The Comic Strippers show has been described as “Whose Line is it Anyway meets Zoolander.” Oiled up and ready to make you laugh, the semi-undressed comedians put on a completely unscripted show, taking on audience suggestions

WHAT’S ON, from page 30

Singalong

Come to a singalong program of traditional Christian music accompanied by the Chilliwack Songs of Praise Orchestra at Cooke’s Presbyterian Church, on Feb. 2 at 3:30 p.m. Located at 45825 Wellington Ave. Call 604-792-2154.

to create a whole new genre of comedy. Danylo assures patrons The Comic Strippers is actually “squeaky clean,” although it is for an 18-and-up audience. This is not a show with comedians stripping; it is a comedy show with improvisers playing fake male strippers. Women often say the most attractive thing about a man is his sense of humour so these stripped-down comedians are sure to make heads explode. As for all the men out there, Danylo says, don’t worry, this is a parody of male strippers.

“We want to make sure the guys come to our shows, too.” The performers have what’s called “comedy bodies” making the men in the audience look good by comparison. Joining Danylo on stage is Ken Lawson who stars in the Canadian sitcom Health Nutz and has performed throughout North America with The Vancouver TheatreSports L eague and The S e cond City. An improv comedy vet, Chris Casillan, also a performer with Vancouver Theatre Sports, is a Canadian Comedy Award winner. Another Chip is Pearce Visser, associate artistic director of The Vancouver TheatreSports League and an actor in Cirque du Soleil’s talent pool. Long-time performer with The Vancouver TheatreSports League, Chip Michael Teigen can also be seen in many films, TV shows and commercials. ◗ The Comic Strippers is Jan. 31 at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre. For tickets call the centre box office at 604-391-SHOW (7469), visit in person or purchase online at www.chilliwackculturalcentre.ca.

ence over a three-day stint at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre on Feb. 14, 15 and 16. With his performance featuring object levitation, making people 6331120 disappear from photographs, and escaping from chains using only his mind, Vitaly at London Drugs. The event will be performing an array will be held at the Mt. Cheam Lions Hall, 45580 Spadina Ave, of unique and self-invented illusions. For tickets call the at 6:30 p.m. centre box office at 604-391from the following businesses... from from the following businesses...the fol Illusionist appears SHOW (7469), visit in person llusionist extraordinaire Vitaly or purchase online at www. Best Western Rainbow Best Western Rainbow Beckman dazzles the audichilliwackculturalcentre.ca. Best Western Rainbow

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What’s On

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Cascadia Wind Ensemble

A “Travel Adventure in Music” with the Cascadia Wind Ensemble plays at G.W. Graham middle secondary school Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. The show will feature harpist Joanne Hankey and vocalist Penny Dalton. Tickets are $15 and are available for purchase at The Art Room: unit 20, 5725 Vedder Rd. in advance, or at the door the evening of the show. The concert is sponsored by the Chilliwack Community Arts Council. Contact 604-769-2787 to order tickets by phone.

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Next up in the Art Gallery in the Chilliwack Cultural Centre, running Jan. 23 to March 8, is Planes + Characters by artists Sandra Wiens and Pierre Tremblay. Tremblay and Wiens both enjoy working with the physicality of paint but with different outcomes. Tremblay has focused on playing with the conventions of portraiture. Playful extremes in both colours and composition play an important role in how his subjects materialize. Wiens has been working on depicting non-specific landscape spaces that explore the notion of both incremental and forceful change. The gallery is at 9201 Corbould St. and is open Wednesdays to Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. during theatre performances. There will be a meetand-greet reception Jan. 25 from 1 to 4 p.m.

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After a short hiatus from the gala fundraising scene, the Chilliwack Academy of Music is back in full force, with a brand new approach. While some couples will enjoy fine dining with soft classical music on that most romantic of evenings, the academy’s Valentine’s Hoedown on Feb. 14 includes a meal of pulled pork with all the “fixins” as well as dancing with a live country band. Tickets, which are $48 each ($96 per couple), are available at the centre box office at 604-391SHOW (7469), visit in person or purchase online at www. chilliwackculturalcentre.ca. They can also be purchased

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Chilliwack Times, January 23, 2014