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Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Vol. 66, No. 1

403-783-3311

editorial@ponokanews.com

www.ponokanews.com

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Idriss Elsayed takes a look at his full lunch plate Dec. 25 during the Community Christmas dinner. There were plates for everyone and more than 200 people attended. Please see the story on page 10. Photo by Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye

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Page 2 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Police stats show decrease in late night crimes in Ponoka By Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye

• Assaults charges between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. “This is a preliminary analysis with a small set of data and a full analysis would best be done over a longer period,” explained Chisholm. He feels a proper evaluation of how the business hours bylaw has affected the community should be done over at least two years to follow trends. Chisholm said the vast majority of calls late at night are alcohol related. Impaired driving numbers dropped — in the studied time period — to 21 charges laid in 2013 from 39 in 2012. Ever since Wetaskiwin first passed their business hours bylaw in 2009, impaired driving charges had doubled, said Chisholm. Those charges were only within town limits and he said eight per cent of the 2012 impaired driving charges came from check stops. “There was a clear linkage between the

Some information is finally emerging with regard to the impact of the implementation of last year’s most controversial piece of municipal legislation in Ponoka. Impaired driving charges have reduced since the implementation of the business hours bylaw in Ponoka, says RCMP Staff Sgt. Cameron Chisholm. After requests from town council to show how the business hours bylaw has affected the community, Chisholm compiled information that, he believes, shows how the Town of Ponoka has become safer. Taking data from July 7, when council passed the bylaw, up to Dec. 16, Chisholm compared 2012 to 2013 in four areas: • Impaired driving • Disturb the peace calls between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. • Domestic violence calls between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.

impact of the Wetaskiwin bylaw against what criminal activity was occurring in Ponoka. And impaired driving was the most significant one,” he explained. Calls for disturbing the peace after 10 p.m. dropped as well; there were 17 in 2013 and 22 in 2012, a drop of five. Domestic violence calls have also dropped to nine in 2013 compared to 16 in 2012. Chisholm said in 2011 the RCMP changed the way they score and investigate domestic violence related calls. The criteria state domestic violence is a conflict between two partners that are in an intimate relationship. “We’ve actually improved in reporting domestic violence,” said Chisholm. While he did not investigate each case to determine the cause, the staff sergeant believes the majority of domestic violence calls involve alcohol. Some of this information is anecdotal from his Mounties who deal with these calls, said Chisholm.

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Assaults saw a minor drop in 2013 with seven charges compared to nine in 2012. Chisholm said he did not conduct a complete file review of each charge but said alcohol and assaults usually go hand in hand. “There is a direct correlation between alcohol and violence,” he said. The provided statistics are to try and answer some of the new council’s questions related to how this has affected the community, Chisholm added. He believes the bylaw has made the Town of Ponoka safer and it shows in his staff. “We’re the ones that are out there at 3 a.m. providing safety to this community.” Businesses affected The owners of the Leland Hotel, Marc and Abby Yaworski have recently closed their liquor store the Leland Liquor Loft. Abby Yaworski said they have had to cut back their employees. “A year ago we would’ve had 12 employees. Now we have four.” Much of their income came from off-sales, which could be sold until 3 a.m. Since they own a hotel, the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission (AGLC) allows liquor sales until that time but the bylaw restricts off-sales until 10 a.m. Since the bylaw passed, the value of her business has dropped by half, said Yaworski. She disagrees with the implementation of the bylaw and waiving certain days such as Almost Midnight Madness and New Year’s Eve. “They (council) say it’s for safety, yet it’s exempt during the Stampede,” she added. Her customers have become confused as to which day they can buy liquor after 10 p.m. A new liquor store in town last year affected her business but she says not enough to warrant shutting down her store. “We were still ordering the same amount of liquor and beer,” said Abby. The Royal Hotel is the only other establishment that had off-sales. Representing town council on the protective services committee is Coun. Loanna Gulka. She voted in favour of the bylaw and still supports it. The recent report provided by Chisholm is a step towards positive change, she said. “It appears to me that something’s making a difference.” But she feels a proper study of the effect of the bylaw should be done over a longer period. “I truly feel that we need more time to decipher whether this is working or not,” said Gulka. She suggests that the bylaw should not have given concessions for liquor sales during the Ponoka Stampede. Since then, council has received two requests, which were approved, to waive the bylaw for certain times. “A lot of these things are coming up because of that,” explained Gulka. She mentioned an alcohol strategy that the province is working on and Ponoka’s bylaw touches on many of those issues. Chisholm, for his part, said he was a part of the strategy when stakeholders first started discussing it. Fore more information on the strategy visit: http:// www.albertahealthservices.ca/AddictionsSubstanceAbuse/hi-asa-alberta-alcohol-strategy-handout.pdf.

Why the waiver for the bylaw? Dear Editor, I need to ask why we have a liquor sales bylaw if every time a special interest group asks for a waiver, our council sees fit to do so. I believe that a majority of the community was behind this when it was being discussed.   Where are our voices now?  The almighty dollar is trumping safety it would seem. Mark Jones Ponoka


Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 3

Culprits found with stolen items in a stolen vehicle A licence plate check of a vehicle by the Ponoka Integrated Traffic Unit last week showed the vehicle and its contents were stolen. The car, a black 1999 Honda Civic was parked on Highway 2A and further investigation showed there was a stolen vehicle identification number on the dashboard as well. Inside the Honda were other stolen items from Red Deer such as computers, credit cards, identification and wallets. Occupants in the vehicle have been charged with different offenses. The 38-year-old male driver from Red Deer, who was recently released from the Centennial Centre for Mental Health and Brain Injury, received seven counts of possession of stolen property. He also received charges of driving while unauthorized and had warrants for his arrest. A 29-year-old Red Deer woman, who was a passenger in the vehicle, also received charges of possession. The man was denied bale. Ponoka man charged with assault An argument between a couple took a turn for the worse last week as police had to intervene between the two. A 911 call from a home on the 4600 block of 38 Avenue heard screaming and yelling in the background. Upon arrival at the home, police found a 24-year-old Ponoka man outside the home. It was reported to officers that the man tackled the woman and assaulted her. To avoid

further attacks, she locked herself in the bathroom with her children, one of whom was a newborn child. Aggressive driver found with marijuana Officers received a call of the driver of a purple 2008 Pontiac G6 refusing to change lanes southbound on Highway 2 Dec. 20 at noon. It is reported the 23-year-old driver gave other motorists the middle finger and drove aggressively around them. Police say an odor of marijuana emanated from the vehicle once it was eventually pulled over. The St. Albert man admitted to having drugs and showed police where a small amount of marijuana and hashish were stored in the vehicle. He was charged with possession of a controlled substance, received a 24-hour suspension and his vehicle was towed. Driver refuses to provide breath sample Police pulled over a 53-year-old Hobbema man after noticing his vehicle driving in the opposite lane Dec. 21 at 4 a.m. on Bobtail Road. He was charged with impaired driving and refusing to provide a breath sample. If you have information on any crime call Ponoka RCMP at 403-783-4472 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

Hobbema man charged with attempted murder - arson

Mayor Bonnett looks to turn Ponoka around to growth By Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye Another challenge for the new council A review of 2013 is relatively tough for Pois developing a recnoka’s newest mayor. reational multiplex. After just two months in the captain’s chair, Mayor Rick Bonnett took a look at what he and Bonnett does not feel the new council have accomplished in such a short town council, Ponoka time. One thing is for certain despite such a short County council and a stint in the mayor’s chair, said Bonnet: each coun- few residents should be the only groups cillor brings vigour and excitement to the table. “That’s one of the things I like about the coun- working on it. Bonnett suggests the only way cil, they’re all gung-ho,” he said. Although councillors do not always agree on to get this plan to work decisions, Bonnett feels they all have a goal to is to have strong comshare their knowledge and see Ponoka grow. “We munity buy-in. “It’s got to be the have a huge job ahead of us in one year to basiwhole community that cally turn the ship.” The new council has been left to deal with an jumps up and says, aging infrastructure, with the need of a new civic “We believe in that dicentre, library, north bridge and a strong desire rection and lets go,” he from residents for a multiplex. Town staff are fac- said. Bonnett wants peoMayor Rick Bonnett ing challenges as well. ple to have more say “We are in some turmoil with morale…I’m not in town planning. He going to sugar-coat it,” said Bonnett. Despite these issues, council wants to chal- suggests giving town lenge the status quo and create a healthy work and county residents a chance to provide feedback environment for employees and follow through on the town’s budget in late spring or early sumwith election promises. Improving on recreation mer. This is an ideal time to give administration a will take some time, however, and how that is chance to consider recommendations. Ponoka’s median age is 41 but there is also done is also up for debate. a strong number of seniors; 19 per cent of the “The mitigating factor is we all are thinking in population are 65 years and older. Bonnett feels the same direction of growth. It’s going to have to everyone should have a voice in the future of the come through some recreation and some business attraction and it means doing some things differ- community. ently than we have in the past,” explained Bonnett. Councillors are persistent enough to follow-up administration with questions and Bonnett encourages them to voice their concerns. He values their input and suggests continued communication will help ensure residents know what is being planned. The biggest challenge this council has faced so 403-783- 3311 far is dealing with snow removal. Two weeks after being elected, central Alberta encountered heavy snowfall, which has been almost continuous in recent weeks, said Bonnett. He credits town PHONE: 403-783-4911 CELEBRATING OVER PHONE: 403-783-4911 EXPERIENCE staff for doing their 50 YEARS TRAVEL FAX: 403-783-5222 THATOF TAKES FAX: 403-783-5222 best to work through YOU PLACES EXCELLENCE! dirtvl@telusplanet.net EST.1961 1961 dirtvl@telusplanet.net EST. this challenge while www.direct-travel.ca www.direct-travel.ca working on maintain- & C R U I S E C E N T R E A PROUD COMMUNITY SUPPORTER ing service levels.

On Dec. 21st, 2013  Maskwa- has since  been charged with attempted cis  RCMP, EMS, and Fire were murder,  aggravated assault,  arson and dispatched to a house fire on the Samson breach of conditions.   He was remanded Cree Nation,  approximately two miles in custody and was scheduled to appear south of the Hobbema townsite. Shortly in court on December 24 in Wetaskiwin. afterward, the  home-owner,  a 50-year- This is not believed to be a gang related old male,  was  located at a neighboring incident. residence,  suffering from multiple stab Police are asking anyone with inforwounds.  The male victim was taken to mation about this incident to contact the an Edmonton hospital by STARS Air Maskwacis RCMP at 780-585-4600 or Ambulance where he was treated and is CRIMESTOPPERS at 1-800-222-TIPS now in stable condition. It is believed the  (8477). victim was stabbed inside his residence where it was then set on fire.   The victim was able to flee The Family Health Clinic Ponoka and Wolf Creek his burning house  and he walked to a nearby resiPCN are pleased to announce, in addition to our dence for help. The home regular services, we are now providing was  destroyed by the fire and police  do not believe there to be any casualties. Twenty six-year-old Ryan OKEYNAN  from the Samson Cree Nation was arrested shortly after the incident, and

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Page 4 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH DIRECTORY Associated Gospel Churches of Canada

CHURCH OF THE OPEN BIBLE Pastor Jerry Preheim • Pastor Matt Sealy 3704 - 42 St. Ponoka 403-783-6500 Worship Service 11:00 a.m. • churchoftheopenbible@telus.net

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH PONOKA

Sr. Pastor Paul Spate Erin Dirsten - Fac. Youth & Family Min. 5109 - 57 Ave. Ponoka www.fbcponoka.org 403-783-5533 Bible Discovery Hour 9:30 a.m.

Worship Service 10:30 a.m.

NEW COVENANT BAPTIST REFORMED CHURCH Currently meeting at Ponoka Christian School 6300-50 St. Worship Service Sunday 10:30 a.m. Everyone Welcome! www.baptistreformedponoka.org

PARKLAND REFORMED CHURCH South on 2A, West on Spruce Road 403-783-1888 Worship Service 10:00 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. Rev. Mitch Ramkissoon www.parklandurc.org

PONOKA ALLIANCE CHURCH 4215 - 46 St. Pastor Norm Dibben 403-783-3958 Sunday Service 11:00 a.m.

Christmas Hangovers My first experience in being part of a construction project for a local church occurred when I was on my internship in Lethbridge. The congregation there had decided to add a new education wing onto their existing facility. As the construction came to an end, so did the eleven year ministry of my supervising pastor. He had decided to move on knowing that the real work in this congregation had just begun: paying for the new facility. The same kind of “hangover” often happens for people after Christmas as the debts occurred in making Christmas “wonderful” now have to be paid for. This “hangover” is probably why Christmas, which officially covers the twelve days from December 25-January 5, quickly ends for people as soon as the gifts are unwrapped. People have had enough of “Jingle Bells” and “Ho-Ho’s” since Halloween and want to get back to the slower pace of regular programming. But the treadmill of spending and non-stop activity does not end there.

Pastor Tim Graff James Strachan Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church

Boxing Day sales and New Year’s Eve parties quickly absorb what little down time we may have. Then before we know it, we’re launched back into that rushing current we call “life.” Although Christmas may have become the celebration of consumerism and marketing, it is still for some of us the beginning of that point where God broke into the rush and debt of our lives to restore us to life. The birth of Jesus Christ is only the beginning of what becomes a life,

The Christian & Missionary Alliance

PONOKA WORD OF LIFE CHURCH Pastor Rob McArthur

403-783-5659

Sunday @ 10:30 a.m.

Corner of Hwy 53 & Hwy 2A (former Crossroads Restaurant)

www.wordoflife.ca

PONOKA UNITED CHURCH Minister: Beatrix Schirner

ponokaunited@shaw.ca

Sunday Service 10:00 am. 5020-52 Ave. Ponoka

Phone: 403-783-4087

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH PASTOR DAVE BEAUDOIN 6230-57 Ave. Ph. 403-783-6404 Saturdays 9:30 - 12 Noon dsjjb@xplornet.com ponokaadventist.ca

SONRISE CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH Pastor W. Delleman Worship Service 10:30 a.m. ½ mile south of Centennial Centre for Mental Health & Brain Injury

403-783-6012 • www.sonriseponoka.com

ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC CHURCH Fr. Chris Gnanaprakasam, S.A.C. Mass Times: 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 9:00 a.m. Sunday

5113 - 52 Ave., Ponoka, T4J 1H6 403-783-4048 stachurch@shaw.ca

ST. MARY’S ANGLICAN CHURCH Ven. Michael Sung, Priest in Charge Deacons - Rev. Jessie Pei and Rev. Doreen Scott 5120 - 49 Ave. Ponoka

403-783-4329

Sunday Service: Holy Eucharist 10 a.m. www.stmarysanglicanponoka.com

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH 5501 - 54 Ave. Ponoka 403-783-4141 Sunday Service: 10:30am Sunday School: 10:30am Pastor Tim Graff • trinityponoka.ca

ZION CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP Pastor Fred Knip 9 miles east on Hwy 53 (403) 782-9877 Jr. Church during service for children Sunday Service 9:30 am

The Willan Chorale

wish to thank everyone who attended their concert at St. Augustine Catholic Church, December 6. Special thanks to the following businesses and individuals for sponsoring this event. Diversified Financial Concepts Sommer Home Hardware Rowland Parker & Associates RN Store Dr. Greg & Amanda Chan Ponoka Professional Pharmacy Books in Balance (Crystal Fleck) Dr. Leslie Gill Professional Corp Wedin’s Team & Corporate  Hamilton’s IGA Crawford Agencies Direct Travel Shoppers Drug Mart Ponoka News Flowers For You Bob Ronnie Catering Dino’s Restaurant & Lounge Dominos Pizza Bob Hepp & Company Subway (Ponoka & Bentley) St. Augustine School (Gr. 6 classes) Garry & Judy Farwell Bryan & Sylvia Corkery Accu Printing & Design Fred & Lynne Calkins Isabel Gette Dina & Gary Lim

Remeigio & Nancy Camet Deacon Rollie & Joanne Comeau Richard Patterson Charmaine Arandez Jan Edwards Ralph Wagner’s Automotive Caring Cayabyab Glady Basanes Barb Secretan Noreen Gorman Ed & Lela Ellingson Betty Cook Stefan & Connie Bossart Maria Lentz Ken & Sharon Hackett Bernard & Marilyn Burke Dr. Brendan Bunting Joe & Sue Henderson Lee & Ligaya Cayabyab Amado & Josie Domagus Romeo Mandanas Roy & Lydia Mandanas JoJo & Maria Molina Gail & Stewart McGinnis Ed & Mary Prediger Flordeliz & Harry Stubbington Kevin & Carolyn Prediger Amelito & Maria Perez Mildred & Andy Forsythe

death and resurrection through which God pays our debt and restores us to a sanity Christ called the “kingdom of God” and the “fullness of life.” I confess that we as the church have not always been a place of sanctuary for people in the midst of life’s onslaught. Too often we have contributed to the debt and busyness of people’s lives. But what if our churches became communities of sanctuary, helping people deal with the “hangovers” so that they might be supported in living in green pastures, beside quiet waters, refreshed to engage the world in a life-giving way (Psalm 23)? These “what ifs” have been made possible because God first entered our world in the person of Jesus Christ so that, by faith in him, we might not only be healed of the many hangovers we face, but also set free to become together a sign, a foretaste and an instrument of God’s kingdom come. May this good news help you through this time of Christmas hangovers and may God bless you with a new year of abundant life through Christ Jesus.

“On Religious Education” Dear Editor, I am writing in response to the letter from Jerel Peters, which appeared in the Dec. 18 edition of the News. Mr. Peter’s comments were directed to the News article entitled “School board questions religious studies.” I am totally in favour of a program of religious education within the school system. So many of the conflicts raging in our world focus on religious differences that education about religion is desperately needed. Unfortunately, what we have at present in our schools is a program of Christian education. Having examined the Divisional curriculum personally, I would further describe it as a singularly sectarian program, since it outlines only one branch of the Christian community’s beliefs. Nothing is taught about Eastern Orthodox Christianity, the classical Reformation branches of the church universal, or the Society of Friends (Quakers). To my mind, a program of education about religion in our world must also introduce students to some of the main religious traditions they will encounter in their post school life. Within the relatively small community of Ponoka, we have members of the Hindu Community, Islam, Baha’i, Judaism, and Buddhism, as well as many who embrace Aboriginal forms of spirituality; nothing either about Jehovah’s Witnesses or the Latter Day Saints (Mormons). Our students will graduate into a world surrounded by believers in these, as well as other, faith traditions. Providing “education in religion” would seem to me to require a school division that it prepare its students to deal with a diverse world, rather than having one branch of one faith only taught to them. I can understand Mr. Peter’s distress, since he has been deeply involved in this sectarian enterprise for some years, and has undoubtedly been a successful proponent of his own faith. However, I believe it is time for the Wolf Creek School Division, as well as others, to devise a religion curriculum which seeks to prepare their students for life in a world of profound diversity, so that they can meet that world as informed and educated persons. Surely the inculcation of one’s own faith stance is the responsibility of the student’s family and church community, not the public school, whose task is preparation of young people to a world as educated and tolerant adults. Respectfully, James Strachan


Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 5

Reflections of Ponoka Reflections of yesterday and today. By Mike Rainone for the News Another year has been and gone, and hopefully, after recovering from the gala December 31st celebration, most of your memories of 2013 have been of joy, family values, successes, and good health. Now, as we boldly head into a new year, we will work very hard to achieve most of our resolutions, and that our lofty plans will include a fair share of work and play and new adventures, as well as some exciting goals to share with family and friends. Many of us will refer to January as the month of the blues, where we face the first blasts of what is supposed to be a long cold winter, and may find ourselves copping with those after Christmas blahs and bills. Then again, looking on the bright side, it can be a great month to spend more quality time at home with family, a chance to revitalize old friendships, favourite hobbies, to become a bookworm, or maybe even take on a few renovations? For the winter sports fan fanatics, there is a ton of snow in which to frolic, the outside lakes and ponds are ideal for skating and ice fishing, and if we bundle up real warm, the fresh air is absolutely invigorating and healthy. Both players and ardent fans of all ages can soon look forward to the torrid race to the playoffs, and how many of us will be glued to the television cheering for our Canadian athletes during the 2014 Winter Olympics from February 6th to 23rd in Sochi, Russia? At the age of 71, I guess I have mellowed just a little, but I still try to stay as active as possible, and am so fortunate to be blessed with a great family and a super bunch of friends. After household chores, my very favourite retirement pastimes are being a member of the Golden Age Bowling Club, watching a good movie, surfing the internet, walking amongst nature, and browsing through the old history books and photos that vividly relate the colorful story of our

Photo courtesy of Fraser Shaw

This classic photo of the Town of Ponoka skyline along 50th street and mirrored in the usually serene Battle River was taken in the 1960’s. Very prominent are the massive wooden grain elevators, which were the historic icons of our bustling farming community for countless decades, the first very busy community arena to the left, the Royal Hotel, and so many other landmarks of our growth and successes, that have spanned over a 100 colorful years, and have proudly carried on the traditions to the present day.

Remember when

Photo courtesy of Fort Ostell Museum

One of Ponoka’s most historic landmarks was the Canadian Pacific Railway station along 50th street, which was built in 1891 and named Siding 14. The construction of the main line between Edmonton and Calgary began in 1890, and featured hundreds of labourourers and equipment laying tons of ties and steel rails that would become the future lifeline of villages, towns, and cities into the future. Massive steam freight and passenger trains rumbled into the stations day and night bringing supplies, mail, and visitors to the growing communities. These classic wooden stations were known as the ‘heart of town’, and thousands of citizens came out to meet the train on special occasions, such as a Royalty, entertainers, a hockey team bringing home a championship, and more!

community and districts. Thanks to the support and encouragement of the great staff at the Ponoka News, the ongoing contributions and ideas from the Fort Ostell Museum and so many other individuals and families, I have been able to put together over 300 Reflections and Remember When features and photos in the weekly pages of your Ponoka News. Like so many others, I was so fortunate to have grown up in and around Ponoka over a span of over 55 years, so I have had the pleasure of watching some of this fabulous history and growth unfold, and of rubbing shoulders with many of the early families, individuals, characters, teams, and events of our proud heritage. These colorful tales have dated back to the late 1800’s when the massive invasion of pioneers from Canada and the United States began moving in and filing claims on the lush and rolling land between Edmonton and Calgary. While the peaceful nomadic Indian tribes roamed the prairies in search of food and shelter, the pioneers settled in to build their homes, break their land, plant their first crops, and then proceeded to raise large families, surviving the often horrific climate conditions by working together and making use of everything that nature had to offer. When the Edmonton/Calgary railroad went through in 1890, the tiny Village of Ponoka began to thrive, as huge sawmills on the Battle River cut millions of feet of lumber from the logs that floated down from Pigeon Lake. With the constant flow of settlers coming into the area, many new districts were formed out in the countryside, and Ponoka responded to assist them by building businesses, and providing the

services and supplies that they would need. Soon to follow were those with skilled professions, as well as a youthful labour force willing to learn and conquer new challenges. With ongoing enthusiasm, they helped to promote and build countless new amenities for the vibrant growing area that included churches, schools, and keen sporting and social events such as hockey, rodeo, baseball, curling, minstrel shows, silent moves, dancing, picnics, and so much more. Growth was constant, Ponoka received its Town status in 1904, huge grain elevators were built along the tracks to serve the bountiful crops of the farmers, the construction of the Provincial Mental Hospital began in 1911, and in the exciting years that followed successes was many, through the good times and the bad. Reflections has strived to honour the founding fathers, families, and milestones of the colorful and exciting history of the Town and County of Ponoka, and would like to carry on this tradition each week in the Ponoka News. We have only been able to write the stories and publish those grand old pictures with the kind and overwhelming support and contributions of so many others from in and around our community and beyond. Our stories have covered generations of families from the beginning of the 19th century and up to the present day, and we would really appreciate your ideas and pictures for future articles. If you can help out please leave me a message at the Ponoka News 403-783-3311, Phone me at 403-341-5750, or contact my email at jrainone@telus.net. Thanks for assisting us to keep those fabulous memories alive for everyone to enjoy.


Page 6 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Northern Gateway and politics of oil It might be a coincidence that for provincial and fedthe announcement of the positive aseral governments in the sessment of an independent panel of course of its minimum National Energy Board on the pro30-year lifetime. Whether we (meanposed Northern Gateway Pipeline ing the people of was made on the same day as the Alberta, and Canada, Prime Minister Stephen Harper deregardless of our apclared his intention to seek a fourth proval of or opposition term of office in the general elections to the development of in 2015, but then again it might not. Mustafa Eric oil sands and expanding As a native of Alberta and his poproduction there) like it litical power base in Calgary, where Editor or not, the economy of most of Canada’s oil companies have Alberta, and Canada at their headquarters, Mr. Harper’s reelection chances will probably get a huge large, has greatly benefited from the windboost and possibly additional substantial fall of royalties from the bitumen extracted campaign contributions once the federal there and we are enjoying the outcome in government uses the conditional positive the form of economic growth. The question is how complacent we assessment to make a decision to go ahead have been so far with regard to this literwith the almost $8 billion project. As for the some 200 conditions attached ally vital issue and how complacent we are to the positive assessment of the review going to remain as the bitumen production panel for the project to go ahead, one can grows and grows in the years to come. It is no secret that some environmental be sure that at least some of them, probably the costlier ones, could and probably will be damage has already been done and regarddiluted as the construction of the 1,177-kilo- less of the fines imposed and court verdicts metre pipeline extending from Bruderheim, issued ordering the responsible parties to clean up the pollution, some of the damage Alta. to Kitimat, B.C. progresses. The expectation is that the project, ca- will never be undone. As more investments are certain to come pable of carrying just over half a million barrels of heavy crude per day, will gener- in with the proposed pipeline, there will be ate more than $2.6 billion in tax revenues heightened probability of more extensive

environmental damage and, as importantly, more First Nations will have their lifestyle and culture come under threat from the expansion of the bitumen production. What can be done to prevent it? Would the option of having the heavy crude of northern Alberta processed and refined immediately as it is produced bring some benefits? Certainly, this alternative, widely supported by the labor unions, would not only bring additional employment but also enhance the added value of the product to be exported, and consequently, boost the revenues generated by the sector. Also, that would reduce the danger of environmental pollution through leaks from the pipeline extending to the coast. Unfortunately, the realities of the international oil markets make it difficult to market refined oil products instead of the crude. That puts the onus the federal government and the provincial governments of Alberta and B.C. to ensure that oil sands are responsibly developed without intensifying the footprint of the corporate oil interests on the pristine environment of the country. The Pembina Institute, respected for their research on environmental issues, commented on the Northern Gateway by saying “Without a credible plan to address greenhouse gas pollution and to ensure the

oil sands are being developed in an environmentally responsible manner, building the infrastructure that enables rapid oil sands expansion cannot be in the public interest.” It added “…our analysis shows the greenhouse gas pollution generated by filling the Northern Gateway pipeline would be equivalent to adding over three million cars a year to Canada’s roads.” We are well aware of the level of indifference on the part Mr. Harper to the environmental concerns and to the privileges of First Nations to have a say in resource development in territories on which they have treaty rights. With Alison Redford and her government pressing hard to get the bitumen out to the international markets regardless of the environmental cost, the only hope for safeguards to be kept in place in the pipeline project is the well-founded sensitivity of the B.C. Premier Christy Clark’s government. If the electorate, both at federal and provincial levels, could, in support of Ms. Clark, force Stephen Harper and Alison Redford to think twice before moving on with the project, we could maybe feel a little safer for the second or third generations to follow us with the thought that they might still have a healthy environment to live in western Canada.

New Year’s resolutions-wishes and challenges After we get through the Christmas World Hockey comrush we will begin to ask ourselves petitions and the 2014 what thrills and chills will come our Winter Olympics, and way in 2014? Are we heading into the whole nation will January with great expectations, with be cheering for you to some tough resolutions and promises bring home a big basket to change some of our worst habits, full of medals. to complete more stages in our excitTo our youth.... ing bucket list, and to endeavour to be always enjoy and chersuccessful, but never at the expense ish your education, the Mike Rainone of others? Whatever the case, please parental guidance, the Hammertime don’t be too hard on yourself, have friends you have made, confidence that you will be able to your accomplishments, accomplish your lofty promises and and the amazing advengoals, but don’t be too disappointed if we tures that you have had while growing up in drop the ball a few times along the way. your home town. Now you can proudly take Here is my 2014 wish list, a few that those memories and opportunities as you purhopes for change, others that we all look for- sue your place in our bright future. ward to, and some that are just for fun. To Professional hockey players....play Ponoka Town and County Councils.... the game hard, but cut out the ‘cheap shots’, welcome to your first year in municipal of- and try to impress and respect those hundreds fice. Always keep asking lots of questions of minor hockey players and fans who idolize around that big table, share with your con- every move that you make. stituents, and work together for a balanced To Mrs. Redford and our Governbudget and a bright future. Please don’t be ment....Now that you have made the choice forced into making quick decisions into vital to bring your favourites to the top of the ‘pocommunity issues, especially those that have litical pecking order’, get on with the job that been hanging around for far too long. you were all elected for. Our so-called called Justin Bieber....don’t retire, just grow up. prosperous and mineral rich province seems Team Canada....We have no doubt that to be floundering in red tape, instead of stackyou will give your best spirited efforts at the ing up the priorities, and making sure that

PONOKA

each and every citizen and every constituency receives a fair share of the much promised ‘Alberta Advantage.’ To distracted-careless and drunk drivers...wake up and realize that thousands of other innocent lives are in jeopardy when you sit behind the steering wheel and act like an idiot. The punishment and consequences for committing these selfish crimes will likely triple in 2014, so hopefully the culprits will find themselves forever walking.. For Rob Ford....now that you have your own ‘bobble head’ doll, why not resign gracefully and start working at your new movie or book entitled... ‘The Booze Brothers’ or a new holiday classic, ‘The Grinch who stoned Toronto.’ Don’t blame the groundhog in 2014... I think it’s time to quit blaming the sleepy old ground hog for the longer winters. After all, he or she is only a rodent, and not a meteorologist, and some of them have really gotten their heads stuck in the drifts with their forecasts this time around. To the citizens of Ponoka and districts....thank you for your overwhelming response and donations to those who need a little help from others, not only at Christmas, but all year round. This includes to the Food Bank, to Santa’s Anonymous, to the Salvation Army, as volunteers, and to countless

other very special causes. To the great staff at the Ponoka News.... Lots of advertisements, the same great news stories and pictures, and just enough space for them to put up with the Hammer for another year. To my wife and family....thank you for your ongoing love and support, and for putting up with my forgetfulness and my bad habits, which are hard to break because they took a life-time of fun getting into. Just for us seniors in 2014. The electronics wizards have now come up with some nifty new texting codes for us seniors, which will make it easier for us to communicate with our children and our friends. ATD (at the doctor’s) BFF (best friends funeral) BTW (bring the wheelchair) BYOT (bring your own teeth), FWIW (forgot where I was), GGFPBL (gotta go, pacemaker battery low), GHA (got heartburn again), TOT (texting on the toilet), WAITT (who am I talking to?) GGLKI (gotta go, Laxative is kicking in.). What the heck, winter has officially arrived, so maybe now it will warm up a little, and it will be only five fluffy and frosty months before the robin will start chirping again. Now that you have hopefully survived the New Year’s Eve bash, just go ahead, and have a great week, all of you.

News Judy Dick Manager

Mustafa Eric Editor

Jeff Heyden-Kaye Reporter

Amelia Naismith Reporter

Karen Douglass Susan Whitecotton Sales Administration

5019A Chipman Ave., Box 4217, Ponoka, AB. T4J 1R6 manager@ponokanews.com editorial@ponokanews.com reporter@ponokanews.com rovingreporter@ponokanews.com sales@ponokanews.com admin@ponokanews.com Phone: 403.783.3311 Fax: 403.783.6300 Email: editorial@ponokanews.com All editorial content, advertising content and concepts are protected by copyright. Unauthorized use is forbidden. Published every Wednesday by PNG Prairie Newspaper Group in community with: Regional Publisher, Fred Gorman


Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 7

MP Calkins considers highs and lows of 2013

From The Town of Ponoka Council & Staff! Town Hall Holiday Hours January 1, 2014 – Closed

MP Blaine Calkins ment of the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) with the European Union (EU) is an important step in that direction. Calkins said the recent agreement has two years before all the details are agreed on but he feels this will benefit the country. The agreement will remove more than 99 per cent of tariffs between Canada and the EU, but both parliaments must still vote on it. Getting back to balanced budgets is another factor important to the federal government. Calkins said the parliamentary budget officer and independent organizations are forecasting a faster return to balanced budgets. A $4 billion surplus is expected by 2015. “We’re doing it without downloading on the provinces. We’re not cutting back. We’re maintaining the transfers for health care,” said Calkins. “We’re finding the savings through growth in our economy. As a matter of fact, we’ve reduced business taxes but we’re now collecting more in business taxes since the recession because of the growth in the economy,” he explained. Changes are underway for members of parliament’s ridings. In the 2015 election Calkins’s riding is changing and Alberta will see more MPs in the province. Calkins, who announced his intention to run for reelection, will take over parts of north Red Deer and Sylvan Lake. He will lose north of Hobbema but still keep Ponoka and Lacombe counties. The geographic area is smaller but the number of constituents is approximately the same. “At the end of the day every single person is going to have a Member of Parliament. That’s the reality,” said Calkins. “Alberta will have a better say,” he concluded.

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SEASON’S GREETINGS TO ALL

By Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye While Ponoka’s new council is navigating uncharted waters with a mostly new group, Wetaskiwin MP Blaine Calkins has kept busy in 2013. A personal highlight for Calkins was helping pass Bill S-213, which created a national day for Korean War veterans. He helped Senator Yonah Martin by sponsoring the bill in the House of Commons. “2013 was the year of Korea in Canada and it was the year of Canada in Korea and it was the 60th anniversary of the end of the signing of the armistice, which ended hostilities,” said Calkins. An issue that attracted much attention in the press was the senate expense scandal and Calkins is pleased to see it is being dealt with. For the first time that he can remember, there are three senators on leave without pay. “It’s an issue that’s probably not going to go away anytime, but it’s an issue that the public at large has seen enough,” he said. Despite the senate expenses controversy, Calkins received feedback from constituents on different issues. One is that employers are struggling to keep employees; they need workers in all levels of employment in the province; the need is high. “If you’re willing to go to work, there’s a job for you here.” “Most companies are struggling to expand or just keep up with their basic service levels,” he added. The temporary foreign worker program is one avenue people have to secure work in Canada. Despite reports of abuse of the system, Calkins expects to see further development in the near future. “These are things that are going to create long-term opportunity for Canadian manufacturers, exporters, producers,” explained Calkins. Municipalities are looking for details on the Building Canada Fund, which ends in 2014. Calkins said transfers have been increased through the Federal Gas Tax and indexed so municipalities have a predictable and stable source of revenue. On the agricultural side of things, a bumper crop in 2013 has producers looking at different avenues to sell their products. Calkins feels expanding trade markets outside of North America is critical. The develop-

Town Times

NOTICES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS Residential Garbage Pick-Up Garbage pick-up regularly scheduled for New Years’ day will be picked up on Friday, January 3.

Business Licenses Are Now Due! The 2014 Business License Renewal Notices have been sent out and are due no later than the close of business on January 31, 2014. Inquiries can be directed to 403.783.0119.

E-Waste Recycling in Ponoka Computer equipment and televisions can be dropped off at Ponoka County’s Waste Transfer Station which is located ½ mile west of Ponoka Chrysler on 39th Avenue. No Charge. Hours of operation are: Wednesdays & Saturdays from 9 am-5 pm. Thank you for your part in caring for our environment.

Christmas Tree Pickup The Town’s Public Works crew will be picking up Christmas Trees beginning January 13th Weather Permitting. Crews will only pick-up trees placed next to residential garbage pick-up location i.e. Next to your garbage stand. Trees should NOT be wrapped in plastic. Christmas trees may also be dropped at the Waste Transfer Station at no charge from Tuesday to Saturday from 10am to 4pm.

EVENTS AND RECREATION Employment Opportunities Qualified Lifeguards and Swimming Instructors Rink Attendant (PT/Seasonal) Application forms are available at www.ponoka.ca. Submit your application to the Town Office at 5102-48 Avenue or email HR@ponoka.org.

Recreation Facilities Schedule is On-line Check it out at www.ponoka.ca and click on ‘Recreation in Ponoka’.

Aquaplex Update - Christmas Holiday Public Swim 1- 3 pm. - Burn those Christmas Calories, Fitness classes run daily 8:30-9:30am, and Tuesday Aqua Zumba 7:30-8:30pm, Thursday Deep water Fitness 7:30-8:30pm. Lap Swim is great for low impact cardio! Runs daily!

Arena Holiday Hours January 1, 2014 – Closed

Public Skating: Proudly sponsored by Ponoka Lions Monday - Thursday: 11:30 am - 1:00 pm, Saturday & Sunday: 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm **Shinny Hockey on Weekdays only**

COUNCIL UPDATES & BYLAW INFO Next Town Council Meetings January 14, 2014 @ 7 pm Visit www.ponoka.ca for copy of the agenda.

2014 Dog Licenses Now Due Take Advantage of the Lower Rate - Pay Before February 1st $25.00 Per Dog Now! Price will go up to $40.00 after February 1st. All dogs over the age of three months must be licensed. As per Bylaw # 114-01, owners will be fined $50 for dogs caught not wearing a current dog tag. Thank you for being a responsible dog owner.

Be always at war with your vices, at peace with your neighbors, and let each new year find you a better man. ~Benjamin Franklin


Page 8 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Wedding in China highlighted by the bridal dress made by Ponoka seamstress By Jessie Pei Submitted

Mr. Luo takes the vow of eternal commitment to Ms. Cui on their wedding day.

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Miss Cui and Mr. Luo got married in the fall of 2013. The wedding was in Chong Qing, a prosperous city in south-west China with a population of 29 million. About 500 people witnessed the happy couple exchanging rings. Of course, the center of attention of the ceremony was the bride beautified by her gorgeous crème satin wedding gown, made by the Ponoka seamstress Mrs. Annette Fenske. The dress order was placed in the spring. “A wedding dress made from scratch by a Canadian seamstress for a Chinese girl with fine skin and small in size,’’ this was the email instruction and order, along with a few pictures of what she would like. There was no further instruction provided, except for a set of measurements in metric system. Annette started collecting designs and jotting down ideas as she shopped around for fabrics. Everything was in place three months later; it was time to cut. “Wait for a second,” said Annette to herself. After converting into inches, the girl’s measurements just didn’t look right. “Who’d have a waist of 21 inches?” After checking with the bride back and forth, the seamstress finally realized that she was making a wedding dress for a living Barbie doll! The design had to be changed according to the size of the dress. Annette removed some of the fancy decoration, handmade satin roses on the bodice, because there was not much space in the front. The skirt needed to be minimized too. “Am I doing it right?” Annette asked herself during the entire dress-making process. The second challenge was everything had to be flexible and adjustable; a corset back would be the best way to go. The bride was never present. There were no fittings. How to make the elegant dress fit perfectly for her? The seamstress was not sure if the bride was able to find somebody to alter her dress when she received it in China if it needed any. The decision was to make everything adjustable: width, length, ornaments, etc. The dress was finished in early October. Mrs. Fenske was happy with her work. But she had to wait to hear what the bride thought about it. “This is beautiful!” When the bride finally received her dress, she exclaimed with joy. She adored the dress and burst into tears. Everything was perfect, the materials, the design, the cutting, the decorations, everything. There was a rumor going among the guests at the wedding that the bridal dress was made by one of the world’s top ten designers! The truth in that rumor is we do have the top notch seamstress here in Ponoka. She is the seamstress for New Beginnings Bridal Shop in town.


Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 9

Olympic hopeful Fofanah has eyes on Rio 2016 By Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye After realizing her potential as a sprinter, Ponoka’s Isatu Fofanah is a strong contender for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Raised in Ponoka, Fofanah, 20,

is now working to realize her dream of becoming an Olympic athlete. She has been training with coaches in Edmonton and said she was working on transferring to San Diego, CA to further her career. She feels the best way to gain experience is to continue competing at

track meets. “If you really want to run with the Getting up early in the morning to train is seen best athletes, you have to travel either nationally not as work but as a fun experience that keeps her or internationally,” she said. strong mentally and physically. Fofanah wants to While this gives her valuable experience continue working towards the Olympics. — Fofanah recently placed first in the 100m sprint Her goal is to raise $5,000 and has collected at the Canada Summer Games this year — it is $1,125, all from her Ponoka family and friends. “I also costly. Expenses add up when she has to fly, think, ‘Wow! They remember me.’” eat, get transportation, get accommodation and Seeing the support from Ponoka has made her pay for entry to races. want to do even better. “There’s a lot of fees related to track meets,” To support Fofanah check out the website: she said. http://www.gofundme.com/5nyaas. On the webGetting to this level requires a lot of work; Fofanah is supposed to train five days a week but site is a video of Fofanah at the Canada Summer Games where she wins the 100m race. does minor workouts on her days off. So seven days a week, she is training and some days are more intensive than others. To help pay for these meets, Fofanah and her coach have started a fund for travel expenses. She is seekWinner of our $1500.00 shopping spree is James Reed ing assistance to help her continue her trainWinner of the $200.00 from Flowers For You is Joyce McDowell ing. Direction from Winner of the $250 from Strand Media is Harry Makkinga her coach is to travel to $ 00 California and St. Kitts as the weather and Business Winner Adams Chev ............................................................................................ Geoff Latta tracks are better. Bruce’s Tru Value..................................................................... Jennette Oosteriuk Fofanah is ranked Busted Ladies Lingerie ..........................................................................Bill Sutton seventh in Canada in Central Office Supplies ........................................................................ Garry Isaac the 100m sprint and Cilantro & Chive ............................................................................ Steve Pederson third in the 200m race Dairy Queen ......................................................................................Gay Cayabyab and feels she has potenDino’s Family Restaurant..........................................................Christine Church tial to make it. “In the Direct Travel ........................................................................................ Deb Peterson 200m, I have a really Don Laing Trailers ................................................................................Devi Kustick Flowers For You ....................................................................... Donna Hagemann good chance.” Fountain Tire .......................................................................... Christine Nicholson Her love of track Hamilton’s IGA ..............................................................................Jennifer Hansen and field developed in Hammy’s Spirits......................................................................................Janice Kary high school in Ponoka. Home Furnishing Gallery .................................................................Amber Rakai Fofanah said many Julie’s Travel ...............................................................................................Rick Cline people encouraged Legacy Ford Ponoka .................................................................... Nathan Kardish her to pursue the sport MacKenzie’s No Frills .....................................................................Patti Adamson as she was good at it. Pixie Photo Inc ....................................................................... Josephine Maschke Ponoka Chrysler Jeep Dodge ..............................................................Janet Blair After some time, she Ponoka Community Golf Club ....................................................... Sheila Swier realized how much she Ponoka Coop Oils .......................................................................... Marian Wianko actually thrived at runPonoka Eyecare .................................................................................... Dick Groom ning. Ponoka Health Foods .................................................................Michelle Bouma “Not only am I Ponoka License and Registry .......................................................... Sarah Olson good at it, but I enjoy Ponoka News ............................................................................. Wayne McGarvey it,” she said. Ponoka Professional Pharmacy .................................................. Troy Greshner

Congratulations to our winners of the Passport to Christmas 2013: 2013 25 Prize Winners

Isatu Fofanah in one of her relay races.

4207 67 Street www.familymeats.com

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Reddi Mart ......................................................................................George Stewart Rexall Drug Store .................................................................................Arlene Cline Sears .................................................................................................... Suanne Morris Shoppers Drug Mart...................................................................Kurt Bloomquist Sisters Country Rustics .................................................................Beatrix Stamm Sommer Home Hardware Building Centre ............................Diane Hodges Steel Magnolias ........................................................................... Froukje Brouwer Strand Media ..........................................................................................Ursula Hefti Super 8 Ponoka ...........................................................................Wendy Hamilton Tantec Electronics .............................................................................Ester Verhoef The Brick ...............................................................................................Debbie Sawa The Cutting Edge ..................................................................... Margaret Williams The Jones Boys Saddelry and Western Wear ........................ Shirley Ingram The Liquor Store .......................................................................... Ken Henkelman Thirsk Automotive ........................................................................Joan Van Wolde UFA...................................................................................................Wendy Hamilton Wagner’s Automotive .............................................................Elaine Stenlunmd Your Dollar Store With More .......................................................... Tasha Lydom Jiffy Lube ...............................................................................................Hillary Styles The Source .......................................................................................Herb Omeasoo

Winners of the $2500 gift certificates are to claim their prize at the respective business or call Les Jaster at 403-783-3888

Thank you for supporting the passport to Christmas in 2013!


Page 10 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Community comes together on Christmas Day By Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye

A surprise gift: A group calling themselves the Royal Rumble, led by Janelle Parent (right) raised $1,605.15 for the FCSS Cancer Fund. $500 was donated from the owners of the Royal Hotel, where the group got its name. Here FCSS board chair Margo Kusiek and director Shannon Boyce-Campbell receive the donation. Photo by Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye

AB small business confidence drops slightly in December Retail sector across country experiences significant decline in optimism The Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) last week released the latest monthly Business Barometer results showing confidence levels among Alberta’s entrepreneurs dropped by 1.5 points in December to 70.6. Across Canada, confidence levels among business owners in the retail sec-

tor fell almost seven points from 66.8 to 60.0, which helped to bring down the overall national small business confidence index by 3.6 points.  “Unfortunately, it looks like many business owners, especially those in retail, are feeling the holiday season may not have been as good as they had hoped and expected,” says Richard Truscott,

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Alberta Director for CFIB. “Despite some softening of confidence in a few keys sectors, which may at least be partly explained by seasonality in the data, our province’s business owners, on balance, are still relatively optimistic about the performance of their business going into 2014”, says Truscott. Alberta’s entrepreneurs are now the second most confident in the country, behind British Columbia (72.6), but more than eight points above the national index of 62.3.  Looking across the country, the results for the other provinces in December were: SaskatchSubway Fresh ewan (68.4), Newfoundland (68.1), Manitoba (63.4), Ontario (62.9), PEI (58.3) Nova Scotia (58.3), New Try our Brunswick (56.7), and Quebec (53.8). In Alberta, entrepreneurs remain generally positive W NE about the general health of their businesses.  Forty four per cent in December said it was good, down six points since November, while only eight per cent described it as bad, two points higher than a month earlier. The shortage of skilled workers easily remains the biggest operating challenge for small businesses, with 36 per cent of entrepreneurs identifying issue as limiting PONOKA RISING the their sales or production SUN CLUBHOUSE growth. Hiring intentions in December were still relatively strong but did see a dip.  Thirty-two per cent of business owners surveyed said they were planning to expand their For per month full-time workforce in the next three months, We will pick up your paper, clean tins, compared to 38 per cent glass, No. 1-5 plastic and cardboard. in November.  Only six We also pick up cardboard from local businesses. per cent of entrepreneurs in December were exFor more information on these programs please call pecting a reduction in employment, one point Weekdays higher than November.

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Some people have few places to turn during the holiday season, especially Christmas Day. This season can be one of loneliness for individuals but with a little work from a dedicated group of volunteers, Community Christmas has become a sanctuary for many people. Held on Christmas Day, the event is a special lunch with ham, turkey, mashed potatoes and more, all put together by Bob and Deb Hepp Catering and a group of helpers. Not only were people’s plates full to the brim but there was a dessert table full of cookies, ice cream and pastries; plus a candy table offered kids fun treats to take away. If that was not enough, there were game tables, a live band and stuffed toys for kids and folks who wanted to bring some home to their family. Bob Hepp said he spent approximately 20 hours prepping for the lunch. He had enough for 260 people to have at least one plate. “No one sits alone and people appear to enjoy themselves.” A crew of volunteers each had a task and for some it was just to sit and enjoy the company of others. Hepp said his granddaughter asked him why he would not be able to visit her during Community Christmas. This was his reply to her: “It’s Christmas for people that wouldn’t have otherwise.” “And it helps me lose a few pounds,” he joked. The Kinsmen Community Centre was full of people with tales of their lives. Just sitting down at one table can tell a person why the Community Christmas is a valuable service. John and Shirley Kole have been coming for the last five years. With just the two of them at home, cooking a whole turkey would be too much work, said Mrs. Kole. “It’s just nice because otherwise we’d sit at home just the two of us.” With their family of four kids, 12 grandkids and eight great grandkids busy with holiday plans, Mrs. Kole feels there is no other place she would rather be on Christmas Day. “It’s the best place in the world,” she stated. Sitting next to the Koles was Brenda Woodridge and her mother Darlienne Terry. Woodridge’s husband recently passed away and she did not have anywhere else to go. She said she loved her first experience of Community Christmas. “It’s kind of my first outing into the community,” explained Woodridge. Leaving home to do most activities has been difficult for her but being at the Christmas Day lunch was a positive step forward, she added. “It’s helping me get back into life.” Her first goal was to volunteer but Woodridge felt that was too much too soon. So, she knitted items that could be used at the lunch. Woodridge intends to volunteer her time next year. There were more than 50 volunteers who helped out at the dinner. Call 403-783-3311 to submit photos, letters to the editor or advertise.

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Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 11

Midget A Wolves, RCMP to play fundraiser game By Mustafa Eric Ponoka’s highly successful Midget A Wolves will put their popularity into use by playing a fundraiser game against an RCMP team at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan 14, with all the proceeds to be donated to the local chapter of KidSport. Ryan Koehli, the head coach of the Wolves, the Mountie from the RCMP Ponoka Detachment assigned as Resource Officer to the schools in town, said several officers from the neighbouring detachments, including Wetaskiwin, Red Deer and Stettler, would join the RCMP team to beef up the local core. He said the event would feature various other activities, including a short game of Mites during the break and a music band playing to the audience. Matt Klimec, one of the high scoring offense players in the Wolves’ ranks, said they were very happy with the opportunity of doing some good for the community. Head coach Ryan Koehli, Jordan Wombold and Matt Klimec of Midget Wolves are excited to be part of an effort to give back to the community. Photo by Mustafa Eric

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“Just because you can get out to the community and give support to people who need it is always a good thing to do.” “And playing hockey is the best way to do it,” Klimec added. But the Wolves may have other motivations, as well, like playing against and beating their own coach in a hockey game. Jordan Wombold, another offense player sounded very confident as he replied “Oh, yes we will,” when asked about their chances of beating the RCMP team. “Coach Ryan is on the (RCMP) team, that is enough advantage for us,” he joked. But jokes aside, Klimec said Koehli was good in getting his message through to his players and that he was communicating efficiently with players as a coach. “He is not a motivational speaker but he can relay messages well and can get the team to do what he wants.”

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Page 12 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

A Response to James Strachan:

CALNASH AG EVENT CENTRE JANUARY CALENDAR

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Please check website regularly for info & updates

Note - Arena will be closed for Open Riding if temps are -20C or colder

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY 1

THURSDAY 2

FRIDAY 3

SATURDAY 4

New Years Day ARENA CLOSED

Arena closed 9am-2pm Open Riding 2 – 7pm Ranch Roping – 7-10pm small arena

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Open & Family Ride/ Build a Better Horse 6-9pm

Open Ride 10am – 4pm

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Open Ride 10am – 4pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Open Ride/Build a Better Horse 6-9pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-4pm Don Laing Trailer Barrel Racing Jackpot #1 – 7pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Private Booking 7-10pm Large arena Ranch Roping – 7-10pm small arena

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm

Private Booking 7-10pm

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Don Laing Trailer Ladies Barrel Racing Jackpot - Double Header #2 & #3 (12 noon)

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Open Ride/Build a Better Horse 6-9pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Private Booking 7-10pm Private Booking 7-10pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-5pm Barrel Practice/Open Ride 5-9pm

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Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Private Booking 7-10pm – Large arena Ranch Roping – 7-10pm small arena Private Booking 7-10pm

Open & Family Ride/ Build a Better Horse 6-9pm

Open Ride 10am – 4pm

17 Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Open & Family Ride/ Build a Better Horse 6-9pm

18 Open Ride 10am – 4pm

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Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Silver Valley 4H 7-9pm arena

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-4pm Don Laing Trailer Barrel Racing Jackpot #4 – 7pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Private Booking 7-10pm – Large arena Ranch Roping – 7-10pm small arena

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Open & Family Ride/ Build a Better Horse 6-9pm

Open Ride 10am – 4pm

Private Booking 7-10pm

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Open Ride 10am – 4pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-6pm Private Booking 7-10pm

Barrel practice/open ride 9am-1pm Open Ride 1-5pm Private Booking 7-10pm

Tentative booking

Tentative booking

Tentative booking

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Dear Editor, The Church is not a flea market and the Christian is not a bargain hunter.   The image of a rummage sale trivializes both the seller and the buyer.   It is generally true that important events happen in the Church happen approximately every 500 years:  The Protestant Reformation occurred 500 years ago, the split between east (Orthodoxy) and west (Roman Catholicism) took place 1000 years ago, and Europe, the Middle East and Northern Africa had been Christianized despite the fall of Rome 1,500 years ago.   In reality, something important is always happening in the Church. James Strachan rightly notes that the “heretic” does have its root in choosing. The ability to choose is one mark of human freedom.   But not all choices enlarge one’s freedom: some diminish it partially, some completely.  I can choose to hate my brother, as Martin Luther did, but that does not make me free. I can choose to exterminate him as did Hitler and Margaret Sanger, but only good choices make us free.  The ability to choose is a gift but only if we choose the good.  When we do not, we permit evil. When Protestants chose to be free of the authority of the Pope, they untethered themselves from meaning. We can see this today in the mass exodus from Protestant congregations, as Strachan has noted.  Luther claimed the Bible to be authoritative on its own and inerrant.  After forsaking the Church, Luther had to find an authority for his teachings.   The Catholic Church has never claimed the Bible to be without error nor that all of it is meant to be read literally. No written text is authoritative on its own or inerrant. Just ask a lawyer, or a politician, or a teacher.  What an important document

needs is an authoritative interpreter, preferably an inerrant one.   Some see the presence of 23,000 Protestant denominations as a good thing, but it is legion.  We can have one pope or a billion.  A billion popes signifies chaos not freedom. An indulgence is not buying one’s way out of hell: It is a remission of the temporal punishment due to sin. It supposes that the sin has already been forgiven.  This is but one example of a misunderstanding, intentional or unintentional, applied to Catholic teaching.   Luther either misunderstood the practice or used ignorance and gullibility for his own purposes.  The Church does not teach and has never taught that one can buy his own or another’s salvation. Also, no Catholic was excommunicated for holding to the heliocentric world view: not Galileo and certainly not Copernicus.   It was Luther and another Protestant, Melanchthon, who were opposed to the sun-centred system because it contradicted a literal reading of the Bible. One begins to see why C.S. Lewis referred to the Reformation as tragic farce:   it was unnecessary and devastating.  This is not to say that Christians, and even Christians in leadership, did not sin before Luther, but to reform the Church one must to stay in it.  One does not take his ax to the trunk of a tree if he hopes to prune it.   Strachan is right to notice that something significant is happening today in the Christian world. Protestantism is dying.   Timothy Nelson

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Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 13

FIRST BABY

2014

The PONOKA NEWS has partnered with these businesses to celebrate the first baby born at the Ponoka Hospital and Care Centre in 2014. The PONOKA NEWS has partnered with these businesses to celebrate the first baby born at the Ponoka Hospital and Care Centre in 2014. These businesses have also donated a gift for the new baby & parents. Cindy’s

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Page 14 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Scuba divers use the Aquaplex as training ground By Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye

than 20 kids as they would need more instructors to attend with students. “We want to have a lot of supervisors when we’re diving,” explained Lekas. Usually there are six to seven local divers, Lekas and two other Rimbey instructors when students get certified in open water scuba diving. “We have a lot of experience with our 20 divers. We want it to be as a safe as possible,” he added. Student Matthew Froehlick is working on his advanced open water certification. He has been scuba diving for two years. During the training session, Froehlick could be seen exploring every part of the deep pool at the Aquaplex. “It’s just so nice and calm under the water.” The training they have received from master diver Denise Boniface has been a benefit to students, explained Lekas. “She instructs other dive masters.” “Before we go in the water, Denise always prepares us really well,” added Froehlick. She provides students with much needed skills by teaching how water pressure can affect the eardrums under water and how to equalize the pressure by plugging your nose, explained Froehlick. He has since been on a cruise with his family and used his first stage open water certification. The experience for students is becoming memorable and Lekas said they usually talk about the training and their certification trip during graduation. He Hours: D enjoys the program too. Dec. 27, Jan. 3 “Rimbey, I think, is 9:30am - 6pm the scuba diving capiDec. 28, Dec. 31, Jan. 4 Jan 2 -–4pm 9:30-5 tal of Alberta right now 9:30am because probably per Dec. 30, Jan. 2 capita we have more div9:30am - 5pm ers in the community.” More than 100 divers have been certified in the last five years, said Lekas. The school helps subsidize the program up to $1,000. Students pay $1,700, which includes all their training 403-790-2878 and the all-inclusive trip to Costa Rica.

Rimbey junior/senior high school students have recently returned to Ponoka Aquaplex to conduct their scuba diving training, something they have been doing for the last five years. Principal Tim Lekas said the optional program is one inspired by the Eckville principal who was a dive master. The first year of the program six students took the course and training was conducted in Victoria, B.C. But sending kids to Victoria was not the best of options. The cost was high, the water was cold and for a little bit more money, students could take a trip to Costa Rica to complete the training. This year, they do travel to Costa Rica in March during school break to finish their scuba diving certification. “They have to do some open-water dives to get their certification,” said Lekas. Training the students in Ponoka has been the ideal choice: the deep pool and salt water offers kids a chance to get some serious practice in: instructors use weights and keep a close eye on students while they receive their training. Once Costa Rica was added as a destination to the training program, the roster of the class has grown, but expanding the course may not be ideal. Lekas feels they can handle no more

Rimbey Jr/Sr High School students get some real hands on scuba diving training Dec. 18 at the Aquaplex. The program is in its fifth year at the school. Photo by Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye

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PONOKA NEWS Page 15

Annual fundraiser has new resource added By Amelia Naismith During St. Augustine’s fourth annual Goodwill Cup on Thursday, Dec. 19, two fundraisers were run simultaneously for the first time. This year’s effort — fundraising through the actual game portion of the event — brought in approximately $750 and the money goes to the school’s Good Samaritan Fund. “That fund is for whatever needy families, kids, for textbooks or winter coats,” said event organizer Darren Josephison. The stands were full of staff and students, who were happily munching away on special treats. “I think it was great. It’s great to see the stands full of kids . . . The kids are really loud,” said Josephison. With the students who play getting older and providing more of a challenge for the teachers, Josephison says the excitement level rises each year. “As long as everybody has fun, it’s good,” he added, saying the event is all about the holiday spirit. Members of the community also took to the ice to counter the growing talent of the students, including RCMP member Adam Al-Kadri, Deacon Rollie Comeau and representatives from the school board. “You like to have a number (of people) from the community to make it bigger,” said Josephison. Josephison modeled the Goodwill Cup after Ponoka Secondary Campus’ Santa Showdown, and as the event grows, the school hopes to be celebrating its own 20th anniversary. “Some people might say ‘oh they’re just copying the Campus.’ That’s exactly what we’re doing. I saw a good thing, so I copied it,” said Josephison. A potato chip fundraiser graced the event for the first time this year, spearheaded by one of the teachers, Sylvia Brendel. During the school’s earlier Ponoka and District Chamber of Commerce-hosted student shopping day, the order of chips placed with The Grocery

Liam Dillen, Grade 1, cheers loudly for the skaters during St. Augustine’s fourth annual Goodwill Cup. Photo by Amelia Naismith

People of Camrose was delivered to the school’s canteen as double the amount, with the additional portion being a donation by the supplier. Brendel said she had more chips then she knew what to do with and the idea was put forth to sell them to students during the Goodwill Cup. The approximately $180 raised — each bag

sold for a dollar — goes toward the school’s Chalice Organization, which is a Christian-based charity program. “We could have sold 150 more had I known it’d be such a popular item,” said Brendel, adding she is thinking of expanding the project for next year.

It’s time to start thinking of spring motorcycle maintenance Submitted Blake Nobles It’s this time of year that those of you that ride motorcycles should be looking at getting your motorcycle work done, engine rebuilds, or major maintenance that you might have been putting off. Winter is the perfect time to get this work done so that when you want to go riding for the first time in the spring, you won’t get left stranded on the side of the road. I remember watching my grandfather tinker with his bike over the winter and I still remember his philosophy for this, “Might as well do it now while I’m not riding it than to try and do it when I want to ride.” Coming from a former Pacific North West Hill Climb Champion from the 40’s, it seemed like some pretty solid old biker guy advice. Here are a few things to check for when you do your winter check over for spring. 1. Check your tires for weather checking caused by low tire pressure and cold weather. If there is no weather checking, make sure your tire pressures are set to the manufactures levels; 2. Check that your brake cylinders have not sprung a mysterious leak. Check your brake fluid levels; 3. Check your fork seals for leaks, winter is a good time to spot these leaks as dust will settle on the oil that seeps out; 4. Check your wheel bearings for slop or play. This is not the place to have any play; 5. Check your neck bearings, any dead spots. If there is, it’s time to replace them; 6. Check all of your hoses. Brake hoses, fuel lines, and vacuum hoses for cracks frays or weather checking; 7. Have your engine gone over by a mechanic, have

them check for valve clearance, cam chain adjust- at BTK Motorsports here in Ponoka. ment, clutch adjustment, and a general service to One last bit of my grandfather’s biker advice keep things running smooth; “Remember it’s how you share the road with others 8. Have your carbs properly adjusted; that defines the kind of biker you are.” Remember to 9. Have your drive chain inspected for wear and ad- ride safe this year. justment; BTK Motorsports 10. Repair any seat cracks in the upholstery so you Bay 2, 5520 Hwy 2A don’t get a wet backside after a rain; Ponoka, AB 11. Check fuel filter for signs of decay or cracking. Some are in the tank at the fuel tap and some are external in line. These are just a few of the things one would want to check over before spring comes around, if you aren’t sure of how to do these At the stroke of midnight and through things or need some help all the days to follow, we hope happiness with them, we are more and good fortune light your way. than willing to help you

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Page 16 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

To And Fro: A Year of Grains In Review The 2012/13 marketing year was the first of its kind in Canada where producers in the Prairies were able to freely market their own grain. It’s undeniable that a drought in the Black Sea region of Europe (Ukraine, Russia, etc.) and the U.S. supported prices throughout the first three-to-five months of 2013, as producers took advantage of $10 wheat and even $15 canola. However, despite the extended winter and subsequent wet spring, the 2013 crop went into the ground across North America in record speed (If this isn’t telling of the technology we have at our disposal, then I’m not sure what is). That being said, what was produced was also a record (not just North America but globally) and prices have since fallen off the enjoyable perches seen at this time a year ago. Around the time we were seeding, on the other side of the equator, South America was still in the process of trying to ship out their record crop of corn and soybeans. Brazil went head-to-head with the U.S. for top soybean-producing nation as both countries took off over 82 million tonnes of the oilseed (America took the win by a debatable 500,000 tonnes). Problems came in

shiploads though (literally) as Brazil faced significant logistical issues of getting their crop from field to port. Poor road conditions, dock worker strikes, and waiting lines of over Brennan Turner three months in FarmLead Breakfast Brief the seas outside main ports kept Brazil’s biggest customer, China, on its toes. However, China seems to be turning the tide back to more normalized growth rates (at least for them). As the world’s largest consumer of commodities, their rapidly growing middle class (around 350 million people), has brought about an insatiable demand for meat. As such, grain imports by the People’s Republic are all seen up in the 2013/14 marketing year, especially for soybeans, up over 15 per cent to almost 70 million tonnes! Ultimately, the U.S.D.A. sees crop pro-

duction in 2013/14 much larger than the year previous (again, due to drier weather seen in a few places). Specifically, soybean production is seen growing almost six per cent to 283.9 million tonnes with another record crop expected out of Brazil (U.S.D.A. forecasts 88 million tonnes but the majority of private estimates are around 90 million). For corn, production is seen growing 11.75 per cent to 964.3 million tonnes, with Ukraine poking its head in as a major player, producing 30 million tonnes and becoming the world’s third-largest exporter of the coarse grain. Finally for wheat, global output jumped 8.4 per cent to 711.4 million tonnes, mostly due to higher production in Australia (18 per cent yearover-year production growth), Russia (36.5 per cent), Ukraine (40 per cent), and Canada (38 per cent). With the 2013 calendar turning over, it was a year of big production. Undoubtedly, improvements in agronomy practices, equipment advancements, and new tools (such as the FarmLead Mobile app), have provided the individual producer the tools to be more efficient and smarter when it comes to working the land. Watch for the

likes of South America, the Black Sea, and China to dominate headlines in 2014 as these are the largest emerging markets in the agricultural industry (the former two regions for production and the latter for consumption just as food security is becoming more important than ever when it comes to the People’s Republic). To growth, Brennan Turner, President, FarmLead.com Brennan Turner is originally from Foam Lake, SK, where his family started farming the land in the 1920s. After completing his degree in economics from Yale University and then playing some pro hockey, Mr. Turner spent some time working in finance before starting FarmLead.com, a risk-free, transparent online and mobile grain marketplace (app available for iOS & Android). His column is a summary of his free, daily market note, the FarmLead Breakfast Brief. He can be reached via email (b.turner@ farmlead.com) or phone (1-855-332-7653).

Big Love for Big Champagne By David White Wine writers love explaining why Champagne and other sparkling wines deserve a spot at the dinner table all year long. Good sparklers are characterized by vibrant acidity and freshness, which help them cut through spicy meals, complement savory food, and elevate even the simplest of dishes. Plus, they’re delicious every night of the week, regardless of whether there’s anything to celebrate. But we inevitably write about this topic in late December. After all, Champagne houses and retailers alike spend millions each year to convince us that New Year’s Eve is best enjoyed with a glass of sparkling wine. And marketing

matters. The focus of these columns is just as predictable. Writers who cater to the everyday consumer offer tips on how to find value, steering readers toward sparkling alternatives like Cremant de Bourgogne, Cava, and Prosecco. After all, Champagne isn’t cheap. Writers who cater to a more sophisticated audience laud “grower” Champagnes. Made by the farmers who grow the grapes, these wines have exploded in popularity over the past few years and offer a refreshing alternative to big brands like Moet & Chandon and Veuve Clicquot. Plus, just as food consumers feel better about purchasing fruit at the local farmers’ market, wine

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er By Eraina Hooy culture and a dynamic Editor sandy beaches, Hobbema Reggae music, members of the of the things e during may experienc are just some t Corps Program Community Cade ica. invitation their time in Jama international received an National The HCCCP t Corps (The ican Police Cade ninth anniversary on from the Jama de) to attend their Cadet Interschool Briga ts will also join the Jamaican Cade P ogram A il 14 The

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consumers feel better about supporting grower-producers. Consequently, few writers champion the brands you can easily find at wine shops across the country. This is unfortunate. While Champagne’s big brands aren’t trendy right now, the top producers deliver consistent, high quality wines year after year. And their offerings have never been better. Earlier this year, I hosted several friends for a blind tasting focused on these brands. We focused entirely on non-vintage wines. Champagne is France’s most northern wine region, so growing conditions can vary significantly and the grapes often struggle to ripen. Since Champagne houses strive to offer a consistent style every year, utilizing multiple vintages helps winemakers achieve uniformity. Of course, if the growing season is strong, many producers will also produce a vintage bottling. We also kept the tasting limited to blends. Most Champagne houses purchase grapes from growers

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across the region, utilizing varying amounts of Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, and Chardonnay, again to achieve consistency. So for the blind tasting, we avoided Blanc de Noirs (comprised of Pinot Noir and/or Pinot Meunier) and Blanc de Blancs (comprised entirely of Chardonnay). Finally, we limited ourselves to “Brut,” the most popular style of sweetness. We threw in one of my favorite grower-producers, Chartogne-Taillet, and also included Costco’s Kirkland Signature Champagne. The biggest surprise? Kirkland. With five first place votes, it won the tasting! That Costco’s Champagne did so well makes sense. The wine is produced by Manuel Janisson, a well-known producer with a long history in the region. Of course, the Kirkland label lacks charm; it’s hard to see the bottle and not think of generic toilet paper or peanuts. And I’ve since learned that the wine lacks the consistency one would expect from Champagne, so be sure to try a bottle before stocking up. Among more traditional labels, Moet & Chandon’s “Imperial” almost always delivers. It’s the best-selling non-vintage Champagne in the world, so oenophiles often pooh-pooh this wine. But it’s bright, ripe, and delightfully complex. And at $40, it rarely disappoints. Other favorites at around the same price include Pol Roger’s “White Foil” and Perrier Jouet’s “Grand Brut.” For about $15 more, Bollinger’s “Special Cuvée” is worth trying. Rich, toasty, and firmly structured, it’s always impressive. Although Veuve Clicquot’s “Yellow Label” has long been associated with luxury, the wine is typically uninspiring. Nicolas Feuillatte’s Brut Reserve is similar. Both wines are tasty, but they offer little in the way of complexity; they’re simply serviceable. There’s never been a better time to explore Champagne. And while there’s nothing like popping a cork when the clock strikes midnight, make sure to save some for January and beyond. David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com, which was named “Best Overall Wine Blog” at the 2013 Wine Blog Awards


Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 17

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Darrian Banack in an attempt to take a shot at the Three Hills net during one of the Stampeders’ top games of the season at the Ponoka Cultural and Recreation Complex on Saturday, Dec. 21. Photo by Amelia Naismith

Stampeders continue to improve despite loss By Amelia Naismith After dominating most of the play, and much of the game being see-sawed back and forth, the Stampeders lost to Three Hills in overtime in their regular league match at the Ponoka Cultural and Recreation Centre on Saturday, Dec. 21. The intensely competitive game ended 5-4 after a Three Hills player was able to intercept a pass from behind the Stampeders net and push it past goalie Eli Falls’ defenses. Despite having the win that head coach Mark Dobler believed they deserved taken away, he’s proud of the boys for their improvement on the ice and ability to stick to the game plan. “The way the year started, and now to finish 2013 like this, it’s pretty impressive. I’m proud of every single one of them and how could you not be?” said Dobler. This is the Stampeders second consecutive loss in overtime after recently ending a third period against Okotoks — the top team in the league — in a 2-2 tie. Dobler says a big part of the boys’ recent advancements is the fact that each team member is finally buying into the game plan. “The third period we were dominant. We competed well and we deserved that hockey game,” he said. “They see if they stick together as a group

they get results,” he added. In the past Dobler has cited straying from the game plan, a lack of commitment to hard work and players overlapping duties as reasons for their losses. However, during the Three Hills game, the Stampeders were skating to a new tune. Whether it was following through on their passes to remain in control, looking for the open spaces to move the puck up the ice, or continually putting the pressure on Three Hills defence, the Stampeders remained in top shape for most of the game. Dobler says the boys only deviated from the game plan for a few minutes at the end of the first period and five minutes going into the second before quickly snapping back when they saw how easy it was for Three Hills to take control. “There was great goaltending,” said Dobler, referring to Falls, who was under a consistent hailing of shots during each period as Three Hills finished the game with 38 shots on net. However, the Stampeders weren’t far behind, ending up with 37 shots on net. The pressure on Three Hills started late in the first period as forward player Jacob Bottomley grabbed the team’s first goal of the game with only 37 seconds left. Three Hills pulled ahead after that, being the only team to score during the second period, but up until

the last second it remained anyone’s game. Bottomley scored again in the third period, as did Tye Munro and Chandler Knibb, who earned the Stampeders last goal of the game during a power play. “It’s disheartening, that last goal. Sometimes guys work to hard to make a play,” said Dobler. During overtime, a Stampeders player lingered a few seconds to long behind his own net before attempting to clear the area, allowing Three Hills to get into position and grab the game-winning goal. Along with being a game of equal skill, it was also intense and action packed, with both teams collecting a plethora of penalties for roughing, tripping, slashing, kneeing and unsportsmanlike conduct. Spectators also became vocally volatile towards the game officials as the intensity of the game took over the arena. This was the Stampeders 19th game and loss of the regular season and going into the new year Dobler is optimistic about what the boys are going to bring forth. “I’m excited,” he said, adding that future games are expected to go well, with the Stampeders continuing their current trajectory. The Stampeders’ first game of the new year will take them on the road to Airdrie, Jan. 3 and back home again Jan. 4 to face off against Didsbury.

Baron brothers win local curling championship Submitted The Legacy Ford Ponoka Super League Curling season wrapped up Wednesday, Dec. 18 with the Baron team winning the championship after defeating the Riske team in a close game. This is the second year in a row the Baron team, comprised of brothers Lionel Baron, Dwayne Baron, Dan Baron and Les Jaster, has won the league. The final standings are: Pool A: Baron 665 Riske 610 Legacy Ford 610 Sherrer 580 Pool B: Classic Granite 445 Ponoka Pro Pharmacy 355 Lambert 345 Pederson 345 Goodwin 295 Morrow 270


Page 18 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Minor hockey roundup By Amelia Naismith The weekend of Dec. 20 to 22 there were 23 minor hockey games played by Ponoka and area teams, leading to an exciting array of wins, losses and one tie. Atom Tier 1 Maskwacis Atom A Chiefs lost to Innisfail 9-0 on Dec. 21 and 9-4 to the Lacombe Rockets the following day. Jason Makinaw, Joseph Raine, Damien Omeasoo and Tryon Simon each scored once. Atom Tier 3 Ponoka Atom A boys beat the Innisfail Servus Flyers in their Dec. 20 home game 4-2. Colton Bresee, Zachary Rausch, Levi Busat and Joshua David each scored once. On Dec. 22 the boys lost 4-2 to Stettler Atom B. Joshua Davic and Zachary Rausch both scored. Peewee Tier 1 Maskwacis Peewee A Chiefs lost to Red Deer Elite Sportswear 9-4 on Dec. 20. Carson Baptiste earned two goals while Nolan Twins and Ashten Littlechild scored once each. The next day they lost 4-2 in another away game to the Innisfail Legion Flyers. Carson Baptiste scored both goals. The Ponoka Peewee A boys took the Bentley Peewee A Bruins 9-2 in an away game, Dec. 21. Rylan Lefebvre scored once, Hunter Busat scored twice and captain Noah Hackett procured six goals. On Dec. 22 Ponoka’s boys lost to Stettler 5-2, with Noah Hackett and Reagan Rabbit each nabbing a goal. Peewee Tier 4 Ponoka Peewee B team was shut out of both their home games, losing 12-0 to the Sundre Peewee Huskies and 4-0 to the Clive Peewee Black Hawks. Bantam Tier 4 Maskwacis Bantam B team tied with the Rimbey Renegades 7-7 in an away game, Dec. 20. Ignatius Cattleman scored twice while Daniel Thom, Cheyden Baptiste, Emerson Samson, Jade Roasting and Bryton Buffalo all scored once. The following day the boys beat the Thunderstars Midget team 6-3. Nolan Lightning scored twice and Bryton Buffalo, George Montour, Bret Bull and Bryton Larocque each nabbed one goal. Midget Tier 1 Ponoka Wolves beat Whitecourt 8-3 during their Dec. 21 home game.

Cody Panbrum, Jared Davis, Denver Norn, Riley Workman, Tyson Borg and Tyson Matejka all scored once while Dustin Bell earned two goals. The boys also beat the Edson Midget A team the following day 5-2 at home. Matthew Klimec scored twice with Jared Davis, Dustin Bell and Riley Workman rounding out the score to five. Midget Tier 3 Ponoka Midget B team took to the road Dec. 22 and lost to the Innisfail Fourlane Flyers 9-5. James Lea, Jarret Henderson, Ethan Deuck, Lane Jones and Logan Abrassart all scored once. Female Atom Lacoka girls beat the Maskwacis Atom Female team 7-2 on Dec. 21. On the Lacoka side Cassie Klinger earned herself a hat trick. Sarah Barnes, Hailey Huchakowski, Cassandra Garbo and Karlee Feragan grabbed the other four goals. For the Maskwacis girls Taylynn Littlepoplar and Jayliese Swampy-Montour both scored. The Maskwacis girls also lost 7-0 to Stettler Atom Female in an away game, Dec. 22. Female Midget Lacoka girls beat Maskwacis Midget Female team 11-0 in an away game on Dec. 20. Danica Poison earned three goals, Robyn Arnold, Robyn Shannon and Emily McLennan each scored twice, and Hayley Shukin and Kallie Nelson both nabbed a goal each. On Dec. 21 Lacoka’s Bantam girls beat Maskwacis’ Bantam team 22-3 during a home game. Jessica Whitebear scored once for Maskwacis while Tricia scored twice. For Lacoka Abby Sim and Ivy Woolf both scored once. Brooke McBurney, Megan Bailey and Lindsey Jansen all scored twice. Jaymee Klinger, Danielle Blacklock and Kelli Rae Sieben each earned a hat trick while Rachael Wood scored five times. On the same day the Maskwacis Midget Female team beat Endmoor 6-5 on Dec. 21. Summer Lightning scored twice and Braylene Saddelback, Megan Erminskin, Aishah Buffalo and Robyn Strongman all scored once. Midget Lacoka lost to the Leduc Midget Rockets 5-2 in an away game, Dec. 22. Kallie Nelson and Emily McLennan both scored.

Braedan Brouillette races down the ice as opposing team members close ranks during the Atom A game, Dec. 20. Photo by Amelia Naismith

Joel Hollingsworth looks to take the puck as a Clive player falls to his knees during the Peewee B game, Dec. 22. Photo by Amelia Naismith


Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 19

REACH OVER 217,000 READERS With one of these great deals! 6 PACK 8 PACK

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What’s Happening

50-70

Employment

700-920

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Items Buy/Sell

Agriculture

150-194

2010-2210

Obituaries

Clerical

FLECK, ALVINA AMELIA Born August 29, 1941 Passed December 18, 2013 Alvina will be sadly missed by all her family and friends. She fought a courageous battle with diabetes and other illnesses. A memorial service will be held at Glenwood Memorial Gardens on January 10, 2013 at 11:30 a.m. 52356 Range Road 232 Sherwood Park. Lunch to immediately follow the service.

What’s Happening #50 - # 70

Arts & Crafts Shows ..................50 Class Registrations....................51 Coming Events ..........................52 Lost ............................................54 Found ........................................56 Companions ..............................58 Personals...................................60 Bingos........................................64 Fitness & Sports ........................66 Happy Ads .................................70

Coming Events In Memoriam

Reached a Milestone?

In loving memory of

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BIG BROTHERS AND BIG SISTERS

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You’re a miracle to me-A special gift from God above Whose life is a reflection of the beauty of God’s love, You’re a blessing in my world--A gentle soul, unique and rare, Who always lifts my spirits With your tender loving care. You’re everything I’d hoped The one I love would ever be, And that’s why you will always be a miracle to me. Loving wife Minnie and children

Caregivers/Aides................710 Clerical ..............................720 Computer Personnel ..........730 Dental ................................740 Estheticians........................750 Hair Stylists ........................760 Janitorial ............................770 Legal ..................................780 Medical ..............................790 Oilfield ................................800 Professionals......................810 Restaurant/Hotel ................820 Sales & Distributors ..........830 Teachers/Tutors..................840 Trades ................................850 Truckers/Drivers ................860 Business Opportunities......870 Miscellaneous ....................880 Volunteers Wanted ............890 Positions Wanted ..............895 Employment Training ........900 Career Planning ................920

720

RONCO OILFIELD HAULING Sylvan Lake is looking for a P/T Admin. Assistant. Email resume tom@roncooilfield.ca or fax. 403-887-4892

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52 1St Ponoka Scout Group

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Wolf Creek Public Schools invites applications for the following position: Executive Assistant to the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Learning Support/System Improvement Division Office Ponoka, AB For further specifics on the above position, please visit Wolf Creek Public Schools’ website at www.wolfcreek.ab.ca, or contact the Division Office at 403-783-3473.

Professionals

810

Wetaskiwin Regional Public Schools Wetaskiwin Regional Public Schools has openings in the Finance and HR/Payroll Departments at our Central Office location: FINANCE MANAGER We require the candidate to have their CPA, CMA or equivalent. A strong knowledge of principles and practices of accounting and financial management and strong analytical, troubleshooting and problems solving skills are required. The candidate will be responsible for supervising the finance department personnel and the general day to day operation of the Finance Department. ACCOUNTING CLERK II Reporting to the Finance Manager and as part of the finance department team this position is responsible for the timely payment of liabilities, data entry, maintaining accounts payable processes and procedures and assisting staff and vendors with AP issues HR/PAYROLL ADMINISTRATOR The HR/Payroll Administrator is responsible for ensuring that the HR/Payroll processes are effectively, efficiently and consistently applied. The Candidate is also responsible to ensure employees are paid according to the appropriate placements on the pay grids and benefits are deducted per employee’s requests accurately and in a timely manner. For further details on these positions and to apply on line, please go to www.wrps.ab.ca and click on Career Opportunities. We thank all those who apply for their interest but only short listed applicants will be contacted.


Page 20 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

AG EQUIPMENT

Rimbey Implements Ltd.

Oilfield

800

Trades

850

Truckers/ Drivers

860

RONCO OILFIELD HAULING RONCO OILFIELD HAULING Sylvan Lake is looking for Sylvan Lake is looking for a Dispatcher. Knowledge a Dispatcher. Knowledge of Travis Permit System of Travis Permit System and computer skills are and computer skills are req’d. Wages negotiable req’d. Wages negotiable dependant on exp. dependant on exp. Email resume tom@ Email resume tom@ PETROFIELD Industries, roncooilfield.ca roncooilfield.ca the Leader in manufacturing or fax. 403-887-4892 or fax. 403-887-4892 Hydrovac trucks, is accepting resumes for the following RONCO OILFIELD HAULING positions: Sylvan Lake. Openings for * General Labourers Picker operator, bed truck * Industrial Painters drivers and swamper’s. * Sandblasters Top wages and benefits. * Material Handler Email resume tom@ * Automotive Electrical roncooilfield.ca Technician or fax. 403-887-4892 * Journeyman Welder / Apprentice TANKMASTER RENTALS req’s Exp’d Class 1 Fluid * 2nd Yr Welder with Business Aluminum experience Haulers for Central Opportunities Alberta. Oilfield tickets Visit our website at: req’d. Competitive wages www.tornadotrucks.com SALES MADE FOR YOU! and benefits. for more details. Our Our professional sales m.morton@tankmaster.ca Company has an team call your prospects or fax 403-340-8818 enthusiastic fast paced for you, so you don’t have working environment, with to. You make between advancement possibilities $1000 up to $3800 a sale; for the motivated person, http:tinyurl.com/m59r33v. and offers an excellent Buying or Selling benefit package. fax 403-742-5544 your home? e-mail: hr@petrofield.com Check out Homes for Sale in Classifieds

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TANKMASTER RENTALS requires Labour Crew supervisor for Central Ab. Pipe fitting & light picker exp. would be an asset . Oilfield tickets and clean driver’s licence req’d. Competitive wages and benefits. m.morton@tankmaster.ca or fax 403-340-8818

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VET SERVICES VERBRUGGEN Veterinary Services • Beef preg-checking with ultrasound • Mobile service for all large animals • Medication & Vaccines • 24/7 on call

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Has Opening for all positions! Immediately. All applicants must have current H2S, Class 5 with Q Endorsement, (No GDL licenses) and First Aid. We offer competitive wages & excellent benefits. Please include 2 work reference names and numbers. Please fax resume to: 403-264-6725 Or email to: tannis@treelinewell.com No phone calls please. www.treelinewell.com

Professionals

810

JOURNALISTS, Graphic Artists, Marketing and more. Alberta’s weekly newspapers are looking for people like you. Post your resume online. Free. Visit: www.awna.com/ resumes_add.php.

850

IRON WING HOLDINGS LTD. now accepting resumes for Journeyman Mechanic and Class 1 Tank Truck Drivers. Send resume: Attention: Laurier Laprise. EmailL laurier.l@ironwing.ca or fax 780-396-0078. JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TECHNICIAN(S) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages, relocation allowance, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrysler.ca. Fax 403-854-2845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net

SHUNDA CONSTRUCTION Requires

Site Superintendents & Foremen For Alberta sites. Email resume to: admin@shunda.ca

CLASS 1 TRUCK DRIVER Must have experience moving heavy equipment that is related to pipeline construction. Clean abstract. Competitive wage. Benefits available. Please fax resumes to 780-372-4238 Or email to: jobs@abpipeliners.com

DELIVERY

DRIVER Must have own vehicle Please reply in person with resume to

Pizza D’Oro #7 5103 - 48 Ave.

Associate Financial Advisor Discover a better place to grow your career; a place that's caring, engaging and rewarding.

The Opportunity Battle River Insurance Ltd / The Co-operators, in Ponoka is looking for an Associate Insurance Advisor I. Our Associate Insurance Advisors are insurance professionals trained in client service, and provide the highest level of service available anywhere in the industry.

Your Qualifications • • • • • • •

Trades

860 Arnett & Burgess is now accepting applications for the following:

in Ponoka County is looking for a

870

Al York

Truckers/ Drivers

General Insurance License is required or must obtain within two (2) months Meet all provincial-licensing requirements in accordance with continuing education in order to obtain and maintain all licenses One (1) year sales and service experience or related business experience is preferred Knowledge or experience with selling techniques is preferred Knowledge of auto and property insurance products is an asset Skilled in communication (verbal and written), organization, time management, client service, decision making Candidate must be comfortable in a technology dependent environment including proficiency with Microsoft Office Valid driver’s license may be required

The Reward • •

A full time position with one of the 50 Best Employers in Canada Opportunity for career development including education opportunities, continuous training and career planning • Commitment to staff wellness including a comprehensive employee assistance program • A generous compensation package including a competitive salary and benefits program, including 3 weeks of vacation in • your first full year of employment • Opportunity to work for a company that is dedicated to giving back to your community through volunteering and an emphasis on environmental and sustainable business practices If you are interested in a career with The Co-operators, please drop off a Cover Letter and Resume at our office in Ponoka. Candidates will be contacted by January 17, 2014. Want to learn more or have questions about this opportunity, please contact Greg Braat, Financial Advisor / Owner.

About The Co-operators The Co-operators Group Limited is a Canadian-owned co-operative. Through its group of companies it offers home, auto, life, group, travel, commercial and farm insurance, as well as investment products. The Co-operators is well known for its community involvement and its commitment to sustainability. The Co-operators is ranked #3 among the 50 Best Corporate Citizens in Canada by Corporate Knights, and listed among the 50 Best Employers in Canada. For more information visit

http://www.cooperators.ca.

Misc. Help

880

ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING AS A SERVICE ADVISOR, BUT WOULD LIKE A CHANGE?

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Reply in confidence by email: cpateman@ponokachrysler.com Craig Pateman Service Manager Fax :403-783-8140

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403.783.3311


Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 21

BOBCAT SERVICES Sur-B Enterprises Ltd.

BOBCAT SERVICE • Snow Removal • Driveways & Parking Lots • Post-Hole Augering - 6, 9, 12, 15 • Corral Cleaning • Grading & Construction Call 403-783-2764 403-588-0599 CallJim JimAshbough Ashbough 783-2764ororCell: Cell: 588-0599 Jack Surbey 403-783-5283 Cell: 403-588-0597 Jack Surbey 783-5283orCell: 588-0597

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Employment Training

900

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Misc. Services

1290

TOWN OF PONOKA SUBDIVISION & DEVELOPMENT APPEAL BOARD

Pet Services

1318

DENTISTRY

RIMBEYDENTALCARE

CLINKERS KENNELS

DR. STEVE CALDER BS C DDS

* Quality Boarding for your dogs & cats *Proof of vaccinations and advance bookings required

Family Friendly Dentistry Box 1100 4905 50 St. Rimbey, AB T0C 2J0

HOURS: Mon - Thurs 9 am - 12 Noon; 4 pm - 6 pm; Fri. 9 am - 12 Noon; 4 pm - 7 pm; Sat. 9 a.m. - 12 noon; Sun. 8:30 - 9:30 a.m. & 4 - 7 p.m.

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The Subdivision and Development Appeal Board has two upcoming vacancies. Any person interested in serving on the Board is requested to submit a completed Application on or before January 6, 2014 to the Town of Ponoka. Application Forms are available at the Town Office: 5102 - 48th Avenue Ponoka, Alberta T4J 1P7 or on the Town’s website at: www.ponoka.ca

Misc. Services

1290

Misc. Services

1290

NEW IN TOWN?

LET US PUT OUT THE MAT FOR YOU! Be sure to call

Attention: Farmers BOTTLE DEPOT

We can deal with your refrigeration problems quickly, efficiently and reasonably

PONOKA BOTTLE DEPOT Open Monday - Saturday 10 am - 5 pm

Closed Sundays & Holidays We Now Recycle Milk Cartons for Deposit

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Motorcycles & ATV’s Tues - Fri: 8:30 am-5:30 pm Saturday: 9 am-3 pm

Personal Services

MAIN: (403) 783-7591 FAX: (403) 783-8178 Website: www.harbinwelding.com E-mail: bharbin@telus.net

DATING SERVICE. Long-term/short-term relationships. Free to try! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1 Call 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet local single ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+). TRUE PSYCHICS! For Answers call now 24/7 Toll Free 1-877-342-3036; Mobile: # 4486; www.truepsychics.ca.

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- General Dentistry - Orthodontics - Cosmetic Dentistry - Bonding - Veneers - Bleaching - White or Gold Fillings - Crown and Bridge - Implant Restorations “WE ENTHUSIASTICALLY WELCOME NEW PATIENTS”

EYE CARE

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Drs. Heimdahl, ZoBell & Kallal 403-783-5575 1-800-662-7168 WWW.4YOUREYESONLY.CA

-

Buy & Sell #1500 - #1990 Heather Goodwin 403-704-3647 heathermccg@shaw.ca

Ph. (403) 843-2173 Fax: (403) 843-2607

Aircraft ..............................1510 Antiques & Art ..................1520 Auctions ............................1530 Bicycles ............................1540 Building Supplies ..............1550 Business Machines ..........1560 Cameras & Accessories ..1570 Children’s Items ................1580 Clothing ............................1590 Computers ........................1600 Concert & Event Tickets ..1610 Equipment - Misc. ............1620 Equipment - Heavy ..........1630 Tools ................................1640 Farmers’ Market & Food Basket......................1650 Firewood ..........................1660 Lumber ............................1670 Garden Supplies ..............1680 Lawn Tractors ..................1690 Health, Dietary, Beauty ....1700 Household Appliances......1710 Household Furnishings ....1720 TV’s, Stereos, VCR’s ........1730 Hot Tubs & Accessories ..1740 Jewellery ..........................1750 Kid’s Deals........................1755 Misc. For Sale ..................1760 Musical Instruments..........1770 Music Lessons..................1780 Piano & Organs ................1790 Office Supplies ................1800 Pets & Supplies ................1810 Pet Services ....................1820 Cats ..................................1830 Dogs ................................1840 Sports Cards ....................1850 Sporting Goods ................1860 Collectors’ Items ..............1870 Swap, Barter & Trade ......1880 Travel Packages ..............1900 Wedding Supplies ............1910 Recycled Products............1920 Wanted to Buy ..................1930 Items to Give Away ..........1940

Auctions

1530

WARD’S AUCTIONS Antiques/Estate Auction. Jan. 5 and 6, 11802 - 145 St., Edmonton. 780-451-4549. Taking consignments now for Feb. 8 Firearms and related auction. Online bidding and pictures at www.WardsAuctions.com

5120-51ST AVE, PONOKA

ADVANCED EYE HEALTH & VISION EXAMS CONSULTATION & REFERRAL SERVICES DESIGNER EYE WEAR & CONTACT LENSES INSURED MEDICAL EYECARE SERVICES NOW AVAILABLE FOR ALL AGES

NEW PATIENTS ALWAYS WELCOME

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“Committed to your comfort”

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Ph: 403-782-7722 Fax: 403-782-7499

robin@KlesAir.com www.KlesMechanical.com

Advertise your business in the Business Directory!


Page 22 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

HEATING & EAVESTROUGHING

Commercial - Residential Installations - Repair

3912 - 66 St, Ponoka www.wcmltd.ca

403.783.3501 wcmltd@telus.net

VETERINARY SERVICES

Bovine Veterinary Services On-Farm Mobile Veterinary Services Ultrasound-aided ReproducĆ&#x;ve Programs CETA CerĆ&#x;ÄŽed Dairy and Beef Embryo Transfer Herd Health

Dr. Bruce Wine

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Firewood

1660

LOGS

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RESTLESS LEG SYNDROME & LEG CRAMPS? Fast relief in one hour. Sleep at night. Proven for over 32 years; www.allcalm.com. Mon-Fri, 8-4 EST. 1-800-765-8660. Looking for a new pet? Check out Classifieds to find the purrfect pet.

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PER WEEK

Call 403-783-3311 VETERINARY SERVICES

Southwest Industrial Park 4102-64 St., Ponoka 403-783-5200 8 a.m. - 5 p.m Mon. to Sat. • Open late Thursday 24-hour Emergency Call Dr. Bill Frischke • Dr. Kelly Loree • Dr. Leighton Coma Dr. Trevor Hook • Dr. Patricia Kelly

Reaching 6000 households weekly

For just

$30 per week this space could be yours!

403-783-3311

Agricultural #2000 - #2290 Farm Equipment ..............2010 Haying Equipment ............2020 Tractors ............................2030 Combines & Headers ......2040 Fertilizer Equipment..........2050 Misc. Farm Machinery ......2060 Equipment Wanted ..........2070 Farm Custom Work ..........2080 Farm Auctions ..................2090 Livestock ..........................2100 Livestock - Exotic..............2110 Sheep ..............................2120 Poultry ..............................2130 Horses ..............................2140 Horse Boarding ................2150 Riding Supplies ................2160 Horse/Stock Trailers ........2170 Pasture Wanted ................2180 Grain, Feed, Hay ..............2190 Seed Grain ......................2200 Seeding & Tillage ............2210

Grain, Feed Hay

Houses/ Duplexes

1550

METAL ROOFING & SIDING. Very competitive prices! Largest colour selection in Western Canada. Available at over 25 Alberta Distribution Locations. 40 Year Warranty. Call 1-888-263-8254.

Misc. for Sale

Phone 403-391-1684 Í´ÍśŠ‘—”Â?‡”‰‡Â?…›ƒŽŽ

Building Supplies

Houses For Sale

4020

FOR RENT For Rent #3000 - #3200 Acreages/Farms ..............3010 Houses/Duplexes ............3020 Condos/Townhouses........3030 Manufactured Homes ......3040 Four Plexes/Six Plexes ....3050 Suites ..............................3060 Cottages/Seasonal ..........3070 Roommates Wanted ........3080 Rooms for Rent................3090 Motels/Hotels ..................3100 Offices ..............................3110 Stores/Commercial ..........3120 Industrial ..........................3130 Warehouse Space............3140 Garage Space..................3150 Storage Space ................3160 Land ................................3170 Pasture ............................3180 Mobile Lot ........................3190 Misc. for Rent ..................3200

Wanted to Rent #3250 - #3390 Acreages/Farms ..............3255 Houses/Duplexes ............3260 Suites ..............................3270 Rooms..............................3280 Manufactured Homes ......3290 Housesitting Wanted ........3300 Garage Space..................3310 Storage Space ................3320 Stores/Commercial ..........3330 Office Space ....................3340 Industrial ..........................3350 Warehouse Space............3360 Resorts & Cottages..........3370 Pasture/Land....................3380 Mobile Lot ........................3390

Houses/ Duplexes

3 BDRM HOUSE $1000/month plus utilities 403-783-6011 Classifieds...costs so little Saves you so much!

4 Plexes/ 6 Plexes

3050

Beautiful fully renovated 3 plex for rent 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 decks New stove, fridge, front load washer and dryer View of river Heat & water included

Call 403-963-3374 or 403-783-4959 Start your career! See Help Wanted

3020

NEW 3 BDRM 1800 SQ FT HOUSE

Something for Everyone Everyday in Classifieds

Misc. Services

Misc. Services

with gas ďŹ replace on Wolf Creek Golf Course 2 car garage $2000/month

403-302-7984

1290

EXECUTIVE 1/2 DUPLEX near Coronation Park and trail system. 1284 sq.ft. 2 storey, 3 bedrooms up, hardwood, gas fireplace, fenced back yard, Dble. garage. Immed. poss. $349,900. 403-396-5516 agent chosen.

Mortgages Bought/Sold

4190

2200

WANTED. Hannas Seeds seeking distributors for forage, turf, native and reclamation seed. Good commissions. Contact Dave at 1-800-661-1529 or dave@hannasseeds.com. CELEBRATIONS HAPPEN EVERY DAY IN CLASSIFIEDS

We now carry a complete line of Ritchie Stockwater parts

1290

Well Drilling

1400

Hours of Business: Monday - Friday 7:30 am - 5 pm

5110 -50 Street Box 4414 Ponoka, Alberta T4J 1R7

JESSE ZINTER Office - 403-783-5489

This space could be yours for $

30

PER WEEK

Call 403-783-3311 Financial #4400 - #4430 Investments ......................4410 Money Wanted ................4420 Money to Loan ................4430

Money To Loan

4430

DO YOU NEED to borrow money - Now? If you own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits will lend you money - It’s that simple. 1-877-486-2161

Misc. Services

PORTABLE TOILET RENTALS

LittleJONS’ Hand Wash Stations Handicap Units Trailer Units New Solar Powered Units with Running Water

Serving Central Alberta

Book On-Line Today! 1290 403.783.8322

www.littlejons.ca

995 plus GST/HST

Alberta Weekly Newspapers Association toll free 1-800-282-6903 x228 email andrea@awna.com or visit this community newspaper

Well Drilling

Reaching 6000 households weekly for just

$

30

PER WEEK

This space could be yours!

403-783-3311

1400

RURAL WATER TREATMENT (Province Wide) Tell them Danny Hooper sent you

PLUMBING

FAST AND EASY LOANS! Bad credit accepted! Get up to $25,000 on your vehicle, mobile-home, land or equipment. 1st and 2nd mortgages. www.bhmcash.com. 403-879-9929.

Value Ad Network

We change daily to serve you better.

5306 - 60 ST, PONOKA, AB T4J 1K7 PH: (403) 783-6372 • FAX (403) 783-6345

4090 PONOKA PLUMBING & HEATING

UNITED HOMES CANADA invites you to view our Heated display homes. Purchase today at 2012 pricing. Inventory clearance starting at $92,500.; www. unitedhomescanada.com. 148 Eastlake Blvd., Airdrie. 1-800-461-7632.

with a combined circulation of over 800,000 for only...

1400

“Reasonable rates on all your plumbing needs� Gas Fitting - Home Renovations - Drain Cleaning -24 HOUR SERVICE-

Manufactured Homes

Place your ad in this newspaper and12345 province wide $

Well Drilling

SHANDALL PLUMBING LTD. JAMES AVERY

zthee MOST out of your advertising dollars e e u q S 2190

LACOMBE COUNTRY FEED STORE, Come see us at: 4836 45A St. Lacombe, Ab Pet Food, Horse, Poultry ALL THE FEED YOUR ANIMALS NEED! 403-782-3333

PLUMBING

Real Estate #4000 - #4190

Realtors & Services..........4010 Houses for Sale................4020 Houses Wanted ................4030 Condos/Townhouses ........4040 Acreages ..........................4050 Acreages Wanted ............4060 Farms/Land ......................4070 Farms/Land Wanted ........4080 Manufactured/ Mobile Homes ..................4090 Income Property ..............4100 Commercial Property ......4110 Industrial Property ............4120 Cottages/Resort Property ..4130 Businesses for Sale..........4140 Buildings for Sale ............4150 Lots for Sale ....................4160 Out of Town Property ......4170 Investment Opportunities ..4180 Mortgages Bought/Sold....4190

HEATED CANOLA buying Green, Heated or Springthrashed Canola. Buying: oats, barley, wheat & peas for feed. Buying damaged or offgrade grain. “On Farm Pickup� Westcan Feed & Grain, 1-877-250-5252

Seed Grain

3020

)RON&ILTERSs3OFTENERSs$ISTILLERSs2EVERSE/SMOSIS h+ONTINUOUS3HOKv#HLORINATOR 0ATENTED7HOLE(OUSE2EVERSE/SMOSIS3YSTEM

12345 7ITHINMILESOF%DMONTON 7ATER7ELL$RILLING 2ED$EER #ALGARY.EW'OVERNMENTWATERWELLGRANTSTARTS!PRIL 4IME0AYMENT0LAN/!#FORWATERWELLSANDWATERTREATMENT

  ")')2/.  View our 29 patented and patent pending inventions online at

www.1800bigiron.com

Reaching 6000 households weekly

For just

$30 per week this space could be yours!

403-783-3311


Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

PONOKA NEWS Page 23

Tires, Parts Acces.

VETERINARY SERVICES

Ponoka Veterinary Clinic Dr. Murray Jacobson Dr. Clayton West Dr. Ashley Shannon

Mon. - Fri. 8 am - 5 pm Sat. 9 am - 4:30 pm

24 Hr. Emergency 403-783-4348

5502 - Hwy 2A Ponoka, AB

T4J 1M1

THIS SPACE COULD BE YOURS FOR

$30

PER WEEK.

CALL 4037833311 ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE FOR JUST

$

30

PER WEEK.

REACHING 6000 HOUSEHOLDS PER WEEK. WATER WELL DRILLING SERVICES

Darcy’s Drilling Services • water wells drilled & serviced • new pump & pressure system installations • all types of pump repairs • well shocking Darcy Schmidt Ph: (403) 783-2220 Fax: (403) 783-8828 Email: darcysdrillingservices@hotmail.com

WATER WELL SERVICE

ECKLUND Water Well Service • Install & Service Pumps • Shock Wells • Pressure Systems Serviced & Installed Home: (403) 783-3712 Cell: (403) 704-3413

CUSTOM TUB GRINDING • Different screens for bedding & feed • 600 HP truck driven for fast grinding • Minimum Charge 2 HRS @ $220/HR

CALL LEEN VOGELAAR 403-704-0919

Transportation #5000-5300

Automotive Services ........5010 Antique & Classic Autos ....5020 Cars ..................................5030 SUV’s................................5040 Trucks ..............................5050 Heavy Trucks....................5060 Vans/Buses ......................5070 Motorcycles ......................5080 Campers ..........................5090 Motorhomes......................5100 5th Wheels........................5110 Holiday Trailers ................5120 Tent Trailers ......................5130 Utility Trailers ....................5140 ATV’s ................................5150 Boats & Marine ................5160 Snowmobiles ....................5170 Tires, Parts & Accessories ......................5180 Auto Wreckers ..................5190 Vehicles Wanted ..............5200 Car/Truck Rental ..............5210 Recreational Vehicle Rental ..............................5220 Trailer Rental ....................5230 Misc. Automotive ..............5240 RV’s ..................................5300

Motorcycles

5080

WIN A 2014 HARLEY-DAVIDSON(R) ROAD KING FLHR. Only 499 tickets sold. 3 early bird draws. $100/ticket. June 20 draw. Proceeds support Harley-Davidson Technician & Motorsports Programs at GPRC Fairview Campus. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

Houses For Sale

4020

5180

WRECKING AUTO-TRUCKS. Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. Trucks up to 3 tons. North-East Recyclers 780-875-0270 (Lloydminster).

Business getting nowhere?

ADVERTISE! 403.783.3311

Ottawa needs to follow Alberta’s example and be accountable for executive pay Gregory Thomas, CTF Federal Director Alberta just became the seventh provincial government in Canada to let taxpayers know how much they are paying senior government employees. And Alberta’s new sunshine policy is the most sweeping and comprehensive in the country. For any employee earning over $100,000, salaries, benefits, bonuses, employer-paid pension contributions and deferred compensation, even severance will all be public information. In making thousands of her senior officials accountable to taxpayers for the money they earn, Premier Alison Redford has demonstrated courage. She deserves praise for this progressive reform. Redford’s courage stands in marked contrast to Ottawa’s approach to pay accountability. In a city racked by scandal over expense fraud, where the wanton greed of some senators has done incalculable damage to the reputations of all politicians, providing taxpayers with salary disclosure should be a no-brainer for the government. Instead, insiders from the Office of the Prime Minister (PMO) arranged in June for a Commons committee to gut the salary disclosure provisions of Bill C-461, the private member’s bill brought forward by Alberta MP Brent Rathgeber and passed in its original form by a majority of the full House of Commons. The political operators in the PMO, who are not themselves subject to any salary or severance disclosure, arranged for the committee to raise the disclosure threshold to $441,661, exempting all but a handful of government officials from any public scrutiny whatsoever. For a government that has raised payroll spending from $28 billion to $44 billion in just seven years, its determination to cover up salaries, six-figure bonuses that can add up to 40 per cent of total pay, benefits, pension entitlements and severance packages, simply doesn’t pass the smell test. It’s hardly surprising four of the seven Conservative MPs frog-marched into the committee to vote against salary dis-

closure were not even members of the committee, but acting members. Or that all but one western Conservative were absent that day, leaving six Ontarians, mostly newcomers to caucus, to carry out the dirty work. Or that many weren’t present to hear the testimony of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation or the National Citizens Coalition, where Stephen Harper once campaigned for accountability as its president. Defenders of the Harper government cite a non-existent right to privacy for government executives as justification for salary secrecy. They make specious arguments about jealousy around the water cooler in government offices. The logic, for want of a better term, that they apply, is that once government employees know what their co-workers are making, their salary demands will escalate, and taxpayers will lose. They cite a single 2010 study from the University of Toronto, whose principal author actually appears on Ontario’s Sunshine salary disclosure list, a study cited nearly nowhere in academic journals since it was first published, and whose mathematical underpinnings have been thoroughly debunked by researchers at MIT. The truth is that employee costs have been skyrocketing in Ottawa, in provinces with sunshine lists and in provinces without sunshine lists. In fact, the average payrolls cost for a single federal government staffer have gone from $86,000 when the Conservatives took office in 2006 to $114,000 last year. The Parliamentary Budget Office forecasts it could reach $129,000 by 2015. Further, how are taxpayers supposed to judge whether these high salaries, and even bonuses, are warranted when they haven’t the foggiest idea of how much they are? On salary accountability Conservatives in Ottawa need to change course. They need to follow the lead of Conservatives in Alberta, conservatives like former premier Mike Harris, who brought salary accountability to Ontario, and conservatives like the Stephen Harper who fought for accountability so long ago.

Welcome Home! Celebrating the birth of your child? Share your happy news with family & friends with a special announcement in the classifieds.

1.877.223.3311


Page 24 PONOKA NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014

Endless Joy

$1000 Costco Rebate Is

Back

Year End Sale

2013 FORD FIESTA SE

2014 FORD FOCUS SE

2014 FORD D ESC ESCAPE S

Stk.#C0084. Auto, Sunroof MSRP $22,024

Stk.#C0402. Auto, winter pkg MSRP $23,764 

Stk.#T0346  MSRP $26,729

YEAR END PRICE $16,995 OR $124 BW

YEAR END PRICE $18,985 OR $138 BW

YEAR END PRICE $21,950  OR $159 BW

2013 FORD F150 CREW C CAB XLT

2013 FORD F150 CREW CAB XTR ECOBOOST

0%

FOR 60 MTHS ON MOST MODELS EXTRA $500 CHRISTMAS CASH

2013 FORD F150 S/C S/CAB XLT St Stk.#T0296/ 5 /AUTO 5.0L MSRP $ $40,949

YEAR END PRICE $26,950 OR $194BW

2014 FORD F250 CREW CAB XLT

2013 FORD F150 CREW CAB FX4

Stk. #T0389 5.0L Auto    MSRP $45,549

Stk.#T0169 MSRP $49,549

Stk.#T0321 MSRP $52,245

Stk.#T0282 Leather, nav, moon roof M MSRP $55,519

YEAR END PRICE $30,985 OR $223 BW

YEAR END PRICE $34,988 OR $251 BW

YEAR END PRICE $39,955 OR $287 BW

YEAR END PRICE $39,986 OR $287 BW

DECEMBER

DEALS

LEGACY USED CLEARANCE CENTRE - OVER 200 USED TO CHOOSE FROM 2007 JEEP CHEROKEE SUV

2008 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GT Stk.

Stk. #L0119

$11995 OR $129 BW

2009 FORD ESCAPE SLT

Stk.#L0238

Stk.#L0186 leather, moon roof

#L0160

$12995 OR $129 BW 2013 DODGE DART

2008 FORD F150 XTR Stk. #T0090B

$17995 OR $169 BW

2011 KIA SOUL SPORT

Stk.# L0219

$18,995 OR $137 BW

2011 DODGE RAM 1500

2011 GMC SIERRA 1500 SLT

$12996 OR $119 BW

$16995 OR $169 BW

2011 JEEP LIBERTY LTD

2010 FORD RANGER SCAB XLT 4X4

Stk.# L0258

$18,995 OR $138 BW 2011 FORD F150 SUPERCREW Stk.#T0017A

Stk. #T0357A

$18,850 OR $158 BW 2011 TOYOTA SR5 Stk. #L0218 mega cab

Stk.#L0122

Stk. T0110A

$21995 OR $179 BW

$22995 OR $189 BW

$26995 OR $223 BW

$29,895 OR $293 BW

USED IS BASED SED ON 60 60-84 84 M MONTHS DEPENDING EN ON N YEA YEAR/5 Y YEAR/5.9%/0 5 9%/0 9 /0 DOW DOWN/ALL WN/ALL AL ALL OAC OAC. SOME ME VEHICLES VEH NOT N EXA EXACTLY ACTLY LY AS IILLUSTRATED ILLUST

“Let your Legacy start here.”

www.legacyfordponoka.ca

YOUR LEGACY TEAM

Pat Boardman Trevor Feragen Sales Manager Sales Consultant

Bob Mass Sales Consultant


Ponoka News, January 01, 2014