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Lost in the mail Canada Post’s move to community mailboxes creates more questions than answers for Saanich

Saanich Coun. Judy Brownoff, at a community mailbox on Sea Ridge Drive, says Canada Post is offering little detail on how community mailboxes will be installed safely and securely as home delivery is phased out. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Kyle Slavin News staff

Coun. Judy Brownoff has a lot of questions for Canada Post, fearing municipalities across the country will be on the hook to pay for costs associated with maintaining safe and accessible community mailboxes. The Saanich councillor says the mid-December announcement that the Crown corporation will do away with home delivery within the next five years shouldn’t have been made before consulting municipalities. Her concerns stem from vague wordings in the Canada Post Delivery Planning Standards Manual that don’t clearly touch

on land-use, lighting, pedestrian safety, sidewalks and mailbox maintenance. “Why, if this is a federal edict, are they not being told to spend some money and get some standards developed, then talk to municipalities,” she said. Brownoff points to the fact that few residential streets in Saanich have sidewalks, per municipal policy, and many streets have sporadic lampposts to prevent light pollution. “People are going to have to have a safe walking environment to get to that box. There’s going to have to lighting – who’s going to pay to put in a light standard? Is Canada Post going to pay to put in a sidewalk? I think this is

going to be them downloading costs onto us,” she says. As for where these boxes will be installed, Brownoff is curious if they will be put on private or municipally owned land. Canada Post estimates 6,000 to 8,000 positions will be eliminated by implementing nationwide community mailboxes. The company says rising costs and falling mail volumes have rendered the traditional operations no longer sustainable. In 1989, Saanich council approved a policy entitled “Supermailbox Location Policies” that establishes guidelines for where Canada Post can install these boxes. In addition to specifying

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how far away a box should be from driveways, sidewalks and intersections, the bylaw indicates these mailboxes can’t be installed on major roads and it puts limits on how many mailboxes there can be in one particular area. Colin Doyle, Saanich’s director of engineering, says since the policy “establishes guidelines,” what’s laid out are “desirables.” Before any work happens, however, Canada Post will be required to receive a permit from the engineering department. “It’s strictly an administrative procedure, just as other people do to work in a municipal right-of-way. They take out a

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permit, and provided the work’s approved, they go ahead and do it, and it’s inspected by our folks,” he said. “Prior to the installation of a supermailbox, Canada Post will submit to the Municipality site plans showing details of the proposed supermailbox locations and other features that may affect the acceptability of their proposed location,” the policy reads. Brownoff expects Canada Post won’t simply drop boxes into neighbourhoods without consulting first with Saanich and area residents.

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A2 • www.vicnews.com

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pornography, which was meant to address pedophilia and exploitation. It’s about teenaged harassment or bullying and needs to be dealt with in a different manner.” The federal government plans to table an anti-cyberbullying bill this spring in the wake of several high-profile cases, including that of Halifax teenager Rehtaeh Parsons. Mackie said the new legislation, if passed, could be relevant to his client’s case. “By all indications, this is a bullying case,” he said.

Daniel Palmer News staff

Victoria Police investigators recovered a collection of gold pocket watches stolen Jan. 3 from the Royal B.C. Museum. Port Alberni RCMP arrested the suspects, a 44-year-old Port Alberni man (formerly of Colwood) and a 29-year-old Port Alberni woman, last week at the request of VicPD. VicPD used a fingerprint left at the scene to trace the crime back to the Colwood man, while the eight pocket watches “had gone through a number of different hands” before officers tracked them down locally, said Sgt. Colin Brown of VicPD’s Crime Reduction Unit. “In this particular case, it’s a crime of opportunity,” Brown said at a press conference Thursday. “But there was definitely some thought that went into it. It’s not like the museum didn’t have good security in place, they did, but you can tell, even though (the suspects) are not the most sophisticated people, they’ve certainly been involved in thefts in the past.” The pocket watches were likely traded for drugs or cash

Daniel Palmer/News staff

Victoria police recovered a collection of historic gold pocket watches stolen from a display at the Royal B.C. Museum, while RCMP in Port Albernia arrested two suspects in the theft. before the couple left Victoria for Port Alberni, and Brown said police worked quickly to recover them through local sources. RBCM CEO Jack Lohman called the incident a “very rare occurrence,” and praised VicPD for tracking down the valuable artifacts so quickly. “I’ve worked with museums all around the world … where there hasn’t been this great speed of work (by police),”

Lohman said. Bill Chimko, RBCM’s head of security, said the watches were stolen from a secured glass case in the Old Town exhibit on the museum’s third floor during operating hours, but refused to go into further detail. He said security measures are being adjusted as a result of the theft. Brian Gerald Holt and Stacy Croft are each facing a charge of theft over $5,000. dpalmer@vicnews.com

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day trial last Thursday. Defense lawyer Christopher Mackie is now awaiting a court date on a constitutional challenge, which was filed last September, asking whether or not child pornography laws should apply to cases involving young people. “We knew (the conviction) was a necessary step, so I don’t think we were under any illusions that this would be the end of the road,” Mackie said in an interview. “My client’s argument has been that this isn’t about child

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Teen convicted on child porn charge A Greater Victoria teenager has been found guilty of possessing and distributing child pornography after she texted naked pictures of another minor found on her boyfriend’s phone. The 17-year-old, whose identity is protected under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, was also found guilty of uttering threats through texting. Judge Sue Wishart gave her ruling Thursday in Victoria Youth Justice Court after a one-

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www.vicnews.com • A3

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, January 15, 2014

COMMUNITY NEWS IN BRIEF

Oil furnace failure sparked house fire

Investigators have determined that a mechanical failure with an oil-fired furnace started a fire that destroyed a home in the 3300-block of Shelbourne Street, killing a family dog. Assistant Chief Rich Pala, with the Saanich Fire Department, says while the cause has been determined to be accidental, the flames were fuelled by nearby items. “There was storage around the furnace that contributed to the growth of the fire. We would remind residents to make sure they don’t store any combustibles near their furnace,” Pala said. He also noted that the home was not equipped with smoke alarms. The fire began around 11:55 p.m. on Jan. 3 while two people were inside the home. Both managed to escape without injury. Fire crews rescued the family dog, but attempts to resuscitate the animal were unsuccessful. Damage to the home and contents is estimated at $300,000.

A care aid for 21 years, Mary Ann Desjardins is part of a health care team in the neuroscience department at Victoria General Hospital, and says employees in her position are more than capable of working in acute care wards. Arnold Lim/News staff

Lightening the workload for nurses

Commercial vehicle goes up in flames

A commercial vehicle which became engulfed in fire on Sunday is now the target of a forensic investigation by Saanich police. The fire happened behind businesses on the 3500-block of Quadra St. late Sunday night. By the time emergency crews arrived the vehicle was engulfed in flames. Saanich police are treating the fire as suspicious and are investigating the incident.

Victoria housing affordability forum

The Victoria Downtown Residents Association is hosting a public forum on housing affordability Jan. 30 at the Victoria Event Centre, 1415 Broad St. Discussion topics include the history of housing policy and affordable housing solutions. The panel includes local housing experts. The free event begins at 7 p.m.

Christopher Sun Reporting

Care aids already part of hospital health care teams This is part three of a three-part series examining proposed changes to acute care nursing in Greater Victoria hospitals.

T

he B.C. Nurses’ Union and Island Health are locked in a bitter dispute about changing the model of nursing, but one health care professional has seen the new system work successfully at Victoria General Hospital. Mary Ann Desjardins, a care aide for 21 years, is stationed at the VGH neuroscience department and works with a team of two registered nurses and one licensed practical nurse. The team normally cares for about 14 patients, and Desjardins helps them eat, get in and out of bed, bathe and use the toilet. “We’re able to do the extra little

pieces that a registered nurse doesn’t have time to do, such as comforting the patient,” she said. “There are times when I look at a patient and decide, ‘I’m going to sit with this person because I know he or she is frightened.’” Her team was part of a small pilot project for the care delivery model redesign (CDMR) implemented in acute care at Nanaimo Regional General Hospital in September and planned for Victoria General and Royal Jubilee hospitals in April. Changes would have care aides take on duties of feeding, bathing and toileting of acute-care patients in an effort to reduce costs and give patients more one-on-one time with a health care professional. Desjardins said having care aides in acute care is a positive change. “It can lighten the load for nurses. I know it’s a good thing, I’ve seen it work,” she said. The BCNU wants CDMR scrapped. The union argues that model decreases, and in some cases eliminates, direct patient time with nurses. It also said care aides don’t have the same education to notice subtle changes in a patient’s health, which could be life threatening. Desjardins disagrees, and said care aides have adequate training in patient observation. “That is our main focus because before being brought into acute care, (care aids) were mostly in residential care. Nurses (in resi-

dential care) totally depend on us,” she said. Yet CDMR is provoking worry across all units at Victoria General, including Desjardins’, due to negative stories emerging from Nanaimo and a lack of details from Island Health, she said. “We don’t know what it’s going to look like,” Desjardins said. “It creates a bit of frustration.”

“We should be part of the care team. We are at the patient’s bedside often where we see changes in a person’s health.”

– Bonnie Pearson Hospital Employees’ Union

The Hospital Employees’ Union (HEU), which represents health care assistants, says its members are upset that their skills are being questioned, as they are trained professionals who work within their mandate, which includes noticing subtle changes in patients. “It’s disheartening to hear people feel they have to advance their own interest by diminishing the role others provide,” said HEU secretary business manager Bonnie Pearson. “We should be part of the care team. We are at the patient’s bedside often where we see changes in a person’s health.” In Alberta, the union represent-

ing nurses is fighting a similar battle as the BCNU, as care aides there have assumed the same tasks that Island Health is trying to implement. The United Nurses of Alberta is also accusing Alberta Health Services of replacing nurses with care aides, and that union claims it has evidence proving Alberta “plans to eliminate hundreds of nursing jobs.” The BCNU also asserts CDMR is about replacing nurses with lowercost care aides. The union fears CDMR will eventually be adopted by other health authorities across B.C. CDMR executive leader Rita den Otter said using care aides in hospitals and in acute-care wards is nothing new. The system was introduced to smaller Island hospitals such as Cowichan, Campbell River and West Coast General in Port Alberni several years ago, and care aides work in acute care wards in other parts of Canada, the United States and in Europe. CDMR will ease a nurse’s workload and will not result in job losses, den Otter said. “We all live on the Island, too, and our families come to our hospital for care,” she said. “When we redesign patient care, we are thinking of our own family as well. We try very hard, always to provide the best possible care we can and show that it’s safe to come to our hospital.” reporter@vicnews.com


A4 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 - SAANICH

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Jan. 11 proved to be bad day for deer when two were killed in motor-vehicle accidents, one on the 900-block of Beach Dr., the other on the 3400-block of Cadboro Bay Rd. Damage to both vehicles, one a police car, and the other an SUV, were minimal.

Full of

This is the time of the year for current grade 5 students to plan for three exciting years at middle school level (grades 6 to 8).

In order to learn about the many choices available at our middle schools, parents/guardians and students are invited to attend the Middle School Information Nights that are listed below. The meetings will be held at the schools and begin at 7:00 pm.

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On Jan. 7, the UVic Faculty Club reported a break-and-enter where a window was smashed and someone had entered the building. A 21-year-old male suspect was located by UVic security and turned over to Oak Bay police who will be submitting charges for approval to Crown Counsel.

where a resident said he observed a man dressed in black trying the door handles of vehicles parked along the street. Neighbourhood patrols and a Saanich canine unit were unable to identify a suspect, and none of the vehicles appear to have been entered.

The Greater Victoria School District has ten exemplary middle schools that welcome all students to their responsive and safe environments.

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A young doe crosses Tyee Road in Vic West, forcing the oncoming bus to take evasive action to avoid a collision with the animal. How often do you see deer in urban areas? Let us know at editor@ saanichnews.com.

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Rockheights Middle School, Monday, January 27, 2014 École Cedar Hill Middle School Tuesday, January 28, 2014 École Arbutus Global Middle School Wednesday, January 29, 2014 École Lansdowne Middle School Thursday, January 30, 2014 Gordon Head Middle School Monday, February 3, 2014 École Central Middle School Tuesday, February 4, 2014 École Shoreline Community Middle School Wednesday, February 5, 2014 Monterey Middle School Thursday, February 6, 2014 Glanford Middle School Tuesday, February 11, 2014 Colquitz Middle School Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Detailed information is also available on our district website www.sd61.bc.ca, click on the Schools link.


SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, January 15, 2014

www.vicnews.com • A5



Victoria health drink preps for U.S. debut Created to help with cystic fibrosis, unlikely entrepreneurs hit growing health market Edward Hill News staff

In early March, Anaheim, Calif., will host the largest natural products trade show in North America, a venue of all that is nutritious. For Victoria’s Paul Underhill, it’s a leap into the wildly competitive U.S. market for health drinks. The expo will mark the U.S. launch of Rumble, a nutrition drink devised by Underhill, 44, originally as a means to cope with symptoms of cystic fibrosis. Rumble has found a foothold here, but the U.S. is a different world. “The west coast of the U.S. is the most competitive market for health food and beverages,” Underhill said. “There’s many more products, and companies spend a lot on marketing. We have to rely on the strength of our product, and word of mouth.” Over the past two years, Rumble has found its way into groceries and health food stores across Canada, and it had its biggest month yet in December after Underhill and colleagues Kim and James McQueen appeared on Dragons’ Den. The drink and the company have come a long way in five years, since Underhill started grinding together fruits and vegetables at his Victoria home in a desperate bid to get food into his body. Along with causing chronic lung infections, cystic fibrosis inhibits the efficient absorption of nutrients. In those days, Underhill hunted around supplement shops and health food stores for meal replacements that were nutritious, organic and didn’t taste awful. As a professional researcher with degrees in psychology and law, he dug into

blending a drink from scratch. “There was nothing out there to drink with a healthy balance. I needed something that didn’t exist. I was forced to make my own,” he said. “But obviously it wasn’t just me that needed it.” Steve Hughes, 45, who lives in View Royal, encouraged Underhill to develop his “super shake” as a commercial product. He left his job as general manager of Albion Fisheries to help get Rumble off the ground. “I told Paul he should try to do this. It’s not just the health-compromised that need this. Everyone needs better choices and nutrition,” Hughes said. “We realized going from the blender at home to production was a big leap. We hired a food scientist. We knew we needed authentication.” Kim McQueen, a naturopathic doctor, formulated the ingredients to maximize the proteins, nutrients and taste. They couldn’t find a manufacturer in Canada to produce Rumble, but found one in an undisclosed location the U.S. With financing from friends and family, Rumble launched in October 2012 at a trade show in Toronto. Neither a protein or energy drink or meal supplement, Rumble is designed as Canada’s first “nourishing drink.” The company’s first commercial order came from Lifestyle Markets, and the first bottle was sold at Niagara Market. Underhill said the final product is healthier than what he made at home – McQueen insisted on pumping up the omega-3s, an essential fatty acid found in fish and nuts. “Creating a tasty all-natural leading-edge nutritional drink with omega-3s was challenging. In lab

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testing the formulation was worked on for over 18 months,” Hughes said. “It took time to work through the formulation to create a stable shelf life.” In the midst of developing Rumble, Underhill’s cystic fibrosis came on with a vengeance, and in 2011, he was on oxygen 24 hours per day. On April 22, 2011, an air ambulance shuttled him to Toronto in critical condition, and by a stroke of fate, he was undergoing double lung transplant surgery within 12 hours. A year later, Underhill cycled the 100 km leg of the Tour de Victoria. Rumble went on to sponsor and Underhill rode the 1,200 km Vancouver to Banff ride for cystic fibrosis, and the company continues to sponsor cyclists and other athletes. “It was too much to even leave the house (in 2011). I was tethered to a tube. It’s hard to reconcile then and now,” he said. As seen on TV, Rumble struck a deal with Dragons’ Den investors, but Underhill said that dissolved amicably amid interest from an investors group

Edward Hill/News staff

Company co-founders Steve Hughes and Paul Underhill show off bottles of Rumble outside their downtown Victoria office. Originally a drink designed to combat Underhill's symptoms of cystic fibrosis, Rumble is now found across Canada and the company will launch into the U.S. in March. in Toronto, which is financing their push into the U.S. From being a civil servant, a cyclist and a health nut, Underhill never envisioned being a guy who negotiated with ven-

Capital Regional District

THE DISTRICT OF SAANICH

CRD IDEA Grants

2014 SCHEDULE OF COUNCIL MEETINGS

IDEA grants support arts programming that is new, innovative or developmental, by non-profit organizations whose mandate is in an area other than the arts or that are ineligible under other CRD programs.

Pursuant to the Community Charter, the public is advised that the 2014 schedule for Regular Council Meetings is available on our web site at saanich.ca, or by contacting the Legislative Division at 250-475-1775 or e-mailing us at clerksec@saanich.ca. All meetings start at 7:30  p.m. and are held in the Council Chambers, Saanich Municipal Hall, 770 Vernon Avenue.

For details see: www.crd.bc.ca/arts Application Deadline: Friday, February 14, 4:30 pm CRD Arts Development Service 625 Fisgard Street, Victoria, BC V8W 1R7 T: 250.360.3215 artsdevelopment@crd.bc.ca

Please note that this schedule may be changed by resolution of Council.

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The Business Licence Bylaw requires that all businesses operating in the District of Saanich be in possession of a valid business licence. This requirement applies to all commercial, industrial, home based and non-resident businesses operating within the municipality. Renewal notices are mailed at the end of each year to all businesses that were licensed the previous year. Payment may be made online at www.saanich.ca, by mail or at the Saanich Municipal Hall. Business licence fees are due and payable on the first business day in January each year, or the date of application for a new business licence, if later. If you are no longer operating your business please contact the Business Licence Division at 250-475-5401 so that we can update our records. Please check the Business Licence Bylaw for licence categories and fees. How do I apply for a Commercial, Home Based or Inter-municipal Business Licence? A Business Licence Application is available online. A copy of the form is also available at the Municipal Hall or can be mailed to you upon request. For further information or fee rates, please contact the Business Licence Division at 250-475-5401. Please read our pages about One Stop Business Registration and BizPal as well at www.saanich.ca.

ZERO ENROLLMENT *

DISTRICT OF SAANICH NOTICE TO SAANICH BUSINESSES 2014 BUSINESS LICENCES

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A6 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, January 15, 2014- SAANICH

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Edward Hill Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The SAANICH NEWS is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Child porn case ignores bullying L

ast Thursday, a 17-year-old Victoria-area girl was convicted of possessing and distributing child pornography after she texted naked photos of another underage girl. The images were sent to the victim, another teen and the 17-year-old’s boyfriend. It appears the conviction met the strict definition of distributing and possessing child pornography, in this case sending around images of her boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend. She also threatened the victim and used the photos to try to humiliate her on Facebook. But are the actions of this 17-year-old equivalent to a pedophile trading child porn over the Internet, and thereby contributing to the harm and degradation of exploited youth? It seems in this case, the intent of the 17-yearold was to bully and harass a potential rival. Clearly Canadian law is unable to cope with the fast moving world of social media and the vicious world of teen bullying, mixed with a culture that encourages young girls to allow racy photos of themselves via a technology that links with ease to the Internet. Many might agree that defaulting to a child porn charge sends a message that teens distributing photos of naked teens should be dealt with harshly under the law. Certainly bullying left unchecked has led to cases of girls committing suicide. That said, we should call this recent case what it is – bullying and harassment due to rivalry and jealousy, plain and simple. That doesn’t diminish the seriousness of the offenses or the suffering and humiliation of the victim. But calling this teen a child pornographer is disingenuous and distracts from the deep and ongoing problem of bullying in the age of social media (not addressed was the fact the boyfriend would have technically been in possession of child pornography, as it was his phone that stored the photos). If nothing else, parents and educators need to make this a teaching moment. Teens and tweens need to understand legal ramifications of images and text transmitted onto the Internet, and the fact that digital images always have the potential to be distributed into the wider world.

What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@saanichnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Saanich News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

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Harper rapped for wrong reasons She’s now a professional Harper Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s hater, with support from the U.S.latest visit to B.C. was portrayed as based Tides Foundation among these things are today: besieged by others. protesters, hiding from One of the issues an ever-vigilant media, Harper didn’t take cynically campaigning for questions on was the the 2015 federal election. consolidation of 11 federal TV couldn’t get enough fisheries libraries into two, of the two “environmental one of them in Sidney, B.C. activists” who dressed as This is portrayed as waiters to slip onstage at part of Harper’s so-called a business breakfast in “war on science,” and Vancouver. has been compared with They’re not the Romans burning the environmentalists, just allTom Fletcher library of Alexandria in purpose protesters using B.C. Views ancient Egypt. the flavour of the month. Fisheries Minister Gail They are associated with Shea defended the cost-cutting a group calling itself “No One Is measure by pointing out that Illegal,” a collection of anarchist almost all access to these libraries kooks that wants to do away with is now digital, so maintaining 11 national borders, and of course duplicated sets of printed reports is capitalism. a waste of taxpayer dollars. As their now-famous sign An anonymous federal scientist said, they want “climate justice fired back on his blog that the head now.” Organizer Brigette DePape of one of these libraries retired explained to a co-operative CBC TV before the contents could even be host that the recent typhoon in the catalogued, much less completely Philippines that killed thousands digitized for online access. of people was caused by global So this material wasn’t even warming, which of course is caused properly organized? Users were mainly by the Alberta “tar sands.” supposed to browse until they I won’t dwell on this routine stumbled on something pertinent? idiocy, except to say the number The ministry reported that the of hurricanes that struck North average number of people other America in 2013 was zero, and than federal fisheries staff who used that hasn’t happened since 1994. these libraries averaged between Also, “climate justice” is like “social five and 12 per year. That’s for justice,” in that both require all 11 facilities combined. And if confiscation of earned wealth. DePape is the former Senate page anyone has even one example of information that was available and fired in 2011 for a similar sign stunt.

isn’t now, they should identify it. Harper’s got plenty to answer for, no question. To take one of many examples, spending our borrowed money on TV ads for a “Canada Job Grant” program that hasn’t even been introduced in Parliament, much less set up, isn’t just wasteful. It’s dishonest and cruelly misleading to the unemployed people the ads pretend to offer help. Harper’s visit to B.C. added a couple of scripted events, starting with softball questions at the Vancouver business breakfast. Then he was off to a photo op at the Kinsol trestle on Vancouver Island, where he announced three more years of funding for the TransCanada Trail. I’m as relieved as anyone that Harper is not killing this modest federal project that started in 1992, but this is not news. It was a fake public event to justify the cost of a trip so Harper could address a new Conservative riding association. And how is the federal deficit after eight years of tight-fisted Conservative rule? We’re only borrowing about $1 billion a month now, down from the Harper government all-time record deficit of $55 billion in 2009. Some cost cutting is in order all right. Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Twitter: @tomfletcherbc tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Harper’s got plenty to answer for, no question.’


www.vicnews.com • A7

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, January 15, 2014

LETTERS No good argument for sewage project Why are all our local politicians, municipal and provincial, racing to follow the edict from the bloated bureaucrats and their corporate sponsors in Ottawa, to build an unneeded sewage treatment system? Why do we have to meekly fall in line and obey their demands? What will happen if we tell them to take their ruling and stuff it? Those of us who do live here know of the many tests and studies carried out over the past 40 years that have produced absolutely no evidence that the system is necessary. When was the last time any of our ocean beaches were closed by high fecal coliform counts? All we have is the whining of a bunch of ignorant urbanites responding to a problem that exists mostly in their fevered imagination, and egged on by the corporate interests who stand to make big bucks from this totally unnecessary project. However, if someone wants to present a cogent argument for the economic benefits that will accrue from taking our tax money back from Ottawa and recirculating it through the community I will be happy to listen. Earl Smith Saanich

Separating Saanich something to ponder Re: Larger municipalities, larger costs (Letters, Jan. 10) The letter writer asserts that the majority of local services have been “proven” to be most effectively provided by municipalities with populations no larger than 20,000. In the name of efficiency, therefore, I propose that her own municipality of Saanich, whose population is already well over 100,000 and growing, be subdivided into six separate townships, each with its own mayor and council. Considerable cost savings should be achieved by adding five new mayors, up to 40 extra councillors, five new police and fire departments and various planning, engineering and administrative posts to the local governance of our geographi-

cally compact region. That’s according to the “evidence” the writer claims is ignored by Amalgamation Yes and its supporters. Moreover, I am sure other major Western Canadian cities that manage to function perfectly well with one mayor, 10 or so councillors, one police force, one fire service and one city hall would be amazed that Greater Victoria could gain greater efficiency and fiscal prudence by creating yet more separate and independent administrative units. John Weaver Victoria

Mainland cities show lower costs Re: Larger municipalities, larger costs (Letters, Jan. 10) Amalgamation Yes doesn’t advocate any particular model for future structure of municipal governance, however we believe in an objective evaluation of the merits of amalgamating some of our 13 separate municipalities and we have some facts to support us. Contrary to the letter writer’s assertions, a review by Amalgamation Yes shows conclusively that larger municipalities don’t necessarily cost more money. Surrey, with a population of 482,000 compared to the Capital Regional District total of 349,000, collected $259 million in general municipal taxes in 2012, compared to our combined $314 million. Clearly with Surrey at $545 per capita municipal tax compared to a range of $867 to $1,370 for our larger communities in the CRD confirms we are overtaxed. And worse, our local politicians have clearly stated they intend to keep costs escalating with annual property tax increases that exceed the rate of population growth. The cost of supporting four local core councils is $965,000 while Burnaby’s cost are only

Send your letters to: Mail: Letters to the Editor, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 Email: editor@ saanichnews.com

DISTRICT OF SAANICH NOTICE TO SAANICH DOG OWNERS $566,000. Our municipalities pay 21 employees over $150,000, and they only need 15. Do we really need 13 fire chiefs? Even if amalgamation didn’t necessarily save money for the same cost of seven police chiefs, we could put 15 more constables on the streets. Clearly there is good reason to support at least some degree of amalgamation. At the very least, an in-depth analysis overseen by the province is warranted to provide the public with unbiased information; however the province will only undertake such a review if there is public support. That is why Amalgamation Yes is encouraging all CRD municipalities to place a public opinion question on their ballots. James Anderson Saanich Board member of Amalgamation Yes

More oil pipelines a great risk to all Re: Many benefits from oil pipelines (Letters, Jan. 3) The writer from Duncan points out that individuals have potential risks from their plane going down or a car accident.  While these events could become tragic incidents for individuals and their families, they cannot be compared with devastation being caused to communities impacted by the extraction activities of oil, gas and coal industries poisoning their water and environments. So pipelines might bring us some short-term financial benefits, but the cost to current and future generations will rapidly wipe out those benefits. Better for us as a province and country to quickly transition to renewable sources of energy and away from all the products we derive from oil. Meanwhile by not allowing the pipelines, we do not risk wiping out the coastal economy of our fisheries, tourism and all the small communities which depend on our clean environment – one spill caused by one human error could wipe out millions of dollars now injected into our provincial coffers. That is a risk we dare not take. Carolyn Herbert Saanich

2014 DOG LICENCES

The Animals Bylaw requires that all dogs over the age of 4 months be licensed on or before February 1, 2014. Licences are valid for the calendar year and may be purchased in person at the Municipal Hall, 770 Vernon Avenue, Victoria BC V8X 2W7, by mail, or at any Saanich Recreation Centre. On or before After Licence fees for 2014 are: March 1 March 1 Male or Female Dog $35.00 $40.00 Neutered Male or Spayed Female Dog $25.00 $30.00 Replacement Tag $5.00 $5.00 If your dog has been neutered/spayed within the last 12 months or is a Guide Dog, the licence is free. Please bring the applicable certificate with you when you obtain the dog tag. WHY SHOULD I LICENSE MY DOG? It is a requirement under the Animals Bylaw. The fine for not having a valid dog licence is $150.00. A Saanich dog tag is the best form of identification to quickly reunite you with your pet. Veterinarians often call to find the owner of injured dogs. 2014 RENEWALS: If you are the owner of a dog that was licensed in 2013, you should receive a 2014 Renewal Notice in the mail. You can purchase your 2014 dog tag online at www.saanich.ca. Otherwise, please return both parts of the notice when you purchase your dog tag in person at the Municipal Hall or Recreation Centre, or by mail.. If a Renewal Notice has not been received, please contact the Municipal Hall at 250-475-5494, local 3587.

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A8 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 - SAANICH

He thinkks they’re chatting abou ut the hospitall jello. His nurse is actually midwaay through dozens of assessmeents. During the minutes spent at the bedside, a professional nurse makes dozens of critical assessments. Any one of them could mean the difference between recovery and something that could result in tragedy. Take direct patient care away from nurses and vital knowledge affecting the health of patients is lost.

B.C. should be increasing the number of nurses, not replacing them with care aides. Ensuring nurses remain in direct contact with patients is crucial to you and your loved ones. While they may not be specialists in jello, when it comes to safe patient care, professional nurses are irreplaceable.

Please sign BCNU’s petition for an independent assessment of Island Health’s unsafe patient care model, at BCNU.org/takeaction.

NEWS


SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, January 15, 2014

www.vicnews.com • A9



Community mailboxes a target for thieves Continued from Page A1

“I think it’s a slap in our face that Canada Post hasn’t come to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities to see what sort of guidelines we need to develop, because it’s going to be different across Canada,” she said. The issue is being raised around other council tables, too. Delta council last week passed a motion requesting a Canada Post representa-

posted to Twitter saying her entire community mailbox was stolen. A report from Brownoff was expected to be brought forward to council Monday night. Among the recommendations was requesting Canada Post re-evaluate the financial and social impacts the decision may have on municipalities and taxpayers. She also recommended the decision needs to be looked at with a focus on age-friendly

tive come speak to council to address their concerns. “One of the concerns is that many of the new mailboxes that are being installed are really not secure,” Delta Coun. Bruce McDonald said. “They have become a very consistent target because you don’t have to break into 48 houses, you just have to break into one and you get 48 people’s mail.” In late December, Saanich South MLA Lana Popham

communities, crime prevention, safe walking spaces, maintaining the infrastructure and security. “Canada Post needs to reevaluate how they’re doing their business. I think they need to be brought to task – you start with contacting and communicating with municipalities,” she said. “We’re going to fight for answers.” Canada Post did not return a request for comment by the News’ press deadline.

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A10 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 - SAANICH

NEWS

Greater Victoria Family

Re-introducing risk into childhood play Pendulum starts to swing away from ‘bubble wrapping’ children Kyle Wells News staff

A trend towards the socalled bubble-wrapping of children, or helicopter parenting, is giving way to the notion of the importance and benefits of introducing risk in childhood play. Ulrich Mueller, a psychology professor at the University of Victoria, estimates the overprotection of children started in the 1980s and ’90s, when parents began to invest more in their children, but also became more afraid of harm. Over the past 10 years, Mueller believes those attitudes have started to shift. Experts are starting to view playgrounds, which encourage imaginative play and appropriate risk taking, as

a helpful aid to developing motor skills and confidence. “This is how children learn what they cannot do and can do, therefore they learn about their own competence,” Mueller said. Mueller and Enid Elliot, an early learning and care instructor at Camosun College, are currently studying a nature kindergarten program based out of Sangster elementary in Colwood to see the effects of natural play. As the study is ongoing there are no results yet, but the researchers are looking at motor development, fitness levels, attention spans and emotional development in the cohorts of tots. Elliot said the early results are positive towards incorporating risk into play.

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Childhood educators agree that elements of risk in places like playgrounds should be a part of childhood development. “I’m convinced that children need to have some ways of practicing how to take risks and how to be safe,” Elliot said. “People have much more catastrophic injuries if they don’t learn from an early

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age to start to learn to manage their own risk.” “You learn to fall down with your knees and your hands to protect yourself, that’s a learned skill,” said Michelle Tannock, a visiting professor with UVic’s centre for research in early childhood. “That gives them a sense of the boundaries of what they can do and what they can’t do,

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versus expecting that others will protect them.” Tannock agrees more talk is circulating about the role of risk in childhood development and she would like to see this idea influence educational programs and play areas and structures. Victoria playground equipment dealer Merv Walker said the call for alternative playgrounds is growing, but he heeds caution. He believes the push for risk creates a grey area for complying with safety regulations for playgrounds established by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA). He worries the rules are being ignored. He even noticed a potential infraction in the photo of a nature-based playground at Pearce Crescent in the Saanich News, with uneven logs next to a pathway. “If a child falls off an icy log for instance, the end of a log, and hits the pathway, it’s not covered by CSA,” Walker said. “CSA is what we have. I may or may not agree with it. In some cases

I think it goes too far, but that’s my personal feeling. Everything we do has to conform to CSA. It’s that simple.” Saanich’s parks planning and design manager, Gary Durrah, said the decision for the Pearce Crescent playground was based more on space and cost than anything else. Safety can be a concern, Durrah said, but it is certainly addressed. “We do our best to minimize the chance of injury. So we still have to put in proper safety surfacing,” Durrah said. “It’s a very difficult thing to regulate.” What needs to kept in mind moving forward is the difference between risk and hazard. Playgrounds actually have low fatality and injury rates, Mueller said, especially compared to other common occurrences such as riding in cars. The distinction is key. “It doesn’t mean playgrounds should have some nails sticking out,” he said. kwells@goldstreamgazette.com

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www.vicnews.com • A11



Greater Victoria Family

A tale of two teeth ... and extraordinary determination

teria, Danica's teeth fell All the tooth trauma of out in quick succession. the past came flooding back The minute she stepped when my hysterical teenage from the house, she daughter called, crying: “My developed a new, closedtooth’s been knocked out!” mouth smile and started Images swirled in my hiding her mouth behind mind: painful bloody her beloved stuffy or her mouth, hockey player long hair. smile; the size of cheque I’d No one knew she had be writing to the dentist. lost her front teeth. And so I braced myself for the inevitable drama as I Susan Lundy Nativity play? Her stuffy got a starring role as she arrived to pick her up. sang (muffled) into its fur. ChristShe tilted her head towards mas dinner with extended family? the light, opened her mouth and She used the new smile and coverpointed. I squinted. Really? Yes, a ing hand. No one outside our house piece of her front tooth was cerever saw her toothless. tainly missing, but this was not Over the years, family tooth exactly Night of the Jack-O-Lantern. drama continued. My younger When Danica, age six, first announced that her front teeth were daughter, Sierra had her first tooth pop out with the help of a teeterwiggly, I assumed all children loved totter. Her second tooth came out markers of maturity and started shortly afterwards, but as she finally singing, “All I want for Christmas is went to place her own tooth under my two front teeth.” But then I realthe pillow, Danica, in a big sisterly ized Danica was not even brushing way, confided that the tooth fairy them. was actually just Momma. For six weeks they hung by But as I tucked Sierra in, she strings, getting increasingly yellow, turned to me with wise-looking eyes gums bulging above them. Finally, and whispered, “I don’t think you’re the school Christmas pageant approached, and Danica, cast as one really the tooth fairy. You don’t have time to go to all the little girls’ and of the three wise men, was to sing a boys’ houses every night.” solo verse of We Three Kings. Ahh, for once ... tooth trauma Then, disaster. Within 24 hours of the production, and amid much hys- averted.

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A12 • www.vicnews.com

Updated with the latest happenings

monday midweek

victoria’s ultimate get out guide

Life as

Creative punks

NaTalIE NOrTh

essays, soon to be released in a book by the same title. While the stories are very much from the mind of McCulloch (and directed by Blake Brooker) its writer is quick to credit Northey’s stage presence – not only for his artistic contributions, but simply as a punk from the same era. “We’re of the same vintage. ... I can confirm or deny something he says just by shared human experience,” Northey says. “all of what he does is about a form of the truth, whether it’s comfortable for people to hear or not.” For Northey, who scored Kids in the Hall: Brain Candy, among other works for the famed sketch troupe, the part-

arts@mondaymag.com

C

raig Northey and Bruce McCulloch may not be young or drunk, but the two veteran Canadian performers are by all means

punk. “Both of us don’t like to be told what to do,” says Northey, founding member of Vancouver-based rock band Odds, who is once again collaborating with McCulloch, Kids in the Hall member, writer/director and actor. “That’s my theory about musicians and comedians and why they got into this – because they wanted a job where no one told them what to do.” Northey was, and still is, attracted to the DIY ethic that came from the ‘80s punk era and how it marked the end of a time in music where, in order to record an album, artists had to overcome a series of roadblocks: a $20,000-price tag and a sound engineer who wouldn’t let you touch any of the controls, he says. Band members were huge stars, unapproachTYSON K. ElDEr phOTO able people living in another world. Odds’ Craig Northey joins Kids in the Hall’s Bruce “When punk came along, it made McCulloch during his Young Drunk Punk show next Friday it for you and me, and you could do it Jan. 24 at UVic. yourself and you don’t need to spend all that money on it, because it wasn’t it. Everything that Bruce and I do, we make the point of the music,” he says. “You could up. It’s coming from nowhere and then it speak about your reality and have a lot of fun, exists. If somebody says you can’t do it, that’s because it’s going fast and it’s going hard and the reason you do it.” it’s going to be fun. I think that has stayed Northey and McCulloch have been longwith anybody who was ever involved in punk time collaborators on a variety of film and rock in any way, or enjoyed even listening to television productions. Their latest work it: you can do it yourself; you just have to do Young Drunk Punk, is a based on McCulloch’s

100 % lo

Bruce McCulloch.

SUpplIED phOTO

nership is successful based on their shared worldview and how they complement each other in a “musical way.” “It’s a strange way to put it, but he understands music and his taste in music complements mine. We give and take

2,346

$ for M was r ovember ais the s ed throug shield ale of wind h at Pen washer flu id insula Co gas c At Bear Wear this year, entre -op s. Snowflake our princess bear donated $750 which included a large box filled with toys. All proceeds went to the Children’s Health Foundation.

,000

$ 15,000 donation to the Saanich Peninsula Hospital Foundation and a $5,000 donation to the Visions Gala benefiting the Victoria Hospitals Foundation.

and push and pull and come up with new things. What he comes up with isn’t exactly what I would have imagined, but together we come up with something new. We’ve learned that dialectic, as the university kids say.” Toronto-based musician Brian Connelly worked with McCulloch on an earlier iteration of the show. Building on Connelly’s contributions, Northey worked on Young Drunk Punk with McCulloch in los angeles to arrive at its current form, something that will only have been performed a handful of times before it hits UVic’s Farquhar auditorium. Much of Young Drunk Punk centres around family and fatherhood, a theme with which Northey, a father of three teens, can identify. and despite any trappings of adult life, Northey, like l.a.based McCulloch, remains very much a punk at heart. It all comes back to the disdain for being told what to do, while going after an artistic vision. “You become possessed by music, or in Bruce’s case, a vision for what will make people laugh, about the truth, and about combining the two in your own way. It’s a disease that you can’t shake and I see that in anyone else who’s younger and who’s trying to do a similar thing and make music. ... That grassroots thing (about) punk rock – that’s back. Because there’s no giant infrastructure of major labels that you have to jump through all these hoops to be a part of – and it’s all about social media and building grassroots support for what you do – it’s no different than it was in 1979.” Northey and McCulloch take their grassroots punk rock ideals to the stage at 8pm Jan. 24. Tickets, $28/35, at tickets. uvic.ca.

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In the spirit of giving back Peninsula Co-op donated to a variety of charitable organizations throughout December.

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Over 1,000 lbs of food from our members, customers and staff was donated to the Mustard Seed and Goldstream Food Banks.

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250-893-6809 A $2,500 donation to the Festival of Trees BC Children’s Hospital.

There’s more online For more stories and web exclusives visit vicnews.com


www.vicnews.com • A13

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Saanich Walk-In Denture Clinic Walk-In Denture Clinic

MONDAY’S top picks FOR YOUR WEEK More onLine: mondaymag.com/calendar

calendar events fri. JAn. 17 BamBi Boudoir’s Burlesque BaBes revue - Join the Burlesque Babes and beautiful Passion and Performance dancers for a night of burlesque and sexy entertainment at Logan’s (1821 Cook). Starring: Bambi Boudoir, Jett MaJique, Damian Frost, Dirty Dollie, Scarlett Pearl, and the dancers of Passion and Performance. Hosted by the fantastic, Kitty David and introducing Burlesque Kitty, Miss Maeve Big-Top. $15, 8pm.

sAt. JAn. 18 theatre skam’s Birthday Bash - Join SKAM at Oddfellows Hall to celebrate 19 years of theatre in Victoria. Their fundraising evening includes live music and dance, a chance to take home a massive raffle prize pack, including season tickets and tons o’ swag from local businesses – and who knows what else.?$19 / $69 with SKAMraffle ticket. 8pm at Oddfellows Hall (1315 Douglas). skam.ca.

Arts news

in brief

Directors’ workshop

In the weeks before the city goes movie mad for the Victoria Film Festival, CineVic is offering an opportunity for local aspiring film artists to polish their direct-

stage

tues. JAn. 21

fri. JAn. 17

wed. JAn. 15

come and Play with ryan and chris - The Copper Owl (1900 Douglas) transforms into a 1990s classroom during this new standup, improvised musical night of comedy from Ryan Bangma and Christopher Vickers. If you like laughing and learning, it’s the comedy extravaganza you’ve been looking for. $12.

five alarm funk -The 10th anniversary celebration of fivealarm proportions goes down at Sugar (858 Yates). Hear why their fourth album Rock the Sky”was nominated for a Juno at 8pm. Tickets are $20 in advance at Lyle’s Place, Ditch Records or ticketweb. ca.

home is a Beautiful word - Playwright/journalist Joel Bernbaum, in a work commissioned by the Belfry Theatre, spent over a year interviewing hundreds of people to form a portrait of homelessness in our community, in the words of our community. Described as moving, enlightening, funny and surprising. Tickets, $25, tickets. belfry.bc.ca. Until Jan. 19. ignorance - The Old Trout Puppet Workshop presents an original piece dubbed “a puppet documentary of the evolution of happiness in an attempt to unleash the mightier shrieks that surge within us.” Whoa. At the Roxy Theatre (2657 Quadra). Tickets, $26.25-42. 250-385-4462. bluebridgetheatre.ca. Until Jan. 19.

sin city: kingdom of thronesThe peasants and royalty of a medieval castle evoke an improvised fairytale world during the the fourth season of the improvised soap with live direction by creator Ian Ferguson and comedic magic of Kirsten Van Ritzen, Wes Borg and Morgan Cranny among others. At the Victoria Event Centre (1415 Broad) every Tuesday at 8pm. $15/$12.

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randy elvis friskie - The King returns when longtime tribute artist relives memorable moments from Prestley, with guests Marilyn Monroe, Ann-Margaret and Shelley Fabares at the McPherson Playhouse. Tickets, $39.50, rmts. bc.ca.

fri. JAn. 17

Barenaked ladies - Torontobased pop artist Clara Venice joins the legendary Canadian band, who take 25 years of pop-rock hits, along with songs from their latest record, Grinning Streak, to UVic’s Farquhar Auditorium. $95-120, tickets.uvic.ca.

ing skills with two days of workshops with an independent filmmaking great. The society of independent filmmakers hosts director Carl Bessai – Lola (2001), Emile, with Sir Ian McKellen in 2003, and No Clue 2013’s film-noir comedy starring Brent Butt and Amy

Smart , among a long list of films which have screened at top festivals around the globe – for intensive workshops Jan. 25 and 26. In Directing Actors on Jan. 25, Bessai focuses on the principals of improv and rehearsal. Sunday’s Directing for the Camera session will explore the

physical execution of scenes on camera with emphasis on blocking and scene coverage motivated by scripted material. Each day runs from 10am to 6pm at CineVic, 1931 Lee and comes with a cost of $165/$295 for the general public. Contact 250-3891590 or office@cinevic.ca.

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Black holes: more than meets the eye - Dr. Laura Ferrarese from UVic’s department of physics and astronomy discuses how black holes may play a more important role in the evolution of galaxies than anyone had anticipated. 6:30pm at Hermann’s Jazz Club, 753 View. Free, but registration is required. eventbrite.ca/e/cafe-scientifique.

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Master of Education in Special Education Information Meeting Tuesday, January 21, 2014 4-6 pm | Belmont Secondary School Cafeteria • Blended model that is accessible from anywhere in BC and beyond • Innovative approach to the field • Grounded in current research and evidence-based practices Please RSVP to confirm your attendance Gail.Krivel-Zacks@viu.ca

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Johane Mui of Victoria hits a return in the women’s open (5.0) singles final Sunday during the New Year’s Classic 2014 tennis tournament at the Oak Bay Recreation Centre. Mui won her match against junior Emily Hooton 6-4, 5-7, 6-4.

Grow a Native Plant Garden.

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

A Classic tennis finish Oak Bay tourney offers something for players at all levels Don Descoteau News staff

Johane Mui isn’t one to back down from a challenge on the tennis court. That much was clear on Sunday, as she faced hard-hitting teenager Emily Hooton in the women’s open final of the New Year’s Classic at the Oak Bay Recreation Centre tennis bubble. At 48, she threw her racquet into the open mix and was promptly ranked No. 1, having won the women’s 45-and-over division in the Classic the previous three years. After taking the opening set 6-4 then dropping the next 7-5, Mui’s experience and savvy helped her post a hard-fought 6-4 win over Hooton in the deciding set to take her first open division singles crown in this tournament. “It’s was nice to hit against someone who hits harder than my peers,” Mui said afterward. “This gives me fire to pursue provincial and national (play) and extend my career.” Mui, who also won mixed doubles with partner Jared Mar-

tin, said the Classic has helped improve her game and allowed her to remain competitively active. Having played the Classic the past nine or 10 years and advanced to various finals in the past five, she sees the tournament as a good local event that helps hone one’s skills. “It gives you that competitive edge and sometimes it comes down to the mental game,” she said, referring to the final, in which she battled Hooton to gain momentum. Over the years, this tournament has also given numerous young players their first competitive experiences, not to mention the opportunity to test their mettle against older players. A case in point was the men’s open division, which saw 14-year-old Aaron Diemer face 17-year-old Austin Hoole in the final. Hoole, ranked No. 2 in the 17-player draw, cruised to a 6-4, 6-1 victory Sunday. Both teens are provincialcalibre players who are serious enough about the sport to adjust their schooling to allow for more tournament play.

“(The Classic) is a good preparation for other tournaments and a good development event. Plus it’s fun,” said Hoole, who will play under-18 singles at a B.C. selection series event this weekend in Vancouver. Diemer is in the U-16 division. The finalists, who are also practice partners, have both played the Classic since they were pre-teens. “I always love playing in this tournament. They do such a great job,” Diemer said. “This is a tournament that always has lots of great competition.” The Classic attracted 210 players of all levels this time around, said organizer Ed Bakker, tennis co-ordinator with Recreation Oak Bay. While the total number of entries was the same as last year, the tournament has seen growth in the junior age categories, he added. “We’re now a fully sanctioned Tennis B.C. tournament, which allows (juniors) to gain provincial points,” he said. For results from the New Year’s Classic visit bit.ly/1iJbYGB. ddescoteau@vicnews.com

Residents of the Capital Region are invited to participate in a FREE workshop on gardening with drought-resistant native plants. Instruction on native plant identification, their benefits and how to use them will be included. An overview of CRD Water Conservation programs will be provided and participants will be given a tour of a native plant garden. These informative workshops will be held at Swan Lake Nature House, located at 3873 Swan Lake Road in Victoria.

Workshop Dates: Sunday, February 2 1 to 4 pm Saturday, February 15 9:30 am to 12:30 pm Monday, March 3 9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Saturday, March 15 9:30 am to 12:30 pm Wednesday, April 9 9:30 am to 12:30 pm Sunday, April 13 1 to 4 pm

Each workshop is limited to 20 participants and pre-registration is required. Call 250.479.0211 to reserve your spot today.

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Locals ranked high on weekly hoops list

Claremont Spartans sit at the top of this week’s Sport Victoria Vancouver Island senior boys level 4A rankings and also jumped into the B.C. top 10 list at sixth after last week’s honourable mention. Oak Bay sat third and Mount Douglas sixth on the Island list, followed by Belmont in eighth and Spectrum at No. 9. Reynolds sits at No. 5 in the Island 3A rankings, followed

by Stelly’s in sixth and Pacific Christian at No. 10. In 2A, St. Michael’s tops the chart on the Island and provincially, followed on both lists at No. 2 by Lambrick Park.

Local rugby juniors heading to Las Vegas

Elite youth rugby players from around B.C. are off to the Nevada desert next week to compete in the annual Las Vegas High School Invitational Sevens tournament.

Making the trip with the women’s under-18 team are Oak Bay High and Castaway Wanderers’ player Caroline Crossley, and UVic Vikes player Nicole Crowley. Two men’s sides will make the trip, made up of players from the B.C. U-18 and U-17 teams. On the roster is Oak Bay Barbarians standout Jack Nyren, who, like Crossley, is making a return trip to the tournament, which runs Jan. 24 and 25. ddescoteau@vicnews.com

Address: Phone:

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www.vicnews.com A16 •www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, January Wed, Jan 15, 2014 2014,- SAANICH Saanich NEWS News

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$$$ TOP CA$H PAID $$$. For ALL unwanted Vehicles, any condition. Call (250)885-1427.

General Manager for Pacific Playgrounds in Black Creek. Basic knowledge of accounting and computers needed. Responsibilities include: Personnel management, resort improvements, marketing and managing annual operations. Previous property management and/or hospitality industry experience preferred. Send resume to: careers.trinational@gmail.com

CALL FOR ENTRIES 12TH ANNUAL Kitty Coleman Woodland Artisan Festival. Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show. Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting May 17, 18 and 19 Applications for Artisans are available at woodlandgardens.ca 250-338-6901 QUALITY ASSURANCE Course for Health Canada’s Commercial Marijuana Program. February 22 & 23 Best Western Hotel, Kelowna, BC. Tickets: www.greenlineacademy.com or 1-855-860-8611 or 250870-1882

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Registered Nurses Bayshore Home Health Bayshore Home Health is currently seeking Registered Nurses to support our Pediatric/Adolescent clients for home care in the Victoria/Duncan areas. Pediatric experience is an asset. We do offer client specific training and support as required. If you are an RN and enjoy working with children, we would love to hear from you. Employee Benefit Package available. Interested individuals are encouraged to Fax resume to our Burnaby office: 1-866-686-7435 or Email:pedsvancouver@ bayshore.ca

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca DID YOU KNOW? BBB provides complaint resolution services for all businesses and their customers. Look for the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory E-edition on your Black Press Community Newspaper website at www.blackpress.ca. You can also go to http://vi.bbb.org/directory/ and click on the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory

MEDICAL/DENTAL

LANDSCAPE HORTICULTURALIST School District No. 62 (Sooke) requires a Landscape Horticulturalist. If you have a Landscape Horticulturist Trades Qualification, we are most interested in hearing from you. For more information about our District, please refer to our website at www.sd62.bc.ca This is a new position and will receive a final pay rating 6 months after the new incumbent starts as per the job evaluation plan. Interim hourly rate of pay: $21.94 Qualified individuals are invited to submit their cover letter and resume, including the names and telephone numbers of at least two references on or before January 24, 2014 to: Dawn Coughlin Human Resources Assistant School District No. 62 (Sooke) 3143 Jacklin Road Victoria, BC V9B 5R1

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VOLUNTEERS VICTORIA COOL AID Society’s Rock Bay Landing Shelter needs volunteers (19 and over) to sort donations plus provide access to showers, laundry and clothing. Shifts are 2 to 4 hours, days or evenings. Other positions including supervision of computer access are available. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-3862269. VICTORIA WOMEN in Need seeks retail sales volunteers for one of its three shops carrying good quality secondhand items, weekly, long-term. Other positions available. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-3862269. VICTORIA YOUTH Custody Services seeks adult recreation volunteers to participate in courtyard and gym activities such as volleyball and basketball, weekly for at least 6 months. Other positions available. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

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CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

FIGURINES: ROYAL Doulton, Coalport, Armani, Mrs. Albee, & misc artists - some very old, some more recent editions. Call (250)474-2774.

MEDICAL/DENTAL

MEDICAL/DENTAL

The Trager Approach

is an Innovative, Gentle & deeply effective Bodywork that Reduces Pain & Tension, and supports Balance & ease of Mobility in a Relaxed Body Rae Bilash Certified Trager Practitioner call for appointment 250-380-8733 www.raebilash.ca * Also Hot Stone Massage

HAMMOCK, Closely woven string, top quality, $60. (250)383-4506.

RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Home Movies to DVD. Also, Portraiture, Baby, Family + Maternity. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

James Bay location

Natural Instincts Massage 1st appointment special. Call 250-519-1018.

ABDOER & accessories, $80. Oak coffee table, $19. Call (250)544-4933.

REGISTERED NURSES VANCOUVER ISLAND

Retirement Concepts is now recruiting full-time, parttime and casual Registered Nurses for Beacon Hill Villa in Victoria, Nanaimo Seniors Village in Nanaimo, and The Gardens at Qualicum Beach in Qualicum Beach. Qualifications include: • Graduate of an approved school of nursing, current active registration with CRNBC. BSN preferred. • Additional training and previous experience in the care of the frail elderly and physically and mentally handicapped persons. • Ability to communicate effectively verbally and in writing in the English language. For a more detailed job description and to submit your resume

Please Visit our website IMMEDIATELY at www.retirementconcepts.com/careers.

While we appreciate all applications, please note only those shortlisted will be contacted. Retirement Concepts is an equal opportunity employer.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION EAR Basic & Post Basic

COUNSELLOR TRAINING online, register before January 15 online at: www.college mhc.com, Mental Health Counsellor Certificate/Diploma, Recognized. Available: Supervision, Membership, Insurance, Employment/Placement Assistance, Client Referrals.

Do y you enjoy working with children?

LEARN FROM home. Earn from home. Huge is a demand for Medical Transcriptionists. Start your online learning today with CanScribe Career College. www.canscribe.com 1.800.466.1535 or email us at: info@canscribe.com.

Career Opportunities: Preschools O Strong Start Facilitators O Group Child Care Cruise Ships and Resorts O Supported Child Development

Early Childhood Educators not only teach childr children, they aim to help children devel develop good habits in learning and in life. 110 -

CALL VICTORIA: 250.384.8121 OR VISIT SPROTTSHAW.COM


SAANICH NEWSWed, - Wednesday, Saanich News Jan 15,January 2014 15, 2014

www.vicnews.com A17 www.saanichnews.com •A17



MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

FOR SALE BY OWNER

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

HOMES FOR RENT

SUITES, LOWER

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

STEINWAY- BOSTON Studio Grand, model 178, ebony, 6 years, immaculate, references. Home studio professional quality. Custom cover included. $15,000. Serious enquiries only please (250)594-5072.

SIDNEY- 2444 Amherst Ave. 1300 sq.ft. updated character home looking for a family w/2 children and a dog. Fenced south facing corner lot near the Salish Sea. Walk to town and schools. Organic gardens & fruit trees, fireplace, hot tub, 6 appls. Free TV forever.... New price$484,000. (250)656-6136.

SOOKE 3 BR rancher on acreage, 2 full baths, 7 appl., heat efficient/pump, $1400, n/s, refs. Avail. Feb. 1. 250642-2015

ROYAL OAK- grd level 2 bdrm, newly reno’d, close to all amens, NS/NP. $950 heat & H/W incld. 250-704-6613. SAANICH- 2 BDRM, 1 bath; Available Feb 1. $985; 250686-6923. Laundry; parking; patio; yard; storage; small dog? Call (250)686-6923. UPTOWN 1-bdrm. 820 sq.ft, 3 storage rms, patio, yard, prkng, own entr & driveway. NS/NP. $850. inclusive. 250-361-3508 WATERFRONT. NORTH Saanich. Large 2-bdrm, 2 bath. $1800./mo inclds utils. Possibly small boat moorage +. Pet OK. N/S. (250)656-5999.

REAL ESTATE DUPLEX/4-PLEX

LARGE DOLL HOUSE (30”x36”) & Country Store (16”x25”) Both furnished with many collectibles inside & out. Can sell separately. Best offer. Come & see! (250)592-1690. MUSTANG WINTER green petite size long jacket and bib pants (never used) $499. 2 VW/ Audi mountain bike holders $100. ea. Car brochure & magazines 1950s & 1960s, Edsel, Ford and Datsun owner’s manuals. (778)426-2835. NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

OPEN HOUSE- Sat & Sun, every weekend, 1-4pm. New Duplex’s For Sale, Duncan, BC at 5909 & 5911 Stone Haven Rd, in Stone Manor Estate’s (behind Hospital). 1850sq ft each, 3 bdrms, 4 bath, 5 appls and much more. $309,000. Call Gord (250)710-1947.

FOR SALE BY OWNER LADYSMITH HANDYMAN Special. 3bdrms up, lrg LR, double garage, lrg storage. Ocean & city view. 1bdrm suite down. Owner will carry mortgage. $1200 month; or rent for $1,800 month. (250)753-0160.

STEEL BUILDING. “The big year end clear out!” 20x22 $4,259. 25x24 $4,684. 30x34 $6,895. 35x36 $9,190. 40x48 $12,526. 47x70 $17,200. One End wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

OTTER POINT RV Trailer Park. 40’ park model trailer (no pad fees) 3 slide outs + 30’x52’ lot, finished deck & shed in new cond. Reduced to $117,900. obo. Owner willing to look at financing. Call (306)290-8764.

RENTALS SIDNEY 9805 2nd St- lrg south facing 1 bdrm apt. Ocean view, lrg full length balcony, in-suite laundry, guest suites, underground parking pet free, secure concrete building w/monitored entrance. No rental restriction, low condo fees. (778)426-0007. Excellent investment opportunity! condoforsale@shaw.ca

HOUSES FOR SALE

APARTMENT/CONDO UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT Bright lg Bach 1,2,3 br. Units Fully reno 5 min drive to DT Victoria Full time on site manager

Move in today 250-588-9799

RECREATION

PENTAX CAMERA with 3 lenses and flash, good cond. 4 Michelin 17” snow tires, used 2 seasons. (250)479-5208. STEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or find us online at: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

ROOMS FOR RENT

RV RESORT ON THE LAKE

NANAIMO 3 HOUSES. Gorgeous Ocean & City views. Easy to buy. Reasonable Down! Owner will carry mortgage. 250-753-0160

SAANICH WEST- 1246 Hastings St, 3 bdrm Rancher, 2 garage, dining/living/family rooms, 2 bath (ensuite), F/P, appls incld, new roof. Walking distance to Interurban campus. Reduced price, $460,000. Call 250-477-4600.

AFFORDABLE AND quiet. 55+ community in Ladysmith. Home of the famous Festival of Lights!!!! Carefree manufactured homes on easy care lots for as low as $119,700. Low monthly lot fee. On transit. Close to parks, community centre, pool and amazing trails. Only 50 minutes from Victoria and less than 20 minutes to Nanaimo. New Home Warranty. Contact Duck Paterson @ 250-246-0637 or email: info@lmfhomes.ca

Spots available at Great Rates. Daily, weekly, monthly. Pool, Hot tub, exercise room, laundry, putting green, hiking, fishing, Pickle Ball Court. Free coffee in one of the best clubhouses on the island. Nanaimo area. www.resortonthelake.com 250-754-1975 or

SIDNEY. LARGE room, close to bus, central location. $550. Avail immed. (778)679-0461.

SUITES, LOWER 1-BDRM LARGE bsmnt suite, Gordon Head. All utils incld. N/P. $750./mo. (250)721-1074 2 bedroom suite. In a excellent neighbourhood. call 250-8858063 email - jloo@shaw.ca $1250 per month. ESQUIMALT- 2 bdrm ground level, W/D, cat ok. N/S. $1025. + 1/3 gas heat. Avail now or Feb. 1st. (250)385-2846. FERNWOOD/Bay St- 2 bdrm suite, W/D, own entry. $1200 inclds utils. (250)370-1981.

1998 TRAVELAIRE 5th wheel. Excellent condition for further info call 250-652-9660 or view at 2537 Mt Newton X Rds.

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES .

SUITES, UPPER SIDNEY- QUIET cozy 1 bdrm. W/D, utils included, NS/NP, furnished or unfurnished. Avail Feb. 1. Call (250)656-7184.

AUTO FINANCING

HARRIET/UPTOWN- fully furnished 3 bdrm, reno’d, 4 appls, bus route, NS/NP. $1400 inclusive. W/D. 250-480-0849.

TRUCKS & VANS

MARIGOLDthe coziest 1 bdrm, W/S, shared W/D, quiet. NS/NP. $850. 250-727-6217.

1990 TOYOTA 4x4. Extended cab, V6, 5-spd. 227,000 km. White, great truck! $6500. Call (250)479-3680.

NORTH NANAIMO: Semi-furn private suite. New floors & paint. Shared laundry. FREE hydro & cable. N/S, No Partiers. $850/mo. Move in now; don’t pay rent until Feb. 1st! 250-756-9746.

SELL IT FAST WITH CLASSIFIEDS! 250.388.3535

Local news. fiLocal l hereshopping. please Your local paper.

admin@resortonthelake.com

HOMES FOR RENT SIDNEY: 2 bdrm rancher, completely remodeled, close to town. NS/NP. Avail Feb 1. $1200+ utils. 604-836-5407.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

BUYING - RENTING- SELLING 250.388.3535

CLASSIFIEDS WORK HARD! Call 250.388.3535

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

FENCING

GARDENING

HANDYPERSONS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

BIG BEAR Handyman. Painting, household repairs. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071. HANDYMAN- Light maintenance. Leaky taps, caulking, stain fabric/floor removal, electrical outlets & switch. Call (250)818-2709.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601 SAVE ON Bookkeeping & Accounting. Small business year ends, payroll & T4s. Personal tax returns from $49. Avail weekends. Mike 250-595-8110

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

FRUIT TREES Overgrown? Pruning, clean-ups, garden maintenance. John Kaiser, 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

HAULING AND SALVAGE $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463. GARY’S HAULING. One call does it all. Small demos & yard clean-up. Vehicle & metal recycling. Call (778)966-1413.

GARDENING

CARPENTRY BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748.

ELECTRICAL (250)217-3090.ELECTRICIAN 30 yrs exp. New homes and Renos. Knob & tube replacement. Service calls. Senior’s Disc. Free est. Lic.#3003. 250-361-6193 Quality Electric Reno’s, res & comm. No job too small. Lic# 22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

250-479-7950 FREE ESTIMATES • Lawn Maintenance • Landscaping • Hedge Trimming • Tree Pruning • Yard Cleanups • Gardening/Weeding • Aeration, Odd Jobs NO SURPRISES NO MESS www.hollandave.ca

250-507-6543. AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, guards, power washing, de-moss, Insured.

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave- window, gutter cleaning, roof-de-moss, gutter guards, power washing. Free est.

JUNK BOX- We Do All The Loading

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578. JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK.

PAINTING A2Z PAINTING. Free estimates. Quality Interior Painting. Call Erin (250)294-5422.

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitchen/bath, wood floors, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694.

JACK NASH, serving Victoria over 30 yrs. We do it all! Free estimates WCB. 250-881-3886

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK BILL’S MASONRY. Brick, tiles, pavers. All masonry & Chimney re-pointing. F/P repairs. 250-478-0186.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

ABBA EXTERIORS Gutter cleaning & repairs. Seniors discounts. WCB, Insured. Free estimates. (778)433-9275.

DONE RIGHT MOVING $70/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. BBB accredited. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

CHECK CLASSIFIEDS! or bcclassified.com ✔ 250.388.3535

LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127. NORM’S PAINTINGWhy wait till Spring? Reasonable, Reliable. Ref’s. Over 25 yrs experience. 250-478-0347. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

PLUMBING FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS RUPE’S ROOFING: Torch on shingles or metal. Fully insured. References; ticketed roofers. Call Rupe 250-4157130 or Mike 1-250-533-9410.

TILING SHAWN THE Tile Guy- Res/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. Free est. Call 250-686-6046.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS FOR YOU! 250.388.3535


A18 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 - SAANICH

3

DAY

NEWS

®

SALE

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

17

JANUARY

N. U S . T A FRI.-S

$

New York Strip Loin Steaks Boneless. Cut from 100% Canadian beef. Sold in a twin package of 4 for only $20.00 each.

18

JANUARY

5

each steak

NLY! O S Y A D 3

SUNDAY

19

JANUARY

3

99

McCain Thin or Rising Crust Frozen Pizza

465 to 900 g. Or Pizza Pockets 8’s. Assorted varieties. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT FOUR - Combined varieties.

ea. E EXTREM PRICE

!

NLY 3 DAYSICEO CLUB PR

From the Deli!

Signature CAFE BBQ Chicken Ready to enjoy! Available hot or cold.

7

49 ea.

Fresh Whole Frying Chicken 1.5 kg.

NLY! 3 DAYS EO

Or Whole Wheat. 675 g.

$ 2for

4

NLY! 3 DAPYRSICEO CLUB

9

ea.

!

Bakery Counter Dinner Rolls Or Crusty Rolls. White or Whole Wheat. Package of 12.

$r 2fo

3

NLY! 3 DAPYRSICEO CLUB

1

99

ea.

E EXTREM E IC R P

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NLY 3 DAYS O

IC CLUB PR

Coast to Coast Italian Style Bread

$

Blackberries Product of Mexico. 170 g. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT THREE.

CLUB

E BUY 1 G

T

Tampax or Always Tampons, Pads or Liners. Select varieties. 14 to 64’s. LIMIT SIX FREE - Combined varieties.

Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, January 17 through Sunday, January 19, 2014 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Co. and Safeway. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

E E R F 1 EQUAL O

R VALUE

R L E S SE

NLY! 3 DAPYRSICEO CLUB

JANUARY 17 18 19 FRI

SAT SUN

Prices in this ad good until January 19th.


SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, January 15, 2014

www.vicnews.com • A19



Blackout proves illuminating for Victoria Daniel Palmer Reporting

City plays catchup with backup power at busy intersections

was finished years ago. “We have spent a lot of money on emergency preparedness ... as part of preparing for an earthquake or an emergency of some sort. We’ve funded big and small pieces,” said Saanich Mayor Frank Leonard. At a cost of about $5,000 for one battery and installation, it will be years before all 145 of Victoria’s signal-controlled intersections and pedestrian crossings are equipped with emergency power. But engineering crews are steadily covering ground, with plans to install batteries at another four intersections in 2014, Myles said. “When we finally get there, we’d like to have a battery backup on all our intersections. For this year, we’re looking at Douglas and Finlayson, Douglas and Bay, Blanshard and Bay and Hillside at Shelbourne.” Myles doesn’t anticipate another major blackout rolling through Greater Victoria any time soon, but said drivers should still take the time to familiarize themselves with traffic rules in the event of power failure. “(Dec. 5) was a good test for us, because the intersections with battery backup worked just as (they were) supposed to.” -With reporting from Edward Hill dpalmer@vicnews.com

Volunteer Today Saanich Volunteer Services Society IS PLEASED TO PRESENT

A Target Theatre Production

Stayin’ Alive

When a bizarre blackout swept across the City of Victoria last month, traffic continued to flow smoothly through some of the city’s busiest intersections. The hour-long power outage during rush hour on Dec. 5 was the biggest test yet for Victoria’s streets operations manager David Myles and his team, who have been installing back-up batteries at key traffic signals across the city. Sharon Tiffin/News staff “Currently, we’ve got three Victoria municipal workers Don Shillington, left, and Don Davenport make intersections with battery adjustments to a new stoplight on the corner of Harriet Road and Gorge backup, capable of running for Road East, at the border of Victoria and Saanich. Traffic lights in the city, two hours with red-yellow-green,” many of which went dark during a major blackout in Victoria’s core last he said. month, are gradually having backup battery power installed to enhance Controls at Hillside Avenue safety during emergency situations. and Douglas Street, Blanshard Street and Hillside and Blanshard at Tolmie Avenue are all able to regulate the flow of traffic during a power outage and can switch to flashing red Healthy Eyes. to conserve power for Doctor Delivered. Dr. Daisy Tao several more hours if needed. The intersections Parents and preschoolers (3 years and up) are invited to  were chosen primarily When reading, you should be seated at for public safety visit their neighbourhood school.  a desk or in a comfortable chair, not lying on   reasons using data your stomach or on your side. Your back should from ICBC, B.C. Hydro ♦ Participate in hands‐on learning activities.  and the municipality, have a normal curve and not be scrunched or ♦ Tour your neighbourhood school.  Myles said. propped up with one arm. If used for a long time ♦ Learn about community resources available to support families.  “Priority is given to the horizontal reading position can seem nor  areas where power mal, even though it causes eyestrain. The visual Wednesday, January 22, 2014  outages have been system gets used to a distorted perspective, but more common, as 3:15 — 6:00 pm  the muscles which coordinate the eyes have to well as the size of Join us at your neighbourhood school.  Dr. Neil Paterson work hard to prevent double vision. an intersection. The Once you decide to be in a comfortable chair, Dr. Suzanne Sutter Brentwood Elementary 250 652 3996      KELSET Elementary  250 655 4648  units we are installing you need to considerOptometrists what kind it will be. It Cordova Bay Elementary  250 658 5315      Lochside Elementary  250 658 5238  protect the system Deep Cove Elementary  250 656 7254      Prospect Lake Elementary 250 727 3314  should permit the feet to be flat on the floor. If from power loss or 100 -2067 Cadboro Bay Rd. Keating Elementary  250 652 9261        Sidney Elementary 250 656 3958  blackouts, power the feet do not reach, try a phone book under surges and power them. The lower back should be supported, and drops, or brownouts.” the deskwww.oakbayoptometry.com or table should be at waist level when Parts of neighbouring the person is seated. Working at a surface that Saanich were hit by the is too high gives a similar distortion to viewing blackout, but didn’t see Dr. Rachel Rushforth* a movie from the front row, far side. You know dead traffic lights along www.admiralsvision.ca how uncomfortable that can be, not only on your its major roadways. *Denotes Optometric Corporation neck but on your eyes as well. A rule of thumb is That municipality that the reading distance should be no shorter has battery backup at 106-1505 Admirals Rd. (near Thrifty Foods) than the length of your forearm. Be good to your 23 intersections along Every success for every child  eyes, they are the only two you will ever have. the McKenzie Avenue, www.sd63.bc.ca  Shelbourne Street We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of  the  and Quadra Street Province of British Columbia through the Ministry of   corridors. Education.  Uninterruptible www.saanichoptometry.ca power supply (UPS) Dr. Daisy Tao* has joined units are now only Dr. Charles Simons* & Dr. Victor J. Chin* installed in new 119-3995 Quadra @ McKenzie (in Saanich Centre) signals, said Saanich *Denotes Optometric engineering, as its Corporation larger UPS program

Saanich Schools (SD63)  Ready, Set, Learn Open House 

introduce 

yourself 

volunteer notebook

Vision Matters

How not to read

And Afternoon Tea

Come and join us for a fun afternoon of entertainment and treats

Thursday January 23rd 1:30-3:00 pm Cedar Hill Golf Course 1400 Derby Road

This community event is free of charge to all our volunteers, clients and supporters RSVP to contactus@ saanichvolunteers.org

250-595-8008 Limited spaces are available

 

250-595-8500

250-995-0449

www.vicnews.com

250-744-2992

If you want to make an impact in your community please contact us at 250-595-8008 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Mon.- Fri. for more information or go to our website www.saanichvolunteers.org or like us on Facebook Community Partners:

District of Saanich

Province of British Columbia Co nne c ti ng pe o ple who c a re with c ause s that matte r®

Provincial Employees Community Services Fund

Learn how you can help! www.saanichvolunteers.org

250.595.8008


A20 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 - SAANICH

Est. 1962

C

ood F d o o G of ars Ye 50 er elebrating Ov

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DEL MONTE

Protein Chewy Bars

76

T GREA FOR K GREE D SALA

1.65 L

LEAN CUISINE OR SMART ONES

VECTOR

KELLOGG’S

Roasted Garlic Cinnamon Cracked Pepper Loaf Raisin Bread

76

Asst.

66

HOT KID

EN GLUTEE FR

per 100 g

per 100 g

GROCERIES

Stoned Wheat Thins

06 per lb

BAKERY

456

Asst.

2

Assorted Flavours

Classic Ice Cream

500 g

Turkey 76

per lb 1.68 kg

ISLAND FARMS

RED OVAL

Chicken Legs No Back

6.75 kg

LOCAL

Ricotta Cheese

Asst.

WHOLE

Attached Stuffed 10.27 kg or Plain

PORTOFINO

76

¢

5 lb Bag

466

each

Large Navel Oranges

BARI

2L

Whole Frying Pork Chicken Back Ribs

ONE HORM E FRESH BONELESS FRE

66

CUDDY

Assorted Flavours

CALIFORNIA GROWN

DAIRY

MEAT

FRESH

each

Grapefruit

Lactose Free Milk

Previously Frozen Pin Bone Removed

296

86¢

R FAT F

Green Kale

TEXAS GROWN

Sockeye Salmon Fillets 26 DED NO ADONES HORM

176

NATREL

Sour Cream

276

CALIFORNIA GROWN

Cello Cauliflower

Anjou Pears

LOCAL

CALIFORNIA GROWN

FULL SERVICE DELI

98% EE

OFF

STASH

PRANA

Organic Tea

Asst.

500

2/

250-477-6513 • 3829 Cadboro Bay Rd. www.peppers-foods.com

We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some restrictions may apply on certain promotions.

Chia Seeds

18’s Asst.

596

300 g

Hours Mon-Fri: 8 am–9 pm Sat: 8 am–7:30 pm Sun: 8 am–7:30 pm


Saanich News, January 15, 2014