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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2013

Vol. 39, Issue 52

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Pot and Pipelines: 2013 B.C. news quiz See how you do

..... page 5

TNRD bylaw for medical marijuana zoning, third reading ..... page 6

Mayor and council expenses reported District of Barriere

..... page 6

Kids, happy hour coming to B.C. pubs

It’s Christmas, Carol! The Dec. 19, annual Christmas Concert at Barriere Elementary School was once again a wonderful production that fully entertained the audience and made parents proud. The concert this year was called ‘It’s Christmas, Carol’, and from beginning to end the whole production was a credit to the school’s staff and students. Find more photos on page 10. Photography by Mikael Kjellstrom (Kjellström)

Other changes being considered

..... page 8

Fees persuade most smart meter holdouts By Tom Fletcher Black Press

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BC Hydro’s imposition of manual meter reading fees has persuaded most holdouts to accept a wireless smart meter. BC Hydro imposed a $35 monthly fee starting Dec. 1 for customers who refuse to part with their mechanical electricity meters, after offering the 68,000 customers who still had them the option of accepting the new meter with the radio transmission function on or off. BC Hydro reported the results this week to the B.C. Utilities Commission (BCUC), which is reviewing the fees. More than 48,000 customers

chose the smart meter to avoid the meter reading fee. Another 450 chose the radio-off meter, which comes with a $100 setup fee and $20 a month starting April 1 to cover costs of collecting readings. Another 6,270 customers chose to keep their mechanical meters, and 13,110 more did not respond to BC Hydro’s letters, so they will have the $35 fee added to their bills until they choose another option. BC Hydro reports that 99 per cent of its customers now have the wireless meter. Most of those have been switched to automated billing, and have their daily electricity use displayed on their online account pages.

Claims of health effects from wireless meter transmissions have been rejected by health authorities, and also by the BCUC in a review of FortisBC’s wireless meter program. BCUC found that the radio frequency signal from a bank of smart meters is less than 10 per cent of the natural background level, and a tiny fraction of the exposure from a cellular phone. Citizens for Safe Technology, one of the more active opponents of the wireless grid, was represented at the FortisBC hearings by Donald Maisch. BCUC rejected Maisch’s claims of health hazards, noting that Maisch’s “consulting livelihood depends on public fears and concerns about radio frequency exposure.”

S E R V I N G T H E N O RT H T H O M P S O N VA L L E Y F R O M H E F F L E Y C R E E K TO B L U E R I V E R


A2 www.starjournal.net

Thursday, December 26, 2013 North Thompson Star/Journal

Sullivan to retire; search begins for new school-district head By Dale Bass Kamloops This Week Letters were sent out to various people on Tuesday, Dec. 17, advising them of the impending retirement of Terry Sullivan, longtime superintendent of the Kamloops-Thompson school district. Board of education chairman Denise Harper said the goal is to involve the community in fine-tuning the job description she expects will go across the country sometime in late January. Thompson Rivers University, the City of Kamloops, unions representing the board staff, the District Parent Advisory Council — all will be sent a description of what the region is like, what it can offer and the attributes being sought for the person who will become just the third superintendent for the school district. Harper said trustees started working on the job posting months ago, when Sullivan privately told them of his plans to retire on July 31, 2014. He plans to stay in Kamloops and perhaps do some teaching, the career he began 40 years ago. Sullivan, 67, was found during a similar national search in 1999,  moving to Kamloops from Nova Scotia. Harper said that job search, which trustees conducted in a process she described as ex-

STAR/JOURNAL photo: Margaret Houben

(L-r) Mayor Bill Humphreys, and Barriere TRU representative Susan Ross, welcome Alan Shaver, president and vice-chancellor of Thompson Rivers University (TRU) to facilitate a workshop in Barriere Dec. 13, regarding future strategies and priorities for the university. Terry Sullivan, longtime superintendent of the Kamloops-Thompson school district is retiring. File photo: hausting and exhaustive, led to more than 60 applications. It was eventually pared down to a shortlist, but Sullivan was seen as “a perfect fit from the beginning,” according to Harper. This time, the board is working with Go Futures Human Resources Inc., an organization run by former educator Ron Pound. Harper said it has a good understanding of the public-education system and a good track record. Harper expects there will also be internal candidates and she would like to be able to announce the successful candidate by the end of March. “I’m excited to see what’s out there,” she said of the process, noting the district, created through an amalgamation in 1996, named Terry Grieve as its first superintendent. She praised Sullivan, calling him “one of Canada’s top

education leaders,” a sentiment echoed by John Hall, president of CUPE Local 3500, which represents unionized non-teaching staff. “I’ve been involved [in education] a long time both here and provincially and I say it everywhere,” Hall said. “This is the best school district in the province and Dr. Sullivan’s leadership is the reason.” Hall said even when he has been dealing with contentious issues, Sullivan “has always been respectful to CUPE and 100 per cent fair. These are massive shoes to fill.” Trustee Megan Wade agreed. “I will never say we are replacing Dr. Sullivan,” she said, “because that would be impossible. I just say we are looking for our next leader.” Wade said Sullivan has “served the district well” and led it to the forefront of education in B.C.

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TRU asks community of Barriere what university’s strategy and priorities should include for future By Margaret Houben North Thompson Star/Journal Alan Shaver, president and vice-chancellor and Lucille Gnanasihamany, associate vice-president at Thompson Rivers University (TRU), were both on hand on Friday, Dec. 13 at the multipurpose room at the Ridge in Barriere.   They were there to get feedback from the community on what residents expected as priorities from Thompson Rivers University (TRU) in Kamloops. Shaver spoke about TRU’s mission, “It’s mission is to be a comprehensive, learner-centred, environmentally responsible institution that serves its regional, national, and international learners and their commu-

nities through high quality and flexible eduction, training, research and scholarship.” He also explained that TRU has it’s own act, completely separate from the acts of all other B.C. universities and colleges.   It’s act was passed in the legislature and states that it’s provincial mandate is: • to offer baccalaureate and masters degree programs • to offer postsecondary and adult basic education and training • to undertake and maintain research and scholarly activities for the purposes of the above • to provide an open learning educational credit bank for students • to promote teaching excellence

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and the use of open learning methods • to serve the educational and training needs in the region specified by the Lieutenant Governor in Council • and to serve the open learning needs of B.C. Those present then moved from station to station, looking at and discussing the suggested priorities in each of the areas of ‘students’, ‘community’, ‘learning and teaching’, ‘research’, and a final station for any other suggestions or comments that did not seem to fall under the other four topics. All the suggestions and comments made by those present will be compiled and added to future discussions for consideration by TRU as they plan where they will go from here. Those who were unable to make the meeting, were also invited to have a say, by sending an email to strategucoruirutues@tru.ca no later than Dec. 20, those comments will be included in the next set of discussions about TRU priorities.


North Thompson Star/Journal December 26, 2013

www.starjournal.net A3

Enbridge pipeline approved, B.C.’s Auditor General clears politicians on with 209 conditions Basi-Virk bills

By Tom Fletcher Black Press A federal environmental review panel has recommended Enbridge’s Northern Gateway heavy oil pipeline can proceed if 209 conditions on environmental protection are met. After 18 months of submissions from experts and the public, the National Energy Board Joint Review Panel concluded the benefits of a twin pipeline from northern Alberta to a proposed tanker facility at Kitimat outweigh the risks. Its two-volume report was released Thursday in Calgary. “The environmental, societal and economic burdens of a large oil spill, while unlikely and not permanent, would be significant,” the panel concluded in its report. “Through our conditions we require Northern Gateway to implement appropriate and effective spill prevention measures and spill response capabilities, so that the likelihood and consequences of a large spill would be minimized.” The panel said there would be significant effect on some populations of woodland caribou and grizzly bear, and uncertainty remains over the effectiveness of Enbridge’s plans to minimize the disruption the pipeline would cause. “It is our view that, after mitiga-

By Tom Fletcher Black Press

Black Press files

Northern B.C. is the site of several pipeline proposals, including Enbridge Northern Gateway from Alberta to Kitimat. tion, the likelihood of significant adverse environmental effects resulting from project malfunctions or accidents is very low,” the report states. Conditions include protection plans for whales and other marine mammals, measures to protect caribou and other land animals and development of methods to track and deal with diluted bitumen spills. Federal Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver reiterated his position that “no energy project will be approved unless it is safe for Canadians and safe for the environment.” The federal cabinet must make a final decision on federal permits for the project by July 2014. B.C. Environment Minister Mary Polak said approval by the federal panel meets

2014 Thompson-Nicola Regional District Board of Directors Regular Meetings are scheduled for 1:15 pm on the following Thursdays in the Boardroom of the TNRD Civic Building located at 300 – 465 Victoria Street, Kamloops, BC V2C 2A9. January February March April May June July August September October November December

16 and 30 20 13 and 27 17 8 and 22 19 17 21 – Out of Town, location TBA 18 9 and 23 6 and 20 11 – at 7:00 pm

one of its five conditions, but doesn’t change the province’s position against the pipeline until its other four are met. They include satisfying legal obligations to consult and accommodate aboriginal communities and developing “world leading” safety and spill response on land and at sea. “Now we have Alberta’s agreement for the five conditions, the federal government is talking about the importance of weighing the environment in the balance, and even Enbridge is talking about the importance of the environment in this equation,” Polak said. We believe we’ve made progress in highlighting the very important steps that are going to need to be taken … but we

need to see evidence that this work is going to be achieved.” Janet Holder, Enbridge’s project leader for Northern Gateway, said the company will work to meet the federal panel conditions, and those laid down by the B.C. government. Northern Gateway has reached equity partnership agreements with 26 aboriginal communities along the pipeline route, but many others remain opposed. “The Yinka Dene Alliance has clearly refused permission for Enbridge’s pipelines to cut through our lands and waters,” said Chief Martin Louie of the Nadleh Whut’en First Nation, speaking on behalf of the northern B.C.-based alliance.

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VICTORIA – B.C.’s Auditor General has found no political interference in the government’s  2010 decision to forgive $6 million in legal defence costs for former ministerial aides Dave Basi and Bobby Virk. The legal costs decision was announced two days after Basi and Virk pleaded guilty to one count each of breach of trust and accepting benefits, after seven years of investigation into their role in leaking confidential information on bids for the sale of BC Rail assets. The guilty pleas, on the eve of testimony by former cabinet ministers, prompted the audit to examine the decision to waive collection of the legal fees. That was contrary to the existing policy that while the government would cover legal defence costs for its employees, that money would be recovered if employees were found guilty. In a report released Wednesday, acting Auditor General Russ Jones concluded that the plea bargain and fee relief were proposed to the Legal Services Branch of the Attorney General’s ministry by Basi and Virk’s defence lawyers. The final decision was made by the former deputy attorney general and deputy minister of finance, with politicians purposely excluded. “The decision was an economic decision,” Jones said. “It was to save money.” The government had spent $6

Attorney General Suzanne Anton million to date and would be putting up another $2 million for defence bills if the trial had continued. Combined prosecution and defence costs were costing taxpayers $15,000 for each day of a trial expected to take six months. The audit noted that Basi and Virk’s combined assets were valued at $400,000. The B.C. government not only covers legal costs for its employees, but for defendants in large criminal trials who can’t afford their own defence. Fees were paid for convicted serial killer Robert William Pickton and for Jamie Bacon, one of the accused in the current Surrey Six murder case. Attorney General Suzanne Anton said the government is acting on the auditor’s recommendations to make the process of covering employee legal fees more transparent.

C

apsule

C

omments

with MICHELLE LEINS

We celebrate many birthdays in December. One that gets overlooked is Louis Pasteur, born on December 27,1822. He was a French bacteriologist who created a process for sterilizing milk to kill pathogens that could cause disease. He also developed a preventive inoculation against rabies. This early work on immunization has saved millions of lives throughout the generations. The human liver is a wonderful organ. It is the only organ that has acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, the enzyme that breaks down alcohol. It does this job well at the rate of one standard drink per hour. Just a reminder, a standard drink is 12 oz of beer, 5 oz of wine, or 1.5 oz of spirits. Had your flu shot yet? It’s not too late. Have your children inoculated, too. Remember, you can’t catch the flu from the flu shot. The more people who get the flu shot, the less the virus will be spread. Coconut water has gotten much publicity lately. It is made from the clear water inside the coconut, not the coconut flesh from which we get coconut milk. Coconut water does contain some potassium (about 200mg per 100ml), is low in sodium and calories and contains primarily water which keeps you hydrated. All the staff of our pharmacy send our best wishes to you all for a happy, healthy and safe holiday season.

PHARMASAVE MON. - SAT. 9 - 6

BROOKFIELD CENTRE

CLEARWATER, 250-674-3122


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OPINION Editorial;

The North Thompson STAR/JOURNAL

Thursday, December 26, 2013 North Thompson Star/Journal 359 Borthwick Avenue, Box 1020, Barriere, B.C., V0E 1E0 250-672-5611

by Tom Fletcher

Here’s the big idea of 2013

One of Canada’s great entrepreneurial success stories in recent years is WestJet, the Calgary-based airline that is expanding across the country and taking on European routes. Clive Beddoe, the founding CEO of Westjet, was famous for helping the cabin crew tidy up the plane before getting off a flight. And the company is also known for its profit-sharing program, with all employees referred to as “owners” who have a stake in the success of the operation. I thought of this management approach when news emerged that the B.C. government was offering public service unions a new kind of contract, with a five-year term and wage increases tied to improved economic growth. The surprising thing is that unions are accepting the idea, even though provincial growth must exceed the government’s independent economic forecast council projections before it can take effect in a given year. The generally non-militant Health Sciences Association was the first to recommend acceptance of a five-year agreement with only 5.5 per cent raises guaranteed. Then they were joined by negotiators for 51,000 health and social services employees, represented by the B.C. Government Employees’ Union and other unions that have long been adversaries of the B.C. Liberals. John Fryer, negotiator for the BCGEU going back to the epic battles with Social Credit governments and now a professor at University of Victoria, wasn’t impressed when he heard the news. “These deals reflect what happens when public sector unions back the losing party in a provincial election,” he said. “Union bargaining power takes a trip down the pooper.” I think there’s more than that going on. Perhaps today’s union leadership is beginning to accept that its wage, benefit and pension arrangements look pretty good compared to the harsh reality of private businesses competing in a global economy. I asked Premier Christy Clark if this new approach is inspired by privatesector profit sharing. She agreed that is the model. “I think that’s a great principle for all of us to work from,” Clark said. “Until now, the growth of public sector wages has been completely insulated from changes in the private sector. And this is the first time we’ve ever been able to successfully link those two things. At this point it’s still a small increment wage growth, but it’s a big change, and I hope we can continue to build on it.” From an employee perspective, it is indeed modest. If real gross domestic product increases one per cent beyond the independent forecast used in the provincial budget, employees get an additional half of one per cent raise for that year. Contrast this labour relations development with what’s happening on the federal scene. A classic confrontation is brewing between the Harper government and the Public Service Alliance of Canada. A key dispute is over sick days, which the government estimates are averaging 18 a year. PSAC currently has 15 “bankable” sick days a year, which the union president refers to as a “negotiated right.” It takes me back to my first union job, where I was warned never to take just one sick day. We negotiated for two at a time, so always take two, the union rep told me. Implicit in this is the mindset that employees should give as little and take as much as possible. Looking through my files each December for the B.C. story of the year, I consider what is likely to matter five or 10 years from now. This partnership approach to building the provincial economy is my pick for 2013. Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Twitter: @ tomfletcherbc Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Thanks to producers TV Players say thank of Christmas parade you to Bev Murphy To the editor; Another successful Barriere Christmas Parade and Tree Light Up. I would like to thank all who helped organize this event. The volunteers who braved the -20° degree weather to prepare and decorate, and to make this an-

other fun evening. A huge thanks to Dan Sweetnam and family, Bev Murphy, Sylvia Chivers, Dustin Doherty, Charlie Kibble, and all of the Grade 7’s who warmed us up with hot chocolate and hot dogs. Ellen Krause Barriere, B.C.

To the editor; The Thompson Valley Players would like to give a great big thank you to Bev Murphy for her efforts on their behalf with the recent Christmas production of An Old Fashioned Christmas, presented at the fall fair hall in Barriere.

Her enthusiasm and hard work were invaluable, and helped make the play the success it was. Bev helped and encouraged everyone who took part in the production, making it a truly enjoyable event for all. Thompson Valley Players

The STAR/JOURNAL welcomes all letters to the editor. We do, however, reserve the right to edit, condense or reject letters over matters of libel, legality, taste, brevity, style or clarity. While all letters must be signed upon submission, and have a contact telephone number, writers may elect to withhold their names from publication in special circumstances. Drop your letter off at the Star/Journal Office, fax it to 672-9900, mail it to Box 1020, Barriere, VOE 1EO, or email to news@starjournal.net. The North Thompson Star/Journal is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www. bcpresscouncil.org.

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Carrier delivery $49.00 plus GST Postal delivery $55.00 plus GST The North Thompson Star/Journal is published each Thursday by Cariboo Press (1969) Ltd. in Barriere, B.C. We welcome readers’ articles, photographs, comments and letters. All contents are copyright and any reproduction is strictly prohibited by the rightsholder.


North Thompson Star/Journal December 26, 2013

www.starjournal.net A5

Pot and pipelines: 2013 B.C. news quiz By Tom Fletcher Black Press 1. When Premier Christy Clark took the stage after her upset election win May 14, the first thing she said was: A: I’m going to Disneyland! B: Well, that was easy! C: Oh no, now I have to pay off the debt! D: Socialism is dead! 2. How many proposed liquefied natural gas export proposals are there on the B.C. coast, according to the premier’s latest estimate? A: four B: six C: eight D: ten 3. After winning $25 million in the lottery, Terrace construction worker Bob Erb gave six-figure donations to: A. Local anti-poverty and other community groups B. Pay for $300,000 in dental work for locals who couldn’t afford it. C. Provide cars and trucks for people he considered needy. D. Sensible BC marijuana legalization campaign E. All of the above 4. How has the province said it would raise money to pay for a promised new bridge to replace the Massey Tunnel? A. Tax increases B. Toll like the Port Mann Bridge. C. Small tolls on all Metro Vancouver bridges and major roads D. It hasn’t 5. What admission to U.S. border guards did some B.C. residents find can be deemed a “crime of moral turpitude” and result in America barring your entry? A. Atheism B. Past use of marijuana C. Past conviction for impaired driving

C. Past or present membership in the NDP 6. Which of the following wasn’t proposed in B.C.’s liquor law review? A: Licensing alcohol sales at farmers’ markets B: Letting children into pubs with their parents C: Serving alcohol for slot players on BC Ferries D: Selling hard liquor in grocery stores 7. Burnaby’s Tung Sheng (David) Wu was convicted and jailed for performing illegal: A. Proctology B. Taxidermy C. Electronic waste recycling D. Dentistry 8. Since his triumph in the HST referendum, former premier Bill Vander Zalm has campaigned against: A: An alleged secret global surveillance system using smart meters B: An alleged secret global climate control scheme using “chemtrails” C: An alleged secret European Union plot to control world finance through consumption taxes D: All of the above 9. What’s the transportation ministry’s solution to prevent the new Port Mann Bridge from dropping more ice bombs onto cars? A. A system of scrapers and brushes along each cable to remove ice B. Aerial drones

that spray the cables with de-icing solution C. A flock of seagulls trained to peck loose ice chunks D. Closing the bridge and waiting for ice to melt 10. What did Metro Vancouver mayors propose in 2013 as a new way to raise money for cash-strapped TransLink? A. $5 toll at the border on all vehicles heading south to the USA B. Regional sales tax of up to 0.5 per cent  C. Adding magnets to new SkyTrain fare gates to suck loose change out of pockets D. Forcing SeaBus passengers to row to help save on fuel costs E. Installing slot machines in SkyTrain stations 11. The government is considering spending $6 million to stop the B.C. legislature dome from: A: Cracking B: Peeling C: Twisting D: Sinking 12. Which was not a 911 call received by EComm operators who begged cellphone users to be more careful about declaring emergencies? A. Asking who won the hockey game B. Broken TV set C. Big spider in living room D. Politician breaking election promise 13. B.C. pharmacies were ordered by their regulating body to stop

doing what? A: Offering wine tastings at the pharmacy counter B: Issuing reward points or other “kickbacks” to customers buying prescription drugs C: Refusing to sell prescribed medical marijuana D: Refusing to act as supervised injection sites 14. In 2013, the B.C. government approved: A: Enbridge’s Northern Gateway oil pipeline to Kitimat B: Twinning Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain oil pipeline to Burnaby C: A pipeline to carry fuel from tankers on the Fraser River to Vancouver airport D: A pipeline to transport glacial water from Garibaldi Park to Squamish for export 15. The poaching of what prompted Vancouver Island aboriginal groups to post a $25,000 reward? A: Roosevelt elk B: Abalone C: Seals D: Easter eggs 16. Which B.C. municipal council fended off a court challenge (and death threats) over its deer cull program? A: Oak Bay B: Cranbrook C: Invermere D: Penticton Answers: 1-B, 2-D, 3-E, 4-D, 5-B, 6-C, 7-D, 8-D, 9-A, 10-B, 11-C, 12-D, 13-B, 14C, 15-A, 16-C

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Thursday, December 26, 2013 North Thompson Star/Journal

TNRD bylaw for medical marijuana zoning, 3rd reading Times Staff During a Thompson-Nicola Regional District board of directors meeting held Dec. 12, a public hearing was held for Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 2442 (Medical Marijuana Grow Operations). The directors gave third reading to the bylaw, which would allow grow operations for medical marijuana on agricultural land over eight hectares in the regional district. Grow-ops on industrial land would have to be larger than four hectares. The proposed bylaw is the result of changes to the federal law regarding medical marijuana. Under the previous law, thousands of medical marijuana growops were licensed. The new law seeks to limit growing medical marijuana to fewer and larger operations that can be more easily monitored. Having received third reading, the bylaw now goes to the provincial government for referral before returning to the board for final approval.

Thuya Creek re-zoned for RV park The TNRD board also held a public hearing and gave third reading to Zoning Amendment Application No. BA 54 (subject property: 8919 Thuya Creek Road, Little Fort, B.C.). The re-zoning would allow the existing campground at Thuya Creek (located about five km south of Little Fort) to be developed as a seasonal RV park. Staff believe the 4.6 ha property to be an appropriate location for the proposed use. Formerly known as Overlander Stopping Place, the existing campground has 27 campsites, a store, maintenance building, pool and washhouses. The re-zoning would allow it to be developed into a 40-site RV park that could be used year-round. Possibly some of the sites could be sold as strata lots so individuals could own their own RV site. Having received third reading, the bylaw now goes to the provincial government for referral before returning to the board for final approval.

H

Baby! Babies of 2013

In our January 9th edition, the Star/Journal will celebrate babIeS born In 2013

Don’t miss the chance to share your excitement by announcing the arrival of a new member of the family!

Submit the following information along with a clear photo

only

$27.99

+ tax

• name • Phone • baby’s First name • baby’s Middle name • baby’s Last name • Date of birth • Parents First & Last names Deadline for your entry is Dec. 31st, 2013 • phone 250 672-5611 or drop in at 359 borthwick, barriere

Bring on the Babies!

IDA continues support to local Food Bank

STAR/JOURNAL photo: Margaret Houben

Barriere IDA Pharmacy staffers, Nicole Stamer and Lori Lengkeek, present a box full of items to the Barriere Food Bank, Dec. 13. The IDA will be doing more fundraising for the Barriere Food Bank during the next few months.  During January, February and March, they will be holding a ‘casual day’ every Friday.  Staff members will pay a loonie each, on Fridays to be in ‘casual’ dress for the day, instead of their usual uniforms. Funds go to the food bank.

TNRD seeks input on financial plan

Thompson-Nicola Regional District

Thompson-Nicola Regional District is currently seeking public input for its 2014-18 Financial Plan. The Local Government Act states: “... a regional district must have a financial plan that is adopted annually, by bylaw, by March 31. The planning period for a financial plan is five years, that period being the year in which the plan is specified to come into force and the following four years.” “The public is en-

couraged to go on our website and review the 2014-2018 Financial Plan and its highlights. If they have any feedback, they can then fill out our Finance Plan Input Form,” said Doug Rae, director of finance. The preparation of the Financial Plan begins in the fall of each year when a Provisional Financial Plan is presented to the board of directors. The Financial Plan incorporates requests from directors and service committees, any new services as well as staff

estimates of funding required to maintain current service levels. The final Financial Plan is then presented in March and adopted before the deadline of March 31. The Finance Department conducts public budget consultation in conjunction with other service-related meetings throughout the year at various locations in the regional district. The TNRD encourages input from taxpayers across the regional district on the Financial Plan.

The Finance Plan Input Form is available at tnrd.ca under the Submission Inquiries header on the homepage. You can also go to the Finance page under Departments and find a link to the online form, as well as a link to a PDF that can be faxed, mailed, or emailed to the TNRD. A link to the 2014-18 Financial Plan is also found on the Finance page. Submissions can be filled out anonymously or information can be provided if you wish to be contacted.

Mayor and council expenses reported North Thompson Star/Journal At the Dec. 16 District of Barriere council meeting, council members defeated the  Fees and Charges bylaw No. 73, Amendment bylaw No. 109, sending it back to staff for an amendment.  The amended version will be voted on at the next council meeting in January. The first three readings of the District of Barriere Waterworks bylaw No. 110 have been passed.  The final reading will be at the January meeting.  Council members also passed Policy No. 26, on Accounting Software Access. The finance department reported on the 2013 council remuneration.  The figures for “duties remuneration” are for the entire year, while the figures for the “expense payments” do not include December expenses. Humphreys, Bill Kershaw, Bill Paula, Patricia Sabyan, Amanda Smith, Virginia Stamer, Ward Stanley. Glen

Duties Remuneration 10,654.00 6,645.60 6,645.60 6,645.60 6,645.60 6,645.60 6,645.60

Expense Payments 9,445.85 46.00 3,278.19 684.13 355.57 3,565.16 993.13

Total 20,099.85 6,691.60 9.923.79 7,329.73 7,001.17 10,210.76 7,638.73

Staff reported that the district office will be closed from Dec. 24, to 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014.  Any monies owing by year end will be accepted without penalty until 4:30 p.m. on Jan. 2.  Residents are reminded that they are welcome to use the district drop box which is located at the entrance to the Ridge at 4936 Barriere Town Road where the district office is located. The Request For Proposals are in for the Financial Audit Services for the District of Barriere for the next five years (2013-2017).  Council passed a motion to enter into an agreement with KPMG LLP for this, starting with an annual fee for 2013 of $15,650.00. During Public Enquiries, council heard from Barriere Food Bank director Antoon Houben regarding the current status of the food bank.  Houben told council that on Wednesday, Dec. 18, the Food Bank would be distributing 90 Christmas hampers, which is nearly double the number that were distributed last year.  Houben also stated that the society’s annual general meeting will be in early March, and that they are in need of more members as they currently only have seven. The next District of Barriere council meeting will be on Jan. 6, at 7 p.m.


North Thompson Star/Journal December 26, 2013

www.starjournal.net A7

A community full of events First off I want to say thanks to the TNRD board of directors for electing me as the chair of the TNRD board. Director Willow Macdonald was elected as vice-chair and between the two of us I am sure we will be able to get the job done. So far we are still working on the list of things I cannot do, or I guess I should say, shouldn’t do as chair. Once I wade through that, the next year promises to be one of growth throughout our region helped along by the amazing teamwork already evident throughout the board. Thanks again to each of the directors for the chance to sit at the head of the table. I want to thank the Barriere council for agreeing to sponsor the Bullarama this year. The Farm Kids Scholarship Fund is a wonderful organization that truly needs our help. The sponsorship package included four tickets to the Bullarama and New Years Dance. Councillor Stamer made a motion that these be donated as two prizes of a pair of tickets to be given to the Barriere Holiday Passport draw. Best of luck to those of you that got your passports and did some local shopping over the holidays. Last year’s Bullarama was top notch entertainment. We had to leave just after the dance started, but I was told it was great fun as well. This year there are more seats, a layout that will allow for the doors to be down so the heat can stay inside and a list of bull riders that includes talent from as far away as Australia and Mexico. Steven Puhallo and his team put in an incredible amount of hours to bring this event to Barriere. It provides good fun on New Years Eve for the

whole family, and the money goes to a great cause. How much better can it get? I tried to help out at the annual turkey dinner held at Barriere Secondary last week. I fear I was in the way more than being a help, but it was a great time. Laura Mairs did the organization and cooking, and if I am wrong on that I apologize. I think I have it right though, and I want to say the turkey was superb. Okay the vegetables, stuffing, gravy and desert were very good as well, but the turkey was the star attraction. Len vanNieuwkerk and his team from the Barriere Lions were there helping with everything. Carman and Barb Smith were there, and Barb was kind enough to show me the right way to get that first piece of pie out of the dish without ruining it. Cpl. Underhill and his team from the local RCMP detachment were charged with handing out the deserts. They man-

ayor M e h t s A . sees it.. with District of Barriere Mayor

Bill Humphreys aged to forestall a pie fight which was good. I thought we would all be banned after the cake fight last year. Councillors Kershaw and Paula were there, as were Barriere school trustee Rhonda Kershaw, Eileen Meirs, Lindsay Arcand and a host of others that helped make the dinner good fun. The students were pleasant and polite just like I am sure their parents and caregivers would want them to be. The Barriere Secondary staff is to be commended for all their efforts in making this possible each year. I did not get a chance to meet our new principal Mr. Ken Rife, but I did meet viceprincipal Mr. Cory Carmichael on the way out the door. If

they continue to do as well for the school as they did getting the students through having dinner in an orderly fashion with a festive spirit, all will be good going forward. At the last council meeting, Mr. Antoon Houben gave us an update on the Barriere Food Bank Society. It appears that a good deal has happened over the past while. The society has its charitable status back. Numerous hampers have been prepared and will be delivered over the next few days, which will be appreciated I am sure. Merry Christmas and Seasons Greetings to you all. May your Holiday Season be filled with happiness and good cheer. Please be very careful if you are travelling.

STAR/JOURNAL photo: Margaret Houben

On the serving side District of Barriere Mayor Bill Humphreys joined a number of other volunteers from the community to help cook and serve up the annual turkey dinner to the students at Barriere Secondary on Dec. 17.

Al Fortin COTY

ociety S s r io n e S t ic r t is Barriere & D ndar le a C 4 1 0 2 y r a u n a J

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Tuesday

Wednesday

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26

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21

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31

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Saturday

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tickets available at the Star/Journal, Barriere legion and insight tire or call 250-672-5611 for info


North Thompson Star/Journal December 26, 2013

www.starjournal.net A11

Christmas stories

continued from last week...

The annual Star/Journal Christmas Story Contest was a little slow to get started, but in the past few days we have been swamped with dozens of wonderful stories and poems from area youngsters. Due to this fact, our judges have not had sufficient time yet to name their winners, so we are publishing the stories first for the enjoyment of our readers, and the winners will be named in our Jan. 2, 2014, issue.. We thank all of the children who took the time to enter and share with our readers their creative works, and we thank the teachers and parents who encouraged them to do so. Please note that all the stories appear in no specific order. Enjoy! The Lonely Elf By Georgia Clough Once in the north pole there was a lonely elf.   Her name was Lola, she was as pretty as a candy cane.  Her problem was she had no friends.  It was the saddest sight to see.   Then one day, Brayden the candy cane slayer came along and stole all of the presents.  It was the maddest sight to see.   Santa and Miss Claws wasn’t as sad as they were with Lola.  The said try making friends with one of the elves, but they were to busy with making presents.   Then Santa and Miss Claws came up with the greatest idea.   How about catching the Brayden candy cane slayer.  She did after the next few hours.   She became the most popular elf in 600 years.  Everyone cheered as loud as they could, saying “Lola, Lola, Lola, Lola.”   Lola wasn’t lonely anymore. That’s the story of Lola the elf that’s not lonely anymore. Christmas Land By Halle Smith Once upon a time in Christmas Land there was a little boy elf named Patrick, he was 12 years old, and he had brown hair and blue eyes.  Patrick was the only living thing in Christmas Land that hat-

ed Christmas.  Absolutely no one knew why Patrick hated Christmas.   I mean Christmas is the happiest time of the year, of course!   In Christmas Land all year they have their Christmas   decorations up, because this little boy elf named Patrick lived somewhere very very special, way up north in the middle of nowhere.   Christmas Land had two names, the people that did not live there called it the north pole, and the people that did live there called it Christmas Land.   Patrick was still grumpy even though all the other elves were all very, very nice to him.   One Christmas eve all the elves were very tired because it was 3:00 a.m. and Santa needed those presents.   The elves were starting to fall asleep so they asked Santa for one hour of sleep and he said yes, because he knew that they were very tired.  Also, Santa thought that if he let the elves sleep, that when they woke up that they would work harder.   When they were sleeping, Patrick had a very weird dream.   His dream was about the past, present and future.   In Patrick’s dream it told him that if he kept being grumpy, there would be big consequences.   When Patrick was working in

the work shop, he realized that it was not fun being grumpy.   Patrick thought and thought and thought some more and that’s when it happened, he made a big decision.   Patrick’s decision was that he was not going to be grumpy a minute longer, this was the first time ever him not being grumpy.  The next day was Christmas, this Christmas was very special because everyone got a present and was happy, they all had so much fun too.  Patrick was never mad again at anything or anyone ever living.   That Christmas was the best Christmas that Christmas Land (North Pole) ever had.   They all lived happily ever after. Waiting for Santa By Hunter Bloomfield Once upon a time there was a little girl named Megan.   She was waiting for Santa.   Her mom said that she did not go to bed Santa would not come to you, so she raced to her bed and went right to bed.  Then when everybody went to bed she got a drink of water.  Then she went back to bed.   Then she heard something, she looked out of her window.  She did not see anything.  She heard it again, she saw Santa and his reindeer.  She woke up her mom and dad.   She said

“it is Santa, he is here.” Her mom and dad raced to the window, they saw Santa and the reindeer too.  Megan told her mom and dad, “you should go to bed, I will go to bed too, good night, mom and dad.” My Pet Penguin By Irene Beeton Once upon a time I went to a pet shop in Alaska because I wanted an arctic animal.  I went in and I could not believe it... they had penguins.  I love penguins!   So I bought two, a female and a male.  I took them home.   I went to get some food and bought them some raw fish for dinner.  So I went home and I fed them.   It was getting late so I went to bed.   Around 12:00 p.m. I heard a mini trumpet noise.   So I went to go check it out.  I saw the cutest little penguin I have ever seen.  That is the story how I got penguins. Christmas Story By James Celesta Sonic, Shadow, Silver,Tails, and Knuckles were having Christmas when Dr. Eggman and Metel Sonic stole all the presents and the tree and left.   Sonic and the gang were mad at Dr. Eggman and Metel Sonic. So they set off to fight Dr. Eggman and Metel

Crafting (L-r) North Thompson Fall Fair and Rodeo Ambassador Jenna Zietsov and Vice-Ambassador Kendall MacKay helped out at the children’s craft table during the Success By Six Breakfast With Santa in Barriere, Dec. 14.

Sonic.   They stumbled into Metel Sonic.  So Tails and Knickles stayed and fought him.   Then Sonic and Silver and Shadow made it to Eggman’s fortress.   Sonic, Silver, and Shadow fought Eggman.   Soon the fight was over and Sonic called the cops and powercomanie and the presents were returned to everyone. Letter to Santa Claus By Julie Hendriks

This year, I am very, very specific in my letter with Santa Claus. We’ve had a lot of misunderstandings in the past. For instance, last year I asked for a trampoline, but I forgot how to spell it so I tried to describe it as a jumpy bouncy thing. But apparently Santa sent me a pogo stick. But this year I wanted a ... reindeer! Not a toy one, a real one that could

fly and that came from where Santa lives. I told him my reindeer should be 13 hands tall, grulla colour with a patch of white under his belly and his name should be Niko. I put a post stamp on my post card and I posted it a week before Christmas. Then I waited and waited and waited. When it was Christmas morning, I jumped out of bed and ran downstairs to see the ...continued on page 13

New Year’s Eve

Bullarama

A WESTERN FUNDRAISER FOR THE FARM KIDS SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Doors open at 6pm • Bullarama 7pm New Year’s Eve Dance After Bullarama

North Thompson Agriplex, Barriere, B.C. Tickets available at North Thompson Star/Journal (Barriere) Horse Barn (Kamloops)

Bullarama and New Year’s Dance (19+): $50

Bullarama & Dance including Kamloops shuttle: $80

Bullarama only: $30 • 12 and under (Bullarama only): Free Food vendors will be available on site For more information, contact Steven Puhallo at 250-371-7654 or puhallo@gmail.com

NEWS·TALK·SPORTS

STAR/JOURNAL photo: Jill Hayward

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North Thompson Star/Journal December 26, 2013

www.starjournal.net A9

If you DRINK DON’T DRIVE 


Plan ahead for a safe holiday and name a designated driver 


Drinking and Driving can ruin more that just your car!!!


 
 
 
 
 


Insurance Corporation of BC

Every year during the Christmas holidays, an average of 50 people are injured in 160 crashes in the Southern Interior. As well, during New Year’s Eve, an average of 30 people are injured in 110 crashes in the Southern Interior. That’s why police will continue to be out in full force at CounterAttack roadchecks across the province during the holidays. While attitudes towards drinking and driving have changed considerably over the years, an average of 95 lives are still lost each year and impaired driving remains a leading cause of car crash fatalities in B.C. Alcohol impacts a person’s judgment, reaction time, coordination and visual functions. Behind the wheel that means it affects a driver’s ability to steer, track moving objects and control speed and lane position. No amount of coffee, food or fresh air can sober up an impaired person – the only cure is time. Safe ride home So ‘tis the season for some good cheer but make sure you plan ahead for a safe ride

home if your festivities involve alcohol. Here are ICBC’s tips to help everyone get home safe this holiday season. • It’s all in the details. You’ve planned out who you’ll go to the party with, how you’ll get there and what you’ll wear, but have you also planned how you and your friends will safely get home? Choose a designated driver before going out or keep money aside for a bus or taxi. Operation Red Nose is also available in 13 communities to help get you and your car home. • Is it your turn? Share the responsibility to help your friends and family get home safely – ask yourself if it’s your turn to be the designated driver. • Take a stand. Never get in a car with an impaired driver. Ask to get out of the car if necessary. Take a stand and don’t let your loved ones get behind the wheel impaired. • Be a good host. If you’re hosting a party, reward your designated drivers with some fun and easy-to-make mocktail treats, like a smooth Kootenay Koffee or a tingling Lemon Fizz.

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A10 www.starjournal.net

Thursday, December 26, 2013 North Thompson Star/Journal

Barriere Elementary Christmas Concert Scrapbook

Photography by Mikael Kjellstrom (Kjellström)

TVP

ULTIMATE 12 Days ULTIMATE of HOLIDAY Holidays HOLIDAY

An Old FashionChistmas Variety Show

GIFT GUIDE GIFT GUIDE

Thank You

at

sponsored by sponsored by

The Thompson Valley Players wish to thank all the elves and Santa’s helpers who came together to create the festive evening at the Fall Fair Hall for “An Old Fashion Christmas Variety Show”. Thank you to all our devoted members young and old, too many to mention, who came together with a lot of hours of hard work. We would like to thank Meaghan Bunn for coming out to help with technical duties and Peggy Bunn for all her help, too! Thank you to Judy Armstrong, and the grade seven students and parents who ran the concession. Thank you to our lovely ladies who worked the door: Peggy Armstrong and Lorraine Sweetnam. We would also like to send out a big thank you to our special guests Jessica Kennedy and her family, Gordie West, Gary Pfeifer, Leah Jones and the Community Chorus, the Red Hot Mommas, Sylvia Chivers, Bob Armstrong and all of the Thompson Valley Players and the Junior Players who did the work performing. A heartfelt thank you to Harry Eberts, Bernice Randrup, Charlie Kibble and the Sweetnams, who above everything else are always there to clean up! Lastly, A big thanks to the North Thompson Fall Fair and Rodeo and caretaker Jackie for the extended use of the hall. Thank you to the Star/Journal for posters, and lastly thank you to the community for such an overwhelming response. The Thompson Valley Players would also like to thank everyone who took part in the Christmas Parade as well, especially Patti Lokstet and Jill Christiansen, with the red truck. Grant Bradford for the use of the flat deck and and his continued support. And to all those hearty souls who helped decorate on that chilly day, thanks for coming and joining in the fun!

Thank you, Beverly Murphy on behalf of TVP!

STAR/JOURNAL photo: Lisa Quiding

STAR/JOURNAL photo: Lisa Quiding

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North Thompson Star/Journal December 26, 2013

www.starjournal.net A11

Christmas stories

continued from last week...

The annual Star/Journal Christmas Story Contest was a little slow to get started, but in the past few days we have been swamped with dozens of wonderful stories and poems from area youngsters. Due to this fact, our judges have not had sufficient time yet to name their winners, so we are publishing the stories first for the enjoyment of our readers, and the winners will be named in our Jan. 2, 2014, issue.. We thank all of the children who took the time to enter and share with our readers their creative works, and we thank the teachers and parents who encouraged them to do so. Please note that all the stories appear in no specific order. Enjoy! The Lonely Elf By Georgia Clough Once in the north pole there was a lonely elf.   Her name was Lola, she was as pretty as a candy cane.  Her problem was she had no friends.  It was the saddest sight to see.   Then one day, Brayden the candy cane slayer came along and stole all of the presents.  It was the maddest sight to see.   Santa and Miss Claws wasn’t as sad as they were with Lola.  The said try making friends with one of the elves, but they were to busy with making presents.   Then Santa and Miss Claws came up with the greatest idea.   How about catching the Brayden candy cane slayer.  She did after the next few hours.   She became the most popular elf in 600 years.  Everyone cheered as loud as they could, saying “Lola, Lola, Lola, Lola.”   Lola wasn’t lonely anymore. That’s the story of Lola the elf that’s not lonely anymore. Christmas Land By Halle Smith Once upon a time in Christmas Land there was a little boy elf named Patrick, he was 12 years old, and he had brown hair and blue eyes.  Patrick was the only living thing in Christmas Land that hat-

ed Christmas.  Absolutely no one knew why Patrick hated Christmas.   I mean Christmas is the happiest time of the year, of course!   In Christmas Land all year they have their Christmas   decorations up, because this little boy elf named Patrick lived somewhere very very special, way up north in the middle of nowhere.   Christmas Land had two names, the people that did not live there called it the north pole, and the people that did live there called it Christmas Land.   Patrick was still grumpy even though all the other elves were all very, very nice to him.   One Christmas eve all the elves were very tired because it was 3:00 a.m. and Santa needed those presents.   The elves were starting to fall asleep so they asked Santa for one hour of sleep and he said yes, because he knew that they were very tired.  Also, Santa thought that if he let the elves sleep, that when they woke up that they would work harder.   When they were sleeping, Patrick had a very weird dream.   His dream was about the past, present and future.   In Patrick’s dream it told him that if he kept being grumpy, there would be big consequences.   When Patrick was working in

the work shop, he realized that it was not fun being grumpy.   Patrick thought and thought and thought some more and that’s when it happened, he made a big decision.   Patrick’s decision was that he was not going to be grumpy a minute longer, this was the first time ever him not being grumpy.  The next day was Christmas, this Christmas was very special because everyone got a present and was happy, they all had so much fun too.  Patrick was never mad again at anything or anyone ever living.   That Christmas was the best Christmas that Christmas Land (North Pole) ever had.   They all lived happily ever after. Waiting for Santa By Hunter Bloomfield Once upon a time there was a little girl named Megan.   She was waiting for Santa.   Her mom said that she did not go to bed Santa would not come to you, so she raced to her bed and went right to bed.  Then when everybody went to bed she got a drink of water.  Then she went back to bed.   Then she heard something, she looked out of her window.  She did not see anything.  She heard it again, she saw Santa and his reindeer.  She woke up her mom and dad.   She said

“it is Santa, he is here.” Her mom and dad raced to the window, they saw Santa and the reindeer too.  Megan told her mom and dad, “you should go to bed, I will go to bed too, good night, mom and dad.” My Pet Penguin By Irene Beeton Once upon a time I went to a pet shop in Alaska because I wanted an arctic animal.  I went in and I could not believe it... they had penguins.  I love penguins!   So I bought two, a female and a male.  I took them home.   I went to get some food and bought them some raw fish for dinner.  So I went home and I fed them.   It was getting late so I went to bed.   Around 12:00 p.m. I heard a mini trumpet noise.   So I went to go check it out.  I saw the cutest little penguin I have ever seen.  That is the story how I got penguins. Christmas Story By James Celesta Sonic, Shadow, Silver,Tails, and Knuckles were having Christmas when Dr. Eggman and Metel Sonic stole all the presents and the tree and left.   Sonic and the gang were mad at Dr. Eggman and Metel Sonic. So they set off to fight Dr. Eggman and Metel

Crafting (L-r) North Thompson Fall Fair and Rodeo Ambassador Jenna Zietsov and Vice-Ambassador Kendall MacKay helped out at the children’s craft table during the Success By Six Breakfast With Santa in Barriere, Dec. 14.

Sonic.   They stumbled into Metel Sonic.  So Tails and Knickles stayed and fought him.   Then Sonic and Silver and Shadow made it to Eggman’s fortress.   Sonic, Silver, and Shadow fought Eggman.   Soon the fight was over and Sonic called the cops and powercomanie and the presents were returned to everyone. Letter to Santa Claus By Julie Hendriks

This year, I am very, very specific in my letter with Santa Claus. We’ve had a lot of misunderstandings in the past. For instance, last year I asked for a trampoline, but I forgot how to spell it so I tried to describe it as a jumpy bouncy thing. But apparently Santa sent me a pogo stick. But this year I wanted a ... reindeer! Not a toy one, a real one that could

fly and that came from where Santa lives. I told him my reindeer should be 13 hands tall, grulla colour with a patch of white under his belly and his name should be Niko. I put a post stamp on my post card and I posted it a week before Christmas. Then I waited and waited and waited. When it was Christmas morning, I jumped out of bed and ran downstairs to see the ...continued on page 13

New Year’s Eve

Bullarama

A WESTERN FUNDRAISER FOR THE FARM KIDS SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Doors open at 6pm • Bullarama 7pm New Year’s Eve Dance After Bullarama

North Thompson Agriplex, Barriere, B.C. Tickets available at North Thompson Star/Journal (Barriere) Horse Barn (Kamloops)

Bullarama and New Year’s Dance (19+): $50

Bullarama & Dance including Kamloops shuttle: $80

Bullarama only: $30 • 12 and under (Bullarama only): Free Food vendors will be available on site For more information, contact Steven Puhallo at 250-371-7654 or puhallo@gmail.com

NEWS·TALK·SPORTS

STAR/JOURNAL photo: Jill Hayward

WINTER TIRES

Install four matched winter tires with the mountain and snowflake symbol to provide you with the best traction in winter conditions. Road Maintenance (thoMpson) inc.

Check Before you go! www.DriveBC.ca

1655 Lucky Strike Place | Kamloops, BC | V1S 1W5 | Phone: 250-374-6690 | Toll Free: 1-800-661-2025


A12 www.starjournal.net

Thursday, December 26, 2013 North Thompson Star/Journal

Do you have a local sports story or event picture?

SPORTS

If you do we’d love to hear from you. Call 250-672-5611 or email: news@starsjournal.net

H

THE STAR/JOURNAL IS DEDICATED TO

elping our

Community

We at the North Thompson Star/Journal take great pride in supporting our community and the organizations who strive to make our area the best place to live: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

North Thompson Agriplex North Thompson Fall Fair Barriere Fire Department Crime Stoppers Barriere and District Food Bank Barriere and District Hospice Barriere Alzheimers Muscular Dystrophy Cowboy Festival Royal Canadian Legion Branch 242 Barriere Search and Rescue Barriere Lion’s Numerous Recreational Groups and Events and many more

THE TIMES photos: Keith McNeill

Clearwater Atoms player Devon Green takes the puck between two 100 Mile House players during a game on Saturday morning.

Clearwater Atoms win home tournament

By Keith McNeill The Times

Clearwater Atoms player Devon Green takes the puck be-

tween two 100 Mile House players during a game on Saturday morning. Behind him is his brother, Brendon Green.

NORTH THOMPSON SPORTSPLEX Hockey Lives Here! Family Skating

Fridays @ 5pm • Sundays @ 4:30pm • No Charge Dec. 27 & 29 Sponsored by Dairy Queen

Wishing you all

a Happy Holiday

Season from the

Sportsplex Staff A BIG THANK YOU to Santa and his helpers

Preschool Skating 10am Home School Skating Wednesdays 1:30pm Clearwater & District Minor Hockey Still accepting registrations. www.cdmha.info • Register @ 250 674 2594 or nissa1537@gmail.com

Raft Mountain Skating Club Still accepting registrations Register @ www.raftmountain.com

Ladies Hockey • Fridays at 6:45pm Mens Drop In Hockey • Fridays at 8:00 Oldtimers Hockey • Every Wednesday at 8:45 and Sundays at 7:00 Wells Gray Curling Club Call 250 674 3768 for more info.

For more information about the Sportsplex or any programs call 250 674 2143

Above: Members of the Clearwater Atoms team pose for a photograph after winning their home tournament last weekend. Pictured are (back, l-r) coaches Mark Green and Donald Collins (missing is Jay Meyer), (back, l-r) Liam Hunt, Alex Lamash, Soli Barstow, Tadam Elliot, Devin Green, Garner Ransome, Parker Collins, Cassidy Tucker, Claire Meyer, (front, l-r) Olin Coates, Aubry Leppington, Piet Oud, Brendan Green, and Ali Settle. The local team won all four of its games. The contest was part of an Atoms tournament held on the weekend at the Sportsplex. Clearwater won the tourney, taking all four of its games. The squad from 100 Mile came in sec-

ond and Valemount came in third. Teams from Williams Lake and Kelowna were also at the tournament. The Clearwater Peewees won their November home tournament as well.


North Thompson Star/Journal December 26, 2013

most beautiful gift I could see and there he was! He was 13 hands tall, with a grulla colour and a patch of white under his belly and around his neck was a red collar with bells and on the tag it said Niko. Santa has come through! I wanted Niko to meet everybody and see everything, so I went on his back and told him to go south to the town. When we got there I asked Niko if he could fly. Niko nodded and jumped up and we were going higher, higher, and higher. When he stopped going higher, we saw all the lights. It was the most beautiful thing I saw in the world. I asked Niko if he wanted to go back home, Niko said, “Yes, but you got to dress warm because I want to show you something.” When we were home, I opened the rest of my presents and I saw a note, it was from Santa. It said; Dear Kila, Please take good care of Niko, because Prancer is his father, and he already misses Niko. I hope you take good care of him. From Santa Kila was about to cry, but then she saw a present that she missed, it said on the top ‘To Kila, fragile’. So she opened up carefully and it was a snow globe of Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Commet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen and Niko at the lead, flying with them pulling the sleigh. She grinned, but then frowned and looked at Niko. I found out that Niko didn’t belong here, he belonged at the north pole with Santa. It was late at night and Kila was bundled up to see what Niko wanted to show her. He told her to go on his back and he started to fly. Faster and faster we went, I closed my eyes and the next minute we stopped. I opened my eyes and I saw the northern lights, it was also beautiful as the town. Kila knew right away that she was at the North Pole, she looked underneath her and she saw and there it was, Santa’s workshop and where he lives. Once we were on the ground, I saw Santa walking up to me and said, “Are you taking good care of Niko? “Look,” I said, “I can’t keep Niko, well, because you need him more than I do and he’s your reindeer. I found out after you gave me that snow globe.” “Well,” Santa said, “since you are here, I could give you another gift.”

www.starjournal.net A13

Christmas stories

“Sure.” “What will it be young lady?” “It will be a horse, breed Mustang, that is tame and the colour is pure white.” “Anything else?” Santa said. “Oh ya, its name is Snowy and it’s a stallion with an outdoor pen.” Kila said. “Okay, close your eyes, Kila, close your eyes.” Kila closed her eyes and the next minute she was in her room, in her bed. She got up and went downstairs, while she was walking down, she saw her parents awake, they said “Kila come quick, there’s something outside and it’s for you!” Kila dressed warm and went outside with her parents, and she saw a pen with a pure white Mustang stallion and on the gate said Snowy. Kila was excited and she knew what to get for next Christmas. A sled so that she could ride and Snowy could pull! Christmas By Kendra Krutschke Once upon a time there was a boy named Charly.   Charly was so excited about Christmas!  Santa’s elves worked so hard, but then candy man struck in the north pole to get all the presents with his giant vacuum.   But there was only tow or three more days until Christmas.   Santa had an idea.   Santa thought his elves can search the cameras.   They put cameras everywhere.   Finally, they go the presents back.  Santa got a present sent to him, it said “Santa, I hope you do not forget me this year. Merry Christmas” and out came a dog.  Then Santa got ready for the big trip.   The reindeer drank eggnog before the trip. Christmas Day By Landon Pearson One day a kid who liked Christmas and all of his friends did too, and an old man who hated Christmas.  The kid was playing a game with his friends and setting up Christmas ornaments and the old man said “Christmas is fake! Santa is fake! Now get away from me, nobody cares about Christmas.” The kids were sad.   It was Christmas night, the old man said “Santa, he is fake.”   The kids heard jingle bells on the roof, they went outside, they seen Santa, they yelled “Santa!” The old man looked out the window, he came

out. “Santa is real, all these years the kids were trying to tell me.” That’s my story, do you believe in Santa.

UGGG.  More Cookies. By Lane Robinson Once upon a time, in a land far, far away, there was a little elf.  His name was Raiden Cookie Fingers.  Every night since he was a little boy, he would sneak around the reindeer barn, over Santa’s sleigh, and through the penguin palace, then into Santa’s kitchen.   Once he was there he would sneak three cookies, but only one was for him.   The other two were for the reindeer and the penguins, because if they didn’t get any then they wouldn’t let him pass. The very next morning, when all the elves were already in the workshop, building toys for all the good boys and girls, Mrs. Clause disappointedly walked slowly towards the work shop.  That morning, she had noticed the difference of cookies taken from the cookie jar.  Once inside she announced that someone had been stealing her cookies.   All the other elves gasped in surprise.   After, she announced that it had happened before, but only once.   Then she said, “If any elves have any idea who the thief is, please report to Santa.”   Then she walked sadly back to her house.  For the rest of the day the progress of toy making had slowed down a great amount. The next morning Santa came into the workshop and said “We’ve found out who the thief is.  It’s Raiden Cookie Fingers.”  Then all the elves mumbled and mumbled until the day was over.  That night Raiden Cookie Fingers sat alone in his room.   None of his friends even talked to him.  Even months after the thievery.  So, he decided he was going to try and ruin Christmas, and for the rest of the month he took extra cookies so he could survive, since he was secretly planning to move out of his bubble gum house to somewhere away from Santa and all the other name calling heartbreaking mean elves. After what seemed like forever, Raiden Cookie Fingers finally had enough cookies to survive for around one month.   But, that’s not all he took.  He was also extra sneaky and took jugs of milk, clothes from other elves houses, and even found a family of mischievous penguins that volunteered to help

him ruin Christmas.   So, on the night of December 1st, after everyone was asleep, the family of penguins waddled over to Raiden Cookie Fingers house and started helping him move his things. The very next morning, no one even noticed Raiden Cookie Fingers was gone.  Meanwhile, he was busy at work, planning with the penguin family.   For weeks they planned and planned and planned and ate cookies and then planned even more, until they were all ready.   They had finally come up with a fool proof plan.   It was basically as easy as it was getting the milk and cookies.   All they had to do was firstly get one penguin to distract Santa.   Secondly, get another to create total chaos in the work shop, and lastly, Raiden and the other two penguins would have to sneak into the control room and completely switch the naughty and nice lists around.   Then, suddenly Santa burst out yelling at the first penguin, meanwhile the other penguin was busy at work to destroying all the toy making machines.  Now all the last three had to do was switch the lists.  Although it sounded simple, it was harder than they all expected.   Raiden Cookie Fingers forgot that Santa used his best (EOC) Elves On Call to guard the computerized lists, but they still passed and made it in.  Then, with a burst of lights and a loud pulsing alarm went off and a cage fell from above them and they were trapped inside it, it was all over.  Within a week Santa had everything back on track.  Then penguins had been sent to their home, and Santa sent Raiden Cookie Fingers to New York where he couldn’t ruin Christmas ever again. A Christmas Disaster By Logan Anderson Once upon a time there was a boy named Logan.   He went outside to make a big snowman.   When it was getting dark he went in his house.   He went to his bed to go to sleep.  When he fell asleep, Santa came.  He came with one of his elves.  The elf stole my Christmas tree. The Grinch Ruins X-Max By Quinn Morin Once there was a boy named Joseph and his dog Lucky were climbing a hill to go sledding, but half way up the climbing hill they saw something green

come out of a cave. “Ah, it’s the Grinch”, said Joseph as they ran down the hill screaming.  When they got to the bottom they did not see him anymore.   They ran to their parents.   “It’s the Grinch on top of white sheep hill,” said Joseph, but his dad did not believe him.  On Christmas night Joseph did not sleep, he stayed up all night looking for the Grinch.  He heard thumping down stairs, but it was just Lucky rolling around in the middle of the night, but he heard it again.  This time he crept quietly down the stairs. “Uh oh, it’s the Grinch”, said Joseph.   he watched the Grinch till he left.  On Christmas morning Lucky and Joseph ran to the north pole. “Help”, as they ran into Santa’s house, “it’s the Grinch” Joseph yelled. “Ho ho ho, me oh my, I will help you stop him!” “He’s on top of white sheep hill.” “Let’s go, I need to go Mrs. Claus.” “Okay, don’t get too cold.” “I won’t”, said Santa. “Okay, bye,” said Mrs. Claus.   Out the door and they raced to white sheep hill. “There he is, he has the presents, catch him,” yelled Santa and they caught him, then they returned the presents and the Grinch was never to be seen again. The Goblin Who Found Christmas By Taylor Harris, grade 3, Mrs. Matthews Once upon a time there was a grumpy goblin who lived in a little shack he had built himself. He hated Christmas.  The sound of kids frolicking in the snow was not music to his ears. One Christmas eve the goblin had an idea.   He went into his shack and made a potion that would make all the kids hate Christmas.   so on that very night he went to every kid’s house and waited until no one could see him and snuck a drop on their Christmas food.  But when he got home he heard a bell.   Then his doorbell rang.  “Yes”, said the goblin. “Yes”, said the man, “I am Santa Claus and I am here to tell you that what you did was very wrong.   Christmas is about giving, not getting.” “Oh”, said the goblin, “I’m so sorry.” “But always remember I see you when you’re sleeping and I know when

continued from last week...

you’re awake.” And then he rode off and as quick as he could he went to his toy box and grabbed all of his toys and he went to the kids house and put a toy in each of their stockings, and that my friends is how the goblin found Christmas. Christmas Wish By Wyatt Mortensen Mrs. Kerslake’s class, Gr.7 Once upon a time, there was a boy named Jonson Jr. His family wasn’t the wealthiest and Christmas was never celebrated the way other families did. Their tree was always small and lanky. They never had a turkey, it was always a chicken. They used old dirty socks for their stockings. His mom didn’t have enough money for fancy wrapping paper, so they used old newspapers instead. So lets not talk about how bad his Christmas’ are. Lets talk about Jonson Jr. He was a kind little boy, but was bullied at school and at home. He usually waas picked on because his right leg wasn’t as long as his left, which made him walk with a limp. He couldn’t run and play sports with the other kids. “Hey limpy!” yelled his older brother Charlie. “Stop saying that, Christmas is tomorrow.” At that moment, Jonson Jr wished he could go to bed and wake up to a Christmas morning like all the other kids did. While he was walking home, his older brother picked on him the entire way home. “Hi mom,” said Jonson Jr. “Hey guys,” said his mom, “do you guys want to go with your father to get the tree?” said his mom. “Sure” said Jonson Jr and Charlie. So they got in their old pickup truck and set off to find a tree. They drove down an old dirt road, and came to see an opening that had the most beautiful tree they have ever seen. Jonson Jr’s dad got the old rickety axe out of the box of their pickup truck. The three of them made their way up to the tree... chop, chop, chop, and down it fell. The boys eyes lit up with joy. Jonson Jr said to Charlie, “This will be a great Christmas after all.” To My Surprise When they pulled in the driveway, Jonson Jr and Charlie went running to the house to tell their mother how ugly the tree was. Jonson Jr said “Hurry Mother, you must come look!”

So she got on her boots and her tuque and followed him out to see the tree. To her surprise the tree was not ugly, it was magnificent! Jonson Jr and Charlie started laughing. “Well, we best get the tree inside. Christmas is tomorrow you know,” their dad said. So they all helped take the tree in and the all dressed the tree. They hung the new stockings that mother had knitted by the fire place. Then mother said, “Santa won’t come if you don’t go to bed.” They both sighed and kissed their parents good night. They set out a small glass of milk and three cookies, then they had scampered off to bed. As Jonson Jr got into bed, he wished on a star, “please Christmas star, can we have a Christmas like never before?” Right before he closed his eyes, the star gave a glimmer like never before. Wishes do come true. When Jonson Jr and his brother, Charlie, awoke in the morning, they walked quietly down the old rickety stairs. When they walked into the living room, they eyes lit up with joy. “Look at all the presents in beautiful wrapping paper!” exclaimed Jonson Jr. “Look at all these stockings! They’re overflowing with candy!” Charlie shouted. Both the boys ran back upstairs to their parents room and jumped on their bed. Jonson Jr enthusiastically said, “Wake up! Wake up!” Charlie shook his dad and yelled, “Wake up! It’s Christmas! You gotta come downstairs!” Their mother and father got their housecoats on and their slippers and followed the boys down the old creaky stairs. “Why are we rushing?” mom asked. “Because mom, we are having a Christmas like never before!” explained Jonson Jr and Charlie. When they arrived in the living room, their mom started to cry. The boys both asked, “Why are you crying, mom?” “It’s, it’s... just so beautiful,” she explained, sniffling back tears. At that moment, Jonson Jr was thanking the Christmas star and Santa for making his wish come true. This year, Jonson Jr had a Christmas like never before! ...continued on page 15


A14 www.starjournal.net 

Thursday, December 26, 2013 North Thompson Star/Journal

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Christmas Christmas stories stories

North Thompson Star/Journal December 26, 2013

a Christmas like never before! Living inside a gingerbread house By Zarina Mitchell The sweet sugary smell came into my room.   I was starting to wake up... but where?  A lot of people thought it was crazy, “Couldn’t be done!” they would exclaim.   But it was.   I was in my gingerbread house. I know what you’re thinking.   Millions of questions are coming in your mind. “Do you actually live in a gingerbread house?” or “Are you crazy?!”. Also, questions like “What type of candy?” and “What is and

isn’t candy?”.  I like questions.  I get asked them all the time and if I eat my own house I would kinda be homeless.  My house is the size of a normal medium/small house. I love my house a lot and I never want to leave, ever.

Peeka Choo’s First Christmas By Desirae Keller Once upon a time in a pet store there was a Pokemon named Peeka Choo.   He was the nicest Pokemon there.   No one had come in for a long time.  One day a boy named Ash came in and was looking at all of the Pokemon, the one that caught his eye was Peeka

www.starjournal.net A15

Choo.  The owner, Linda, said he was a good beginner Pokemon.   Linda the owner asked where the boy’s winter coat was.  He said it was in his backpack.   Linda said, “Well good thing  you have it, it’s winter.” Ash told Linda that he was interested in buying the Pokemon Peeka Choo.   He asked how much it costs.  She let him know that it was about 30 dollars.   He only had 15 dollars.   Linda said that he should save up because it’s almost December, unless his parents would buy him for him.  Ash told the store keeper that he had no parents.   She thought that was very sad and she

worried about how he had the money that he did.  He explained that he does chores in his neighbourhood for people.   Linda wondered how he got food and clothes.  Ash told her that sometimes he goes to the grocery store if he has enough money for himself and his friend Dawn. Linda realized that Ash takes care of Dawn and himself.  Ash said that Daw has a Pokemon and it protects them, but now he wants a Pokeman.  Ash said bye to Linda and went to find Dawn.   He told Dawn about the Pokemon named Peeka Choo. Dawn said, “Well, Ash, that name sounds like a good Pokemon, well

where is he?” Ash said, “I didn’t get him.” Dawn said, “How much did he cost then?” Then Ash said he cost about 30 dollars. Dawn said, “It’s almost Christmas and you don’t have a Pokemon to help Piplup, Ash,” then said, “Well, we better get doing chores.” Ash said, “What if we klid our money. Then Dawn said, “Alrighty then.” Thirty minutes later Ash said hi to Linda and then said Hi to both of them.   Linda asked them if they had the money to buy Peeka Choo.   Dawn said yes, they had the

money.  So Linda grabbed Peeka Choo and a Pokemon ball. “Young lady, do you have a Pokemon?” Then Dawn said, “I do.” Linda then asked if she had a Pokemon ball for her Pokemon.  Dawn then said no she didn’t.   Then Linda gave her a Pokemon ball.   Then Dawn said thank you to Linda.  Then they said bye to each other.  Linda then said wait to Dawn and Ash and then said, “it’s really cold  and snow.” Then Ash said it was “no biggy, well people say if it’s snow and cold team rock”et will get you.” Dawn then said, “its

just a fairy tale”. Linda said, “okay then”. Two days past. Dawn said, “where are you Ash?” Then Ash said, “what was that Dawn?” Team rock then said, “hi, we are team rock”et and we are hired to steel Peeka Choo.” Then Dawn said, “you are not getting Peeka Choo.” Then she said “Piplup attack.” Tem rock”et then was in the sky after Piplup attacked. Christmas Day.  When they all got in their house there were presents under the tree.  It was Peeka ...continued on page 18

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A16 www.starjournal.net 

Thursday, December 26, 2013 North Thompson Star/Journal

Celebrating 36 Years

the salt & cook, stirring, for about 8 mins, until the onion becomes soft, verging on golden. Stir in garlic & lay spinach on top to wilt. Stir, w/the potatoes & sprouts, remaining salt, pepper & cream. Mix thoroughly & transfer to prepared pan. Sprinkle top w/bread crumbs & cheese & dust lightly w/paprika. Bake for 15 to 20 mins, or until the cheese is melted & turning golden. Serve hot or warm.

lemon juice & chicken brothn & pour over chicken. Cook on low for 3-4 hrs.  

Each week a group or volunteer(s) are recognized in this space for their contribution to our community. If you, your service organization or group would like to recognize an individual please call the North Thompson Volunteer and Information Centre at 672-0033.

Cranberry Apple Oatmeal Bread 2 cups quick oats 1 tsp baking soda ½ tsp Kosher salt 1 tsp cinnamon ½ cup Stevia, Splenda or sugar 1 cup unsweetened apple sauce 1 tsp vanilla 1 /2 cup low fat buttermilk 2 lrg eggs 2 tbs melted butter 2 tbs oil 2/3 cup dried cranberries Preheat oven to 350F. Place oats in food processor pulse to a coarse flour, add baking soda, salt, cinnamon & sugar. Pulse a couple times to sift. Place apple sauce, vanilla, buttermilk, eggs, melted butter & oil in mixing bowl. Beat until smooth, add dry mixture & beat until smooth. Fold in cranberries. Pour into 2 mini loaf pans (or full size pan or muffin tins) Bake 30-35 mins until pick pulls clean.

Little Fort Recreation Society

By Dee

Slowcooker Lemon Pepper Chicken 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts 1/4 cup flour 1 tsp pepper 1/4 cup butter 1 pkg dry italian dressing/seasoning mix 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice 1/2 cup chicken broth salt & pepper to taste In a shallow dish, combine flour & pepper.  Coat chicken in flour. Melt butter in a saucepan over med heat.Brown chicken, not cooking it throughout.  Spray crockpot w/cooking spray & place in chicken & sprinkle italian seasoning on top. Mix together

By Dee

FROM MY KITCHEN

Brussels Sprout Gratin w/Potatoes & Spinach 2½ tbsps olive oil 1 lb potatoes, cut into 1⁄8” thick half circles (peeling optional) 1 lb brussels sprouts, trimmed, cut into 1⁄8” thick 2 cups chopped onion (1 lrg) 1 tsp salt 2 tsps minced or crushed garlic ½ lb fresh spinach (baby leaves or coarsely chopped lrg leaves) black pepper ¼ cup cream, milk, 1/2-&-1/2, or soy 1 cup fresh whole-wheat bread crumbs 1 packed cup grated Gruyère paprika (optional) Preheat to 350°F, w/rack in highest position. Coat a 9”x13” baking pan w/ olive oil. Fill a med.-lrg saucepan w/ water & put it on to boil. Add potatoes & brussels sprouts & cook for 8-10 mins, or until fork-tender. Drain & shake to thoroughly drain. Meanwhile, heat a lrg skillet over med heat for about a min, add 1 tbsp olive oil (2 tbsps, if not adding butter) & coat pan. Add onion & ¼ tsp of

GROUP OF THE WEEK

FROM MY KITCHEN

This registered, non-profit society administers the Little Fort community hall and is funded in part by a local improvements levy. They meet on the first Thursday of the month, 7 p.m. at the hall. Carpet bowling is a weekly event, taking place on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9:30 a.m. till noon. They also have an annual craft fair on the last Sunday in October. Everyone is welcome to join. For more information about this group, contact Barb Denton at 250-677-4367.

THANK YOU!!

Dec. A p r 26, i l 2013 2 3 - - 2Jan. 9 , 1, 2 02014 12 Remember that This week is all words saidandintake, the about give heat of theDomoment Capricorn. for will notandsoon others, they be will forgotten, do for you. ACaprispecial corn. Don’t event calls forforget some toextra-special employ some gifts. tact December 22– when discussing January 19 serious matters with loved ones.

January 20– February 18

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Aries, some dif-and Speak up, Aries, ficulty awaits the problem willyou, be but youAare solved. littlestrong miracle and fullymakes capable at home for an ofinteresting handling what’s weekend. coming yourcome way. Travel plans Maintain together. your composure and stick it out a little longer. Taurus, is your Cast asidethis all doubt, week shine Taurus.toThe offerand is let everyone at bring work genuine and will know justrewards. how talyou many A ented test of and faith devoted begins— you are toMoney the team. be strong. woes Enjoy ease. the fanfare while you can get it. Distractions Feeling blessedare lurking, these days,Gemini, Gemini? but will A Pay you it forward. still manageat to compromise home get things done. raises everyone’s Somehow youensues find spirits and fun the focus needed all weekend long! to muddle through all the work.

June 22– July 22

Trust someone close A business relationship to you with blossoms withaanfew of your secrets, Cancer. addition. A larger-thanHolding themdrops in life personality may only causeyouyou by with an offer grief in theOh long can’t refuse. boy, run. Don’t worry, oh boy, Cancer. your confidante will September 23– October 22 be supportive.

Some added Lady Luck smiles on confidence is all you, Libra, and there you needbeyond to getyour is nothing back the right reach.on A treasured track, Libra. Things heirloom resurfaces, are bound tomany work bringing back out your favor, fondinmemories. especially when you put your mind to something.

July 23– August 22

Leo, investment Oops,an Leo. You fall opportunity has behind on a project, piqued your interraising some est. UntilNot youtosign eyebrows. over worry.the Youfunds, will getbe sure evback to on research track sooner erything thoroughly than you think, thanks and in some October 23– to ancall innovation. expert advice. November 21

Scorpio, The tiniestjust of when skepticism changes makeseems a vast to be taking over, improvement in a you will discover onceis project. A rejection in a whileinthere are a blessing disguise. aBefew surprises with grateful for what happy endings. Enyou’re given, Scorpio. joy your good luck.

Virgo, yousave havemore a lot Spend less, on but andyour you’llplate, definitely you can handle it on get more, Virgo. More your own. If things in your bottom line are getpeace done, andto more of you will themprovide acmind.get Flowers complished of your a great pick-me-up. own accord, even if November 22– August 23– September 22 it takes longer. December 21

Sagittarius, though News from afar gets unusual, the creativeyour juices behavior might flowing, and you seem perfectly accomplish more than reasonable to you. you have in some time, But unlessAyou share Sagittarius. game of your wits atthoughts the office with others, they may proves challenging. wonder what is going on.

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

Dec 31 - New Year’s Eve celebration @ Legion. summer. at the Barriere Food Bank. Judy 250-672-5275 or Fran 319-8023. 250-672-2012. Dec 31 - New Year’s Eve Bullarama @ NT Agriplex Riding Club: Jan-Mar: 3rd Sun. 1pm; Apr-Oct: 3rd Little Fort Recreation Society: 1st Thurs. each mth Thurs. 7pm at NTVIC. www.barrieredistrictridingclub. Barriere Search & Rescue: 2nd Tues. of mth, 7pm. 7pm Jan 9 - ‘Making your money last’. Free seminar from Training on 4th Tues. of mth, 7pm. Edward Jones open for any age group, refreshments & com. Darcey 250-318-9975. LNT Catholic Women’s League: 2nd Sat. each mth, snacks provided. Volunteer Centre 6:30pm. Cancer Support: 672-9263, 672-0017 or 672-1890 BSS PAC & Booster Club: 1st Tues. of mth, 5:30pm. 9am at St. George’s. Call 250-672-9330 for info. 250-672-9943. Jan 11 - Winter Farmers Market, 10am-1pm @ Sam’s Choir: Thurs. @ Christian Life Assembly, Annesty Rd. McLure Rec.: 1st Wed. each mth at 7:30pm McLure Pizza. Survivors of Brain Injuries: John 250-372-1799. Youth 7-18 3:30pm; Adults 19+ 6:30pm. Leah 250957-8440. Jan 18 - Al Fortin’s Citizen of the year banquet, 6pm Bethany Baptist Church Prayer: Every Tues., 7pm. Firehall. Except Jul & Aug. 250-578-7565 for info. @ Legion hall, downstairs. Curling Club: Oct.-Mar. Curling, league & bonspiels. Carpet Bowling: Mon, Wed, & Fri., 9:30am-12 @ McLure Fire Dept.: 2nd & 4th Tues., 7pm, McLure Jan 25 - Winter Farmers Market, 10am-1pm @ Sam’s Drop In Art. Fridays 11:30am-2:30pm at NTVIC end Little Fort Hall. Firehall Pizza. of Sep to Mar (except holidays). Nominal fee. Community Kitchen: If interested call Dede 554Men’s Floor Hockey: Tues., 8-10pm at Barriere Sec. Jan 25 - Cashless Craft Swap. 12:30-2:30 NTVIC 3134. Barriere Elementary PAC: 1st Wed. of mth, NT Fish & Game Club: 4th Mon. each mth 7pm Feb 8 - Winter Farmers Market, 10am-1pm @ Sam’s 6:30pm, call 672-9916 or Leesa Genier at 320-3629. Community Soup Day: Christian Life Assembly on Pizza. NTVIC. 672-1843 Annesty Rd. 3rd Mon. of every mth, 11:30 am. Barriere Fire Dept.: Firehall, Thurs., 7pm Feb 22 - Winter Farmers Market, 10am-1pm @ Sam’s Crib: Mon. & Fri. 1-4pm @ Little Fort Hall. NT Valley Hospice: 3rd Tues, 11am, Little Fort Hall. Barriere Food Bank: Wednesdays. Message 672Pizza. Crib: Barriere Legion 242, every Thurs. 7pm, Sept. to 672-5660. Army Cadets - 2941 RCACC Cadet Corp. - ages 12- 0029 May. Genealogy: Every 1st & 3rd Friday of the mth at the 18. New Recruits Welcome. Marc 672-9681. Quilting: 1st Tues of the mth, 10am @ Little Fort Darts: Barriere Legion 242, Thurs. 7pm, Sept. to May. Baha’i Night: Fri., 7:30pm, @ Marge Mitchell’s 672- Library, 6-7pm, except Jul/Aug. 250-672-9330. Hall. Barriere Hospice: Loans out handicap equip - call Gambler’s Anonymous: 250-374-9165 or 250-3745615. Safe Home: Get away from domestic abuse, call 2509866. Adult Day Program: Mon. & Wed. 9-2. Lunch, crafts 250-672-9391. 674-2135 (Clw) or 250-682-6444 (Barriere). & music at the Seniors Ctr. Sherry Jardine 672-5121 Photography Club. All welcome. Shelley Lampreau Heffley Creek Acoustic Coffee House: 3rd Fri. Walk & Fitness: Indoors, Tues & Thurs 12-2pm. every mth 7pm. Call 578-0056. Barriere & District Heritage Society: 3rd Wed. of 250-672-5728. mth, 1pm at NTVIC in the winter, at Museum in the Community Quilters: 2nd & 4th Thurs. of mth, 2pm Literacy Tutoring: Learn to read FREE. Jill Hayward Barriere Ridge Gym.


North Thompson Star Journal Thursday, December 26, 2013

www.starjournal.net A17

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.672.5611 fax 250.672.9900 email office@starjournal.net

Office Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9am -5pm 359 Borthwick Ave. Box 1020, Barriere BC V0E 1Eo

Ph: 250.672.5611 • Fax: 250.672.9900

CLASSIFIED RATES AND DEADLINES Buy a Classified in the Star/Journal and your ad goes into The Times FREE Regular Rate: 8.50 + GST Maximum 15 words .20c per word extra Special Rates: 3 Weeks; $22.15 + GST

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Personals

Trades, Technical

Work Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Barriere Alcoholics Anonymous Call: 250-672-9643 For Al Anon Call: 250-672-9643, 250-677-4234

JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages, relocation allowance, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrysler.ca. Fax 403-854-2845; Or send by email to: chrysler@telusplanet.net

HAFI GRANTS Notice to low income seniors and persons with disability. You may qualify for a grant up to 20,000. to modify and adapt your home for improved safety and accessibility. For details contact your local HAFI expert Hans Ounpuu, Building contractor @ 250-674-3875.

Clearwater: AA meetings Every Wednesday, #11 Lodge Dr., side door. Roll call 8 p.m. 250-674-1923, 250-674-7313

Travel

Happy Occasions: Happy Birthday, Happy Anniversary, etc. 1 column by 3 inch - $18.49 + GST Deadlines: Word Ads: Mondays 12pm

Display Ads: Mondays 12pm

It is the policy of The Star/Journal and The Times to receive pre-payment on all classified advertisements. Ads may be submitted by phone if charged to a VISA, MC or an existing account. CHECK YOUR AD! Notice of error must be given in time for correction before the second insertion of any advertisement. The paper will not be responsible for omissions or for more than one incorrect insertion, or for damages or costs beyond the cost of the space actually occupied by the error. Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of ads which discriminate against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved. Readers; in ads where ‘male’ is referred to, please read also as ‘female’ and where ‘female’ is used, read also ‘male’. NOTE: When ordering items out of province, the purchaser is responsible to pay provincial sales tax. Do not send money in response to an advertisement without confirming the credentials of that business, and be aware that some telephone numbers will be charged for by the minute Free Ads: Lost, Found, Student Work Wanted Free ads maximum 15 words will run 2 consecutive weeks.

“The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia” In Partnership with Barriere & District Chamber of Commerce and Yellowhead Community Services

Travel

CLEARWATER EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 58A Young Road, Clearwater BC V0E 1N2 • 250-674-2928 • Fax 250-674-2938 E-mail: info@clearwateremployment.ca • Web Page: www.clearwateremployment.ca

Cards of Thanks

Information

Employment

Clearwater Seniors would like to thank the Lions Club and all their helpers for a great turkey dinner. Also thank you to the Campbell Family for the entertainment. Wishing all a Happy Holiday Season

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

Business Opportunities

Daytime Stick Curling Afternoon league/drop-in Starting in January Wells Gray Curling Club For Info call Larissa 250-674-3373 Wells Gray Curling Club Mens Skins Spiel Jan. 11 & 12 Guaranteed 4 — 6 end games Cash prizes Registration $200/team Ph. Mel @ 250-674-3847 or sports@docbc.ca to register

Information

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca HOSPITAL AUXILIARY THRIFT SHOP

Located across the railway tracks in Vavenby, B.C. Wednesday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Help Wanted

Logging Truck Driver: Seasonal/ Clearwater #C0269 Age Friendly Event Coordinator: PT/ Clearwater #C0267 Farm Supervisor: incl. accom./Salt Spring #CB0265 German Speaking Tour Guide: FT/ Seasonal/Clearwater #C0264 Professional Driver: Casual/Seasonal/ Clearwater #C0263 Early Childhood Educator/Facility Manager: FT/PT Barriere #CB0262 Facilitator/Case Manager: PT/Barriere #BC0261 Support Worker - Child care programs: 2 positions/Clearwater #CB0259

CENTURY PLAZA HOTEL Best Rates. 1.800.663.1818

Free Workshops

TRAIN TO be an Apartment/Condominium Manager online! Graduates get access to all jobs posted with us. 33 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1800-665-8339, 604-681-5456.

Help Wanted

impression you will make to your future employer. Please drop in and our friendly staff will assist you. Targeted Wage Subsidy (TWS): Are you currently on Employment Insurance or have you been in the last 3-5 years? If you have, you may be eligible for wage subsidy. Ask us for further info. Funding for Skill Enhancement: Recent or active EI clients with a career plan in mind seeking assistance through Service Canada are required to book an appointment with one of our Employment Counsellors. • Blue River Library: An employment consultant comes to the Blue River School. Next visit is Tuesday January 14th from 12:30-2:30. If a one on one appointment is required, please call to set up a time prior to the drop in.

Experienced parts person required immediately for James Western Star in Williams Lake. Full time, competitive wages, benefits and signing bonus. Fax resume to 250-398-6367 or email: nwejr@jamesws.com

GENERAL LABOURERS

OIL & GAS INDUSTRY GUARANTEED Job Placement

Operated by Yellowhead Community Services The Employment Program of BC is funded by the Government of Canada & the Province of British Columbia • Labourers • Tradesmen • Class 1 Drivers

Call 24Hr. Free Recorded Message 1-888-213-2854

Help Wanted

Traffic Control: Casual/Clw #C0256 Early Childhood Educator/Educator Assistant: FT/PT Clw/Barriere#CB2050 Maintenance Technician (Instrumentation): FT/Clw#C0248 Cook: 2 positions/Clw #C0240 12 Postings/Blue River: PT & FT #CB0222 Chef Garde Manger, Assistant Pastry Chef, Sandwich Maker, Marketing Coordinator, Registered Massage Thqerapist/ Lodge Employee, Lodge Employee/Kitchen Helper, Registered Massage Therapist-Albreda Lodge, Maintenance Manager, Guide, Fine Dining Server, Registered Massage Therapist, Housekeeper

to help with your work search are available. Please contact us to register for one or all of these free workshops. Creating & Updating Your Resume Workshop: Thurs. Dec. 19th “Back to Work Boot Camp”: Jan. 6th – Jan. 10th: Workshops will be as follows: ‘Discover You’ (Assessments) Workshop: Mon. Jan. 6th Resume, Cover Letter and Interview Skills Workshop: Tues. Jan. 7th Networking, Cold Calls & Dress for Success Workshop: Wed. Jan. 8th Internet & Email Basics Workshop: Thurs. Jan. 9th Accepting, Maintaining & Starting Employment Workshop: Fri. Jan. 10th Resumes & Interviews: Go hand in hand, so the better prepared you are the greater the

Great deals - low prices

Safe Home Response Providing a safe place to escape for women and their children. Volunteers always needed. Call 250-674-2135.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATOR – Yellowhead Community Services CB0250 SUPPORT WORKER – Yellowhead Community Services CB0259 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATOR/MANAGER – Yellowhead Community Services CB0262 GENERAL LABOURER – Woodco Sawmill B0266 MYSTERY SHOPPERS – In-Touch Insight Systems B0268 Skill Development: If you have been on Employment Insurance in the past 3 years (5 years maternity) & are currently unemployed, you may be eligible for re-training dollars. Book an appointment to see one of our counselors for information. We look forward to seeing you: come in and we’ll personally see that you get the information you’re seeking or call and make an appointment. • Free computer & Internet access • Free resume help • Free information on many services.

CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No risk program. Stop mortgage and maintenance Payments today. 100% money back guarantee. Free consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

Announcements

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

629 Barriere Town Rd. V0E 1E0 • 250-672-0036 • Fax: 250-672-2159

E-mail: mail@barriere-employment.ca • Website: www.barriere-employment.ca

Go To: http://www.wiegele.com/employment.htm for information on jobs with Mike Wiegele.

Timeshare

Announcements

Coming Events

NORTH THOMPSON JOBS BARRIERE EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

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By shopping local you support local people.

Looking for the perfect fit?

They are looking here. Call 1-855-678-7833 today for more details.


A18 www.starjournal.net A18 www.starjournal.net

Services

Thursday, Thursday,December December26, 26,2013 2013 North NorthThompson ThompsonStar/Journal Star Journal

Pets & Livestock

Real Estate

Transportation

Financial Services

Pets Good Dog Obedience Classes Starting January 5 * NEW DATES* Basic Obedience - A 6 week course in good manners & canine behaviour begins Sunday, Jan. 5, 1pm at the Fall Fair Hall in Barriere for all dogs at least 6 months old & up. Cost $100. To register or for more information contact Jill Hayward at 250-319-8023.

Mobile Homes & Parks

Auto Financing

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

Legal Services

24/7 • anonymous • confidential • in your language

YOUTH AGAINST VIOLENCE LINE

1-800-680-4264

info@youthagainstviolence.com

Stand up. Be heard. Get help.

Merchandise for Sale

Free Items Old newspaper. Stop by the Times office and pick up a bundle. 14-74 Young Rd. Clearwater

Photography / Video Need a professional

photographer? Portraits, weddings, special events, pet portraits, commercial. Affordable memories that last a lifetime. Seniors rates. Book now avoid & disappointment. Sorry no passport photos Jill Hayward 250-319-8023/250-672-0055

PHOTOS

by Keith McNeill

Digital and film photographs. Phone 250-674-3252 or email:kmcneill@mercuryspeed.com

Handypersons Wilkeekon Services Handyman & Cleaning Residential & Commercial Moving in/out, DIY projects, construction site, interior/exterior, light hauls Bonded Gayle Peekeekoot Ray Wilson 250-674-2775

Telephone Services DISCONNECTED PHONE? National Teleconnect home phone service. No one refused! Low monthly rate! Calling features and unlimited long distance available. Call National Teleconnect today! 1866-443-4408. or visit online: www.nationalteleconnect.com

Mystery By Haille Johnson Once there was a girl named Shelbey.  She had lots of fun.  But one night the water went missing. She worried bad.  First she went to the ocean, no water there.  Then to the lake, nothing there. Then tried the tap, again, didn’t work. She looked out noones tap was working. She hired Kayla, Haille and Cadence.  Kayla, Haille and Cadence looked in the house. Next night, dark, mean scary Chris took the water again. She had to figure out by herself. Chris, mean, dark, scary, admitted he took the water.

Misc. for Sale 2013 woodlands 9.5hp, hm126 20 used blades. $1,650. dobson4rocks@hotmail.com 2 saddles, good condition, $300 each. Also vet supplies. 250-672-2086 Dewalt Saw $45. Craftsman Saw $40. 3 extension ladders $60 each. Plumbing crimp tool $75. Box stick nails 21o $50. Call Don, 250-672-1971 HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper? STEEL BUILDINGS/Metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or visit us online at: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

Misc. Wanted Local Coin Collector Buying Collections, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins etc 778-281-0030 Used Postage Stamps

Support International Scouting by donating used stamps which are sorted & sold to raise money for the International Development Fund of the International Scout & Guide Fellowship. This fund pays for training for Scouters in the third world. Drop stamps off at front counter of the Star/Journal in Barriere, or call Margaret at (250)672-9330.

CHURCH DIRECTORY

Mobile Home for Sale downtown Barriere: 66’x12’, in quiet 55+ park. New: F/S, roof, flooring & pellet stove. Upgraded insulation. Quick possession. $16,900 w/2mo free pad rent. 250-457-6604

CHURCH OF ST. PAUL

4464 Barriere Town Road

Rentals

Worship Sunday 11:00

Apt/Condo for Rent

A worshipping community of Anglicans, United & Lutherans

All Are Welcome

CLEARWATER, 1-Br @ Woodside. Quiet, clean, updated. Common laundry. NS/NP, DD + refs. $575/mo. 604-790-2482

the Rev. Brian Krushel

Office: 250 672-5653 www.norththompsonpc.ca

For Rent: 2 bdrm appt. in Barriere, Dunn Lake Rd. Heat & power incl. NP/NS DD $750/mo. 250-319-5220 or 250-672-9958.

ST. GEORGE’S ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

Mobile Homes & Pads

Sunday Mass - 9am Wednesday, Friday & Saturday Mass - 9am

Clearwater: Immed occupancy 2 bdrm MH, covered deck, fenced yd. Ref + DD $325, rent $650/mo incl water, sewer & garbage. Ph. 250-587-6373

Father Donal O’Reilly

Ph 672-5949 • Fax 672-5974

Homes for Rent

Cars - Domestic

2 bdrm house, full carport, fully furnished, all appliances, w/full basement, some outbuildings. Wood/electric heat, private country living, 8 km from Barriere. N/S, rent negotiable. For application form, call or text (250) 318-7100.

2004 Buick Lesabre 83,000 km, 4 dr Sedan, navy blue, 6 cyl, auto, summers/winters mounted. $4,000.00 Ph. 250-674-3264

Barriere: 3 bdrm house, 5 new appliances. RR, NS, pets neg. $1200/mo, avail Feb 1. 250672-9362 Clearwater: 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, newly reno’d, close to schools, medical center, Weyerhaeuser Sub. Avail Jan. 1. Please call 1-250-600-3885

Rooms for Rent Clearwater: Room for rent, incl internet, shared facilities/living sp, Dutch Lake Trailer Court, ref req. $300/mo. Male perfered. Ph. 250-674-8300

Suites, Lower Barriere: 2 bdrm bsmt suite, FS/WD. Avail Jan 1. $600/mo + DD. RR. 250-672-2494 Birch Island: 2bdrm suite. $600/mo. Incl sat tv, utilities & laundry. Available Dec. 1. Ph. 250-674-1768

CHRISTIAN LIFE ASSEMBLY 4818 Annesty Rd. (Across from High School) 9:30am Adult Sunday School 10:30am Sunday Service and Children’s Sunday School Pastor: Lance Naylor 672-0111 www.clabarriere.org

Legal

Legal Notices FOREST Stewardship Plan. The Adams Lake Indian Band is preparing an amendment to the Forest Stewardship Plan #311 for the Thompson Rivers Forest District. The amendment is to reflect the latest Old Growth Management Areas implemented by government. The amendment is publicly available for review and for written comment until March 1, 2014. The amendment is available at the Natural Resources Department at 6453 Hillcrest Road in Chase, B.C. The department is open from 9am to 4pm from Monday to Friday. Please call Stuart Parker at 250-803-0181. Written comments may also be sent to P.O. Box 588 Chase, BC V0E 1M0, attention Stuart Parker, RPF.

THE OPEN DOOR FELLOWSHIP 11:00 am Sundays at the Ridge Bible Study on Tuesdays at 1pm PASTOR TODD ENGLISH Join us for refreshments after the Service.

Phone 250-672-1864 anytime.

This Crossword Sponsored by

WELLS GRAY HOME HARDWARE 86 STATION RD., CLEARWATER

The Cy Who Stole Presents By Justice Wassimer Once in a small town named Barriere, on Christmas night after Santa came, Cy came and stole all the presents.  The kids were sad.   The police caught the present thief.   The kids were happy. Miserable Children By Sawyer Cousins “It’s almost Christmas,” yells Bob.  “Christmas gets boring; when you’re 10 you don’t get as many presents.” “Now honey! It isn’t about the getting, it’s about the giving,” said mom. “Yea right, I’m going to bed so I can see how

many presents I get,” said Mellony.  “Good night.” “Me too,” says Bob. “Sigh, kids,” says mom. “I have found one family’s Christmas to ruin, the Godfrey’s,” says the night vulture. Christmas morning, “where are the presents?” mom says. Bob, “I don’t know.” “Son, I think someone stole them,” says mom. “I heard some rustling, but I thought it was you putting presents under the tree,” says Mellony. “Well, I have a couple extra presents for you.   I’ll call the cops to guard the house tonight,” says mom. “But mom, I want to wake up to presents un-

Classifieds Get Results!

der the tree,” says Bob. “Okay, I will wait one more day,” says mom. Pop. “okay, time to find those kids some presents.” Zip, roll. “Okay, I’m in the present store.” Ah ha, buy, buy. “Okay, I have the presents,” says elf. “Hi little elf, get in the bag,” says the night vulture. Drive, drive. “Where are we, laboratory?” says elf. Kick, hit, smack, bam, run, run, smack, put, put, put. “Now there, Christmas is saved,” says elf. Dear Mr. and Mrs. Claws By Tahanna Carolspawn I wanted to write you a letter and story, so I

did.   My name is Tahanna Carolspawn, I am 11, and my birthday is January 3.   I’m in grade 6.  So how are you?  I’m good.  So please enjoy the story, Claws. The chaperts are very shor.t. Chapter One Once a year us humans have a holiday called Christmas.  But - that all changed in 2020.   When I, Delta, saw all the made up animals: dragons, faeries, the Lockness monster, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.  I was only 6.  It was a warm night, also a loud one; parents fighting, siblings (Lola, my sister) aruging, and me - wanting to run.  Run from all of it.  Five years of doing nothing of it. I’m sick of it - every birthday wishing the

Seventh-day Adventists

Meet in the Church of Saint Paul on Saturday Mornings Bible Study - 9:30am Worship Service - 11am Fellowship Meal - 12:30pm Everyone Welcome 318-0545

674-3717

Christmas stories

Affiliated with North American Baptist Association. “Believe in the Lord Jesus - and you will be saved.” (Acts 16:31)

continued from last week...

same thing: “I wish I can live with a family that loves me.”  It never coming true. Chapter Two “Please... please help me Lola... I’m stuck under the bike... its very... very heavy...” I called out to Lola. “Why should I help you, hmm, what have you done for me?” Lola argued back.   I overheard my parents fighting over something completely pointless.  Yak, yak, yak, is all they ever say.   I was starting to get cold between the bike and ground - it feeling like it’s crushing my bones - maybe snapping.  Now it was dark and cold, still helplessly being crushed.   I saw a note in my reach, I grabbed it, and it said:

You have no use, just give up.   You have: no home, no heat, and no help.  It’s time to go back where you belong, you have sacred powers, use them wisely, Delta Dusayla.   I was shocked; how did it know my name?!   Who was it from?! And at that very moment, I fainted. Chapter Three *Beep... beep... beep...*   Is all I heard from the hospital bed.   I was very warm now... but instead of my family, I saw a family that I made up, not a thing like mine.   And at that moment I realized my wish came true.... Hope you enjoyed.   Thank you for reading, reader. The End.


North Thompson Thursday,26, December Clearwater TimesStar/Journal Thursday, December 2013 26, 2013

www.starjournal.net A7 A19 www.clearwatertimes.com

Couple gets married in the snow nearly 70 years ago do to celebrate? Who came? Royce: The wedding was across the river from Avola in my grandparents’ home, Will and Edith Gibson, whom I called “Mamie” and Grampa. They were pleased to host the event since I was the eldest grandson and the first to wed.

Eleanor Deckert An interview with a friend or relative who is your elder, yields so many interesting details. Included here are the questions that were asked as prompts to encourage others to participate in an interview. Jot down the stories of days-goneby while they are still available. Collecting these stories, one begins to weave together an ever-more-complete view of life in this part of Canada as history is made through problems to solve, personal decisions, employment, daily chores and meaningful family moments. How did you set the date for your wedding? “I just couldn’t do without her anymore,” Royce Gibson, states as he recalls the day he was the groom. It has been 67 years since their wedding day on Dec. 27, 1946. The tone in his voice and the twinkle in his eye on their anniversary conveys his affection, respect and deep, long-lasting love for his bride, Nancy Holt. When did you first meet each other? Did you stay in touch when he went overseas? “We were just kids. But in those days, friendships were formed and lasted for years,” Nancy (Holt) Gibson explains. She has a sensible,

Newlyweds Royce and Nancy Gibson begin married life in Avola, Dec. 27, 1946, as friends and neighbours look on from an icicle framed porch. Photo submitted

steady, cheerful manner, glad to describe what she remembers. They met in 1938 when the Avola school kids (Royce) had a sports day with the McMurphy school kids (Nancy). He was 13. She was 12. (see Valley Voices in the Times, Oct. 3, 2013) Six years later, he left for WorldWar II, serving in 2nd AntiTank Regiment of 2nd

Canadian Division in Belgium, Holland and Germany. They wrote letters, as friends, while he was overseas. It was just what people did in those times. How long were you engaged? Royce: One year and one week: I asked her on Dec. 20, 1945. Where was the wedding? What did you

Who officiated at the ceremony? Did you exchange rings? Did you have guests? Royce: Rev. Moran of the United Church came up on the train from Birch Island. Nancy: Yes, it was a double ring ceremony. We picked out the rings at a jeweller in Kamloops. Besides Avola and Birch Island, the minister also led services in Clearwater and Blue River. My parents and family lived in Birch Island and they arrived by train, too. The Nord family, who were friends from when we lived at McMurphy, also came by train. Royce: Guests? All of Avola came out! It was minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit (nearly -30’C). The river was frozen over and the people walked across on the ice. How did you know it was safe? Royce: We had horses and logging and went across all the time. Of course, we tested the thickness of the ice now and then.

It got as thick as 27-30 inches sometimes. What did you wear, Nancy? Nancy: I chose a grey pin-striped suit for the occasion. At that time you had to be practical when you spent money and I knew I would wear the suit again. I had fashionable wedge high heels. Royce’s grandmother gave me her gold wishbone broach. Did you have a cake? a reception? a dinner? a dance? Nancy: I lived in Kamloops at the time, working in the Royal Inland Hospital. I prepared special diet trays for the patients and also made supper for the nurses on night shift. I used to walk past a Chinese bakery on the way to school and often bought a treat. I asked the Chinese baker to make my cake. It was still wartime, you know, so I gave him my sugar

ration coupons. Royce: The reception was at Mom and Dad’s on the Avola side of the North Thompson River. So everyone walked back across on the ice. The family dinner was at my parent’s place, too (Gerald and Mary Gibson). The dance was in the evening at the present-day Avola Community Hall. The band came up from Vavenby. They got into the sauce, so Nancy and I had to play the last dance after midnight! Nancy: I played the piano and Royce played the violin. Did you have a honeymoon? Where did you live? What was your house like? Royce: We had $10 between us when we got married. There were no extras like a honeymoon. Come to think of it, the whole time since then has been a honeymoon! At first, we lived

Royce Gibson plays the fiddle and Nancy Gibson the accordion during a recent community event. Times file photo

Proud supporter of the

North Thompson Star/Journal Monday, June 18, 2012

in the shingle house I had been renting as a bachelor up the hill from the schoolhouse in Avola. It must be that when the new highway came through it took down that house. In April we moved into a better house directly across the street from the Avola log schoolhouse where I had gone to school. From 1948 to 1953 we lived at my grandparent’s farm. We actually traded houses with them when the work got too hard as they aged. At first we had board furniture. When some money came from the army we bought some furniture. Nancy: One of our wedding gifts was an airtight wood stove. Another was a quilt that my Grannie and my Mother made. Were there any other customs for your wedding? Nancy: Well, here’s a funny thing people used to do: They gave us a shivaree (the dictionary defines “shiveree” as “a mock serenade of discordant noises made with kettles, tin horns, etc.”). Royce: Since we had no honeymoon, the neighbours all knew where we were that first night. Nancy: They tried to catch the bride and groom by surprise, outside their house, banging pots and pans. But I had the coffee pot on. We knew they were coming.

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Thursday, December 26, 2013 North Thompson Star/Journal

STAR/JOURNAL photo: Margaret Houben

Submitted photo:

Interior Savings supports food bank (Top left) Interior Savings manager Lindsay Arcand is shown presenting the Barriere Food Bank with a large number of items donated to the Knitten Mitten Tree (pictured above) that stands at the Interior Savings Credit Union in Barriere. During the weeks before Christmas, area residents leave numerous knitted items on the tree, or donate other items such as toys or blankets for the community’s food bank.

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Barriere Star Journal, December 26, 2013