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About 300 participate in Idle No More Lindsay Chung THE CHRONICLE

Drums and voices rang out loud and clear on a cool Monday afternoon, as hundreds of people gathered just outside Ladysmith to lend their support to the Idle No More movement. Idle No More means many t h i n g s t o Ti m H a r r i s , a Stz’uminus First Nation councillor and school principal. Harris organized a mid-Island Idle No More demonstration Dec. 31 at the Husky Gas Station just north of Ladysmith with

help from his sister, Stephanie Harris, and his cousin, Gina-Mae Harris. About 300 people took part in the demonstration, many drumming and waving signs. They stopped traffic on the TransCanada Highway for a short period of time but mostly kept off the highway. “I would have to say when I think of Idle No More, it kind of brought it all together,” said Harris. “It spoke a thousand words to me.” Harris says, first of all, the demonstration supported

Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence, who has been on a hunger strike on Victoria Island in the Ottawa River since Dec. 11. Spence vowed not to eat solid food until Prime Minister Stephen Harper would meet with her. Harper has set a meeting with First Nations leaders for Jan. 11, and Spence is expected to take part in the meeting. Another aspect of Idle No More is killing Bill C-45, an omnibus budget bill that Harris says is “really tough” on the environment. Harris says the main concern

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with Bill C-45 is the legislation me, solidarity is not just First regarding waterways and the Nations coming together — it’s environment. everyone. It’s all of us who use “It basically puts it on a sil- the land and care about the land.” ver platter for pipelines to go Education and awareness are through First Nations territo- important pieces of the puzzle ries,” he said. “The other big for Harris. thing is the lack of consultation “It’s saying ‘no, we’re not going within this.” to stand still and take this anyFor Harris, one of the key more,’” he said. “People need aspects of the movement is to understand we’re not just standing together — and not there for free handouts. We’re just as First Nations, but as not just on reservations collectCanadians. ing free money. Idle No More is “It’s also in regards to solidar- also about educating the public ity and coming together and about what First Nations have See Demonstration Page 3 also stepping up,” he said. “For

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John Sherry will be the first BC Conservatives candidate for Nanaimo-North Cowichan in the party’s history during the next provincial election. Here, Sherry is pictured with his wife Hayley and their daughters Romy, 4, and Luca, 7, following the party’s nomination meeting Jan. 12 in Ladysmith. For more, please see page 4.

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Property taxes in Ladysmith were due July 2, and Erin Anderson, the town’s director of financial serO n e o f L a d y s m i t h ’s m o s t vices (no relation), says about 92 well-known daughters, Pamela per cent of taxes were unpaid at Anderson, has recently been in the the due date. Property owners who do not pay news not for her acting, modelling or her activism, but for owing prop- by July 2 are assessed a penalty, and it sits like that until the end of erty taxes in her hometown. A tax certificate from the Town the year, explained Anderson. Starting Jan. 1, those properties of Ladysmith shows that, as of Jan. 14, the balance due for Anderson’s began to accumulate interest, and Chemainus Road property is just starting in September 2014, they See Property Page 3 over $31,000. THE CHRONICLE

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About 60-70 students from Ladysmith Secondary School presented their annual Dance Showcase Friday, Jan. 18. For more photos of the performance, please turn to page 12.

Ladysmith student accepted at Oxford Nick Bekolay Friday, Jan. 11, and she plans to study anthropology and archaeology at Oxford beginning next Charlotte McDonald’s academ- September, provided she mainic bent is readily apparent as she tains an average of 85 per cent recaps how her essay comparing through the remainder of the the similarities between Hamlet school year. and Montaigne, inventor of the Her acceptance to Oxford is modern essay, helped pave the the result of several months’ way to her acceptance at Oxford worth of effort. University. McDonald applied to five McDonald, a Grade 12 stu- schools last October, abiding dent at Ladysmith Secondary by the standard rules of UCAS, School (LSS), said she learned the Universities and Colleges of her conditional acceptance on Admissions Service, a non-profit

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Claire Saunders performs a dance she choreographed herself to Nick of TIme by Bon Iver during the Chemainus Secondary School Dance Showcase Thursday, Jan. 24. For more photos, please see page 13.

A training exercise turned into a life-saving mission for marine search and rescue volunteers from Ladysmith this past weekend. Bill Bond is Ladysmith Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue (RCM-SAR) Station 29’s newest coxswain, and on his first mission in his new role, his vessel and crew were responsible for rescuing a hypothermic swimmer near Round Island Saturday, Jan. 26. While Station 29’s Ladysmith Responder and its crew was conducting a coxswain training exercise with Nanaimo 27 and Nanaimo 27B near Dodds Narrows, a pan pan message — which is one step down from a mayday — was heard on Channel 16 stating that two people and an overturned kayak had been spotted in the water in the Boat Harbour/Yellow Point area, Nick Epp-Evans, the station leader in Ladysmith, explained in a news release. The Nanaimo 27 vessel (McGregor) responded to Victoria Coast Guard radio that they and Ladysmith 29 were in the area on a training exercise and could respond immediately. Victoria then tasked Ladysmith immediately. After an approximately five- to 10-minute transit toward the Boat Harbour area from the vessels’ location on the south end of Dodd Narrows, Nanaimo 27 spotted the

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December, and she received final the process. confirmation of her acceptance “He was super supportive a few weeks later. through the whole process,” McDonald has yet to learn McDonald said. “Honestly, I which of Oxford’s 40-odd col- probably would not have made leges she’ll attend, but she said it to Oxford if Mr. Taylor hadn’t she’s happy to finally be “in.” been by my side the whole time. Earning herself a spot at He’s definitely encouraged me to Oxford wouldn’t have been pos- reach for my goals.” sible without the help of her McDonald listed “technical thementor, Bill Taylor, McDonald atre” — she manages the lighting added. Taylor, a drama teacher and sound controls for school at LSS and coach of the school’s performances — and reading as improv and drama clubs, guided her hobbies. See McDonald Page 3 McDonald through every step of

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service through which most prospective undergraduate students in the U.K. apply to university. Her choice of schools included the University of Edinburgh, St. Andrews, University College London (UCL), the University of Durham and Oxford. She was accepted to all five of her candidate schools, selecting Oxford and UCL as her “firm” and “insurance” choices. A week-long visit to the U.K. for in-person interviews at both Oxford and UCL followed in

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The B.C. and Yukon division of the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) has decided to close its Ladysmith office effective March 31, leaving the office’s volunteer staff scratching their heads as to how logical a decision that might be. Janice Grinnell said she’s volunteered with the local CCS office for the last 19 years. She now serves as

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Wade Fotherby and his son Cyrus skip rocks at Transfer Beach as they enjoy a sunny Friday afternoon on Feb. 8.

Questions linger over Alton’s death Nick Bekolay THE CHRONICLE

When the body of David James Alton was discovered in a dugout at Aggie Field on the afternoon of Jan. 14, he lay on his side as though he was asleep. Ladysmith RCMP Staff Sgt. Larry Chomyn said there was nothing suspicious about Alton’s death, but the exact cause of his death has yet to be determined. Cindy Cox, Alton’s cousin, said the coroner suspected three possible causes of death including hypothermia, heart attack or a drug overdose. Barb McLintock, a spokesperson with the B.C. Coroners Service, said Alton’s case remains open. Preliminary tests were inconclusive, McLintock added, and the results of additional tests won’t be returned until “late spring at best.” Alton found himself homeless in early January after he was evicted from his apartment at 631 First Ave., Cox said, because he had not

paid rent for three months. An advocate working with the Ladysmith Resource Centre Association assisted Alton in late November to arrange payment for his rent, she said. Alton did not return to inform her of his eviction, however, so she could not comment on why he may have been evicted. Lindsay Widsten of Widsten Property Management said he could not confirm whether or not Alton was evicted citing limits imposed by the Privacy Act. However, if Alton was in fact evicted, Widsten said it would not have been as a result of the condition of his property. Former classmate spoke with Alton days before his death Bruce Mason graduated from Ladysmith Secondary School with Alton in 1965. He crossed paths with Alton “three days or so before he died.” “He looked very ill when I saw him” Mason said. “I didn’t recog-

nize him at first because he was so thin. He looked 90 years old.” Alton had recently turned 65, Mason said. “He was obviously not well,” Mason added. “He was wearing clothes that were all falling apart. I think he had a lot of layers on. He had a leather jacket, but all the seams were splitting. He had a toque on, but he was in rough shape. He was really down and out.” Alton was “very upset,” Mason said. “[Dave] said ‘I’m homeless. They kicked me out of where I was living and they threw all my stuff away.’” Alton had lost his possessions and a small collection of his father’s sporting trophies that Alton said he “valued most in life,” Mason added. Alton repeatedly assured Mason that he would be fine. “I thought maybe he was with a friend,” Mason said. “It’s quite tragic and it shouldn’t have happened and hopefully it will never

happen to anyone else in town.” saw Alton around town “within a Alton’s friends will gather at month” of his death. Elliott’s Beach near Coffin Point “It was shocking to see him,” later this spring or summer, Mason Bodaly said. “He was a bone rack.” said, to scatter his ashes. It had been a long, slow descent A t h l e t i c s m o r e o f a into destitution for a friend he priority than academic remembers as having been “fairly potential popular in high school.” Carman Bodaly first met Alton Bodaly described a young Alton when Alton was four years old, as a “fun, good-looking guy who he said. They were playmates had lots of potential. He was wellas children and partied together built, handsome, fun to be with through high school and into their and he drove around in a muscle 20s. Bodaly married in 1967 and car. I don’t think his marks were his daughter was born in 1971. outstanding because he was doing “When I had a child, I started to a lot of partying even back then. change,” Bodaly said. “It didn’t His ambition in high school was happen overnight, but I gradually to be a marine biologist, but that pulled the reigns in on myself.” never happened. He never attendMeanwhile, Alton’s life contin- ed [university]. Back in those days, ued to revolve around “booze and you got out of [high] school and drugs and partying,” Bodaly said. got a job. He was making good The two men slowly drifted apart, money.” parting ways entirely when they Alton managed a gym in Nanaimo were in their 50s after Bodaly lent in the late 70s or early 80s and Alton rent money he knew Alton “was into weight lifting quite seriwouldn’t be able to repay. ously,” Bodaly said. Bodaly hadn’t spoken to Alton Alton was heavily influenced in “four or five years” and last See Alton’s Page 3

Nick Bekolay

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Kathy Holmes of Ladysmith is one of 35 British Columbians who will receive a B.C. Community Achievement Award. Holmes, seen here at the Ladysmith Waterfront Art Gallery, is being recognized for her volunteer contributions to the community.

Kathy Holmes wins provincial award

Haley Lackie and siblings Miranda and Stewart Caplin have spent countless afternoons and evenings at Chemainus’s old firehall over the last five years. Lackie first visited the Cowichan Neighbourhood House Association (CNHA) when she was 13 years old. Fast forward five years and you’ll find Lackie, now 18, studying child and youth care at Vancouver Island University in Nanaimo — a direct result of her Neighbourhood House experience and the relationship she formed with a former CNHA youth worker. Homeschoolers Miranda, 18, and Stewart, 16, found their way to Neighbourhood House around the same time as Lackie when the “youth action crew” they’d signed up with was relocated to CNHA from Chemainus Secondary School. Up until a year ago, Lackie and the Stewarts would visit CNHA nearly every single day to play pool, video games and “mad games of poker.” They don’t visit Neighbourhood House now as often as they used to “because we’re kind of growing up,” Miranda said, but they still come “fairly regularly.” They dislike the idea of housing CNHA’s programs in “a shed,” Lackie said, referring to the proposed relocation of CNHA’s programming to portable classrooms when the old firehall is torn down next year. Miranda, Stewart and Lackie attend Grade 12 Ladysmith Secondary School student Bobby Rice presents a cheque to Elizabeth Newcombe, cooking classes at CNHA every secexecutive director of the Vancouver Island Crisis Society, at a Pink Shirt Day event Feb. 27 at LSS. Stu- ond Thursday where they’ve learned dents and teachers involved in the school’s Aboriginal Education program raised $225 for VICS through a to cook everything from Thai green student-run hot dog sale. To learn more, please see page 4. NICK BEKOLAY/CHRONICLE curry to Egyptian dishes, something

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Doug Rou Routley ey is running unn ng for o re-election e e e on

do that. We’re going to raise corpoNick Bekolay rate taxes and we’re going to raise some of the higher income brackEight long weeks remain before ets’ [taxes] so that we can have the British Columbians head to the resources to address some of these polls to elect a new provincial problems.” government, but that hasn’t “We need a poverty reduction stopped incumbent Nanaimo- plan,” Routley added. “We’re one North Cowichan NDP MLA Doug of the only provinces that doesn’t Routley from rolling up his sleeves have a poverty reduction plan, and we have the highest levand jumping into the Quoted in the Chronicle els of poverty. Our plan fray. isn’t simply addressRoutley shifted his ing income issues. It’s campaign into gear “We’re talking Saturday, March 16 about running a addressing housing issues; it’s addresswith an open house a t h i s d o w n t o w n campaign that’s ing opportunities and training; it’s addressbased on a Ladysmith constituency office, vowing redistribution of ing income security, as well as food security. to put an end to what wealth to some So there are a numhe described as the ber of approaches that Liberal’s brand of “govextent.” need to be taken all at ernment by surprise” Doug Routley, once.” should he be re-elected current NDP MLA Routley said the NDP to represent the riding. would restore the proNDP strategies for vincial bank tax to fund r e d u c i n g p o v e r t y, improving environmental oversight both a reduction in interest rates and investing in apprenticeships on student loans and a $200-miland education were topics Routley lion training and apprenticeship program. discussed with his supporters. In addition, an NDP government “We’re talking about running a campaign that’s based on a redis- would “remove corporate and union donations for political partribution of wealth to some extent,” Routley said, referring specifically ties,” Routley said, and “restore a to the province’s high rate of child legitimate environmental assesspoverty. “No one has ever run and ment process” to compensate for won in B.C. by saying ‘We’re going the loss of meaningful provincial See Routley Page 3 to raise taxes,’ but we are going to

Clad in green camouflage, actor Aaron Taylor-Johnson rides a missile-toting military train alongside director Gareth Edwards (at centre), camera operator Mitch Dubin and a cast of extras during filming for an upcoming Warner Bros. production of Godzilla. Film crews from Legendary Pictures descended on the railroad crossing at Oyster Sto’Lo Road and Highway 1 Thursday morning for their second day of filming in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith area. Godzilla’s production crew was scheduled to spend a total of six days filming on Vancouver Island before returning to Vancouver where shooting will wrap up “early summer.”

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The Ladysmith Steelers football team kicked off its five-a-side flag football season Saturday, March 16 at Forrest Field. Team practices run Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30-7 p.m., with intra-squad games scheduled for Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon. For more information on Steelers Football, contact coach Demetreos Bourodemos at 250-729-1519.

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Ernie Malik, a freelance publicist representing Godzilla’s production crew, before they return to the Lower Mainland. The remainder of the film will be shot in-studio and “at various locations” in Vancouver from now through to “early summer,” Malik added. Godzilla roars into theatres May 16, 2014. Godzilla, a joint venture between Warner Bros. Entertainment and Legendary Pictures, stars Aaron Taylor-

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its way through a crowded railway crossing flanked on either side by crowds of extras posing ostensibly as refugees. On board, cast members dressed in camouflage fatigues guarded the train’s cargo of ballistic missiles. Classic monster movie material. Thursday, March 21 marked day two of filming in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith area. The crew was slated to shoot a total of six days’ worth of footage at Nanaimo, Ladysmith and Shawnigan Lake locations, said

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Film crews from Legendary Pictures converged on the railway crossing at Oyster Sto’Lo Road and Highway 1 last Thursday to film a scene for the latest Western reincarnation of Godzilla, Japan’s favourite radioactive monster-from-thedeep. The camera crew shot repeated takes aboard a mock military transport train as it lumbered

Johnson of Kick-Ass fame, Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad’s legendary chemist “Heisenberg”), Elizabeth Olsen (younger sister to Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen) and Juliette Binoche, star of Chocolat and the Three Colors trilogy. David Strathairn — Edward R. Murrow from Good Night, and Good Luck — and Ken Watanabe from Inception and The Last Samurai round out the cast listing, Malik said. Godzilla is director Gareth Edwards’ sophomore feature

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they’re convinced they’ll no longer be able to do if CNHA moves to a facility that lacks a kitchen. And a lack of culinary instruction isn’t their only concern. “How are you supposed to run a free store from a portable classroom?” Lackie asked “How are you supposed to have a game of hockey in a portable classroom?” Miranda added. CNHA’s current location is equally important because of its proximity to “the Jungle,” Miranda said, referring euphemistically to the forested slopes of Waterwheel Park. “In the park, a lot of people do things that you shouldn’t,” Miranda said. “I remember when I was 13, this place definitely kept me out of it. Say there was a fight. You could come here and nothing was allowed to happen because there was adult supervision. It’s a safe place as well as a hangout.” “Neighbour helping neighbour” CNHA runs its programming out of the old town firehall on Willow Street. Over the last 16 years, the association has invested countless volunteer hours renovating and modifying the 4,000-square-foot, two-storey space to suit its needs. The former truck bays now house a recreation room filled with billiard, foosball and table-tennis tables, a small bank of computers, and couches and chairs. Office and storage space, an art room and a toy zone for kids fill the remainder of the first floor. A licensed commercial kitchen (key to their daily soup-and-a-bun program), a lounge, a counselling office and a small gymnasium occupy the building’s second floor. See Council Page 3

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Two-year-old Julie Forslund of Victoria fills her Easter basket during the Easter Eggstravaganza, sponsored by the Chemainus-Crofton Fraternal Order of Eagles, Satuday, March 30 at Fuller Lake Park. For more photos of Easter activities, please see page 11.

Representatives of the Canadian Cancer Society, BC and Yukon Division (CCS) responded to the criticisms and pleas of veteran volunteers at Eagles Hall Wednesday, March 27 with expressions of sympathy, but remained unyielding in their decision to close the Ladysmith CCS office. Much to the chagrin of local members, Ladysmith’s CCS office marked the 75th anniversary of the society last Friday by opening its doors to the public for the last time. The office is now closed. Senior staffers Peter Kingston, CCS’s divisional-vice president of operations, and Kathy Ilott, the society’s regional director for Vancouver Island, met with Ladysmith residents at Eagles Hall to discuss the impending closure. Following a presentation on CCS funding initiatives and programs, volunteers and donors disenchanted with the planned closure aired their grievances to Kingston and Ilott and suggested means of keeping the office open. When asked to reiterate the society’s motives for closing the local unit office, Kingston said the decision stemmed from “a number of cost-cutting steps that we were faced with taking this year.”

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Ladysmith Mayor Rob Hutchins and his brother Andrew Hutchins were two of 75 British Columbians recognized by B.C. Premier Christy Clark at a ceremony hosted at the Fairmont Empress Hotel in Victoria Tuesday, Feb. 26. Premier Clark awarded Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medals (QE2 medals) to the Hutchins brothers and their fellow recipients “in recognition of their service to their fellow citizens,” stated a government press release. The awards ceremony was intended to celebrate the accomplishments of individuals in the fields of business, public service, law enforcement, education, sports and volunteerism. Hutchins first learned of his award Jan. 27 when a package containing a medal, an official certificate and a message from Governor General David Johnston arrived at his office. “It was both a surprise and a mystery,” Hutchins added, “as there was no indication of the nominee.”

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“We believe that when we were looking at the budget for the next fiscal year, which we have now started, we needed to trim some costs in order to continue to deliver services,” he said. “The economic environment and the revenue projections showed us that if we didn’t reduce some costs, we wouldn’t be able to deliver service. So we had to take some very tough choices.” CCS administrators looked at cutting “optional costs” like marketing, communications, travel and training, Kingston added — a process which led to the closure of both the regional office in Whitehorse, Yukon and unit offices in Ladysmith and Parksville-Qualicum. “In addition, because we’re trying to make sure we go into the fiscal year with a balanced budget, we did have to reduce our total payroll cost,” Kingston said, “and we have reduced the equivalent of 12 full-time positions. I know you’re looking at [the cost of operating the Ladysmith office] in isolation. This is, in your minds, a small cost — the $5,000 rent cost plus the cost of us administering the unit — but for us, it’s a whole package of cost-cutting of which this is one element. “We know that the community is going to be disappointed. We understand that.” See Unit Page 3

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Mid-Isle Soccer Club hosted its first annual five-a-side soccer tournament Saturday and Sunday at Forrest Field. The two-day tournament served as a fundraiser for the Mid-Isle Highlanders and saw a total of 28 teams — including five teams of adults — battle it out in friendly competition. For more photos from the tournament, please see page 15.

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tor, too, Greer said, to facilitate the relocation of items from the museum’s collection. Chris Dawes and Denise Sakai from Island Timberlands were on hand to assist with the groundbreaking, Greer said, in recognition of the company’s ownership of the land once designated as parkland by H.R. MacMillan. Eric Veistrup, president of the Chemainus Valley Historical Society, and Greer were joined by Sakai, Nanaimo-North Cowichan MLA Doug Routley, CDCOC president Peter Matthews, North Cowichan Mayor Jon Lefebure and Mel Dorey, CVRD director for Saltair, for a ceremonial groundbreaking at the site Friday afternoon. Veistrup said they hope to start construction “within a week or two” in order to complete the building’s foundation “within the next two months,” prior to a slowdown for tourist season. Framing will begin in the fall, Veistrup said, “and by this time next year we should have the roof on our structure. That’s our goal.” “The visitor centre is now going to be part of our museum,” Veistrup added, “and we have promised them that they will be ready to See Construction Page 3

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Two days later, Hutchins received an e-mail from Karen Leibovici, an Edmonton city councillor and the president of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) informing him of the fact that FCM had selected him for the award. “Mystery solved,” Hutchins added. In her Jan. 29 e-mail, Leibovici wrote: “FCM chose you to receive this distinction for your exemplary efforts to make your community a great place to live ...We sincerely appreciate your municipality’s affiliation with FCM, and its support of strong communities and good government.” Hutchins said he was pondering over what to do next when he shared the news with one of his children. As the news trickled through the family grapevine, it was revealed that Hutchins’ brother Andrew — a director at the Cowichan Sportsplex in Duncan — had also been nominated for a QE2 medal and was due to receive his at a ceremony presided over by Premier Clark Feb. 26. See Brothers Page 3

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Breaking B eak ng g ground ound on Chema Chemainus nu Va Valley ey Mu Museum eum expan on expansion Notable locals gathered outside the Chemainus Valley Museum (CVM) Friday afternoon (April 5) to break ground on the museum’s long-anticipated expansion. Norma Greer, a CVM “archivist, secretary and gopher girl,” said the addition will be completed to the lockdown stage “by the spring of next year.” Interior remodelling of the museum’s portion of the expansion is expected to be completed by 2016, Greer said, “by the 25th anniversary of the building of our original building.” The Chemainus Visitor Centre and its sponsor, the Chemainus and District Chamber of Commerce (CDCOC), will also call the expansion home. Greer said the Visitor Centre will be open “hopefully early next spring.” The expansion will include three floors in total, with the lowest floor consisting of a single room designed to serve as storage for the museum, Greer added, as they are “busting at the seams with stuff” and have exhausted their existing storage space as a result. The expansion includes an eleva-

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Nathan Mrus gets a foot on the ball as Great Britain, Ladysmith’s Under-13 boys team, kicks off the 2013 Mid-Isle Soccer Club House League Tournament with a 2-0 loss against Oceanside Saturday, March 9 under sunny skies. Great Britain followed that up with a narrow loss to Nanaimo’s Italy. Game two saw Great Britain battle back from a 2-0 deficit, only to lose 3-2 following a shootout. For more from the soccer tournament, please turn to page 15.

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film, Malik added, falling into the same colossal-creature genre as his freshman 2010 alien-invasion thriller Monster. Jim Rygiel, a veteran of The Amazing Spiderman and The Lord of the Rings trilogy, will serve as visual effects supervisor for Godzilla, Malik said. According to the Internet Movie Database (IMDb), Godzilla’s screenplay was written by Max Borenstein, with finishing touches added by Drew Pearce, See Police Page 3

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Holmes now serves as both president and media liaison for the Ladysmith and District Arts Council, and she sits on the board of directors with the Ladysmith Chamber of Commerce (LCOC). She has helped organize Paddlefest, Ladysmith Days, Arts on the Avenue, Oktoberfest, the Home, Garden and Business Show and the Spirit of Ladysmith Community Awards. In her spare time, Holmes See Award Page 3

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thing but tedious. “When I volunteer, I do it actually for selfish reasons because I really love doing it and I get a lot of pleasure out of it,” she said. “So in a sense, it’s not a grind. It’s just a whole bunch of fun for me.” Holmes has called Ladysmith home for the last 19 years. She worked with the Chronicle’s advertising and sales department for 10 years, earning design awards for her ads.

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with at least one person. “I said ‘yes,’ and then I phoned my son right away,” Holmes a d d e d , l a u g h i n g . “ H e ’s i n Toronto. Who the heck’s he going to tell?” Holmes said she grew up in a family where community volunteerism was a routine part of life. “It was just expected that you had fun volunteering and contributing to your community,” Holmes said. As a result, Holmes views her volunteer commitments as any-

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from the B.C. Achievement Foundation (BCAF) presuming they had contacted her to solicit a donation. When she discovered instead that she’d won an award, Holmes said she was “so dumbfounded, I didn’t know what to say. It wasn’t what I was expecting.” Holmes was asked to keep the news confidential until the BCAF publicized its list of award recipients, but she couldn’t resist sharing the news

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to Barbara Kaminsky, CEO of the CCS B.C. and Yukon division, Don protests the closing of the Ladysmith and Qualicum/ Parksville offices — the CCS’s Qualicum Beach and Whitehorse, Yukon offices are also slated for closure —reminding Kaminsky that the Ladysmith office was founded in 1946. Don challenges the suggestion that donations be submitted at the Nanaimo office or online, advising See Volunteer-run Page 3

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the grant they’d received from CAI. “I went to the meeting and proposed a new vision [for the project] that I thought would be really great,” Taylor said, “and that’s to have the youth create a media product. The idea would be for youth to tell their stories and the stories they find in their community.” Discrepancies in how the project’s budget was being managed led to the resignation, in January, of James Latour, PRL’s former project manager. Taylor stepped in to fill the void as PRL shifted its focus towards empowering youth through storytelling. “Narrative therapy,” as Taylor referred to it, has proven itself to be an effective means of intervening in the lives of at-risk-youth, he said. As participants craft their stories, it provides them with an opportunity to perceive their own lives as stories they themselves are the authors of. Students then recognize that they are capable of determining the narrative governing their own lives. “That alone is an intervention,” Taylor added. Choosing, instead, to narrate someone else’s story offers advantages of its own. “That builds community right away,” Taylor said. “In the new incarnation of the project, it might be as simple as having a [participant] tell a community member’s story or a place’s story or a group’s story. Think of it like a virtual library that will help youth [better] understand their community.” Key to the project’s success will be its ability to help youth address feelings or emotions that arise from their storytelling projects, especially those that are autobiographical in See Community Page 3

closure Monday, Jan. 28, one week prior to World Cancer Day. CCS administrators, including regional director Kathy Ilott and Kingston advised volunteer staff of the closure in person. Ilott and Kingston advised the volunteers that local donors would be able to continue to donate in person by visiting the CCS’s Nanaimo office, Don said, or donate by phone or online. In a letter addressed

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ies of Ladysmith, and is not necessarily dependent on having a physical office location, which incurs rent expenses in addition to other district-wide expenses,” he said, adding the lease for the Ladysmith office is approximately $5,000 annually, but there are more costs that make up running any office across the division. Volunteer staff at the Ladysmith CCS office — Don and Janice included —learned of the impending

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According to Peter Kingston, the vice-president of operations for the CCS B.C. and Yukon division, this represents revenue generated by volunteers working in the community, not just out of the unit office, as well as CCS staff in the Vancouver Island regional office, supported by the division office in Vancouver. “This revenue is produced by many project teams, spanning a geographic area beyond the boundar-

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its president. Her husband Don has served as treasurer for seven years. The Grinnells said the CCS will save no more than $5,500 per year by closing the Ladysmith office, a sum readily offset by the value of donations the society will lose without volunteers on staff to receive donations in person or to organize local fundraising ventures. The Ladysmith CCS office processed close to $69,000 in 2012, Don said.

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Project REEL Life (PRL) is fast approaching its first post-makeover public appearance. Cinema is still a key feature of the project, but a youth-run theatre is no longer featured on PRL’s list of objectives. Under new guidance from Bill Taylor, Ladysmith Secondary School’s drama and English teacher, PRL will now focus on mentoring community youth through the process of producing their own media projects. The implementation of the new version of PRL involves “a paradigm shift in how one thinks about projects in education,” Taylor said. “We’re moving from a site-based, time-based model to a virtual model that can then accommodate a flexibility in terms of time, place and mentorship. The original model for Project REEL Life was that the youth would build and run a theatre, which was a really cool idea. It involved entrepreneurship. It involved skill building in terms of setting budgets. They found a need in the town for youth to be engaged, and they were working toward providing a space for youth to congregate. It was a very cool project.” PRL received $200,000 from the Community Action Initiative (CAI) to make that happen, Taylor added, but the project stalled when it “hit road blocks that weren’t apparent to them when they started.” By December 2012, PRL was on LINDSAY CHUNG/CHRONICLE the verge of collapse. As the project Marcy Drinkwater and her daughter Delilah, who is one and a half years old, get in the Valentine’s spirit floundered, participating members by making Valentine’s Day-themed crafts during a Ladysmith Family and Friends session at Aggie Hall last called a meeting to discuss how they week. might salvage the project and retain

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A crowd of onlookers gathered at Fisherman’s Wharf in Ladysmith Wednesday, Jan. 30 to witness the Tedora’s return to the sea after six years on dry land. It was a milestone in a lengthy restoration project by Michael Schaefer, who has been working on the 13-ton classic wooden boat for nearly a decade. To find out about the boat’s colourful history and how it ended up in Ladysmith, please turn to page 3.

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capsized kayak and two people in the water just south of Round Island, according to Epp-Evans. The Ladysmith crew — Bond and two crew members, Dan Smith and Dwayne Dyer (also coxswains with Station 29), and a guest crew member, Paul Mottershead from Nanaimo 27 — recovered one person from the water, while Nanaimo 27A recovered the other person and Nanaimo 27B retrieved the capsized kayak and paddles. The person retrieved by Ladysmith was treated on the deck for hypothermia and was then transferred to the Nanaimo 27 enclosed-cabin boat for transport to the Boat Harbour Marina to meet BC Ambulance attendants, according to Epp-Evans. “If these vessels had not been training in the vicinity, this situation could easily have proven life-threatening,” he explained. “Normally, a rescue vessel being tasked would have taken at least half an hour to reach this destination. With a location different from the actual being reported, an even longer time frame would have occurred. “In these waters, at this time a year, an individual would be in dire distress after 20 minutes.” Bond was officially listed as the coxswain for the call, getting his first taste of being in charge of the vessel and crew in a real-life experience of saving lives on the water.. Bond has been an active crew member with Station 29 since See Newest Page 3

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Firefighters from Chemainus, Crofton and Ladysmith were called to a fire at ProFab Manufacturing Ltd. at the end of Hope Place near Chemainus Sunday morning. The fire departments were called out around 8 a.m. Jan. 6, and the cause of the fire was not known at press time.

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went into the credit union to find out more. It turned out, once they started looking into it, that money Parishioners of Ladysmith First had been transferred out of several United Church (LFUC) were robbed accounts.” Some of the church’s accounts are of more than their holiday spirit when they discovered shortly after rarely if ever used and have restricChristmas that someone had stolen tions placed on them requiring two people to sign authorization for $40,000 from the church’s coffers. Brian Saunders, chairman of the transactions, Saunders said. These board for LFUC, said the church’s restrictions don’t apply to online treasurer signed in to online bank- banking, however, because all of ing on Dec. 27 to check the LFUC’s the church’s accounts were accesaccount balances while preparing sible through a single username and password. end-of-year financial reports. What they discovered was that “We have several accounts with the [Ladysmith and District Credit someone had gained access to the Union],” Saunders said, “one of church’s online account and used it to them used for the day-to-day paying transfer funds on six separate occaof salaries and bills. The balance sions to Bank of Montreal (BMO) didn’t match what she knew there pre-paid credit cards. The fraudulent should be, so she looked further and transactions took place between Dec. found that there had been money 12 and Dec. 27, Saunders said, and transferred out of the account. She See Loss Page 5

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Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle Tuesday, December 31, 2013 3

Year in Review

The year in pictures

We take a look back at some of our favourite photos from the year 2013 Carmen Gibson of Chopstix Salon sheered Corey Cross’s long locks for the Canadian Cancer Society Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock Sept. 30 as the town celebrated the Tour’s arrival. Cross, an 11-year-old Ladysmith Intermediate School student, raised “just over $4,000” in the process, a sum later matched by Ladysmith’s Coastal Trucking NICK BEKOLAY

Outgoing Ladysmith Ambassador Kelly Wallace passes on the crown to Kristy DeClark, who was named Ladysmith’s Ambassador for 2013-14 during the program’s annual coronation event in April. NICK BEKOLAY

About 60-70 students from Ladysmith Secondary School presented their annual Dance Showcase in mid-January, giving the community a glimpse of how much talent our youth possess. Chemainus Secondary School students presented their dance showcase the next week. NICK BEKOLAY

Two-year-old twins Connor and Brianna McQuillin make the acquaintance of Captain Jack Sparrow and Miss Scarlett at the Ladysmith Kids’ Pirate Day June 1 at the Ladysmith Maritime Society (LMS) Community Marina. This was the first year the LMS broke its Maritime Festival into separate events on separate weekends.

A smurf gives out treats during the Ladysmith Days parade at the beginning of August. NICK BEKOLAY

The parade during Summer Fest in Chemainus About 300 people of all ages participated in this past June was a cheerful, colourful high- an Idle No More demonstration at the Husky light of the summer. STACEY CROSSLEY Gas Station last Dec. 31. LINDSAY CHUNG

NICK BEKOLAY

Four-year-old Darevin Curnow of Chemainus showed us how much fun ArtBeat in Chemainus was in early August. LINDSAY CHUNG

A live nativity was part of Ladysmith’s Old Tyme Christmas and Candlelight Walk in early December. STACEY CROSSLEY


TOWN OF LADYSMITH

NOTICES & NEWS JANUARY 2014

COUNCIL MEETING SCHEDULE Monday, January 6th and Monday, January 20th at 7:00 p.m. *Municipal Services Committee Monday, January 20th *Mayor’s Open Door – City Hall Thursdays, 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. City Hall (410 Esplanade) Business Hours Monday - Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Corner of Trans Canada Hwy. and Roberts St. except statutory holidays *Please check the website or call City Hall at 250.245.6400 to confirm times. Council Meetings

HOLIDAY CLOSURES

City Hall, Development Services and Public Works will be closed December 25, 2013 to January 1, 2014, reopening January 2nd. The Frank Jameson Community Centre Pool and Fitness Centre will be closed on December 25, 26 and January 1. Please call the FUNN line at 250.245.6425 during the holidays for the Holiday Schedule.

FOURTH QUARTER UTILITY BILLS TO BE INVOICED IN JANUARY Utility bills for October to December will be sent out in January. If you haven’t received your bill by the end of January, or have any questions about it, please call City Hall at 250.245.6414, extension 6206. *Note* As per statutory requirement, outstanding utility fees not paid by December 31, 2013 will be transferred to your property tax arrears.

PEERLESS ROAD RECYCLING CENTRE TEMPORARY DROP OFF SITE - 4142 THICKE ROAD

The temporary drop off site is open while upgrades are carried out at the main site. The direct phone number for the site is 250.245.5757. Winter hours are: Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. For questions about materials accepted and fees, please contact the CVRD Recycling Hotline at 1.800.665.3955 or visit their website at http://www.cvrd.bc.ca.

TRANSIT SERVICE

Ladysmith is served by BC Transit. Routes and maps are available through a link on our website www.ladysmith.ca. Schedules, tickets and passes are available at City Hall, Frank Jameson Community Centre and the 49th Parallel Grocery. For more information, please call City Hall at 250.245.6400.

DOG LICENCES

Dog owners are reminded that 2014 dog tags are now available. The Town offers a discount for early purchase. Fees are as follows: Price Before February 1st Price as of February 1st Neutered / Spayed $22 $32 Not Neutered or Spayed $40 $50 Licences (tags) are available at City Hall, (410 Esplanade) during regular office hours, at Frank Jameson Community Centre, (810 6th Avenue) and Little Rascals Pet Store, (416 First Avenue).

SNOW REMOVAL

In the event of a snowfall, the Town of Ladysmith will be responsible for clearing “heavily travelled” sidewalks along First Avenue and Dogwood Drive. For all other areas, property owners and residents are reminded you are required to clear snow and ice from the sidewalk in front of your premises. Removal should take place no later than 10:00 a.m. on each day of a snowfall. This will greatly help all pedestrians and add to the safety of the elderly and those with limited mobility. The Town will make every effort to keep major arterial and collector streets open and clear snow from as many residential streets as possible. Thank you for your assistance in keeping our streets safe.

BURNING REGULATIONS

Please be reminded that no outdoor burning is permitted within the Town of Ladysmith, with the exception of small cooking fires (no bigger than .5 m. sq.) such as a barbecue, fire pit or chiminea.

GARBAGE / RECYCLING COLLECTION YOUR GARBAGE COLLECTION DAY IS CHANGING!

Following the Christmas Day and Boxing Day statutory holidays on December 25th and 26th your garbage pick-up day will be moving forward by 2 (TWO) days. Following the New Year’s Day statutory holidays on January 1st, your garbage pick-up day will be moving forward by 1 (ONE) day. Schedules are available on our website www.ladysmith.ca or at City Hall.

BOULEVARDS

Reminder to property owners that it is your responsibility to maintain the boulevards adjacent to your properties. This includes mowing and keeping them tidy. For more information please call City Hall at 250.245.6400 or Public Works at 250.245.6445.

HOMEOWNER GRANT

December 31st is the deadline to claim your homeowner grants for 2012 (retroactive) and 2013, if you have not already done so. Please contact the Tax Department at 250.245.6414, ext. 6206 for more information.

ZONING BYLAW UPDATE PROJECT

A project to review and update the Ladysmith Zoning Bylaw is now underway and residents will be able to have their say. The project is scheduled to be completed soon. The aim of the Zoning Bylaw Update project is to: ✔ Lay out clear, technically sound regulations ✔ Be consistent with the Official Community Plan ✔ Implement ideas and principles from the Ladysmith Sustainability Vision and Community Energy Plan ✔ Support economic development For more information and background on why an updated Zoning Bylaw is important to our community, please visit the Zoning Bylaw Project website at www.ladysmithzoningbylaw.ca, or click the link at www.ladysmith.ca, or call 250.245.6415

REMEMBER – ATVs and other motorized vehicles ARE not permitted on ANY TOWN trails

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The Year in Review

The Chronicle looks back at some of the stories that made headlines in the first half of 2013

January At the beginning of January, we reported the exciting news that the Ladysmith Players had signed an agreement with School District 68 for the society to purchase the former Diamond Elementary School building on Christie Road that houses the Ladysmith Little Theatre. The year also started off with a report from a local demonstration supporting the Idle No More movement. Tim Harris, Stephanie Harris and Gina-Mae Harris organized a demonstration just outside Ladysmith at the Husky Gas Station on Dec. 31, and about 300 people took part. Parishioners of Ladysmith First United Church were robbed of more than their holiday spirit when they discovered shortly after Christmas that someone had stolen $40,000 from the church’s coffers. February At the beginning of February, we found out that the B.C. and Yukon division of the Canadian Cancer Society had decided to close its Ladysmith office effective March 31, leaving the office’s volunteer staff scratching their heads as to how logical a decision that might be. Questions were raised about what services are available for homeless people in our community after the body of David James Alton was discovered in a dugout at Aggie Field on the afternoon of Jan. 14. Ladysmith RCMP Staff Sgt. Larry Chomyn said there Hungry - Tired! Order Pizza Tonight!

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was nothing suspicious Dr. Doug Player about Alton’s death, worked as a consulbut the exact cause of tant to assist senior his death had not yet management with the been determined. Al- definition of the key ton’s cousin, Cindy Cox, elements of a draft 10said Alton found him- year facilities enhanceself homeless in early ment plan, and his recJanuary after he was ommendations were evicted from his apart- presented to the board ment because he had April 11. not paid rent for three Near the end of the months. month, Kristy DeMarch Clark was named LaMany Ladysmith dysmith’s Ambassador residents were hon- for 2013-14. Followoured with Queen ing the ceremony, DeElizabeth II Diamond Clark — a 16-year-old Jubilee Medals in 2013, Grade 11 student at and in March, we re- Ladysmith Secondary ported that School and president of the LSS student council — admitted the win took her by surprise. Kira Mauriks and Sydney Jordan were named Vi c e - A m b a s sadors. May In early May, residents in Ladysmith a n d L a d y s m i t h Chemainus had a Mayor Rob Hutchins chance to hear from and his brother Andrew the six candidates vyHutchins were two of ing to represent Nanai75 British Columbians mo-North Cowichan recognized by B.C. Pre- in the provincial Legmier Christy Clark at a islature during all-canceremony in Victoria. didates forums. Doug If you saw a mock Routley (BC NDP), military transport train Amanda Jacobson (BC on the railway cross- Liberal Party), John ing at Oyster Sto’Lo Sherry (BC ConservaRoad and Highway 1, tive Party), Murray you were actually wit- McNab (Independent), nessing the filming of P. Anna Paddon (InGodzilla. Film crews dependent) and Mayo from Legendary Pic- McDonough (Green tures shot a total of six Party of BC) addressed days’ worth of footage issues such as health in Nanaimo, Ladysmith care, smart meters, and Shawnigan Lake. raw log exports and The movie is expected education during the to hit theatres May 16, forums. 2014. Ongoing negotiations April between Couverdon In mid-April, a re- (TimberWest’s real esport presented to the tate business) and the School District 68 Town of Ladysmith school board recom- over the incorporation mended some signifi- of 700-plus acres of cant changes over the forested Cowichan Valnext 10 years, includ- ley Regional District ing the controversial land had residents of reconfiguration of North Oyster and the schools in Ladysmith. Diamond in a huff. Robe rts St reet Pi Robe zza rts St reet Pi zza

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News

Couverdon expected to hold public open house in February Ladysmith council receives a schedule for boundary extension proposal Lindsay Chung THE CHRONICLE

The Town of Ladysmith has received the formal boundary extension proposal from Couverdon Real Estate and is now figuring out the next steps in the process. Council received an update on the process schedule for Couverdon Real Estate’s boundary extension proposal during the Dec. 16 council meeting. Couverdon and Ladysmith are brokering a deal whereby Ladysmith would expand city limits to include a 283-hectare parcel of land west of the Diamond — stretching from north of Grouhel Road to Malone road — in exchange for Ladysmith gaining title to 180 hectares of TimberWest land adjacent to Stocking and Holland lakes. If everything goes ahead, Couverdon would foot the bill to build roads, install services and subdivide lots in preparation for the sale of parcels beginning in early 2017. Couverdon’s application includes a preliminary land use concept which envisions “a mixed-use community which will be an extension of the historic fabric of the town, building upon the community’s strong community history and culture,” according to a staff report from development services director Felicity Adams. Council had previously provided direction for the consideration of the Couverdon boundary extension proposal that the proposal be considered under the criteria of acquisition of watershed lands (both Stocking Lake and Holland Lake) to protect the drinking water that supplies the Town, the Diamond and Saltair and the proposed service to Stz’uminus First Nation; viewscape protection (the forested hills behind Ladysmith); and that any development must employ Smart Growth Practices and support the Town’s Sustainability Vision.

The derelict barge that had been sitting at Slack Point in the Ladysmith Harbour since 2012 has been removed by the provincial government and is in the process of being disposed of. BRENT BROWNING

Barge now out of the water Lindsay Chung THE CHRONICLE

Circled here are parcels of TimberWest land the Town of Ladysmith hopes to gain title to through a land deal with Couverdon, TimberWest’s real estate business. The deal in question would see Ladysmith expand its city limits to envelope a 283-hectare parcel of TimberWest land — located northwest of the city — in exchange for title to 180 hectares of land surrounding Holland and Stocking lakes, the town’s water supply. FILE PHOTO On Dec. 16, council agreed that staff should consider the proposal under those criteria, and council directed staff to proceed with the review of the proposed 283-hectare boundary extension proposal as outlined in the process schedule. As well, council voted that the Town ask Couverdon to present the Watershed Acquisition Proposal, Viewscape Protection Strategy and Land Use Concept Plan to council in January. Back in November, council had directed staff to prepare a process schedule for the consideration of the boundary extension proposal submitted by Couverdon Real Estate, including municipal electoral approval by alternate approval process. The proposed schedule is based on the consideration of council’s conditions for the application, as well as the provincial boundary extension process. Council has requested that Couverdon host a community open house to present the boundary extension proposal to the Ladysmith community, and the process schedule in-

cludes this open house in February, to coincide with the alternate approval process. In January, Couverdon will be making a presentation to council at the Jan. 27 meeting, at which time council will vote whether or not to authorize submission of the proposal to the provincial government. At this time, council will also direct whether or not to proceed with the alternate approval process. If the proposal is submitted to the Province, the ministry review will take place in late January and in February. Couverdon would then hold a community open house in midFebruary. The deadline for receiving electoral responses to the alternate approval process would be mid-March, and council would vote whether or not to approve the final proposal. If council approved the boundary extension, it would need provincial approval, and the Ministry would need to prepare Letters Patent to implement the proposed boundary change. For more information about Couverdon’s proposal, visit http://ladysmithopenhouse.ca.

It’s been sitting in the Ladysmith Harbour for nearly two years, and this month, the derelict barge that had been beached near Slack Point was finally removed. The provincial Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations spent the week of Dec. 16 dismantling the barge. It is one of five pieces of Second World War-era dry dock that sat in the Chemainus Harbour, a remnant of the breakwater project tied to the failed Chemainus Quay and Marina, and it had been towed to Slack Point by Transport Canada in March 2012. Three of those barges sunk in the Chemainus Harbour in 2012, and one is still floating. Scott Allen of the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, project supervisor for the barge disposal, says the first phase of the removal of the derelict barge in Ladysmith is complete, and the rest of the disposal is expected to be finished in the new year. “The barge is now completely out of the water, and the materials are all on dry land,” he said on Dec. 23. Allen says the barge is mostly made of wood, steel and concrete, and ministry staff have been separating the materials so they can dispose of them. All of the garbage and other refuse has been removed and dis-

posed of. On Dec. 23, they had separated about 80 per cent of the concrete from the wood, taken out the steel and taken all the metal to be recycled. That leaves a main pile of wood debris on land, and Allen says the ministry has a few options for disposal. “There will be a wood debris pile, and what happens next is we try to reduce the amount of debris you pay to get rid of at cost,” he explained, noting one way to reduce the volume of wood is to shred it. “We will make efforts to reduce the volume of the material that will be disposed of.” Allen says they will put safety fencing around the woody debris pile, and in the new year, they will take steps to dispose of the debris. “When we determine the volume, we’ll choose where it will go,” he explained. The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations is paying for the disposal. Allen isn’t certain if there was any one particular trigger for dismantling and disposing of the barge at this point in time. “It’s a step toward cleaning up the harbour,” he said. “Phase one is done, the barge is out of the water, and phase two is underway.” Allen believes the ministry does not have any immediate plans to deal with the barge that remains in the Chemainus Harbour.

Town of Ladysmith

NOTICE

The Town of Ladysmith intends to adopt changes to the Council Procedures Bylaw. These changes will remove the requirement for Council to hold a regular meeting on a Tuesday following a Monday statutory holiday. Town of Ladysmith Procedure Bylaw 2009, No. 1666, Amendment Bylaw (No. 1) 2014, No. 1845 (a bylaw to regulate the meetings of council) is scheduled to be adopted at the January 6, 2014 Council Meeting. You can see a copy of the proposed bylaw at City Hall, 410 Esplanade, Ladysmith, B.C. during regular business hours Monday to Friday, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, except on statutory holidays – or on the Town’s website at www.ladysmith.ca For further information, please contact Sandy Bowden, Director of Corporate Services at 250.245.6404 (sbowden@ladysmith.ca)


6 Tuesday, December 31, 2013 Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle

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Harvest House benefits from Festival of Trees Lindsay Chung the chronicle

This year’s Chemainus Festival of Trees, hosted by the Chemainus Gardens, is being hailed as a huge success. The festival, which is a nearly-monthlong fundraiser for the food bank, generated $3,101 through tree sponsorship, a silent auction and public donations in its third year, and Len Wansbrough of Chemainus Gardens donated an additional $1,500. On Dec. 21, festival co-ordinator Margaret Perry presented a cheque for $4,601 to the Chemainus Harvest House Food Bank. “We thank all those

who helped raise the bar on this year’s donations by more than $700,” she said. Rick O’Doherty, vice-president of Harvest House, says a donation like this makes a huge difference because Harvest House can use this money to buy more food; they often get a better price because they are a food bank, and they can often get food at wholesale prices. Harvest House serves roughly 300 people in Chemainus and Crofton each week. “As you can imagine, January, February and March are the most difficult time for food banks,” said O’Doherty. “We’re like squirrels;

l be We wil pairs or re closed f ance from ten & main y 1- 8 and Januar pen on o will re- y 9th. Januar hen! t See you

we need to benefit from the generosity at Christmas and keep that going. Christmas may come and go, but the food bank is every week.” Thirty-five people regularly volunteer at Harvest House, and O’Doherty says the big difference between Harvest House and other food banks is the frequency by which they give out food, as some food banks are only biweekly, but Harvest House is weekly. “There definitely is a need,” he said. “Not only are we seeing people who are hungry, but also people who don’t make enough money to make it to the end of their paycheque. Chemainus has been

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Margaret Perry, co-ordinator of the Chemainus Festival of Trees, presents a cheque for $4,601 to Rick O’Doherty, vice-president of the Harvest House Food Bank, Dec. 21 during the festival finale at Chemainus Gardens. Lindsay Chung absolutely an excel- Festival, was the tree lent community, for judge. such a small commuShe chose the rustic nity to support us like Aerial Tree Service this, and it’s because tree as the first-place of events like this. Ev- tree, while Ladysmith erybody supports it.” and District Credit As the festival Union’s cheery tree wound down, Perry took second place. also announced the The tree decorated winners of the tree by the Girl Guides of decorating and the Canada Chemainus poetry contest. and Crofton units This year, Crys- won the People’s tal Hanson, head Choice award. of wardrobe at the Writer and poet Chemainus Theatre Susan Martin from The Book Nook in Chemainus judged the poetry contest, and she says there were many great entries this year. The theme this year was “My Christmas Wish.” The winners were 14-year-old Anjilee Manhas, 12-year-old Hannah Dumez and nine-year-old Grace Lavigne.

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san Martin, to Phillip, the puppeteer from Cherry Tree Early Education; Simon from Crafty Cuppa; photographers Art and Daphne Carlyle who donated their time to take photos; all the volunteers; all the choirs and musicians who donated their time to perform; and Linda Kelly from Chemainus Gardens, who took care of everything office-related. Kelly wouldn’t let Perry go without praise. Rick O’Doherty “She does a fabulous Harvest House job, and each year, it’s bigger and better,” she said. Kelly says the Festival of Trees might move to a new venue Festival of Trees, in- that is closer to town cluding judges Crys- next year, but that is tal Hanson and Su- still up in the air.

Christmas may come and go, but the food bank is every week.

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2nd 60 Minutes challenge starts soon Don Fennell Black Press

An hour a day of fitness can be made fun, especially when it is coupled with other healthy choices like eating right. That’s the goal of the 60 Minute Kids’ Club, a fun and engaging online program designed to help get elementary schoolaged children active. The 60 Minute Kids’ Club is now looking to expand its community reach by partnering with Black Press. “Our strong commitment to healthy communities is wellJohn Mulrooney from the Ladysmith Rotary Club helps Mayan women Mariserved in our partnership with Cruz and Gabriella build a prefab cooking stove during a Nanaimo Rotary- the 60 Minute Kids’ Club” says sponsored volunteer project in Guatemala. Mulrooney is returning to Guate- Randy Blair, president of Black mala this Janaury with the Ladysmith Rotary Club. Photo Submitted Press’ Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island divisions. “The benefits of active families are so numerous, it will deliver increasingly great news.” “We want to make (children being healthy) even more of a

Ladysmith Rotarians headed to Guatemala Ross Armour

the chronicle

Ladysmith Rotary Club’s latest project will see the group head to South America in the new year. The group’s goal is to help enhance economic and educational opportunities for women in Guatemala, a country just south of Mexico. “It’s a culture project with a women’s centre just outside Lake Atitlan in the San Lucas Toliman area of Guatemala,” said John Mulrooney from the Rotary Club. “We’ve applied for a small $5,000 Rotary grant to help.” Mulrooney and company will head to Guatemala from Jan. 25 to Feb. 15 and will work specifically with the Mayan people of the country and the area on a permaculture venture. “They came up with the plan for what they wanted, and we are just there to support. They have use of a couple of hectares of land just outside the community centre there and they want to grow vegetables and raise chickens and ducks. We need to get something going so that it continues into the future,” he said. Mulrooney explained that the women’s centre was given use of the land by a local Catholic church in Guatemala, providing “they use it wisely.” He also said the local community centre there is smaller than any house in British Columbia. “The Mayan people are generally pretty poor, and they came through a terrible civil war in the

1980s. It’s difficult for them. The general population down there works separately from them.” The Rotary Club will arrive during Guatemala’s dry season, and Mulrooney says a lot of time will be spent on flood preparation for later on in the year. “They’ll have challenges, as when it rains, it rains,” he explained. “The water will be used economically during the dry spell, and we’ll pour small portions on the plants. It’s going to be total manual labour for growing the vegetables. There’s no machinery.” “It’s dry season in February and Lake Atitlan is 5,000 feet above sea level,” he added. “At night, we’ll have jackets on, as it’ll be cool, but during the day, it’ll be in the 20s, so dry, sunny, warm and beautiful.” This trip will be far from Mulrooney’s first trip to Guatemala last year helping a similar group install stoves into houses. Mulrooney and his wife Mary were inspired by the good work of the small Mayan women’s community centre Mujeres Siempre Vives in San Lucas Toliman, Solala Guatemala, where they were volunteers. The intention on this January’s Ladysmith Rotary Club-sponsored project is to provide education and training courses for the women, many of whom are single mothers, according to Mulrooney. Seed funding of $2,500 was raised from Ladysmith and many other Island clubs to earn matching funds from Rotary District 5020, he noted.

community effort,” says Gillian Thody, Western Canada manager of the 60 Minute Kids’ Club. And that means engaging more parents on the importance of their children making healthy choices, while demonstrating healthy choices themselves. These include physical literacy (playing for at least 60 minutes each day), eating healthy (including five or more vegetables and fruits daily and eliminating sugar and sweetened drinks), and cutting back on computer and TV time (two hours or less). Two 60-day challenges and one 45-day challenge are held throughout the school year, skipping over busy times and holidays. The first challenge of the year from Oct. 1 to Dec. 1 has just wrapped up, with the second challenge set to begin Jan. 15. Schools across Canada participate at the same time. Schools can sign up for the challenge at

www.60minkidsclub.org. Each student logs in and tracks his or her own progress, receiving points for each log in, which aggregate under their school. This enables organizers to determine the most active kids, grades, schools, districts, regions and provinces across Canada. The 60 Minute Kids’ Club, which is aligned with Canadian Sport for Life, originated in 2009 with Innovative Fitness, a personal training business. At that time 5,000 Kindergarten through Grade 6 students in five schools in B.C., Ontario and Nova Scotia participated in a pilot program which produced encouraging results. In 2012, 70 schools in B.C. were involved, and the program has now expanded to Alberta and Manitoba. To learn more about the 60 Minute Kids’ Club, visit www.60minkidsclub.org.


8 Tuesday, December 31, 2013 Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle

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Opinion

NDP doing good Opposition work on Senate issue

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YOUR WORDS

“They’ll have challenges, as when it rains, it rains.” John Mulrooney, Page 7

T

he B.C. NDP is doing its Official Opposition job well with this issue. Early this month, the New Democrats of this province announced they will introduce a motion in the legislature to support the abolition of the Senate. “The recent Senate scandals serve to underline that the Senate needs to be abolished,” said soon-to-be-replaced leader Adrian Dix. “B.C. is under-represented, with one senator for every 764,000 British Columbians, while other jurisdictions get a senator for less than 37,000 people.” What’s more, Dix says Premier Christy Clark has “repeatedly” changed positions on the Senate “based on her political needs.” In typical NDP fashion, they just throw that accusation out there about the premier’s political needs without actually listing examples or backing it up, but we digress because we find ourselves in agreement with the NDP on this one. As stated in the NDP news release, a motion to abolish the Senate was passed unanimously in Saskatchewan with the support of both the governing Saskatchewan Party and the Opposition New Democrats. We are at a loss to come up with what value the Senate brings to Canadians, aside from providing fodder for journalists in Central Canada who get tired writing about Rob Ford. The Senate is not representative. It is not democratic. If it was designed to give sober second thought to bills from the House of Commons, that has evaporated as the chamber became a place to reward loyal party soldiers, thereby making it a body that votes on political lines just like the House. The NDP is doing some good Official Opposition work by putting the feet of the premier and the B.C. Liberals to the fire on this issue. We believe the majority of B.C. residents, that same group of people who returned the B.C. Liberals to power in May, would like to see the premier take a stand on the Senate and call for its abolition. —Parksville Qualicum Beach News

Question of the Week

Do you make New Year’s resolutions? Vote online at www.ladysmithchronicle.com. This web poll is informal, not scientific. It reflects opinions of website visitors who voluntarily participate. Results may not represent the opinions of the public as a whole. Black Press is not responsible for the statistical accuracy of opinions expressed here.

Results from last week’s question Are you happy the school board delayed its decision? Yes 0% No 100% The Ladysmith-Chemainus Chronicle is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby Street, Nanaimo, B.C., V9R-2R2. For information phone 1-888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Here’s the big idea of 2013 BC Views

by Tom Fletcher

O

ne of Canada’s great entrepreneurial success stories in recent years is WestJet, the Calgary-based airline that is expanding across the country and taking on European routes. Clive Beddoe, the founding CEO of WestJet, was famous for helping the cabin crew tidy up the plane before getting off a flight. And the company is also known for its profit-sharing program, with all employees referred to as “owners” who have a stake in the success of the operation. I thought of this management approach when news emerged that the B.C. government was offering public service unions a new kind of contract, with a five-year term and wage increases tied to improved economic growth. The surprising thing is that unions are accepting the idea, even though provincial growth must exceed the government’s indepen-

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dent economic forecast council projections before it can take effect in a given year. The generally non-militant Health Sciences Association was the first to recommend acceptance of a fiveyear agreement with only 5.5 per cent raises guaranteed. Then they were joined by negotiators for 51,000 health and social services employees, represented by the B.C. Government Employees’ Union (BCGEU) and other unions that have long been adversaries of the B.C. Liberals. John Fryer, negotiator for the BCGEU going back to the epic battles with Social Credit governments and now a professor at the University of Victoria, wasn’t impressed when he heard the news. “These deals reflect what happens when public sector unions back the losing party in a provincial election,” he said. “Union bargaining power takes a trip down the pooper.” I think there’s more than that going on. Perhaps to-

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada, through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

one per cent raise for that year. Contrast this labour relations development with what’s happening on the federal scene. A classic confrontation is brewing between the Harper government and the Public Service Alliance of Canada. A key dispute is over sick days, which the government estimates are averaging 18 a year. PSAC currently has 15 “bankable” sick days a year, which the union president refers to as a “negotiated right.” It takes me back to my first union job, where I was warned never to take just one sick day. We negotiated for two at a time, so always take two, the union rep told me. Looking through my files each December for the B.C. story of the year, I consider what is likely to matter five or 10 years from now. This partnership approach to building the B.C. economy is my pick for 2013. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press.

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day’s union leadership is beginning to accept that its wage, benefit and pension arrangements look pretty good compared to the harsh reality of private businesses competing in a global economy. I asked Premier Christy Clark if this new approach is inspired by private-sector profit sharing. She agreed that is the model. “I think that’s a great principle for all of us to work from,” Clark said. “Until now, the growth of public sector wages has been completely insulated from changes in the private sector. And this is the first time we’ve ever been able to successfully link those two things. At this point it’s still a small increment wage growth, but it’s a big change, and I hope we can continue to build on it.” From an employee perspective, it is indeed modest. If real gross domestic product increases one per cent beyond the independent forecast used in the provincial budget, employees get an additional half of

Editor ................................................ Lindsay Chung editor@ladysmithchronicle.com Reporter ................................................ Ross Armour news@ladysmithchronicle.com

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Letters

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When it comes to Your View Echo Heights, we can choose a path towards both justice and sustainability Editor:

The struggle to preserve the entire 54-acre urban Coastal Douglas Fir Echo Heights Forest in Chemainus is ongoing. Reasons for preserving it are as diverse as the species which thrive there in its unique ecosystem. This fall, the struggle intensified as the North Cowichan Subscribe to planning department Subscribe to strengthened its position to build on 20 per cent of the land. Their250-245-2277 only 250-245-2277 evident reason is financial gain. Includes $ Includes online This natural jewel, $ online used as a access access park for decades by the community, is common ground. PHOTO SUBMITTED The land is of great signifiClassifi eds sent us this great photo from a trolley ride during Ladysmith’s Old Tyme Christmas in early DecemBob Dendoff cance to the Penelakut First ber, capturing the town’s winter beauty. If you have any photos you’d like to share with us, please send them to Nation, valued for its healingSell! foods and medicines, as a sa- editor@ladysmithchronicle.com. cred ceremonial place and a place of cultural education. El- mother’s message to council. story say about how his rights ders Florence James and Augie It was delivered respectfully and the rights of all children to Sylvester have been teaching us and professionally. He looked culture, health, education and to understand the importance beyond his mother to mayor nature were addressed? On the and council as she called to day he found his pencil, did of this land. On Nov. 4, the chief of Penel- them for a consultation process council hear and respond to his akut, Earl Jack, came with a to begin regarding the Echo mother on behalf of his people? delegation to the Chemainus Heights Forest land. She said Did council know it was NationAdvisory Committee Subscribe to meeting at that such a process will save al Child Day and that they have Call our North Cowichan a lot of money a great opportunity to change the North Cowichan office. This in court. the course of history? was a rare opportunity toClassifed listen Department Having delivered the imporIt was painful to hear the counto250-245-2277 the chief and his delegation Includes tant request and the reasoning cil vote to go ahead and destroy and witness their call to council $ online for it, she prepared to leave. The 20 per cent of the forest, thus for consultationaccess about the land. 1-855-310-3535 On Nov. 20 —  National Child child picked up a pencil which endangering the rest. It is hopeful however that two Day — North Cowichan council had rolled onto the aisle. In simet. On the agenda was the fate lence, he held it up and looked of our leaders, Mayor Lefebure of Echo Heights Forest. The around for its owner. Jeff Rat- and Coun. Marsh, voted to precliffe smiled and said “you keep serve the whole forest. They chamber was packed. A young First Nations woman it.” Riel Racette, left the council realize that short-term financial entered the crowded venue. She with a pencil which he clutched gain and a grab-what-you-canwhile-you-can attitude, losing was carrying a sleeping child. for days. So after all the deliberations valuable assets in the process, She found a space to sit, at the at committee tables, kitchen is not sustainable. centre of the back row. The next step can be to reflect, A delegation spoke to coun- tables, in coffee shops and at cil on the First Nations per- council meetings, it seems to find and choose a path towards spective on the land. The child me what is crucial now is the both justice and sustainability awoke. The mother stepped for- story this child is going to write as we move in the year 2014. We really do have a choice, and ward to respond to a question. with his pencil. Subscribe to will he have to tell? we really do each have a small What story She introduced to herself, Renee Subscribe Racette, legal council for the Will it be history repeating it- part to play in history and in the self? Going forward from this child’s unfolding life story. Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group. 250-245-2277 250-245-2277 Mary Dolan Includes at which our comHer son, four-year-old Riel Ra- $ crossroads Includes online stands, what will his Chemainus $ cette, listened intently to his munityaccess online

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New business licence launched Jon Harding Black Press

Business leaders and politicians say they have eliminated some red tape for local entrepreneurs with the launch of the Mid-Island Inter-Community Business Licence. Starting Jan. 1, businesses can purchase a licence that allows them to legally operate in 12 communities from Duncan to Campbell River. “Up until now, there has been a lot of red tape for businesses,” Parksville-Qualicum

MLA Michelle Stilwell said during a news conference at a construction site Thursday in her constituency. “This is a helping hand for them.” Contractors and others who find themselves doing work in, say, Parksville one day and Comox or Port Alberni the next, can now purchase a business licence in their home community and add this new licence for a fee. To comply with the current bylaws of most communities, businesses must have a licence to oper-

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ate in each separate community. The price of this supplementary licence has not been released. There were other concerns raised by town and city politicians and others about how cash-strapped municipalities would find the staff and resources to do any enforcement related to non-complying businesses. The 12 participating municipalities in the Mid-Island program are: Campbell River, Comox, Courtenay, Cumberland, Duncan, Lake Cowichan, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, North Cowichan, Parksville, Port Alberni, and Qualicum Beach. They have all adopted a common bylaw. According to a provincial government new release, there are now 10 mobile business licence agreements throughout the province, involving 69 communities. The provincial government says B.C. is one of the first provinces to have such a program.

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Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle Tuesday, December 31, 2013 11

A&E

Sold-out variety concert raises nearly $4,500 Lindsay Chung THE CHRONICLE

The Celebration of Light was another sellout and another huge success. A Christmas fundraiser for the Ladysmith Food Bank organized by Skellig and the Rock Christian Fellowship and sponsored by local businesses, service clubs, individuals and churches, the variety concert was held Friday, Dec. 20 at the Ladysmith Eagles Hall. The fifth Celebration of Light raised $4,406.70 for the Ladysmith Food Bank, which Lisa Burness of Skellig says is almost the same amount as last year. That total could jump to more than $6,000 if Starbucks is successful in getting a $2,000 grant again this year. The evening also raised 700 pounds of food, which is more than last year. “We had lots of people putting $20 bills in the donation jars and lots of positive comments,” said Burness. “I was pleased.” This year’s concert featured music by Elfsong, Rev Up and the Deadbeat Deacons, Dead Byrds, Ryan Mc-

Mahon, Murray Atkinson, Kendall Patrick and the Headless Bettys, and Skellig. There were also carols by the Ladysmith Celebration Brass outside the Eagles Hall. This year, organizers tried to make the event even more family-friendly by including new features such as a visit from Santa and a tree decorating contest, and Burness felt it went really well, and they will try to expand the offerings for children even more next year. Burness is grateful to all the musicians who volunteer their time to perform at the event, the volunteers who help set it up and clean up afterwards and everyone who makes this a success. “It’s such an honour to work with such fantastic musicians who give their time up every year,” she said. “The Eagles are just wonderful; I can’t say enough about them. They let us use the hall for free, and the men and women both give us a significant donation. The people from the church are so fullon; they’re there right from 3 p.m. to when we’re cleaning up at

midnight. It really is a pleasure to do something for the community where the community gives so much back.” The community is so generous that the organizers have zero expenses, and they can

donate everything that she said. “I did not is brought in that night spend one dollar.” to the Ladysmith Food Once again, this Bank, explained Bur- year’s event was a sellness. out. “What shocks me ev- “The biggest comery year is every penny ment I heard from donated goes to the people buying their food bank because tickets and afterwards everything is donated,” was ‘I really feel like

it’s Christmas now’ and ‘this is part of my Christmas,’” said Burness. Burness is happy with how this year’s event went, and she’s already looking forward to next year. “Big thank yous to all

the volunteers; there were a lot of volunteers who did a lot of work,” she said. “I’m very pleased with the comments, and next year, we will have to up the ante and see if we can push it past the $5,000 mark.”

Sandy Jasper of Elfsong performs during the fifth Celebration of Light Dec. 20 at the Ladysmith Eagles Hall. LINDSAY CHUNG

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12 Tuesday, December 31, 2013 Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle

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It’s been a ‘banner year’ for the arts council Community art showcase

munity Art Magazine tary Garden Tour by the LAC continues to showcasing local art- having artists display take this issue very ists, art shows, guest their works in some seriously. Architecspeakers and work- of the garden venues. tural plans have been shops. It’s a one-stop August’s Arts on the drawn up, the city has Sherry Bezanson Ladysmith Arts Council art magazine that was Avenue was another been consulted, and venture. the LAC has raised 2013 has proven to created to provide successful a focus for tourists Moving the venue approximately $6,000 be a banner year at the Ladysmith Arts and locals who are lower on First Avenue, in 2013. If you have looking for an artis- close to the library, a personal interest in Council (LAC). The opening night tic experience. Editor proved to be a wise this project, please galas have the largest Kathy Holmes worked move. Turnout for the contact Holmes to attendance records diligently to make this event was one of the make a donation. “I made and sold to date, gallery and project come alive, best ever over the last and Trisha Oldfield, 15 years, and reports over a hundred clay gift shop sales have art director of the of artists’ sales were pears that I designed increased, volunteer and fired after taking hours have tripled, magazine, lent her over the top. October brought the a beginning pottery and the membership skilled eye and vision to give the magazine a Multi-Media Show, a class last spring. In has grown to over professional layout. juried art show that the last six months, 300. All of this growth In April, a new attracted artists from over 100 pears have has made the gallery and studio on Oyster 4 0 - f o o t - b y - 1 0 - f o o t all over Vancouver sold across Canada Bay Drive an ever- banner that faces the Island and the Gulf Is- and one Nanaimo inspiring place to be. building was created lands. Big cash prizes gallery is displaying The buzz of activity is by Ladysmith youth brought much excite- them,” says a delightment, and opening ed Holmes. palpable as you enter for BC Art Week. A new printmaking night headcount for To make all these the building. studio with an Ettan this show was 175 projects happen, volLAC president Kathy Holmes indicated that Etching Press print- people. Local winner unteer hours topped there has been a suc- maker was added in Carrie Kendall took 8,000 hours this past year. This signifies a cessful completion of May to the main floor home a $1,000 prize. space next to the The LAC has crephenomenal contribumany projects in the last 12 months. Here classroom area. Be- ated window art dis- tion and affirmation are some of the high- ginner classes began plays throughout the that the LAC is comin earnest in the sum- year in partnership mitted, determined lights: Sparking off the new mer, with printmaker with local businesses. and here to stay to year in January 2013, Ann Jones teaching This has been a vital inspire the arts in the showcase for local Ladysmith commuLAC launched the classes. The LAC particiartists. nity and area. first of three quarterly Throughout the year, Art shows and Sherry Bezanson looks at the latest works displayed by Ladysmith Arts Council editions of a com- pated with annual Roopening night galas events engage about members at the Ladysmith Waterfront Art Gallery. KATHY HOLMES introduced a wide ar- 13,000 people a year, a membership of $24 ray of talented speak- including Arts on tered books, wicker munity art. Ladysmith Water- for the year, and bring ers from around the the Avenue, a major furniture, acrylic and print- front Gallery cura- your art in,” explains Island. One of our event, and gallery at- watercolour, making and pottery,” tor Leona Petrak re- Petrak. “It is very imbig draws was Jim tendance. Erickson, set deco- “The last three years adds Holmes. “Please ported that the main portant for emerging rator for Academy have been years of check our website for thrust for 2014 is to artists to have a forum Award-winning movie growth and change classes and sign up continue with the cur- to present their art Lincoln. Erickson for the Ladysmith for some in the new rent model of chang- and learn to display it lives on Salt Spring Arts Council,” indi- year; you never know ing the gallery show in a professional manIsland and has a 30- cates Holmes. “The where an art class on a monthly basis ner, but one that is a year career working board of directors might take you. We’d and offering opportu- non-threatening expein Hollywood. Others and members are be- like to get the young- nities for the member- rience.” Petrak shared that included art instruc- coming more visible er adult population in ship to interpret the monthly by providing a weltor Paul Fudge, Sean in the community. Art our community more suggested coming forum, new Sherstone, Rocky is part of a healthy active in our organi- theme. For members, there artists gain confiCreek Winery owners, community, and part- zation. That voice is Rob Elphinstone and nerships with local currently fairly silent, is an opportunity to dence in their abilities. “Our role is to enothers. businesses are so im- and we are always display up to five items for each show courage and provide invigorated by the The main capital portant to the cominstruction project for 2013 and munity as a whole. younger members in and up to 10 small helpful items for the gift that celebrates the continuing to 2014 is We are poised to go our midst.” Holmes encourages store. The LAC offers emerging artist. Our the elevator project. into an even greater model young adults to con- a progressive work- inclusivity Identified as one of growth phase and we the main barriers to are so grateful to the sider joining the LAC ing model to members means we encourage service is the set of 22 ongoing support from and having their own and is one of the few people to be involved stairs to climb to get the town and local voices heard in that boards that focuses in the art world as growth process. She on inclusivity in the spectators, creators, to the gallery and stu- businesses.” artists, writers, and dio. Holmes’s vision is “Ladysmith Arts invites young adults art world. “The LAC provides a we provide the space to see an elevator in- Council is a learn- to take advantage of @saveca facebook.com/savedotca stalled that will allow ing environment and the opportunity for monthly venue where for that to happen in accessibility to all. 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Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle Tuesday, December 31, 2013 13

Pantomime provides lots of laugh-out-loud moments Lindsay Chung the chronicle

If you love music, bad jokes and a good story, you’ll love Ladysmith Little Theatre (LLT)’s Christmas pantomime, The Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe. The production contains all of the classical elements of a British pantomime, such as a dame, a hero, a princess and a witch. Throw in contemporary songs, references to local names, audience participation and flying tomatoes, and you’ve got a recipe for fun at the theatre. In this hilarious story, written by Norman Robbins, Dame Dallymore’s orphanage is in peril. The cruel Squire wants to make her and all the orphans homeless, and just when the situation seems dire, it gets worse, for a giant treads on the orphanage and smashes it to smithereens. Mother Goose turns the shoe into a home for the orphans and all looks fine — until the giant comes back for his shoe and accidentally carries off Princess Marigold. Throughout the production, the audience is encouraged to be part of the show, booing and cheering loudly. Audience members even get to throw fake tomatoes at the stage, leading to lots of laughout-loud moments. The actors are all fantastic, and I especially love seeing such a wide range of ages up on the stage. That’s one of the best things about LLT’s Christmas pantomime, in my opinion — there are so many opportunities for children to be part of their first play. This year’s chorus featured adorable fouryear-old Alivia Tassone, along with Amelia Trimble, Hannah Copp, Marley Bohmer, Hailey Bohmer, Samantha Barney, Cathryn Barney and Aija Alle-Kopas. They were great, and you couldn’t help but smile as soon as they appeared. Everyone does a wonderful job, but I have to give special attention to a few actors. Gordon McInnis is terrific as Dame Dallymore, and he and Mort Paul (Old King Cole) have a hilarious singing scene. Shellie Trimble is fabulous as Giggles, and Dover Bay Secondary

School students Anne- (Corydon) and Melissa Marie Walker (Calum- Ann Buckle (Princess nia), Kate Krynowski Marigold) are all great

in their LLT debuts. Your last chance to catch the pantomime

is tonight (Dec. 31). There will be a special New Year’s Eve presen-

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14 Tuesday, December 31, 2013 Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle

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Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle Tuesday, December 31, 2013 15

Sports Festive Fuller Lake skaters put on Christmas show Chronicle

The Fuller Lake Skating Club presented its Christmas Extravaganza holiday skating show Dec. 16 at Fuller Lake Arena in Chemainus. Pictured here, clockwise from top left, are: Brielle Varasteh and Jazmin Wheeler skating to Perfect Christmas Night; Lucy Street and Brooklyn Puska skating to Jingle Bell Rock; and Naomi Eastman and Marina Ellison skating to Run Run Rudolph during the show. ANDREW LEONG

Cedar Spartans playing for their school for the last time Greg Sakaki THE CHRONICLE

The 2013-14 high school basketball season started earlier this month, and Nanaimo News Bulletin sports editor Greg Sakaki did a round-up of Nanaimo teams, including the Cedar Spartans, as they looked ahead to the coming season. CEDAR BOYS To be in the mix, the Cedar Spartans know they need to mix things up. The Spartans senior AA boys want to fast break and push the pace as much as possible on offence, and try to take a breather by slowing down the opposition at the other end. Implementing the system is new coach Gord Cawthorne, who has a core of returning vets comple-

mented by some new additions. Forward Josh Seward and swingman Ben Cawthorne are good at working a two-man game to create offence, and Braxton Clark is a primary ball handler who can find his teammates or slash to the net himself. Raury Lancaster and Edward Sackey are some of the other contributors. The coach said the team has a lot of positives in place and just needs to build on them. He’d like his players to round out their defensive game and do a better job of capitalizing on their chances the other end of the floor. “We still have to work on just a little bit of finish inside,” Gord Cawthorne said. “It’s just concentration. The mechanics are there, the ability’s there, the strat-

egy’s there, it’s just they’ve got to finish.” CEDAR GIRLS For all Cedar Secondary School’s sports teams, it’s the last year before the high school closes. The basketball teams may or may not make history, but at least they can make some memories. Daryl Rodgers, coach of the Spartans senior AA girls, said he’s told his players to just have fun and enjoy their last year at Cedar. The team will participate in a tournament in Calgary in February and proudly sport the black and gold. The Spartans have posted some good results in league play early this season. Rodgers said the team can still work on its defensive positioning and, at the other end of the court, on its ball movement.

Stefanie Talboys is the team’s top player and the most basketball-committed of the bunch. Marika Grubac, Shelby Dorman-Banks, Hailey Bradley and Kelsey Hutt are other key players. “We’ve got people that can shoot from all over the floor so we’ve just got to keep hitting our shots,” the coach said. The team should improve as it gets used to basketball fundamentals again as the high school sports seasons change. “A lot of their favourite sports is volleyball and they’re playing basketball on the side,” Rodgers said. “So I’m not going to push them too, too hard. Just have fun, enjoy your last year and at the same time, play hard, and the more success you have, the more fun you’ll have.”


16 December 31, 2013 Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle A16Tuesday, www.ladysmithchronicle.com

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INFORMATION

How would you like to be remembered?

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

WELCH, Beverley May December 23, 1930 – December 13, 2013 Born in Ladysmith, the fourth of ten children to Adolphe & Marie (De Frane) Fourmeaux, Mom led a happy life. Mom attended school in Ladysmith where she enjoyed Miss TransďŹ eld’s English classes and playing basketball. Mom joined the work force early and was happy to earn her way at the New Western Hotel, the movie theatre, The Hub, and Cochrane’s before attending a commerce course at St. Mary’s convent. Mom then began a 42 year long career for School District #67 as the board ofďŹ ce secretary and later School District #68 as a school secretary, working at Ladysmith Primary, Davis Road, NDSS, and Dufferin Crescent from which she retired in 1996. Mom had deep empathy for the welfare of others, and with her faith in God remained active in her church, Development and Peace, and donated to many charities. Mom sponsored a child in a developing country and volunteered at the Ladysmith food bank for many years after retiring. We will remember Mom as a warm, gentle, and compassionate woman with a sunny disposition. Mom loved to travel; ďŹ rst to Alberta as a young woman, to Disneyland with her children, to Australia & New Zealand with her sister Mary, and to Quebec, the Maritimes, and Alaska with her daughter Erin. She loved her home and garden, music, and singing in a choir. Family was her greatest love which she worked hard to support. Mom adored her grandchildren. Some of Mom’s special memories were picking blackberries with her brother Boy at Spinny’s creek, sleigh riding down the hills of Ladysmith, going to dances & the Wheatsheaf with Tony, taking her children to Chemainus River, and the Santa Claus parade which stopped in front of her home. Mom loved a glass of sherry, sweets, and a big mug of tea (2 sugars). We will always feel honoured to have had her as our Mom and Grandmother; grateful for her devotion, strength of spirit, and strong work ethic. Mom passed peacefully with her four children by her side. Predeceased by parents, brothers; Adolphe (Colleen) & Lawrence, sisters; Virginia Wilkin, Gloria Vern, Dolores Davey and brother-in-law; Bob Hendy. Survived by sisters; Mary, Geraldine Gilks, and Judy (Tom) Plensky and brother; Johnny (Maureen), sister-in-law; June Hendy, children; Tracey (George Sharp), Arden Chailler (Dan Ostler), Bradley, and Erin, granddaughters; Lauren and Michele Chailler, and step-grandson; Rob Ostler, as well as numerous nieces and nephews.

Telford’s

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

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LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

LAND ACT: Notice of Intention to Apply for a Disposition of Crown Land Take notice that Ronald Gordon Greene has applied to the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO), West Coast Region for a Private Moorage – Specific Permission for Private Moorage situated on Provincial Crown land located at Coffin Point/vicinity of Evening Cove, Ladysmith. The Lands File Number that has been established for this application is File # 1414179. Written comments concerning this application should be directed to the Section Head, Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations at 142 - 2080 Labieux Rd, Nanaimo, BC, V9T 6J9, or emailed to: AuthorizingAgency. Nanaimo@gov.bc.ca. Comments will be received by MFLNRO until February 7 2014. MFLNRO may not be able to consider comments received after this date. Please visit our website: http://arfd. gov.bc.ca/ApplicationPosting/index.jsp for more information. Be advised that any response to this advertisement will be considered part of the public record. For information, contact the Freedom of Information Advisor at the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operation’s office in Nanaimo.

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Special thanks to Dr. Lisinski and the staff at Arbor Cottage. Mass was celebrated on Saturday, December 21st, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. from St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, 1135 4th Avenue, Ladysmith, BC. Father Robert Mmegwa, celebrant. Interment Cedar Valley Memorial Gardens, Cedar, BC Donations can be made to the charity of your choice. Condolences may be offered to the family at telfordn@ shaw.ca Telford’s of Ladysmith 250-245-5553

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THE LEMARE GROUP is accepting resumes for the following positions: •Heavy Duty Mechanics •Feller Buncher •Boom man •Chasers •Hooktenders •Grapple Yarder Operators •Off Highway Logging Truck Drivers •Hydraulic Log Loader Operators •Processor Operators •Hand Buckers •Coastal CertiďŹ ed Hand Fallers Fulltime camp with union rates/benefits. Please send resumes by fax to 250-956-4888 or email to office@lemare.ca.


www.ladysmithchronicle.com www.chemainuschronicle.com Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle Tue, Dec 24, 2013 HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

FOR SALE BY OWNER

HOMES FOR RENT

OFFICE SUPPORT CLERK

FINANCIAL SERVICES

MOVING & STORAGE

EVENCE Ltd is a furniture supply company and we are looking for an administrative assistant for our busy office. This position requires strong organizational skills, attention to detail and good interpersonal skills. Duties include but are not limited to data entry, reception and production administration. The Successful candidate will: -Have strong analytical and communication skills, -Be a self-starter who is able to work with minimal supervision, -Have a sound knowledge of MS Office (Excel, Word, Outlook) Candidates with more than 2 years experience will be given preference.Salary is very attractive with other benefits attached. Please forward resume and cover letter to tass@offurntre.com for consideration.

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)753-6633. Cowichan Hauling & Moving We do it all. Call for a free estimate. (250) 597-8335

LEGAL SERVICES

PLUMBING A SERVICE PLUMBER. Licence, Insured. Drains, HWT, Reno’s, Repairs. Senior Discounts. After Hour Service. Call Coval Plumbing, 250709-5103.

TRADES, TECHNICAL

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages, relocation allowance, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrysler.ca. Fax 403-854-2845; Or send by email to: chrysler@telusplanet.net

Ladysmith: 3 bdrm rancher close to downtown, f/s, w/d, oil heat, n/s, n/p, refs req. $900/mo.

Location, Location! Walk to mall. 2 bed, 2 bath rancher in Ladysmith. Heat pump, wood fp, built-in vac. Sunroom, new windows, great home for seniors. $255,000. 250-245-1484.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

PERSONAL SERVICES

HAULING AND SALVAGE

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Cowichan Hauling & Moving We do it all. Call for a free estimate. (250) 597-8335

HOUSEHOLD SERVICES

* Gutters * Windows * Siding * Moss Removal * Pressure washing Mill Bay/Duncan 250-743-3306 Chemainus/Ladysmith 250-324-3343

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EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

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:Ä‚ĹśuÄ‚ĆŒy ĎŽ7, ĎŽĎŹ1Ď° dĆľĹ?Ć&#x;ŽŜ ĆŒÄžÄšĆľÄ?Ć&#x;ŽŜ ĂŜĚ Ć?tuĚĞŜt fuŜĚiĹśg mÄ‚y bÄž Ä‚vÄ‚ilÄ‚blÄž

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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

NOW HIRING Western Products Inc. Inc. is an isintegrated Canadian forest products WesternForest Forest Products an integrated Canadian forest company on Vancouver that is committed safety of productslocated company located onIsland Vancouver Island thattoisthe committed our employees, the culture of performance and the discipline to achieve to the safety of our employees, the culture of performance and the results. discipline to achieve results.

We thethefollowing openings: Wecurrently currentlyhave have following openings:

HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC (North Island)

WOODS FOREMAN (Port McNeill )

Detailed job postings can be viewed at

http://www.westernforest.com/business-value/our-people-employment/careers s WFP offers a competitive salary and a comprehensive benefit package. If you believe that you have the skills and qualifications that we are looking for, please reply in confidence to: Human Resource Department Facsimile: 1.866.840.9611 Email: resumes@westernforest.com

Residential/Commercial New and Re-roofing 24hr Emergency Repairs

Professional Service Since 1992

250-245-7153 www.r-and-l-rooďŹ ng.ca

TELEPHONE SERVICES DISCONNECTED PHONE? National Teleconnect home phone service. No one refused! Low monthly rate! Calling features and unlimited long distance available. Call National Teleconnect today! 1866-443-4408. or visit online: www.nationalteleconnect.com

Chemainus: 3 bdrm apt in old town, water views, f/s, shared w/d, n/s, n/p, hydro incl, refs req. $950/mo.

Call 250-245-2498

RENTALS

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

APARTMENT/CONDO LADYSMITH: 1 & 2 bdrm apt, heat incl., n/p, ref’s required. The Villa 250-245-3583.

Trent Dammel All Types of RooďŹ ng

Ladysmith: 2 bdrm home close to town, f/s, w/d, oil heat, nice yard, n/s, n/p, refs req. $900/mo.

Meicor Properties Chemainus: Lockwood Villa. Well kept bldg, 1 bdrm $625, available now. N/S, 1 small pet welcome. 250-246-1033. www.meicorproperties.com Meicor Properties Ladysmith: bachelor unit avail now $590/mo incl. heat & hot water, sm pets ok. 250-9246966. www.meicorproperties.com

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL SPACE for rent in Ladysmith. 276 sq ft. Suitable for hair salon or office, storefront parking, popular 740 1st Ave building. Available now 250-245-4525.

Roommate Wanted: $350/mo + half utilities. References required. Call 250-734-1069. Leave a message.

SUITES, LOWER NORTH NANAIMO: Attention Students/Working Professionals: semi-furn private suite. New floors & paint. Shared lndry. FREE hydro & cable. N/S, No Partiers. $800/mo. Dec. 15th. 250-756-9746

TOWNHOUSES EDGEWOOD ESTATES. 3bdrm, 3 bath townhouse. $1125./mo. Avail now, Jan.1st or Jan 15th. (250)248-1657

TRANSPORTATION AUTO ACCESSORIES/ PARTS

HOMES FOR RENT

PETS PET CARE SERVICES

Rentals Available

CAT SITTING in my home. Safe, loving environment. No cages. 7day to long term stay. Limited space. 250-740-5554

Ladysmith: #41-100 Gifford Rd. 2 bdrm, 2 bath level entry ocean view condo. $1100/mo. Avail Dec. 1. Ladysmith: #7-100 Gifford Rd. 2 bdrm, 2 bath lower level ocean view condo. $975/mo. Avail Dec. 1. Ladysmith: #7-941 Malone Rd. 3 bdrm, 3 bath comfortable condo. $950/mo. Avail Dec. 1. Saltair: 11145 Chemainus Rd. 3 bdrm, 2 bath ocean front home. $1500/mo. Avail Dec. 15. Ladysmith: 4275 Shell Beach Rd. 2 bdrm, 1 bath bright level entry bsmt suite. $900/mo. Avail now.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE APPLIANCES APT. SIZE deep freeze $125. Medium size up right deep freeze $150. White 17cu ft fridge, $200. White 30� range $175. 30� almond range $125. White 30� propane stove $150. Apt size front load washer, dryer, $300. Kenmore Washer dryer sets $200-$350. Washers $150-$250. Dryers $100-$150. Built-in dishwashers $100-$150. White portable dishwasher $100. 6 month warranty on all appliances. Please call Greg at (250)2469859.

FURNITURE

JOHN BOOTH 250-245-2252 Royal LePage Property Management

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

www.royallepagenanaimo.ca

REAL ESTATE APARTMENT/CONDOS NANAIMO WATERFRONT 2nd floor condo. 1500 sq.ft. LR/DR/2bdrms with view, den, gas FP, secure bldg. 2 underground parking spaces. Maintenance fee includes hot water/gas/landscaping. 1 pet OK. $339,900 (250)753-9123

FOR SALE BY OWNER LADYSMITH HANDYMAN Special. 3bdrms up, lrg LR, double garage, lrg storage. Ocean & city view. 1bdrm suite down. Owner will carry mortgage. $1200 month; or rent for $1,800 month. (250)753-0160.

AUTO FINANCING Need A Vehicle! Guaranteed Auto Loan. Apply Now, 1.877.680.1231 www.UapplyUdrive.ca

WANTED Quality Rentals to add to our Property Management Portfolio

QUEEN MATTRESS & BOX. New in plastic. Pillowtop. Only $200. (250)713-9680

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper? STEEL BUILDINGS/Metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or visit us online at: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

CHRIS CRAFT Engines For Sale. 2 Chris Craft 350 cid gasoline engines. Matched pair left hand and right hand rotation. Circa 1965, rebuilt in mid 1980’s and kept in storage ever since. Bore: 030 Mains: 010 Rods: 010 Bore: 030 Mains: 020 Rods: 020. Asking: $1600 for the pair (obo). Contact: (250)245-3004

528 1st Ave. Ladysmith, BC

Up Coming PLEASE SUPPORT LSS GRAD CLASS OF 2014 The LSS grad class of 2014 is doing a bottle drive this Sunday, Jan. 5th. Please donate bottles to them if they come to your door, or you can drop them off at Junction Bottle Depot.

On Going

DAD'S GROUP - Drop In Breakfast - Program of the Ladysmith Resources Centre Association. 630 - 2nd Ave., Upper Floor, Saturdays, 10 - noon. 250-245-3079.

ďŹ l here please

CO-ED BADMINTON for adults and youth held Tuesdays at North Cedar Intermediate gym. Fun for all levels Equipment supplied. 7:00 - 8:30. $2 drop in fee. Phone Karen 250 722 2414 ext 249

COWICHAN VALLEY HOSPICE Emotional support for those facing a life threatening illness, family and friends and for those grieving the death of a loved one. 1-888-7014242. Group, telephone & individual support available.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Type of health plan 4. Atmospheric haze 7. A period of time 10. Auricle 11. Copycat 12. Manpower 13. Delicate fern genus 15. Diego, Francisco or Anselmo 16. Zanzibar copal 19. Jackie’s 2nd husband 22. Calcified tooth tissue 23. Conjoined twins 24. Mythological birds 25. This (Spanish) 26. Lowest hereditary title 29. Pre-transplant plot 33. Fiddler crab genus 34. Professional legal organization 35. Most thick 40. Sleeve indicator of mourning 44. Far East housemaid 45. Hmong 46. With three uneven sides 49. Tempts 53. Jewelry finding 55. Showed intense anger 56. Black tropical American cuckoo 57. Sculpture with a head 58. A single entity 59. What part of (abbr.) 60. Before 61. Confined condition (abbr.) 62. Hurrah 63. Transport faster than sound

ANSWER to THIS WEEKS PUZZLE

PERSONAL SERVICES

Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle Tuesday, December 31, 2013 17 www.ladysmithchronicle.com A17

CLUES DOWN 1. Sorli’s Tale hero 2. A musical master 3. Speech 4. Swiftest 5. Opaque gem 6. Origins 7. Proceed from a source 8. Rechristened 9. Liquorice flavored seed 13. Small amount 14. Mineral aggregate 17. Prefix for wrong 18. Point midway between E and SE 20. A single instance 21. French river 26. Undeveloped blossom 27. One pip domino 28. Fled on foot 30. Sheep bleat 31. One point N of due E 32. Father 36. A projecting part 37. Improved by editing 38. Made melodious sounds 39. Treatment 40. Agreeableness 41. Bell sound 42. Tennis contests 43. Furnace vessels 46. Sirius Satellite Radio (abbr.) 47. Licensed accountant 48. Crude potassium bitartrate 50. Insert mark 51. Election Stock Market (abbr.) 52. A health resort 54. So. Am. Indian people


18 Tuesday, December 31, 2013 Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle

Chronicle

www.ladysmithchronicle.com

www.chemainuschronicle.com

The Last Word

Heard around town...

• The Chemainus Legion is hosting a New Year’s Party tonight (Tuesday, Dec. 31), featuring Cat’s Meow quartet with vocalist Cynthia Davis. Doors open at 8 p.m., and the music starts at 9 p.m. Food will be served at 11 p.m. Tickets are $25 from the Legion Hall. • The next Chemainus Garden Club meeting will be held Tuesday, Jan. 7 at 1 p.m. at the Calvary Baptist Church at 3319 River Rd. in Chemainus. The theme will be “All About Poinsettias.” Guests are welcome, and there will be door prizes and a brag table. There is Brad Grigor (far left) and Peter Matthews from the Chemainus and District Chamber of Commerce prea $2 drop-in fee. A sented this photo of Chemainus from the early 1970s to Erik Viestrup, president of the Chemainus Valley LINDSAY CHUNG yearly membership Historical Society, Dec. 14 at the Chemainus Valley Museum. costs only $15. For more information, call 250-246-1207. • The Frank Jameson Community Inclusive - Diverse - Vibrant Ladysmith Centre (FJCC) in First United Church Ladysmith is closed Sunday Service Wednesday, Jan. 1, including Sunday school but when it re-opens at 10:30 am Jan. 2, there will be Healing Pathway 1st & 3rd Tuesdays, lots of Christmas 6-8 pm Break activities for Rev. Min-Goo Kang children and youth. 232 High Street On Thursday, Jan. 250-245-2183 www.ladysmithunited.org 2 and Friday, Jan. 3, FJCC is offering Welcome to fun-filled Christmas St. Mary’s Break activity days Catholic Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1135 - 4th Avenue There will be superLadysmith, BC vised games, sports, January 1, 2014 9:00 AM swimming, movies Mass Times: and arts and crafts. Sat. 5:00 pm The cost is $30 per Sun. 9:00 am child per day and $10 John Mulrooney reports that the week-long goods drive for vicitms of Typhoon 250-245-3414 for each additional Hall Rentals Available Haiyan in the Phillipines was well supported. Here, clothing and food for the child in the same 250-245-2077 Phillipines are loaded to go. The local Phillipines community and St. Mary’s family per day. • The Ladysmith Church completed the week-long drive, and 49th Parallel donated the use of PHOTO SUBMITTED Chamber of Com- its van. ANGLICAN merce wants us to Ladysmith Commu- Thursday, Jan. 30. 1200. CHURCH • We hear that keep some dates in nity Awards are be- The annual general 314 Buller St., Ladysmith mind for early 2014. ing planned for the meeting will be held The Pottery Store Jesus Said: “Come and in the evening at on Willow Street The next Chamber spring. Journey with the Saviour” For more informa- Ladysmith Little The- in Chemainus has general meeting will Sunday Morning be Wednesday, Jan. tion about Chamber atre. Right now, the closed its doors, as 15; the Chamber’s activities and events, LDBA is looking for of Dec. 28. HowWorship Home, Garden and visit www.ladysmith- silent auction items ever, the potters 8 am - Holy Communion for a fundraiser. If and other artists are Business Show will cofc.com. 10 am - Holy Eucharist take place Friday, • The Ladysmith you would like to not closing down -— Rev. Susan Hermanson something, they will continue March 28 and Satur- Downtown Business donate 250-245-5512 day, March 29, and Association (LDBA)’s please contact Les- to work in their stuthe 2013 Spirit of AGM is coming up ley Parent at 250-245- dios, and The Pot-

NEW IN TOWN?

Our hostess will website tery Store Island, according to bring gifts & greetings and Facebook pageChemainus: the Chemainus and Diana 250-246-4463 along with helpful will show studiosLadysmith: District Chamber Eileen 250-245-0799of community information. and showrooms all Commerce’s latest around Vancouver news update.

Do you need to get the word out? Advertise your small business here! This size - $1525+HST/issue Minimum 4 weeks

e Sav% Call Now! 250-245-2277 0 3

NEW IN Shop at Home TOWN? Service Our hostess will bring gifts & greetings along with helpful community information.

Chemainus: Diana 250-246-4463 Ladysmith: Eileen 250-245-0799

Carpet, Hardwood, Hardwood Resurfacing DAVID Lino, Tile,Do Blinds you need to get the word out?

KULHAWY Advertise your small business here! Owner This size - $1525+HST/issue Minimum 4 weeks

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e DUNCAN250-245-2277 Sav% Call Now! LADYSMITH 250-245-0046 30

Reserve Your Directory Space Now! Shop 250-245-2277 at Home Call Service

CHURCH DIRECTORY Carpet, Hardwood, Hardwood Resurfacing Lino, Tile, Blinds

DAVID Attend KULHAWY regularly 2727 JAMES ST. 250-748-9977 DUNCAN the churchLADYSMITH 250-245-0046 of your Reserve Your Directory Space Now! choice Call 250-245-2277 Owner

1149 Fourth Ave, Ladysmith, 250-245-8221 Family Worship Service every Sunday at 10:30 am (Nursery & Children’s classes available) Mid-week programs for kids, preteens and teens

ST. JOHN’S

Beyond Your Expectations

Sunday’s @10am Pastor Darin Phillips 381 Davis Road 250 250--245 245--5113 www.oceanviewchurch.ca

Call for a Free Home www.itscarol.ca Evaluation 640 Trans Canada Hwy., Ladysmith, BC P. 250-245-3700 C. 250-667-7653 E. itscarol@shaw.ca


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Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle Tuesday, December 31, 2013 19

Welcome to the driver’s seat

There are a few coupes still available and one that is worthy of consideration is this new 2014 Honda Accord Coupe V6. Zack Spencer

Visit the Honda Accord Coupe photo gallery at drivewayBC.ca

Honda’s contemporary on a dying breed 2014 Honda Accord Coupe V6 It’s fascinating to watch trends in the auto industry play out over time. Some changes happen quickly, with one manufacturer coming out with a feature, then the rest of the industry following suit. Backup cameras would be a good example of this. Other trends are much slower, changing because of demographic fluctuations. One example of a slow-moving trend is the two-door coupe falling out of favour and its replacement by sedans and crossovers. This trend is greatly affected by baby boomers getting older and buying more for practical reason, rather than styling. In the 1980s, and even the beginning of the 90s, there were plenty of coupes to choose from and they sold well. But where are the Honda Prelude, Toyota Celica, Pontiac Sunfire and Ford Probe coupes? Now gone and many not replaced with newer models. I’m thrilled to report that there are a few coupes still available and one that is worthy of consideration is this new 2014 Honda Accord Coupe V6. Looks The Accord Coupe is based on the all-new Accord sedan that has been selling very well for Honda. In fact, it won the Canadian Car of the Year this year as decided by the Automobile Journalist Association of Canada. Honda has done a good job of updating this big coupe with a more modern twist. Sold in three configurations from the base EX to the EX-L Navi (L stand for leather and navi is self-explanatory),

which are both 4-cylinder way the radio stores and equipped models. The top retrieves pre-set radio trim is the EX-L Navi with stations. It took a long V6. This top trim level is the time to set the stereo model seen here: it comes up and having to go with LED projector headback and forth between lamps, 18-inch wheels and different screens is not duel chrome exhaust tips. If you like the idea that intuitive. The rest of The 4-cylinder equipped the dash is large, with big models come with halogen of a smart looking car cup holder and plenty of headlamps and 17-inch storage areas. that is well equipped alloy wheels. The coupe The steering wheel and powerful, you starts at $26,400, a $2,500 buttons and heat controls premium over the regular might want to move on on the dash use first rate an Accord Coupe. sedan but when the switches and they are sedan is equipped with placed with precision. Zack Spencer alloy wheels, the price is Drive Another trend almost identical. The EX-L that Honda is bucking, with this Accord is $30,100 for the leather and navi and Coupe, is the inclusion of a 6-speed the V6 premium is $35,500. Not an manual transmission and V6 engine. The inexpensive car but most are very well latest movement is to turbo or superequipped. charged 4-cylinder engines to replace V6

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Inside It’s a big and comfortable coupe. The back seat is actually usable for adults and the front seats are very comfortable. The trunk is huge and the back seat folds for extra long items but the seats do not split and fold, plus the opening to the back seat is small. Standard feature on all Accord models is a backup camera and heated seats. Honda, in my opinion, has raised the bar in the mid-sized category and produced the nicest dash I have seen in this class. There are two screens in the centre console, one for the navigation unit and the other for the radio. They are framed in beautiful, high quality satin metal, chrome and soft touch materials. One area that could be improved is the

power plants and duel clutch automatic transmission in favour of a manual. I’m glad that Honda still offers this layout; it shows they are serious about being a true enthusiast’s car company. Granted, most buyers will get the very good 6-speed automatic transmission with the 3.5L V6, but with 278hp and 252 lb.ft. of torque it will be a very lively car in either configuration. The manual is a joy to use and it is like a throwback to drive a V6 equipped manual car. The 4-cylinder models have 185hp from a direct injection 2.4L engine and either a manual transmission or continuously variable transmission (CVT) for added fuel savings. The CVT is capable of 7.8L/100km in the city and 5.7L on the highway. The

V6 uses more at 10.0L/100km in the city and 6.1L on the highway. Verdict When I started reviewing cars back in the early 1990s, cars like this were common: a mid-sized sedan with a V6 engine and a manual transmission. I can clearly remember driving a Toyota Camry, Nissan Maxima and Accord equipped this way. While most companies are moving away from this design, Honda is sticking with it for now. Soon Honda will have smaller turbocharged 4-cylinder engines available and this big coupe might too be fitted with something more efficient. If you like the idea of a smart looking car that is well equipped and powerful, you might want to move on an Accord Coupe V6 before it follows the latest trend.

The Lowdown Power: 2.4L 4-cylinder with 185hp or 3.5L V6 with 278hp Fill-up: 7.8L/5.7L/100km (city/highway 4-cylinder) Sticker price: $26,400-$35,500 zack.spencer@drivewaybc.ca

Service with integrity, every time. After all, it’s in our name. Integra Tire Ladysmith

Located in the JUNCTION CENTRE #1-13136 Thomas Rd. (at the Cedar Road turnoff)

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Question OF THE WEEK:

What is your favourite car colour and why? Please explain why you have made that decision.

?

QUESTION OF THE WEEK!

Go to drivewayBC.ca to submit your answer.

Safety Tip: Over the past five years, 10 people were killed and 36 were seriously injured in impaired driving related crashes in B.C. between Christmas Eve and New Year’s Day. Share the responsibility of being the designated driver this holiday season, or if you’re hosting a New Year’s bash have taxi numbers on hand.

Find more online at

drivewayBC.ca


20 Tuesday, December 31, 2013 Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle

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Ladysmith Chronicle, December 31, 2013