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Autism assistance

Ingenious inventors

A family from P.E.I. searched Canada for the best place to live with their young autistic children. They chose Whitehorse.

Plans are underway to create a new space for the territory’s artists, tinkerers, hobbyists and craftspeople.

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Page 15 Your Community Connection

Wednesday • Friday

Friday, January 17, 2014

Established 1960

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Soggy times at Yukon College PAGE 5

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Workers clear snow and ice from the roof of the Centre de la francophonie on Strickland Street in Whitehorse on Thursday. Heavy snow accumulation and warm temperatures have caused trouble for many buildings this week.

Minto mine cuts jobs PAGE 3 Full of drips.

VOLUME 54 • NUMBER 5

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Yukon News

Inquests are a slog for affected families

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ust over a year ago, Mark Potvin stood at an inquest into the death of his son and questioned the last people to see him alive. The Ontario father represented his family while facts were laid out about how RCMP Const. Michael Potvin drowned in Mayo’s Stewart River on July 13, 2010. At the inquest the family did not have a lawyer. Potvin is in the uncommon position of being able to know what’s awaiting the families of Teresa Scheunert and Mary Johnny. The two women died on separate occasions after receiving care at the Watson Lake Hospital. A single inquest into their deaths was originally planned for March and has now been pushed back until the summer. Scheunert’s family has publicly raised concerns about their inability to find a lawyer to represent them. They’re also unsure of how to cover the cost of coming from Alberta to the Yukon if they have to represent themselves. Both the Yukon Hospital Corporation and the two doctors involved will have lawyers representing them, alongside a lawyer working for the coroner. In an interview yesterday, Potvin said he doesn’t regret not having a lawyer. “I explored the idea, but quite frankly, they’re just too expensive for what you’re going to get. An inquest is a non-binding, nonfault finding inquiry,” he said from his home outside Ottawa. “So there’s no benefit to hiring a lawyer. It’s not like a civil case where you’re going to have some money to be made out of this. It’s an entirely different paradigm.” That doesn’t mean the process was an easy one. The computer programmer estimates he spent 100 hours of his own time preparing for the inquest. Without a lawyer, Potvin said he had to work to find other sources of help. In the end he turned to the B.C. Civil Liberties Association. That organization gave him a sounding board and someone to bounce ideas off of. “He couldn’t represent me, and he couldn’t give me legal advice, but I could talk to him. He would at least talk to me when I had problems, particularly legal problems, and say, ‘Well, they should be doing this or they should be doing that.’ “But he couldn’t give me legal advice. At least he could keep me on the right track,” Potvin said. The hardest part comes early in the process when the sides are discussing what information will be made public, he said. “The biggest part was disclosure, getting all the facts. I kept running into privacy restrictions.

Submitted photo/Yukon News

Teresa Ann Scheunert, left, with her daughter Crystal Thomas. Scheunert’s family is worried they won’t be able to effectively represent themselves at the inquest into her death at the Watson Lake hospital in 2012.

Every time I’d want something I’d get told, ‘I’m sorry, you can’t know because that’s restricted.” He eventually did get all the information he needed, Potvin said. The NDP has raised concerns about the fairness of the process, if the Scheunert and Johnny families don’t have legal representation. Health critic Jan Stick called for the government to provide some form of support. “What we do want is at minimum a basic amount of legal support,” she said. Stick points to a number of pre-inquest meetings that are being planned. The families should have someone to turn to for help understanding what is going on, she said. But, for families, the cost of an inquest goes beyond the cost of a lawyer. Scheunert’s sister and two daughters have said they would like to come to Whitehorse for the hearing. That means things like flights and hotel rooms. In Potvin’s case, his costs were covered by an RCMP family fund set up to support members in need. No one has come forward to offer Scheunert’s family help, said Scheunert’s sister, Wanda Zimmerman, this week. Potvin estimates it cost about $2,000 for a flight from Ontario and $1,000 for accommodations. The Potvin inquest lasted about a week. The Scheunert/Johnny inquest is scheduled for two weeks. Stick points out that witnesses called by a coroner for an inquest have all of their costs covered by the government. The most recent inquest, into the death of a Porter Creek family and their friend from carbon monoxide poisoning, cost between $60,000 and $70,0000, said Department of Justice spokesper-

son Dan Cable. That includes witnesses’ expenses and other costs associated with running a hearing. A witness list hasn’t been set for the upcoming inquest, Cable said. The territory averages about 1.5 inquests a year. Depending on where you live in Canada, it may be possible for a family to get help with legal representation at an inquest. British Columbia legal aid does not cover inquests. But Ontario does, for those who can prove financial need. In the Yukon, inquests are not covered under the mandate of legal aid. Nils Clarke, executive director of Yukon Legal Services Society, said they are open to considering the expansion of services in the future. “However, at this juncture, YLSS has been chronically underfunded for many years in relation to its core areas of coverage. YLSS has lobbied for many years to address this vital access to justice issue. We perceive that we have made some headway in having a reasonable level of core funding confirmed for the upcoming fiscal year,” Clarke said in a statement. “However, YLSS will not likely know of the decision of our territorial government until the spring sitting of the legislature. If a reasonable and sustainable level of core funding is not supported, then all current legal aid services will have to be reviewed.” Stick said she would support expanding legal aid’s coverage. She pointed out that, since Scheunert’s family is from Alberta, it is unlikely they would qualify for legal aid in the Yukon. Potvin said he wishes the families the best of luck. “It’s really not that hard a process, it’s just a tedious process.” Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com


3

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Minto halves production, lays off staff Jacqueline Ronson News Reporter

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apstone Mining Corp. has cut production at its Minto mine in half because of a hold up in permitting. The 44 lost jobs belonged to employees of Pelly Construction Ltd. and its subcontractors. That company is itself a subcontractor to Capstone, and is responsible for the open pit operations at the mine. Pelly Construction was notified of the layoffs on January 10, said Jennifer Byram, vice president of community affairs. “It was a sad morning when we made the announcement, but most people are in the mining industry and understand that these things happen. The crew here is dedicated, hard working, loyal people to us and it was a very sad time.” About two-thirds of the jobs belonged to Yukoners, she said. Production will be cut from about 10,900 cubic metres per day to about 5,000. The reason for the slowdown is that Capstone is running out of ore that it is allowed to mine under the current permit. The company is currently before the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board for approval of an expansion to the mine.

complete. After a period of public review, assessors this week asked the company for a few pieces of additional information. The board will eventually generate recommendations as to whether the expansion should go ahead, and under what conditions. After clearing the YESAB process the company must also apply for updated quartz mining and water licences. Once that is all in place earthworks will begin at the next open pit, said Light. The hope is to immediately jump to processing 15,000 cubic metres a day and return to full employment levels, said Light. In the meantime the company is permitted to continue some underground operations. But underground operations have just moved from one location to another, so nothing is being proJesse Winter/Yukon News duced from those at the moment, Forty-four Pelly Construction workers at Minto mine were laid off this week because of said Light. permit delays. After six to eight weeks of the current development phase underIn August the board asked for “If we don’t get it in August, But the new permits are not exground productions will resume, extensive additional information pected to be in place before August. we’ll have to re-evaluate our mine he said. plans and see what we can do from that would be required before the The remaining ore under the Before the layoffs the full operaproposal would be accepted as there.” current pit would be used up in tions at Minto employed a total Capstone submitted its proposal complete. about three months, said Ron of about 350 people including That information was submitted Capstone employees and subconLight, the mine’s general manager. for the mine expansion to YESAB by the company over the followback in July. By cutting production in half tractors. ing months and in December the “We applied as early as we the company can continue open pit Contact Jacqueline Ronson at board deemed the proposal to be could,” said Light. operations for longer, he said. jronson@yukon-news.com

Campground battle heats up as decision looms Jacqueline Ronson

“We want to do everything we can to protect our rights and our title to that area,” said Ward. lmost two months after assesDixon declined an interview sors recommended that a new request for this article, saying that campground be built on Atlin Lake, discussions are between the two the Yukon government has not governments. made a decision on the project. The proposed campground is The Atlin-based Taku River located on the east shore of Atlin Tlingit First Nation remains fiercely Lake, just north of the border with opposed to the project, and says the British Columbia. Yukon is not within its legal rights It is within the traditional terto push ahead. ritory of the Taku River Tlingit, If the campground were built, “it according to a claim that was apwould be the most harmful thing proved by the federal government in that ever happened to the Taku 1984 with support of the Council of River Tlingits,” said John Ward, Yukon First Nations. spokesperson for the First Nation. As a result, the First Nation has It’s worse than if the area were asserted rights and title to the area, turned into a mine, because mines and the Yukon government is legally are temporary and campgrounds required to consult when decisions are forever, he said. are made about that land. Environment Minister Currie But the First Nation first heard Dixon and other officials met with about the planned campground representatives from the First Nawhen it was publicized in the media tion for several hours on January 2, in March of last year. but the parties are no closer to an Official consultation with the agreement. First Nation did not begin until May The First Nation would like to 8, according to the government’s initiate a land claims negotiation record. before it considers the possibility “We feel that the consultation of a campground, and the Yukon that has been conducted by the Yugovernment says it is unwilling to kon government has been adequate delay its plans. in the circumstances,” said Dermot If the Yukon government forges Flynn, with Yukon’s aboriginal ahead, which by all indications it relations branch in an interview intends to do, it will be under threat Thursday. of legal action from the First Nation. The Taku River Tlingit has asked News Reporter

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the Yukon government to halt work on the campground until a treaty negotiation is underway. It has offered to fast-track campground talks within that negotiation. But the government would like to see the First Nation deal with its claims to B.C. territory before it engages with the Yukon. “That’s been the approach that Canada and Yukon have taken in the past,” said Flynn. “Their primary claim should be dealt with first, and then the transboundary claim could be dealt with after that.” The First Nation has reached out to the Canadian government to help pressure the Yukon into a treaty negotiation. A federal official has suggested a meeting between the three parties. The Taku River Tlingit have asked Yukon to delay a decision on the campground until those discussions take place. It’s unclear if the Yukon government is willing to wait that long. A spokesperson with Environment said Friday morning that a decision could be coming within the next few days. The First Nation wants to see interim protection on Yukon portions of its traditional territory so that land claims can begin. “Yukon government has been recording mineral claims, granting land, creating parks, settling

land claims and is now on the path to creating a campground in the TRTFN’s unsurrendered traditional territory without consulting or accommodating the TRTFN,” said Nicole Gordon, manager of lands and resources with the First Nation. Other alternative campground locations exist that would be more appropriate, including the proposed campground at the Conrad historic site near Carcross, she said. The Carcross/Tagish First Nation and the Yukon government have recently signed an agreement to explore the development of that site into a campground. The Taku River Tlingit believes that the area of the proposed Atlin campground is one of the few valuable parcels of land left in its traditional territory, and it should be preserved as a potential land selection through the treaty process. “That’s a key area, I believe, that could support the Taku River Tlingits so that we can get away from social assistance, handouts and so on,” said Ward. The First Nation could use that land not only for traditional harvesting activities but also for commercial development, he said. The Yukon government is not open to providing interim protection for Yukon portions of the First Nation’s traditional territory, said Flynn.

With other land claims negotiations, protections for selected land parcels has only occurred at a very late stage of the treaty process, he said. “Just a wholesale withdrawal of land from other use, that has never been agreed to.” The government has offered to continue to consult with the First Nation on the campground if it moves forward, and to negotiate a process for future consultations, said Flynn. The Taku River Tlingit believes it has a strong legal case against the Yukon government and against the development of a campground on that spot, according to recent letters from the First Nation to the Yukon. Indeed, the Yukon government has a poor track record in recent years when it comes to court battles with First Nations on questions of land and consultation. In the most recent example, the Yukon Court of Appeal mandated that the Yukon must consult the Ross River Dena Council on mineral staking and low-level exploration activities on its traditional territory. But the Taku River Tlingit would like to avoid a legal battle, if possible. “Nobody wins going to court, it seems,” said Ward. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com


4

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Jury was not pressured, court rules Ashley Joannou News Reporter

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Request for Public Input on Changes to the Employment Standards Act From December 19, 2013 to January 31, 2014, the Yukon government is seeking public input In the spring 2013 legislative session, the Government of Yukon made changes to the Employment Standards Act. The Act now provides an employed parent of a critically ill child with up to 37 weeks of job protection to match the federal Employment Insurance Act, and up to 35 weeks for a parent of a missing child or a child who has died as a result of a crime so that they can take unpaid leave from their jobs and be able to access new federal financial benefits. With this public review, we now ask Yukoners to provide their feedback on the minimum length of employment required before becoming eligible for these new types of leave. We also ask for feedback on the maximum length of unpaid leave for employed parents of a missing child or a child who has died as a result of a crime. In addition, we are reviewing the appropriate ‘probationary’ period for all employees governed by the Employment Standards Act. To complete the online survey or to submit written comments, please visit www.community.gov.yk.ca/es.html or contact: Employment Standards, Community Services Email: employmentstandards@gov.yk.ca Phone: 667-5944, or toll free in Yukon at 1-800-661-0408, ext. 5944 Fax: 867-393-6317 Survey feedback and written comments are invited until January 31, 2014.

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Yukoner who claimed his Carmacks jury was pressured to reach a verdict because they didn’t want to travel to Whitehorse has lost his appeal. Joseph Townsend, also known as Joseph Desjarlais, was convicted of sexual assault after a three-day trial in November 2011. He would later be sentenced to eight and a half years in prison. The assault took place in Pelly Crossing but the trial happened in Carmacks. The jury was made up of members from both communities. After hearing testimony, the jury began its deliberations just after noon on Nov. 23. About four hours later they returned to the courtroom and gave Yukon Supreme Court Justice Ron Veale a piece of paper that said “undecided.” In his response, the judge told the jury that the “normal process is to keep going.” If their deliberations continued overnight, the judge said, they would be taken to Whitehorse, where there were accommodations, the decision says. According to the Yukon Court of

More flu shots arrive After running out of vaccines last week, the territory will be offering one-time flu clinics today. The Whitehorse Health Centre will hold a flu immunization clinic from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Kwanlin Dun Health Centre will also hold a clinic today from 9 a.m. to noon, and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The territory received an additional 1,250 vaccinations this ursd

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Appeal decision released this week, the jury also asked for more instructions about some of the legal issues in the case. After hearing those instructions, they continued to deliberate. They returned with a guilty verdict after about half an hour. “The appellant maintains the trial judge introduced extraneous considerations into the jury’s deliberations when he informed the jurors that they would be sequestered overnight in Whitehorse, approximately two hours driving time away from Carmacks,” Yukon Court of Appeal Justice Risa Levine wrote in her ruling. “This information came at a time when the jury had indicated to the trial judge that they were undecided and required clarification of a number of substantive issues. The appellant says the jurors were made aware that they faced significant inconvenience if they failed to reach a verdict that day.“ Townsend pointed to the half hour between the instructions and the guilty verdict as a sign that there was pressure during the deliberations. But the Court of Appeal disagreed.

BRIEFS week, said Dr. Brandon Hanley, the Yukon’s chief medical officer of health. The Yukon had to ask for more vaccines from the federal government after going through about 9,000 this flu season. For now, today’s clinics are the only ones on the schedule. Officials will have to see how much is left after that before

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scheduling more, Hanley said. About half of the new batch of flu shots is the standard variety administered with a needle. The other half is known as Flu Mist. That type of vaccine is given through the nose. It’s usually used for children from two to 17 years old, but is effective on adults up to 59 years old, Hanley said. He said the 1,250 vaccines are about the amount the territory had asked for. If this batch runs out, the Yukon is still on the list for vaccines coming from places outside Canada, such as Europe. The territory asked for about 1,000 more vaccines from that program and should hear from them soon, Hanley said. (Ashley Joannou)

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If the jurors had been told earlier in the trial about the plans for being sequestered, they would have been similarly inconvenienced, Justice Levine wrote. “Second, in my opinion it amounts to speculation that a juror would allow a concern about his or her personal inconvenience to, in effect, violate the juror’s oath to decide the case based on the evidence. “Jurors take their role seriously, and it would be contrary to our expectations of the jury system to conclude that it is ‘reasonably possible’ that a juror would allow his or her personal inconvenience to eclipse the importance of the juror’s responsibility.” Justice Levine went on to point out that the last thing the jurors heard from the trial judge was the further instructions in response to their questions, not the information about going to Whitehorse. It is more likely that those instructions caused them to reach agreement than the information about travelling to Whitehorse, she said.

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5

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Snowmelt seeps through college roof Jesse Winter

smell. An office in the trades wing had water flooding down windowpanes and across the floor last ukon College’s roof is leaking. week, but early this week it was The recent warm weather mostly dry. following December’s heavy Leaking also damaged the stusnowfall has led to melted snow dent union office, and school staff seeping through the roof of Yukon had to lay out buckets in various College’s Whitehorse Ayamdigut hallways and the school’s entrance campus in a number of places. to catch dripping meltwater. “I’ve never seen it this bad,” said “We’re tenants in this building. the school’s director of college relaThe Yukon government is working tions, Jacqueline Bedard. on getting the snow off the roof “I’ve not seen it this early and finding a long-term solution. before. Even our facilities guy, who Right now we’re working on findhas been here almost 15 years, he ing out where the water is coming hasn’t seen it this early,” Bedard in,” Bedard said. said. Some snowmelt is common The government hired a conat the school in the spring months, tractor to remove the snow and but with double the usual snowfall ice at the school this week, which for December still sitting on the should help mitigate the situation roof, and a near-record-breaking until repairs can be completed, warm spell over the last week, the according to Alicia Debreceni, a leaking caught most people at the spokeswoman for the department school by surprise. of Highways and Public Works. “We were actually praying for “A full assessment of damages colder weather. It was great when it Ian Stewart/Yukon News and associated costs is still being dropped to minus 20 and everyWorkers clear snow from a rooftop patio at Yukon College on Thursday. Heavy snow buildup generated. A structural engineer thing froze up a little bit, but the and warm temperatures have led to substantial water damage at the college. and an architect have both inspectwarmer weather this week, not so ed the college and have ensured great.” proved financially viable. Instead, The daycare and the Yukon Works and the Workers Compenthat there are no related structural Bedard said the impacts to the school converted an unused Native Language Centre are not sation Health and Safety Board or integrity issues,” Debreceni said. working and teaching space has so classroom into office space. impacted, Bedard said. to complete more mould testing far been minimal, with only two “Currently there are no reports “At the moment it’s OK because Most of the damage is conthroughout the college. There is staff being relocated. of leaking at other Yukon governwe’re only talking about two tained to the trades and technology no immediate health risk and the Space is already at a premium ment buildings, although there is people, and it’s still time when a wing. One room has been decom- building has been deemed fit for in the college. There was a serious potential at other ones. Highways lot of people are away. As long as missioned because of the leaking, occupation, according to Michael space crunch last fall that left 12 and Public Works is assessing the and a staff break room has been Vernon, a spokesman for the colstaff without an office. The school we don’t get a ton more snow and risks and will mitigate where posa ton more leaks we’re OK. The closed because of mould. The aflege. looked at everything from ATCO sible,” Debreceni said. worst of it seems to have happened fected area has been sealed off and In other areas of the school trailers and renting office space Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com downtown, but neither solution over Christmas,” she said. the school is working with Public there is soggy drywall and a moldy News Reporter

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College hikes tuition

will increase by $60 for students taking five courses per semester. Not all programs will see a The Yukon College will be raising its change. Tuition for culinary arts, retuition fees this September. The college’s board of governors newable resource management and practical nurse programs, as well approved a 1.9 per cent tuition fee as academic and skill development increase. The cost of a single credit will go programs, will not increase. “We strive to ensure that the from $110 to $112. price of education at Yukon College That means costs for a full year

BRIEFS

fixed costs of providing post-secondary education continue to rise.” Along with increasing tuitions, the college has eliminated the $50 does not exceed the lowest one-third application fee for domestic stuof comparable colleges in Western dents applying to the college. Canada, and this continues to be the “The application fee can be a case,” said Jennifer Moorlag, the col- barrier to accessing education for lege’s registrar, in a statement. some students. Whereas many “At the same time, however, the students are eligible to receive

financial assistance with course fees and textbooks, application fees come directly out of their pockets,” Moorlag said. “As part of our fee discussion this year we took a hard look at ways we could reduce this particular barrier for our students and decided that we should eliminate it entirely.” (Ashley Joannou)

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Yukon News

Addictions troubling in Yukon workplaces

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researching the impact of drugs and alcohol. “We’re not sure where that numubstance abuse at Yukon workber came from in the study. Nobody places is a serious concern, but in the mining industry was even hard numbers are hard to come by. asked,” Thrall said. According to a recent report Hugh Kitchen, the president of the on the healthcare needs of Watson Yukon Chamber of Mines, agrees. He Lake and Dawson City, roughly one said that the three operating mines quarter of all Yukon mining jobs are have treatment programs in place to lost because of substance abuse in the help workers struggling with addicterritory. tions and try to save jobs when they The figure comes from the report’s can because it’s cheaper than hiring qualitative assessment of the issues new employees. facing the two Yukon communiThe mines all have robust testing ties, which represents a “synthesis of and enforcement protocols. Drug observations from informed sources,” tests are also done as part of the not hard data. reporting process after injuries or But according to the Yukon near misses, and if an employee fails Producers’ Group, the real number of a drug test or is found intoxicated at lost jobs is nowhere near that high. work, he’s not necessarily fired on the “No, I don’t think it’s a fair spot. reflection at all. We were certainly “Instead of just firing him and surprised,” said Brad Thrall, the chair running him off, they say okay, perof the Yukon Producers Group. haps let’s try and help this individual “Our data indicates certainly less with this. Mines are always struggling than one per cent of the turnover to get someone. In the long run it’s is due to drug and alcohol abuse or cheaper to keep them and get them problems at the site. It’s not even some help,” Kitchen said. close to the 25 per cent,” Thrall said. He conceded that it’s possible the He criticized the report for not situation may be different for junior having sought the input of the mining and exploration companies, Yukon’s three producing mines when which could help explain the disparNews Reporter

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Friday, January 17, 2014

ity between the Producers Group claim of one per cent and the report’s 25 per cent. “There are so many jobs and so much activity out in the bush and lots of turnover. Many of the jobs are seasonal, but I don’t know how they arrived at that 25 per cent number,” Kitchen said. According to the Yukon Worker’s Compensation Health and Safety Board, somewhere between 15 and 25 per cent of post-injury reports at jobsites find some involvement of substance abuse. Kurt Dieckmann, the board’s director, cautioned against putting too much stock in specific statistics. Given the small sample sizes in the Yukon, even one positive drug test after an accident or near miss at a jobsite could sway the statistics greatly. “The problem is we’re talking about very low numbers, like maybe four or five incidents. That’s the problem with Yukon statistics; the numbers are just so low,” Dieckmann said. He also explained where he thinks the numerical disparity might be coming from. It can be hard to gauge the exact number of jobs lost to

addictions because people getting caught with drugs and fired is only a small part of those affected. “In that report, we think that people were self-selecting out of the mining industry because they know there is drug and alcohol testing. If somebody uses drugs and alcohol, and they know they’re going to be tested, they’re not going bother showing up for work,” Dieckmann said. On the whole, Dieckmann said it is likely that only one per cent of the workforce is actually caught with drugs and fired as a result at the big mines. But just because three producing mine companies are good at keeping drugs off their property doesn’t mean there isn’t still a problem. “It does not negate the fact that we still have a concern with the health of the Yukon workforce. The mining industry is actually an industry that does the best work in terms of drug and alcohol screening. My greater concern is the drug and alcohol use in Yukon workplaces in general, across the full gamut of industry,” Dieckmann said.

transport. Once in Watson Lake the supercooled fuel will be pumped from the truck into a special storage tank. “The tank is kind of like your lunch box thermos that you used to take to school,” said Redden. It would look a bit like a large propane tank for industrial storage, he said. There will be a berm around the area in case of accidental leakage. It will be double-lined and insulated to keep the LNG cold until it is needed. At that point, the liquid will be pumped into a vaporization unit, where waste heat from the generators will be used to heat the liquid until it turns back into a gas. Then it will be piped into the power plant and into the generators. Yukon Electrical hopes to begin construction in the spring, and begin burning natural gas in the fall.

The company will first retrofit only one of the generators. Emissions will be monitored to ensure that they meet guidelines. Then, if all goes as planned, the remaining five generators will be converted in 2015. The project has not yet been approved by the Yukon Utilities Board. It was one of several capital projects proposed in Yukon Electrical’s most recent rate application to the board. A decision on that is expected in March or April, said Redden. If the board were to decide that ratepayers’ money was not prudently spent on the Watson Lake LNG project, it could deny the project. In that case the company would have to halt the project and deal with the costs that have already been spent towards it.

Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

LNG licence a first for Yukon

Jacqueline Ronson

they instead burn a mix of diesel and natural gas. It could displace two million ukon Electrical Company Ltd. is litres of diesel fuel per year, said pleased to have the first liquefied Redden. natural gas facility licence in the terThe capital costs for the upgrade ritory, said general manager Dwight is a little over $1 million, he said. Redden. Because natural gas is cheaper “That was some pretty good news than diesel, the utility expects to see for us.” a return on that investment in six or The Yukon government amended seven years. its Oil and Gas Act a year ago to alRetrofitting the generators is low for the regulation of LNG. relatively simple, he said. Yukon Electrical recently received It involves installing piping to the the first permit under that amended generators so that natural gas can legislation. be piped in and then mixed with air “Being the first ones through, and diesel for combustion. we weren’t sure of all the steps to be Most of the capital costs relate to taken,” said Redden. the storage and vaporization faciliBut regulators and assessors were ties for the gas. all supportive through the process, The fuel will be trucked up from he said. an LNG facility in Delta, B.C. It is supercooled to minus -162 The plan is to retrofit Watson C so that it takes up less room for Lake’s six diesel generators so that News Reporter

Y

Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

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7

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Kevin McLachlan, centre, performs a hip-hop routine with the Extremely Moving Youth Society on Thursday as part of Go Nuts, a fundraising showcase of original choreography. The final show runs at 7 p.m. tonight at the Yukon Arts Centre.

k r ? o W t r A How Does D

Case 1: Will be a Clan Regalia Case sensitive to the important cultural artifacts that are being displayed. The case will dramatically display the objects and create a safe standard museum environment. The case will free standing easy access exhibit case of wood and tempered glass with stand alone lighting system with storage/display drawers. The case will accommodate 2 life size mannequins and two upper torso mannequins and three glass shelves. Maximum size is 9'X 8'X 4'.

Through presentations, group work and practical exercises, the workshop will focus on ways artists can recognize opportunities, generate new ideas and organize resources in planning to realize their artistic goals.

WHERE WHEN COST

Yukon Arts Centre February 15 and 16, 2014 $75 (includes two lunches)

* Please Note: participants from outside of Whitehorse are eligible for travel and accommodation subsidies.

ExprEssion of intErEst DEsign anD ConstruCt Display CabinEts for thE tEslin tlingit hEritagE CEntrE The Heritage Department of the Teslin Tlingit Council requires new cabinets for display of artifacts and artwork. We are looking for professional(s) experienced in design and construction display cases. Cases will be sympatric in look and materials to existing cases.

eveloping and Managing your Art Career – Yukon Arts Centre presents a two-day workshop for both emerging and established artists of all disciplines – visual artists, writers, dancers, theatre artists, musicians, media artists and others are invited to participate.

The seminar will be led by artist, curator and educator France Trepanier. For more than 25 years, France has been active in the arts as an artist, curator, educator, administrator, government arts policy advisor and arts funder. She was a cultural diplomat in Paris and is the founder and director of the Centre for New Media at the Canadian Cultural Centre.

Teslin Tlingit Heritage Centre

Case 2: Will be a wall mounted case of wood construction with tempered glass with ceiling lighting with storage/display drawers. It is to be easily accessible and be design to dramatically display the objects and create a safe standard museum environment. Maximum size is 10'X6'X2'.

TO REGISTER, CONTACT: Michele Emslie michele.emslie@yac.ca 867-667-8476

REGISTRATION DEADlINE: February 8

Interested parties please submit proposal, budget, timelines, resumes of principals and references on or before 4:00pm January 20th, 2014 to the Department of Heritage, Teslin Tlingit Council, Box 133 Teslin Tlingit Council. Email proposals are acceptable to tip.evans@ttc-teslin.com Contact Tip Evans, Director of Heritage, Teslin Tlingit Council Box 133 Teslin, Yukon Y0A 1B0 Phone 867 390 2532 Ext 330 tip.evans@ttc-teslin.com


8

Opinion

Yukon News

EDITORIAL

Friday, January 17, 2014

INSIGHT

LETTERS

EDITORIAL Scheunert’s family deserves Yukon’s support

P

ut yourself for a moment in the shoes of Wanda Zimmerman. You’re still grieving over the unexpected death of your sister, Teresa Ann Scheunert, who had worked as a nurse in Watson Lake until she died in the summer of 2012. More than anything, you’d like to have questions surrounding Scheunert’s death put to rest – conflicting reports suggest she either died as a result of an irregular heartbeat, or from consuming a lethal combination of painkillers while in hospital. You’ve already had to wait a year for the coroner to release her report into Scheunert’s death. That report was promptly contradicted by the hospital report’s own findings, which rebuffed the coroner’s assertion that the health-care system failed your sister. You had hoped that the upcoming coroner’s inquest would provide some clarity. But those hopes are fading. You’ve recently learned the inquest has been delayed until this summer, to allow hospital officials and doctors to appropriately lawyer up. You, unfortunately, don’t have similarly deep pockets. You can’t afford a lawyer, and no government agency has offered to pay for your legal representation at the inquest. As a resident of Alberta, you’re similarly on the hook for the cost for travel and accommodation to attend the inquest in Whitehorse – a cost that the government seems happy to cover for other parties attending the inquest, but not yourself. Coroner’s inquests aren’t intended to assign blame. But they are supposed to shed light on what caused a death. You worry that the way the cards are stacked, the government will use its obvi-

ous advantage in the proceedings to diminish its role in your sister’s death. You’ve been told that having a lawyer isn’t a requirement to attend an inquest, and that during past inquests other family members have represented themselves. That doesn’t change the fact that you will be walking into a room full of lawyers intent to shield the government from embarrassment or legal culpability. Without legal representation yourself, you may not know which questions are the right ones to ask witnesses. These matters shouldn’t simply be the concern of Zimmerman. It should trouble anyone who wonders whether the health-care system did indeed fail Scheunert, as well as Mary Johnny, both of whom passed away within two months of one another following hospital treatment in Watson Lake during the summer of 2012. Johnny was misdiagnosed as suffering from alcohol withdrawal, when in fact she had an obstructed bowel, according to the coroner’s report. By the time she transferred to Whitehorse General Hospital it was too late. Her case will also be examined during the forthcoming inquest, and her family faces a predicament similar to Scheunert’s. Inquest jurors will reach their own conclusions, but they should have the benefit of knowing that the inquest is conducted on a level-playing field. As it stands, that won’t be the case. There’s also the matter of who presides over the inquest. It’s a relief to hear that Yukon’s chief coroner, Kirsten Macdonald, has realized it would be inappropriate for her to do the job herself. It was baffling that this wasn’t immediately obvious, given how Macdonald’s report into Scheunert’s death forms a part of the controversy. Publisher

Mike Thomas

mthomas@yukon-news.com

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Macdonald says she will find another coroner to preside. But given how everyone seems to be gearing up in preparation for a lawsuit for negligence or malpractice, and given how the past inquest into Raymond Silverfox’s death triggered repeated court appeals caused by questionable decisions made by Macdonald’s predecessor, this is probably a job that would be best handled by a judge. To date, the response of territorial ministers has been to shrug and say that they trust the process. But it’s hard to have faith in the process when the process appears flawed. Certainly, it appears that way when you look at things Reporters

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Jesse Winter

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from Zimmerman’s viewpoint. Our territorial politicians face a choice. They can follow their usual instincts to minimize any potential embarrassment and decline to help the families of Scheunert and Johnny represent themselves at the inquest. Or

they could show a little decency, see beyond the legal wrangling and political point-scoring, and ask themselves how they would like to be treated if they were in the position of Scheunert and Johnny’s families. The answer should be obvious. (JT)

Quote of the Day “I’ve never seen it this bad.” Jacqueline Bedard, Yukon College’s director of college relations, on the school’s problems with snowmelt leaking through the roof. Page 5

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9

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Anything’s possible by AL POPE

NORDICITY C

onservative campaign worker Andrew Prescott has agreed to give evidence in Elections Canada’s investigation into widespread tampering with the 2011 general election. Prescott promises to give “full and complete testimony” in return for immunity from prosecution. Like the Conservative Party itself, Prescott has always maintained his innocence in the robocalls scandal and, like the party, he has up till now refused to cooperate with the EC investigation. Under Canada’s elections act, the regulator has no authority to compel testimony, and one after another Conservatives have refused to meet with investigators. The handful of junior staffers who have been permitted to submit to interviews did so under the strict supervision of

party lawyer Arthur Hamilton. By all accounts, their testimony was curiously similar. On election day in May 2011, a number of Canadian voters received automated calls attempting to send them to the wrong polling stations. The highest concentration of these voters appears to have been in Guelph, Ontario. The people who got these calls had one thing in common: they had identified themselves to Conservative Party canvassers as supporters of other parties. A subsequent investigation connected the calls to RackNine, an Edmonton firm with ties to the Conservatives. From there, the trail led to a burner cell phone purchased under the now-infamous pseudonym of Pierre Poutine, and to Prescott’s computer at Guelph Conservative campaign headquarters. Last May, Federal Court Justice Richard Mosely found that “there was an orchestrated effort to suppress votes during the 2011 election campaign by a person or persons with access to the CIMS database.” The CIMS database belongs to the Conservative Party. It is closely guarded, only available to senior staff, and there is no indication that it has ever been

hacked. Despite these facts, the Conservatives deny any involvement in the scheme to cheat non-Conservative voters out of their right to vote. Mosely was hearing a case brought by the Council of Canadians against six Conservative MPs, including the Yukon’s Ryan Leef, alleging that illegal robocalls in their ridings had helped them win in closefought races. The case failed, not for lack of evidence that the calls occurred, but because it was impossible to prove that they had been effective in turning away enough voters to affect the outcome of the election. Arthur Hamilton, representing the Conservatives, was criticized by the judge for engaging in procedural tricks and ad hominem attacks against witnesses. In his judgement Mosely complained that “the respondent MPs engaged in trench warfare in an effort to prevent this case from coming to a hearing on the merits.” Michael Sona, campaign communications director for Marty Burke, the Conservative candidate in Guelph, has been charged with “wilfully preventing or endeavouring to prevent a voter from casting a ballot,” for his alleged involve-

ment in hundreds of robocalls in the Guelph riding. Facing a possible prison term, Sona has told the media that he is being scapegoated, and has tweeted that he “won’t take the fall” for his party. As anyone who has ever watched a cop show on TV knows, immunity agreements do not exist to protect the innocent. Accused criminals seek immunity from prosecution when they know there is evidence that could link them to the crime. Also, immunity doesn’t come cheap. Suspects without information to trade that could convict someone guiltier, or higher up the criminal ladder, need not apply. Newspaper columnists are almost as constrained as judges when it comes to declaring parties guilty of crimes before all the evidence is in. In the press, as in court, you can’t call someone guilty unless you can prove it. And who knows? The CPC and its operatives may be completely innocent of trying to subvert the 2011 election, despite all the evidence to the contrary. It makes no difference that the Conservatives have a history of serious criminal breach of the Elections Act. During the

2006 election, party brass engineered the in-and-out scheme, involving 67 pliant candidates, to get around election spending limits. The party plea-bargained and paid the maximum fine, in a deal that gave four senior members immunity from charges that carried possible prison sentences. But that doesn’t necessarily mean the party is guilty this time. Possibly, the CPC has changed its ways since 2006. Maybe having to pay fines of $52,000 had a rehabilitating effect, and left campaign workers and politicians alike determined to win the 2011 election on the strength of their policies, and the power of their attack ads. But then, who is responsible for the robocalls? Wait. I think I’ve got it. No doubt, foreignfunded radicals hired some wizard who hates freedom and loves taxes to spirit the CIMS data away and use it to embarrass the government. Maybe the Conservatives are completely innocent in this affair. Hey, who knows? Anything is possible. Al Pope won the Canadian Community Newspaper Award for best columnist in 2013. He also won the Ma Murray Award for Best Columnist in B.C./Yukon in 2010 and 2002.

Experience is undervalued in child care Stephanie Joyeux

years, you are not given a level. Also, if you come from a related or two years, I have been asking field with 1,800 hours or more of Yukon’s Child Care Services Unit education (Montessori teacher, for (CCSU) to review and bring changes example), you can be a level three, to their level designation guidelines but CCSU will make you re-apply for child care workers. for your level every year, even if you If you don’t know how the work full time in a daycare. Yukon system works, here is a little If you do not do this every year, overview. you lose your level and are no longer To work in a licensed daycare, considered “qualified.” you must be assigned a level. It also With my three-year diploma in helps determine your salary because special education (having close to of subsidies offered for higher levels. 3,000 hours of classes) in Yukon, I There are three levels. By comam a level three. parison, a level one has 60 hours of Every year, to reapply for my coursework in early childhood and a level, I must enroll as a student in an level three has over 1,800 hours. early childhood education program When doing the “level designaand do one class. That is, until I have tion,” CCSU does not consider work done the program entirely, including experience. That means that if you placements. have been working as a child care Taking the Yukon College early worker, in a licensed daycare, for 20 childhood education program one

F

for many years, to enroll in a program in the evenings or weekends, including doing unpaid placements, without taking in account their knowledge and experience is not the same as professional development, and in my opinion, not beneficial in any way to the worker, or the children they work with. How many great, qualified workers decided they had no time to waste filling these requirements and were lost in the child care field because of this “incentive”? If you are one of them, I would really appreciate if you could take the time to share your experience with the department of CCSU since they told me no one else has ever complained about this Yukon requirement. If you are a daycare employer, you know the challenges that come with finding and keeping a level

LETTERS

Don’t trust those frackers In Wednesday’s article “Meet the frackers,” you quote Aaron Miller of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, who claims he is “not sure why the fracking industry has drawn such ire from environmentalists and other critics.” Nonsense! He knows precisely why. Fracking has been responsible for earthquakes, land fragmentation, property devaluation, land subsidence and extensive groundwater contamination with methane

class per year could take an individual around 15 years. This requirement is for people with related degrees, like teachers, or educators for special needs, that are already working full time in daycares. The reason for this, according to CCSU, is to create ‘’an incentive to take training.” I am not against training. Anybody who is passionate in his job should be interested in professional development. Compare this to teachers having to take professional development every year. This is great and makes sense: they learn about the new content in their field. I believe teachers are even paid to attend these. But asking a person who has a related degree and that has been working full time in the field, often

and other hydrocarbons in rural Alberta, Wyoming, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Texas and Arkansas. After land and water are contaminated, oil and gas companies pay the victims to be silent. According to Canada’s auditor general, more than 800 chemicals have been used to frack open more than 200,000 oil and gas wells in recent decades. At least 33 of the substances are known carcinogens. The Canadian Association of

Petroleum Producers has millions to spend on slick media campaigns to whitewash fracking and convince Canadians that anyone opposing fracking is “political” or “ideological.” And of course tub-thumping for the oil and gas industry is neither political nor ideological, just doing what’s good for business. If Miller is concerned about politics and ideology he should put his attention on the Harper government’s muzzling of scientists,

closure of libraries and destruction of scientific data. Consider that the founding president of the Canadian Association of Petroleum producers, Gerry Protti, was appointed board chairman of the public Alberta Energy Regulator. A former Encana executive with strong ties to the Harper government, this fox was literally handed the keys to the henhouse, making a mockery of any claim by

three. If you are an employed level three, you know how your personal life has been impacted by the requirement of spending years doing these classes. Most of all, if you are a parent with children going to daycare, you know what you are looking for in a child care worker. Would you turn away a person with 15 years of experience in daycare and a diploma in special ed. to work with your child? If you agree it’s time to make some changes to make it possible for people like me to work with your children, pleas, send your comments to Lesley.gardiner-falle@gov.yk.ca and Bradbell@gov.yk.ca, or ask your daycare provider about the petition circulating right now on these issues. Stephanie Joyeux is a child-care worker who lives in Whitehorse.

the Alberta government to balance environmental regulation and sustainability. Under Alberta’s new Responsible Energy Act, the province’s energy regulator no longer has a mandate to protect “the public interest.” Miller’s smug and smarmy remarks are media manipulation of the worst kind. Protecting the environment from Steven Harper and the oil and gas industry for our children and us is common sense. Scott Henderson Whitehorse


10

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Neil Young slams proposed pipeline Chinta Puxley The Canadian Press

WINNIPEG ocker Neil Young took aim at the proposed Keystone XL pipeline Thursday on his concert tour condemning the Alberta oilsands, while energy executives, politicians and even a fellow musician shot back that he is irresponsible and uninformed. Young told a news conference ahead of his Winnipeg concert that the TransCanada pipeline, which would carry oilsands bitumen from Alberta to Texas refineries, makes no sense since the oil would be sent to China – a country he called one of the dirtiest on Earth.

R

“People don’t understand this oil is not for Canada,” Young said. “A couple of months ago, Beijing had 30 times the World Health Organization’s approved level of pollutants and dangerous substances in the air – 30 times that – and we’re sending them oil. “I don’t feel really good about that.” TransCanada quickly replied that the pipeline would be a supply line for U.S. refineries and not an export pipeline. Company spokesman Shawn Howard said the vast majority of exported oilsands oil is used in gasoline, diesel fuel and other North American products. “It’s unfortunate that people

like Mr. Young want to mislead people about where Canadian oil goes and the benefits it creates,” he said in an emailed statement. “It has helped him create records and CDs, allows his tour buses to run, airplanes to fly, (allows) the manufacturing of high-tech equipment and guitar picks needed to entertain his audiences.” Young is on a four-city Canadian tour to support the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation that lives downstream from the oilsands. The band has filed a lawsuit to try to protect its traditional territory from further industrialization. Since he kicked off the tour in Toronto on Sunday, the iconic musician has traded shots with the Prime Minister’s Office and oil executives who say Young doesn’t understand the oilsands or their economic benefit. Even fellow Canadian musician Jim Cuddy from Blue Rodeo called Young’s comparison of the oilsands with Hiroshima extreme. “He’s grossly exaggerating,” Cuddy told Saskatchewan-based Missinipi Broadcasting Corp. “Nobody can say that any kind of open-pit mining – whether it’s oil, shale or whatever – is beautiful,” he said. “I’m not sure this is about esthetics. It’s about clean water, clean air and economics.”

However, Cuddy, who was to play a concert in Fort McMurray on Thursday night, also suggested that Young has triggered a national discussion about the oilsands that is long overdue. “You have to appreciate that Neil in his own extreme, crazy way has begun a dialogue that we have to have in this country.” Young continued his offensive undeterred Thursday. “We can preserve what we have so that we can say we did the right thing. If we don’t, it’s just going to look like the moon in Alberta,” he said. “It is like a war zone, a disaster area from war, what’s happened up there.” Both the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers and Shell Canada held a news conference in Calgary to rebut Young’s claims. It is the approval Shell has received for its Jackpine Mine expansion that the Athabasca Chipewyan are fighting. Association president Dave Collyer said Young’s statements “demonstrate pretty consistently a lack of understanding of the oilsands” and the economic benefits. “I think it’s fair to say the misrepresentations being made on the tour are quite irresponsible,” he said. “More importantly, they do a disservice to the First Nations he is ostensibly trying to help, to the many individuals whose livelihoods depend on

oilsands activity and ... to Canadians who we believe generally benefit very greatly from oilsands development.” Collyer said Young is entitled to his opinion. “I would suggest that he has a democratic right to be wrong.” Collyer added he’d be pleased to meet with Young and Athabasca Chipewyan Chief Allan Adam when they come to Calgary on Sunday for the final stop of the “Honour the Treaties” tour. Shell vice-president Stephanie Sterling said the world may one day rely solely on renewable fuel sources, but for now oil provides an “affordable” and “accessible” energy source. “In our experience, the aboriginal peoples want to build sustaining economic communities while they protect their traditional land and the environment,” she said. Adam said First Nations aren’t opposed to economic development. But the federal government is bound by treaty to properly consult aboriginal people and use natural resources responsibly. “We are totally for economic development for our future generations to come but we want to do it in a reasonable way,” Adam said. “Our treaties are being broken, in more ways than one.”

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11

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Arctic architecture Canada’s entry to Venice Biennale

The deadline to get your Pivot Theatre Festival Pass is January 22nd! Just 53$ to gain access to all three headliner shows as well as our fabulous after-parties (76$ Value)! Local Acts are PWYC. Getting your pass is as easy as picking up the phone and calling the Yukon Arts Centre Box Office at 667-8574, or by going to Arts Underground.

Check out the NEW Pivot Theatre Festival website at www. pivotfestival.com

Nakai Theatre’s Pivot Theatre Festival presented with the Yukon Arts Centre takes place from January 23rd-26th, 2014. For more information go to www.pivotfestival.com

Bob Weber Canadian Press

The Pivot Festival is made possible with the support of the following sponsors:

F

rom the land of snowdrifts to the city of canals – five designs that use architecture to address the realities of Inuit life in Nunavut are Canada’s entry to this year’s Venice Biennale, one of the world’s top showcases for builder’s art. “We all have the images of the Arctic that we get in National Geographic,” said Lola Sheppard, a Toronto architect and a curator of the Arctic Adaptations show that is to open in Venice in June. “But the physical, tangible realities of what it is to live in the North and what are the daily realities – what is a road? What do commutes look like? How do you get things there? – I think those things remain unknown. I think that’s a really interesting and important story to tell.” The show brings students from five of Canada’s top architecture schools together with architects working in the North and with various Nunavut organizations. The resulting designs address themes of health, arts, recreation, housing and education. Some take traditional ideas of building and transpose them to unusual sites. Dalhousie University’s take on what an arts centre might look like locates the building right at the breakwater that separates Iqaluit’s beach from Frobisher Bay, putting a performance space in the middle of where many locals work and play. Other designs don’t even look like architecture. On the recreation theme, University of Manitoba students present an idea for a network of trails linking five communities along the west coast of Hudson Bay. The trails would be signed by glowing markers and studded with small shelters, all powered by an array of 265 windmills that would also feed into the local grid. All of the proposals take Inuit ideas seriously. The University of Toronto’s idea for housing includes private and public spaces clustered together to cut wind and snow accumulation, with areas that could be used for everything from carving to butchering a caribou. The health proposal, from the University of British Columbia, addresses the importance of the land – and Nunavut’s mental-health issues – with “healing spaces” in communities and out on the tundra. For education, the Universite de Montreal proposes small, decentralized pavilions strung out

Pivot would also like to acknowledge the invaluable support of the following funders:

Yukon Fish & Game Association PRESENTS

Saturday, February 1st, 2014 Cocktails at 5:30, Dinner at 6:30 Come and enjoy a Wild Game feast, and bid at our silent auction & Dance to the “Sunday Night Jam band” Tickets are available at the YFGA office (667-4263) 509 Strickland Street Whitehorse, Yukon

HO/The Canadian Press

An artist’s conception of a design that will represent Canada at this year’s Venice Biennale, one of the world’s best-known and widely attended festivals for architecture.

across the territory and linked by modern communications technology – “a contemporary echo of traditional Inuit architecture,” the designers say. The trick, said Sheppard, is to design something with authentic roots that doesn’t resort to inukshuk-ridden cliche. “Part of what the whole exhibition seeks to ask is: ‘What is a modern vernacular that is rooted in place and culture and geography?’ We need to figure out a language that doesn’t yet exist.” Fancy architecture may seem like a frill in a territory with so many pressing social and economic issues. But Sheppard said that, like public education, good building is a long-term investment that pays off. “The idea of making places that have a sense of identity, that have a sense of collectivity – and that work – are crucial.” Iqaluit is full of developments, lifted directly from southern models, that have aged badly, such as much of the Nunavut capital’s housing. Many of its older public

buildings were clearly designed by southern experts who thought they knew best. One of its schools has no windows. It was thought that Inuit children, accustomed to 24-hour dark, wouldn’t miss them. Sheppard, politely, calls them BEst “emblematic of a moment in AnD… SaShimi • Tempura • robaTa • bbq • Teriyaki! time.” Private room for Nunavummiut, increasingly Large grouPs. town-dwellers, deserve better, she S said. ope N 7 Day ! k e e “These places are here to stay W a Mon. - Fri. 11:00-3:00, now. They’re communities that Sat: 12pm-3pm Free Delivery will be here for hundreds of years. “One can always say, ‘Let’s wait.’ Downtown & Riverdale on food orders $45 or more Mon. - Sat. 4:30-10:00 But we’ve made enough mistakes Sun. 4:00-10:30 In Porter Creek, Crestview, Granger, KK, Hillcrest, in our southern cities. We can’t Takhini on food orders $70 or more. always just be solving a problem TAKE OUT 10% DiscOUnT that’s immediate.” on pick-ups $40 and over! The Arctic Adaptations show is to open in Venice on June 7. About 300,000 people are expected to see it at the Biennale, often referred to Japanese as the “Olympics of architecture.” Restaurant Canada is one of 30 nations with a permanent pavilion. 404 Wood The Arctic exhibit returns to FuLLy LiCeNSeD (867) 668-3298 Canada in the fall and is expected to tour nationally in 2015.

any Karr & Comp k n a H : g n ri gers Featu : Marilyn Ro d n a b m ja t Sunday nigh aac & more & Moe, Ed Is at Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre January 31st, 2014 7-10 pm (doors open 6:30)

Cash Bar • 50/50 Draws • silent auCtion Door Prizes • sanDwiChes for sale Support Yukoners’ Cancer Care Fund

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Wild Game Banquet, Awards & Dance.

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The purpose of the meetings is to inform the public about the next house selection. Applications for this home can only be obtained at the public information sessions. www.habitatyukon.org/

Public Information Sessions Habitat for Humanity is holding two public information sessions

January 23 at 6 p.m. & January 26 at 10 a.m. both will be held at the Whitehorse Public Library.


New Projects Open for Comment

12

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Yukon News

j k l m v b x WHITEHORSE g j k l m v b WEATHER s g j k l m v 5-Day Forecast f s g j k l m

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Friday, January 17, 2014

New New Projects Open forPublic Public Comment Projects Open for Comment PROJECT TITLE

CLOSEST COMMUNITY (Assessment Office)

SECTOR

PROJECT #

DEADLINE FOR COMMENTS

Carcross Tagish C-31 FS Rural Residential Subdivision

Carcross (Teslin)

Residential, Commercial and Industrial Land Development

2013-0097

Extended to: January 27, 2014

Taking Down the Ross River Suspension Bridge

Ross River (Watson Lake)

TransportationRoads, Access Roads, and Trails

2013-0168

January 24, 2014

Lot 1282 Enlargement – Kulan Industrial Subdivision

Whitehorse (Whitehorse)

Residential, Commercial and Industrial Land Development

2013-0166

January 29, 2014

To get more information and/or submit comments on any project To Visit get more information and/orORsubmit comments on any project – www.yesab.ca/registry Call Toll Free 1-866-322-4040 Visit - www.yesab.ca/registry or Call Toll Free 1-866-322-4040

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Friday, January 17, 2014

13

Yukon News

Tens of millions in federal ad spending skimps on flu awareness Bruce Cheadle

last spring on a televised campaign touting the Canada Job Grant – a proposed job-training program OTTAWA that remains inaccessible because he Conservative government it does not yet exist. The ads were is refusing to say how much part of Employment and Social of Health Canada’s $5.8-million Development Canada’s $11-million advertising budget this fiscal year is ad budget for 2013-14, much of being spent on public awareness of which went toward TV campaigns influenza. on skilled trades and apprenticeBut after days of prodding by ship programs. The Canadian Press, the departIndustry Canada and Public ment did provide a list of flu-relat- Works more recently spent $9 miled communications efforts. lion on an ad campaign that attacks They include “fact sheets, postthe country’s major cellphone ers and reference guides for Cacompanies and appears aimed at nadians and health care workers,” whipping up public discontent and “targeted outreach” through a about a lack of wireless competicoalition of provincial and private tion. sector groups to promote vaccinaAnd Public Safety Canada has tion. just launched a major TV ad blitz There’s also a FightFlu.ca web that focuses on raising awareness site “brought to you by the govern- about cyberbullying and its legal ment of Canada in collaboration consequences. with the provincial and territorial “The total budget for the camgovernments,” along with some paign is $4.5 million, which is cononline advertising. sistent with other media campaigns Noticeably absent: a major TV of this size and duration,” Public campaign to promote mass influSafety spokeswoman Josee Picard enza immunization, the kind of said in an email. advertising that costs real money. It’s no coincidence that tens of “Our marketing activities go millions of tax dollars are available beyond traditional advertising by for high visibility ad campaigns on using cost effective means to reach public safety, “responsible resource our target audiences,” Health Cana- development,” job training and da spokeswoman Sylwia Krzyszton consumer cellphone complaints said in an email, five days after The – all themes that just happen to Canadian Press first asked about reinforce the political messaging federal influenza communications. and brand of the governing ConKrzyszton would not provide a servatives. budget for the campaign. But it can sometimes be difficult It’s not a model shared by some to discern what the viewing public other federal departments. is supposed to do with the mesMinister Joe Oliver recently dis- sages in these ads. closed Natural Resources Canada The Canada Job Grant camwill spend $40 million on campaign last summer earned a formal paigns promoting Canada’s energy rebuke from Advertising Stanresource sector – principally the dards Canada, a self-regulating ad oilsands – at home and abroad. industry watchdog, after numerous Ottawa also spent $2.5 million public complaints. The Canadian Press

T

The current $9-million telecom campaign, which depicts frustrated cellphone customers in a variety of familiar scenarios, also leads to questions about what viewers are to make of the message. “Our policy to increase competition in the wireless sector is providing Canadians with more choices and access to the latest technology at lower prices,” Stefanie Power of Industry Canada responded in an email. Wind Mobile, however, just pulled out of a government wireless spectrum auction, leading analysts to predict Canada’s big three telcos will snap up the available frequencies and little will change. Some observers say the government has its priorities wrong, especially when it comes to the potential public-health risk posed by the flu. “There is no infectious disease in Canada that predictably and preventably kills more people every year,” said Amir Attaran, the Canada Research Chair in Law, Population Health and Global Development Policy at the University of Ottawa. “Apparently the federal government thinks it is a low priority to prevent us dying, and it is a higher priority to get us riled up about our cellphones,” he continued. “I cannot imagine what kind of cruel and small-minded person has that as a set of priorities, but that’s the message that’s sent.” Attaran’s vitriol about government advertising practices isn’t unique. The government’s own internal polling on the ubiquitous “economic action plan” advertising – which has cost taxpayers at least $113 million since 2009 – prompt-

ed reactions such as “propaganda” and a “waste of money.” According to the National Post, Advertising Standards Canada received more than 20 consumer complaints about the Canada Job Grant ad. And the Harper government’s political opponents are at their wit’s end. “They have more damned nerve than a burglar,” said David McGuinty, the Liberal MP who has proposed a private member’s bill to screen all government advertising for partisanship, similar to an Ontario provincial program. McGuinty accuses the government of “gaming the system using our tax revenues and putting out ads that are symmetrical to Conservative party ads – same colour,

Happy New Year!

Year of Horse Chinese Canadian Association of Yukon

Chinese New Year’s Celebration Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre • Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014 • 1-4 p.m. (Doors open at 12:30 pm)

Colourful Chinese Cultural Performances, Delicious Chinese Food Tickets available at Vision Express Optical, Horwoods Mall – (1116 Front Street, Suite 110, 867-668-4262) Adults $15; Children (3-15) $10 For more information, please email to yukonchineseassociation@gmail.com

RequesT FoR BoaRd MeMBeRs The Council of Yukon First Nations is requesting applications from Yukon First Nation Citizens for nominations on the following Boards and Committees:

◗ ◗ ◗ ◗ ◗

Gas Tax Review Committee* (2 alternate seats) Training Policy Committee (1 seat) Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board (2 seats) Yukon Hospital Corporation Board of Trustees (2 seats) Yukon Police Council (1 seat) *Honorarium is not provided.

For application forms and/or for more information, please visit our website at www. cyfn.ca or contact Jennifer Ward at (867) 393-9236 or by e-mail at jennifer.ward@cyfn.net.

Kids at this age are so much fun, and constantly on the go! That’s why we’re getting the flu shot — and not missing a moment. Get the flu vaccine. To see a complete schedule visit yukonflushot.ca NOTE: A bilingual nurse will be on duty at most Whitehorse flu clinics.

DEADLINE for applications is Jan. 24, 2014 at 4:30 PM YUKON NEWS: 17 January

almost the same logo, same ‘look and feel,’ as they say in the advertising world.” “They don’t seem to have an internal compass – check and balance – on this.” New Democrat MP Charlie Angus said he’s heard from distraught constituents in his northern Ontario riding who are wondering where they should sign up for apprenticeships and job training. Federal ads have become all about pushing the Conservatives’ “favourite hot buttons,” Angus said. “The role of federal advertising should be letting Canadians know about services that exist. That should be the role of federal government advertising – not to stir the pot for the Conservative war room.”

Tourism and Culture Government


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15

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

BUSINESS

ENVIRONMENT

YuKonstructing a home for the territory’s inventors Jesse Winter News Reporter

I

magine if there was a space where you could build anything from cuckoo clocks to computer servers, a space where the community could come together and share ideas, expertise, tools and creativity. “And imagine if that space existed here in Whitehorse,” said Ben Sanders on Tuesday night, speaking to a room packed with 200 people. It was the kick-off of the YuKonstruct project, a plan to create a co-operative workshop, studio and design suite for Yukon artists, tinkerers, hobbyists and craftspeople. Sanders is essentially captaining the project. He said the idea came from the Department of Economic Development’s tech and telecom team. “We went out and started talking to the community, asking for input and advice. What we heard was that people didn’t have the space to build things, or they didn’t have the tools, or they didn’t have the other half of the knowledge to capitalize on an idea,” Sanders said. Tuesday night’s event was a chance to gauge public interest in the project, as well as gather ideas for shaping the space and its goals. So-called makerspaces have been popping up across North America in recent years. They range in size and structure from small clubs of a few dozen people working out of a garage to professional design suites and construction spaces with hundreds of members. Sanders spent his Christmas holiday touring other makerspaces in North America, getting ideas for what could be built here. “The one in Winnipeg seemed like a model I’d like to see happen here. It’s the biggest. It’s got a little bit more of a leadership team, and it has a specific goal to start businesses. That has helped them acquire more space, more tools, and they’re actually seeing products and services evolve from that space,” Sanders said. Right now, most Yukon entrepreneurs have to go Outside to access prototyping technology and specialized tools to bring their ideas to

Jesse Winter/Yukon News

Thirteen-year-old Sam Fleming shows off a computer server he built himself. Fleming was one of many inventors on hand at the YuKonstruct open house on Tuesday night.

life. Sanders wants to see that work stay in the territory. “The next steps are to have a meeting with the people who come forward and say they want to build it. We need to find a space. We need to find some tools. Three or four companies have already come up to me and said they want to pledge their support in one way or another,” he said. At Tuesday’s event, the organizers brought together dozens of inventors and craftspeople to show off the kinds of creations that could grow out of a Yukon makerspace. The event was such a huge success, “we had to order another 200 slices of pizza,” Sanders said. Thirteen-year-old Sam Fleming was one of the most impressive inventors at the event. He built himself a standalone computer server and website, and he’s never taken a computer engineering class. “I have a Raspberry Pi. It’s a small credit-card sized microcomputer,” he says, proudly. “I’m running a web server off of it, and on my Mac beside it I can access that web

Jesse Winter/Yukon News

Logan Sherk made a vest of leaf chaimaille and other metalworking projects.

page. On the web page it asks you what your name is and your favourite colour. Then on the other screen it will say, welcome whatever your name was and your favourite colour. Then you can click back to the home page,” Fleming said. “I kind of just taught myself. I think a space like this, it would be absolutely awesome. I’d use it all the time,” Flem-

ing said. Another craftsman, Thomas Jacquin, was showing off his computer numerical control machine, which he used to precision-carve an ornate wooden clock. “I was online and I found a website of a guy doing wooden clocks. I really liked it so I asked for the electronic plans. At home, it runs for 15 hours.

To build it, it took about two or three months,” he said. It’s exactly this kind of creativity that Sanders wants to foster. “The Yukon, there is a lot of creativity here. It seems to draw a certain type of person. What’s really interesting about the decentralization of manufacturing and design is that now you can come up to the Yukon for the lifestyle and plug into the Internet, build a product and sell it to the rest of the world without a geographic disparity being a problem. “Maybe this could become a small Silicon Valley in the North, where you can mountain bike on the weekend and tap into the Internet and build things during the week. What’s great about it is that you can market to the whole world. We already have people flying in from Vancouver who are thinking about moving part of their business here because they see some of the excitement and the energy,” Sanders said. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com


16

Yukon News

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Friday, January 17, 2014

17

Yukon News

Concept cars that made it and didn’t after their Detroit auto show debuts Dee-Ann Durbin

three years later. But it was and the Imperial disappeared. Infiniti was exploring how plagued with safety recalls, to give equal seating space to MAZDA FURAI (2008) – A and Fisker eventually halted six passengers. It never made super car with wildly undulating DETROIT production and filed for it to Infiniti showrooms. But lines was the apex of Mazda’s narototype cars – also called bankruptcy protection. That the concept bears an uncanny gare – or “flow” – design language. “concepts” – appear at every wasn’t the Karma’s final resemblance to the sevenThe lone model was accidentally auto show. They’re a way for com- chapter, however. At last passenger Ford Flex. destroyed by a fire that same year. panies to test ideas, gauge reaction year’s auto show, a comCHRYSLER IMPERIAL But before its demise, the Furai and hint at future designs. pany called VL Automotive (2006) – The beautiful and helped Mazda prove its sporting Audi, Nissan, Kia, Volkswagen showed the Destino – a imposing Imperial sedan chops. and others will have concept cars Karma body with a Corvette was more Rolls Royce than TOYOTA A-BAT (2008) – The at this year’s Detroit auto show, engine under the hood. This Paul Sancya/AP Photo Chrysler. An homage to Imfunky A-Bat pickup truck had a which opens to the public Jan. 18. year, VL Automotive is exThe Volvo XC Coupe concept car at the perial sedans of the 1930s and 4-foot bed that could be extended Some will be nearly identical to pected to show off a convert- North American International Auto 1940s, the Chrysler Imperial to 6 feet, as well as a four-passenthe cars that wind up in dealerible Destino. was rumoured to be headed Show in Detroit this week. ger compartment. Toyota shelved ships; others will be more outCADILLAC CONVERJ to market in 2010. But before it when the recession slowed landish. (2009) – A rakish Cadilthat could happen, Chrysler The elegant HCD-14 previewed demand for pickups – especially Here are some past prototypes lac with the Chevy Volt’s plug-in filed for bankruptcy protection, the new Genesis, which Hyundai weird-looking ones. that debuted in Detroit over the hybrid powertrain wowed crowds will reveal at this year’s show. last decade, and what happened in 2009, a recession year when Some details from the concept, afterwards: there was little to cheer about in like the rear-hinged rear doors and the auto industry. The Converj, Five that made it: the giant grille, didn’t survive. But renamed the ELR, re-emerged in CHEVROLET VOLT (2007) the Genesis teems with new techproduction form at the 2013 show, nology, including automatic park– GM’s revolutionary electric car with a backup gas engine debuted and is set to go on sale early this ing and compatibility with the as a sexy concept in 2007. So, fans year. Google Glass wearable computer. FORD VERTREK (2011) – were disappointed with the dull Sunday Five that didn’t: There’s no Vertrek on the lot at looks of the production version DODGE KAHUNA (2003) – your local Ford dealer. But there is January 26th revealed a year later. The car reAimed at surfers, the Kahuna was a Ford Escape, the small crossquired significant design changes Mile 3.2 Grey Mountain Road 2:00pm a cross between a Woodie wagon over SUV that the sleek Vertrek to improve its efficiency. But at and a minivan. It did have one feaforeshadowed in its 2011 Detroit least the idea made it to market. debut. The new Escape was a radi- ture that eventually made it into The Volt went on sale in 2010. Chrysler’s minivans: Flexible seats FISKER KARMA (2008) – The cal departure from the boxy old Doors open at noon to accept membership renewals version, and customers welcomed that were a forerunner to the Stow hybrid sports car, with its long it. The Escape was the 9th bestsell- N’ Go seating introduced in 2005. hood and flowing lines, wowed ing vehicle in the U.S. last year. INFINITI KURAZA (2005) – crowds as a concept car in 2008. HYUNDAI HCD-14 (2013) – The $95,000 Karma went on sale With the boxy, wagon-like Kuraza, Associated Press

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Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Ford’s new F 150, built mostly of aluminum, could radically change pickup truck market Dee-Ann Durbin And Tom Krisher Associated Press

DEARBORN, Mich. ord pickups have been doing the country’s work for 66 years. They’ve hauled grain, towed logs and plowed snow. They’ve cleared debris after tornadoes and pulled floats in the Rose Bowl parade. They’ve shouldered those loads with parts forged from steel. Until now. On Monday, Ford unveils a new F-150 with a body built almost entirely out of aluminum. The lighter material shaves as much as 700 pounds off the 5,000-pound truck, a revolutionary change for a vehicle known for its heft and an industry still heavily reliant on steel. The change is Ford’s response to small-business owners’ desire for a more fuel-efficient and nimble truck – and stricter government requirements on fuel economy. And it sprang from a challenge by Ford’s CEO to move beyond the traditional design for a full-size pickup. “You’re either moving ahead and you’re improving and you’re making it more valuable and more useful to the customer or

F

Carlos Osorio/AP Photo

Journalists surround the new F-150 with a body built almost entirely out of aluminum at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit on Monday.

you’re not,” Chief Executive Alan Mulally told The Associated Press in a recent interview. Ninety-seven per cent of the body of the 2015 F-150 is aluminum, the most extensive use of aluminum ever in a truck. And

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this isn’t just any truck. F-Series trucks – which include the F-150 and heavier duty models like the F-250 – have been the bestselling vehicles in the U.S. for the last 32 years; last year, Ford sold an F-Series every 41 seconds.

The key question for Ford, and the people who sell its trucks, is: Will customers embrace such a radical change? Dealers who have seen the new F-150 say they expect to encounter some skepticism, but the change had to be

made. “We’re aggressive, stretching the envelope,” said Sam Pack, owner of four Ford dealerships in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. “I think you have to do that. If you don’t, then you get into that predicament of being a ‘me too’ vehicle.” Still, it’s a big risk. Ford makes an estimated $10,000 profit on every F-Series truck it sells, making trucks a $7.6 billion profit centre in the U.S. alone last year. And the company has had some quality issues with recent vehicle launches, adding to dealers’ worries. The 2013 Escape small SUV has been the subject of seven recalls. The 2015 F-150 goes on sale late this year. While aluminum is more expensive that steel, Ford truck marketing chief Doug Scott says the F-Series will stay within the current price range. F-Series trucks now range from a starting price of $24,445 for a base model to $50,405 for a top-of-the-line Limited. It’s difficult to calculate how much more aluminum costs, since there are different grades of aluminum and steel. Pete Reyes, the F-150’s chief engineer, said Ford expects to make up the premium by reducing its recycling

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costs, since there will be less metal to recycle, and by slimming down the engine and other components, since they won’t have to move so much weight. Aluminum was used on cars even before the first F-Series went on sale in 1948. It’s widely used on sporty, low-volume cars now, like the Tesla Model S electric sedan and the Land Rover Evoque. U.S. Postal Service trucks are also made of aluminum. Ford has spent decades researching the metal. Twenty years ago, the company built a fleet of 20 all-aluminum experimental sedans. Later, it used aluminum on exotic cars from Aston-Martin and Jaguar, brands it used to own. But up to now, Ford limited the aluminum on its trucks to the hoods and used steel for the rest. New government fuel economy requirements, which mandate that automakers’ cars and trucks get a combined 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025, are speeding the switch to aluminum. Chrysler’s Ram is currently the most fuel-efficient pickup, getting 25 mpg on the highway. The current F-150 gets as much as 23 mpg. Ford won’t say what the new truck’s fuel economy will be, but says it will trump the competition. That could be an especially important incentive for landscapers, carpenters and other small business owners focused on their bottom line. “I think that’s going to outweigh the aluminum part of it,” said Brian Jarrett, a Ford dealer in Winter Haven, Fla., who hasn’t yet seen the new truck. Improvements in aluminum are also driving the change. Three years ago, for example, Alcoa Inc. – one of Ford’s suppliers for the F-150 – figured out a way to pretreat aluminum so it would be more durable when parts are bonded together. Carmakers can now use three or four rivets to piece together parts that would have needed 10 rivets before, Alcoa spokesman Kevin Lowery said. And Ford is able to take more risks. When the F-150 was last redesigned, in the mid-2000s, Ford was losing billions each year and resources were spread thin. But by 2010, when the company gave the green light to an all-aluminum truck, Ford was making money again. CEO Alan Mulally, a former Boeing Co. executive who joined Ford in 2006, encouraged his team to think bigger. After all, it was Mulally who led

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19

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014 early development of Boeing’s Dreamliner, which replaced aluminum with even lighter-weight plastics to be more efficient and fly further. “Everything becomes more efficient once you take the weight out,” Mulally says. He expects aluminum to be used across Ford’s model lineup in the future. Ford is convinced truck buyers will accept the change. The company says the new truck will tow more and haul more, since the engine doesn’t have to account for so much weight. It can also accelerate and stop more quickly. Aluminum doesn’t rust, Ford says, and it’s more resistant to dents. Reyes says the company planted prototype F-150s with three companies – in mining, construction and power – for two years without revealing they were

aluminum. The companies didn’t notice a difference. Mulally says Ford’s customers have already shown a willingness to adopt new technology. Forty per cent of the F-Series trucks sold last year had Ford’s more efficient EcoBoost engines, for example, which were introduced just three years ago. And Mulally says owners trust Ford. Ford will still have a tough time wresting customers from the competition, mainly Chevrolet, GMC and Ram, says Jesse Toprak, an independent auto industry consultant in Los Angeles. “Movement between brands in the full-size truck segment is extremely minimal,” Toprak says. “It’s the strongest loyalty of any segment.” Still, about 20 per cent of pickup buyers traditionally are open to jumping from brand to

brand based on features or price, Toprak said. The company with the newest, most advanced truck has the advantage in getting those customers, plus those who are new to the market, Toprak says. Some steel remains on the truck. The frame beneath it is built primarily of high-strength steel, which Ford says will make it tougher and stiffer than the current frame. There’s also steel in the front dashboard, because Ford thought steel was better at dampening nose from the engine. In all, a four-door F-150 has 660 pounds of aluminum, or nearly double the average use of aluminum per vehicle used now, according to Drive Aluminum, an aluminum industry Web site. If the Ford truck is a success, use of aluminum could expand rapidly at the expense of steel. “People are beginning to

truly understand the value that aluminum can bring to the table,” Lowery said. Ford is expecting some issues with the design or the manufacturing as it makes the change, Mulally said. But the company is working hard to troubleshoot. “I think the attitude is, expect the unexpected and expect to deal with it,” he says. “Sometimes I think our core competency is scrambling. That’s not unique to Ford.” Mulally, who grew up driving an F-150 on his family’s farm in Kansas, particularly likes the new truck’s front windows, which dip down 2 inches for better visibility. “That’s just an unbelievable innovation. You’re sitting up there and you need to know where you are,” he says. “I think that is absolutely a laser focus on what the customer wants and values.”

HEARING TIME:

YUKON UTILITIES BOARD

Notice of Hearing

9:00 a.m. DATE: March 31 to April 3, 2014 LocATIoN: Westmark Whitehorse 201 Wood Street Whitehorse, Yukon

SuMMARy of AppLIcATIoN

ScHEDuLE of pRocEEDING

On December 9, 2013, the Yukon Energy Corporation (YEC)

The Board has established the following schedule for this

applied under Part 3 of the Public Utilities Act for an energy project

proceeding, pending Ministerial approval:

certificate and an energy operation certificate regarding the Whitehorse Diesel to Natural Gas Conversion Project (project).

AcTIoN

DATE (2014)

Notice of hearing published

January 17

Register with the Board

January 31

Information Requests to YEC

February 17

Information Responses from YEC

February 27

An oral public hearing of the Application is tentatively scheduled

Intervener Evidence

March 6

to commence at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, March 31, 2014, at the

Information Requests to Interveners

March 13

Information Responses from Interveners

March 20

Oral Public Hearing including Oral Argument and Reply

March 31 to April 3

Public Session

March 31

The Minister of Justice referred the YEC Application to the Board, by way of correspondence dated December 20, 2013, for an energy project certificate and an energy operation certificate to the Yukon Utilities Board (Board) for a review and hearing.

HEARING

Westmark Whitehorse at 201 Wood Street in Whitehorse, Yukon. The oral hearing is tentatively scheduled for four days.

pubLIc SubMISSIoNS A session is planned to provide an opportunity for members of the public who are not otherwise registered interveners to make submissions to the Board. This session will be held on March 31

pubLIc INSpEcTIoN of THE AppLIcATIoN

at 7:00 p.m., with a format to be set in advance. Registration for

The Application and supporting documents are available for

the public session will be required.

inspection at the following Yukon Energy Corporation locations:

INTERvENTIoNS Persons intending to participate in the Hearing and other process

• Head Office: 2 Miles Canyon Road, Whitehorse, Yukon; and • District Offices in relevant Yukon communities.

steps are to register in writing with the Board’s Executive Secretary

A copy of the Application and supporting documents are

no later than Friday, January 31, 2014, indicating the nature of their

also available on the Board’s website:

interest and the issues of interest in relation to the Application.

yukonutilitiesboard.yk.ca/proceedings/yec-lng-project-proceeding/

pRocEEDING ISSuES

cLARIfIcATIoN AND boARD coNTAcT

The Board will not distribute an issues list for this proceeding as

Persons intending to participate and who are uncertain as to the

the issues for consideration in the proceeding are set out in the

manner in which to proceed may contact the Board’s Executive

terms of reference issued by the Minister of Justice.

Secretary, Deana Lemke, by telephone at (867) 667-5058, in writing to Box 31728, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 6L3, by email to yub@utilitiesboard.yk.ca or by fax at (867) 667-5059.

online at

www.drivingforce.ca


18

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Ford’s new F 150, built mostly of aluminum, could radically change pickup truck market Dee-Ann Durbin And Tom Krisher Associated Press

DEARBORN, Mich. ord pickups have been doing the country’s work for 66 years. They’ve hauled grain, towed logs and plowed snow. They’ve cleared debris after tornadoes and pulled floats in the Rose Bowl parade. They’ve shouldered those loads with parts forged from steel. Until now. On Monday, Ford unveils a new F-150 with a body built almost entirely out of aluminum. The lighter material shaves as much as 700 pounds off the 5,000-pound truck, a revolutionary change for a vehicle known for its heft and an industry still heavily reliant on steel. The change is Ford’s response to small-business owners’ desire for a more fuel-efficient and nimble truck – and stricter government requirements on fuel economy. And it sprang from a challenge by Ford’s CEO to move beyond the traditional design for a full-size pickup. “You’re either moving ahead and you’re improving and you’re making it more valuable and more useful to the customer or

F

Carlos Osorio/AP Photo

Journalists surround the new F-150 with a body built almost entirely out of aluminum at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit on Monday.

you’re not,” Chief Executive Alan Mulally told The Associated Press in a recent interview. Ninety-seven per cent of the body of the 2015 F-150 is aluminum, the most extensive use of aluminum ever in a truck. And

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this isn’t just any truck. F-Series trucks – which include the F-150 and heavier duty models like the F-250 – have been the bestselling vehicles in the U.S. for the last 32 years; last year, Ford sold an F-Series every 41 seconds.

The key question for Ford, and the people who sell its trucks, is: Will customers embrace such a radical change? Dealers who have seen the new F-150 say they expect to encounter some skepticism, but the change had to be

made. “We’re aggressive, stretching the envelope,” said Sam Pack, owner of four Ford dealerships in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. “I think you have to do that. If you don’t, then you get into that predicament of being a ‘me too’ vehicle.” Still, it’s a big risk. Ford makes an estimated $10,000 profit on every F-Series truck it sells, making trucks a $7.6 billion profit centre in the U.S. alone last year. And the company has had some quality issues with recent vehicle launches, adding to dealers’ worries. The 2013 Escape small SUV has been the subject of seven recalls. The 2015 F-150 goes on sale late this year. While aluminum is more expensive that steel, Ford truck marketing chief Doug Scott says the F-Series will stay within the current price range. F-Series trucks now range from a starting price of $24,445 for a base model to $50,405 for a top-of-the-line Limited. It’s difficult to calculate how much more aluminum costs, since there are different grades of aluminum and steel. Pete Reyes, the F-150’s chief engineer, said Ford expects to make up the premium by reducing its recycling

is

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costs, since there will be less metal to recycle, and by slimming down the engine and other components, since they won’t have to move so much weight. Aluminum was used on cars even before the first F-Series went on sale in 1948. It’s widely used on sporty, low-volume cars now, like the Tesla Model S electric sedan and the Land Rover Evoque. U.S. Postal Service trucks are also made of aluminum. Ford has spent decades researching the metal. Twenty years ago, the company built a fleet of 20 all-aluminum experimental sedans. Later, it used aluminum on exotic cars from Aston-Martin and Jaguar, brands it used to own. But up to now, Ford limited the aluminum on its trucks to the hoods and used steel for the rest. New government fuel economy requirements, which mandate that automakers’ cars and trucks get a combined 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025, are speeding the switch to aluminum. Chrysler’s Ram is currently the most fuel-efficient pickup, getting 25 mpg on the highway. The current F-150 gets as much as 23 mpg. Ford won’t say what the new truck’s fuel economy will be, but says it will trump the competition. That could be an especially important incentive for landscapers, carpenters and other small business owners focused on their bottom line. “I think that’s going to outweigh the aluminum part of it,” said Brian Jarrett, a Ford dealer in Winter Haven, Fla., who hasn’t yet seen the new truck. Improvements in aluminum are also driving the change. Three years ago, for example, Alcoa Inc. – one of Ford’s suppliers for the F-150 – figured out a way to pretreat aluminum so it would be more durable when parts are bonded together. Carmakers can now use three or four rivets to piece together parts that would have needed 10 rivets before, Alcoa spokesman Kevin Lowery said. And Ford is able to take more risks. When the F-150 was last redesigned, in the mid-2000s, Ford was losing billions each year and resources were spread thin. But by 2010, when the company gave the green light to an all-aluminum truck, Ford was making money again. CEO Alan Mulally, a former Boeing Co. executive who joined Ford in 2006, encouraged his team to think bigger. After all, it was Mulally who led

PIN-BACK BUTTONS 207 Main Street Tel: 633-4842

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used vehicle sales

StOP BY tOdAY ANd SAve At 303 OgIlvIe… AShleY FurNIture hOMeStOre IN the QwANlIN MAll

www.ashleyfurniturehomestore.com Phone:867-668-7575 Fax: 867-668-7579 email: info@ashleyyukon.com hOurS: MON. - FrI. 10AM - 7PM SAt. 10AM -6PM OPeN SuN. 11 AM -4PM

UP TO

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INSTANT SAVINGS EVENT January 1st to March 31st, 2014 See in-store for detail.com

the purchase of Electrolux & Electrolux ICON® applinaces.

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19

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014 early development of Boeing’s Dreamliner, which replaced aluminum with even lighter-weight plastics to be more efficient and fly further. “Everything becomes more efficient once you take the weight out,” Mulally says. He expects aluminum to be used across Ford’s model lineup in the future. Ford is convinced truck buyers will accept the change. The company says the new truck will tow more and haul more, since the engine doesn’t have to account for so much weight. It can also accelerate and stop more quickly. Aluminum doesn’t rust, Ford says, and it’s more resistant to dents. Reyes says the company planted prototype F-150s with three companies – in mining, construction and power – for two years without revealing they were

aluminum. The companies didn’t notice a difference. Mulally says Ford’s customers have already shown a willingness to adopt new technology. Forty per cent of the F-Series trucks sold last year had Ford’s more efficient EcoBoost engines, for example, which were introduced just three years ago. And Mulally says owners trust Ford. Ford will still have a tough time wresting customers from the competition, mainly Chevrolet, GMC and Ram, says Jesse Toprak, an independent auto industry consultant in Los Angeles. “Movement between brands in the full-size truck segment is extremely minimal,” Toprak says. “It’s the strongest loyalty of any segment.” Still, about 20 per cent of pickup buyers traditionally are open to jumping from brand to

brand based on features or price, Toprak said. The company with the newest, most advanced truck has the advantage in getting those customers, plus those who are new to the market, Toprak says. Some steel remains on the truck. The frame beneath it is built primarily of high-strength steel, which Ford says will make it tougher and stiffer than the current frame. There’s also steel in the front dashboard, because Ford thought steel was better at dampening nose from the engine. In all, a four-door F-150 has 660 pounds of aluminum, or nearly double the average use of aluminum per vehicle used now, according to Drive Aluminum, an aluminum industry Web site. If the Ford truck is a success, use of aluminum could expand rapidly at the expense of steel. “People are beginning to

truly understand the value that aluminum can bring to the table,” Lowery said. Ford is expecting some issues with the design or the manufacturing as it makes the change, Mulally said. But the company is working hard to troubleshoot. “I think the attitude is, expect the unexpected and expect to deal with it,” he says. “Sometimes I think our core competency is scrambling. That’s not unique to Ford.” Mulally, who grew up driving an F-150 on his family’s farm in Kansas, particularly likes the new truck’s front windows, which dip down 2 inches for better visibility. “That’s just an unbelievable innovation. You’re sitting up there and you need to know where you are,” he says. “I think that is absolutely a laser focus on what the customer wants and values.”

HEARING TIME:

YUKON UTILITIES BOARD

Notice of Hearing

9:00 a.m. DATE: March 31 to April 3, 2014 LocATIoN: Westmark Whitehorse 201 Wood Street Whitehorse, Yukon

SuMMARy of AppLIcATIoN

ScHEDuLE of pRocEEDING

On December 9, 2013, the Yukon Energy Corporation (YEC)

The Board has established the following schedule for this

applied under Part 3 of the Public Utilities Act for an energy project

proceeding, pending Ministerial approval:

certificate and an energy operation certificate regarding the Whitehorse Diesel to Natural Gas Conversion Project (project).

AcTIoN

DATE (2014)

Notice of hearing published

January 17

Register with the Board

January 31

Information Requests to YEC

February 17

Information Responses from YEC

February 27

An oral public hearing of the Application is tentatively scheduled

Intervener Evidence

March 6

to commence at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, March 31, 2014, at the

Information Requests to Interveners

March 13

Information Responses from Interveners

March 20

Oral Public Hearing including Oral Argument and Reply

March 31 to April 3

Public Session

March 31

The Minister of Justice referred the YEC Application to the Board, by way of correspondence dated December 20, 2013, for an energy project certificate and an energy operation certificate to the Yukon Utilities Board (Board) for a review and hearing.

HEARING

Westmark Whitehorse at 201 Wood Street in Whitehorse, Yukon. The oral hearing is tentatively scheduled for four days.

pubLIc SubMISSIoNS A session is planned to provide an opportunity for members of the public who are not otherwise registered interveners to make submissions to the Board. This session will be held on March 31

pubLIc INSpEcTIoN of THE AppLIcATIoN

at 7:00 p.m., with a format to be set in advance. Registration for

The Application and supporting documents are available for

the public session will be required.

inspection at the following Yukon Energy Corporation locations:

INTERvENTIoNS Persons intending to participate in the Hearing and other process

• Head Office: 2 Miles Canyon Road, Whitehorse, Yukon; and • District Offices in relevant Yukon communities.

steps are to register in writing with the Board’s Executive Secretary

A copy of the Application and supporting documents are

no later than Friday, January 31, 2014, indicating the nature of their

also available on the Board’s website:

interest and the issues of interest in relation to the Application.

yukonutilitiesboard.yk.ca/proceedings/yec-lng-project-proceeding/

pRocEEDING ISSuES

cLARIfIcATIoN AND boARD coNTAcT

The Board will not distribute an issues list for this proceeding as

Persons intending to participate and who are uncertain as to the

the issues for consideration in the proceeding are set out in the

manner in which to proceed may contact the Board’s Executive

terms of reference issued by the Minister of Justice.

Secretary, Deana Lemke, by telephone at (867) 667-5058, in writing to Box 31728, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 6L3, by email to yub@utilitiesboard.yk.ca or by fax at (867) 667-5059.

online at

www.drivingforce.ca


20

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

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2011 NISSAN SENTRA 2.0 SL

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2012 NISSAN XTERRA PRO-4X 4L, V6, auto, PW, PL, PM, bucket seats, keyless entry, aluminum wheels, red - #117432

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2011 BUICK LACROSSE CXL 3.6L, V6, auto, PL, PW, PM, heated seats, remote start, panoramic sunroof, HID system, red - #105783

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2010 FORD TAURUS SEL 3.5L, V6, auto, PW, PL, PM, dual climate control, heated seats, black - Stk #101939

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2011 GMC YUKON SLT W/1SC 5.3L, auto, PW, PL, PM, power rear hatch, power pedals, rearview camera, $ park sensors - white - Stk #105819

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2007 FORD SUPER DUTY F-350 DRW LARIAT 6L, Diesel, auto, PL, PW, BFG tires, wooden boxliner, flipball gooseneck hitch, $ LR remote start, green - #117434

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2011 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 3.6L, V6, auto, PL, PW, cloth seats, smart key, remote start, AWD, dark charcoal - #105482

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Acid mine waste cuts fracking fluid radioactivity Ramit Plushnick-Masti Associated Press

HOUSTON esearchers believe they have found an unlikely way to decrease the radioactivity of some hydraulic fracturing wastewater: Mix it with the hazardous drainage from mining operations. The wastewater is created when some of the chemical-laced water used to fracture thick underground rocks flows back out of the wellbore. The water is tainted with chemicals, toxins and in some parts of the country – such as Pennsylvania – naturally occurring radioactive materials, such as radium. Research has shown that even wastewater that had been treated with conventional means was changing the chemistry of rivers when discharged into waterways. In 2011, Pennsylvania barred drillers from taking the wastewater to treatment facilities, forcing them to haul the fluid waste to be disposed in underground injection wells in Ohio. This, along with a lack of freshwater in other parts of the country needed to drill new wells, has scientists and the industry looking for creative solutions. The discovery by Duke University researchers would allow oil and gas drillers to combine flowback waters from the fracking process with acid drainage from mining, or any other salty water. The solids that form, which include radioactive materials, are removed and dumped at a hazardous waste landfill, and then the now cleaner water is used to drill a new well, said Avner Vengosh, the Duke professor who oversaw the project, which included scientists from Dartmouth College and the Technion Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. The metals and radium in the drilling wastewater automatically attract to sulfates – or salts, he explained. “It’s a romance. It’s inevitable it will combine,” said Vengosh, a professor of

R

21

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

used in fracking, Vengosh said. “I’m not sure it resolves all the problems, but it can have some improvement,” Vengosh said. Ben Shepperd, president of the Permian Basin Petroleum Association, which represents drillers in an oil-rich, desert-like area of West Texas, said maximizing water use is a top priority for the industry. “Those of us who live, work and play near oil and gas activities place a premium on efficient water uses,” he said in an email. But Tad Patzek, chairman and professor of the petroleum engineering department at the University of Texas in Austin, cautioned that the method could present problems in the field. The remaining water would still be jam-packed with chemicals and toxins, he noted. “That water can get spilled,” Patzek said. “That water can get into a shallow aquifer. There are many other considerations.” Still, freshwater and wastewater are such serious issues that Donald Van Nieuwenhuise, director of the University of Houston’s geosciences program, said researchers are seeking solutions on several fronts: by recycling flowback water, by creating ways to use less water to begin with or by using a liquid other than water to crack the rock. Texas doesn’t have acid mine waste, an environmental threat to the Appalachian basin, to mix with the fracking fluids, but the method could be applied in the Lone Star state differently, Van Nieuwenhuise noted. The contaminated drilling water could be mixed with fluids from brine aquifers that are too salty to be used as drinking water, he said. “This is novel. It’s a really neat idea,” he said, adding that solid waste is safer than liquid and the amount created in this process would be manageable.

geochemistry and water quality. The research was primarily funded by Duke University, Vengosh said. One of the scientists had some funding from the National Science Foundation, he added. Vengosh’s research was published in December in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, but still needs to be field tested, he said. Finding solutions for safely dealing with contaminated water and having enough usable water to drill new wells is crucial for the oil and gas industry. It has booming in recent years due to new methods of hydraulic fracturing – or fracking – a method that uses millions of gallons of chemical-laced water to crack thick layers of underground rock so fossil fuels can flow out. But as drilling spreads to more areas the industry has faced obstacles. In the gas-rich Marcellus shale region of Pennsylvania, wastewater disposal is problematic. In drought-prone areas, such as Texas and California, drillers face a shortage of freshwater. As a result, the industry is seeking to recycle wastewater. Vengosh’s researchers blended fracking wastewater from the Marcellus shale with acid drainage from mines, materials collected in western Pennsylvania by the industry. The researchers had hypothesized that the salts, metals and radium would combine so they could be removed as solids, leaving behind water clean enough to be used in another fracking operation, though not quite pure enough to be potable. After two days, they examined the chemical and radioactive levels of the 26 different mixtures they had created and found that within the first 10 hours the metals – including iron, barium and strontium – and most of the radium had combined to form a new solid. The salinity of the remaining fluid had reduced enough to be

Interior Heavy Equipment Operator School

What’s New?

Standing Committee Meeting Jan. 20

Environmental Grant Deadline February 17

At 5:30 pm in City Hall Council Chambers:

You have a great environmental project idea

Festivals and Special Event Fund Policy Revisions; Trail Plan Implementation – East Side Yukon River (EYR); Whitehorse Trail & Greenways Committee Terms of Reference Revisions; CCMARD Appointment Recommendations; Summary of Properties Subject to Tax Lien; 2013 Umbrella Grants Bylaw; Capital Budget Amendments – 2013 Umbrella Bylaw; Operating Budget Amendments – 2013 Umbrella Bylaw; Finance Committee; Zoning Amendment – Skookum Asphalt Quarry Lease.

We can help off-set some of your project costs

For more information on Council meetings, visit: whitehorse.ca/agendas whitehorse.ca/CASM

Proposed 2014 Operating Budget Written submissions are encouraged by email to budgetinput@ whitehorse.ca Citizens can also address Council during Public Input Night on January 27 at 5:30pm in City Hall Council Chambers. Second and Third Reading will take place February 10. The full budget package, important materials and other information are available at: whitehorse.ca/budget

Mayor's Awards The City and Persons With Disabilities Advisory Committee are looking for nominees by February 14.

NO SIMULATORS START WEEKLY. YEAR ROUND.

NEVER SHARE MACHINES GET TRAINED. GET WORKING.

ENDORSED BY INDUSTRY  FREE Site Tours  Job Boards  Funding Options

Toll Free: 1-866-399-3853

Call for details

Awards will be presented at the Disability Expo on March 12. Get details and forms at whitehorse.ca/ mayorsawards or call 668-8611.

Eligible projects contribute to the Whitehorse Sustainability Plan including environmental education; waste reduction; preserving and/or enhancing land, air, water or wildlife; demonstrating innovative technologies and environmental leadership. Eligible applicants are nonprofit societies, community groups and businesses in Whitehorse. Visit whitehorse.ca/ envirogrant, call 668-8652 or email environment@ whitehorse.ca for details.

Festivals & Special Events Grant This offers grants and in-kind support to nonprofit societies, community groups and organizations. Events should present a unique and multi-faceted program and demonstrate broad community participation. The deadline is January 30, 2014 for events scheduled between July and December of 2014. Visit whitehorse.ca/grants or call 668-8325 for more information.

Shipyards Park Group Bookings The skating loop and fire pits are open for booking! Take advantage of the decorative lights and atmosphere. Great for birthday parties, family & friend gatherings, school / group outings, and can be combined with tobogganing on the hill. Washrooms and fireplace are available indoors, and park attendants help with fire pits & setup if required. Call 668-8325 for details or visit our website.

www.whitehorse.ca


22

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Massive mine in Bristol Bay region could hurt salmon, Alaska native culture Becky Bohrer Associated Press

JUNEAU, Alaska government report indicates a large-scale copper and gold mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region could have devastating effects on the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery and adversely affect Alaska natives, whose culture is built around salmon. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday released its final assessment of the impact of mining in the Bristol Bay region. Its findings are similar to those of an earlier draft report, concluding that, depending on the size of the mine, up to 94 miles of streams would be destroyed in the mere build-out of the project, including losses of between 5 and 22 miles of streams known to provide salmon spawning and rearing habitat. Up to 5,350 acres of wetlands, ponds and lakes also would be lost due to the mine footprint. The report concludes that “large-scale mining in the Bristol Bay watershed poses significant near- and long-term risk to salmon, wildlife and native Alaska cultures,” EPA regional administrator Dennis McLerran said in a conference call with reporters. The battle over the proposed Pebble Mine has been waged for years and extended beyond Alaska’s borders, with environmental activists like actor Robert Redford opposing development. Multinational jewelers have said they won’t use minerals mined from the Alaska prospect, and pension fund managers from California and New York City last year asked London-based

A

Rio Tinto, a shareholder of mine owner Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd., to divest, a request Rio Tinto said it planned to consider. EPA has said its goal was to get the science right. McLerran said the report doesn’t recommend any policy or regulatory decisions and will serve as the scientific foundation for the agency’s response to the tribes and others who petitioned EPA in 2010 to use its authority under the Clean Water Act to protect Bristol Bay. He said no timeline for a response had been set. The report also found that polluted water from the mine site could get into streams through runoff or uncollected leachate, even with the use of modern mining practices. It noted culvert blockages or other failures could impede fish passage and failure of a tailings dam, where mining waste is stored, could be catastrophic though the probability of such a failure was considered quite low. Supporters of the EPA process hoped it would lead the agency to block or limit the project, action they urged again Wednesday; opponents saw it as an example of government overreach and feared it would lead to a pre-emptive veto. Jason Metrokin, president and CEO of Bristol Bay Native Corp., said the corporation supports “responsible development where it can be done without causing unacceptable risks to the people, cultures and fishing economy of our region. The proposed Pebble mine is not such a project.” John Shively, the chief executive of the Pebble Limited Partnership, which was created to

Al Grillo/AP Photo

Test drilling at the Pebble Mine site in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska in 2007. An EPA report warns of the devastating effects on the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery should the large gold and copper mine become a reality.

design, permit and run the mine, called the report rushed and flawed, saying EPA did not take the time or commit the financial resources to fully assess such a large area. In a statement, he said the report is “a poorly conceived and poorly executed study, and it cannot serve as the scientific basis for any decisions concerning Pebble.” Some see the mine as a way to provide jobs, but others fear it will disrupt or devastate a way of life. A citizens’ initiative scheduled to appear on the August primary ballot would require legislative approval for any largescale mine in the region. The Bristol Bay watershed produces about 46 per cent of the world’s wild sockeye salmon, and salmon are key to the way of life for two groups of Alaska natives in the region, Yup’ik Eskimos and the Dena’ina. The report said the

response of native cultures to any mining impacts was unclear, though it could involve more than the need to compensate for lost food and include some degree of cultural disruption. Jeff Frithsen, a senior scientist and special projects co-ordinator with EPA, said the Pebble deposit is a low-grade ore deposit, and over 99 per cent of the ore taken from the ground will end up as waste. He said the deposit’s location is at the headwaters of two of the watersheds that make up half the Bristol Bay watershed and produce half its sockeye salmon. He said the existence of a large-scale mining operation there would affect fish habitat and any accidents would add to that. He said any loss of habitat can affect the overall diversity of the fishery habitat in the watershed.

“Changes in the portfolio of streams within the Bristol Bay watershed can reduce the overall reliability and increase the variability of the fishery over time,” he said. Asked whether EPA believed a mine could co-exist with fish, McLerran said the assessment spoke for itself. While EPA initiated the review process in response to concerns about the impact of the proposed Pebble Mine on fisheries, the report wasn’t meant to be about a single project. EPA said the report looks at possible impacts of reasonably foreseeable mining activities in the region. The agency said it drew on a preliminary plan published by Northern Dynasty and consulted with mining experts on reasonable scenarios. Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell said in a statement the report was little more than a pretext for an EPA veto of the state’s permitting process. “As my record demonstrates, I will not trade one resource for another, and every permitting application – when filed – deserves scientific and public scrutiny based on facts, not hypotheticals.” The Pebble Partnership has called the mine deposit one of the largest of its kind in the world, with the potential of producing 80.6 billion pounds of copper, 107.4 million ounces of gold and 5.6 billion pounds of molybdenum over decades. While EPA focused on the effects of one mine, the report said several mines could be developed in the watersheds studied, each of which would pose risks similar to those highlighted.

Contractors’ Breakfasts Presented by Juergen Korn, P. Eng., Research & Development

All builders are invited to attend the following information sessions: New Building Code Requirements (NBC 2010) Jan. 23/14 Stan Dueck, Chief Building/Plumbing Inspector, Yukon Government Residential Construction – City of Whitehorse Building Requirements Building plans, drainage, energy standards, blower door tests Doug Thorseth, Chief Building Inspector, City of Whitehorse Wood Burning Appliances and Chimneys Installation, cleaning, safety Charles Nadeau, WETT Certified, Yukon Chimney Sweep Location: Westmark Whitehorse – Banquet Room #4 Time: 8 a.m. – 10:00 am

For more information, please contact Roger Hanberg, Alternate Energy Officer at 667-5759

Feb. 6, 2013

Feb. 20/14


23

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Some Canadians now spend 8 hours of free time daily staring at screens Michael Oliveira

and 15 minutes daily, and three pairing of using their phone and Canadian Press quarters of that usage was at home. their computer together, and then Computer users said they spent using their tablet while channel TORONTO three hours and 10 minutes working surfing. he average Canadian smartor playing on a PC daily in their Half of all TV viewers said they phone owner estimates that personal time, including an hour always have their phone, tablet or they spend almost eight hours of away from home. computer with them while looking their free time every day staring at When asked about using their for something to watch. one of the many screens they own, devices simultaneously – for The polling industry’s professuggests a recently released report. example, swiping and tapping on a sional body, the Marketing Research In an online poll of 2,058 Cana- phone or tablet while watching TV and Intelligence Association, says dians – conducted this fall by Ipsos – 87 per cent said they do it at least online surveys like the one conductonce a week. ed for Google cannot be assigned a on behalf of Google – smartphone Those multi-tasking users were margin of error because they do not owners said 86 per cent of their randomly sample the population daily so-called “media interactions” most likely to be on their phone like traditional telephone polls. were screen-based, including watch- while watching TV, followed by a ing TV, using a computer, tablet or e-reader. Only 14 per cent were The Whitehorse Cross Country Ski Club, not screen-based, such as listening on behalf of all our members, would like to the radio, reading a newspaper, to congratulate Emily Nishikawa on magazine or book. being named to the Sochi 2014 Canadian The respondents said they spent Olympic Cross Country Skiing Team! an average of 7.9 hours a day glazing We are so proud, and can’t wait to cheer at one of their screens, not includyou on in February! ing time they might have spent on a computer or mobile device for work. On average, smartphone owners said they spent about an hour and a half each day on their phone for personal use, with about 56 per cent of that activity happening outside the home. Tablet owners said they were using their device for about an hour

Mark Your Calendars! 20th ANNUAL Marsh Lake Classic Cross-Country Ski Loppet Saturday, February 8th, 2014

T

Congratulations, Emily!

REGISTRATION FORMS NOW OUT!

Get your registration forms at: Coast Mountain Sports, Icycle Sport or WCCSC at Mt Mac in Whitehorse or at the Marsh Lake Community Centre. Register today. Deadline Wednesday, February 5th.

FUN FUN FUN!

The Yukon’S Fun LoppeT

Annual Captain Fun Award for best fun spirit AnD Special 1980s Spirit Award – bring your 80s spirit and costumes.

For info, call 660-4999 or email marshlake@gmail.com

Yukoners overwhelmingly understand that… “If we fail to sustain the ecosystem, we have no basis for a sustainable society, nor for a sustainable economy.” F inal R ecommended Peel WateRshed R egional l and Use P lan

Talk with your friends and neighbours, and Let your community leaders and your MLA know that you want to…

PROTECT THE PEEL NOW AND FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS F Riends

oF the

Peel WateRshed


Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

From ‘No thanks’ to ‘Got to have it’: The unpredictable appeal of flu shots Helen Branswell

rience a phenomenon such Canadian Press as what has been happening in Western Canada where, TORONTO undeterred by frigid temnfluenza is notoriously peratures, people embarked on mercurial, forcing even sometimes desperate searches the experts to guess at which for flu shots – something they strain will dominate from one should have done weeks ago to year to the next. As Canada is get optimal protection. learning this winter, almost While public health auas unpredictable as the virus thorities are delighted people itself is whether the public will want to be vaccinated, they be willing to embrace flu vacare puzzled by the unexpected cination. clamour for flu shots. Going Public Health officials by the numbers, this year’s flu regularly plead and cajole, but season is active, but not overly most years the majority of severe. people pass on getting a shot. So what the heck is goCanadian flu vaccination rates ing on? When it comes to flu sit pretty squarely in the oneshots, why does cool indifferquarter to one-third range, ence sometimes give way to Statistics Canada data show. white hot demand? But occasionally we expe-

I

Attention: Nacho Nyäk Dun Citizens The NND FINANCe COMMITTee will be holding Citizen meetings in Mayo and Whitehorse to get input regarding the 2014-2015 BUDGET.

MAYO

WHITEHORSE

When: January 15, 2014 Time: 7:00 - 9:00 pM place: NND Government House Multi-purpose Room

When: February 1, 2014 Time: 1:00 - 4:00 pM place: NND Development Corp. 7209 B- 7th Avenue

“The psychology of influenza vaccination uptake is sometimes almost as complex as the disease itself,” says Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Diseases Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. “We want everyone to be vaccinated. But the question is: Why do we sometimes have these runs?” So far this year the data collected by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control suggest North America is experiencing a normal sort of flu season. Hospitalization rates for influenza, for instance, are lower than those of some recent years. And where 171 children died from flu infections last winter in the United States, so far this year there have been 10 pediatric deaths there. “I think that this year will assuredly end up less – as far as sheer numbers – than the 2009 pandemic,” says Dr. Michael Jhung, a medical epidemiologist in the CDC’s influenza division. “And it looks like it will have had less activity than last year, but that I’m not so sure about until we get all the data in.” But Jhung and others say the overall picture may be

Yukon Energy Corporation is a publicly owned electrical utility that operates as a business, at arm’s length from the Yukon government. Established in 1987 and headquartered in Whitehorse, Yukon Energy is the main generator of electricity in the territory. Yukon Energy works with its parent company, Yukon Development Corporation, to provide Yukoners with a secure and continuous supply of clean, affordable power. Help lead the way to a sustainable energy future in Yukon as their next...

masking a shift that the public is actually picking up on. It’s not that more people are getting admitted to hospitals or dying from flu. The concern stems from who is getting severely ill and who is dying. For years, flu saved its biggest wallop for the elderly. But since the new H1N1 strain emerged in the 2009 pandemic, you can’t assume that grandma and grandpa are the folks most likely to end up in ICUs with flu. As was seen in the pandemic, the elderly aren’t as susceptible to this H1N1 as they are to H3N2, the virus that dominated last season. Younger people are more likely to get infected with this virus, and some of those infections lead to serious illness. “We’re used to our parents being the ones who end up in ICU or dying, sadly…. But now it’s us, right?” says Dr. Perry Kendall, chief medical officer of health for British Columbia. “So if you’re a 50-yearold, you would be sad if your father or your mother went into ICU. But when it’s your spouse or your brother, it’s different. The risk is a lot more proximal.” By flu terms, the numbers of deaths being reported this year are still small. Two deaths

here, 10 there. Each is a tragedy. Still, the reality is lots of people die from flu every year; the Public Health Agency of Canada estimates the toll to be about 3,500 Canadians a year. But those smaller numbers actually mean something to people, where the larger estimate is an abstraction, suggests Dr. Kumanan Wilson, a senior scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. “A few stories that are particularly vivid and clear can start to create a perception of risk that’s much greater than the actual number of deaths,” he says. “There’s a big difference between an individual story of a young person who was healthy, got the flu and then died than at the end of the flu season someone saying ‘Actually, X thousand people died from the flu.”’ Jhung says as of last week the U.S. had seen 2,622 hospitalizations. Of those, 61 per cent were in the 18-to-64 demographic. “When we think about who gets hospitalized for flu, it’s usually 60 per cent of those hospitalizations are in people 65 or older.” In both Canada and the U.S., there are reports of really sick young and middle-aged adults in ICUs. That was the pattern during the H1N1 pan-

25

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014 demic, so public health folks who know influenza aren’t surprised. That’s the way this virus rolls. But it’s not something the public – or even some doctors – expect from flu, Jhung says, admitting this could be making influenza more noticeable this year. “I do get the sense – and this is not substantiated by any data – that clinicians are being maybe taken aback a little bit by the number of severe illnesses they’re seeing in younger adults.” The perception something unusual is happening fuels demand for vaccine and supplies start to tighten. Suddenly that shot you didn’t think you needed is something you desperately want, something

you and your children need to be safe. It’s happened before. In 2004, the U.S. lost about 40 per cent of its vaccine order when one of its suppliers had to jettison its entire output because of a contamination problem. Word that supplies would be tight sent demand soaring. Americans were crossing the border to get a flu shot in Canada. Canada had plenty of vaccine that year, but media coverage of the U.S. shortage spiked demand here too. And just as Canadian vaccination clinics were poised to open in the 2009 pandemic, a young boy died from the new flu in Ontario. Lines for vaccine were enormous. “Every time a child or a youth dies, demand goes soar-

ing up,” says Kendall. The frustrating thing for public health officials is that these periodic runs on flu vaccine do not seem to translate into long-term increases in demand for flu shots. It’s quite probable that many of the people who lined up this week will not bother getting a flu shot next fall. “It’s a shame that this psychological effect also tends to wane over time,” says Jhung. “You would think that if they’d never been vaccinated, once they go through the process and recognize that it’s really not that bad, that they may continue to do it. But I don’t know what’s going to make the message stick. We haven’t figured that out yet.”

The Victoria Faulkner Women’s Centre will be hosting the workshop

Coping Skills

this workshop will explore how we think about and handle the stresses we face every day. this is an opportunity for women to connect, share, and heal from their experiences together. When:

Tuesday 6:30pm to 8:30pm January 21st Where: 503 Hanson St Cost: Free Free Free Please contact the Victoria Faulkner Women’s Centre for more information 667-2693

MY NISSAN

MY YEAR WITH OUR

ALL-NEW

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The 2014 VERSA NOTE

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The Totally Redesigned 2014 NISSAN ROGUE

The President & Chief Executive Officer is appointed by and reports to the Board of Directors. His/her primary responsibilities are to: support the Board in providing overall leadership and vision in developing Yukon Energy’s strategic direction; provide overall leadership and vision in developing the strategies, tactics and business plans necessary to realize corporate objectives; and, manage the overall business to ensure strategic and business plans are effectively implemented and financial and operational objectives are attained. What type of background do you have? You have a relevant (ideally post graduate) university degree, with 10-15 years of experience at the senior management level. You have reported to a Board,

and have strong track record in business, leadership, project management and people management. You have both political and media acumen, along with excellent communication, negotiation and relationship building skills. The opportunity to live, work and contribute to the community in Yukon is something that excites you. The hidden gem of Western Canada, Yukon offers recreational opportunities, breathtaking scenery and a growing and vibrant population. For further information, please visit www.watsoninc. ca. To express your interest in this position, please email your cover letter and resume to resumes @watsoninc.ca by 14 February 2014.

Everyone is welcome to attend the following events to contribute their ideas and help shape the Range Road North Neighbourhood Plan. This area includes the Takhini & Northland Mobile Home Parks, Mountain View Place, Mountain Air Estates, Stone Ridge, several Kwanlin Dün First Nation parcels, and surrounding greenspace. Public Event 1: Visioning Workshop 7-9 pm, Tuesday January 21 Public Event 2: Design Workshop Open House 7-9 pm, Wednesday January 22 Both events will be held in the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre, Multi-Purpose Room (1171 Front Street). For more information please visit whitehorse.ca/rangeroad, email ben.campbell@whitehorse.ca or phone 668-8338.

www.whitehorse.ca

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2261 - 2nd Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Tel: (867) 668-4436

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Representative semi-monthly lease offer based on new 2014 Versa Note 1.6 S (B5RG54 AA00), manual transmission/2014 Sentra 1.8 S (C4LG54 AA00), manual transmission/2014 Rogue S FWD (Y6RG14 AA00), CVT transmission. 0.9%/0%/3.9% lease APR for a 39/39/60 month term equals 78/78/120 semi-monthly payments of $69/$79/$138 with $0/$0/$1,850 down payment, and $0 security deposit. First semi-monthly payment, down payment and $0 security deposit are due at lease inception. Prices include freight and fees. Lease based on a maximum of 20,000 km/year with excess charged at $0.10/km. Total lease obligation is $5,380/$6,156/$18,289. $1,250/$950 NF Lease Cash included in advertised price, applicable only on 2014 Versa Note 1.6 S (B5RG54 AA00), manual transmission/Sentra 1.8 S (C4LG54 AA00), manual transmission through subvented lease through Nissan Finance. $200/$400 dealer participation included and available only on 2014 Versa Note 1.6 S (B5RG54 AA00), manual transmission/Sentra 1.8 S (C4LG54 AA00), manual transmission. This offer is only available on lease offers of an 39 month term only and cannot be combined with any other offer. Conditions apply. ▲ Models shown $20,585/$24,765/$34,728 Selling Price for a new 2014 Versa Note 1.6 S SL Tech (B5TG14 NA00), Xtronic CVT® transmission/Sentra 1.8 SL (C4TG14 AA00), CVT/Rogue SL AWD Premium model (Y6DG14 BK00), CVT transmission. ≠▲ Freight and PDE charges ($1,567/$1,567/$1,630), certain fees, manufacturer’s rebate and dealer participation where applicable are included. License, registration, air-conditioning levy ($100) where applicable, insurance and applicable taxes are extra. Finance and lease offers are available on approved credit through Nissan Finance for a limited time, may change without notice and cannot be combined with any other offers except stackable trading dollars. Retailers are free to set individual prices. Offers valid between Jan. 3 – 31, 2014. † Global Automakers of Canada Entry Level Segmentation. MY14 Versa Note v. MY13/14 competitors. *All information compiled from third-party sources including manufacturer websites. Not responsible for errors for errors in data on third party websites. 12/17/2013. Offers subject to change, continuation or cancellation without notice. Offers have no cash alternative value. See your participating Nissan retailer for complete details. ©1998-2013 Nissan Canada Inc. and Nissan Financial Services Inc. a division of Nissan Canada Inc.

24

N-3460-VNSR_MNMY_YN1


Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

From ‘No thanks’ to ‘Got to have it’: The unpredictable appeal of flu shots Helen Branswell

rience a phenomenon such Canadian Press as what has been happening in Western Canada where, TORONTO undeterred by frigid temnfluenza is notoriously peratures, people embarked on mercurial, forcing even sometimes desperate searches the experts to guess at which for flu shots – something they strain will dominate from one should have done weeks ago to year to the next. As Canada is get optimal protection. learning this winter, almost While public health auas unpredictable as the virus thorities are delighted people itself is whether the public will want to be vaccinated, they be willing to embrace flu vacare puzzled by the unexpected cination. clamour for flu shots. Going Public Health officials by the numbers, this year’s flu regularly plead and cajole, but season is active, but not overly most years the majority of severe. people pass on getting a shot. So what the heck is goCanadian flu vaccination rates ing on? When it comes to flu sit pretty squarely in the oneshots, why does cool indifferquarter to one-third range, ence sometimes give way to Statistics Canada data show. white hot demand? But occasionally we expe-

I

Attention: Nacho Nyäk Dun Citizens The NND FINANCe COMMITTee will be holding Citizen meetings in Mayo and Whitehorse to get input regarding the 2014-2015 BUDGET.

MAYO

WHITEHORSE

When: January 15, 2014 Time: 7:00 - 9:00 pM place: NND Government House Multi-purpose Room

When: February 1, 2014 Time: 1:00 - 4:00 pM place: NND Development Corp. 7209 B- 7th Avenue

“The psychology of influenza vaccination uptake is sometimes almost as complex as the disease itself,” says Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Diseases Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. “We want everyone to be vaccinated. But the question is: Why do we sometimes have these runs?” So far this year the data collected by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control suggest North America is experiencing a normal sort of flu season. Hospitalization rates for influenza, for instance, are lower than those of some recent years. And where 171 children died from flu infections last winter in the United States, so far this year there have been 10 pediatric deaths there. “I think that this year will assuredly end up less – as far as sheer numbers – than the 2009 pandemic,” says Dr. Michael Jhung, a medical epidemiologist in the CDC’s influenza division. “And it looks like it will have had less activity than last year, but that I’m not so sure about until we get all the data in.” But Jhung and others say the overall picture may be

Yukon Energy Corporation is a publicly owned electrical utility that operates as a business, at arm’s length from the Yukon government. Established in 1987 and headquartered in Whitehorse, Yukon Energy is the main generator of electricity in the territory. Yukon Energy works with its parent company, Yukon Development Corporation, to provide Yukoners with a secure and continuous supply of clean, affordable power. Help lead the way to a sustainable energy future in Yukon as their next...

masking a shift that the public is actually picking up on. It’s not that more people are getting admitted to hospitals or dying from flu. The concern stems from who is getting severely ill and who is dying. For years, flu saved its biggest wallop for the elderly. But since the new H1N1 strain emerged in the 2009 pandemic, you can’t assume that grandma and grandpa are the folks most likely to end up in ICUs with flu. As was seen in the pandemic, the elderly aren’t as susceptible to this H1N1 as they are to H3N2, the virus that dominated last season. Younger people are more likely to get infected with this virus, and some of those infections lead to serious illness. “We’re used to our parents being the ones who end up in ICU or dying, sadly…. But now it’s us, right?” says Dr. Perry Kendall, chief medical officer of health for British Columbia. “So if you’re a 50-yearold, you would be sad if your father or your mother went into ICU. But when it’s your spouse or your brother, it’s different. The risk is a lot more proximal.” By flu terms, the numbers of deaths being reported this year are still small. Two deaths

here, 10 there. Each is a tragedy. Still, the reality is lots of people die from flu every year; the Public Health Agency of Canada estimates the toll to be about 3,500 Canadians a year. But those smaller numbers actually mean something to people, where the larger estimate is an abstraction, suggests Dr. Kumanan Wilson, a senior scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. “A few stories that are particularly vivid and clear can start to create a perception of risk that’s much greater than the actual number of deaths,” he says. “There’s a big difference between an individual story of a young person who was healthy, got the flu and then died than at the end of the flu season someone saying ‘Actually, X thousand people died from the flu.”’ Jhung says as of last week the U.S. had seen 2,622 hospitalizations. Of those, 61 per cent were in the 18-to-64 demographic. “When we think about who gets hospitalized for flu, it’s usually 60 per cent of those hospitalizations are in people 65 or older.” In both Canada and the U.S., there are reports of really sick young and middle-aged adults in ICUs. That was the pattern during the H1N1 pan-

25

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014 demic, so public health folks who know influenza aren’t surprised. That’s the way this virus rolls. But it’s not something the public – or even some doctors – expect from flu, Jhung says, admitting this could be making influenza more noticeable this year. “I do get the sense – and this is not substantiated by any data – that clinicians are being maybe taken aback a little bit by the number of severe illnesses they’re seeing in younger adults.” The perception something unusual is happening fuels demand for vaccine and supplies start to tighten. Suddenly that shot you didn’t think you needed is something you desperately want, something

you and your children need to be safe. It’s happened before. In 2004, the U.S. lost about 40 per cent of its vaccine order when one of its suppliers had to jettison its entire output because of a contamination problem. Word that supplies would be tight sent demand soaring. Americans were crossing the border to get a flu shot in Canada. Canada had plenty of vaccine that year, but media coverage of the U.S. shortage spiked demand here too. And just as Canadian vaccination clinics were poised to open in the 2009 pandemic, a young boy died from the new flu in Ontario. Lines for vaccine were enormous. “Every time a child or a youth dies, demand goes soar-

ing up,” says Kendall. The frustrating thing for public health officials is that these periodic runs on flu vaccine do not seem to translate into long-term increases in demand for flu shots. It’s quite probable that many of the people who lined up this week will not bother getting a flu shot next fall. “It’s a shame that this psychological effect also tends to wane over time,” says Jhung. “You would think that if they’d never been vaccinated, once they go through the process and recognize that it’s really not that bad, that they may continue to do it. But I don’t know what’s going to make the message stick. We haven’t figured that out yet.”

The Victoria Faulkner Women’s Centre will be hosting the workshop

Coping Skills

this workshop will explore how we think about and handle the stresses we face every day. this is an opportunity for women to connect, share, and heal from their experiences together. When:

Tuesday 6:30pm to 8:30pm January 21st Where: 503 Hanson St Cost: Free Free Free Please contact the Victoria Faulkner Women’s Centre for more information 667-2693

MY NISSAN

MY YEAR WITH OUR

ALL-NEW

MAKE IT YOUR

LINEUP: BEST 2014 SUBCOMPACT CAR OF THE YEAR

The 2014 VERSA NOTE

The 2014 SENTRA

• BETTER COMBINED FUEL EFFICIENCY THAN YARIS & FIT*

• BETTER COMBINED FUEL EFFICIENCY THAN CIVIC & ELANTRA*

• BEST-IN-CLASS TOTAL INTERIOR VOLUME†

$

Visioning & Design Workshops

LEASE FROM

69 0.9 39 $0

FOR

%

AT

SEMI-MONTHLY≠

1.6 SL Tech model shown▲

YEAR EVER.

PER MONTH

MONTHS

FREIGHT AND PDE INCLUDED

DOWN

APR

• HEADLIGHT LED ACCENTS AND LED TAILLIGHTS LEASE FROM

79 0% 39 $0

$

AT

APR

SEMI-MONTHLY≠

PER MONTH

MONTHS

FOR

SL model shown▲

DOWN

FREIGHT AND PDE INCLUDED

INTRODUCING

The Totally Redesigned 2014 NISSAN ROGUE

The President & Chief Executive Officer is appointed by and reports to the Board of Directors. His/her primary responsibilities are to: support the Board in providing overall leadership and vision in developing Yukon Energy’s strategic direction; provide overall leadership and vision in developing the strategies, tactics and business plans necessary to realize corporate objectives; and, manage the overall business to ensure strategic and business plans are effectively implemented and financial and operational objectives are attained. What type of background do you have? You have a relevant (ideally post graduate) university degree, with 10-15 years of experience at the senior management level. You have reported to a Board,

and have strong track record in business, leadership, project management and people management. You have both political and media acumen, along with excellent communication, negotiation and relationship building skills. The opportunity to live, work and contribute to the community in Yukon is something that excites you. The hidden gem of Western Canada, Yukon offers recreational opportunities, breathtaking scenery and a growing and vibrant population. For further information, please visit www.watsoninc. ca. To express your interest in this position, please email your cover letter and resume to resumes @watsoninc.ca by 14 February 2014.

Everyone is welcome to attend the following events to contribute their ideas and help shape the Range Road North Neighbourhood Plan. This area includes the Takhini & Northland Mobile Home Parks, Mountain View Place, Mountain Air Estates, Stone Ridge, several Kwanlin Dün First Nation parcels, and surrounding greenspace. Public Event 1: Visioning Workshop 7-9 pm, Tuesday January 21 Public Event 2: Design Workshop Open House 7-9 pm, Wednesday January 22 Both events will be held in the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre, Multi-Purpose Room (1171 Front Street). For more information please visit whitehorse.ca/rangeroad, email ben.campbell@whitehorse.ca or phone 668-8338.

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26

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

IBM Jeopardy! champ computer gets its own NYC business unit Bree Fowler Associated Press

Notice of Writ of Election Kwanlin Dün First nation

An Election will be held for One (1) Chief Six (6) Councillors On Wednesday, March 19, 2014 All nomination papers must be submitted no later than Wednesday, February 5, 2014 at 4:00 pm to the Chief Returning Officer at the KDFN Election Office located at 89 McClennan Road in the McIntyre subdivision Whitehorse. Nomination forms are available at the following locations: • KDFN Election Office - 89 McClennan Road • KDFN Main Administration building 35 McIntyre Drive • Online at www.kwanlindun.com – What’s New Section For more information, contact the Chief Returning Officer, Mary Anne Carroll Cell: 867-689-0817 or Email: cro2014@kdfnelection.com

NEW YORK ne of the most famous Jeopardy! champs of all time is moving to Manhattan. No, it’s not Ken Jennings. IBM announced Thursday that it’s investing more than $1 billion to give its Watson cloud computing system its own business division and a new home in New York City. The Armonk, N.Y.-based computing company said the new business unit will be dedicated to the development and commercialization of the project that first gained fame by defeating a pair of Jeopardy! champions, including 74-time winner Jennings, in 2011. In the years since Watson’s TV appearance, IBM has been developing the computing system for more practical purposes and changed it to a cloud-based service. While still in the development phase, Watson’s massive analytical capabilities are currently being used in industries ranging from health care to banking. IBM CEO Ginni Rometty said what makes Watson unique is that it isn’t programmed like most computers. Instead of relying only on the information that’s put into it, Watson learns by “reading” vast amounts of information and combining it with the results of previous work to find answers to problems – which she says makes it ideal for the reams of data now involved in many industries. IBM is building a new headquarters for the business on the edge of New York City’s East Village near

O

Seth Winig/AP photo

Jeopardy champions Ken Jennings, left, and Brad Rutter, right, look on as the IBM computer called Watson beats them to the buzzer in 2011.

New York University and other technology companies. In addition to its marketing and engineering capabilities, the new headquarters also will provide a place for IBM to collaborate with clients and startup companies that are building apps for Watson. IBM will invest about $100 million in various startup companies working on Watson projects. Rometty said at an event announcing the move Thursday in New York that it’s those collaborations with startups and clients that will help find new uses for the Watson technology. Eventually the business, which started out as a team of 27 people, will employ about 2,000, with several hundred set to move into the new headquarters. One of the first fields to use Watson was health care. Dr. Jose Baselga, physician-in-

Yukon Fisheries Field Assistant Program (Fish Tech) This program provides training necessary for fisheries-related field work with prospective employers such as First Nations, government agencies, environmental consulting companies, or Yukon River Panel Restoration and Enhancement projects. The coursework for this program is delivered in two components: The first portion is nine weeks of online learning, followed by a 10-day field camp, where the “hands-on” portion of the course will be taught. What you will learn: • Yukon fish species and fish habitats • Yukon fisheries management under Land Claims • Traditional, local and professional knowledge in fisheries • Assessing fish populations and restoring fish habitats How you will learn: • Online readings, quizzes, activities, audio / video files • “Hands-on” field work • Completing a fisheries field project

The new Yukon home of

Prerequisite: • Physically fit and able to spend 10 days in a field camp • English 10 or equivalent; OR acceptable scores on College Placement Test • A valid First Aid/CPR is required for field camp

Course Schedule Spring 2014

February 3 – 28: Applications accepted March 3 – 14: Program registration March 17 – May 16: Online component of course requiring 20 hours per week. May 26 – June 4: Field camp

chief of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, attended Thursday’s event. He said Watson has helped his doctors deal with the skyrocketing amount of information involved in the treatment of cancer. Meanwhile, others see the potential for using Watson in industries such as retail and travel. Terry Jones, a founder of the travel websites Travelocity.com and Kayak.com, also attended the event. He said that while Internet search engines have become the method of choice for booking travel, they can’t yet provide the expert advice about particular destinations and travel activities that an old-fashioned travel agent can. He said Watson’s ability to understand language allows it to search travel blogs, books and newspapers to help answer users’ questions. Michael Rhodin, a long-time IBM executive named to lead the new business, said the New York City headquarters is meant to be a departure from the project’s current research facility’s sleepier surroundings about 40 miles north of the city in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. The angular glass building also will stand out from the rest of its neighbourhood, which is home to some of the oldest buildings in the city. Rhodin said the move will help it attract young talent that expects Silicon Valley style. “The millennial generation gets this, they understand what this is,” Rhodin said. “This is a departure. It’s a statement on our part.”

For more information please contact: Darrell Otto, Instructor Renewable Resources Management dotto@yukoncollege.yk.ca t. 867.668.8868 f. 867.668.2935 500 College Drive, PO Box 2799 Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5K4 Canada www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/programs/yffa

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Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

National Women’s Issues Symposium The Women’s Issues Symposium of the Canadian Teachers’ Federation is an annual event. This year it is hosted by Yukon Teachers’ Association with support from Yukon Education and Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario.

2014

what do we need to know? the symPosium will focus on two main areas:

engaging men and Boys and what do we need to know.

27

FEB 19 & 20 Jackson Katz, Ph.D., is an educator, author and acclaimed lecturer who is a pioneer in the fields of gender violence prevention education and critical media literacy. He is cofounder of Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP), one of the original “bystander” programs; Katz is one of the architects of this popular approach to prevention/ social norms change. It is also the most widely utilized sexual and domestic violence prevention initiative in college and professional athletics in North America. Katz is the creator of the awardwinning documentaries Tough Guise and Tough Guise 2 (just released) and author of The Macho Paradox and Leading Men: Presidential Campaigns and the Politics of Manhood.

ParticiPants will examine: the suBtleties of language; • how to talk to young children k-4; • how to talk about “consent” and what does mean it; • engaging boys as allies in violence prevention; • how to work discussions into curriculum; • strategies, resources and tools that nurture a culture of peace, respect and empathy which can help to break the cycle of violence. Diane Redsky

Panelists • • • •

Brenda Barnes: Women’s Directorate Bev Park: Newfoundland and Labrador Teachers’ Association scott carlson: White Ribbon Campaign Bhreagh daBBs: Victoria Faulkner Women’s Shelter … and more!

8:30 – 4:00pm High Country Inn Convention Center (lunch included both days)

PublIC are welCome t o regIster. e ve n t f e e $300

RegiSTeR oNLiNe: www.ctf-fce.ca or by calling 668-6777 ext. 1 (deadline is January 31, 2014) YTA members can apply under “Local PD” Book signing and wine & cheese with Jackson Katz, 7pm Feb 19.

Government

is a nationally renowned visionary thinker and community leader who has long worked to address the myriad of issues facing Winnipeg’s Aboriginal community in all areas of health, justice, education and social services. Since 1993, she has served in both a professional and volunteer capacity working within the social services sector and has become a strong advocate for aboriginal, children’s and women’s issues. She has helped to create numerous innovative programs that have helped build healthy communities. She believes in a shared value and culturally appropriate approach and possesses clear vision to detail.

Sarah Bingham is a dedicated women’s rights advocate and public educator specializing in family violence and abuse within the women’s shelter movement. She has worked as a Crisis Counsellor in an emergency shelter for abused women, Youth Violence Prevention and Healthy Relationships Coordinator, Group Facilitator for Sexual Assault Support Groups and has piloted successful Survivor Engagement projects for abused women. She currently works at the Calgary Women’s Emergency Shelter as the Family Violence Community Action Coordinator.


28

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

LIFE

From P.E.I. to Yukon, for the kids Jesse Winter News Reporter

H

ans Best is crouched in front of his dad’s ambulance, tracing patterns in the muddy tire tracks with his nineyear-old fingers. In another part of the Whitehorse emergency response centre’s ambulance bay, his sister, Abida, squeals with delight and throws her arms around her father’s neck before promptly bursting into a 10-year-old’s tears at the sight of a photographer’s camera. Sister Jaime, seven, wanders ghostlike with a coat hung over her head like a Halloween costume, and Danielle, the youngest at four years old, squirms as her mother peels off layers of winter clothing. Trying to corral four small children into the back of an ambulance for a portrait with their paramedic dad would be a challenge for any parental duo, but for Nathan and Lissa Best, it’s just another day in a somewhat chaotic life. “We call it the circus,” Nathan says, grinning. The family didn’t end up clustered together in the ambulance garage by accident. Three of the Best’s four children have autism and a number of other disabilities – “Jaime is the only neurotypical one,” Nathan explains – and they came to Whitehorse to look for help. Originally from P.E.I., the Bests were getting desperate. The support services there for disabled children were barely enough for families with even one special child, let alone three. “What we were facing there, the government-funded programs were fairly minimal.” Living in P.E.I. it was a herculean struggle just to make ends meet. All the doctors and specialists, the extra cost of childcare and support, it all adds up. Nathan was working 90-hour weeks and holding down three jobs, and had all but abandoned his career as a paramedic – a dream job he had worked towards since he was a boy. “I drove a truck, milked cows at night and then I’d go wash buses for the city transit company. I also volunteered for the local fire department, but we were barely surviving, financially.” In early 2012 they decided to move, Nathan explained, but they had no idea where to go. “So we did our research, calling all across Canada and through a friend of mine we basically stumbled across Whitehorse,” Nathan said. “She called the Department of Education, told them of our situation, and the people from the department were absolutely

Jesse Winter/Yukon News

Nathan Best and his wife Lissa with their three autistic children Hans, left, Abida, centre, and four-year-old Danielle.

incredible at accommodating us, and taking care of our children when we got here. Just the way that first phone call went, we knew this was the right choice.” But packing up an entire life and moving across the country is no small feat for any family. For the Bests, it was even bigger. One of the most important things for children with autism is stability, and the prospect of uprooting their lives to move to the Yukon was a calculated risk. They sold almost everything. Nathan packed up the family VW wagon with what was left and drove the 7,006 kilometres across the country alone. Lissa followed with the four kids on a plane. “It was a huge risk. I didn’t even know if I would have a job here when we decided to leave,” Nathan said. But since arriving, things have gotten much better. Back east, the school system doesn’t have enough money to provide every special needs child with their own educational assistant, but having one is one of the most powerful supports a family can get. Here in the Yukon, each Best child has their own EA, and it’s made a huge help, Nathan said. “Our oldest – Abida – goes to Jack Hulland elementary where there is a teacher who is absolutely exceptional with disabled kids. Her confidence and her scholastic ability has grown by

leaps and bounds, just this year,” Nathan said. That teacher, Jeff Frizzell, also had a surprising idea for the family. “They were on some pretty potent drugs, to help moderate their behaviour and outbursts. Jeff told us he wanted to get them off of those drugs, through behaviour therapy and careful scheduling work. “He said, ‘I want to work with Abida, not with her altered self.’” With a lot of effort, it worked, and the result has been very good for the kids, Nathan said. But even with that hurdle cleared, finding activities for the kids to do is another enormous challenge. “Most parents can get some time away – even a few hours – by sending their kids to soccer, to scouts or something. We can’t do that because we can’t send our kids there alone. They need one-on-one support. With three kids like that, there’s no way we could pay for all those babysitters,” Nathan said. That’s another place where the Yukon system has been indispensable for the Bests. The Yukon’s Health Department has a program called Family Support for Children with Disabilities that provides a range of support, but one of the most important is respite – time away for Nathan and Lissa to be together and get a break from

the chaos. The help has been so astounding that Nathan wanted to find a way to give back. This past August, just after the family’s one-year anniversary in the Yukon, he was hiking with some co-workers from emergency services, and they started daring him to grow his hair out. “I’ve been bald for years. I said, ‘No way, I hate hair,’ but they kept pressing me. They offered me money to grow it. At first I said, ‘No way am I taking money for that,’ but I thought about it for the rest of the day and decided we could use it as a fundraiser for Autism Yukon,” Nathan explained. Nathan created a Facebook page and started asking for donations. More co-workers kicked it. Family and friends from across the country started sending money. A few months later, Nathan was sitting in the Roadhouse Pub just before Christmas with his running club – the Hash House Harriers – getting strangers to pay for the chance to shave his head. “They heard about it, so we did a run on December 20. Whenever you go to a Hash Run you have to put up $5 cash, so the people in charge of this hash said all the ‘hash cash’ will go towards Autism Yukon as well.” They coupled the run with the Harrier’s 12 Bars of Christmas – pub-jogging their way

around town, taking donations and slowly reducing Nathan’s crop until it was gone. They raised $676 that night alone. By the end of the campaign, Autism Yukon had $2,500 and Nathan had his smooth, hairless head back, much to his and his family’s relief. Nathan fairly beams when describing how much of a difference the Yukon’s support system has made in his family’s quality of life, but perhaps one anecdote encapsulates it the most. Ever since he was a toddler, Hans has had an almost crippling fear of fire engines, ambulances and sirens – which makes what his dad does for a living more than a bit complicated. But over the years, Nathan and Hans have been working together to overcome that fear. “We’d start by just being in the ambulance bay. Then slowly, I’d let him get comfortable and even try sitting in the driver’s seat. Then we’d try turning the lights on. Slowly, he started to get over his fear,” Nathan said. It’s been a long process, but the comfort and stability of Whitehorse has also helped. “Now, he says when he grows up he wants to be a paramedic and work with his dad,” Nathan says, with a catch in his throat. “I don’t even know if it’s possible yet, but it would be absolutely incredible.” Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com


29

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

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306 RAY STREET • WHITEHORSE, YUKON Y1A 5R3 • PHONE: (867) 633-2627 • FAX (867) 668-2428 • 1-800-661-0528 • checkeredflag@northwestel.net • www.checkeredflagrecreation.com


30

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Running during winter? Slowing down, strengthening muscles can help avoid injury Lauren La Rose

ski, a member of the Manitoba Runners’ Association. “In the summertime, you’re ven as the temperatures nose- just sort of in the lockdown dive, there has been no dip mode and you just focus on in productivity for Al Garlinski, running ahead. With the winter, who continues to log between you’re so cautious about your around 80 and 97 kilometres a week as part of his running rou- footing, you’re taking shorter strides, you’re wearing ice grips tine – with some adjustments. “You have to be more aware of on your runners, which a lot of your surroundings,” said Garlin- runners will do for safety’s sake.” Canadian Press

E

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January 21-23, 2014 20541

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Northern Institute of Social Justice

The Winnipeg running enthusiast said he prefers to use ice grips on his shoes for “peace of mind,” but still demonstrates extra care. If Garlinski approaches an icy patch while out running, he’ll simply stop and walk around it. And when temperatures drop to around -25 C, he’ll run indoors, usually joining friends for laps around different tracks in the city. Still, Garlinski’s first choice is take his strides outside – even when it’s chilly. “It’s still an exhilarating experience. You’ve got the fresh air in your lungs, even though it’s cold, but you feel better after the run,” said the 50-year-old. “In a controlled environment, when you’ve got the room temperature and you’re running on the track with that boredom, it’s still not the same.” Running on ice-slickened sidewalks, paths and trails has the potential to cause injury unless key modifications are made. “When the snow falls or when it gets icy out, the natural thing for a runner to do is to increase their stride width – so they run with their feet a little further apart – and they decrease their stride length. They take more steps per kilometre, they take shorter, choppier steps,” said

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

Runners brave a winter storm in Halifax in December. Running on ice-slickened sidewalks and paths has the potential to cause injury unless key modifications are made before, during and after the workout.

Reed Ferber, director of the Running Injury Clinic at the University of Calgary. In order to reduce their injury risk, Ferber said they tell runners that they need to run in that manner to retain stability in slippery conditions. “They need to reduce their mileage, reduce their intensity and get stronger and more flexible because of that biomechanical pattern.” Research has shown that hip

strength – specifically in the gluteus medius, the muscle on the side of the hip – is critical in terms of maintaining balance, Ferber said. “All of the other muscles in your legs – your quads, your hamstrings, your glutes, your calf muscles – they are responsible for energy absorption when your foot lands on the ground, and they’re responsible for energy generation to propel you forward.

“The only muscle that controls your side-to-side balance is your gluteus medius. If you’re running in slippery conditions, you’re in an unstable situation. Strength of that muscle is critical in order to improve your balance.” He recommended doing strengthening exercises daily and anytime after a run to avoid causing fatigue beforehand. The Running Injury Clinic’s website features videos of some common muscle strengthening exercises aimed at preventing and treating running injuries, several of which require use of a resistance band. “Stretching is also important because when you decrease your stride length, you’re taking shorter, choppier steps, you’re going to be using your hip flexors – the muscles in the front of your hip – and you’re going to be using your hamstrings and your glutes – the muscles in the back of your hip and your leg – a lot more,” Ferber said. What about people who don’t modify their approach and continue to run as quickly as they normally would? “The risk is that you’re going to slip,” Ferber said. “If you take a big long stride, you’re going to land on your heel most likely. Ninety-five per cent of runners

strike the ground with their heel first, and by doing that, your foot is going to slip out from underneath you.” Bruce Raymer laced up in ultra-chilly conditions while living in Saskatchewan and remembered what he described as one of his most “savage” runs in Regina. “It was -40 with the wind chill, and it was so cold that your eyelashes would start sticking together,” recalled Raymer, a Canadian marathon champion and former member of the national team. As a run coach and personal trainer serving the Greater Toronto Area and Ontario’s Durham Region, Raymer said he usually tells clients to get shoes with an “aggressive” tread; but for the most part on really bad days, most will run indoors on a track or treadmill – himself included. “If it comes down to footing or temperature, they’ll take footing any day because they just want to get out there and get the run in,” he said. If weather is consistently bad, some clients like to cross-train to give running a break, Raymer said. “They’ll just view it as a chance to do something else, maybe hit the weight room and

Yukon Bible Fellowship

(Union of Methodist, Presbyterian & Congregational Churches) 10:30 a.m. - Sunday School & Worship Service Rev. Beverly C.S. Brazier

160 hillcrest Drive 668-5689 Sunday Service 10:00 a.m. Pre-Service Prayer 9:00 a.m. Family Worship & K.I.D.S. Church

Grace Community Church

Church Of The Nazarene

601 Main Street 667-2989

8th & Wheeler Street

Pastor Paul & Moreen Sharp 667-2134 10:30 aM FaMILY WoRShIP WeeKLY CaRe GRoUP STUDIeS Because He Cares, We Care.

The Salvation Army

311-B Black Street • 668-2327

Sunday Church Services: 11 am & 7 pm eveRYoNe WeLCoMe

Our Lady of Victory (Roman Catholic)

1607 Birch St. 633-2647

Saturday evening Mass: 7:30 p.m.

Confessions before Mass & by appointment. Monday 7:00 PM Novena Prayers & adoration Tuesday through Friday: Mass 11:30 a.m.

ALL WeLCOMe

FoURSqUaRe ChURCh

PaSToR RICK TURNeR

2111 Centennial St. (Porter Creek) Sunday School & Morning Worship - 10:45 am

Call for Bible Study & Youth Group details

PaSToR NoRaYR (Norman) haJIaN

www.whitehorsenazarene.org 633-4903

First Pentecostal Church 149 Wilson Drive 668-5727

Sunday 10:00am Prayer / Sunday School 11:00 am Worship Wednesday Praise & Celebration 7:30 pm Pastor Roger Yadon

Whitehorse

TRINITY LUTHeRAN

Baptist Church

668-4079 tlc@northwestel.net Sunday Worship at 10:00 aM Sunday School at 10:00 aM

Family Worship & Sunday School

4th Avenue & Strickland Street

Pastor Deborah Moroz pastor.tlc@northwestel.net

eVeRYONe WeLCOMe!

Riverdale Baptist Church

15 Duke Road, Whse 667-6620 Sunday worship Service: 10:30am Rev. GReG aNDeRSoN

www.rbchurch.ca

Quaker Worship Group ReLIGIoUS SoCIeTY oF FRIeNDS Meets regularly for Silent Worship. For information, call 667-4615 email: whitehorse-contact@quaker.ca

website: quaker.ca

Seventh Day Adventist Church

Reader Service Sundays 10:30 am 332-4171 for information

www.orthodoxwhitehorse.org

Mondays 5:15 to 6:15 PM

www.vajranorth.org • 667-6951

Christ Church Cathedral Anglican

TAGISH Community Church

(Roman Catholic)

4th Avenue & Steele Street • 667-2437 Masses: Weekdays: 12:10 pm. Saturday 5 pm Sunday: 9 am - english; 10:10 am - French; 11:30 am english

Bethany Church

Ph: 668-4877 • www.bethanychurch.ca

Christian Mission

403 Lowe Street

Sacred Heart Cathedral

at 10:30 AM

Orthodox

Meditation drop-in • Everyone Welcome!

oFFICe hoURS: Mon-Fri 9:00 aM to 12 Noon

Pastor Mark Carroll

St. Nikolai

Vajra North Buddhist Meditation Society

1609 Birch St. (Porter Creek) 633-5385 “We’re open Saturdays!” Worship Service 11:00 am Wednesday 7:00 pm - Prayer Meeting All are welcome.

Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada early Service 9:00 - 10:00 am Family Service 10:30 am - Noon Filipino Service 4:00 - 5:00 pm Sunday School ages 0-12

2060 2nd AvEnuE • 667-4889

Rigdrol Dechen Ling,

Tough to break free on your own?

91806 alaska highway

The Temple of Set

The World’s Premier Left hand Path Religion

a not-for-prophet society. www.xeper.org

canadian affiliation information: northstarpylon@gmail.com

4Th aveNUe & eLLIoTT STReeT Services Sunday 8:30 aM & 10:00 aM Thursday Service 12:10 PM (with lunch)

668-5530

Meeting First Sunday each Month Details, map and information at:

www.tagishcc.com 867-633-4903

Calvary Baptist

1301 FIR STReeT 633-2886

eCKANKAR

Church of the Northern Apostles

An Anglican/episcopal Church Sunday Worship 10:00 aM

Sunday School during Service, Sept to May

THe ReV. ROB LANGMAID

45 Boxwood Crescent • Porter Creek 633-4032 • All Are Welcome

Bahá’í Faith

Box 31419, Whitehorse, YT Y1a 6K8 For information on regular community activities in Whitehorse contact:

whitehorselsa@gmail.com The Church of Jesus Christ of

Latter Day Saints

108 WICKSTROM ROAD, WHITeHORSe

1-867-667-2353

Sunday Sacrament Service starts at 10:00 AM Sunday School at 11:00 AM and Priesthood hour will be from 12:00 to 1:00 PM

Dale & Rena Mae McDonald Word of Faith Ministers & Teachers. check out our website!

www.northernlightministries.ca

St. Saviour’s

1154c 1st Ave • Entrance from Strickland

Regular Monthly Service: 1st and 3rd Sundays of the Month 11:00 AM • All are welcome. Rev. David Pritchard 668-5530

For further information about, and to discover Islam, please contact: Javed Muhammad (867) 332-8116 or Adil Khalik (867) 633-4078 or send an e-mail to info@yukonmuslims.ca

Anglican Church in Carcross

SUPPORT is the key

QuitPath 1-866-221-8393 or 867-667-8393 (to register)

QuitPath.ca

or call 456-7131

Yukon Muslim Association www.yukonmuslims.ca

those devices.” Ferber said they always ask runners to be reasonable and listen to their bodies, which includes staying in if they simply find conditions too chilly. “If your goal was to run 5Ks, for example, but your body is telling you that either it’s too cold out or you’re starting to get injured, there’s no reason why you can’t shorten that to a 2K or 3K run,” he said. “We want runners to listen to their bodies and they can make good decisions based on that.”

WHERE DO I GET THE NEWS? The Yukon News is available at these wonderful stores in Whitehorse:

HILLCREST

PORTER CREEK

RIVERDALE:

Airport Chalet Airport Snacks & Gifts

Coyote Video Goody’s Gas Green Garden Restaurant Heather’s Haven Super A Porter Creek Trails North

38 Famous Video Super A Riverdale Tempo Gas Bar

Bernie’s Race-Trac Gas Bigway Foods

Smokers’ Helpline

The Deli Extra Foods Fourth Avenue Petro Gold Rush Inn Cashplan Klondike Inn Mac’s Fireweed Books Ricky’s Restaurant Riverside Grocery Riverview Hotel Shoppers on Main Shoppers Qwanlin Mall Superstore Superstore Gas Bar Tags Well-Read Books Westmark Whitehorse Yukon Inn Yukon News Yukon Tire Edgewater Hotel

1-877-513-5333 (toll-free)

SmokersHelpline.ca THE YuKoN NEWS IS AlSo AVAIlABlE AT No CHARGE IN All YuKoN CoMMuNITIES AND ATlIN, B.C.

Northern Light Ministries

Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor L.e. harrison 633-4089

Ferber said the decision to use them is entirely individual. “We completely leave it up to the runner. And there’s zero evidence to support or refute they’re injury-protective or injury-causative properties,” he said. “For the simple fact that it’s going to grip the ice and it’s going to give you better traction, that’s great. But if it changes your biomechanics, if it changes the fundamental way that you run enough that it causes a different type of injury, maybe that means that that person shouldn’t run in

DOWNTOWN:

Religion of the Light and Sound of God

For more information on monthly activities, call (867) 633-6594 or visit www.eckankar-yt.ca www.eckankar.org ALL ARe WeLCOMe.

do some strength stuff and do some core, do some stuff that maybe they don’t pay as close attention to when they’re running all the time.” In addition to stretching and muscle strengthening, building core strength is also key, Ferber noted. “We see a lot of people that undertake yoga, Pilates, they do a lot of core (work), but they still neglect the hip and pelvis musculature. All of it is one functional unit.” As for ice traction devices,

GRANGER

Religious Organizations & Services Whitehorse United Church

31

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Getting personalized support and counselling can double your chances of becoming smoke free. Choose the support that’s right for you.

MONDAY • WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

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30

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Running during winter? Slowing down, strengthening muscles can help avoid injury Lauren La Rose

ski, a member of the Manitoba Runners’ Association. “In the summertime, you’re ven as the temperatures nose- just sort of in the lockdown dive, there has been no dip mode and you just focus on in productivity for Al Garlinski, running ahead. With the winter, who continues to log between you’re so cautious about your around 80 and 97 kilometres a week as part of his running rou- footing, you’re taking shorter strides, you’re wearing ice grips tine – with some adjustments. “You have to be more aware of on your runners, which a lot of your surroundings,” said Garlin- runners will do for safety’s sake.” Canadian Press

E

NORTHERN INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL JUSTICE

TRAINING PROGRAMS **NEW** Date: CRN: Location:

Mental Health First Aid Canada For Northern Peoples

January 21-23, 2014 20541

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9:00am to 4:00pm $450 + gst

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10:00am to 4:30pm $400 + gst

Registration: Please call Admissions at 668.8710 and quote the Course Registration Number (CRN). For more information on the Northern Institute of Social Justice and courses offered: Visit our website: http://www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/programs/info/nisj Call: (867) 456.8589 Email: nisj@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Northern Institute of Social Justice

The Winnipeg running enthusiast said he prefers to use ice grips on his shoes for “peace of mind,” but still demonstrates extra care. If Garlinski approaches an icy patch while out running, he’ll simply stop and walk around it. And when temperatures drop to around -25 C, he’ll run indoors, usually joining friends for laps around different tracks in the city. Still, Garlinski’s first choice is take his strides outside – even when it’s chilly. “It’s still an exhilarating experience. You’ve got the fresh air in your lungs, even though it’s cold, but you feel better after the run,” said the 50-year-old. “In a controlled environment, when you’ve got the room temperature and you’re running on the track with that boredom, it’s still not the same.” Running on ice-slickened sidewalks, paths and trails has the potential to cause injury unless key modifications are made. “When the snow falls or when it gets icy out, the natural thing for a runner to do is to increase their stride width – so they run with their feet a little further apart – and they decrease their stride length. They take more steps per kilometre, they take shorter, choppier steps,” said

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

Runners brave a winter storm in Halifax in December. Running on ice-slickened sidewalks and paths has the potential to cause injury unless key modifications are made before, during and after the workout.

Reed Ferber, director of the Running Injury Clinic at the University of Calgary. In order to reduce their injury risk, Ferber said they tell runners that they need to run in that manner to retain stability in slippery conditions. “They need to reduce their mileage, reduce their intensity and get stronger and more flexible because of that biomechanical pattern.” Research has shown that hip

strength – specifically in the gluteus medius, the muscle on the side of the hip – is critical in terms of maintaining balance, Ferber said. “All of the other muscles in your legs – your quads, your hamstrings, your glutes, your calf muscles – they are responsible for energy absorption when your foot lands on the ground, and they’re responsible for energy generation to propel you forward.

“The only muscle that controls your side-to-side balance is your gluteus medius. If you’re running in slippery conditions, you’re in an unstable situation. Strength of that muscle is critical in order to improve your balance.” He recommended doing strengthening exercises daily and anytime after a run to avoid causing fatigue beforehand. The Running Injury Clinic’s website features videos of some common muscle strengthening exercises aimed at preventing and treating running injuries, several of which require use of a resistance band. “Stretching is also important because when you decrease your stride length, you’re taking shorter, choppier steps, you’re going to be using your hip flexors – the muscles in the front of your hip – and you’re going to be using your hamstrings and your glutes – the muscles in the back of your hip and your leg – a lot more,” Ferber said. What about people who don’t modify their approach and continue to run as quickly as they normally would? “The risk is that you’re going to slip,” Ferber said. “If you take a big long stride, you’re going to land on your heel most likely. Ninety-five per cent of runners

strike the ground with their heel first, and by doing that, your foot is going to slip out from underneath you.” Bruce Raymer laced up in ultra-chilly conditions while living in Saskatchewan and remembered what he described as one of his most “savage” runs in Regina. “It was -40 with the wind chill, and it was so cold that your eyelashes would start sticking together,” recalled Raymer, a Canadian marathon champion and former member of the national team. As a run coach and personal trainer serving the Greater Toronto Area and Ontario’s Durham Region, Raymer said he usually tells clients to get shoes with an “aggressive” tread; but for the most part on really bad days, most will run indoors on a track or treadmill – himself included. “If it comes down to footing or temperature, they’ll take footing any day because they just want to get out there and get the run in,” he said. If weather is consistently bad, some clients like to cross-train to give running a break, Raymer said. “They’ll just view it as a chance to do something else, maybe hit the weight room and

Yukon Bible Fellowship

(Union of Methodist, Presbyterian & Congregational Churches) 10:30 a.m. - Sunday School & Worship Service Rev. Beverly C.S. Brazier

160 hillcrest Drive 668-5689 Sunday Service 10:00 a.m. Pre-Service Prayer 9:00 a.m. Family Worship & K.I.D.S. Church

Grace Community Church

Church Of The Nazarene

601 Main Street 667-2989

8th & Wheeler Street

Pastor Paul & Moreen Sharp 667-2134 10:30 aM FaMILY WoRShIP WeeKLY CaRe GRoUP STUDIeS Because He Cares, We Care.

The Salvation Army

311-B Black Street • 668-2327

Sunday Church Services: 11 am & 7 pm eveRYoNe WeLCoMe

Our Lady of Victory (Roman Catholic)

1607 Birch St. 633-2647

Saturday evening Mass: 7:30 p.m.

Confessions before Mass & by appointment. Monday 7:00 PM Novena Prayers & adoration Tuesday through Friday: Mass 11:30 a.m.

ALL WeLCOMe

FoURSqUaRe ChURCh

PaSToR RICK TURNeR

2111 Centennial St. (Porter Creek) Sunday School & Morning Worship - 10:45 am

Call for Bible Study & Youth Group details

PaSToR NoRaYR (Norman) haJIaN

www.whitehorsenazarene.org 633-4903

First Pentecostal Church 149 Wilson Drive 668-5727

Sunday 10:00am Prayer / Sunday School 11:00 am Worship Wednesday Praise & Celebration 7:30 pm Pastor Roger Yadon

Whitehorse

TRINITY LUTHeRAN

Baptist Church

668-4079 tlc@northwestel.net Sunday Worship at 10:00 aM Sunday School at 10:00 aM

Family Worship & Sunday School

4th Avenue & Strickland Street

Pastor Deborah Moroz pastor.tlc@northwestel.net

eVeRYONe WeLCOMe!

Riverdale Baptist Church

15 Duke Road, Whse 667-6620 Sunday worship Service: 10:30am Rev. GReG aNDeRSoN

www.rbchurch.ca

Quaker Worship Group ReLIGIoUS SoCIeTY oF FRIeNDS Meets regularly for Silent Worship. For information, call 667-4615 email: whitehorse-contact@quaker.ca

website: quaker.ca

Seventh Day Adventist Church

Reader Service Sundays 10:30 am 332-4171 for information

www.orthodoxwhitehorse.org

Mondays 5:15 to 6:15 PM

www.vajranorth.org • 667-6951

Christ Church Cathedral Anglican

TAGISH Community Church

(Roman Catholic)

4th Avenue & Steele Street • 667-2437 Masses: Weekdays: 12:10 pm. Saturday 5 pm Sunday: 9 am - english; 10:10 am - French; 11:30 am english

Bethany Church

Ph: 668-4877 • www.bethanychurch.ca

Christian Mission

403 Lowe Street

Sacred Heart Cathedral

at 10:30 AM

Orthodox

Meditation drop-in • Everyone Welcome!

oFFICe hoURS: Mon-Fri 9:00 aM to 12 Noon

Pastor Mark Carroll

St. Nikolai

Vajra North Buddhist Meditation Society

1609 Birch St. (Porter Creek) 633-5385 “We’re open Saturdays!” Worship Service 11:00 am Wednesday 7:00 pm - Prayer Meeting All are welcome.

Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada early Service 9:00 - 10:00 am Family Service 10:30 am - Noon Filipino Service 4:00 - 5:00 pm Sunday School ages 0-12

2060 2nd AvEnuE • 667-4889

Rigdrol Dechen Ling,

Tough to break free on your own?

91806 alaska highway

The Temple of Set

The World’s Premier Left hand Path Religion

a not-for-prophet society. www.xeper.org

canadian affiliation information: northstarpylon@gmail.com

4Th aveNUe & eLLIoTT STReeT Services Sunday 8:30 aM & 10:00 aM Thursday Service 12:10 PM (with lunch)

668-5530

Meeting First Sunday each Month Details, map and information at:

www.tagishcc.com 867-633-4903

Calvary Baptist

1301 FIR STReeT 633-2886

eCKANKAR

Church of the Northern Apostles

An Anglican/episcopal Church Sunday Worship 10:00 aM

Sunday School during Service, Sept to May

THe ReV. ROB LANGMAID

45 Boxwood Crescent • Porter Creek 633-4032 • All Are Welcome

Bahá’í Faith

Box 31419, Whitehorse, YT Y1a 6K8 For information on regular community activities in Whitehorse contact:

whitehorselsa@gmail.com The Church of Jesus Christ of

Latter Day Saints

108 WICKSTROM ROAD, WHITeHORSe

1-867-667-2353

Sunday Sacrament Service starts at 10:00 AM Sunday School at 11:00 AM and Priesthood hour will be from 12:00 to 1:00 PM

Dale & Rena Mae McDonald Word of Faith Ministers & Teachers. check out our website!

www.northernlightministries.ca

St. Saviour’s

1154c 1st Ave • Entrance from Strickland

Regular Monthly Service: 1st and 3rd Sundays of the Month 11:00 AM • All are welcome. Rev. David Pritchard 668-5530

For further information about, and to discover Islam, please contact: Javed Muhammad (867) 332-8116 or Adil Khalik (867) 633-4078 or send an e-mail to info@yukonmuslims.ca

Anglican Church in Carcross

SUPPORT is the key

QuitPath 1-866-221-8393 or 867-667-8393 (to register)

QuitPath.ca

or call 456-7131

Yukon Muslim Association www.yukonmuslims.ca

those devices.” Ferber said they always ask runners to be reasonable and listen to their bodies, which includes staying in if they simply find conditions too chilly. “If your goal was to run 5Ks, for example, but your body is telling you that either it’s too cold out or you’re starting to get injured, there’s no reason why you can’t shorten that to a 2K or 3K run,” he said. “We want runners to listen to their bodies and they can make good decisions based on that.”

WHERE DO I GET THE NEWS? The Yukon News is available at these wonderful stores in Whitehorse:

HILLCREST

PORTER CREEK

RIVERDALE:

Airport Chalet Airport Snacks & Gifts

Coyote Video Goody’s Gas Green Garden Restaurant Heather’s Haven Super A Porter Creek Trails North

38 Famous Video Super A Riverdale Tempo Gas Bar

Bernie’s Race-Trac Gas Bigway Foods

Smokers’ Helpline

The Deli Extra Foods Fourth Avenue Petro Gold Rush Inn Cashplan Klondike Inn Mac’s Fireweed Books Ricky’s Restaurant Riverside Grocery Riverview Hotel Shoppers on Main Shoppers Qwanlin Mall Superstore Superstore Gas Bar Tags Well-Read Books Westmark Whitehorse Yukon Inn Yukon News Yukon Tire Edgewater Hotel

1-877-513-5333 (toll-free)

SmokersHelpline.ca THE YuKoN NEWS IS AlSo AVAIlABlE AT No CHARGE IN All YuKoN CoMMuNITIES AND ATlIN, B.C.

Northern Light Ministries

Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor L.e. harrison 633-4089

Ferber said the decision to use them is entirely individual. “We completely leave it up to the runner. And there’s zero evidence to support or refute they’re injury-protective or injury-causative properties,” he said. “For the simple fact that it’s going to grip the ice and it’s going to give you better traction, that’s great. But if it changes your biomechanics, if it changes the fundamental way that you run enough that it causes a different type of injury, maybe that means that that person shouldn’t run in

DOWNTOWN:

Religion of the Light and Sound of God

For more information on monthly activities, call (867) 633-6594 or visit www.eckankar-yt.ca www.eckankar.org ALL ARe WeLCOMe.

do some strength stuff and do some core, do some stuff that maybe they don’t pay as close attention to when they’re running all the time.” In addition to stretching and muscle strengthening, building core strength is also key, Ferber noted. “We see a lot of people that undertake yoga, Pilates, they do a lot of core (work), but they still neglect the hip and pelvis musculature. All of it is one functional unit.” As for ice traction devices,

GRANGER

Religious Organizations & Services Whitehorse United Church

31

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Getting personalized support and counselling can double your chances of becoming smoke free. Choose the support that’s right for you.

MONDAY • WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

“YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION” WEDNESDAY * FRIDAY

AND …

Kopper King Hi-Country RV Park McCrae Petro Takhini Gas Yukon College Bookstore


32

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Chimps who share meals have more ‘love hormone’ Frank Jordans Associated Press

BERLIN himpanzees who share are chimpanzees who care, it seems. A study published Wednesday appears to confirm that friendships are forged at mealtimes, at least for our closest living relatives. Scientists from Germany, Switzerland, Britain and the United States have found that chimps who share their food have higher levels of oxytocin, known as the love hormone, than those who don’t. Oxytocin has previously been linked to bonding between mothers and their breastfeeding babies, both in primates and humans. Researchers studying dozens of wild chimpanzees in Uganda found that the giver and the receiver of food had higher levels of oxytocin in their urine, indicating that sharing is something that makes both parties feel good. Roman Wittig of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, said chimpanzees had more than twice the level of oxytocin after sharing food than after mutual grooming – another important bonding behaviour in primates. “We think food sharing can help spark new friendships, whereas grooming is more for confirmation of existing relationships,” he told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. Julia Lehmann, an evolutionary anthropologist who wasn’t involved in the study, called the results “very clear and highly significant.” They appear to support the idea that food sharing can extend social benefits normally found in animals who are related to each other to those dining partners who

C FREE Legal Education Seminar Parenting After Separation HOW TO CREATE A PARENTING PLAN ______________________________________________________________________________

Managing Conflict Wednesday January 29, 2014 from 6:00 – 8:00 PM The Old Fire Wednesday, Hall, 1105 First Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5G4 . January 30, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m Whitehorse Public Library meeting room 1171 First Ave. (at Black St.), Whitehorse

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To register, pleasethecontact theInformation Centre (FLIC): To register, please contact Family Law (867)667-3066, or toll-free at 1-800-661-0408, ext. 3066 Family Law Information Centre (FLIC): (867)667-3066, Email: FLIC@gov.yk.ca toll-free at 1-800-661-0408, ext. 3066, or FLIC@gov.yk.ca

Justice

Classical Territory Local soloists and ensembles

January 18, 2014 Local group “My Fabulous String Quartet” will open the concert.

Mark Baker/AP Photo

Chimpanzees play with a pumpkin at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo. Scientists from Germany, Switzerland and the United States have found that chimps who share their food have higher levels of the so-called love hormone oxytocin than those who don’t.

aren’t related, she said. In other words, the way to a chimp’s heart is through its stomach. “I also find it very interesting that the direction of the food sharing does not affect the results, i.e. it is not better to receive than to give – or the other way around – at least not in terms of oxytocin level,” said Lehmann, an academic at Roehampton University in Britain.

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The research was conducted on wild chimpanzees because researchers weren’t sure that animals in captivity would react the same way to oxytocin, said Wittig. Their caution results partly from studies in humans, where children who grew up in institutions sometimes struggle to form normal bonds later in life. While no studies have yet been conducted on oxytocin levels in humans after dinnertime, Wittig said the principle would suggest a similar effect. “We’ve known for decades that human mothers and breastfeeding children both have an oxytocin surge. And if we consider breastfeeding to be a form of food sharing then there’s a similar mechanism in humans.” The study was published Wednesday in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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Yukon News

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WISE BUYERS READ THE LEGAL COPY: Vehicle(s) may be shown with optional equipment. Dealer may sell or lease for less. Limited time offers. Offers only valid at participating dealers. Retail offers may be cancelled or changed at any time without notice. Dealer order or transfer may be required as inventory may vary by dealer. See your Ford Dealer for complete details or call the Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. For factory orders, a customer may either take advantage of eligible Ford retail customer promotional incentives/offers available at the time of vehicle factory order or time of vehicle delivery, but not both or combinations thereof. Retail offers not combinable with any CPA/GPC or Daily Rental incentives, the Commercial Upfit Program or the Commercial Fleet Incentive Program (CFIP). †Until February 28, 2014, eligible purchase financing and lease customers will have the equivalent of their first four bi-weekly payments covered by Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited up to a maximum amount per eligible vehicle (the “Offer”). The Offer applies to the first four bi-weekly payments for customers paying on a bi-weekly basis and the sum of 12 monthly payments divided by 26 and multiplied by 4 for customers paying on a monthly basis (“First 4 Bi-Weekly Payments”). Maximum amounts are $500 on 2013/2014 [Focus S and Fiesta S]; $750 on 2013/2014 [Focus (excluding S), Fiesta (excluding S)] and 2014 [CMAX]; $1,000 on 2013/2014 [Fusion], 2014 [Mustang (excluding Shelby GT500), Escape]; $1,250 on 2013/2014 [Taurus, Edge], 2014 [F-150 Regular Cab, Super Cab, and Super Crew]; $1,500 on 2013/2014 [Flex], 2014 [Explorer]; $1,750 on 2014 [Expedition]. All Mustang Shelby GT500, Transit Connect, E-Series, F-150 Raptor, Super Duty, Medium Truck, Chassis, Stripped Cab and Available in most new Ford vehicles with 6-month cutaway models excluded. Offer only available on approved credit (O.A.C.) from Ford Credit. If the equivalent of the First 4 Bi-Weekly Payments exceeds the maximum amount, the customer will be responsible for the balance. First 4 Bi-Weekly (or monthly payment equivalent, as applicable) payments are required from customer. Finance customers will receive a cheque for the amount of their First 4 Bi-Weekly Payments from the dealer. For RCL customers, the first month’s payment will be waived and they will receive a cheque for the amount of two bi-weekly payments according to the formula described pre-paid subscription above - customer will then be responsible for making all of his/her remaining scheduled payments in accordance with their contract. Offer not available to cash purchase customers. Not combinable with CFIP, CPA, GPC, Commercial Upfit Incentive Program or Daily Rental Allowances incentives. ‡Until January 31, 2014, receive $500/ $1,000/ $1,500/ $2,000 / $2,250/ $2,500/ $3,000/ $3,250/ $4,000/ $4,500/ $5,500/ $5,750/ $6,500/ $6,750/ $8,500/ $9,000/ $10,000/ $10,500 in Manufacturer Rebates with the purchase or lease of a new 2014 [Escape (excluding 2.0L)]/ 2013 [Focus (excluding BEV), Fiesta], 2014 [Focus BEV, Escape 2.0L, E-Series] / 2013 [Escape S, E-Series], 2014 [Mustang V6 Coupe, Taurus (excluding SE)] / 2013 [Edge AWD (excluding SE), F-150 Regular Cab XL 4x2 Value Leader, F-350 to F-550 Chassis Cabs], 2014 [Edge, Transit Connect (excluding Electric), F-150 Regular Cab XL 4x2 Value Leader, F-350 to F-550 Chassis Cabs]/ 2013 [Taurus SE]/ 2013 [Mustang V6 Coupe]/ 2013 [Edge FWD (excluding SE), Explorer Base], 2014 [Mustang V6 Premium]/ 2013 [C-MAX]/ 2013 [Taurus (excluding SE), Escape 1.6L, Transit Connect (excluding Electric)], 2014 [Mustang GT]/ 2013 [Mustang V6 Premium, Escape 2.0L, Explorer (excluding Base)] / 2013 [Mustang GT]/ 2014 [F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2)] / 2013 [Expedition], 2014 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Gas Engine]/ 2014 [F-150 Super Cab and Super Crew]/ 2013 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Gas Engine], 2014 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Diesel Engine]/ 2013 [F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2)]/ 2013 [Focus BEV, F-150 Super Cab and Super Crew]/ 2013 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) -Diesel Engine] - all Raptor, GT500, BOSS302, and Medium Truck models excluded. †††Until January 31, 2014, receive 0% APR purchase financing on new 2013 Edge (excluding SE) models for up to 48 months, 2013 Fusion, Taurus, Flex and 2014 Taurus and Escape models for up to 60 months, and 2013/2014 Ford Focus (excluding BEV) and Fiesta models for up to 72 months to qualified retail customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest interest rate. Example: $25,000 purchase financed at 0% APR for 48/60/72 months, monthly payment is $520.83/ $416.66/ $347.22, cost of borrowing is $0 or APR of 0% and total to be repaid is $25,000. Down payment on purchase financing offers may be required based on approved credit from Ford Credit. †† Until February 28, 2014, lease a new 2014 Fusion model for up to 24 months and get 0% APR on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest APR payment. Example: Lease a vehicle with a value of $24,164 at 0% APR for up to 48 months with $0 down or equivalent trade in, monthly payment is $308, total lease obligation is $14,784 and optional buyout is $8,699. Additional payments required for PPSA, registration, security deposit, NSF fees (where applicable), excess wear and tear, and late fees. Some conditions and mileage restrictions apply. Excess kilometrage charges are 12¢per km for Fusion plus applicable taxes. Excess kilometrage charges subject to change, see your local dealer for details. All prices are based on Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price. *Purchase a new 2014 Focus S Sedan/2014 Fusion S/2014 Escape S FWD 2.5L/2013 F-150 Super Cab XLT 4x4 with 5.0L engine/2013 F-150 Super Crew XLT 4x4 with 5.0L engine for $17,449/$23,499/$25,499/$28,249/$30,699 after Manufacturer Rebate of $0/$0/$500/$10,000/$10,000 is deducted. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price after total Manufacturer Rebate has been deducted. Offers include freight and air tax of $1,665/$1,665/$1715/$1,765/$1,765 but exclude variable charges of license, fuel fill charge, insurance, dealer PDI (if applicable), registration, PPSA, administration fees and charges, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. All prices are based on Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price. Manufacturer Rebates are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives. **Until February 28, 2014, receive 0.99%/0.99%/2.99%/2.49%/6.09%/6.09% annual percentage rate (APR) purchase financing on a 2014 Focus S Sedan/2014 Fusion S/2014 Escape S FWD 2.5L/2013 F-150 Super Cab XLT 4x4 with 5.0L engine/2013 F-150 Super Crew XLT 4x4 with 5.0L engine for a maximum of 84/84/84/72/72 months to qualified retail customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest APR payment. Purchase financing monthly payment is $215/$310/$331/$469/$510 (the sum of twelve (12) monthly payments divided by 26 periods gives payee a bi-weekly payment of $99/$143/$153/$217/$235 with a down payment of $0 or equivalent trade-in. Cost of borrowing is $618.78/$2,574.05/$2,313.14/$5,545.54/$6,026.49 or APR of 0.99%/0.99%/2.99%/2.49%/6.09%/6.09% and total to be repaid is $18,067.78/$26,073.05/$27,812.14/$33,794.54/$36,725.49. Offers include a Manufacturer Rebate of $0/$0/$500/$10,000/$10,000 and freight and air tax of $1,665/$1,665/$1715/$1,765/$1,765 but exclude variable charges of license, fuel fill charge, insurance, dealer PDI (if applicable), registration, PPSA, administration fees and charges, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price after Manufacturer Rebate deducted. Bi-Weekly payments are only available using a customer initiated PC (Internet Banking) or Phone Pay system through the customer’s own bank (if offered by that financial institution). The customer is required to sign a monthly payment contract with a first payment date one month from the contract date and to ensure that the total monthly payment occurs by the payment due date. Bi-weekly payments can be made by making payments equivalent to the sum of 12 monthly payments divided by 26 bi-weekly periods every two weeks commencing on the contract date. Dealer may sell for less. Offers vary by model and not all combinations will apply. �Offer only valid from December 3, 2013 to January 31, 2014 (the “Offer Period”) to resident Canadians with an eligible Costco membership on or before November 30, 2013 who purchase or lease of a new 2013/2014 Ford (excluding Fiesta, Focus, C-Max, Raptor, GT500, Mustang Boss 302, Transit Connect EV, and Medium Truck) or Lincoln vehicle (each an “Eligible Vehicle”). Limit one (1) offer per each Eligible Vehicle purchase or lease, up to a maximum of two (2) separate Eligible Vehicle sales per Costco Membership Number. Offer is transferable to persons domiciled with an eligible Costco member. Applicable taxes calculated before CAD$1,000 offer is deducted. ***Estimated fuel consumption ratings for 2014 Focus 2.0L I4 5-speed manual transmission: [7.8L/100km (36MPG) City, 5.5L/100km (51MPG) Hwy] / 2014 Fusion FWD 2.5L I4 6-speed SST transmission: [9.2L/100km (31MPG) City, 5.8L/100km (49MPG) Hwy] / 2014 Escape FWD 2.5L I4 6-speed automatic transmission: [9.5L/100km (30MPG) City, 6.3L/100km (45MPG) Hwy] / 2014 F-150 4X4 5.0L V8 6-speed automatic transmission: [15.0L/100km (19MPG) City, 10.6L/100km (27MPG) Hwy]. Fuel consumption ratings based on Transport Canada approved test methods. Actual fuel consumption will vary based on road conditions, vehicle loading, vehicle equipment, vehicle condition, and driving habits. ±Based on year-end 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 total sales figures for light vehicles in Canada from DesRosiers Automotive Consultants Inc. (and Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association data exchanged by OEMs). ®: Registered trademark of Price Costco International, Inc. used under license. ©2014 Sirius Canada Inc. “SiriusXM”, the SiriusXM logo, channel names and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc. and are used under licence. ©2014 Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. All rights reserved.

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DATE

INITIAL


34

Yukon News

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Let’s celebrate the gifts of winter can say about these two natural elements.” In Inuktitut, words consist of a foundational element by DAVID that provides basic meaning, along SUZUKI with other elements “to clarify and/or modify the basic meaning. New words can therefore easily be created from another term.” For example, the word siku refers to ice in general, and sikuaq (“small ice”) refers to “the first layer of thin ice that forms on puddles in e Canadians have a special the fall.” relationship with snow and Sikuliaq (“made ice”) refers to ice. We ski in it, skate on it, play “the new ice appearing on the sea in it, shovel it, drive through it, or on rock surfaces.” Some words sometimes even bicycle through also have broader meanings, deit and suffer through it for many pending on the context. The word months of the year – some of us maujaq, for example, means “soft more than others, depending on ground”, but when referring to what part of the country we call home. But how much do we know snow, it means “the snow in which one sinks.” about it? So, “the total number of terms Do Inuit really have dozens of referring to the various aspects words for snow and ice? Are snowof snow and ice goes far beyond flakes always six-sided? Can two ten or a dozen,” allowing Inuit to ever be alike? Why is snow white? Is it a mineral? What makes frozen “draw very subtle distinctions bewater so important to us? Some of tween a very high number of snow the answers are more complicated or ice types.” When it accumulates on the than you might imagine. ground, snow appears white Even though English-speaking because, unlike many natural maskiers and snowboarders use terials, it reflects most light rather multiple adjectives to more acthan absorbing it, and visible light curately describe different types of snow, such as powder, corn and is white. And although snowflakes champagne, some say the claim of form in near-infinite patterns and shapes depending on temperature, numerous Inuit words for snow wind, humidity and even polluand ice is a myth. But is it? tion, each single crystal is always According to the Canadian hexagonal, or six-sided, because of Encyclopedia, “the few basic the complex way water molecules words used by the Inuit to refer bond. When a frozen droplet or to different types of snow or ice crystal falls from a cloud, it grows do not translate everything they as it absorbs and freezes water from the air around it, forming a employee six-sided prism. The almost innametags finite variables mean it’s unlikely, although not impossible, for two 207 Main St. 668-3447 snowflakes to be exactly alike. And yes, snow can be classi-

SCIENCE

MATTERS

W

January 27th-30th / 9am - 4pm

You’re invited to the film launch of

Friday, January 17, 2014

Vous êtes cordialement invité au lancement du film

fied as a mineral. According to the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center, “A mineral is a naturally occurring homogeneous solid, inorganically formed, with a definite chemical composition and an ordered atomic arrangement.” Frozen water fits that description. Snow and ice are important to life on Earth for many reasons. Both are part of the cryosphere, which includes “portions of the earth where water is in solid form, including snow cover, floating ice, glaciers, ice caps, ice sheets, seasonally frozen ground and perennially frozen ground (permafrost),” according to the Snow and Ice Data Center. It covers 46 million square kilometres of the planet’s surface, mostly in the Northern Hemisphere, and helps regulate the planet’s surface temperature. Changes in the cryosphere can affect climate and water availability, with corresponding effects on everything from winter sports to agriculture. By reflecting 80 to 90 per cent of incoming sunlight back into the atmosphere, snow cover cools the Earth. Losing that reflective protection, as is happening in the Arctic, upsets the energy balance and accelerates global warming. Snow also insulates parts of the Earth’s surface, holding heat in and keeping moisture from evaporating. When soil freezes, it prevents greenhouse gases like carbon and methane from escaping into the atmosphere. When snow melts, it fills rivers and lakes. Instead of complaining about the dark and cold of winter, we should celebrate snow and ice. The cryosphere is an important piece of the intricate, interconnected puzzle that keeps us alive. So, build a snowperson, play some hockey, get out on the slopes and enjoy the gifts that winter brings. With contributions from David Suzuki Foundation senior editor Ian Hanington. Learn more at www.davidsuzuki.org.

Rotary Music Festival

April 2-12, 2014

“My Friend Anne/Mon amie Anne” A co-production of Yukon Public Legal Education Association and l’Association franco-yukonnaise A Yukon-produced animated film designed to encourage conversation about potentially abusive situations faced by seniors and elders

Date: Tuesday, January 21st

Time: 4:00 to 6:00 pm Place: Centre de la francophonie, 302 Strickland Street Sponsored by Yukon Public Legal Education Association and l’Association franco-yukonnaise Funded by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons for Seniors Program.

« Mon amie Anne / My Friend Anne » Une coproduction de l’Association franco-yukonnaise et de la Yukon Public Legal Education Association. Film animé produit au Yukon pour favoriser la discussion sur la prévention d’abus et d’exploitation envers les personnes aînées

DATE : le mardi 21 janvier

HEURE : de 16 h à 18 h LIEU : Centre de la francophonie, 302 rue Strickland Commandité par l’Association franco-yukonnaise et la Yukon Public Legal Education Association. Cette ressource a été produite grâce au financement reçu du Gouvernement du Canada dans le cadre du Programme Nouveaux Horizons pour aînés.

Syllabus & Registration Online at www.rmfestival.ca Deadline for entries: February 1st, 2014 Late deadline: February 2nd - 8th (double entry fees)

Info: (867) 393-2389 rmfestival@yahoo.ca


35

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

In Hawaii, hints of a giant Alaska tsunami main) power plant is at 7.3 metres above sea level, and we could get run ups to 15 metres.” His modeled epicentre for the earthquake that would have sent the tsunami to Kauai was in the Aleutian trench somewhere between Adak and Unimak islands. “It was (located) between the 1946 and 1957 events, in an area focused right at us,” he said. “It looks like this one

by Ned Rozell

ALASKA

SCIENCE C

lues from a crater-like sinkhole on the island of Kauai point back to a giant wave that came from Alaska at about the time European explorers were pushing west, seeing the Mississippi River for the first time. The Makauwahi Sinkhole on the southeast shore of Kauai holds the mysterious equivalent of about nine shipping containers full of rocks, corals and shells from the Pacific Ocean. For the material to breach the amphitheater-like limestone walls of the feature required a wave about 25 feet (7.6 m) high, said Rhett Butler of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology in Honolulu. Butler gave a presentation on the subject at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union held in San Francisco in December 2013. That wave probably came from a great Aleutian earthquake, Butler said. The tsunami probably struck between the years of 1540 and 1660, according to dating of the organic materials within the sinkhole. The great tsunami story starts with David Burney’s explorations of caves within the limestone complex. While Burney, an archeologist, ecologist and director of conservation with the National Tropical Botanical Garden of Kauai, was trowling for and finding evidence of ancient people, he also discovered the layer of ocean materials about six feet below the surface. Butler noticed Burney’s work and wondered how large a tsunami needed to be to breach the most vulnerable eastern wall of the sinkhole. He dialed up tsunami-generating earthquakes on a computer model until he found one that was plausible. “A magnitude 9.25 in the eastern Aleutians gives us an 8-meter (about 25-foot) wave,” Butler said. “It gets (the sinkhole) wet. Smaller events do not get it wet.” The tsunami Butler modeled had some collaborating evidence revealed at the same conference in San Francisco. The subject of last week’s column was a revealing hole on Alaska’s Sedanka Island first dug by Gary Carver of Kodiak. That research pit, inspired

has happened before. There’s potential there and we have to confront that. This doesn’t mean it’s going to happen, but no one likes a surprise. A lot of people were surprised by Tohoku (Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami).” Since the late 1970s, the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute has provided this column free in co-operation with the UAF research community. Ned Rozell is a science writer for the Geophysical Institute.

Lions Clubs Rhett Butler photo

The interior of the Makauwahi Sinkhole on Kauai, which contains ocean deposits carried there by a tsunami, probably generated from an earthquake off the Aleutians about 500 years ago.

by a tsunami-carried driftwood log high above tideline, shows the sandy evidence of six big tsunamis, each spaced about 300 years apart. One of those sand deposits dates to the late 1500s. The wave that carried that sand might be the same tsunami that surged more than 2,000 miles (3,218 km) and topped the wall of the Kauai sinkhole. Butler, who lives in Honolulu, sees the evidence for a past great tsunami as a warn-

ing sign. “Could an event like that happen here?” he said. “What are the ramifications for Hawaii?” Current Hawaii tsunami inundation maps underestimate the water that would come from an earthquake similar to the one that soaked the sinkhole, Butler said. “The beach (on Oahu) where President Obama spends Christmas gets entirely flooded,” he said. “(Oahu’s

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36

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

An aviation love triangle CPY bears the serial number 4665 and was built in August of 1942. During the war, she flew transport missions in India and China. After the war, she was purchased by Canadian Pacific Airlines, and flew scheduled service across Canada for the next 15 years. When they took her out of service in 1960, she was purchased by Crae Dawson, of Osoyoos, British Columbia, whose daughter, Dawn Connelly and her husband Ron, were flying in the Yukon. Thus, CFCPY became part of the fleet of Connelly-Dawson Airways, of Dawson City. by Michael Gates From as far back as she could remember, Dawn Dawson wanted to be a pilot. At age 18, magine a love affair between her father sent her to Vana man, a woman – and an couver for flying lessons, and airplane, and you have the storyline for Lady on a Pedestal, she excelled. She received her pilot’s licence October 20, 1950, a new book written by Gordon followed quickly by her instruBartsch. ment rating. She was not the This is the account of the first instrument-rated female love of two people who shared pilot, but she was certainly the their passion for flying, built youngest, and it was not easy around a durable and reliable old airplane with the call letters for her, as this book goes on to explain. CF-CPY. To gain her qualification in The airplane was a Douglas DC-3, one of the most air-tested various categories of flight certification, she had to be better airplanes in the world. In total, than her male counterparts, and more than 16,000 of these airplanes were built, most of them overcome the prejudices that during World War II as military existed at the time. The Departtransports known as C-47s. CF- ment of Transport inspector

HISTORY

HUNTER

I

schedule

Thursday

Saturday

Jan 23

Pivot Festival Ice Breaker

5:00-7:00pm

Location: Baked Café

Huff by Cliff Cardinal 7:00-8:10PM Location: Yukon Arts Centre Leave a Message (après le bip) 7:30-830pm Location: Old Fire Hall Talkbalk: 8:40 pm

Friday Jan 24 Leave a message (après le bip)

7:30-830pm Location: Old Fire Hall

PIvot Bar will be open in the YAC lobby

6:30-930PM

How to Disappear Completely

by Itai Erdal 7:00-8:10 Location: Yukon Arts Centre Talkback: 8:30PM

Huff by Cliff Cardinal 9:30-10:40pm

Location: Yukon Arts Centre

Pivot Dance Party 10-12pm Location: Burnt Toast

Jan 25

Play Writing Workshop

with Anita Rochon 12:30-4:30pm Location: YAC Studio

PIvot Bar Open 4:30 to 8pm in

the YAC Lobby

Huff by Cliff Cardinal 5:30-6:40pm Location: Yukon Arts Centre Talkbalk 6:50pm Blue Box by Carmen Aguirre 7:30-9pm Location: Old Fire Hall Talkback 9:10pm

who qualified her for instrument flight, gave her a more arduous flight test than he did for the male candidates. “I’m not going to fly with no goddamn girl,” he blustered, “there ain’t nothing in the book that says I gotta pass her.” He made her take not one, or two, but three passes at the Vancouver airport, each flying on instruments alone. The third time, she was reduced to needleball and airspeed indicators to aid her in her final approach. Three times, she “split the runway” perfectly. There was no way the inspector could fail her. As this book demonstrates, this prejudice against women pilots was a continuing theme in her career. Working for a flying business in Prince Rupert, the insurance company objected to covering her under their policy – a complaint they never expressed with any male pilots. When PWA pilots wanted to join the Canadian Air Line Pilots’ Association, no women were allowed, so her name was removed from the seniority list. It would be another 17 years before she became the first woman pilot to captain a scheduled passenger flight in Canada. Gordon Bartch’s flying career was much easier and he moved quickly through the ranks to become a pilot for Canadian Pacific Airlines. Along the way, he met Dawn Dawson, but fate initially carried them along different paths. They married other partners, but later on ended up working together for Connelly-Dawson Airways. Eventually they divorced their spouses and were married in December of 1962.That was 50 years ago, and they are still married today.

Lady on a Pedestal is a compelling story of the Bartches’s involvement in the growth and development of commercial flying in the North, first with Connelly Dawson, then with Great Northern Airways. In the course of this narrative, we learn about the challenges and obstacles they overcame to fly in the North. They mastered the art of sandbar landings so that they could provide regularly scheduled flights to Old Crow. They responded to missions of mercy to medevac the ill and injured to hospital. On one occasion, after they landed to pick up a shipment of fish from a frozen lake near Hay River in the Northwest Territories, they could not take off again in the chunky snow. It took them six days to shovel, by hand, a landing strip 10 metres wide and 500 metres long down the lake – from which they were able to take off. On another occasion, they had to take a full load of inebriated and rowdy miners from a camp to Watson Lake. The only way they could get the boisterous drunks to settle down was to take them up to 5,000 metres, where the thin atmosphere put them all to sleep. This book is enriched with colourful stories of the people and places where the Bartches flew between 1950 and 1970, a period that is only now slipping away into that nebulous zone between the living present and the distant past, which makes this book all the more valuable. CF-CPY logged more than 31,000 hours of flying time, the bulk of which was in the North. She was retired in November of 1970. In the following years, she was restored and placed on a

large swivelling pedestal near the main Whitehorse airport, thus earning her the title of the largest weather vane in the world. In 2011, Gordon and Dawn Bartsch were inducted into the Order of Polaris by the Yukon Transportation Hall of Fame. Dawn was a pioneer at breaking down gender barriers, and together, they changed how Yukoners and travellers from afar move into and through the vast northern landscape. Lady on a Pedestal was recently published by Epix Design Company in Calgary. Its 271 pages contain almost 90 photographs, most of which, though not credited, appear to have been gleaned from the author’s personal collection. Despite the fuzzy focus in some of the images, the small size of some, and the soft quality of the printing, which may make them difficult to enjoy, they are well chosen and add emphasis to the narrative. Five maps accompany the text and again provide a clearer understanding of the breadth of CF-CPYs ventures in the North. A short glossary of abbreviations and aviation terms used is placed at the back of the book to enlighten the uninitiated reader. There is a short bibliography, but no index. This is a thoroughly enjoyable read, and you may find it hard to put it down. Five dollars from every book sold will be donated to the Yukon Transportation Museum. Michael Gates is a Yukon historian and sometimes adventurer based in Whitehorse. His latest book, Dalton’s Gold Rush Trail, is available in Yukon stores. You can contact him at msgates@northwestel.net

Safer Communities and Neighbourhoods (SCAN) for all Yukoners

How to Disappear Completely 8-9:10pm Location: Yukon Arts Centre

Are you seeing suspicious activity such as: Bootlegging or Drug Trafficking?

Salsa Yukon January 2014 Fiesta

Common signs of illegal activities:

8:30pm-12am Location: Antoinettes Restaurant

Sunday Jan 26

Conversation with Carmen Aguirre 2pm Location: Public Library

Blue Box by Carmen Aguirre 7:30-9pm

Location: Old Fire Hall

Nakai Theatre’s Pivot Festival presented with the Yukon Arts Centre takes place from January 23rd to 26th, 2014 at the Yukon Arts Centre, the Old Fire Hall as well as a number of sponsoring businesses around town. A limited number of festival passes are available for $53 at the Yukon Arts Centre Box Office and at Arts Underground. Deadline to get your Pivot Pass is January 22nd, 2014.

Check out the NEW Pivot Theatre Festival website at www.pivotfestival.com The Pivot Festival is made possible with the support of the following sponsors:

Pivot would also like to acknowledge the invaluable support of the following funders:

> Frequent visitors of short duration at all times of the day and night > Visiting vehicles may have multiple occupants yet only one person goes into residence > Blackened windows or curtains always drawn > Strange odours coming from the residence, garage or other buildings > Extensive investment in home security > Drug paraphernalia around the property Confidentially report online scanyukon.ca or phone: 456-SCAN (7226) in Whitehorse 1-866-530-SCAN (7226) in the communities


It’s surprising what can be eaten with a fork by Judith Martin

MISS

MANNERS DEAR MISS MANNERS: I must have been born about a hundred years too late, because I have always delighted in the specialized flatware that was so loved in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I have recently secured a longelusive prize in the form of eight ice-cream forks. Beyond a basic plate of ice cream (I assume that sorbet, gelato and sundaes are included), with what dishes can I properly use them? I rarely serve just ice cream, and when I serve pie or cake with ice cream, I have always set a dessert fork and dessert spoon at each place. But that was before I had these nifty little sporky things, which I am eager to use. I realize that my question does not offer much in the way of great general interest or mass appeal, but it is a matter of intense concern for me, and I trust no one else to provide me with the correct answer. GENTLE READER: If you insist upon a correct answer, Miss Manners is forced to say that ice-cream forks should be used only to eat ice cream. That is what specialized flatware is all about. However, you surely know that she shares your fondness for it and wants to do better for you. Just please be good enough not to betray her to even sterner purists. Ice cream forks are not the only table implements that combine a bowl with prongs. You could pass these off as terrapin forks. What’s that? Your guests don’t want to eat a gelatinous mass embedded with turtle parts? Miss Manners will try again. They could be used as ramekin forks. And you don’t even have to catch a ramekin. That can consist of anything baked into an individual dish, such as eggs with breadcrumbs, cheese, bits of meat, whatever you choose. A souffle, if you wish. Or you could enjoy your ice cream, and set out in pursuit of specialized terrapin and ramekin forks. Miss Manners would understand. DEAR MISS MANNERS: I have a friend who is always looking for people to do things for him or go out of their way to drive him places. His excuse is that he has an old car and doesn’t feel that it will make it there. I am only talking about 10 miles one

37

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

way at the most. He also asks me to have a party at my house and invite him over or take him to dinner or on a trip when I mention I am going somewhere, or asks me to buy him a drink when we are at the bar. He claims to have old movie posters that he could sell for a lot of money, but he still cries poverty. Would you say this individual is a freeloader? He probably does these things because in his mind he thinks I have a lot of money. GENTLE READER: He probably does these things because in his experience he knows you will comply. Miss Manners suggests that you solve your problem by not doing so.

such as AARP, AAA and insurance discounts, and those are also listed on the sign. My issue is that when I ask for payment, some patients argue with me about the price. I guess the squeaky wheel gets the grease? In front of others in the lobby, they boom. I work alone and need to keep the peace, collect the fees, take the patients back for pretesting and then to the doctor for the exam. Time is not my friend, as I have much to do in a little amount of time. I have to keep it moving or there’s a train wreck. What polite, short and to-thepoint thing can I say with a smile on my face and in my voice to keep the mood upbeat in an all’sDEAR MISS MANNERS: What well environment? is the proper way to address a GENTLE READER: “I’m sorry, former governor who resigned but I’m authorized to collect the from office? It seems disrespectful fees only as stated, so I’ll have to to all the governors who maindo that now. But you could write tained their commitment to their a letter, stating your reasons for solemn oath and disrespectful asking for a discount, and I’ll pass to the office to address a person it on to the doctor’s lawyer to see who resigned a state’s top office as if an adjustment should be made.” Governor Smith or Jones. This is a bit long, but if it is GENTLE READER: Such is the said clearly, those in line behind protocol, however. Miss Manners will pressure the protester to is afraid that it is rude to refer to give up. And in Miss Manners’ such a person by his incarceration experience, those who argue the number. longest are the least willing to write letters. DEAR MISS MANNERS: I (Please send your questions to Miss work for a popular doctor with a Manners at her website, www. huge following at a large optimissmanners.com; to her email, cal practice. Our prices are listed dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or in a very nice frame on the wall through postal mail to Miss Manners, as you enter the office. We do Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.) participate in various discounts

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C&C&C Come join Council for Coffee & Conversation

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whitehorse Yukon Inn Willow Room

January 25th 1 - 4pm

January

18 – 19, 2014

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Learn to survive the music business with advice from the pros on touring, getting into festivals, social media and more…

Yukon Master Gardener

GARD 010 Presented in partnership with the Yukon Agriculture Branch. Yukon Master Gardener is a standardized course used throughout North America that focuses on building gardening expertise. The Yukon course provides northern examples with a focus on management that is effective for cold climates. A series of instructors deliver the course, giving you a broad background in plant botany, physiology, taxonomy, soils, compost, outdoor gardening, greenhouse management, lawn care, houseplants, pests and pest control, medicinal plants, woody perennials and ornamental horticulture. Jan. 28- Feb. 25 | Tues. & Thurs. | 6:00-9:00pm Feb. 1 & Fe. 15 | Sat. | 9:00am-5:00pm $250.00 + GST | CRN 20297 Mar. 25- Apr. 22 | Tue. & Thurs. | 6:00-9:00pm Mar. 29 & Apr. 12| Sat. | 9:00am-5:00pm $250.00 + GST | CRN 20299

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Looking for updates about what is going on each month? Sign up for our monthly newsletter at www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/ce/!

Continuing Education and Training REGISTRATION: 867.668.8710 www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/ce INFORMATION: 867.668.5200 ce@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Weekend Conference passes: $25 for Members, $50 for non-members Tickets available at yukonartscentre.com

musicyukon.com Sponsored by: Made possible with the support of the Department of Economic Development and the Yukon Film & Sound Commission.


38

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Business&Professional D I R E C T O R Y

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www.yukon-news.com Your Community Newspaper. One Click Away.

WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY


Friday, January 17, 2014

39

Yukon News

SPORTS AND

RECREATION

Alpine team opens race season in Fernie

Jim Hall photo

Abby Hawes of the Yukon Alpine Ski Team races in giant slalom at the Teck Kootenay Zone event in Fernie, B.C., last Friday. Hawes placed sixth in a slalom event on Sunday.

Tom Patrick

Fernie. Yukon’s Abby Hawes bounced back from Saturday with a sixth he Yukon Alpine Ski Team place finish in Sunday’s two-run got some race experience slalom event. Hawes also placed last weekend, just in time for the 14th in Friday’s giant slalom. Arctic Winter Games trials this Teammate Josie Storey also weekend. got into the single digits with Eight team skiers competed ninth in Friday’s giant slalom in at the Teck Kootenay Zone B.C. U16 girls. Alpine event in Fernie, and Yukon’s Tayler Mitchell raced raced in giant slalom on Frito 13th in Sunday’s slalom and day and slalom Saturday and 17th in Friday’s giant slalom in Sunday. U16 girls. The team’s first trip of the Samantha Richardson, who season generated three top-10 was racing out of Yukon for the finishes, but getting race expos- first time with the team, sped to ure was just as important, said 20th in Friday’s giant slalom. Yukon team head coach Yves “We had a few top-15 and Titley. top-10 for the girls, so I’m quite “So they all have experience pleased,” said Titley. with other kids – there was Yukon’s Shane Orban carved about 123 racers,” said Titley. “It up some consistent results in gave them a little boost. They U14 boys. know where they’re standing, He cut through strong winds they know what they need to to place 10th in his first run in train on.” Sunday’s slalom and then went a Though Yukon’s four little faster in his second run of under-16 females failed to the day to take ninth. register a placing in Saturday’s Orban also placed 13th in slalom, either not finishing or both giant slalom races Friday getting disqualified, they also and was 13th in his second run produced some of the team’s in Saturday’s slalom. “He was improving his time best results in other races in News Reporter

T

Jim Hall photo

Yukon’s Manas Sarin-Toews tears down the giant slalom course.

in treacherous, abominable conditions because it was raining on Saturday,” said Titley. “On Sunday there were 100-kilometre winds right in the face…. I was on the course and you could see their speeds slowing down because the wind was blowing so hard.” U14 boys teammate Charlie Hawes tied Orban with 13th in the giant slalom. He also skied to 12th in his second run in

Saturday’s slalom. Yukon’s Manas Sarin-Toews cracked the top-20 with 19th in Sunday’s slalom. He also took three 22nd-place finishes over the weekend in U14 boys. “The U14 boys did quite well,” said Titley. “Charlie, Shane and Manas were born in 2001, so this is their first year in U14. So what I was looking for them was to get the experience.” The Yukon team’s newest

member, Grace-Anne Janssen, also competed in Fernie in U14 girls. Janssen took 25th out of 27 both runs in Friday’s giant slalom. “That was her first time racing (with the team). She’s raced in the Yukon Cup once, but she just joined the team,” said Titley. “She just joined the team at the end of December, early January. So she didn’t have very much training. “Essentially, I was quite pleased with her results.” Alpine Yukon’s Arctic Winter Games trials will take place on Saturday at Mount Sima. If Storey makes the team, it will be her third time at the Arctics. She won a silver medal at the 2012 Games for Yukon’s first medal in alpine skiing since the 2006 Arctic Games. Storey and Abby Hawes had the fastest overall times at the Yukon Cup, the territory’s alpine ski championship, last season. Abby had the fastest time of any skier in the giant slalom, while Storey had the fastest overall time in the slalom event. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


40

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Elks, Creative Works, ClaimsPro score Toonie titles Tom Patrick

Creative Works almost didn’t make the final. They defeated Sale Salvage in a he Whitehorse Minor shootout in the semifinal. Soccer Toonie TournaLucas Henderson booted in ment wasn’t limited to White- the winning goal and Cozens horse teams last weekend. stopped all five Sale Salvage Dawson City and Haines shooters in the shootout. Junction had teams in all Epic Pizza captured the three divisions at the midU9 bronze in a win over Sale season indoor tournament at Salvage. the Canada Games Centre. “We were just happy. Elks douse We were happy Dawson Firefighters in U7 final and Haines could come so it would be fun for other The Whitehorse Elks are people,” said Creative Works shaping up to be the team to player Antoine Krahn. “Everybeat this season in U7. The one had fun and that’s pretty team has a rather unbalanced much the point of the game, win-loss record. to have fun.” “Throughout the whole Krahn’s Creative Works season we pretty much domteam had another reason to inated it,” said Elks coach be happy. Dianne Pawluk. “We’ve only They scored their way into lost two games all season and the top spot with a 5-2 win over SportsLife in the U9 final tied one game.” The Elks went undefeated on Saturday. in the Toonie tourney, beating Creative Works’ Luke the Whitehorse Firefighters Cozens had a hat trick in the Association 2-1 in the gold final while teammates Kade medal match. Bringsli and Krahn kicked in “But this was the best tourindividual goals. nament because they played Shamus O’Brien scored together more as a team inboth SportsLife goals in the stead of having a couple guys gold medal match. scoring,” said Pawluk. “Pretty “This tournament was much everyone scored today great because we had just and put in their best efforts.” about everybody score,” Elks’ Carlos Magsucang said SportsLife coach Lindy Dunlop. “It was a whole team scored in the first half and Brendon Wilcox had the effort, which was really nice to see.” game-winner in the second News Reporter

T

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

ClaimsPro goalie Cassidy Cairns prepares to make a save during the U11 final of the Whitehorse Minor Soccer Toonie Tournament last Saturday at the Canada Games Centre. ClaimsPro defeated Yukon Outfitters 3-2 in the final.

half. The Firefighters tied the final 1-1 with a goal from Souleymane Sangaro. “A lot of the games were close all weekend, so it was a great weekend,” said Firefighters coach Arlo Oriordan. “The kids had fun, so everyone is happy.” Dawson City defeated the Electrical Shop 2-1 for bronze in U7.

ClaimsPro claims U11 gold

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CA L L FO R

ClaimsPro went undefeated en route to gold in U11, but it was by no means a cakewalk for the team. ClaimsPro narrowly held on for a 3-2 win over Yukon Outfitters in the U11 gold medal match. “It was awesome, they really played like a team this tournament,” said ClaimsPro coach Sarah Hanson. “We had one sub that was sick, when we had one, so they pretty much

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Creative Works’ Luke Cozens puts a shot on net during the U9 final against SportsLife. Creative Works won 5-2.

had to play the whole time, which sometimes helps because they get a lot of minutes under their belts. “They all played outstanding all together. Everyone played well, everyone contributed.”

FI RST NATION OF

NA-CHO NYÄK DUN

GENERAL MEETING Saturday, January 18, 2014 Starts at 9:00am at the NND Government House, Multi-Purpose Room, Mayo Need a ride...call 332-1244. All Nacho Nyak Dun Citizens Welcome

The five goals in the final were put in by two players. ClaimsPro’s Joe Hanson had a hat trick in the final. Ben Kishchuk scored both for Yukon Outfitters. “I think all of them were playing their hearts out,” said Outfitters coach Bruce Bennett. “We came down with a few injuries sliding on that grass in there, had some twisted ankles, pulls and sprains. It was a pretty busy tournament – intense starting Friday, having two or three games a day.” Wolverines won the bronze in a 5-2 victory over Alpine Bakery. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com CHECK OUT THE JOB SECTION IN THE


41

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Snowboarders head into selection camp for Arctics Tom Patrick

Top-three results from trials

News Reporter

I

t’s time for some snowboarders to throw down some tricks, hit top speeds in slalom and show some sportsmanship. Following Arctic Winter Games trials last Sunday at Mount Sima, eight snowboarders received invites to a selection camp this weekend that will determine the team set for the Games. Cool tricks, high speeds and good attitudes are what Snowboard Yukon is looking for. “We try to do a holistic approach, not just focusing on points and performance in competition, but also athlete conduct, sport conduct, team building, team participation, those kind of things,” said head coach Katrina Couch. “We’re looking for a well rounded athlete, not just a kid that can throw down. A kid who will support a teammate, show up on time, who is a good role model.” Each Games jurisdiction is allowed two boarders in each of the four categories – junior and juvenile, male and female. With no junior-level females out at last Sunday’s trials, Yukon will likely be made up of six athletes, unless one of the three female riders competes up in junior. Five males were invited to the selection camp after the trials, which included slopestyle on rails and jumps and the banked slalom event in Sima’s halfpipe. Included in the camp are Haylie Grant, Tim Schirmer and Adam Waddington, all of whom won medals at the 2012

Banked slalom

Slopestyle

Juvenile female

Juvenile female

1st Haylie Grant 2nd Reanna Newsome 3rd Rachel MacIntosh

1st Reanna Newsome 2nd Haylie Grant 3rd Rachel MacIntosh

Junior male

Junior male

1st Adam Waddington 2nd Robert Faulds

1st Adam Waddington 2nd Robert Faulds

Juvenile male

Juvenile male

1st Tim Schirmer 2nd Nic MacDougall 3rd Esa Suominen

1st Tim Schirmer 2nd Esa Suominen 3rd Nic MacDougall

Junior Shooting This is an invitation to youth interested in learning to shoot. An inexpensive program to learn firearm safety and have fun!

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Haylie Grant catches some air during the Yukon’s snowboard team trials for the Arctic WInter Games at Mount Sima on Sunday. Eight boarders have been invited to a selection camp this weekend.

Games in Whitehorse. Yukon’s snowboard team will also include assistant coach and chaperone Alexander Chisholme, a former Games competitor who won a silver and two bronze for Yukon in snowboarding at the 2010 Arc-

tic Games. The Arctic Winter Games will take place this March in Fairbanks, Alaska. Yukon’s snowboard team will be announced next week.

Hosted by the Yukon Shooting Federation at the Whitehorse Rifle and Pistol Club on Grey Mountain Road. All equipment is supplied and instruction is provided in a safe supervised environment.

StartS tueSday, January 21 at 7:00 PM For more information, call 334-1688 or 667-6907.

THE YUKON SHOOTING FEDERATION IS THE SPORT GOVERNING BODY FOR SHOOTING SPORTS IN THE YUKON

Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com

Fast, Hassle-Free

CASH FOR GOLD Bring in Gold… Get Instant CASH!

Open 7 Days A Week WHIteHorSe Money MArt 2190 Second Avenue 867-668-6930

FREE Legal Education Seminar Married vs. Common-Law Relationships: Your Rights Under the Law DATE: TIME: LOCATION:

Wednesday January 22, 2014 6:00 – 8:00 PM Westmark Whitehorse Hotel 201 Wood Street, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, Y1A 2E4

This free seminar is an opportunity to learn about Yukon’s laws governing married and common-law relationships.  Learn how common-law relationships are defined under the law and how rights for common-law couples differ from rights for married couples. Complementary snacks and beverages will be provided.  Registration deadline: Tuesday, January 21, 2014  To register, please contact the Family Law Information Centre (FLIC): (867)667-3066, toll-free at 1-800-661-0408, ext. 3066, or FLIC@gov.yk.ca

Justice


42

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

UFC boss dismisses St-Pierre’s concerns about drug testing

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Vancouver Yukoners’ Association

86th Annual Reunion Banquet Saturday, april 12, 2014

river rock Casino/resort Whistler Ballroom 8811 river rd. richmond BC FRee PARkiNg iN CASiNo PARkADe Hotel Reservations 604-247-8900 or toll free 1-866-748-3718 Ask for Yukoners Rate FoR gRoUP SeATiNg ReSeRVATioNS FoLLoW DiReCTioNS oN WeB PAge AT

www.vancouver-yukoners.com Hospitality Room open Friday from 4 pm and Saturday from noon. Pick up tickets then Banquet Reception No Host Bar 5 pm – 6 pm Welcome followed by Dinner 6:15 pm For tickets contact Vivian Stuart at lornellis@shaw.ca #217 – 3255 Cook St, Victoria BC V8X 1A4

Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press

Dana White, president of the Ultimate Fighting Championship, dismissed Georges St-Pierre’s concerns about drug testing, calling them ridiculous and “a little kooky.” Canadian Press

tickets are

58 payable in advance. $

Tickets will be available for pickup on Friday and Saturday.

250-383-1349

Review of Proposed Regulations including Minimum Rental Standards for the Residential Landlord and Tenant Act

Regulations, including minimum rental standards, are being proposed to support the new Residential Landlord and Tenant Act. Input from Yukoners will help balance the rights of tenants and landlords in support of a healthy rental market in Yukon.

Provide your input and comments by MARCH 11, 2014 Questionnaires can be completed online at www.community.gov.yk.ca/ consumer/new_rlta.html. Print copies are available at your nearest community library and at the Information Desk in the Yukon Government Main Administration Building on Second Avenue in Whitehorse. For more information, contact: Employment Standards and Residential Tenancies Community Services 307 Black Street, Whitehorse Phone: 867-667-5944 Toll-free outside of Whitehorse: 1-800-661-0408, ext. 5944 Email: residentialtenancies@gov.yk.ca

DULUTH, Ga. FC president Dana White has dismissed Georges St-Pierre’s concerns about drug testing, calling them ridiculous and “a little kooky.” White, speaking after Wednesday night’s fight card at the Arena at Gwinnett Center outside of Atlanta, had harsh words for his former pay-per-view king who announced he was taking a hiatus from the sport after a controversial win over Johny Hendricks at UFC 167 in November. “What I heard is Georges St-Pierre is upset about some of the things I said at the (UFC 167) press conference and he’s upset that I said that he didn’t win the fight, that I thought Johny Hendricks won the fight,” White said when asked about GSP’s drugtesting comments earlier this week. “But if that’s the case, call me man-to-man. Let’s talk on the phone, let’s sit down face-to-face. I talked to him after the fight faceto-face, he didn’t say any of that to

U

me. So the whole thing is a little weird.” “Everything Georges St-Pierre says is a little kooky,” White added. St-Pierre spoke his mind Tuesday in his native Montreal when asked by a reporter about the UFC not supporting him when he proposed drug testing in the weeks preceding the Hendricks fight. White said deals for such extra testing never come to fruition. “You see it in boxing all the time. One guy comes out and says ‘I want to do extra drug testing because I’m worried about this guy and I want to see what’s going on.’ They never come to an agreement. This guy says ‘I want to use this one,’ this guy says ‘I want to use that one.’ “The Nevada State Athletic Commission is going to test them, OK?” The Nevada commission routinely tests all fighters on its cards for performance-enhancing and illegal street drugs. The commission also does random testing (heavyweight Alistair Overeem tested positive for elevated testosterone

Workshop on Mining Haines Junction coMMunity caMpus Monday January 20, 2014 and tuesday January 21, 2014 4:30pm till 8:00pm (or so) Malcolm Taggart, an independent Yukon economist, will be offering a workshop focussed mainly on economic issues around mining in the Yukon. Food will be served at the supper break each evening and all are welcome. Please see community bulletin boards for specific topics and schedule.

on a random test). The UFC boss also pointed out that St-Pierre asked for the extra tests to prove that he wasn’t cheating, not because he thought Hendricks was taking anything. St-Pierre, he said, had been accused of cheating for years but had never tested positive for anything. White also defending the sport’s drug-testing policies, saying both heavyweight Josh Barnett and opponent Travis Browne were tested before their recent fight because of Barnett’s drug history. “We paid for that drug testing. Also, for him (St-Pierre) to say we’re very lenient on drug testing, when we go out of the country and we regulate ourselves we test everybody on the card, not just the main event, not just the co-main event.” White pointed to the Antonio (Bigfoot) Silva-Mark Hunt fight in Australia, where the UFC had tested Silva for testosterone levels. “So we tested him again after and his levels were through the roof and he got destroyed. Lost the win money that we gave him, lost the bonus money that we gave him, and obviously he’s not getting an extra bonus. The guy got smashed, and he’s suspended for a year. So if that’s lenient on drugs I guess we’re lenient then. I mean, I don’t even know what to say to it.” White also dumped on StPierre for not reaching out with his complaints directly. “I’ve been on planes, and doing all this stuff. Lorenzo (UFC coowner Lorenzo Fertitta) reached out to him and Lorenzo still hasn’t heard from him yet. If Georges StPierre wants to talk like a man he can pick up the phone and call us or come see us face-to-face, but everything that he said is ridiculous.”


Friday, January 17, 2014

43

Yukon News

Film Highlights: Arctic Defenders, The Summit, Watermark, The Rocket, No Clue, The Grand Seduction, Gabrielle, The Congress, Rhymes for Young Ghouls, Tom at the Farm, Crazywater mehaffey

5 Film Passes & single tickets on sale now! YAC Box Office, online, Arts Underground

Media Industry Forum ALFF 2014

consulting inc.

Learn about the changing face of the Canadian film and media landscape in the digital age. Network and build relationships with other industry professionals in a relaxed environment. Present your projects for feedback in group discussions and one-on-one meetings. Expand your professional vision for your film and digital media projects and goals. GUEST FILMMAKERS Don McKellar, John Walker, Kawennahere Devery Jacobs, Carl Bessai, Vincent Morisset, Charles Wilkinson, Emily Alden, Dennis Allen, Kirk Tougas, Alanis Obomsawin, Tina Schliessler, Werner Walcher

INDUSTRY GUESTS

Telefilm Canada | Canada Media Fund | National Film Board of Canada | Mongrel Media | Super Channel Pacific Northwest Pictures | Bravofact (Bell Media) | Film and digital media directors, producers, screen talent and executive producers from across Canada and the USA

FORUM REGISTRATION $80/$50 YFS Production Members. YAC Box Office or YFS at 393-3456. Registration includes all Forum events, workshops, master classes and receptions. Check out the full schedule, guest bios and all things ALFF at alff.ca.

Feb 1-5 Old Fire Hall

Presented by YUKON FILM SOCIETY

Presenting Partner YUKON FILM & SOUND COMMISSION


44

COMICS DILBERT

BOUND AND GAGGED

ADAM

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

RUBES速

by Leigh Rubin


45

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

PUZZLE PAGE

Kakuro

By The Mepham Group

Level: Moderate

Sudoku Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test! Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in blod borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

FRIDAY CROSSWORD PUZZLE

To solve Kakuro, you must enter a number between 1 and 9 in the empty squares. The clues are the numbers in the white circles that give the sum of the solution numbers: above the line are across clues and below the line are down clues and below the line are down clues. Thus, a clue of 3 will produce a solution of 2 and 1 and a 5 will produce 4 and 1, or 2 and 3, but of course, which squares they go in will depend on the solution of a clue in the other direction. No difit can be repeated in a solution, so a 4 can only produce 1 and 3, never 2 and 2. © 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

Puzzle A

CLUES ACROSS

1. Free from danger 5. Dull in appearance 9. Mothers 14. Grand __ racing 15. Department in France 16. Into a state of difficulty 17. Two-toed sloth 18. Printing liquids 19. Genus Bouteloua grasses 20. Jagger’s band 23. Pulls 24. No longer is 25. Waldorf and tossed

Puzzle B 28. In constant agitation 33. Actor Ladd 34. Spanish diacritical mark 35. No (Scottish) 36. Fruit pastries 38. A male ferret 39. Strike with fear 41. Australian flightless bird 42. ET says, “_____ home” 44. Minerals 45. Personal backgrounds 47. Purplish red 49. Major division of geological time

50. Chapeauxs 51. Guitarist in 20 across 57. Ivanhoe author Sir Walter 59. New Rochelle college 60. Scoring area 61. Donate income regularly 62. Carthage queen 63. Beige 64. Cow emitted sound 65. Endymion, 1st King of 66. Japanese rice beverage

21. Method of birth control 22. Indebted to 25. Dulled by surfeit 26. l836 siege of U.S. 27. Gull genus 28. Imaginary perfect places 29. Czech & German River 30. 3rd largest Finland lake 31. Nostrils 32. Long necked birds 34. Norse god of thunder 37. Lively & energetic 40. Prom flowers

43. Degree of warmth 46. Boil over with anger 47. Chocolate trees 48. Israeli airport code 50. Official language of India 51. Japanese stringed instrument 52. Prevent from being seen 53. Churn up 54. Cape near Lisbon 55. Not light 56. Change direction abruptly 57. Immediate memory (abbr.) 58. AFL-___:labor organization

CLUES DOWN 1. Cowboy’s boot prod 2. River in Florence 3. Small liquid container 4. Triumphantly happy 5. Deeds, actions or events 6. Surrounds 7. Requests 8. Superlative of “good” 9. Tycoons 10. Start anew 11. Extinct ratites 12. OM 13. Patti Hearst’s captors

Puzzle C

LOOK ON PAGE 55, FOR THE ANSWERS


46

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

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$ + GST picture & text in 1x3 ad any 3 issues within a 3 week period.

30 Words

6+gst per issue/$9+gst boxed & bolded 30+gst per month $ 45+gst per month boxed & bolded $ $

www.yukon-news.com • 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2E4 • Phone: (867) 667-6285 • Fax: (867) 668-3755 For Rent 3-BDRM 2-BATH new townhouse, PC, lots of storage, 6 appliances, balcony, 2 plug-in parking, avail Jan 15, N/S, no parties, pets negotiable. $1,575/mon + utils. 336-4948

Beautifully finished office space is available in the Taku Building at 309 Main Street. This historic building is the first L.E.E.D. certified green building in Yukon. It features state of the art heat and ventilation, LAN rooms, elevator, bike storage, shower, accessibility and more.

Call 867-333-0144

ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com $575, $775, $900, ROOMS. BACHELORS. 1-BDRMS. Clean, bright, furnished, all utilities incl, laundry facilities. Close to college & downtown. Bus stop, security doors. Live-in manager. 667-4576 or Email: barracksapt@hotmail.com

Office Space fOr LeaSe

Above Starbuck’s on Main St. Nice clean, professional building, good natural light. 544 sq.ft. (can be leased as one office or can be split into two smaller spaces). Competitive lease rates offered.

Sandor@yukon.net or C: 333.9966

ARE YOU New to Whitehorse? Pick up a free Welcome to Whitehorse package at The Smith House, 3128-3rd Ave. Information on transit, recreation programs, waste collection & diversion. 668-8629 WEEKEND GET AWAY Rustic Cabin-45 minutes from town Hiking Trails in the summer Skiing in the winter Includes sauna. Reasonable rates. Rent out by the week or for a weekend. 867-821-4443 SKYLINE APTS: 2-bdrm apartments, Riverdale. Parking & laundry facilities. 667-6958

Horwood’s Mall Main Street at First Avenue Coming Available Soon! Two small retail spaces. 150 & 200 sq. ft.

For more information call Greg

334-5553

HOBAH APARTMENTS: Clean, spacious, walking distance downtown, security entrance, laundry room, plug-ins, rent includes heat & hot water, no pets. References required. 668-2005 1-BDRM APT in Copper Ridge, full bath, big L/R, shared laundry, avail Jan 1, $1,000/mon + util. 456-7099 1-BDRM WALKOUT bsmt suite in Copper Ridge, N/S, N/P, avail Mar. 1, $1,000/mon + shared utils & dd. 334-2248 RIVERDALE: FURNISHED room, N/S, N/P, no drinking, clean, quiet home, serious inquiries only, $600/mon. 667-2452 3-BDRM APT in a house, 2 full baths, dbl garage, shared laundry, N/S, pets negotiable. Refs & DD reqʼd, avail immed, $1,700/mon + utils. 334-1907 1-BDRM NEW apt in Riverdale, avail immed, N/S, N/P, no parties, includes heat, hot water, lights, responsible tenant, $1,200/mon. 668-5558 Available Now Newly renovated OFFICE SPACE & RETAIL SPACE Close to Library & City Hall A short walk to Main Street Phone 633-6396 ROOM FOR rent, N/S, N/P, immed, $750/mon. all incl. 393-2275

House Hunters riverdale 1/2 duplex

brand new: meadow lakes!

5-Bdrm porter creek with suite!

InSite

Home Inspections Property Guys.com

SIGN # 143611

$270,000

62 Green Crescent Whitehorse 867-667-7410

Property Guys.com™

SIGN # 703130

$369,000 Alusru Way Whitehorse

Property Guys.com™

SIGN # 143609

$406,900 36 Tamarack Drive Whitehorse

867-335-6200

867-334-3567

Mobile & Modular Homes Serving Yukon, NWT & Alaska

business opportunity

Buying or Selling? Good information ensures a smooth transaction.

No SurpriSeS = peace of MiNd

• Pre-Sale or Purchase visual inspections of structure and systems • Commercial Maintenance Inventory Inspections • W.E.T.T. Inspections of Wood and Pellet burning stoves / fireplaces

Call Kevin Neufeld, Inspector at

867-667-7674 • 867-334-8106 KevinNeufeld@hotmail.com

www.InsIteHomeInspectIons.ca

WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

House Hunters Advertise your Home in 3 issues (3 consecutive weeks) for only $60+GST PHONE: 867-667-6283

FAMiLy HoMe or stAFF HousinG

667-7681 or cell 334-4994 23 Lorne Rd. in McCrae

clivemdrummond@gmail.com

Watson Lake Accommodations! 5-bedroom fully furnished house for rent. 1 kitchen and 1 kitchenette, 2 full bathrooms. Located on Airport Road.

Call Lelah for more info 780-632-9618.

RENDEZVOUS PLAZA on Lewes Blvd, Riverdale Lots of parking 1,100 sq ft (previously flower shop, studio) 7,000 sq ft (previously Frazerʼs) Call 667-7370 ROOM IN Hillcrest duplex, N/S, N/P because we already have some. No drinking or drugs. DD reqʼd, incls utils, $625/mon. 334-5032 NEWER 1,200 sq ft SHOP/STUDIO/OFFICE in Marwell area lots of natural light, in-slab heat with Viessman boiler, bathroom and small kitchen, $1,500/mon. See kijiji AD ID 510028138 or call 668-3408 RENT ONE of our cozy cabins with sauna for a weekend getaway Relax and enjoy the winter wonderland on the S. Canol Road 332- 3824 or info@breathofwilderness.com. LARGE ROOM in PC (12ʼx24ʼ), private ent, recent reno, shared accom, avail immed, $750/mon + dd. 668-7213 3-BDRM HOUSE, Takhini area, 2,000 sq ft w. garage, N/S, N/P, avail Jan. 1, $1,500/mon. 334-6510 1-BDRM FULLY furnished apt in d/t, incl heat, lights, hot water, basic cable, N/P, no parties, responsible tenant, avail Jan 1, $950/mon. 668-5558 STUDIO/OFFICE SPACE available on Copper Road. Two spaces available or able to combine for one large space. First unit, 780 sq. ft. Second unit, 1,080 sq. ft. Full lunchroom and utilities included. Contact Brenda or Michelle at 667-2614 or email totalfire@northwestel.net 3-BDRM 2-BATH new townhouse Porter Creek, avail immed, $1,600/mon + utils & dd. 334-8088 2-BDRM HOUSE D/T, avail Feb 1, ample parking, newer appliances, N/S, dd&refs reqʼd, $1,500/mon + utils. 667-7170 or 668-4865 1-BDRM BSMT suite, Porter Creek, full bath, w/d, N/S, N/P, avail immed or Jan. 1, $1,000/mon + dd, heat/light incl.   456-7729 1-BDRM BSMNT suite, PC, avail immed, w/d, N/S, N/P, $1,250/mon incl power & heat. Stephanie 335-2090 WANTED: FEMALE roommate, prefer over 40, to share 2-bdrm apt beside Riverdale Super A, basic cable & utils incl, $450/mon + $450 dd. 335-8915 2-BDRM HOUSE, Riverdale, spacious, newly renovated, open concept, heated tile floors, close to bus stop, $1,500/mon. Amy 334-3878 BACHELOR APT, clean, bright, 15 mins from downtown, above ground, small deck, close to bus stop, N/S, N/P, $900 incl. cable & utils. 333-0497 3-BDRM 2.5 bath duplex, Takhini North, new, 1800 sq ft, avail Feb. 1, new appliances, deck, fenced back yard, refs reqʼd, $1,900/mon + utils, laram@northwestel.net or 668- 3756 TWO STOREY cabin south of Whitehorse, elec, oil monitor heat, water nearby, quiet location, prefer no pets. 393-2728 2 UNITS available on beautiful country spread, Mary Lake mins from D/T, all inclusive, HD satellite TV & Wifi, rent starts at $750/mon. 689-4751 2 BEDROOMS, Copper Ridge, for more details contact Julie at 334-4430


47

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014 2 BEDROOM townhouse/condo, 1300 sqft, min one year lease, N/S, N/P, avail immed, $1,800 + utils, a month obo. 335-7515

WANTED: 1-2 bdrm for family of 4 for June or earlier, prefer heat included in cost, have great references, N/S, N/P & working, respond by email tara_deej@live.ca

2-BDRM 1 bath mobile home, 209 Mountain View, 1,000 sq ft, extra large kitchen and fireplace in L/R, has a fully fenced yard w. shed, avail Feb. 1. 633-3812

LOOKING FOR studio space, recent Emily Carr graduate working in sculpture. 667-6973

1-BDRM 1 bath suite Crestview, avail immed, c/w dishwasher/washer/dryer, parking spot w/plug in, quiet, N/S, N/P, $1,000/mon incl utils, dd reqʼd, 393-2378

WANTED: 2 or 3 bedroom apt, house or cabin north of Whitehorse or Porter Creek, long term rent, call 867-393-2111 or email: waldlaeufer_c@web.de

ROOM IN clean home in Hillcrest, share kitchen, bath, laundry and living space with one, N/P, $650 all incl, 456-7140

Real Estate

BACHELOR SUITE 15 mins from downtown, clean & bright, private entry, above ground, on bus route, N/S, N/P, suit 1 person, $900.00 incl cable & utilities. 333-0497

HAINES JUNCTION 2-storey house. Contemporary design, open concept on cul-de-sac, 10+ acres, Fire-smarted around house, lots of trees left, view of St. Elias Mtns, 1350 sq. ft. Rod 634-2240

Help Wanted CANADIAN LYNDEN TRANSPORT Looking for Class 1 drivers with superb experience Please e-mail resume to abjork@lynden.com or Fax 867-668-3196 Phone: 668-3198

TRAPLINE FOR sale, Dawson area, wray556@yahoo 3 BDRM on large corner treed lot, 2 driveways, basement suite, close to bus stop & elementary/high schools, will sell furnished or unfurnished, 49 Redwood St. 633-6553

APT TO share with single, mature, N/S female,  Riverdale, steps from bus stop, reasonable price, avail Jan 15.  Leave contact details at  336-0355

Creative Play Daycare is seeking a full-time and part-time child care worker Wage will depend upon level of ECD education Level 1 - $16.00/hr Level 2 - $18.00/hr Level 3 - $22.00/hr Downtown location Health Benefits Off the floor planning Wonderful facility with on-site playground and indoor mini gym Drop off resume to 312 Strickland Street or Phone 667-2761

WINTER GET-AWAY in Sooke, BC, mobile home priced at $129,000, furnished, clean, adult park, allows two dogs, new flooring, green space/beaches nearby. 456-7140

3-BDRM HOUSE, Takhini, 2,000 sqft w. garage, N/P, N/S, avail immed. $1,700/mon. 334-6510

RIVERDALE LOT, clear, vacant, ready to build, new services, upgraded, 100x50, RS zoning, south-facing back yard/alley, quiet street, 2 minutes trails and, river, 393-4440

LARGE ROOM in comfortable home, incl double bed, TV/cable, wifi internet, parking, w/d, phone/long distance/utils. 667-7733 or 332-7054

1,400 SQ ft 2-bdrm house, Ibex Valley, 1 acre of land, 65x65 ft dog pen, 500 sq ft attached shop both wood/oil heat, owner motivated for quick sale. 335-2103

BEDROOM, FULLY furnished, Riverdale house upper level, on bus route, share kitchen, N/P, N/S, avail immed, $650 + dd, utils incl. 336-0368

COUNSELLOR TRAINING ONLINE, Register before January 15 at www.collegemhc.com, Mental Health Counsellor Certificate/Diploma, Recognized. Available: Supervision, Membership, Insurance, Employment/Placement Assistance, Client Referrals Gold Village Chinese Restaurant Looking for experienced full-time kitchen helper and server Apply with resume to 401 Craig Street, Dawson City, YT Y0B 1G0 867-993-2368

NOC: 6435 Wanted: Hotel Front Desk Clerk Full time, 40 hours per week, permanent Wage: $13.00 per hour Main Duties: Register guests, Answer Inquiries Follow Safety and Emergency Procedures Clerical duties (faxing, photocopying) Apply by email to yukon202@gmail.com Employer: Elite Hotel & Travel Ltd.

E M P L OY M E N T O P P O RT U N I T Y

COMMUNITY WELLNESS SOCIAL WORKER Position Type: Full-time, Term - one year Department: Health - Counselling Unit Salary: Level 6 - $66,107 to $79,329 plus benefits Closing: Jan. 23, 2014 For complete details, visit www.kwanlindun.com/employment

Softgoods Buyer Wanted

We are the Taku Sports Group, a group of sports companies that cater to a wide range of sports and outdoor enthusiasts in the Yukon. We have 4 stores encompassing 30,000 square feet of retail space, located in downtown Whitehorse, Yukon.

We are looking for a softgoods buyer, to be located in Whitehorse, Yukon. Responsibilities include:

SMALL 1 bdrm apt D/T, quiet, secure building, new floors, paint, includes 1 parking spot w plug-in, N/P, N/S, refs&dd reqʼd. $750/mon + partial utils. 334-2269

STAFF NEEDED:

1-BDRM BASEMENT suite w second spare room, PC, avail Feb, clean, spacious, new windows/upgrades, close to bus, $900/mon. info/photos at www.79-12.com. 334-2490 1-BDRM IN CR, private kitchen, bathroom, L/R, shared laundry, rent includes heat/elec, N/S, N/P, avail Feb 1, $800 + dd. 336-0627

Delivery Drivers

3-BDRM APT, Riverdale, TV/cable, refs&dd reqʼd, avail Feb. 1, $1,550/mon including utils. 456-4120

Part-time, Flexible hours after 4:00pm

2-BDRM 1.5 bath, Teslin, lakeview, wood/oil heat, central location, large L/R, den, arctic entry, fenced yard, pets ok, NS, $750 +dd, 250-686-6416

Managing product assortment in order to identify and address opportunities; • Negotiating product costs, terms; • Identifying items to maximize promotional and marketing opportunities; • Participating in product pricing strategies to achieve specific margin objectives, and recommend appropriate markdowns; • Traveling to trade shows across Canada and the US.

expeRience/education RequiRed: • Minimum 2 years related retail buying experience; or equivalent combination of education and experience. • Effective communication, analytical, negotiation and organizational skills. • Completely comfortable working with Excel and Word. We offer a highly competitive salary and benefits package. If this opportunity appeals to you, please send your resume to chougen@hougens.com or fax 867-667-7282.

Excellent wages. Must have own vehicle.

2220 2nd Ave

4-BDRM, 2-BATH house, Riverdale, avail Jan 1st, 6 appliances, carport, N/P, N/S, no parties, $1,700/mon + utils & dd. 335-5976

Apply in person to Tony

BACHELOR APT 15 mins fr downtown, private entrance, on bus route, N/S, N/P, dd&refs reqʼd, avail Jan 01. $950/mon incl cable. 333-0497

Selkirk First Nation

P.O. Box 40, Pelly Crossing, YT Y0B 1P0 Phone: 867-537-3060 Fax: 867-537-3075

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

ROOM IN Copper Ridge, $600/mon all inclusive. 335-7223 for info.

Yukon Summer Music Camp Coordinator

ROOM IN Northland, smokerʼs home, everything included, avail Feb. 1, $800/mon. 668-4776

$14,000 per annum

3-BDRM 1-BATH duplex, Valleyview, 6 appliances, view, oil heat, N/S, dd&refs reqʼd, $1,600/mon + utils. 668-6147

The Yukon Music Camp Society is requesting resumes for the Camp Coordinator position by January 20. The main duties will involve working with the Board of Directors to organize and produce the 27th Yukon Summer Music Camp (July 27 to August 2, 2014).

MAIN STREET 1-bdrm executive condo, east-south facing windows, top finishings, rooftop patio, covered parking, avail Feb. 1 $1,550/mon + elec. 335-7640

This position is ideal for someone who: · is very organized; · is a good communicator; · has experience working with volunteer-based organizations; and · is enthusiastic about music education in the Yukon.

3-4-BDRM 1.5 bath house, PC, 6 appliances, close to schools & bus, $1,600/mon + utils, dd&refs reqʼd. 633-4626

Wanted to Rent HOUSESITTER AVAILABLE Mature, responsible person Call Suat at 668-6871

Interviews are planned for the end of January 2014.

LONG-TERM HOUSESITTER available for winter months, gd w/pets & plants. No criminal record, 30 yr. Yukon resident. 335-0009

For a copy of the job description and to submit a resume, please contact Sophia Marnik at sophia.marnik@yahoo.com. http://www.yukonmusiccamp.ca/

HOUSESITTER WANTED, rural property near Whitehorse, have own wheels, love dogs, OK with woodstoves, Feb. 21 – March 9. 393-2929

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Corrections Officer 1 - Casual Training (on-going) – Whitehorse (Term) Department of Justice Salary: $29.78 to $34.32 per hour

Closing Date: March 31, 2014 Requisition: #4480

For viewing all jobs, please go to

www.employment.gov.yk.ca “Committed to employment equity” Public Service Commission (867) 667-5834

Finance Director THE CANDIDATE: Reporting to the Chief and Council through the Executive Director, the Director of Finance will be a key member of and support to the Selkirk First Nation (SFN) senior management team. The successful candidate will be a well-rounded and hands on accountant who is responsible for all financial activities of SFN. She/he will provide leadership, direction, training and guidance to the finance staff, overseeing and carrying out a full range of day-to-day financial activities including: overseeing the payroll, preparing budgets, managing and monitoring funding and financial agreements and reporting requirements, cash flow analysis, preparation of financial statements, month end and year end reports. The Director of Finance will develop and enhance financial controls and systems while supporting and overseeing financial administration and reporting for several. She/he will also possess the following qualifications: • an accounting designation, complimented by a minimum of five (5) years financial management or an equivalent combination of demonstrated ability and education; • Proven skills in developing, implementing and monitoring financial systems, controls, policies and best practices while ensuring compliance with all regulators and funding agencies; • Advanced proficiency in with Excel and accounting software, ideally Quickbook; • Demonstrated strong communication and interpersonal skills combined with the ability to work • Effectively with all internal and external stakeholders including auditors, lending institutions and • Government agencies; familiarization with Selkirk First Nation Final Agreement and FTA an asset • Strong organizational and administrative skills as well as experience managing multiple projects and time sensitive deadlines; • Previous knowledge and experience working with First Nations governments and communities • (preferably within the Yukon Territory), INAC, CMHC and other government agencies is an asset; and A competitive annual salary with full benefits is offered, commensurate with qualifications / experience for this senior management position located at Pelly Crossing, Yukon Territory. If you are interested in this exciting career opportunity, please provide your resume and cover letter in complete confidence by, January 31, 2014 to: Albert Drapeau, Executive Director preferably by Email: execdir@selkirkfn.com Or by Fax: (867) 537-3902. No phone calls will be accepted. The successful candidate will be required to complete/provide: 1. 3 recent work related references; 2. The successful candidate will be subject to a criminal records check; 3. Applicants must be able to work in Canada. Applicants are requested to submit resume package consisting of a cover letter describing their qualifications and resume. We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.


48 Miscellaneous for Sale COMMERCIAL PROPANE 48” flat top griddle, reconditioned. 333-0943

Yukon News YASHICA-CONTAX LENS, 100-300 mm, $60. 335-8964 MODEL CARS & trucks, 1/24th -1/25th scale. Most are new/sealed, many to choose from, $10-$20 each & up. 667-6717

EmploymEnt opportunity

Executive Director The Yukon Conservation Society (YCS) is seeking an experienced and highly motivated person to lead and manage our organization. The successful candidate must have: • excellent communication skills • management, fundraising, and strategic planning skills • experience with non-governmental organizations • relevant educational background or equivalent experience • knowledge of environmental issues • a strong environmental ethic

YCS is a vibrant, 45-year-old grassroots environmental organization committed to pursuing ecosystem well-being and sustainable living throughout the Yukon and beyond. 37.5 hours per week $27 to $32 per hour

We will pay CASH for anything of value Tools, electronics, gold & jewelry, cameras, furniture, antiques, artwork, chainsaws, camping & outdoor gear, hunting & fishing supplies, vehicles & ATVs. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS

Friday, January 17, 2014 WORLD HOCKEY Association – 5 complete hockey card sets from the 1970s. Exc cond. $750. 633-3154

LADIES "COWBOY Threads" western style vest. New, never worn, with tags. Small. $25. 667-6717

TOASTER, NEW, white, Hamilton, $12, 14” Canon cartridges, $14. 335-8964

TRADING CARDS – binder full of non-sport trading cards (James Bond, X-men, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom). About 500 cards. $50. 633-3154

PELICAN BOX #1400, airtight, shockproof, ideal for cameras, sat phones, $60. 335-8964

HOCKEY CARD set: 1956-57 Parkhurst Missing Years set, printed 1993-94, set of 180 + Future Stars insert set of 6. $150. 633-3154 CFL FOOTBALL cards – 17 different complete sets of cards, including early OPC. Almost 2,600 cards, serious inquiries. $1,500. 633-3154

First NatioN oF Nacho Nyak DuN is currently seeking 3-4 interested individuals to serve on the

administrative appeals Working Group Please send your expression of interest and resume by 4 p.m. on January 24, 2014 to: Executive Director, Brenda Jackson Box 220 Mayo, Yukon Y0B 1M0 or email to execdirector@nndfn.com

yukon Conservation Society 302 Hawkins Street, Whitehorse, yukon, y1A 1X6 867-668-5678

THREE COMPLETE OPC hockey card sets (1999-00 to 2001-02 period) plus some short prints. Over 900 cards. $150. 633-3154 HOCKEY CARD set, 1964-65 Parkhurst (Tall boys format; printed 1994-95), 180 cards + Future Stars insert, set of 6. $150. 633-3154 CIVIL WAR Trading Cards: 4 complete sets of unique trading cards commemorating the U.S. Civil War, including the 1962 Topps set. $750 firm. 633-3154

Closing date: February 16, 2014.

Email resume and cover letter to: ycs@ycs.yk.ca, Attention: Search Committee For full job description see www.yukonconservation.org

WORLD HOCKEY Association – remember it? Two rare books, (history, statistics, photos). Exc. shape, $50. 633-3154

À LA RECHERCHE D’UN EMPLOI?

MCDONALDS H O C K E Y cards from 1991-92 to 2009/10. Almost every card issued minus some short prints, incl. 27 unopened paks/yr. Over 1,200 cards, $1,000 firm. 633-3154. HELMET, MOTOR bike, size for 8-12 yrs, $10. 667-6966 1X6” CEDAR boards, 370 sq ft, $500. 633-4018 20 IAN Rankin paperback novels (John Rebus detective), all in good cond, $30. 633-3154 BARBELL WITH 290 lbs of weights, $200 obo. 633-5324

Employment Opportunity www.yukoncollege.yk.ca Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Expression of Interest Temporary/Casual Hire Web Developer

College Relations Ayamdigut (Whitehorse) Campus From: January 27, 2014 to March 31, 2014 (with a possible extension) Hourly Rate: $28.99 (based on 75 hours bi-weekly) Competition No.: 14.03 Initial Review Date: January 17, 2014 Yukon College is looking for a web developer to assist with two large projects. The qualified candidate must be able to develop HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and MySQL; and participate in running focus groups and usability testing. The ideal candidate should have post-secondary education in a related field and should clearly demonstrate their knowledge and experience with: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, MySQL and PHP, their ability to write code that conforms to current best practices, and have strong communication skills. Experience in the Adobe Suite, including Photoshop will be considered an asset. Candidates with an acceptable combination of education, training and experience may also be considered. Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

FIBREGLASS WALL & tub combo, half price, some minor damage, can be hidden during inst, $450, can view on Main St, local deals only. 996-7531

Des professionnels engagés

BATTERY CHARGER, new, 10A2A, $20, electric heater, mini-oil filled, new, $15, Brother 275 fax/phone, heat printing, no ink, $20. 335-8964

Conseils en développement de carrière Création, amélioration et traduction de CV

CASH REGISTER, $100, 12”x18” paper cutter, like new, $35, Sylvania microwave, great shape, $30. 334-7250

Simulation d’entrevue

TEETER EP 950 Inversion table w elec massage mat, like new, paid $780, asking $400. 633-4607

Des services personnalisés et des ressources utiles.

SNOWBLOWER, SEARS, 30”, 10 HP, in great shape, $800 obo. 633-2916 Éducation

Direction de l’enseignement postsecondaire

CENTRE DE LA FRANCOPHONIE 302, rue Strickland, Whitehorse (Yukon) 867.668.2663 poste 223 www.sofa-yukon.ca

Taku River Tlingit First Nation

Governance Office EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

FAXPHONE, BROTHER 275, heat printing, no cartridge needed, $20. 335-7535 INK CARTRIDGES, Canon, 14 units, $20. 335-8964 WOMENʼS/GIRLʼS MOUNTAIN Hardwear brown down jacket, sz. small, $50. 334-0455 EFEL HARMONY 3 Oil Stove for sale 21ʼ of chimney, gravity feed, works without electricity. 35,000 BTU's, price for all $550, reply to anna.lorrina@gmail.com BOWMAN BOLTS. One box of 300 pieces.  6 inch long  by 3/8 NC grade 5.  (57 pounds) I have six boxes total, $50ea obo. 668-5207 SHAW MULTI-SWITCH, takes 4 lines, puts out 8 lines, $50. Jesse 667-2355 PORTABLE MEDICAL oxygen unit. Comes with two tanks, valves and hoses, very clean. $250 obo. 633-3392

Chief Administration Officer

YUKON PARKA w shell, full length, sz L, purple color, dry cleaned, $250. 668-7320

Regular Full Time • $80,000 to 90,000 Salary • TRTFN wage scale dependent upon experience, knowledge and suitability.

HEATER, RADIANT, Noma, exc. cond, $50. 335-8964

The CAO reports directly to the Spokesperson. This management position will be responsible for ensuring that government services are in place and working effectively, ensures that policies are developed, updated and complied with by all managers and staff of TRTFN. This position also directs the activities of the Administration department, including planning and evaluation in the areas of administration, human resource management, organizational analysis; development of budget, staffing activities. The CAO will be working closely with the Finance Department, a firm grasp of accounting is recommended. To obtain a job description, contact: Vickie Cowan, Assistant to the Spokesperson at (250)651-7904. To submit a cover letter and resume, Fax: (250)651-7908 Email: spoke.assist@gov.trtfn.com or mail to TRTFN • Box 132 • Atlin BC • V0W 1A0. Closing date: January 24th, 2014

We thank all those who apply but only those who are being considered will be contacted.

OLSEN FURNACE w. Beckett burner, ECM fan motor, blocked flu switch, for parts, $300. 334-3497 2 WATER pumps, 1 1/2” Homelite,  like new, and 3” Briggs and Stratton. 633-6553 3 TON chain hoist, new, 30,000  BTU  propane forced air heater,  new. 633-6553 PORCELAIN COLLECTIBLE dolls, various prices. 667-6847 JIM ROBB prints, "Moon over the Klondike", “Caribou Crossing", Bateman print "End of Season Grizzly", prints signed by the artists & framed. 633-6553 BETTER BID NORTH AUCTIONS Foreclosure, bankruptcy De-junking, down-sizing Estate sales. Specializing in estate clean-up & buy-outs. The best way to deal with your concerns. Free, no obligation consultation. 333-0717


Electrical Appliances KENMORE DRYER, front loader, works great, $300. Also nw pump out of Kenmore washer, $40. 332-7797 WASHER AND dryer, Kenmore, regular, top loading washer and matching propane dryer, both work fine. $60 ea. or $100 for both. 393-2929 SMALL CHEST freezer, 5.5 cu ft, compressor makes high-pitched sounds, fine in a basement, $30. 393-2929 ELECTRIC WATER Heater, 1 year old, bought atFred's Plumbing, John Wood Pro Series 184 litre, 4500 watts, pickup or delivery, $350. 667-2680 KENMORE DRYER, good working cond, you pick up, Takhini Hotsprings Road, $50. 633-3608 KENMORE CERAMIC top range, convection, self-clean, delay cook, etc, top end model, works well, $300, can deliver in Whse area, 667-2276

TVs & Stereos Paying cash for good quality modern electronics. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS 32 INCH Sony Bravia Flatscreen TV, $125.00. 334-1785

Ta’an Kwäch’än Council

117 Industrial Road, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2T8 Telephone: 867.668.3613

EmploymEnt opportunity

Manager Housing and Infrastructure Regular Full Time ı TKC wage scale Level 9

In this new and exciting position, your leadership skills will be relied upon to manage Ta’an Kwäch’än Council’s housing and infrastructure department. Reporting to the Executive Administrator, you will work diligently to reflect Ta’an Kwäch’än Council’s goals to actively seek out opportunities to address our citizens’ housing needs. As well, you will be responsible for estimating and forecasting budget requirements; preparing, monitoring and reporting on various project initiatives; and, preparing proposals thus ensuring that funding is available that addresses our housing plan and initiatives.

Ideally, you will possess post secondary education in property management, housing administration, business administration or First Nations Management, or, you can demonstrate having the equivalent combination of education and work related experiences. To access the job description, please call Human Resources Department or contact by e-mail pkimbley@taan.ca. Closing date: Monday, February 3, 2014. The TKC Preferential Hiring policy will apply. Please submit a cover letter and résumé to the above address.

BLACK 19" & gray 27" TV's, exc cond, no storage room, $20 for the 19” and $30 for the 27". 334-2888

MACBOOK AC power extension cord (cord only), new, for MacBook Air/Pro 11”, 13”, 15”, and 17”. 6 feet. $10. 667-6717 ASUS LAPTOP Model: S400C  Windows 8 touch screen.   Asking $500. 668-4364

Musical Instruments We will buy your musical instrument or lend you money against it. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS PIANO TUNING & REPAIR by certified piano technician Call Barry Kitchen @ 633-5191 email:bfkitchen@hotmail.com GUITAR, GODIN 5th Ave Kindpin Sunburst Archtop electric acoustic, mint, great tone, c/w original case, $600. 667-6876 DRUM KIT, bass, floor tom, snare, high hat, 2 hanging toms, 2 cymbals. 393-3929

Firewood

Duke’s Firewood standing dry beetle Killed spruce

avoid the Fall rush & prices! spring Wood prices: 6 cord load $210/cord $230 for multiples of 2 cords Come cut your own at $75/cord Approx 20 cord truckload logs $2800 Approx 8 cord loads of 20ft dry logs $1300

cash and debit accepted

334-8122 CGFJ WOODCUTTING SERVICE $250 - 16” lengths $220 - 4ʼ lengths Prompt, friendly service Dry timber, money-back guarantee 689-1727 TEN TON Firewood Services $160/cord for 10-cord load - 30ʼ lengths $200/cord - 3-cord load 11' lengths $240/cord - bucked up, discounts on multiple-cord orders Call or text David 867-332-8327 HURLBURT ENTERPRISES $250 per cord We have wood. You-cut, You-haul available. Discount for larger quantities. Stockpiled in Whitehorse for PROMPT Delivery Visa, M/C, Cheque, Cash Dev Hurlburt 335-5192 • 335-5193

EMPloYMEnt oPPoRtunitY Dakwakada Development Corporation (DDC)

Finance Manager

Currently Dakwakada Development Corporation (DDC) has an opening for a Finance / Office Manager. Reporting to the General Manager, this is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the overall success of the corporation (and its subsidiaries) by effectively managing all financial tasks along with administrative oversight. The position will also include efforts to minimize corporate risks, coordination of Board of Director meetings, provide corporate support, property management and assisting with researching and assessing business cases and emerging investment opportunities while providing recommendations to Senior Management. Qualifications: The ideal candidate should possess a university degree or college diploma in Accounting, Commerce, or Business Management/Administration and a minimum of 3- 5 years of progressive financial and office administration experience. Knowledge of the construction and manufacturing sector is considered to be an asset. Candidates should also possess advanced knowledge of all aspects of financial analysis, accounting and financial reporting. The candidate should further possess demonstrated skills in problem solving and analysis, proficiency in the use of computer programs particularly excel, relational databases, MS office. Good oral and written communication skills to be able to clearly explain financial concepts and the ability to maintain a high level of confidentiality as it concerns sensitive financial information are required. A valid driver’s license is required. Some travel may be required. HoW to aPPlY: Qualified candidates are invited to send their resume and cover letter by February 10, 2014 to: Human Resources at #6 – 17 Burns Road Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 4Z3, fax to (867) 668-5841, or email to michelle@dakwakada.com Preference will be shown to a qualified Champagne Aishihik First Nation Citizen. We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. oRGaniZational BacKGRounD: Dakwakada Development Corporation (DDC) is a privatelyheld investment firm located in Whitehorse, Yukon. Our sole-shareholder is the Champagne and Aishihik Trust, an organization whose purpose is to hold and manage most investment and business assets of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, based in Haines Junction, Yukon.

Computers & Accessories LINKSYS WIRELESS G Router (in box) and 2 Adapters (1 new in box). Exc shape. $50. 667-6717

49

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanic Key Responsibilities: This position is responsible for safely completing all fleet and commercial mechanical repairs to trucks, trailers, and other equipment. Ideally you have achieved your journeyman status of the Heavy Equipment Technician, Heavy Duty Equipment Mechanic or Truck & Transport Mechanic program and are able to diagnose and complete repairs on all aspects of heavy equipment. This position will also entail completion of work orders and offering direction and assistance to apprentice mechanics. Along with managing the Mechanics Shop you are responsible for scheduling of the fleet and commercial vehicles. Wage: Starting at $40.00/hr and up, based on experience Schedule: This position has a Monday thru Friday work week, with shifts from 8:00am – 5:00pm and overtime and weekends as needed. Qualifications and Skills • High School Diploma • Red-Seal Journeyman status in Heavy Equipment Technician, Heavy Duty Equipment Mechanic and/or Truck & Transport Mechanic • CVIP License is an asset, or must be willing to obtain • Previous experience with repairing on-road heavy duty equipment is an asset • Strong mechanical aptitude and demonstrate the willingness to learn • Excellent interpersonal skills with proven leadership ability • Ability to triage the work in the Mechanics shop • Knowledge of the technology side of the mechanic’s job would be a huge asset as well. This is a tremendous opportunity for a dynamic, ambitious and enthusiastic individual looking for a career with a vibrant and growth oriented company. If this sounds like something that would interest you, we want to hear from you.

DDC has made numerous investments in the Yukon, primarily in growing sectors. Investments in construction and manufacturing sector include Castle Rock Enterprises, Kilrich Industries Limited and the RAB Energy Group/Northerm. Other investments include a variety of property holdings.

Dakwakada Development corporation #6 - 17 Burns Road, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 4Z3

www.dakwakada.com | p. 867-668-5831 | f. 867-668-5841

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

FLIGHT ATTENDANTS

Our flight attendants provide authentic Yukon hospitality throughout the Yukon, Canada, and the United States. A flight attendant’s primary responsibility is to ensure the safety of all passengers and crew while on duty. Positive energy, teamwork, a sense of humour, a professional attitude and the ability to work in a team environment are required to work in this highly visible, fast-paced and exciting environment. For complete details visit flyairnorth.com/careers CLOSING DATE: January 20, 2014 LOCATION: Whitehorse, Yukon POSITION TYPE: Seasonal full-time, March – September 2014 If you are interested in this position, please submit your resumé to Krista Power on or before January 20, 2014. EMAIL/FAX: careers@flyairnorth.com / 867.456.3111 IN PERSON: Air North Administrative Office 150 Condor Road, Whitehorse, Yukon We wish to express our appreciation to all applicants for their interest in the position and advise that only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Our preferred method of application is to email resumes to sheldon@pnwgroup.ca We would like to thank all candidates in advance for their interest in this position, however only those being considered will be contacted. Applications are being accepted until February 3rd 2014.

www.yukon-news.com

flyairnorth.com/careers

Air North, Yukon's Airline is committed to employment equity, and has been serving Yukoners for over 35 years. We offer competitive wages, a benefits package and an enriching work environment to our over 300 employees.


50

Yukon News

Fire-killed Spruce Firewood Very dry, clean burning $250/cord 16”x3-cord load Larger loads available $190/cord if you cut & haul from my yard in town 333-5174 EVF FUELWOOD ENT Year Round Delivery • Dry accurate cords • Clean shavings available • VISA/M.C. accepted Member of Yukon Wood Producers Association Costs will rise. ORDER NOW 456-7432

FIREWOOD Clean, beetle-kill, dry Ready for pick-up, $210/cord or Local delivery, $250/cord 1/2 cords also available for pick-up only Career Industries @668-4360 DONʼS FIREWOOD 20-cord bucked firewood always available No-charge emergency delivery Kwanlin Dun Wy wait? Prompt delivery $245/cord City limits No excuses 393-4397

1ST QUALITY heating wood Season-dried over 3-yrs. to be picked up on Levich Drive in Mt. Sima industrial subdivision. Complete info at 335-0100. FIREWOOD FOR SALE 20-cord orders Big or small tree length Logging truck loads $150/cord Delivered to Whitehorse Call Clayton: 335-0894

LEE ENFIELD No.4 Mk1, 303 British, 10 rd. mag, sporterized, good+ cond, T 01 scope mounted instead of rear sight, sling, $300 firm, PAL reqʼd. 667-2276

Wanted

DIMOK TIMBER 6 CORD OF 22 CORD LOADS OF FIREWOOD LOGS BUNDLED SLABS YOU CUT FIREWOOD @ $105/CORD CALL 634-2311 OR EMAIL DIMOKTIMBER@GMAIL.COM

WANTED: POWER-LIFT chair for elderly person with disabilities, must be in very good operating condition. Linda 633-3476 WANTED: PLASTIC model car and truck kits, AMT, Revell, Monogram, etc, small or larger collections, all considered. 667-6717 WANTED: SNOWMOBILE trailer 2 place steel frame. 634-2559

Case cutlery, high quality hand-crafted pocket and hunting knives available at G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS BRAZILIAN MAUSER in 8mm Mauser, hand made hardwood stock, bedded and floated, recent refinish of whole rifle, $300 firm, PAL req'd, 667-2276 LEE ENFIELD No.1 Mk 3, 303 British, 10 rd mag, sporterized wood, good bore, military sights, steel scope rings, with 3-9x40mm scope mounted. PAL req'd, $350 firm. 667-2276

HirscHe

LEE ENFIELD No4 Mk1, 303 British, 10 rd mag, sporterized, good condition, picatinny style rail instead of rear sight, sling, $300 firm, PAL req'd, 667-2276

June 15, 1947 January 17,2012

VINTAGE BEAR archery "polar" recurve RH 55# @ 28" $180. 334-7664

We thought of you with love today But that is nothing new We thought about you Yesterday and Days Before that too

WINCHESTER 94 30-30, $375. Marlin lever 30-30, Bollard rifling, $350, Mossberg 12-gauge, short barreled pump, like new, $350. 334-7465

COMPOUND BOW, asking $150. 336-2607

Guns & Bows

Lovingly missed by Jim, Loreen, Lizann, Wesley, Shoniqua, Bella Rain and Reyven.

Friday, January 17, 2014

WANTED: SMALL woodstove suitable for a wall tent. 633-4322 WANTED: RELATIVELY cheap used or new flat screen TV. 333-9604 WANTED: 3” chimney and wicks for coal oil lamp. 334-6265 WANTED: EXTERIOR door frame and threshold  for  36 inch door (just the frame etc) 668-5207 WANTED:  USED, or deal on new, pwf pressure treated wood 2x4  2x6 or 2x8 or 8ft or longer. 668-5207 WANTED: VHS to DVD recorder. 456-4922 WANTED: OLDER snowmobiles, working, almost working, and not working. 456-4922

Cars

WANTED: LEE Enfield No4's prefer Longbranch- Top $ for original sniper stuff, email me at thirtypound@hotmail.com or call pete @ 905-878-1584 CUSTOM 98 Mauser in 8 mil, stepped barrel, butterknife bolt, c/w 6X Redfield sling & 5 boxes ammo, $450. 668-4632 SAKO A7 Stainless/Syn bolt-action 308 win. Peep sight, extra mag, scope rings. $950. 334-3375

We think of you in silence We often speak your name All we have are memoires and Your Pictures in a frame Your memory is our keepsake With which we’ll never part God has you in his keeping We have you in our hearts

13 Denver roaD in McCrae • 668-6639

Custom-cut Stone Products

HEADSTONES • KITCHENS • BUILDING STONE • AND MORE...

sid@sidrock.com

2008 KIA Magentis, fully loaded, 66,000 kms, recent appraisal $12,400, asking $10,000. 668-7090 2007 FORD ZX5 manual, 151,000 kms, sunroof, leather, touchscreen, perfect condition, 2 sets of tires/rims, great on gas, $8,500 obo, email sgraham87@hotmail.com 2007 TOYOTA Highlander SUV, white, AWD, command start, extra set winter tires, tow package, approx 128,000kms, $15,000 obo. 332-4143 2006 FORD Fusion, auto start, good tires, 173,000 kms, no problems but has cracked windshield, $5,400 obo. 335-5690 2004 JETTA 4-dr auto, 2L, GL model, aluminum alloy rims, sunroof, Monsoon stereo, new windshield, brakes, timing chain, certified. $6,500. 660-4806 2002 C H R Y S L E R Concorde LX, 117,000kms, leather, CD, A/C, fully optioned, super clean cond, $3,800. 335-3868 2001 FORD Crown Vic, V8 auto, c/w winter tires, reliable car, $2,000 firm, call or text 867-332-7781 2001 KIA Sportage, needs work, I have parts, $2,000 firm. 334-8668 2000 HYUNDAI Accent 5-sp manual, 130,000 kms, $2,000 obo. 668-7190, lv msg 1998 HONDA Civic 4-dr, auto, a/c, 179,000 miles, 2 sets tires, great cond, $2,200. 334-5964 1998 MERCURY Grand Marquis, good cond, $1,800 obo. 633-5924 1997 CHEV Lumina, 117,000 kms, priced to sell, $1,000 obo. 333-9880 1997 COUGAR XR7, Gold Edition, never winter driven, exc cond, ivory, 142,000 kms. $8500 obo. 633-3116 or 334-3160 1997 HYUNDAI Tiburon, great car but needs transmission work, $700.00. 334-5309 1996 HONDA Accord, 5-spd manual, fuel efficient, well maintained, 2 sets of wheels. $2,100 obo. 335-7707 1982 CHRYSLER Cordova slant 6, auto, make offer. 336-1695 HHR 2006, 149,000km, 5 seats, lots of cargo space, many extras, $7,000 obo. 336-2036

the yukon’s best pre-owned vehicles! ✔ I50 point comprehensive vehicle inspection ✔ 3 month or 5000 km limited powertrain warranty ✔ 10 day or 1000 km Vehicle Exchange Privilege ✔ Car Proof verified report ✔ Complimentary Roadside Assistance ✔ Nitrogen inflated tires ✔ Full tank of fuel ✔ First two oil changes FREE

dependable...

Nicole Turner

piece of mind

Nervous about your credit? No problem! call us!

August 2, 1982 - December 7, 2013

whitehorsemotors.com

Trucks 2002 CHEV Silverado 1/2 ton 4x4, auto, V8, ext cab, P/S, P/B, cruise, a/c, radio/tape, new Wrangler grips, short box, 207,000 kms, $6,250. 336-2029

In LovIng MeMory

June 8, 1950-January 17, 2013

SATurDAy, JANuAry 25, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at yukon Bible Fellowship 160 Hillcrest Drive Whitehorse, yukon Territory

It’s been one year since you left to be with Jesus. It just seems like yesterday that we were laughing at your jokes. We think of your smile, kind heart and sense of humour daily. We love and miss you more than words. Til’ we meet again. Love your wife Winnie, sons Dwayne (Pearl) & Chris, Grandchildren; Latisha, Brandon & Nathan.

2002 FORD Windstar, 270,000kms, bucket middle seats, bench 3rd row, new stereo, power locks, windows, mirrors & power sliding back doors, runs great, summer/winter tires, $4,000. 334-2888

We Sell Trucks! 1-866-269-2783 • 9039 Quartz Rd. • Fraserway.com

CENTENNIALMOTORS.COM 867-393-8100 We are now The Yukonʼs Distributor for TRUCKBOSS. TRUCKBOSS is simply the best truck deck on the market today. TRUCKBOSS provides users unequalled quality and flexibility in hauling snowmobiles, ATV's, UTV's, and motorcycles along with industry exclusive winch loading & sealed under deck storage.


2005 DODGE 1/2 ton 4x4 quad cab 4-dr, long box, auto, V8, P/S, P/B, cruise, a/c, radio/CD, $6,550. 336-2029

SALES • BODY SHOP • PARTS • SERVICE 2001 Dodge Dakota 4x4 Clubcab, v8, GREY...................................... $5,500 2005 Honda Pilot EX, black ..........................................................................$13,900 2007 Toyota Sequoia Limited, black ..................................................$27,500 2007 Pontiac Torrent, aWD, RED..................................................................$12,995 2005 Ford F350 Crewcab, 4X4, DiEsEl .................................................$10,500 2007 Kia Spectra 5, 5-spEED, RED................................................................. $6,595 IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE!

2005 F150 Super Crew, loaded, leather int, FX4, sun roof, 135,000kms, black, $17,800. 334-3160 or 633-3116 2005 F350 diesel Lariat, 4wd, long box, fully loaded, all engine updates, exec condit, $19,000. 668-7455 2005 F350, 6” lift, 20” rims, $17,000 obo. 335-0293

2008 Toyota Corolla SE

2005 GMC Sierra, crew cab, leather, Bose stereo, lots of miles, regularly serviced, runs good, $6,500. 334-5239

10,550

2004 DODGE 1500 4x4 Laramie, fully loaded, c/w canopy, new tires, windshield, $12,500, call or text 867-334-2846

4 door, Auto, White

$

2014 Dodge Dart SXT Black, Auto

2004 GMC Savannah Cube Van, 143,000 km, white, good condition, priced for quick sale $12,000 obo. 334-9903

2012 Chrysler 200 LX

2003 FORD Explorer SportTrac XLT, 4x4, 4L.V6, 4-door, heated leather seats, remote start, sunroof, c/w 4 winter tires, pickup box cover & extension rack. $7,500. Call 667-6951 eves

23,595

$

4-Door, Red

SOLD!

17,900

$

LOADED!

2013 Chrysler 300

SOLD!

11,000 Kms, Leather

27,900

$

*VehicLes mAy not Be exActLy As shoWn

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK In-House Financing Available

For Quick Approval call: 668-5559 #4 Fraser Road, McCrae, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5S8

2011 DODGE Ram 2500 diesel 4X4 crew cab, 8ʼ box w/canopy & slide-out, many features, 129,000kms, $34,500. 333-0451 2008 F250 supercab with 7' flatdeck, 5.4L V8, 4WD, auto, recent full service, new windshield/battery, winter package, new tires/rims, low kms. $12,000 obo. 334-3049 lv msg 2008 FORD F150 4x4 quad cab 5.4 l, c/w P/S, P/L, P/W, cruise, back-up camera, tow package w/brake controller, 3-pc. Tonneau, CD, new tires, etc., 120,000 km. $17,500. 660-4806 2008 GMC Sierra 2500 6.0l 200,000km $15,500. 334-4923 2008 TOYOTA Tundra 4X4, 5.7L standard, crew cab, heated seats, climate control, canopy w/slideout, CD changer, AM/FM, Bluetooth capable, 129,000 kms, $27,000. 333-0451 2007 CHEV Avalanche LT, 5.3L 4X4, 129,000kms, black, cloth seats, 17” wheels, new Cooper Discoverer AT tires, headers, exhaust, $24,000 obo. bruce@ykgold.ca or 867-322-1049

2002 F250 ext cab long box 4x4, 225,000km, lariat trim, tow package, camper package, new transmission, $8,400. 668-5882 2001 FORD F-250 Super Duty, 225,000kms, 7.3L diesel, auto, new tires, Titan fuel tank, Detroit TrueTrac rear diff, bed liner, Tonneau cover, isspro gauges, alpine headunit, $10,500 obo. 335-7878 2000 INTERNATIONAL 4700 Deck Truck, fully hydraulic beavertail, 2-10,000 lb winches, well maintained, 335-7510 2000 TOYOTA Tundra SR5, 4.7L V8 auto, 4-dr, xtra cab, 2wd, black, power everything, clean, 175,000kms, $5,500. 334-8604 lv msg 1999 DODGE Dakota 4X4 V6 Magnum, clean, runs great, 6-CD changer, tonneau cover, class 4 hitch, $5,500 obo. 633-3881 1998 DODGE Dakota Sport, 4x4, 5 spd manual, rear airbag ride. Nw: front brakes, roters, ball joints, tie rod & a boxliner. Candy apple red. 229,000kms. $6500obo. 633-3116 or 334-3160 1995 CHEVY Blazer, 4-dr, auto, 4x4, $2,500 obo. 335-0293 1994 F150 2-w drive, ext cab, short box, black w/matching canopy, 302 auto, captain seats, many power options, $1,500 obo. 333-0263 1994 F250 w. canopy, 219,000kms, priced to sell, $1,000 obo. 333-9880 1994 FORD F250 Econoline van, runs, needs windshield/battery, insulated, and 1995 Ford Aerostar, runs, needs TLC & windshield. Info 333-9358 1992 GMC 2500 ext cab 4/4, new motor, exhaust system & transfer case, very powerful, $5,500 obo. 334-5032

Gently Used

Inventory Atv’s: 2009 Yamaha Big Bear 250 ..........................................................$3,499 2009 Yamaha Wolverine 450 .......................................................$4,999

snowmobiles: 2007 Yamaha Apex Gt 121" .........................................................$5,999 2008 Yamaha Phazer Mtx 144" Timbersled Suspension ..........$6,499 2009 Yamaha Nytro Rtx Se 121" Sno X Edition 1275km ...........$7,999 2012 Yamaha Nytro Xtx 144" Speed Racer Edition ...................$9,999 2012 Yamaha Nytro Mtx 162" 270hp Turbo ..............................$15,999

motoRCYCles: 2000 Yamaha 650 Vstar ............................................................... $3,499 2008 Yamaha Wr450 Offroad .......................................................$4,499 2008 Honda Shadow 750..............................................................$4,999 2008 Yamaha R6 Canadian Edition .............................................$7,999 2011 Harley Davidson Sportster 1100 ........................................$8,999 2012 Yamaha Bw50 Scooter ....................................................... $2,499 2013 Kawasaki Ninja 300 .............................................................$3,999

YUKON

51

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014

YAMAHA

(867) 668-2101 or 1-800-661-0430

1 KM south of Robert Service Way, Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, Y.T.

1991 GMC 1/2 ton, 6.2L diesel, air bags, needs work, make offer. 336-1695 1990 DODGE 1-ton van, V8, auto, rear cabinets c/w heater, mint cond (needs differential), near-new rubber, $1,400. 667-7777 1986 F150 ext cab long box 2x4 351w. either for parts or needs some TLC, body quite rough, $500. 334-6776 1984 FORD F250 4x4, c/w 300-straight 6, winch, rails, perfect firewood truck, $2,500. 334-8668

BLACK CANOPY to fit Dodge Dakota truck, pretty new, $700. 393-2630

FOUR 245 75 R16 tires, $80, two 215 75 R15 tires, $30. 333-1010

TRUCK CANOPIES - in stock * new Dodge long/short box * new GM long/short box * new Ford long/short box

HEAVY DUTY receiver hitch that specifically will fit a 2011 Chev/GMC 3/4 or 1-Ton Longbox. Gd shape. C/w bolts. ($800 new), $200. 667-6717.

Hi-Rise & Cab Hi - several in stock View at centennialmotors.com 393-8100

PubLIC TENDER

Auto Parts & Accessories NEW 2007-2013 GMC pickup Grille with GMC Emblem, in box. $150. 667-6717

REqUEST fOR PROPOSAL HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE Project Description: This RFP is intended to procure a contract for the identification, consolidation and disposal, treatment or recycling of household hazardous waste from specified sites in Yukon. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 29, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliott Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Dwayne Muckosky at (867) 456-6191. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

GENETIC ANALYSIS OF CARNIVORE SAMPLES Project Description: Environment Yukon requires analysis of carnivore samples including species identification, gender identification, individual identification, and parentage analysis. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is February 11, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliott Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Ramona Maraj at (867) 393-7423. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

STANDING OFFER AGREEMENT FOR GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING SERVICES Project Description: Government of Yukon is soliciting proposals for professional engineers to provide geotechnical services for Yukon mine site and mine remediation projects for use by Assessment and Abandoned Mines Branch. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is February 18, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliott Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Geena Grossinger at (867) 4563915. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Energy, Mines and Resources

Environment Community Services

PUBLIc TENDER

REquEST FOR PROPOSAL

REquEST FOR PROPOSAL DEVELOP BRAND IDENTITY AND BRAND BOOK FOR VICTIM SERVICES

REqUEST FOR PROPOSAL ENGINEERING CONSULTING SERVICES FOR VILLAGE OF MAYO INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES AND REHABILITATION

Project Description: To supply 270 sheets of Polyethylene Flotation Foam as per tender. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is February 5, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliott Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Sandy Brown at (867) 667-5108. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Project Description: The Contractor will develop a brand identity and a brand book for the Victim Services Branch. The Contractor will also do branding work on two of the Branch’s programs; namely Project Lynx and Crime Prevention Victim Services Trust Fund. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 30, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliott Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Annette King at (867) 667-5962. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Project Description: To provide engineering consulting services for the detailed design, tendering and construction services to improve Mayo’s sanitary sewer mains, water distribution mains and roads. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is February 11, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliott Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Rick Kent at (867) 456-6564. This project is being funded through the Build Canada Initiative The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Highways and Public Works

Justice

Community Services

FOR THE SUPPLY OF POLYETHYLENE FLOTATION FOAM


52

Yukon News 15” NOKIAN winter tires on alloy rims, 195x65R from 2001 Honda accord, 65% treadwear remaining, $1,500 new, asking $500. 334-5964

Friday, January 17, 2014 Pets 2 PET carriers, small, for cat, plastic hard shell, $15 ea. 660-4806 FUNDOGS DOG TRAINING January 2014 Classes

PUbLIc TENDER

PUbLIC TENDER

REPAIRS AND UPGRADES YUKON HOUSING UNIT 130102 - 716A LIARD WATSON LAKE, YUKON

3 FURNACE REPLACEMENTS YUKON HOUSING UNITS CARCROSS, YUKON

Positive, gentle, force-free

Project Description: Installation of 3 Dettson furnaces

Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 30, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location.

Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is February 6, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location.

If documents are available they may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Laura Vanderkley at 867-667-8114.

If documents are available they may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Carmon Whynot at 867-667-3764.

Site Visit January 21, 2014 at 2:00 p.m.

The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted.

The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted.

View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

REqUEST FOR PROPOSALS EVALUATION OF THE SOCIAL HOUSING PROGRAM YUKON HOUSING CORPORATION Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 28, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. If documents are available they may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Don Routledge at 867-667-8086. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Yukon Water Board – Application Notice Yukon Water Notice Office des eaux duBoard Yukon –– Application Avis de demande

Office des eaux du Yukon – Avis de demande

Application Number Numéro de la demande

PM13-052 PM10-022-2 (Amendment to PM10-022)

Applicant/Licensee Demandeur/Titulaire

Water Source Location Point d’eau/Lieu

Type of Undertaking Type d’entreprise

Deadline for Comments 4:00pm Date limite pour commentaires, avant 16 h

Bedrock Mining Company Inc

Maisy May Creek

Placer

February 11, 2014

40419 Yukon Inc

Maisy May Creek

Placer

February 11, 2014

Any person may submit comments or recommendations, in writing, by the deadline for notice. Applications are available for viewing on the Yukon Water Board’s online registry, WATERLINE at http://www.yukonwaterboard.ca or in person at the Yukon Water Board office. For more information, contact the Yukon Water Board Secretariat at 867-456-3980.

Notice

Toute personne peut soumettre ses commentaires ou ses recommandations à l’Office avant la date limite indiquée sur le présent avis. Pour voir les demandes, consultez le registre en ligne WATERLINE au http://www.yukonwaterboard.ca ou rendez-vous au bureau de l’Office des eaux du Yukon. Pour de plus amples renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec le secrétariat l’Office au Board 867-456-3980. YukondeWater

Puppy Kindergarten Jan14 Small Dog Play Jan20 Growly Dog Class Jan14 K9 NoseWork® I + II Jan16 Good Manners I + II Jan20 667-6668  FunDogsTraining.com Canines & Company Puppy & Obedience Level 1 January 7 Private Lessons Behaviour Modification FCI/WUSV/MEDE certified Bronze Master Trainer Serving the Yukon since 1992 www.facebook.com/ caninesandcompany 333-0505 or 668-4368 caninesandcompany@northwestel.net NEW EXO Terra reptile terrarium, c/w lock, Eco Earth substrate, PT2602 Mini/Tall size, 12”wx12”deepx18”tall, $100. 667-6717 MINIATURE SMOOTH Dachshund puppies, 1 black/tan male, 1 brown female, 1 red/tan female, ready to go to their forever homes in mid-January. 633-2336 BLUE HEELER/BEAR dog cross, good temperament, 6 months, all shots, spayed if chosen, serious inquiries only. 667-6207

Motorcycles & Snowmobiles TAITʼS CUSTOM TRAILER SALES 2-3-4- place snowmobile & ATV trailers Drive on Drive off 3500 lb axles by Trailtech - SWS & Featherlight CALL ANYTIME: 334-2194 www/taittrailers.com 1982 YAMAHA SS440, mint, $2,000. 250-651-7773 RONʼS SMALL ENGINE SERVICES Repairs to Snowmobiles, Chainsaws, Lawnmowers, ATVʼs, Small industrial equipment. Light welding repairs available 867-332-2333 lv msg 2008 SKIDOO Summit X154 track 800R c/w Skidoo cover, tank & belt, exc cond, $6,900 obo. 332-8801 2001 POLARIS 700RMK 144"x2", windshield bag, slp air filter, cover, belt cover bag, hitch, 2,600 mi, exc cond, atac temp/altitude controller, lots of extras. $3,999 obo. 668-5644

2009 BEARCAT 570 XT Wide Track, 2up, reverse, hand warmers, elec starter, good cond, $4,950. 332-1002 2006 ARCTIC Cat Panther touring, 660 4 stroke, 2600 miles, exc cond, quiet, great on fuel, full factory cover $4,700. 333-0866 2 ARCTIC Cat 440s trail sleds, 1988 & 1989, ʻ89 has new motor/clutch, good cond, ʻ88 has torn track, good motor/clutch, good for parts, $2,400 for both. 334-7030 2005 FIRE Cat 700 runs awsome, low kms. $3,000. 336-3922 2009 YAMAHA Venture MP, 500 cc 4 stroke, exc cond, $6,500 obo. 633-3012 USED SIMMONS Skis to fit Polaris spindles, good cond,  $250.00. 660-4000 2010 POLARIS Assault 146 2 1/2" paddle track good mountain machine, c/w new powder track, many accessories, low compression in one cylinder, offers. 335-1983 2008 POLARIS Widetrak LX, c/w Muff pot, bib kit, chainsaw holder, axe holder, beverage cover,  well maintained, $5,500 firm. 668-2407 PROJECT SLED, Mint Formula Z Chassis with 1100cc street bike motor, hood, drivetrain, motor mounts, have everything to finish project, $2,000, info at 334-6776 1999 SUMMIT x 670 HO, 136X2" track (90%) runs awesome, twin Jaws Pipes (stock as well), 4" risers, pro taper bars, $2,800, 334-6776 2003 POLARIS 600 cc snowmobile, rack in the back, good cond, $2,500 or exchange for ATV. 819-817-0841 SNOWMOBILE SLED deck, aluminum, power tilting, LED lighting, good cond. $1,000. 333-0117 YAMAHA SRV 500, $1,500, sled trailer, $200. 633-3086 2001 POLARIS 800 RMK 151” track, black, low miles, exc cond, $3,500 obo. 334-4477 2004 SUMMIT Highmark 800 HO, 46” track, can and pipe, $5,000. 335-0293 2009 M8 Arctic Cat,  153" x  2" track, Can  2" riser. 800cc, take a test ride. 334-1890

Office des eaux du Yukon

Water Board – Application Notice of Type AYukon Application and Public Hearing Office des eaux du Yukon – Avis de demande

Avis de demande de permis et d’audience publique

WHITEHORSE COPPER TAILINGS REPROCESSING & RECLAMATION PROJECT -AMENDMENT TO USE THICKENER AND FLOCCULANT DURING TAILINGS REPROCESSINGApplication Number / Numéro de la demande: IN12-048-1 Applicant / Demandeur: Eagle Whitehorse LLC Type of Undertaking / Type d’entreprise: Industrial Location / Emplacement: Whitehorse Copper Mine Site, accessible via Mt. Sima Rd. Public Hearing Date / Date de l’audience publique: To be determined Public Hearing Location / Endroit de l’audience publique: To be determined Intervention Deadline / Date limite d’intervention: February 7, 2014 @ 4:00 pm Applications are available for viewing on the Yukon Water Board’s online registry, WATERLINE at or in person at the Yukon Water Board office. For more information, contact the http://www.yukonwaterboard.ca FOR OFFICE USE ONLY Whitehorse Star, Yukon News: JanuaryYukon 17, 2014Water Board Secretariat at: Telephone: 867-456-3980 - Fax: 867-456-3890 - Email: ywb@yukonwaterboard.ca Pour voir les demandes, consultez le registre en ligne WATERLINE au http://www.yukonwaterboard.ca ou rendez-vous au bureau de l’Office des eaux du Yukon. Pour de plus amples renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec le secrétariat de l’Office au Téléphone: 867-456-3980 - Télécopieur: 867-456-3890 - Courriel: ywb@yukonwaterboard.ca

PUBLIC TENDER Contract Description: The Yukon Wildlife Preserve Operating Society (YWPOS) is accepting proposals for an annual Review Engagement by a Certified Professional Accountant &/or Certified Professional Accounting Firm. Proposals should be for a three-year term commencing April 1, 2014. Respondents must submit a written proposal clearly marked “YWPOS Annual Accounting Services” in a sealed envelope by 4pm local time, Friday January 31, 2014. Yukon Wildlife Preserve Operating Society PO Box 20191 Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 7A2 Please direct any questions to: Greg Meredith, Executive Director (867) 456-7313 | greg@yukonwildlife.ca This is a value driven RFP where timeliness (FS due midJune/annum), local client service and quality of product will be evaluated. The successful applicant may not necessarily be the highest ranked or the lowest price. See link below to access past financial statements: http://www.yukonwildlife.ca/aboutywp/staffjobs/


2003 RXI Yamaha 1000 turbo sled, for parts or rebuild, low miles, $1,500. 334-5239 2009 SKIDOO Summit 800 xp x package, 1,700 miles, c/w ceramic coated can, Skidoo cover, extra set of upper/lower a-arms, great shape, $7,000 obo. 333-0484 2010 VK pro 4 stroke widetrack, red, 1600 km, located in Dawson but will deliver to Whitehorse if needed, $10,000 firm, 993-6217 PITSTER PRO X2 140cc 2011 model, some cosmetic damage but repairable, runs great, $900 obo. 335-8405 1996 ARCTIC Cat Bearcat 440 162" track, fan cooled, good cond, new pistons, rebuilt clutches, completely serviced, $3,200. 334-8261 2004 YAMAHA WR 450F, street legal, elec start, Rekluse clutch, bar riser, heat grips TrailTech Vapor digital gauge, low miles, well maintained, $4,200 obo. 633-5495

Marine PROFESSIONAL BOAT REPAIR Fiberglass Supplies Marine Accessories FAR NORTH FIBERGLASS 49D MacDonald Rd Whitehorse, Yukon 393-2467 18ʼ SANGSTERCRAFT w trailer, $1,500, 115hp Johnson, $1,000, 125hp Merc w jet leg, $1,000, complete OMC leg V6 engine $ controls, 250-651-7773

Heavy Equipment 2001 CHAMPION 740G grader, 5 winter tires, extra cutting edges, Sam at 332-7020 for info D-8K STRAIGHT blade, double hydraulic tilts, new corner bits & cutting edges (still in pkg, never installed), $5,000. 667-7777

Campers & Trailers TAITʼS TRAILERS www.taittrailers.com taits@northwestel.net Quality new and used Horse * Cargo * Equipment trailers For sale or rent Call Anytime 334-2194 Southern prices delivered to the Yukon TRAILER 5ʼX10ʼ, HD construction, 3 new tires, stake pockets, 2 toys or firewood, 5km on new trailer, $700 obo, 456-4137 after 4pm

Coming Events ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com ATLIN - GLACIER VIEW CABINS “your quiet get away” Cozy self contained log cabins canoes, kayaks for rent Fax/Phone 250-651-7691 e-mail sidkatours@ atlin.net www.glacierviewcabins.ca CHILKOOT TRAIL/LOG Cabin: Non-Motorized Weekend, Jan 17-19. Other weekends & weekdays, Multi-Use. For more info: 867-667-3910

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of

Clayton Robert Wilson,

of Dawson City, Yukon, Deceased, who died on November 4, 2013, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor at the address shown below, before the 7th day of February 2014, after which date the Executor will distribute the Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which they have notice. AND FURTHER, all persons who are indebted to the Estate are required to make payment to the Estate at the address below. BY Cheryle R. Wilson c/o Lackowicz & Hoffman Suite 300, 204 Black Street Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2M9 Tel: (867) 668-5252 Fax: (867) 668-5251

53

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014 THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone with Dementia. Info call Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713

QUEER YUKON: upcoming socials events for the LGBT and allies community at www.queeryukon.com. Bowling night, Rendezvous Drag Dance, Film Fests and more!

HOSPICE YUKON: Free, confidential services offering compassionate support to those facing advanced illness, death and bereavement. Visit our lending library @ 409 Jarvis, M-F 11:30-3:00, www.hospiceyukon.net, 667-7429

FALUN GONG is an advanced practice of Buddha school self-cultivation. Fa study Monday, Wednesday, Friday at Wood Street Annex from 6 p.m. No charge. Newcomers are welcome. Call 633-6157

CRESTVIEW CROSS-COUNTRY ski group meets Sundays, 11am, at 222 Squanga Ave, to ski Pine Forest Loop, 2 to 3 hours, free

YUKON SCHUTZHUND Association AGM, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014, 1:00pm-3:00pm, Whitehorse Public Library meeting room. Dog training enthusiasts invited.

HORAIRE PISTE Chilkoot/Log Cabin: Multi-usage sauf du 17 au 19 janvier : fin de semaine réservée aux activités non motorisées. 867-667-3910 THE YUKON Orienteering Association AGM will be held Jan. 29, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. in the Sport Yukon boardroom. Members are welcome. MENTAL HEALTH Caregivers Support Group meets the third Thursday of every month, 7-9 p.m., #4 Hospital Rd., main floor resource room, in Whitehorse. 667-8346

TAI CHI Yukon classes resume the week of January 6 including two classes for beginners. See www.taichi-yukon.ca, email info@taichi-yukon.ca or call 668-3814 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Action Circle. Letter writing to protect and promote human rights worldwide.  Tuesday, January 28, upstairs of Whitehorse United Church 7:00pm-9:00pm, www.amnesty.ca, or call 667-2389

WEEKLY DROP-IN Recovery Group meetings, Wednesdays: 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm, Alcohol and Drug Services. Call 667-5777 for more information SEEKING SAFETY Group, for women dealing with trauma and addiction. Call Alcohol and Drug Services at 667-5777 for more information YUKON WIG Bank provides wigs, free of charge, to individuals suffering hair loss due to cancer treatment. For more information contact: yukonsupport@hotmail.com PEER FACILITATED Support Group for people with a diagnosis of cancer. First Monday of each month, Copper Ridge Place, 7:00-9:00 p.m. Next meeting February 3, 2014. Info: yukonsupport@hotmail.com PEER FACILITATED Support Group for people with a diagnosis of cancer. First Monday of each month, Copper Ridge Place, 7:00-9:00 p.m. Next meeting February 3, 2014. Info: yukonsupport@hotmail.com

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION Association general sharing meeting. All welcome! Thursday January 30, Whitehorse Public Library meeting room 3:45 pm. Find out/tell us about EE in Yukon SENIOR LIBERAL Commission meeting, Monday January 20th 7:00pm, 40 Firth Road. Call Ron at 668-2886 to confirm attendance PORTER CREEK Community Association meeting Monday, February 3rd, 5:15 pm at the Guild Hall. More information 633-4829. Everyone Welcome. Come show your support COME EXPERIENCE an Aurora workshop on Saturday, January 25, 2014, 10:15am4:15pm, Whitehorse Public Library. Learn new strategies that enhance your day-to-day learning TOO MUCH Guitar Quartet w/ Oliver Gannon & Bill Coon. Sun, Jan 26, 7:30 pm cabaret. Arts Centre. Tix yukontickets.com. YAC Box Office, Arts Underground or door

YUKON WIG Bank lends wigs, hats, head coverings to cancer patients for free. Email yukonsupport@hotmail.com to make an appointment or for more info LDAY SNOWSHOE Loppet: Saturday, February 1st at Mt. Mac, 2.5 and 5 km routes. Hot lunch, prizes and silent auction. $20 adults/$10 children/$40 families. www.ldayukon.com/668-5167 for details YOGA AT Golden Horn School, starts Tues. Jan. 21, beg. and int. class. For info contact Terice, yukonterice@gmail.com or 668-6631

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of

GERALD BRIAN TONER, of Watson Lake, Yukon Territory, Deceased, who died on Oct. 28, 2013, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Administrator at the address shown below, before the 19th day of February, 2014, after which date the Administrator will distribute the Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which they have notice.

AND FURTHER, all persons who are indebted to the Estate are required to make payment to the Estate at the address below. BY: Sandra Ellis, Proposed Administrator c/o Lackowicz & Hoffman Suite 300, 204 Black Street Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2M9 Tel: (867) 668-5252 Fax: (867) 668-5251

PUbLIC TENDER 11 FURNACE AND 4 FUEL TANK REPLACEMENTS YUKON HOUSING UNITS WATSON LAKE, YUKON

Project Description: Installation of Owner supplied Dettson furnaces and fuel tanks Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 28, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. If documents are available they may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Carmon Whynot at 867-667-3764. Site Visit: Wednesday January 15, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

PUblIc TENDER EXTERIOR RETROFIT YUKON HOUSING UNIT 874200 ROSS RIVER, YUKON Project Description: Exterior retrofit of Unit #874200 in Ross River Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is February 5, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. If documents are available they may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Robert Kostelnik at 867-667-5795. Site visit January 29, 2014 at 12:00 noon The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

PUBLIC TENDER RESIDENTIAL FUEL TANKS AND SUPPLY LINE REPLACEMENTS YUKON HOUSING UNITS ROSS RIVER, YUKON Project Description: Installation of 6 supplied residential fuel tanks and supply line replacements. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 23, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. If documents are available they may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Carmon Whynot at 867-667-3764.

PUbLIC TENDER

PUBLIC TENDER

RESIDENTIAL FUEL TANKS AND SUPPLY LINE REPLACEMENTS YUKON HOUSING UNITS MAYO AND PELLY CROSSING, YUKON

1 FURNACE AND 2 FUEL TANK REPLACEMENTS YUKON HOUSING UNITS DESTRUCTION BAY, YUKON

Project Description: Installation of 4 supplied residential fuel tanks and supply line replacements. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 23, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. If documents are available they may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Carmon Whynot at 867-667-3764. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Project Description: Installation of Owner supplied 1 Dettson AMP098SD furnace.l Installation of 2 fuel tanks Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 23, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. If documents are available they may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Carmon Whynot at 867-667-3764. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

PUBLIC TENDER

PRE-QUALIFICATION SOURCE LIST FOR CLASS III WILDLIFE PROJECTS - HELICOPTER SERVICES

CONTROLS UPGRADE BERINGIA INTERPRETIVE CENTRE - BLDG.#1329 WHITEHORSE, YUKON

Project Description: Request for PRE QUALIFIED Source List for Class III Wildlife Projects Helicopter Services Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 28, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliott Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Rose Heisz at (867) 667-5797. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is February 4, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliott Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 6675385. Technical questions may be directed to Rob Kelly at 667-8980. Mandatory Site Visit: January 23, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Environment

Highways and Public Works

The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html


54

Yukon News

QUALITY ASSURANCE Course for Health Canada's COMMERCIAL MARIJUANA PROGRAM. February 22 & 23 Best Western Hotel, Kelowna, BC. Tickets: www.greenlineacademy.com or 1-855-860-8611 or 250-870-1882 YUKON GIRL Guides celebrate 100 years of Guiding history. Exhibit opens Sat Feb 1 at 2:00pm, MacBribe Museum.  Reception open to public.  There will be cookies! Phone 667-2709 or 667-2455

WOULD YOU like to represent Yukon in upcoming NAIG games in Regina? Looking for male/female soccer players under 18 yrs. Spread the word, last call! Deadline: Jan 17th

AVALANCHE AWARENESS Days, Saturday, January 18, 2014, 10am–4pm, free event for general public, Grey Mountain Room, Mt Mac

RIVERDALE COMMUNITY Association, Trails Meeting Wednesday January 22nd at 7:00 pm at Mad Trapper Alleys. Proposals before City Council will be presented. Q&A session

LORNE MOUNTAIN Centre February 8th Coffeehouse, Two Piano Tornado with Annie Avery, Grant Simpson, doors open 7pm, tickets $18, info www.mountlorne.yk.net

WANT TO find out more about the Suzuki Method for Music? Suzuki Strings Yukon hosts Kathleen Spring of Denver, CO, Sunday, January 19 at 1:30-2:30pm/Riverdale Baptist Church (Duke St)

HABITAT YUKON is holding 2 public information sessions, Whitehorse Public Library, Jan. 23, 6:00pm, and January 26, 10:00am. Applications for a habitat home can only be obtained at these presentations

A DAY of Quiet Retreat at Hospice Yukon, Sunday, February 2. Remember your loved one with writing, painting, collage or simple reflection. 667-7429 info@hospiceyukon.net

YUKON LIBERAL Party Leadership. Per YLP constitution 29A, this is notice of a leadership convention to be held March 1, 2014. See ylp.ca for details

BRASS KNUCKLE Society Band performance and jam, January 18th, 2-4pm, Tagish Community Centre. Everyone welcome! Info: 867-399-3407 YUKON ANIMATED film about abuse of elder/senior, “My Friend Anne/Mon Amie Anne”, January 21, 4:00pm-6:00pm, Francophone Centre. Sponsors LʼAFY & Yukon Public Legal Education Assoc. 393-2044 MT LORNE Classic Ski Race 2014, Feb 22nd noon, info and registration @ www.mountlorne.yk.net LORNE MOUNTAIN Centre Skate-A-Thon, February 16th 2:00pm. Join us for fundraising activity for the whole family, pledge forms, info on great prizes, www.mountlorne.yk.net LORNE MOUNTAIN Centre, Foodie Club meeting February 10th  7:00pm. Discover East India cuisine. Register 667-7083,  more info www.mountlorne.yk.net

Love from Dad, Mom & Dawn

Public Meeting

Hotsprings Road Property Owners The Energy Mines and Resources, Land Planning Branch is holding a public meeting to discuss possible changes to the minimum lot size and allowances for detached secondary dwellings on rural residential properties in the Hotsprings Road Development Area. When: 7:00 - 9:00 p.m., thursday, January 23, 2014 Where: Hootalinqua Fire Hall For more information contact please contact the EMR Land Planning Branch at 667-3236 or toll-free at 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3236.

Public Meeting

local Area Plan - tagish The Yukon government and Carcross/Tagish First Nation will be holding public information sessions on local area planning for Tagish residents and Carcross/Tagish First Nation citizens. Local area plans are policy documents that guide land use and development in a particular area. They are developed with the assistance of a planning committee consisting of people who are familiar with the planning area. There will be public information sessions in Tagish and Whitehorse: Tagish Wednesday, January 15, 2014 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., tagish community Hall Whitehorse Wednesday, January 22, 2014 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., Whitehorse library For more information please contact Doris Dreyer, Land Use Planner, Energy, Mines and Resources, Land Planning Branch at (867) 667-5299 or toll free 1-800-661-0408, or email doris.dreyer@gov.yk.ca

ROTARY MUSIC Festival online registration is open until February 1st. Regulations & Syllabus document available online, www.rmfestival.ca. For info: 393-2389 or rmfestival@yahoo.ca TAGISH PANCAKE Breakfast January 19th, 9:30am-12 noon, Tagish Community Centre. $8.00 per adult, $3.00 per child. Everyone is welcome MESSY CHURCH: for grandparents, moms, dads and kids. Christ Church Cathedral, Sunday, Jan. 19, 3:00pm, Youtube and more. For info, http://anglican.yukon.net/messy-church.htm or 668-5530 TO MOUNT Lorne residents against subdivision of lots, an information meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 22 at 7:00pm at Mount Lorne Community Centre

Services - INSULATION Upgrade your insulation & reduce your heating bills Energy North Construction Inc. (1994) for all your insulation & coating needs Cellulose & polyurethane spray foam Free estimate: 667-7414

Friday, January 17, 2014 TITAN DRYWALL Taping & Textured Ceilings 27 years experience Residential or Commercial No job too small Call Dave 336-3865 S.V.P. CARPENTRY Journey Woman Carpenter Interior/Exterior Finishing/Framing Small & Medium Jobs “Make it work and look good.” Call Susana (867) 335-5957 susanavalerap@live.com IBEX BOBCAT SERVICES “Country Residential Snow Plowing” •Post hole augering •Light landscaping •Preps & Backfills Honest & Prompt Service Amy Iles Call 667-4981 or 334-6369

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Yukon Communities & Atlin, B.C.

Beaver Creek Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Carcross Y.T. Wednesday - 7:30 p.m. Library Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Carmacks Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Dawson City Y.T.

Thursday - 8:00 p.m. New Beginners Group Richard Martin Chapel Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Saturday 7:00 p.m. Community Support Centre 1233 2nd Ave.

BACKHAULS, WHITEHORSE to Alberta. Vehicles, Furniture, Personal effects etc. Daily departures, safe secure dependable transportation at affordable rates. Please call Pacific Northwest Freight Systems @ 667-2050

Destruction Bay Y.T.

SHARPENING SERVICES. For all your sharpening needs - quality sharpening, fair price & good service. At corner of 6th & Strickland. 667-2988

Faro Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

MC RENOVATION Construction & Renovations Laminated floor, siding, decks, tiles Kitchen, Bathroom, Doors, Windows Framing, Board, Drywall, Painting Drop Ceiling, Fences No job too small Free estimates Michael 336-0468 yt.mcr@hotmail.com THOMAS FINE CARPENTRY • construction • renovation • finishing • cabinets • tiling • flooring • repairs • specialty woodwork • custom kitchens 867-633-3878 or cell 867-332-5531 thomasfinecarpentry@northwestel.net NORTHRIDGE BOBCAT SERVICES • Snow Plowing • Site Prep & Backfills • Driveways • Post Hole Augering • Light Land Clearing • General Bobcat Work Fast, Friendly Service 867-335-1106 BUSY BEAVERS Painting, Pruning Hauling, Snow Shovelling and General Labour Call Francois & Katherine 456-4755

Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Haines Junction Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Mayo Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Old Crow Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Pelly Crossing Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Ross River Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Tagish Y.T. Monday 7:30pm Lightwalkers Group Bishop’s Cabin, end of road along California Beach Telegraph Creek B.C. Tuesday - 8:00 p.m. Soaring Eagles Sewing Centre

LOG CABINS & LOG HOMES Quality custom craftsmanship Using only standing dead local timber For free estimate & consultation contact: Eldorado Log Builders Inc. phone: 867.393.2452 website: www.ykloghomes.com

Teslin Y.T. Wednesday - 7:00pm Wellness Centre #4 McLeary Friday - 1:30p.m. Health Centre

SNOW CLEARING No job too big or too small Skid Steer & Trailer Call Lawrence at 335-3390

Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Watson Lake Y.T.

LOG CABINS: Professional Scribe Fit log buildings at affordable rates. Contact: PF Watson, Box 40187, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 6M9 668-3632 PASCAL PAINTING CONTRACTOR PASCAL AND REGINE Residential - Commercial Ceilings, Walls Textures, Floors Spray work Excellent quality workmanship Free estimates pascalreginepainting@northwestel.net 633-6368 CITYLIGHT RENOS Flooring, tiling, custom closets Painting & trim, kitchens & bathrooms Fences & gates Landscaping & gardening Quality work at reasonable rates Free estimates Sean 867-332-1659 citylightrenos@gmail.com SUBARU GURU Fix•Buy•Sell Used Subarus 30 year Journeyman Mechanic Towing available Mario 333-4585 ELECTRICIAN FOR all your jobs Large or small Licensed Electrician Call MACK N MACK ELECTRIC for a competitive quote! 867-332-7879 CATHWAY WATER RESOURCES We buy used hot tubs and take trade ins! come visit us today at 101B Copper Rd., Whitehorse or call 668-7208 HEATHER MJOLSNESS, RMT Relaxing and therapeutic Swedish massage Gift certificates available! 689-5908

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS in Whitehorse

MONDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 8:00 pm New Beginnings Group (OM,NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. TUESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 7:00 pm Juste Pour Aujourd’hui 4141B - 4th Avenue. 8:00 pm Ugly Duckling Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. WEDNESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St.. 8:00 pm Porter Crk Step Meeting (CM) Our Lady of Victory, 1607 Birch St. 8:00 pm No Puffin (CM,NS) Big Book Study Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. THURSDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Grapevine Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 6:00 pm Young People’s Meeting BYTE Office, 2-407 Ogilvie Street 7:30 pm Polar Group (OM) Seventh Day Adventist Church 1609 Birch Street (Porter Creek) FRIDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Big Book Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 1:30 pm #4 Hospital Rd. (Resource Room) 8:00 pm Whitehorse Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. SATURDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 2:30 pm Women’s Meeting (OM) Whitehorse General Hospital (room across from Emergency) 7:00 pm Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS) SUNDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 7:00 pm Marble Group Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS)

NS - No Smoking OM - open mixed, includes anyone CM - closed mixed, includes anyone with a desire to stop drinking

www.aa.org

bcyukonaa.org

AA 867-668-5878 24 HRS A DAY


Snowblower and Shovelling Driveways, sidewalks, and Low sloped roofs Put me to work! Good rates. Call Dave at 333-9084

Lost & Found LOST: DEC. 24, Pilot Mtn area, husky mix female, brown/reddish color, wearing green or red collar, shy, lives in Ibex Valley, name is Red. 668-3469 LOST: SKIDOO "mud" flap between Porter Creek/dump/Haeckel Hill area. Need it back. 633-5495 LOST: DENIM fur-lined vest on Main St. Jan. 14, would really appreciate it being returned, no questions asked. 667-6699

Sports Equipment

Baby & Child Items

LARGE WOOD office desk and matching credenza, two large metal filing cabinets. 633-6553

BOYS BAUER ice skates, sz. 5, Pro-Hockey Life, exe cond, paid $335, asking $150 obo. 667-6966

CHILDRENʼS CLOTHING in excellent condition, given freely the first & third Saturday monthly at the Church of the Nazarene, 2111 Centennial. 633-4903

Personals

EXERCISE EQUIPMENT for $20! Bowflex Extreme, approx 10 yrs old, needs new rods (cost of $230). 393-3638 FISHING GEAR, new, never used, 5 reels-Scientific Angler, Penn, Daiwa. 8 rods-Tica Spey (15 ft.), Abu Garcia, Okuma, Penn, Alps, Colman, Berkley, Rapala, #1600 Pelican case, package $$. 668-4732 FREESPIRIT FOLDING treadmill, 12 mph, 10 degree incline, 11 programs, heart monitor, 20" by 55" running track, great cond, c/w manual, can deliver within Whitehorse area, 633-3824 WESLO 9 speed treadmill spacesaver, paid $500, sell for $225. 393-4403

Looking for New Business / Clients?

Livestock

Get 1 MONTH OF FREE ADVERTISING Book Your Ad Today! T: 667-6285 • F: 668-3755 E: wordads@yukon-news.com Worldwide travel company seeks distributors. We are well established in the luxury travel industry. Full training and support is provided. Very lucrative compensation plan. Ph: 633- 5756 or info@onlineholidayincome.com High Paid Consulting & Information Product Blueprint Earn $2,500-$8,000 per sale. Call Now To Apply. 24 Hour Free Recorded Message:  1-800-846-9070 ext. 465

FRI. 7pm-8:30pm 4071 - 4th Ave Many Rivers Office

ARE YOU MÉTIS? Are you registered? Would you like to be involved? There is a Yukon Metis Nation that needs your support Contact 668-6845

Puzzle Page Answer Guide

Your Community Newspaper.

Furniture

RESIN SHELVES, 36”x18”x72”, new, $18. 335-8964

HAY FOR SALE Good variety of excellent quality hay 1st cut alfalfa/timothy mix (65/35%) 60-65 lb, $14.50 2nd cut alfalfa/timothy mix (90/10%) $15 Brome/timothy/orchard grass mix $14.50 Plus we have our own brome hay, $12 for 50-55 lb Oat straw bales $7 Nielsen Farms - Maureen at 333-0615 or email: yukonfarm@gmail.com

DRUG PROBLEM? Narcotics Anonymous meetings Wed. 7pm-8pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. BYTE Office

Sudoku:

MAY-MAY'S FAMILY Day Home in Cowley Creek has two (18 months & up) spaces available M-F 7:30-3:30pm. Hot meals and diapers included. Day Home is closed on all school holidays (Christmas/Spring breaks & summers from July to mid-August) Please call Mary @ 668-3348 for more info

HORSE HAVEN HAY RANCH Dev & Louise Hurlburt Irrigated Timothy/Brome mix Small square & round bales Discounts for field pick up or delivery Straw bales also for sale 335-5192 • 668-7218

TWO OFFICE chairs, adjustable height, exc cond, $50 & $25. 334-7250 2 CDN. Tire Jobmate work benchs, $40 ea, computer desk, exc cond, 24”x50”, $25, book shelf 28”x48”, like new, $15. 334-7250

TV/ENTERTAINMENT STAND, black, holds 32” TV, 3 large shelves/storage on both sides, $25 obo. 456-7880

One Click Away. www.yukon-news.com

Kakuro:

WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

Crossword:

HERITAGE BREEDING sows available, Berkshire/Tamworth mix, 335-4431 Fresh free run farm eggs for sale. $6.00 / dozen Phone 633-4249

Town and Mountain Hotel 401 Main Street Apply to Kayle Tel: 668-7644 Fax: 668-5822 Email: info@townmountain.com

LOW COST MINI STORAGE

Now 2 locations: Porter Creek & Kulan. Onsite & offsite steel containers available for rent or sale.

Phone 633-2594 Fax 633-3915

Childcare

CREAM-COLOR OVERSTUFFED couch, in great shape, $150, 633-4707

Kitchen or Restaurant for Lease

n n

3-WHEEL SCHWINN jogging stroller, good cond, $100. 667-7061

QUALITY YUKON MEAT Dev & Louise Hurlburt Grain-finished Hereford beef Domestic wild boar Order now for full delivery Payment plan available Samples on request 668-7218 335-5192

Advertise in The Yukon News Classifieds!

Take Advantage of our 6 month Deal... Advertise for 5 Months and

BABY CAR seat, newborn-12 mo, $40, auto baby swing, $50, 2-pc infant snowsuit, new, 1-pc infant snowsuit, new, all in good cond, 334-7061 for details

CITIZENS ON PATROL. Do you have concerns in your neighborhood & community? Be part of the solution! Volunteer valuable time to the C.O.P.S. program. With your eyes & ears we can help stomp out crime. Info: RCMP 867-667-5555

OFFICE LOCATED BESIDE KLONDIKE WELDING, 15 MacDONALD RD., PORTER CREEK, info@lowcostministorage.ca

60 Below Snow Management Commercial & Residential

Snow Removal (867) 336-3570

Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Rooftops and Sanding

WHITEHORSE - ASSISTANT STORE MANAGER Love Jeans? Warehouse One is looking for an experienced and enthusiastic retail supervisor to join our team. We offer our team members great sales and leadership training, a positive work environment, and a 50% off employee discount. Send your resume by e-mail to hr@warehouseone.com For more information visit warehouseone.com/careers

Word Scramble A: Facials B: Beats C: Freezer

Fast, Hassle-Free

payday loans

Get up to $1,500… in casH! Open 7 Days A Week Whitehorse Money Mart 2190 second avenue 867-668-6930

01.17.2014

Business Opportunities

55

Yukon News

Friday, January 17, 2014


Friday, January 17, 2014 Yukon News

56

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Yukon News, January 17, 2014  

January 17, 2014 edition of the Yukon News

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