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PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Wetland project in Central Saanich

Variety of services at BCS

Nature Conservancy and Distirct of Central Saanich team up to restore Maber Flats, page 5

Sidney’s Beacon Community Services holds its annual holiday open house for community and clients, page 3 Black Press C O M M U N I T Y

N E W S

M E D I A

Watch for breaking news at www.vicnews.com

Friday, December 20, 2013

Steven Heywood/News staff

Police on the Saanich Peninsula and throughout Greater Victoria - like Central Saanich Police Service constable Paul Brailey seen here in a recent Counterattack roadblock - are looking for impaired drivers this season. While the winter months are a focus for the police, catching drunk drivers is a year-’round priority. See pages 10 and 11 for more.

Brakes applied to district town hall project Central Saanich council to focus on fire hall debt repayment Devon MacKenzie News staff

Central Saanich council has voted to put the brakes on the town hall project that has been talked about for over ten years until a plan to pay back the debt racked up from the fire hall project is underway. The vote was made Monday night during a council meeting after Mayor Alastair Bryson made

a motion regarding the project. “During Monday night’s meeting we were presented with a report from our CAO which we requested, outlining the potential next steps to the town hall project,” explained Bryson Tuesday. “I stepped out of the chair to make my comments and put forth the motion. I appreciate staff had followed through with the report for potential next steps however my thoughts were that the timeline for a November referendum was too quick. The community has limited appetite to entertain further borrowing in the current economic climate. Families and those on fixed incomes are already stretched and they’re hav-

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ties and the exploration ing to prioritize their has been ongoing. personal budgeting and A new firehall was it’s important that counconstructed in the cil reflect that approach meantime to assure a as well,” he said. safe base of emergency The municipality has operations for the fire been looking at the department and emeroptions for a new town gency services. The hall as far back as the $8.9 million project was 1990s. completed this past In 2000, critical upgrades to the police Alastair Bryson summer and the municipality estimates debt wing were made to the servicing fees will round tune of around $300,000. In 2002, upgrades to the adminis- the number out closer to $13 miltrative side of the building were lion total. Bryson said the District will made at a cost of around $200,000. In 2006, the district began seri- now turn its focus to that debt ously looking into the needs and repayment, some of which will desires regarding municipal facili- be achieved through the sale of

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municipally owned properties on White Road and Verling Avenue. “The community wants to see options to expedite the pay back of the firehall expenses,” Bryson said. “The fact that the motion passed reflects we’re prepared to pay down that debt before we make that next big investment.” Councillor Zeb King said he’s happy with the choice made by council and added the need for a new town hall in Central Saanich hasn’t vanished completely — but it’s not “a compelling need right now.” Please see: Safety concerns, page 2


www.vicnews.com A2 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, December 20, 2013- PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

North Saanich adds to doctor committee NORTH SAANICH — Mayor Alice Finall has been appointed the District of North Saanich’s liaison to the doctor recruitment and retention committee being formed on the Saanich Peninsula. Local doctors and the Saan-

ich Peninsula Hospital Foundation have teamed up to try to address the issue of retiring doctors and a marked lack of available replacements. “It’s a going concern,” Finall said. Councillors in the District

noted that more doctors are being lost to the community and are concerned with a lack of action so far by provincial authorities to address the matter of retiring physicians in a region that is dependant upon its doctors. — News staff

File photo

Central Saanich’s existing town hall and police services department will have to do for the immediate future.

Safety concerns to manage Continued from page 1

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“A new town hall is a need, certainly,” he said, “but the mayor and council are now saying they want to pay down the debt on the new fire hall. It’s a recognition of how everything seems to be creeping up,” King said. “Cost for transit, library and the municipality keep creeping up. As more gets added, without people’s income levels going

up, I think … there has been a recognition that we’ll have to phase (the town hall project) differently.” An early estimate of a new town hall building, according to King, was $16 to $19 million. That amount would probably have changed based on which of a series of options the municipality and its residents might have favoured. King said the District was facing another

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www.vicnews.com • A3

2013 PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, December 20, 2013

Peninsula News in brief Grad event

NORTH SAANICH — The graduating class at Parkland Secondary will hold a bottle drive in the new year. On Saturday, Jan. 11, grads will collect bottles at the school parking lot at 10640 Macdonald Park Dr. from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

— Submitted

Missing puppets

SIDNEY — Susi McMillan — aka Susi Sunshine the Facepainter - is seeking help in locating a lost box of handmade puppets. They were lost on Dec. 5 in Deep Cove. Anyone with information can call the PNR (250-656-1151) and we will relay the message.

Former local firefighter honoured

LAKE COUNTRY — A former Central Saanich firefighter was recognized this month for his long service. Steve Windsor, fire chief for the District of Lake Country since 2004, received a 35-year bar. Windsor’s career began with the District of Central Saanich in 1976.

— Black Press

A Beacon for local job-seekers Beacon Community Services open house welcomes clients, newcomers Steven Heywood News staff

There’s still a grey market for jobs out there on the Saanich Peninsula and Greater Victoria, says Denise Smith of Beacon Community Services (BCS). Employers, she said, are more often than not turning to people they know to help them find new workers in a variety of fields. It’s a departure from the traditional posting of jobs either in paper or online. It’s a continuing trend for people like Smith, the WorkBC team lead and client advisor for employment services at BCS. That’s why, Smith said during an open house at BCS in Sidney on Dec. 17, they offer programs and services for people who need work, enabling them to tap into that grey area. “Connecting with the community is key,” she said. “The more people you know, the better your chances (at finding employment) are.” Doing that can require a certain skill set and that’s what people like Smith and the BCS team of client advisors try to teach. People of any age or level of experience can access programs like this at BCS, said Smith. “It’s a safe, respectful place for people to access ser-

Steven Heywood/News staff

Denise Smith, WorkBC team lead and client advisor for employment services at Beacon Community Services leads a tour during BCS’s open house on Tuesday, Dec. 17. vices,” she continued. BCS is home to a variety of employment services, offered through various provincial and federal programs. The Sidney location is owned by BCS and the three-floor building has space for youth

seeking work, families, parents and adults looking for an opportunity. “We try to assess our clients’ needs as best we can,” said Smith, adding in addition to one-on-one services, they offer a variety of work-

shops on such topics as resume-writing and cover letter development. It has been a good year for BCS, Smith continued, adding the goal of the open house is to welcome clients back and help spread the

word about what BCS can offer to job-seekers. To learn more, visit www. beaconcs.ca or drop by their Third Street office in Sidney, next to the town hall. editor@peninsula newsreview.com

Province

Kids, happy hour coming to B.C. pubs Tom Fletcher Black Press

VICTORIA — The B.C. government has uncorked another round of liquor law reform, with children to be allowed in pubs and restaurants allowed to serve drinks without food. Premier Christy Clark announced the changes at a downtown Vancouver restaurant Tuesday, as the provincial cabinet works

its way through a list of 70 recommendations from a recent public consultation on updating B.C. liquor laws. As with earlier rounds of liquor reform, Tuesday’s event was short on details and long on populist appeal. Some time next year B.C. will see the changes, and will also join all other Canadian provinces in allowing pubs to offer discounted drinks for happy hour. Permitted times and a minimum drink price

are still to be determined. Children are to be allowed to accompany their parents into pubs up until an evening curfew time, also yet to be determined, but Clark said it will allow families to have lunch or dinner together at a pub. Royal Canadian Legion branches will have the same freedom to admit under-age family members. Restaurants with food primary licences will still have to offer a full menu when

liquor is available, Clark said, “but customers who don’t want to order food shouldn’t be forced to do so, and food primary businesses that want to fully transition away from food service after a certain hour, and operate for example as a night club, will be able to apply for a special licence to do so.” NDP critic Shane Simpson said the changes effectively erase the distinction between a licensed restau-

rant and a pub and are being announced for popular effect without any research to support them. The province also intends to make its Serving it Right liquor training available to all servers in licensed restaurants, as well as staff at B.C. Liquor Stores and rural agency and wine stores. Farm markets will also be allowed to offer samples and sales of locally made beer, wine and spirits.

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www.vicnews.com A4 • www.vicnews.com Jim Parker Publisher Steven Heywood Editor Janice Marshall Production Manager Bruce Hogarth Circulation Manager

Friday, December 20, 2013 - PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW

VIEWPOINT

The Peninsula News Review is published every Wednesday and Friday by Black Press Ltd., #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7. Phone: 250-656-1151. Fax: 250-6565526. Web: www.vicnews.com

The Peninsula News Review is published by Black Press Ltd. | #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 | Phone: 250-656-1151 • Fax: 250-656-5526 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Re-evaluate spending plans Central Saanich is taking the wise approach and focusing on long-term debt repayment in the wake of a $13 million expenditure on its new fire hall on Keating X Road — instead of adding to that debt by possibly building a new town hall. However, it doesn’t take the powers of a psychic to predict that voters probably would have soundly kiboshed that town hall replacement plan in a proposed referendum next November. After spending millions on the new fire hall, public appetite for even more capital spending probably isn’t high. Taxpayers throughout the Saanich Peninsula municipalities should be aware, however, that new town halls or at least upgraded ones, are on the Christmas These are bigwish lists of Sidney, North Saanich and ticket items for Central Saanich. any municipality While Central Saanich has been the one closest to advancing their plans for a new municipal hall, the strategic plans for Sidney and North Saanich include similar plans. In the case of North Saanich, that planning starts with an engineering study of the state of the north wall of their municipal building. This has the potential to lead to a large capital expenditure down the road. In Sidney, their long-term planning also calls for a feasibility study for a new town hall. In the immediate future, Sidney is investigating using school district property at the Sidney Elementary School to relocate its fire hall and ambulance service buildings. These are big-ticket items for any municipality. While they are still in the planning phases, it’s prudent for both local community leaders and residents to clearly state their priorities for the new year and beyond. In Central Saanich’s case, their plans for a new town hall are on hold as they ensure their financial house is in order. Their neighbours should ensure they do the same before embarking on costly construction. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@peninsulanewsreview.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Question

of the week

?

YOUR VIEW

Homeless people want a place I had cause to visit a shelter for the homeless recently and I felt encouraged largely by the kinds of people I found there. Most of these people, both men and women, possessed a sincerity in purpose, a sensitivity in being as well as a depth of feeling and understanding of each other as it would be for most human beings. I was, however, aware they were very much on their own and trying to make something of a life for themselves in the face of their suffering without a place of their own to retire to. These were people who needed the shelter to function. Support for housing and other ministry issues was handled by support workers. Social connection between these people was evident as a very necessary way of spending some of their time. Generally speaking, I feel people who are homeless are neither helpless nor powerless. Their inability to change their state is essentially the lack of financial capacity. Resources are opening up and the community is making strides in meeting the needs of the homeless, but society’s attitudes are a definite barrier to betterment. The weight of these attitudes serves to exclude them from other members of society — a painful burden itself. This is why our society has established and needs to further develop community kitchens, shelters storage areas for long-

Will you be spending time with family and/or friends on Christmas Day? Answer online at www.vicnews.com

term use, clothing and blanket distribution, medical assistance, etc. But this could all be more adequately addressed by accessible and financially-sufficient employment. Work that is based on hiring self-developed abilities and skills and acumen will make a life and is enabling and productively progressive. Some of these people with their gifts, skills and talents should be included in the workforce. These people who are homeless want to work — they want jobs in the work world. Dianne Mark Saanichton

Not a raging priority Re: Consider Safety on Beacon Avenue, Dec. 11 letter by Jennifer Hill. We have spent enough dollars beautifying this town. And it has been a great development but from my perspective, changing the traffic pattern again for three blocks on Beacon Avenue is not a raging priority. An alteration will cost the town money that should be for badly needed upgrades in our neighborhoods such as sidewalks, curbs, street drainage improvement and road paving. On my curbless, sidewalk-less and unpaved for more than 30 years street, one must walk in the street avoiding traffic day and night.

Last Week

we asked you:

If safety is to be a priority, then I think its about time we focused on these issues in our neighborhoods. I have lived in Sidney for 22 years now and love this town. I have also come to appreciate and see the one-way section on Beacon Ave. as a much calmer traffic pattern and, as such, witness that it is a much safer design for pedestrians and for drivers. Crossing the car centered twoway street of Bevan on foot or by car is a way more hazardous scene. Christine Bender Sidney

Elect caring politicians While benefactors of the Boys and Girls club should be incensed at government delaying their building project, they should not be surprised given Central Saanich’s demonstrated control-freak mentality.  Consider for example how voters bounced the Co-op around for years. Municipal elections are coming and I urge voters to develop and elect candidates who actually care about people instead of interfering with their lives.  Keith Sketchley Saanich ••• Let your voice be heard. Send your thoughts to editor@ peninsulanewsreview.com

Will the addition of more community mailboxes help people get to know their neighbours better? 100 responded YES 19% NO 66% MAYBE 15%


www.vicnews.com • A5

PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, December 20, 2013

Maber Flats target of restoration project Central Saanich teams up with The Nature Conservancy of Canada for a local wetland Devon MacKenzie

pleting the restoration and managing the property for conservation over the long term at $5.7 million. This project will be the first significant engi-

News staff

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) and the District of Central Saanich have joined forces on a project that will see wetland restored and storm water management increased on a large property in the municipality. The project, dubbed The Maber Flats Wetlands Restoration Initiative, will fulfill a number of goals including enhancing the ecological and recreational opportunities of the area (off Wallace Drive near the back of Stelly’s School and the Polo fields) and enhancing drainage for agricultural properties surrounding it, say proponents. Maber Flats was originally a bog before it was drained for agricultural use years ago and is now home to over 50 species of birds including some endangered species. It has also become a popular bird watching location. “The restoration initiative is more than just a conservation project,” said Tim Ennis, West Coast Program Manager for the NCC. “This is an incredible opportunity to meet a wide range of community goals such as reversing some of the habitat loss we have seen in the region, providing community recreation and education and working with local government to improve storm water management.” The NCC will manage the southern portion of the property with the objective of maximizing the benefits to ducks, shorebirds and other wildlife and ecosystems. The northern section of the wetland

neered wetland undertaken by the municipality.

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The Nature Conservancy of Canada and the District of Central Saanich have joined forces on a land use project that will restore wetland area in Maber Flats as well as improve stormwater management and agricultural potential. will be engineered by the District as a storm water retention facility to help alleviate seasonal flooding issues in the area and generate other agricultural and water quality benefits for surrounding lands. Early engineering studies from the District indicate that an engineered wetland will fully alleviate spring and fall inundation of neighbouring farm land and reduce peak flows on Graham and Hagan Creeks. When completed, the restoration initiative will create a wetland and nature reserve on the 68-acre property

similar to other local nature sanctuary projects like Swan Lake and Rithet’s Bog. “This collaborative project is an opportunity for the municipality and the NCC to showcase best practices for managing wet soils to enhance both farm productivity and habitat values,” said Central Saanich Mayor Alastair Bryson. “Council is working toward achieving one of the municipality’s highest storm water management priorities and seeing significant improvement in the agricultural values of neighbouring farm

properties.” The NCC and the District of Central Saanich have had positive preliminary discussions with the provincial Agricultural Land Commission about the project but approval for the engineered wetland component hinges on the ALC giving the final thumbs-up. The NCC has begun fundraising to purchase the property and Central Saanich will contribute to the purchase, although it is not clear yet how much will be spent by the municipality. The NCC estimates the total costs of com-

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Friday, December December 20, 20, 2013 2013 -- PENINSULA Friday,

NEWS REVIEW

North Saanich changes mind on medical marijuana Prohibition in place as council debates an about-face on policy adopted earlier this month Steven Heywood

On Dec. 2, the District council actually enacted an outright prohibition on licensed medical marijuana production within North Saanich boundaries. By Dec. 16, however, several councillors had changed their minds thanks to the lobbying of Ted Daly who was

News staff

North Saanich politicians are on the verge of changing their minds over the production of medical marijuana in their community — but first they want to seek the opinions of local farmers.

the lone holdout in the Dec. 2 vote. When the prohibition was brought back to council by staff for another vote this week (this time to add further rationale to the bylaw), it was apparent a majority of council no longer wanted the prohibition.

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“I’m not even sure we can legally (do this),” Councillor Daly said. He noted that the production of medical marijuana is allowed on Agricultural Land Reserve property — and such is the case with a new facility being built in the neighbouring community of Central Saanich. “I still think it’s wrong,” Daly continued, adding he’s in favour of enhancing local farming — even if it’s medical marijuana. Coun. Dunstan Browne said he came around to Daly’s position when he thought about farmers growing barley, hops and yeast — ingredients in beer. That, he said, is legal to grow, so why not medical marijuana? Also changing their minds Monday night were Craig Mearns and Conny McBride. “I was against (medical marijuana production) two times,” said McBride, “but North Saanich allows wineries. Alcohol has just as many vices as

District’s reasons for banning pot production

In an updated report, North Saanich staff outlined a rationale for allowing a prohibition of the production of medical marijuana in the community. Those include specific authority areas under B.C.’s Community Charter: • demand on municipal services • public health and welfare • nuisance and disturbance • fire and electrical safety Other concerns out of the District include: • lack of local servicing in a mostly-rural community • odour, noise and light pollution • groundwater contamination concerns • security concerns • compatibility within the community • property value impacts.

(marijuana) and the drug companies need legal grow-ops to have access. “I’m still waffling.” Mearns added the District could end up in legal trouble over an outright prohibition. Yet despite voting 4-3 on Monday night not to confirm their earlier vote, District staff pointed out council would have to go through the added process of rescinding their Dec. 2 vote. Instead of doing that, council decided to keep the existing prohibi-

tion in place for now, ordered staff not to proceed with changing any bylaws and asked that the issue be reviewed by the Peninsula Agricultural Commission and other District committees. “I’d really like to hear from the farmers before we make a decision,” said Browne. Coun. Celia Stock pointed out the earlier prohibition vote set out a six-month period to review any ramifications of the policy, stating council would then have a chance to revisit

their decision. Mayor Alice Finall and Coun. Elsie McMurphy both joined Stock in voting to keep the prohibition in place. In a later interview, Finall said she wasn’t sure why the councillors changed their minds from one meeting to the next. “This was well-discussed and initially had only the one holdout (Daly),” she said. Other than that, the mayor said she had no further comment. editor@peninsula newsreview.com

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, December 20, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A7



We’ve put our sink on a fat-free diet.

Charla Huber/News staff

Jack Hembruff tells Santa his Christmas wishes at Victoria General Hospital on Dec. 16. The six-year-old from North Saanich was unsure if he’d be home for Christmas. Santa arrived at the hospital via helicopter bringing cheer and gifts for children in the paediatric unit.

Santa visits young patients Charla Huber News staff

A bit of holiday cheer was added early to the paediatric unit at Victoria General Hospital, Dec. 16. Santa and one of his elves caught a lift in a helicopter to stop in on the young patients. He made his rounds to all the rooms, some he could enter and other’s he could only chat with the children at the doorway due to kids in isolation rooms. Six year old Jack Hembruff

has been fighting off an infection, uncertain if he’d spend Christmas at his North Saanich home or in the View Royal hospital. Even through the pain, the young boy told Santa he would really like a Super Mario costume and an Octonauts toy. Ross Hallaway, a paramedic specializing in infant transportation made the rounds with Santa. “It’s great to see the little girls and boys get the holiday spirit,” he said, adding it’s nice to see the children to give them gifts

rather than in emergency situations. During the visit 19 children were on the unit. On average about 15 spend Christmas at Victoria General Hospital, said Diane Edwards, child life specialist. “This visit brings cheer to everyone here, the children, their parents and the staff,” Edwards said. Santa also stopped at Royal Columbian Hospital in the Fraser Valley and the B.C. Children’s Hospital in Vancouver.

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A8 • www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com

Friday, December December 20, 20, 2013 2013 -- PENINSULA Friday,

NEWS REVIEW

Aquarium board elected Parkland second in Xmas hoops tourney resources and strategic planning specialist as well as Board Secretary, Martina Beck, a graduate student in the University of Victoria School of Environmental Studies.   Other board members include: Bill Cooke (former CEO of VIATEC), Patty Golumbia (educator at SIDES), Stephen Gormican (Chair of Environmental Tech Program at Camosun), Sue Hodgson (owner Seaside Magazine), and Jane Powell (owner Buddies Toys). — Submitted by SODC

First time in 21 years for PSS girls team to make event final Steven Heywood News staff

Parkland Secondary School’s senior girls basketball team placed second in its division in the annual Victoria Christmas Invitational tournament Dec. 14 and 15 — the first time in the event’s 21-year history that a Parkland senior girls team played in the final. The Panthers were in the final of the Gold Division on Saturday against Vancouver’s Lord Tweedsmuir, coming up shy in the end after defeating Southridge (Vancouver) and Nanaimo District Secondary School en route to the championship. “It was a very good result for the girls,” says coach Larry Green. Parkland’s Kristie Gallagher averaged a little more than 30 points per game and a pair of the team’s younger players — Arianne Stevenson and Emma Davis — contributed to the scoring as well. Parkland is scheduled to play next at home Tuesday, Jan. 7 against St. Michael’s University School. — with files from Parkland Secondary School

Steven Heywood/News staff

Parkland’s Kristie Gallagher averaged more than 30 points per game in the annual Victoria Christmas Invitational tournament.

Drift cards show potential oil spill impact in B.C. Jeff Nagel Black Press

VANCOUVER — Two environmental groups that dropped wooden drift cards to model the flow of oil from a spill in Vancouver Harbour say the initial results demonstrate how quickly local beaches could be fouled. Raincoast Conservation and the Georgia Strait Alliance dropped 1,644 cards six weeks ago at nine locations and asked people who found them to

report the locations and times. Cards dropped off Point Grey and at the Second Narrows washed ashore very quickly, the groups say, suggesting oil spilled in the harbour could reach Vancouver and West Vancouver beaches within 24 to 48 hours and continued to wash up there for weeks. Those cards eventually circulated to the San Juan Islands, the Sunshine Coast and other locations, sometimes travelling 200 to 300 kilometres.

The preliminary report of the Salish Sea Drift Card Study says it’s likely oil spilled at any of the test sites would reach much of the south coast of Vancouver Island from Sidney to Tofino, the San Juans, the southern Gulf Islands and the north coast of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. About 28 per cent of the dropped cards have been recovered so far. The map is updated as more are found and can be viewed at salishseaspillmap.org.

Wishing you a holiday season filled with Comfort & Joy and a New Year brimming with Wellness & Vitality™! From all your friends at Amica Mature Lifestyles

Come see us during the holidays for a complimentary lunch and tour. Amica at Beechwood Village A Wellness & Vitality™ Residence 2315 Mills Road, Sidney, BC V8L 5W6 250.655.0849 • www.amica.ca

13-1712

SIDNEy — Two new board members were elected at the AGM for the award-winning not-for-profit aquarium of the Salish Sea in Sidney. Colleen Craig, Victoria accountant and principal of C.E. Craig and Associates was elected as Vice-Chair. Chris Cowland, Senior Partner at Cowland Paterson & Co Accountants of Sidney was elected as Treasurer.   Returning board members and officers of the Society include Board Chair, Nancy Barbour, a human


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, December 20, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A9



Toys for Tots campaign wraps up

MERRY CHRISTMAS

PNR readers have contributed $2,300 in the ongoing Coins for Kids effort

from McTAVISH ROAD STORE

Steven Heywood

$

$2,370 in coins and the campaign continues next week. To find out more

News staff

Regular 10 pack is $29.99 Promotional 10 pack is $19.99 with coupon. Limit one per person.

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of

Submitted photo by Steve Duck

The toys are wrapped and ready for Christmas. Dec. 14 and 15, Duck said 12 volunteers were at the Mary Winspear Centre wrapping each toy — in red wrapping for girls, blue for boys and others in a variety of colours that apply to either boys or girls. Sidney Mayor Larry Cross came in on the Saturday, Duck said, offering encouragement to the volunteers and making a donation of his own. It was a gesture, Duck said, that was appreciated by the volunteers. This week, the presents were being given to families in need to help them get through Christmas with something under the tree for their kids. While the food bank is the initial point of contact, Duck said the Secret Santas are always open to recommendations of people in need from the

community. “It is a way for people to let us know if they think there’s anyone else deserving,” Duck said. “The need is beyond Christmas and can be anytime throughout the year.” He said while this holiday push is a major event, people are encouraged to think about others all year long. The Secret Santas continue to collect toys and Duck said they are very grateful to the donations of time and space from local supporters like the Mary Winspear Centre, local volunteers and the Peninsula News Review which has been donating the proceeds from their Coins for Kids campaign to Toys for Tots. PNR readers have raised more than

9142 E Saanich Road North Saanich 250-656-6011

Lori (Lorena) Joyce Swan,

The presents are wrapped with care and this week the Saanich Peninsula Secret Santas began handing out presents to local children in need. The Toys for Tots campaign is helping families celebrate Christmas by providing a gift to a boy or girl of almost any age. The gifts are being distributed through the Sidney Lions Food Bank. Toys for Tots spokesperson Steve Duck says the campaign brought in more than 500 toys from generous donors in the community — and more are still coming in. He said people’s generosity again this year was amazing. “Someone brought in four bags of new toys from Buddies Toys,” he said. “There are some kids that are going to get some phenomenal gifts.” A pair of local men — Howard and Bob — delivered hand-made wooden toys — a testament, Duck said, to the amount of care and hard work people were willing to put into Toys for Tots. On the weekend of

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Saturday, December 14, 2013 at the age of 64 years. Born in Vancouver on May 9, 1949, Lori was predeceased by parents, Vernon and Thelma Smith and her brother, Danny. Lori is survived by her loving husband Vic, daughter Kerry (Jim), son Dean (Sherry), step-daughter Chris, sisters Shawn (Dale) and Micky, brother Steve (Sandy), nieces, nephews and friends.

On behalf of my Family and myself I wish a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all our Customers and friends.

In 1988 Lori began a 20-year career with the Peninsula News Review. Beginning in circulation, she was quickly promoted to office manager and within a short time moved into sales. When she retired in 2008 she held the position of sales manager. Lori was very well known and respected by colleagues and local business owners. She was a regular at Chamber mixers, volunteered for several years with the Peninsula Celebration Society and participated in the work of numerous community-based organizations. Almost 5 years ago, Lori fought a battle with cancer and won…when it reared its ugly head this time, although she gave it everything she had, she couldn’t win. At Lori’s request there will be no memorial service; however donations may be made to the Canadian Diabetes Society or Canadian Cancer Society in lieu of flowers.

The MORTGAGE Centre Sidney Branch 9771 Fourth St. Sidney BC V8L 2Y9

A special thanks to Dr. Maria Michel and the staff at CMQ Premier Hospital in Puerto Vallarta, the doctors of the Royal Jubilee Hospital and Canadian Cancer Clinic and a huge thanks to the nurses and staff of 8 South, RJH for their outstanding care and comfort during her final hours.

Loving wife, mother and dear friend, rest in peace – you will remain in our hearts forever. To send a condolence visit www.earthsoption.com

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www.vicnews.com A10 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, December 20, 2013 - PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW

Plan to stay alive … These community

businesses urge

No amount of alcohol is a safe amount Steven Heywood

for them to wait it out — time is the only cure for being inebriated. Not leaving enough time between having a few drinks and then getting behind the wheel can often mean a person is still impaired.

News staff

On the lookout for erratic or impaired drivers throughout the year, police officers know the months of November, December and January can be some of their busiest. Counterattack roadblocks have been up for weeks, as the Sidney North Saanich RCMP and Central Saanich Police Service try to warn people away from drinking and driving — and catching those who drink and get behind the wheel. Corporal Erin Fraser of the Sidney North Saanich RCMP says the simple rule people should remember is if they drink, they should not drive. “Don’t have anything to drink if you are planning to drive,” she said. “People always ask ‘how much can I have?’ My response is always: nothing.” Don’t drink, she added, and drivers will have nothing to worry about. Constable Paul Brailey of the Central Saanich Police Service notes that his department has seen a minor drop in the amount of impaired drivers on the road. But that doesn’t mean they are gone altogether.

An expensive mistake

Steven Heywood/News staff

Sidney North Saanich RCMP Constable Scott Suetter speaks with a driver during a Counterattack roadside check on Mount Newton X Road. “In a recent roadblock over an evening, we only stopped one impaired driver,” he said. “That’s pretty good for the 600 vehicles we stopped.” However, the good record was shattered the next day when two impaired drivers were caught at around 10 a.m. And that raises the

importance for people to realize that the later they stay up celebrating, the longer it takes to rid their bodies of the alcohol in their system. It’s an ongoing focus of the police, said both Fraser and Brailey — looking for possible impaired drivers well into the mid-

morning and even afternoon. “Impaired driving can happen at any point in the day,” Fraser added, noting there are plenty of cases of police catching drunk drivers in the morning after they were out drinking the night before. The only way for people to become sober, say the officers, is

Mayor Larry Cross Councillors & staff wish all residents a safe and happy holiday season

Celebrate Responsibly Please Don’t Drink & Drive

Please be responsible . . . If you drink, don’t drive. Town of Sidney www.sidney.ca

Police officers are always on the lookout for erratic and possibly impaired drivers. Fraser said that police look for almost anything and everything that might indicate someone is driving drunk. Often, they learn of a potential impaired driver after someone else has called police. Brailey added he thinks people’s attitudes on drinking and driving have changed over his 18 years of service. Having more of an impact, he said, are the steep penalties and fines that drivers face if they are stopped for impaired driving. If a driver is over .05 mg of alcohol in their bloodstream, Fraser said they will receive an immediate roadside driving suspension for three days and their vehicle is impounded. A second .05 gets you a sevenday prohibition and your vehicle impounded. A third means a 30-day suspension and further

Make the Right Choice

DON’T

Drink and Drive District of North Saanich

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, December 20, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A11



… don’t drink and drive you to drive safely and responsibly

Stay safe on the road, says ICBC Steven Heywood News staff

Steven Heywood/News staff

Central Saanich Police Service Constable Paul Brailey speaks with a driver during a Counterattack roadside check on Mount Newton X Road. that level, things get much worse. A single .08 mg result hits the criminal code threshold, said Fraser. A driver can be charged with impaired driving, face a 90-day immediate roadside prohibition and their vehicle impounded for 30 days. The fines for all of this can be hefty. Brailey said it can quickly add up to thousands of dollars — starting with a $55 ticket for blowing over .08, the fines, impound fees and points against your drivers license can soar to up to $4,000.

This alone, he continued, is helping contribute to changing attitudes and reducing the number of impaired drivers on the road.

Still out there Police and local communities are still concerned with impaired driving and it remains a key focus of enforcement for local police officers every day. “They’re still out there,” said Fraser,

Enjoy a Safe and Happy Holiday Please DON’T DRINK DRIVE!

&

noting the RCMP on average in Sidney and North Saanich stop around 80 impaired drivers every year. People still offer up various excuses — from outright denial to saying they’ve only had “a couple of drinks.” The best advice Fraser can offer to people at this time of year, or any time if they are going to have a drink or two, is to put the keys away and do not get behind the wheel — call a cab or have a friend do the driving.

Recognizing Road Sense May You Have a Safe & Happy Holiday Season! SIDNEY CENTRE

2401 Mount Newton X Rd., Saanichton Ph: 250.652.4464 email: western66motelinn@telus.net

Please celebrate responsibly.

visit thriftyfoods.com

Plan ahead, advises Colleen Woodgen, ICBC’s Road Safety Co-ordinator in Victoria. “Make the best decision when you are going out — get a designated driver, call a taxi, take the bus or have a sober friend or family member do the driving.” Woodgen said people also need to ask themselves if it’s their turn to be the designated driver, taking a turn to be the responsible “Make the best one. decision when you Woodgen joined are going out - get a local police in an Coundesignated driver, call awareness terattack roadblock a taxi, take the bus ...” in Central Saanich this month. She – Colleen Woodgen said while attitudes are changing about drinking and driving, there are still too many deaths due to impaired driving. She said there are around 95 people killed each year (2008-2012 figures). In 1976, the year prior to Counterattack’s creation, Woodgen said the average was around 300 people per year. Collaborative efforts between ICBC, the police and tougher drinking and driving laws have helped — but she said there’s a still a long way to go to reverse or eliminate a preventable cause of death on our roads. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

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www.vicnews.com A12 •www.peninsulanewsreview.com

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FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

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ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

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RICHARD ACTON PHILLIPS October 19th 1916 December 11th 2013. Richard passed away peacefully surrounded by family at Saanich Peninsula Hospital. Predeceased by his first wife Grace, grandsons Bobby and Scott, greatgranddaughter Abygail. Survived by his loving wife Sandra, sons Bob (Linda), Richard and Michael (Toni), grandchildren Dean, Teresa (Yann), Stephen, Erik and Star, greatgrandchildren Brandon, Brittany, Jarod, Isaac, Irene and Skye, numerous nieces and nephews. Dad was never one to sit idle. Always biking, hiking and choosing a path less traveled well into his nineties. The joy his grandchildren brought to him was always evident. Sadly missed but never forgotten his positive outlook will always be with us.

“Never give up!�

Celebration of life on December 28th at Holy Trinity Church 1319 Mills Road, North Saanich at 11am.

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LEGALS NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS RE: THE ESTATE of MYRA DOROTHY MILLIKEN, RETIRED, late of SAANICHTON, BC. NOTICE is hereby given that creditors and others having claims against the estate of the above deceased are hereby required to send them to the undersigned at 3rd Floor, 612 View St., Victoria, BC V8W 1J5, before January 13, 2014, after which date the Executor will distribute the said estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims of which She then has notice. LILIAS MACFARLANE BATEMAN Executor By George Easdon, her Solicitor HORNE COUPAR

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NOTICE is hereby given that the Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of Lucia Giovina Cain also known as Lucy Giovina Cain, deceased, late of 602 220 Townsite Road, Nanaimo, BC and most recently care of Saanich Peninsula Hospital, Extended Care Unit, who died on October 22, 2013, are hereby required to send them c/o Mont & Walker Law Corporation, 201 Selby Street, Nanaimo, BC V9R 2R2, Attention: Michael P. Walker, before February 14, 2014, after which date the Executor will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto having regard to the claims of which it has notice.

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OFFICE SUPPORT CLERK EVENCE Ltd is a furniture supply company and we are looking for an administrative assistant for our busy office. This position requires strong organizational skills, attention to detail and good interpersonal skills. Duties include but are not limited to data entry, reception and production administration. The Successful candidate will: -Have strong analytical and communication skills, -Be a self-starter who is able to work with minimal supervision, -Have a sound knowledge of MS Office (Excel, Word, Outlook) Candidates with more than 2 years experience will be given preference.Salary is very attractive with other benefits attached. Please forward resume and cover letter to tass@offurntre.com for consideration.

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FINANCIAL SERVICES

BC FAMILIES in Transition needs weekly front desk attendants with computer skills to receive phone calls, greet visitors, and connect staff to clients. Inquiries may be complex, so ability to think quickly is preferred. Training provided. Website Developer also needed. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269. THE ACTION Committee of People with Disabilities requires a positive, friendly receptionist to greet clients and answer phones, half day per week. Other positions available. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269. THE LEUKEMIA & Lymphoma Society needs a variety of volunteers beginning in January to organize the October 2014 Light The Night Walk, including entertainment, outreach, communications, and volunteer recruitment. Positions require about 3 to 8 hours per month. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269

PERSONAL SERVICES

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW December Peninsula News Review Fri,- Friday, Dec 20, 2013 20, 2013 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

www.vicnews.com •A13 A13 www.peninsulanewsreview.com



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FOR SALE BY OWNER

SUITES, LOWER

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper?

NANAIMO WATERFRONT 2nd floor condo. 1500 sq.ft. LR/DR/2bdrms with view, den, gas FP, secure bldg. 2 underground parking spaces. Maintenance fee includes hot water/gas/landscaping. 1 pet OK. $339,900 (250)753-9123

SIDNEY- 2444 Amherst Ave. 1300 sq.ft. updated character home looking for a family w/2 children and a dog. Fenced south facing corner lot near the Salish Sea. Walk to town and schools. Organic gardens & fruit trees, fireplace, hot tub, 6 appls. Free TV forever.... New price$484,000. (250)656-6136.

WATERFRONT. NORTH Saanich. Large 2-bdrm, 2 bath. $1800./mo inclds utils. Possibly small boat moorage +. Pet OK. N/S. (250)656-5999.

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

FOR SALE BY OWNER

RENTALS

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

APARTMENT/CONDO

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700 SIDNEY 9805 2nd St- lrg south facing 1 bdrm apt. Ocean view, lrg full length balcony, in-suite laundry, guest suites, underground parking pet free, secure concrete building w/monitored entrance. No rental restriction, low condo fees. (778)426-0007. Excellent investment opportunity! condoforsale@shaw.ca

REAL ESTATE ACREAGE

1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $500-$1200 inclds utils. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references! Call 250-478-9231.

SUITES, UPPER SIDNEY: AIRPORT side of Beacon Ave, 2072 Henry Ave West. Managers suite, 2nd floor, 1 bdrm. D/W, W/D. 1 parking spot, small locker. $920+ utils. Avail. immed. Ask for Harold (250)655-6454.

WANTED TO RENT AUTO SERVICES

YOUNG SENIOR lady needs town house, condo to rent or buy in Sidney (under $450,000) March or later. Call (250)652-0076.

$$$ TOP CA$H PAID $$$. For ALL unwanted Vehicles, any condition. Call (250)885-1427.

TRANSPORTATION

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

GORGE- 1 bdrm condo, laundry on site, NS/NP. $750. Avail now. (250)882-2330.

SUITES, LOWER

Beautiful 2 acre South Island property, homes and garden $715,000 www.CobbleHillHome4Sale.com

250 743 9882

BUYING - RENTING- SELLING 250.388.3535

SAANICH WEST- 1246 Hastings St, 3 bdrm Rancher, 2 garage, dining/living/family rooms, 2 bath (ensuite), F/P, appls incld, new roof. Walking distance to Interurban campus. Reduced price, $460,000. Call 250-477-4600.

AIRPORT: 1 bdrm bachelor new windows, curtains, flooring, paint. Private door, yard. Parking. $820/mo all util’s incld’d. NS/NP, Jan. 1. Call (250)656-9910. HARRIET/UPTOWN- fully furnished 3 bdrm, reno’d, 4 appls, bus route, NS/NP. $1500 inclusive. W/D. 250-480-0849.

1966 CHEVY Pick up, 1/2 ton short box, burgundy. 3 in the tree, 6 cylinder. Good condition, runs great, comes with second set of winter tires and rims. Second owner for last 45 years, in Victoria. $6,000 obo. Call: 250-479-0441 or email: havoc@telus.net

1998 TRAVELAIRE 5th wheel. Excellent condition for further info call 250-652-9660 or view at 2537 Mt Newton X Rds.

TRUCKS & VANS 2011 FORD RANGER Sport. 4WD, 6 cyl. 25,000 km. $20,000. (778)351-0852.

fil here please

Make a Big Difference for Many Families at Christmas.

Every year, the Peninsula News Review raises funds to purchase gifts for less fortunate kids in our community. This year, we are asking for your donations to support the local SECRET SANTA TOYS FOR TOTS. We are asking for your help in this important initiative. Please consider giving this year by dropping off your donation at the Peninsula News Review office or at the following businesses:

Brentwood Pharmasave - 7181 West Saanich Road Sidney Pet Centre - #4 - 9769 Fifth St., Sidney Christine Laurent Jewellers - 2432 Beacon Ave., Sidney Hypersport Activewear - 2443 Beacon Ave. Sidney TD Canada Trust - 2406 Beacon Ave., Sidney

SERVICE DIRECTORY CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

SELL IT FAST WITH CLASSIFIEDS!

SIDNEY: 1 bdrm, laundry, private prkng, share util’s. $850. NS/NP. Call (250)884-4608.

250.388.3535

CHECK CLASSIFIEDS!

✔ 250.388.3535 or bcclassified.com

#6 - 9843 Second Street, Sidney, BC V8L 3C7

250-656-1151

vicnews.com

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

GARDENING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

INTERIOR DESIGN

PAINTING

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

10% OFF! Fall Cleanups, Raking, Pruning, Hauling, Mowing. (250)479-6495.

ABBA EXTERIORS Gutter cleaning & repairs. Seniors discounts. WCB, Insured. Free estimates. (778)433-9275.

VIRGO INTERIORS- Certified Interior decorator specializing in color schemes that work the first time. Call (250)721-2777. designerg@shaw.ca

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601

ELECTRICAL (250)217-3090.ELECTRICIAN 30 yrs exp. New homes and Renos. Knob & tube replacement. Service calls. Senior’s Disc. Free est. Lic.#3003. 250-361-6193 Quality Electric Reno’s, res & comm. No job too small. Lic# 22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave- window, gutter cleaning, roof-de-moss, gutter guards, power washing. Free est. 250-479-7950 FREE ESTIMATES • Lawn Maintenance • Landscaping • Hedge Trimming • Tree Pruning • Yard Cleanups • Gardening/Weeding • Aeration, Odd Jobs NO SURPRISES NO MESS www.hollandave.ca

MASONRY & BRICKWORK CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

HANDYPERSONS BIG BEAR Handyman. Painting, household repairs. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071. HANDYMAN SERVICES. Lawns, fences, pruning, flooring, painting, drywall, small reno’s. Mike/Chris 250-656-8961

MOVING & STORAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE JUNK BOX- We Do All The Loading

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463. SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

HOME IMPROVEMENTS 250-216-9476 ACCEPTING new contracts; landscape and carpentry. BBB/Insured. Res /Comm. www.ftguland.com

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127.

SAFEWAY PAINTING

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB

D O N E R I G H T M OV I N G . C A $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. BBB accredited. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

BUYING - RENTING- SELLING 250.388.3535

Looking For Staff? Start Here. Call 1-855-678-7833 today for more details.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

UPHOLSTERY UPHOLSTERER work. Your fabric 250-480-7937.

or

NEEDS mine.

WINDOW CLEANING BLAINE’S WINDOW WASHING. Serving Sidney & Brentwood since 1983. Average house $35. 250-656-1475 DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS FOR YOU! 250.388.3535


A14 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, December 20, 2013 - PENINSULA

HomeFinder Find a place to call home

He Said, She Said

GREATER VICTORIA MARKET UPDATE » AS OF DEC. 16

195 » $778,900 » 3,709 »

TOTAL PROPERTIES SOLD OR DEALS PENDING THIS MONTH HIGHEST BENCHMARK PRICE (TYPICAL HOME) IN THE REGION: HIGHLANDS TOTAL NUMBER OF HOMES LISTED IN ALL CATEGORIES

BUYING TIP | Consult a professional builder before considering a home that needs renos

Courtesy Victoria Real Estate Board

Q: WHAT’S THE GENDER TREND AMONG HOME BUYERS HERE?

SINGLE FEMALES: Made up 18.2 per cent of all home buyers in Greater Victoria, roughly matching a 2012 U.S. national home buyers and sellers profile. SINGLE MALES: Made up 13 per cent of all home buyers.

Do you have a house-hunting story you’d like to share with us? Email ddescoteau@ vicnews.com To advertise in HomeFinder, call John Graham at 250.480.3227 or email jgraham@ blackpress.ca

NEWS REVIEW

To renovate or not: that is the question Be realistic about cost, think twice about your motivation

Homeowners and prospective buyers come at the idea of renovations in a variety of ways. Some consider making improvements to add value to their home before selling. Others weigh the idea of enhancing their personal living space with shopping for a home that better meets their needs. Still others look at buying low and doing basic renos as a way to turn a quick profit. In the Capital Region, the last category is pretty much non-existent, given the relatively flat prices, says agent and Victoria Real Estate Board member Wendy Moreton. For other people, however, certain factors are important to consider. “The first thing I would look at would be the market conditions, to see who’s buying right now,” she says. “Are people wanting (the home) all done, or are people willing to roll up their sleeves and do

Jim Wood photo

Kitchen renovations, like those undertaken by Mereta Witt and family in their 1913-built Fairfield home, can add value to a property, but only if done with care and quality, says realtor Wendy Moreton. the work?” While kitchen and bathroom makeovers get many people excited, renovators have to be careful about how they go about such jobs. “There’s cost-effective, there’s thrifty and then there’s just plain cheap,” Moreton says. “Sometimes people will do cheap and quick, but the majority of people can see through those kind of renovations.”

Spending a little more on such features as proper cabinet installations, decent bathroom fixtures, and well-fitted carpet or flooring can pay off in getting more serious prospective buyers. Also crucial to consider is whether the property is a good candidate for a reno, Moreton says. If it’s “a good little house with a good lay-

out,” it might be a good candidate, she says, whereas if it’s on a busy corner or is clearly rundown, it might not be worth putting money into. Experts say that while certain homebuyers are skilled enough to do some work themselves, they make up a small percentage of the total. It’s also common for people to be surprised by the cost of renova-

tions. When buyers purchase an older house that needs work, the upgrades frequently cost more than expected. A good idea is talking first to a professional with renovation experience. For homebuyers on a budget, create a list of improvement priorities, work with a builder from there and spread costs over a period of years. – Don Descoteau

Let us Pay you Cash on your next home purchase www.TotalRealtyDiscount.ca

Ray Kong

PURCHASE A PROPERTY LISTED BY ANY REAL ESTATE COMPANY AND WOW! WE PAY YOU Realtor® Prof. Engineer UP TO 2/3 OF OUR COMMISSION AND MORE! One Percent Realty V.I.

PURCHASE PRICE CASH REBATE*

$300,000 $400,000 $500,000 $600,000 $700,000 ETC.

$500 $2,000 $3,500 $5,000 $6,500 $$$

Ph: 250-590-7011 Ray@RayKong.ca

* Conditions:

!

WOW g costs Cash Rebates apply Only to s with closin rniture lp he 3.0% first $100,000 +1.5% of w fu - buy some ne liday balance buyer agent - go on a ho commission, first $5,500 of any commission payable to buying agent

And of course sell your home for only $ 6,900 (props. over 600k are 1% +$900)

www. TotalRealtyDiscount.ca www. OnePercentRealty.com

Why pay more for the same Full MLS® Service

Guy Effler

Realtor® Former Teacher

One Percent Realty V.I. Ph: 250-812-4910 Guy@OnePercentRealty.com

We are pleased to announce that Judy has chosen our company to offer her services and grow her business as an experienced real estate agent and consultant. You can easily drop by our offices to meet her at 2444 Bevan Avenue, in Sidney (between 4th & 3rd) or contact her through our office at 250-984-2310


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, December 20, 2013



www.vicnews.com • A15

From Our Home To Yours

Select your home. Select your mortgage. Oak Bay 250-370-7601 Victoria 250-483-1360 Westshore 250-391-2933 Sidney 250-655-0632 Chatterton Way 250-479-0688 www.vericoselect.com

OPEN HOUSES | DEC. 19 - DEC. 25, 2013 more details in Real Estate Victoria, available FREE on news stands now 3795 Burnside Pl, $549,900

VICTORIA 606 Speed Ave, $215,000

Saturday & Sunday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Scott Munro, 250 477-5353

5-1027 Belmont Ave, $639,000

Saturday Jan 4, 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Dennis Guevin, 250-477-7291

ESQUIMALT 404-520 Foster St, $199,900!

Saturday Dec 21, Dec 28 & Jan 4 11-1 Pemberton Holmes Rick Couvelier, 250-477-0921

SAANICH EAST 982 Mckenzie Ave, $299,900 Saturday & Sunday 1-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty James Liu, 250 477-5353

1025 Scottswood, $545,000 Sat & Sun Dec 21/22nd & Sun Dec 29th 1-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Maggie Thompson, 250-889-5955

Midtown Park

Saturday & Sunday 12-4 RE/MAX Alliance Ron Neal, 250-386-8181

220-1680 Poplar Ave, $142,900 Saturday, Dec. 21 2-4 Pemberton Holmes Jeff Shorter, 250-744-9903

SAANICH WEST 3835 South Valley Dr, $769,000

Sunday, Dec. 22 2-4 Century 21 Queenswood Realty Anke Venema, 250-477-1100

Saturday January 4 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Jenn Raappana, 250-590-3921

SAANICH PENINSULA

3379 Vision Way, $339,900 Saturday, Dec. 28 & Sunday, Dec .29 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Mike Hartshorne, 250-590-3921

3467 Happy Valley Rd.

Saturday, Jan. 4 & Sunday, Jan. 5 12-4 Saturday Dec 21 1-4 DFH Real Estate Ltd. DFH Real Estate Ltd. Patti Locke-Lewkowich, 250-477-7291 Mike Hartshorne, 250-889-4445 9820 Seaport Pl, $499,500+ Saturday & Sunday 1-3 3379 Vision Way, $339,900 Holmes Realty Saturday Jan. 4 & Michele Holmes, 250-656-0911 Sunday Jan. 5 1-3 17-2115 Amelia Ave, DFH Real Estate Ltd. $349,000 Mike Hartshorne, Saturday, Dec. 21 & 250-590-3921 Sunday, Dec. 22 1-3 19-848 Hockley Ave, $59,500 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Bill Knowles, 250-656-0131 Saturday, Dec. 21 11-1 Pemberton Holmes Ltd. 110-10461 Resthaven, Eileen Jespersen, $164,900 250-686-4820 Sun Dec 22, Sun Dec 29 & Sun Jan 5 11-1 24-848 Hockley Ave, $74,500 Pemberton Holmes Saturday, Dec. 21 11-1 Rick Couvelier, 250-477-0921 Pemberton Holmes Ltd. 9776 Fourth St. Eileen Jespersen, Tuesday-Saturday 1-3 250-686-4820 except Dec 22-Jan 6 3377 Vision Way, $339,900 Gordon Hulme Realty Don King 250-516-1202 Saturday & Sunday Dec 28/29th & Jan 4/5th 1-3 WEST SHORE DFH Real Estate Ltd. 2655 Sooke Rd, $219,900 Jenn Raappana, 250-590-3921 Thursday thru Monday 1-4 3008 Dornier Rd. Re/Max Camosun Saturday, Jan. 4 & Brad Gregory, 250 744-3301 103-383 Wale Rd, $207,900 Sunday Jan. 5 12-4 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Saturday 1-3 Mike Hartshorne, DFH Real Estate Ltd. 250-889-4445 Kevin Seibel, 250-580-4878

7179 Skyline, $498,800

IAN HEATH MARILYN BALL JONESCO Real Estate Inc.

Have Your Oceanfront You Have Arrived and Swim There Too! - Elegant & Stately .72 acre

$1,109,000

I Can Sea for Miles

$963,800

Thank You

And Best Wishes for the Holiday Season From all of us at Holmes Realty Ltd.

Congratulations to these Re/Max Top Producers for the Month of November 2013

Karen Dinnie-Smyth

Debbie Gray

Jack Barker

Roy Coburn

250-655-7653 www.ianheath.net

- Ultimate Freehold Luxury Condo - SW corner unit has with 3 - Rare south facing Oceanfront Oceanfront Home. balconies - Full sun & Sensational sunsets! - Features Control 4 lighting - Folding wall system opens for which automates lighting with - Panoramic Ocean views music, shades, locks, climate - Steel & concrete building is an indoor-outdoor feel second to none - Easy access to the beach & Your control, and video. - Voluminous Rooms & Custom - Enjoy the full facilities of a own mooring buoy. Kitchen 5-star hotel - Quality finishes

$1,698,800

During this Festive Season, our thoughts turn gratefully to those who have made our progress possible. So at this special time, simply and sincerely

A Honey of a Deal

- Custom 3006sqft home - Set on a very useable 1 acre - Light filled spacious living spaces - Hardwood floors, gas fireplace, gourmet kitchen - In law or nanny accommodation

$675,000

Camosun Peninsula

250-655-0608

Debbie Gray TOP LISTER

#14-2510 Bevan Ave., Sidney


A16 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, December 20, 2013 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Merry Christmas from all of us! Lilydale Fresh Grade “A” Young Turkey

Grade “A” Turkey

Frozen, All Sizes While quantities last. Limit one per family order $2.16/kg

All Sizes While quantities last. $4.39/kg

Over Limit Price $1.39/lb, $3.06/kg

On Sale

1

On Sale

98

¢

99 Per lb

Per lb

With a minimum $50 family order (including turkey)

Green Giant Vegetables

Coke, Pepsi,

Available in the Meat Dept. 300g

Selected Flavours, Dasani or Aquafina Water 12 Pack or Glaceau Vitamin Water 4 Pack Selected

Assorted 750g

On Sale

3

On Sale

On Sale

4Each9

39

1

for

9Each9

Where this symbol appears, deposit & enviro levies are applicable.

Thrifty Kitchens Cranberry Orange Sauce

99

20

Weekly Specials in effect until 6pm Tuesday, December 24th, 2013

Christmas Store Hours

December 18th –23rd

December 24th

We’re open Boxing Day!

24 hour locations will remain open 24 hours

at all locations

24 hour locations will remain open 24 hours

6am–Midnight

6am–6pm

9am–6pm


Peninsula News Review, December 20, 2013