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A Christmas gift

First Metropolitan Church presents Wilde tale Page A8

NEWS: Hydro increase adds up for district /A5 COMMUNITY: Family carol time with choir /A6 DRIVEWAY: Meet the miser /B7

OAK BAYNEWS Friday, December 20, 2013

www.vicnews.com

Firefighters step up, help family Christopher Sun News staff

Don Denton/News staff

Tree tribulations Grade 3 student Andrew Vining is overshadowed by a shrub as he and classmates from St. Patrick’s elementary sing Christmas carols on Oak Bay Avenue Wednesday. Andrew was standing in the back row underneath the greenery.

Oak Bay firefighters have generously donated $1,360 and approximately fourand-a-half pickup truck loads of cans and bottles for a Saanich family that recently lost everything in a house fire. Tanya Burt and Jason Yankowy’s rented home on Obed Avenue caught fire on Dec. 8, leaving the couple, their nineyear-old daughter and 16-year-old son with no home. Oak Bay firefighter Doug Trumble received an email from a mutual friend, seeking donations of cans and bottles to help raise money for the family. Trumble, an 11-year member of the fire department, forwarded that email to his firefighting coworkers who opened their wallets and recycling bins. “We’ve seen the devastation of a house fire,” said Trumble, adding he does not know the family, just the neighbour who organized the fundraiser. “It obviously touched us. We were not going to stand by after someone has lost everything and not do anything.” The family moved from Yellowknife, N.W.T. in November 2012 when Burt and Yankowy bought a coffee shop in Bastion Square. The business went under and closed in October. The source of the fire has not been determined, but it caused $200,000 in structural damage to the home. Neighbour Jessica Peterson, had put a call out on Facebook to help the family, raising money and organizing a bottle drive to help them last Saturday, Dec. 14. - With files from Edward Hill reporter@vicnews.com

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Friday, December 20, 2013- OAK

BAY NEWS

Red Art Gallery on the move The Red Art Gallery is moving two blocks East to bigger digs in the heart of Oak Bay Village. The space, at 2249 Oak Bay Ave., near Hampshire, is 60 per cent larger than the gallery’s current location, said Red Art Gallery director

Bobb Hamilton. The gallery will remain open until Christmas at its current location, 2033 Oak Bay Ave. A grand re-opening in the new location is planned for February. editor@oakbaynews.com

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Don Denton/News staff

A visit with Santa Two-and-half-year-old Benjamin Hirsch, in the arms of grandmother Elizabeth Causton, gets a close look at the Santa and reindeer display outside the Oak Bay Fire Hall on Monterey Avenue. Benjamin is the grandson of former Oak Bay mayor Christopher Causton.

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www.vicnews.com • A3

OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, December 20, 2013

A return to the Blethering Place

New owners bring in Ken Agate to help restaurant survive in a tough market

O

ak Bay restaurateur Ken Agate retired from the industry after closing his popular Blethering Place restaurant almost three years ago, but he couldn’t completely leave the business that he was involved in for 30 years. Agate has been working for the past few months with owners of The Oaks Restaurant and Grill, located in the same spot his former restaurant and tea house was, to bring back some of the things that made the Blethering Place a popular destination. There have been decor changes and additions made to the menu as the restaurant slowly brings back its former British flavour. “You’re always Christopher Sun going to follow the Reporting industry that you’ve been involved with all your life,” Agate said. “I have always had an interest in Oak Bay, restaurants in Oak Bay and in particular, this corner.” When Agate closed his restaurant on Oak Bay Avenue in January 2011, the West Coast-style Oak Bay Bistro opened, but closed its doors in August 2012. It was followed by a short-lived supper club. The present Oaks Restaurant has been in business since November 2012. Agate, who is being compensated for his guidance, said the other two restaurants failed because there is too much competition in Oak Bay for high-end restaurants, with solid reputations. He feels his restaurant did well because it was different; an affordable place where people wanted to hang out. “The niche was the tea room,” Agate said. “I think people would like to have more of a drop-in place. A place to talk with coffee, tea, desserts, scones. Light, inexpensive items and (the option to order) more filling things.” Agate lives a few blocks away from his former restaurant and is a regular patron at the Oaks. A few months ago, Oaks Restaurant co-owner Nick Hopkins asked Agate for help to make the Oaks as popular as the Blethering Place once was. “We started about a year ago and everything was going really well but we

Don Denton/News staff

Nick Hopkins, left, owner and chef of The Oaks Restaurant and Tea Room, stands with Ken Agate, former owner of the Blethering Place, which used to occupy the same space on Oak Bay Avenue. Agate is mentoring Hopkins on running an Oak Bay eating establishment. the 1950s and ‘60s. He had been a regular want to gain back the customers Ken entertainer at the Blethering Place for 10 had here,” Hopkins said. “The Blethering years until it closed. Place was an icon in the community. The While Agate spoke highly of the building is (also) an icon, everybody restaurant and its offerings, online knows it.” reviews haven’t been as kind. The Oaks Hopkins said Agate has been providing currently has a 68 per cent direction for the restaurant, which he has been busy “I’m trying positive rating out of 34 reviews on Urbanspoon, a wellimplementing. In the last to recreate the known restaurant review site. three months, the “flashy” wallpaper was removed to give Blethering Place TripAdvisor, another online review site, has a 58 per cent the restaurant a more homey and bring it to positive recommendation out of feel and new items have been the now.” 17 reviews for the restaurant. added to restaurant’s standard Hopkins acknowledged there fare. The restaurant has also - Nick Hopkins were problems with service rebranded itself as the Oaks when the restaurant first opened. He said Restaurant and Tea Room. he and his business partner, Isa Hosein, “There is a tea and dessert menu now were hands-off owners originally, but that … we now have all-day breakfast and we has since changed. Hopkins can now be brought back brunch,” Hopkins said. “We are also doing a lot more events here now.” found working away in the kitchen. “We’ve been here a year and we had lots The restaurant now airs Coronation of growing pains,” Hopkins said. “I’m sorry Street every Sunday morning from 7:30 to that some people had a bad experience 10 a.m., something Agate recommended. and felt this was not the place for them or For New Year’s Eve, Johnny Vallis will the place it should be, but I ask them to entertain patrons with music covers from

come back and give us another shot. “We had managers in place before but now as owners, we’ve taken over managing.” Agate said he has heard nothing but positive reviews in the last few months. “I always go looking for that stuff so I can help them,” Agate said. “Everything I’m hearing is that they like it.” Hopkins said there was talk about having a grand reopening, but he’s too busy, so he’s counting on word of mouth and the restaurant’s website to inform the public about the changes. He added that he is grateful that Agate is willing to share his knowledge and experience. “I’m trying to recreate the Blethering Place and bring it to the now,” Hopkins said. “I’m not Ken and I can never be Ken. It’s about what I can do with my team to make it the spot people will think of to bring visitors, family and friends to.” reporter@vicnews.com

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Friday, December 20, 2013 - OAK

VIEWPOINT

BAY NEWS

The Oak Bay News is published every Wednesday and Friday by Black Press Ltd., 818 Broughton S., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4. Phone: 250-381-3484. Fax: 250-386-2624. Web: www.vicnews.com

2009 WINNER

OUR VIEW

High marks for grad strategy For many students across Greater Victoria, graduating from high school can seem an insurmountable task. Stresses from family, substance abuse, peer pressure, poverty or learning disabilities can erode the chances a youth will graduate on time, or at all. Outcomes from this are predictable and dire, and Dogwoods are the bare minimum for most jobs higher than minimum wage. For the past decade, the Greater Victoria School District has recognized that with a specific grade structure, and a focused effort, it could boost what was a truly lousy graduation rate (called the completion rate) of less than 70 per cent. For 2012-13 it hit an all-time high of 84.5 per cent. There is no magic formula, and SD61 has seen declines along the way, but it has recognized that traditional approaches of punishment and threats are no longer seen as useful tools to get a student to change bad habits. Educators and administrators now strive to find the root of students’ problems and challenges. Teachers can’t force kids to go to school, but they can give them resources and strategies to change bad situations and realize what’s in their best interest. Keeping kids coming back to the building can be key, and SD61 superintendent John Gaiptman is proud to point out that the district has made it very difficult to drop out of school. Administrators in the district also comb databases of student attendance and achievement to gauge very early on who will be at-risk of not graduating without intervention and monitoring. Other school districts and educators in the region work hard to have their students graduate on time, but they might want to look at what SD61 is doing differently. Other than Greater Victoria, completion rates in the other local school districts remains below the provincial average of 83.6 per cent. Sooke district hit 73.3 for 2012-13 and Saanich district 69.7. Of course, any number below 100 per cent means kids are entering society without a basic education, and all school districts are still far from that ideal.

The News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Question

of the week

?

YOUR VIEW

Hydro cost analysis no simple matter Re: Hydro complaints off the mark (Letters, Dec. 13) As for Joe Sawchuk’s letter on Ms. McFadyen’s “shooting from the hip” with her comments on B.C. Hydro’s rate increase, I would suggest this might be a case of the pot calling the kettle black. To get a meaningful understanding of the validity of rate increases, one would need to do an in-depth financial analysis of costs over a number of years, compare this with other jurisdictions and see what corrective action could be taken. It’s not enough to simply state that we have the third-lowest costs in the country and should therefore be thankful. As a cost and management accountant, if I established that costs in my corporation were 41 per cent and 23 per cent higher than two seemingly comparable companies, as he states is the case with B.C. Hydro over Quebec and Manitoba, and that a nine-per-cent price increase was being planned when inflation is running at 2.4 per cent, I would want meaningful answers from management. I would also inquire as to the practice of reserve accumulation for funding development to avoid or minimize this being met by price hikes, which should be limited to covering inflation and minimized by aggressive cost-reduction programs. James McMillan Victoria

Will you be spending time with family and/or friends on Christmas Day? Answer online at www.vicnews.com

Sewage treatment plan perfect premise for movie Someday, there will be a movie made about Victoria’s sewage treatment plant. It will be a comedy that ends as a disaster. The working title will be: “Just Following Orders.” The premise: A group of politicians are given $1 billion to build a state-of-the-art treatment facility. They follow an outdated blueprint that is a financial and environmental disaster. Due to climate change, the facility ends up below sea level. Presently, for those who can’t wait for the movie, this performance is ongoing in a Capital Regional District theatre near you. Art Bickerton Saanich

Create a better welcome to Butchart Gardens Central Saanich has a small stretch of roadway down which one million visitors annually are attracted to one of the most beautiful gardens on the planet. The narrow roadway, Benvenuto Drive, is lined with half-dead trees and made up of cracked and heaved cement slabs. Unfamiliar drivers careen down the curved steep hill at teeth-jarring, dangerous speeds. Cyclists and pedestrians wisely avoid the avenue. A handful of years ago, local politicians commissioned a study outlining options for a major fix.

Last Week

we asked you:

Consultation and open houses followed. An acceptable costsharing arrangement between the municipality, Butchart Gardens and others proved elusive, resulting in the shelving of the entire exercise. Are current politicians prepared to make a 2014 resolution, dust off the study and attempt another try? Why not make the “welcome” road to Butchart Gardens as beautiful and safe as the destination? Ron Devion Central Saanich

Resident in the dark over city’s lack of action I wonder how long we must wait before city workers replace the burnt-out bulb in the lamp standard at the entrance to Chown Place on Harriet Road? Despite repeated requests over two months, no action has been taken and this area remains in a dark and dangerous state. This is particularly disturbing since many of the elderly residents at Chown Place have difficulty walking. I have already observed one elderly gentleman stumble on one of the darkened curbs. Must we wait until someone falls and breaks a hip or leg before a new bulb is finally put in? Gordon Pollard Victoria ••• Let your voice be heard. Send your thoughts to editor@oakbaynews.com

Will the addition of more community mailboxes help people get to know their neighbours better? 100 responded YES 19% NO 66% MAYBE 15%


OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, December 20, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A5



BC Hydro rate increase could cost Oak Bay $1 million District will have to shell out for energy efficiencies Christopher Sun News staff

BC Hydro’s planned rate increase of 40 per cent over the next 10 years will cost the District of Oak Bay an additional $1.1 million in electricity costs unless more is invested in energy efficient technology, says recreation centre maintenance supervisor Ken Olson. Olson explained how much energy and money the district has saved thanks to previous initiatives such as switching to energy efficient light bulbs and switching heating fuel from oil to natural gas. In the last two decades, the district saved millions of dollars from gradually installing various energy efficient technologies. “One success story to date is the recreation centre is using 52 per cent less electricity than in 1993,” Olson said. “The entire municipality now uses less than what the rec centre used in 1993.” In 1993 the recreation centre paid $53,000 to convert its heating system from oil to natural gas and saved $25,952 in its first year. “If all things stayed the same, it would have been $467,000 saved in 20 years,” Olson said. “But because of inflation and

Black Press file

Ken Olson, Oak Bay Recreation Centre’s maintenance supervisor warns that costs could go up with Hydro rates. In 2010, the district spent the increasing price of the $351,000 in upgrades at product (natural gas), it ended Monterey Centre, Henderson up being $868,000 worth of Centre and the Oak savings.” Bay Recreation However, with “The entire where new BC Hydro’s pending municipality now Centre, lights and a boiler rate increase and the likely price uses less than what were installed. To the district increase in natural the rec centre used date, has saved $158,000 gas, the district will in energy costs. need to spend more in 1993.” Olson said there as newer and more - Ken Olson are limits to how energy efficient much Oak Bay technologies come can do to save energy, which to market, which will cost more also brings down the district’s and take longer to realize the greenhouse gas emissions. savings.

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The Corporation of the District of Oak Bay

1% INTEREST ON PREPAID TAXES FOR 2014

Prepayments on 2014 taxes may now be made. Payments received prior to January 1, 2014 will receive interest from January 1 to July 2, 2014. Payments received from January 2, 2014 to April 30, 2014 will receive interest for the number of days from the date of payment to July 2, 2014. The amount of prepayment on which interest will be paid may be up to 95% of the preceding year’s taxes after deducting the Provincial Home Owner Grant, if applicable. P.A. Walker Municipal Treasurer

However, that limit changes as new technologies emerge. “Two years ago, the technology wasn’t there for LED underwater lights, so I couldn’t do the swimming pool with them,” Olson said. “Now there is and we are going to save 90,000 kWh a year. That’s how technology moves.” That savings in electricity translates to $6,331.55 in savings for 2013/14. The pool was retrofitted with the new lights in June. This week Olson presented council with his strategic energy management plan, which calls for street lights to be replaced with LED lighting; replacing the arena’s dehumidifiers; installing more energy efficient heat pumps for the pool and to continually look out for various grants that would ease the high cost of introducing the latest energy efficient technologies.

GREATER VICTORIA

CRIME STOPPERS The individuals pictured here are wanted as of Dec. 18, 2013

Matthew DORAN

District of Oak Bay Council and Committee of The Whole Meeting Schedule For The Year 2014 A schedule of the 2014 Council and Committee of the Whole meeting dates is now available. Meetings are held in the Council Chambers, Oak Bay Municipal Hall, 2167 Oak Bay Avenue. Regular Council meetings are held on the second and fourth Monday of each month commencing at 7:30 p.m. The Committee of the Whole meets every third Monday commencing at 7:00 p.m.. On holiday Mondays the meetings are held on the immediately following Tuesday. Oak Bay Council usually amends this schedule for the months of July, August and December. A complete list of dates is available at the Municipal Hall, or you can call 250-598-3311, or refer to http://oakbay.ca/municipal-hall/meetingsminutes/meetings-agenda to confirm meeting dates.

The Mayor and Council of The Corporation of the District of Oak Bay invite the community to

Stephen SOMERVILLE

is wanted for Assault with a Weapon and Possess Weapon.

is wanted for B&E x2, Possession of Stolen Property, Possession of B&E Tools. • Weight: 181 lbs. • Height: 6’ • DOB: July 8, 1984

• Weight: 130 lbs. • Height: 5’5” • DOB: Aug. 28, 1961

Rachel BAILEY

Kenneth HANSONCausing

is wanted for Theft x3, Proceeds of Crime, Possession of Stolen Property, Fail to Comply, and Fail to Appear x3 • Weight: 133 lbs. • Height: 5’4” • DOB: May 4, 1975

Roberto ANTONELLO

is wanted for Assault, Violate Recognizance and Fail to Appear. • Weight: 181 lbs. • Height: 5’9” • DOB: April 18, 1971

F Christopher NEUDOR of

is wanted for Breach Recognizance and Surety Withdrawal. • Weight: 170 lbs. • Height: 5’9” • DOB: Feb. 16, 1981

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Mayor Nils Jensen said district staff has done a great job with energy conversation and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. “Oak Bay is a leader in the Capital Regional District,” Jensen said. “I look forward to more energy reduction.” Even though future energy saving projects will cost more with savings taking longer to realize, Jensen said it’s something in which the district must continue to invest. “With rising energy costs, it is certainly economically imperative to reduce energy consumption,” Jensen said. “Also with climate change, it’s important for us to reduce energy consumption. “On both fronts, we have an obligation to do whatever we can to reduce energy needs and our carbon footprint.” reporter@vicnews.com

is wanted for Assault Bodily Harm.

• Weight: 188 lbs. • Height: 5’9” • DOB: March 15, 1983

Peter WARENKO and is wanted for Theft x3 Breach of Undertaking.

• Weight: 175 lbs. • Height: 6’2” • DOB: July 16, 1990

Matthew GIBSON

is wanted for Assault x2, Obstruct PO, Carry/Use/Threaten to Use a Weapon and Assault with Intent to Resist. • Weight: 201 lbs. • Height: 6’3” • DOB: Jan. 10, 1983

Armed bank robbery

On Nov. 20 at approximately 2 p.m., the CIBC at 2224 Oak Bay Ave. was robbed by a lone male with a handgun. He is described as a Caucasian man, 25 to 20 years, 5’11” to 6’, 180 to 190 lbs, with a thin to medium build. He wore a grey hoodie, jeans, black runners, and a scarf/bandana covering his face. He carried a blue Adidas bag.

New Year’s Day Activities in Oak Bay 11:00 - 12:00 Jazzercise in the Indoor Sports Field 12:30 Community Walk starting from the Oak Bay Recreation Centre Lobby 1:30 – 2:30 Meet Mayor and Council for coffee and tea 1:00 – 3:00 Fitness Studio Orientations (please pre-register) 1:30 – 3:00 Ice Skating 1:30 – 3:00 Organized Fun in the Tennis Courts 3:00 – 5:00 Swimming 3:15 & 5:15 Children’s movies in the Sports View Activities are free, donations to KidSport will be gratefully accepted. Sports View Deli Bar and Grill will be open 2:30 – 7:30 pm. For more information please contact Recreation Oak Bay 250-595-7946.

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Friday, December 20, 2013 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Sing along with Pete You’ll want to take note of this event.

Join us for our New Year’s Eve Celebration at Revera – The Kensington.

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Tuesday, December 31 , 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm st

The Kensington is now accepting non-perishable food donations for our local food bank.

The Kensington 3965 Shelbourne St Victoria

250-477-1232 reveraliving.com Working together to overcome ageism. Visit AgeIsMore.com

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13430 11.13

Music makes the heart grow fonder. Come out to enjoy an evening of all your favorites from the 20’s, 30’s and 40’s played by Borgy’s Trio at our New Year’s Eve Celebration. During the concert, enjoy refreshments as we celebrate the New Year. Invite a friend along – or come meet someone new!!

The Victoria Philharmonic Choir’s 5th annual family Christmas carol sing-along concert is Saturday, Dec. 21, 7 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church. Peter Butterfield will lead the audience in traditional Christmas songs, with a 60-voice choir providing rich harmonies. Little singers and mini-maestros will enjoy a special place in the spotlight during the audience participation portions of the evening. Special guests include organist and Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Anglican Submitted photo Church music director Peter Butterfield directs the Victoria Michael Molnar, and a Philharmonic Choir’s 5th annual family brass quintet from the Christmas concert. Greater Victoria Youth Orchestra. The quintet is A Hymn To The Virgin. led by trumpeter Christopher Fenje, Doors 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 a Victoria-native, now studying for adults, $10 for students and at Northwestern University in free for children under 12, at Ivy’s Chicago. The ensemble includes Ian and Tanner’s Bookstores, La Tavola Cohen on trumpet, Liam Caveney Kitchenware, The Shieling, Long & on trombone, Simon Dawkins on McQuade and online at vpchoir.ca. French horn and Kory Major on The Victoria Philharmonic Choir’s tuba. chamber choir is also having a singThe choir will also perform along with pianist Julian Greenwood some short choral gems including at the Oak Bay Beach Hotel on Tchaikovsky’s Crown of Roses, Sunday, Dec. 22, at 2 p.m. Tickets are John Tavener’s The Lamb and an $45 and reservations are required. arrangement of Elizabeth Poston’s Call 250-598-4556. Jesus Christ The Apple Tree and editor@oakbaynews.com Benjamin Britten’s

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OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, December 20, 2013

Steering students to the graduation track SD 61 strategy to keep kids in school paying off Edward Hill News staff

Two years ago, Adam Johnson had a bad habit of skipping classes at Mount Douglas secondary. Hanging out with friends and procrastinating on schoolwork lured the teen away a few hours per week, enough to raise red flags with school administration. “It wasn’t an everyday thing, but skipping one or two classes per week builds up,” said Johnson. “You don’t realize until the end how much you’ve missed.” Vice-principal Phil Pitre intervened and started asking questions to drill down to the

core problems. “The administration, especially Mr. Pitre, keep a close eye on me. It’s a school of 1,200 kids and he dedicates a lot of time keeping everyone on a straight path,” said Johnson, who is now on track to graduate next year. “He questioned why I was missing quite a few classes. It wasn’t hostile, there weren’t threats, but it was embarrassing. He helped me realize skipping isn’t the way ... to succeed.” The 17-year-old is one of many students in SD 61 who have shown “at risk” tendencies – poor grades or poor attendance – in terms of graduating on time, and who fell under an ongoing and aggressive strategy to make sure they stay on track. SD 61 superintendent John Gaiptman calls it a “whatever-it-takes

Donate your spare change All proceeds going to The Salvation Army Stan Hagen Center for Families Our newspapers collect change, convert it to dollars and donate funds to this year’s chosen children’s charity. Thank you for supporting Coins for Kids

mindset.” provincial average. The following “We make it very hard to year, the district undertook withdraw from school,” he fundamental reconfiguration to its said. “We track at-risk students grade structure – adding elementary involved in things grades to middle not helpful to school (grades 6-8) and “We track atgraduate, or who extending high school are absent a lot, or risk students … who to four years (grades are failing courses are absent a lot, or 9-12). or are in danger of Pitre said having an are failing courses failing. Anything accurate and timely that might trip up a or are in danger of database of attendance student who might failing.” and grades is key to not graduate.” catching students - John Gaiptman It’s a longwho might slip away, running policy especially in a large that’s finally starting to pay off. high school. For 2012-13, SD 61’s six-year Administrators can also see Dogwood completion rate hit a attendance records from primary record high of 84.5 per cent, a and middle schools, which tend to measure of how many students be better indicators of who will be at graduate within six years of risk of not graduating. entering Grade 8. “We ID students at risk mainly in In the 2000-01 school year, SD 61 struggled with a completion rate of less than 70 per cent, more than six points below the

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the middle school level, but the data picks up red flags in Grades 1, 2 and 3. It’s amazingly accurate,” Pitre said. “We talk to their teachers and facilitate with their parents. We involve whoever they need. It’s about checking up, it’s about conversation.” Gaiptman noted that while serious problems can emerge for students in high school, the war over graduation is usually won or lost in early grades. “It’s a lot easier in elementary and middle school to give foundation and focus to a student who needs extra support,” he said. “We couldn’t do it without support we get from elementary and middle school teachers. If you start this in high school, it’s too late.” editor@saanichnews.com

We’ve put our sink on a fat-free diet.

That’s because, around here, we know that all drains lead to the ocean. So we never flush fats, oils or grease from cooking or leftovers down our drains with hot water. Instead, we save energy and water by putting them in a sealable container, refrigerate them until they become solid and discard them with our household waste. It’s a good feeling to know that we’re helping to keep our marine habitats healthy. Visit www.crd.bc.ca/cleanwater to learn more.

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A8 • www.vicnews.com

Updated with the latest happenings

monday’s weekend victoria’s ultimate get out guide

Wilde

approved

WiNTeR TAle

It’s the latest project for Weigler, a spirited purveyor of stage and its effect on the audience. He recently completed a doctorate of he magic of Christmas revisits its applied theatre at the University of Victoria. roots with moments both happy One of his research areas involved studying and heartfelt in the Will Weiglerthe nuances of stage performance to reveal directed Christmas staging of Oscar why an audience loses their preconceived Wilde’s The Selfish Giant. notions and allows themselves to be whisked Heralded as a Victorian-era away by the story. bad boy, Wilde’s Christianity “It comes down to those The Selfish inspired him to pen multiple ‘a-ha’ moments and other Giant’s shorts, each carrying a message things that make an astonishing of faith such as The Selfish moment of theatre,” Weigler themes that Giant, a perfect fit as part of said. the First Metropolitan United resonate They’re designed to hapChurch’s annual Christmas serpen about every two minutes are the vices on Dec. 23 and 24. throughout the 35-minute “The Selfish Giant’s themes connection Selfish Giant program. that resonate are the connecAdults puppeteer the chilof tion of community, sorrow and dren, part of an intergeneraloss,” Weigler said. “We know tional cast who use as much of community, these as ideas in our head, the grand First Met stage and sorrow and but to see it on stage, we can surrounding area as needed. experience it with our body There’s no enclosing Weigler, loss. (through physical emotion).” whose play From the Heart: - Will Weigler For those unfamiliar with enter into the journey of recthe simple but moving tale, a onciliation, was performed Giant returns from an extended within a labyrinth designed and absence to find children playing in his garerected at Uptown mall. den. When he tries to banish them, he finds “Physical theatre is such a visual medium he is the one who was banished, until he you want to use the entire space,” he said. experiences a merciful release from a long, Sound is woven into the show by First cold winter. Met musical director Fran Pollet, who has The performance is loaded with physipaired the play’s hard and soft winter elecal theatre. It features original puppets ments with music. A choir of 24, a harp, a and the animated personification of the trumpet and percussion by Kelby MacNayr. story’s weather elements wind, snow and “We have 50 volunteers helping to put hail, which transcend the play as characters this on,” Pollet said. “We draw from the themselves. community for this play and it’s not just for

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ONLINE mondaymag.com

Friday, December 20, 2013 - OAK

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T

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Five year old Tallulah Macleod, who plays the role of the Giant, shares a moment with a puppet during the Selfish Giant. The original puppets were created for the Selfish Giant and are part of an interactive cast of children and adults who share the First Met stage with a full choir Dec. 23 - 24.

the congregation, it’s for the entire community.” Harp playing will greet the congregation for 40 minutes before the show, which starts at 7:30pm on Dec. 23 and Dec. 24. A word to the wise: the regular congregation often swells on Christmas Eve, filling the hall, and the church has had instances of turning away people at the door. Pollet

recommends taking in the Monday show as it has traditionally drawn less.

did you know? The First Met granted Weigler three months of free space to develop and rehearse From the Heart which is how he came on board for The Selfish Giant.

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CRD ARTS GRANTS DEADLINES NEAR

The deadlines for Capital Regional District arts development grants – for project funding for arts organizations – are fast approaching, with proposals due by Jan. 10 at 4:30pm. Idea grants, intended to support arts programming by organizations not eligible for other CRD funding programs, are due by 4:30pm on Feb. 14. Details available at crd.bc.ca/arts. YOUTH CHOIR AUDITIONS OPEN

The School District 61 Honour Choir is holding auditions for the January 2014 school term. Any 11-to 17-year-old students in the district are invited to audition. Call 250-477-5569 to book an audition time and location, or book online at choir.sd61.bc.ca. LAST CHANCE FOR FERRIS WHEEL RIDES

The holidays descended on the city with free horsedrawn trolley tours and ferris wheel rides downtown thanks to the Downtown Victoria Business Association and the City of Victoria in November. This is the last weekend to enjoy the festivities. Check downtownvictoria.ca for the schedule.

ONLINE mondaymag.com

Broken Dreams

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Set in Braddock, Penn., a hardscrabble town whose economic engine is a dying steel mill, Out of the Furnace is an unrelentingly bleak portrait of tough men whose blue collar lives are unraveling with a slow and harsh inevitability. At the centre of the film are the two Baze brothers: Russell (Christian Bale), the older and more responsible one, works in the mill just like his dad did; Rodney (Casey Affleck, Gone Baby Gone) was born reckless, and four brutal tours in Iraq have left him with bad dreams and a bad attitude. With gambling debts to pay off, Rodney has taken up illegal bareknuckle boxing for a local hustler (Willem Dafoe), but he keeps getting deeper into debt because he can never play along and “lose” the fights he’s told to. Increasingly desperate, he heads north into hillbilly country for a bigger payday, only to find himself on the wrong side of Harlan DeGroat (Woody Harrelson), a drug-dealing, mean-as-a-snake degenerate. When Rodney doesn’t come home, it’s clear that something bad has happened. But Braddock’s sheriff (Forest Whitaker) doesn’t have jurisdiction and his law enforcement counterparts upstate seem reluctant to start a feud with a valley full of vicious inbreds. Which leaves Russell and his uncle (Sam Shephard) to grab their deer rifles and see if they can set things right. Although this sounds like the setup for a standard-issue Stallone or Schwarzenegger revenge flick, this is primarily a character-driven drama and the plot takes the audience where it isn’t really expecting to go. Slowpaced and elegiacal, Furnace spends a lot of its time showing the cost to human lives as hard times lead to hard choices. The movie lacks a bit of focus, but there are so many great performances that you likely may not notice (or care). Bale has become a multi-millionaire mumbling his way through the Batman trilogy, but he brings heartbreaking clarity to his work here as a hardworking and decent man who is slowly losing everything. Affleck plays a reckless jerk with crazed bravado, and does a great job representing every war vet who has come back from Iraq with a head full of spiders. And then there’s Harrelson, cruel and repulsive and predatory, who is like a one-man horror movie. Rating: ★★1/2 (Out of the Furnace continues at SilverCity) Extended review of Out of the Furnace and listings at mondaymag.com. .

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A10 • www.vicnews.com

How to reach us

Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

Friday, December 20, 2013 - OAK

Painting

SPORTS

Playing pro hockey in Sin City Grizzlies alum talks hockey in the desert Travis Paterson News staff

Brian Nugent’s holiday return is happenstance, but it keeps his streak alive. The 24-year-old is 21 games into his pro hockey career with the Las Vegas Wranglers after wrapping up his NCAA career with the Northern Michigan Wildcats in May. With the Wildcats he was able to visit during his school holiday breaks, and because of a short break in the ECHL Wranglers’ schedule, he’s here until Boxing Day. Then it’s back to Vegas, where he lives with two teammates, one of them Geoff Irwin, a fellow Victoria product who won the 2006 RBC Cup junior A championship with the Burnaby Express. “The experience is unbelievable, Vegas is an incredible city and I’m enjoying it so much,” Nugent said. “We live about eight to 10 minutes from the rink. As soon as I’m out of the complex I can see the strip.” The trick with living in Vegas is picking your spots, he says. “There’s so much to do. It’s all business at the rink but on off days, or after practice, we take in a lot of shows.” The temptation of Sin City is often too great for visiting teams. ECHL scheduling limits travel by grouping games into two or three per visit, meaning visiting players are there for days at a time.

Photo by IIA Photography

Brian Nugent is living the life of a pro hockey player in Las Vegas.

toria Grizzlies’ captain during the RBC Cup hosting year in 2008-09. But Nugent only scored nine times in four years of Div. 1 play in the NCAA’s Western Collegiate Hockey Association conference. He’s hoping his two-way game will be appreciated by the many American Hockey League scouts who constantly comb the ECHL for undiscovered talent beyond goal scoring. “Obviously there’s still a system to follow in the ECHL defensive and neutral zones. But in the offensive zone the Wranglers coaches tell us to be creative. In college, anywhere

“We usually figure in the (two- to three-game) series at least one of the games the other team should be hung over, guys have a tough time with that,” Nugent laughs. As much fun as it is there is a desire to move up. Nugent’s not sweating the fact his offence is dry with only a goal and two assists so far. “I’m an energy type player and I think the ECHL definitely suits my style of play more than the NCAA,” Nugent said. Back in junior he contributed 52 points in 53 games as the Vic-

BAY NEWS

on the ice you were a robot and you were doing exactly what you were told to do.” To be fair Nugent is happy with his time on the Wildcats. He’s chasing a pro career with the comfort of having his bachelor’s degree in business and marketing. He is following a very similar to another pro player from Victoria, Adam Cracknell of the St. Louis Blues. Cracknell and Nugent are alumni of the junior B Saanich Braves. Cracknell played for the Wranglers in 200708 and one of his teammates was Make Madill, the Wranglers current head coach and general manager. “Cracknell let (Madill) know about me and that’s how it all got started. Basically I have Cracknell to thank,” Nugent said. One of the reasons Nugent was keen on the Wranglers is because it is without an AHL affiliation. “Any AHL team can pick up players from the Wranglers, it doesn’t limit me to one AHL team,” he said. Nugent saw what happened to everyday Salmon Kings players when its parent affiliates, the Vancouver Canucks and Manitoba Moose (AHL), assigned players to Victoria. “No one can get sent here from the AHL and take your job. When your’e on an affiliate team, it doesn’t matter if you’re playing better than the player assigned to your team. They’re going to get your ice time because they’re signed to an AHL or NHL team,” he said. In the meantime, it’s a pretty good life in Las Vegas. sports@vicnews.com

Royals avenge Oil Kings, hit break on a roll It's been a different Victoria Royals team ever since it suffered a 5-0 loss to the Edmonton Oil Kings at home in Victoria on Nov. 6. Ever since the embarrassing blowout at home, the Royals have gone 13-3-1, including a 5-3 win over the Oil Kings in Edmonton on Tuesday. The Oil Kings scored first but the Royals soon tied it when 16-year-old rookie Matt Dykstra, an Edmonton native, scored his first WHL goal in his hometown, in just his third WHL game. Then came Royals goals from Axel Blomqvist, Ben Walker and Jack Palmer to make it 4-1, just a minute into the second period. Brandon Magee scored an empty-netter in the final minute of the game. Victoria’s Dyson Mayo, a promising 17-year-old defenceman, scored for the Oil Kings. The Royals host the Prince George Cougars for two games, Dec. 27 and 28 at SaveOn-Foods Memorial Centre. sports@vicnews.com

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OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, December 20, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A11



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Nine-year-old speed skater Kyle Brown takes to the ice demonstrating his skill at Archie Browning Sports Centre between periods of the Victoria Cougars junior B game versus the Westshore Wolves. It was fitting the Cougars were host to the Westshore Wolves as the Cougars were nearly forced to move to the West Shore in 2007 when Esquimalt announced it would close Archie Browning for good.

Archie Browning flourishing in new era Travis Paterson News staff

Fans at the Victoria Cougars home game on Sunday were treated an expo of speed skating races by junior members of the Esquimalt Speed Skating Club. The co-tenants of the Archie Browning Sports Centre showed their speedy discipline during the first period intermission of the Cougars’ Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League game. There were plenty of highlights in less than 10 minutes of racing, including a triple wipeout as all three skaters from one of the faster races slid into the wall padding. Perhaps most impressive was the efficiency with which the senior speed skating members and Cougars players set up the pads on the

boards. “We’re always looking for more members of any age and skill level,” said longtime Esquimalt Speed Skating member and organizer Ian Phillips. “It takes a back seat in Victoria but it’s really a lot of fun, I think people don’t realize that.” The Archie Browning arena, and it’s various users, are enjoying a new era. There was a time when the user groups hardly mingled other than at city events such as Buccaneer Days. Then came Esquimalt’s proposed closing of the rink in the spring of 2007. It unified the Esquimalt Curling Club, Esquimalt Figure Skating Club, Victoria Minor Hockey Association, Cougars and Esquimalt Speed Skating. They created a joint task force, which Cougars president Gary Boyer

headed, and overturned that decision within months. “That ‘proposed’ closing prompted a reaction from us and we’ve all kept a pretty strong partnership here at Archie Browning,” Boyer said. The rink has undergone considerable renovations and updates. “This was going to be what, a parking lot and commercial building?” Boyer said. “We’re very grateful for this facility and for the other members here. We don’t forget that.” Case in point, to start the 2012-13 season, the speed skaters bumped their Thursday night start time 30 minutes earlier to accomodate the Cougars, so the team could have a more family-friendly 7 p.m. face off for it’s weekly home games. sports@vicnews.com

Bulldogs, Rams football players on Team B.C. Four players from the Mount Douglas Rams and two more from the Belmont Bulldogs have been named to the prestigious U-18 Team B.C. team that will play two games in the upcoming Football University International Showcase in Texas. Representing the Belmont Bulldogs are Tristin Fourish as an offensive lineman and Sam Varao as a linebacker. From the AAA B.C. champion Mount Douglas Rams are Nicholas James as a defensive lineman, Sheldon Mack as a linebacker, Aarmin

Purewal as an offensive lineman and Julian Luis as a running back. Alexis Sanschagrin of Belmont will act as the defensive backs coach and Mark Townsend of Mount Doug will take on the running backs and special teams coaching jobs. B.C. plays Texas East at Heroes Stadium on Wednesday, Jan. 1 and Team Europe on Saturday, Jan. 4 in the Alamodome. sports@vicnews.com

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- The Trager Approach - Hot Stone Massage * Gift CertiďŹ cates * Discount rates for December Rae Bilash CertiďŹ ed Practitioner 250-380-8733 www.raebilash.ca

INFORMATION ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@blackpress.ca DID YOU KNOW? BBB provides complaint resolution services for all businesses and their customers. Look for the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory E-edition on your Black Press Community Newspaper website at www.blackpress.ca. You can also go to http://vi.bbb.org/directory/ and click on the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory

PERSONALS REAL PEOPLE, Real Chat, Real Discreet Try FREE! 18+. Call 250-220-1300. Or visit online at: www.livelinks. com

LOST AND FOUND LOST: 3 oval framed pictures. In Sidney area. Reward. Call (250)652-8556. LOST SILVER hooped earring, Costco area. Valued keepsake! If found please call (250)388-7568.

FOUND SOMETHING? Call 250.388.3535

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE ACREAGE

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

OFFICE SUPPORT CLERK

MIND BODY & SPIRIT

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. NO Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. SignUp Online! iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853

EVENCE Ltd is a furniture supply company and we are looking for an administrative assistant for our busy office. This position requires strong organizational skills, attention to detail and good interpersonal skills. Duties include but are not limited to data entry, reception and production administration. The Successful candidate will: -Have strong analytical and communication skills, -Be a self-starter who is able to work with minimal supervision, -Have a sound knowledge of MS Office (Excel, Word, Outlook) Candidates with more than 2 years experience will be given preference.Salary is very attractive with other benefits attached. Please forward resume and cover letter to tass@offurntre.com for consideration.

Kripalu full body massage. Release your stress now. Over 13 years experience. Gift Certificates. Women only. Holiday special. Professional. 250-514 -6223, www.andreakober.com

FIGURINES: ROYAL Doulton, Coalport, Armani, Mrs. Albee, & misc artists - some very old, some more recent editions. Call (250)474-2774.

HELP WANTED GENERAL LABOURERS

OIL & GAS INDUSTRY GUARANTEED Job Placement

• Labourers • Tradesmen • Class 1 Drivers

Call 24Hr. Free Recorded Message 1-888-213-2854 THE LEMARE GROUP is accepting resumes for the following positions: •Heavy Duty Mechanics •Feller Buncher •Boom man •Chasers •Hooktenders •Grapple Yarder Operators •Off Highway Logging Truck Drivers •Hydraulic Log Loader Operators •Processor Operators •Hand Buckers •Coastal Certified Hand Fallers Fulltime camp with union rates/benefits. Please send resumes by fax to 250-956-4888 or email to office@lemare.ca. THE OLD Spaghetti Factory now hiring F/T LINE COOK. Duties incl: cooking, prep work, cleaning, training & supervising. Min. 3 yrs. exp. or equivalent vocational training. $13.73/hr. Apply in person, 703 Douglas, 250-381-8444. THE OLD Spaghetti Factory now hiring F/T KITCHEN HELPER Duties include: clean, peel, slice and trim food, prepare food, portion/wrap food, stock refrigerators and salad bars. $10.40/hour. Apply in person, 703 Douglas, 250-381-8444.

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD WANTED F/T Cook at SUSHI DEN Rest. 609 Abbott St. Vancouver. 2 yrs. exp., high school diploma. wage: $2240/mth. 40hrs/wk. Apply: sushiden94@gmail.com duties: cook Japanese meal, plan menu, create item. Staff training.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

PROFESSIONAL/ MANAGEMENT

CAD Tech wanted for office in Saanich. 3-5 Yrs Exp. Ph. 250-472-6300 www.teccana.com

SALES

The Trager Approach

is an Innovative, Gentle and Therapeutic Bodywork that Reduces Pain & Tension and supports Balance and Presence in a Relaxed Body. Rae Bilash CertiďŹ ed Trager Practitioner call for appointment 250-380-8733 www.raebilash.ca * Also Hot Stone Massage

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

250 743 9882

FOR SALE BY OWNER

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

BC FAMILIES in Transition needs weekly front desk attendants with computer skills to receive phone calls, greet visitors, and connect staff to clients. Inquiries may be complex, so ability to think quickly is preferred. Training provided. Website Developer also needed. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

SĂ–OFĂ–*/"Ă–6ACANCIES

www.CobbleHillHome4Sale.com

LARGE DOLL HOUSE (30�x36�) & Country Store (16�x25�) Both furnished with many collectibles inside & out. Can sell separately. Best offer. Come & see! (250)592-1690.

VOLUNTEERS

THE LEUKEMIA & Lymphoma Society needs a variety of volunteers beginning in January to organize the October 2014 Light The Night Walk, including entertainment, outreach, communications, and volunteer recruitment. Positions require about 3 to 8 hours per month. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269

Beautiful 2 acre South Island property, homes and garden $715,000

FINANCIAL SERVICES

COSMETIC SALES PERSON for Outdoor Cart at Up Town Mall, shift work, $12/hr. Apply to mirjam@telus.net

THE ACTION Committee of People with Disabilities requires a positive, friendly receptionist to greet clients and answer phones, half day per week. Other positions available. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper?

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Home Movies to DVD. Also, Portraiture, Baby, Family + Maternity. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE FRIENDLY FRANK COMPUTER System 2.4 GHZ 256MBRAM 40gbHD, monitor & speakers$50. 250-479-1101

FUEL/FIREWOOD

REAL ESTATE APARTMENT/CONDOS NANAIMO WATERFRONT 2nd floor condo. 1500 sq.ft. LR/DR/2bdrms with view, den, gas FP, secure bldg. 2 underground parking spaces. Maintenance fee includes hot water/gas/landscaping. 1 pet OK. $339,900 (250)753-9123

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING -

SAANICH WEST- 1246 Hastings St, 3 bdrm Rancher, 2 garage, dining/living/family rooms, 2 bath (ensuite), F/P, appls incld, new roof. Walking distance to Interurban campus. Reduced price, $460,000. Call 250-477-4600.

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO 1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $500-$1200 inclds utils. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references! Call 250-478-9231. GORGE- 1 bdrm condo, laundry on site, NS/NP. $750. Avail now. (250)882-2330.

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT Bright lg Bach 1,2,3 br. Units Fully reno 5 min drive to DT Victoria Full time on site manager

Move in today 250-588-9799

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

bcclassiďŹ ed.com

CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT Join a profession that supports and cares for our community. Medical and dental office clerks and transcriptionists are always in high demand. In addition to basic administrative and bookkeeping skills, you will also learn standard medical terminology. Career Opportunities: Medical Office Assistant O Dental Office Assistant Medical Transcriptionist MSP Billing Clerk O Ward Secretary Pharmaceutical Firms O Medical Supply Firms Medical Clerical in Research & Care Agencies

110 -

CALL VICTORIA: 250.384.8121 OR VISIT SPROTTSHAW.COM


Oak DecDecember 20, 201320, 2013 OAK Bay BAY News NEWS Fri, - Friday, RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

ROOMS FOR RENT

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

FAIRFIELD ROOM- walk to Cook St Village and amenities. NS/NP. Women only. Call 250-382-6681.

SEASONAL ACCOMMODATION WANTED 1 or 2 bdrm to rent for 1 month to 6 weeks on or near waterfront in Oak Bay during May, June or July. Call Heather (250)920-9043 or email: heather ferguson01@gmail.com

SUITES, LOWER

1966 CHEVY Pick up, 1/2 ton short box, burgundy. 3 in the tree, 6 cylinder. Good condition, runs great, comes with second set of winter tires and rims. Second owner for last 45 years, in Victoria. $6,000 obo. Call: 250-479-0441 or email: havoc@telus.net

AUTO FINANCING

AIRPORT: 1 bdrm bachelor new windows, curtains, flooring, paint. Private door, yard. Parking. $820/mo all util’s incld’d. NS/NP, Jan. 1. Call (250)656-9910.

WATERFRONT. NORTH Saanich. Large 2-bdrm, 2 bath. $1800./mo inclds utils. Possibly small boat moorage +. Pet OK. N/S. (250)656-5999.

BUYING - RENTING- SELLING Call 250.388.3535

I am a newspaper carrier ‘‘and I’m a somebody’’ I deliver your Community Newspaper

In some cases it’s my first job and it’s helping me learn responsibility and customer service. Others that deliver our paper do it to stay fit or to contribute to their household income.

ďŹ l here please

We all have a common goal. We help you stay in touch with this great community. And we help local businesses thrive too. The weather isn’t always great and the hills can be steep, but I still endeavor to give you my best.

HARRIET/UPTOWN- fully furnished 3 bdrm, reno’d, 4 appls, bus route, NS/NP. $1500 inclusive. W/D. 250-480-0849. NORTH NANAIMO: Attention Students/Working Professionals: semi-furn private suite. New floors & paint. Shared lndry. FREE hydro & cable. N/S, No Partiers. $800/mo. Dec. 15th. 250-756-9746

www.vicnews.com A13 www.oakbaynews.com •A13



I am your community newspaper carrier.

Call for a route in your area‌ AUTO SERVICES $$$ TOP CA$H PAID $$$. For ALL unwanted Vehicles, any condition. Call (250)885-1427.

250-360-0817

SERVICE DIRECTORY 3-!,,Ă–!$3Ă–'%4Ă–")'Ă–2%35,43

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR



#OMPLETEĂĽGUIDEĂĽTOĂĽPROFESSIONALĂĽSERVICESĂĽINĂĽYOURĂĽCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

GARDENING

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

PAINTING

PLASTERING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

10% OFF! Fall Cleanups, Raking, Pruning, Hauling, Mowing. (250)479-6495.

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

250-216-9476 ACCEPTING new contracts; landscape and carpentry. BBB/Insured. Res /Comm. www.ftguland.com

SAFEWAY PAINTING

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

JACK NASH, serving Victoria over 30 yrs. We do it all! Free estimates WCB. 250-881-3886

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601

CLEANING SERVICES HOUSEKEEPER EXPERIENCED, reliable. References. 250-920-6516, 250-881-7444.

ELECTRICAL (250)217-3090.ELECTRICIAN 30 yrs exp. New homes and Renos. Knob & tube replacement. Service calls. Senior’s Disc. Free est. Lic.#3003. 250-361-6193 Quality Electric Reno’s, res & comm. No job too small. Lic# 22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

250-479-7950 FREE ESTIMATES • Lawn Maintenance • Landscaping • Hedge Trimming • Tree Pruning • Yard Cleanups • Gardening/Weeding • Aeration, Odd Jobs NO SURPRISES NO MESS www.hollandave.ca 250-885-8513 Winter Clean Up pros. Hedging, pruning, Hauling, Gutters, xmas light set ups. Yearly maintenance programs. Seniors discounts DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

NEED REPAIRS?

Use our community classiďŹ eds Service Directory to ďŹ nd an expert in your community

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

ABBA EXTERIORS Gutter cleaning & repairs. Seniors discounts. WCB, Insured. Free estimates. (778)433-9275.

HANDYPERSONS BIG BEAR Handyman. Painting, household repairs. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071.

HAULING AND SALVAGE $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

JUNK BOX- We Do All The Loading

JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774 SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

D O N E R I G H T M OV I N G . C A $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. BBB accredited. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

PAINTING A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

UPHOLSTERY UPHOLSTERER work. Your fabric 250-480-7937.

today for more details.

or

NEEDS mine.

WINDOW CLEANING PLUMBING EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

Looking For Staff? Start Here. Call 1-855-678-7833

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

MOVING & STORAGE 2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

PRESSURE WASHING

STUCCO/SIDING

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee�. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave- window, gutter cleaning, roof-de-moss, gutter guards, power washing. Free est.

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB

DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS FOR YOU! 250.388.3535


A14 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, December 20, 2013 - OAK

HomeFinder Find a place to call home

He Said, She Said

Q: WHAT’S THE GENDER TREND AMONG HOME BUYERS HERE?

SINGLE FEMALES: Made up 18.2 per cent of all home buyers in Greater Victoria, roughly matching a 2012 U.S. national home buyers and sellers profile. SINGLE MALES: Made up 13 per cent of all home buyers.

To advertise in HomeFinder, call John Graham at 250.480.3227 or email jgraham@ blackpress.ca

GREATER VICTORIA MARKET UPDATE » AS OF DEC. 16

195 » $778,900 » 3,709 »

TOTAL PROPERTIES SOLD OR DEALS PENDING THIS MONTH HIGHEST BENCHMARK PRICE (TYPICAL HOME) IN THE REGION: HIGHLANDS TOTAL NUMBER OF HOMES LISTED IN ALL CATEGORIES

BUYING TIP | Consult a professional builder before considering a home that needs renos

Courtesy Victoria Real Estate Board

Do you have a house-hunting story you’d like to share with us? Email ddescoteau@ vicnews.com

BAY NEWS

To renovate or not: that is the question Be realistic about cost, think twice about your motivation

Homeowners and prospective buyers come at the idea of renovations in a variety of ways. Some consider making improvements to add value to their home before selling. Others weigh the idea of enhancing their personal living space with shopping for a home that better meets their needs. Still others look at buying low and doing basic renos as a way to turn a quick profit. In the Capital Region, the last category is pretty much non-existent, given the relatively flat prices, says agent and Victoria Real Estate Board member Wendy Moreton. For other people, however, certain factors are important to consider. “The first thing I would look at would be the market conditions, to see who’s buying right now,” she says. “Are people wanting (the home) all done, or are people willing to roll up their sleeves and do

Jim Wood photo

Kitchen renovations, like those undertaken by Mereta Witt and family in their 1913-built Fairfield home, can add value to a property, but only if done with care and quality, says realtor Wendy Moreton. the work?” While kitchen and bathroom makeovers get many people excited, renovators have to be careful about how they go about such jobs. “There’s cost-effective, there’s thrifty and then there’s just plain cheap,” Moreton says. “Sometimes people will do cheap and quick, but the majority of people can see through those kind of renovations.”

Spending a little more on such features as proper cabinet installations, decent bathroom fixtures, and well-fitted carpet or flooring can pay off in getting more serious prospective buyers. Also crucial to consider is whether the property is a good candidate for a reno, Moreton says. If it’s “a good little house with a good lay-

out,” it might be a good candidate, she says, whereas if it’s on a busy corner or is clearly rundown, it might not be worth putting money into. Experts say that while certain homebuyers are skilled enough to do some work themselves, they make up a small percentage of the total. It’s also common for people to be surprised by the cost of renova-

tions. When buyers purchase an older house that needs work, the upgrades frequently cost more than expected. A good idea is talking first to a professional with renovation experience. For homebuyers on a budget, create a list of improvement priorities, work with a builder from there and spread costs over a period of years. – Don Descoteau

Let us Pay you Cash on your next home purchase www.TotalRealtyDiscount.ca

Ray Kong

PURCHASE A PROPERTY LISTED BY ANY REAL ESTATE COMPANY AND WOW! WE PAY YOU Realtor® Prof. Engineer UP TO 2/3 OF OUR COMMISSION AND MORE! One Percent Realty V.I.

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WOW g costs Cash Rebates apply Only to s with closin rniture lp he 3.0% first $100,000 +1.5% of w fu - buy some ne liday balance buyer agent - go on a ho commission, first $5,500 of any commission payable to buying agent

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Guy Effler

Realtor® Former Teacher

One Percent Realty V.I. Ph: 250-812-4910 Guy@OnePercentRealty.com


OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, December 20, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A15



Select your home. Select your mortgage.

OPEN HOUSES | DEC. 19 - DEC. 25, 2013

Oak Bay 250-370-7601 Victoria 250-483-1360 Westshore 250-391-2933 Sidney 250-655-0632 Chatterton Way 250-479-0688 www.vericoselect.com

VICTORIA 606 Speed Ave, $215,000

Saturday & Sunday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Scott Munro, 250 477-5353

5-1027 Belmont Ave, $639,000

Saturday Jan 4, 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Dennis Guevin, 250-477-7291

ESQUIMALT 404-520 Foster St, $199,900!

more details in Real Estate Victoria, available FREE on news stands now

1025 Scottswood, $545,000

Sat & Sun Dec 21/22nd & Sun Dec 29th 1-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Maggie Thompson, 250-889-5955

7179 Skyline, $498,800

Midtown Park

9820 Seaport Pl, $499,500+

Saturday & Sunday 12-4 RE/MAX Alliance Ron Neal, 250-386-8181

220-1680 Poplar Ave, $142,900 Saturday, Dec. 21 2-4 Pemberton Holmes Jeff Shorter, 250-744-9903

SAANICH WEST Saturday Dec 21, Dec 28 & Jan 4 11-1 Pemberton Holmes 3835 South Valley Dr, $769,000 Rick Couvelier, 250-477-0921 Sunday, Dec. 22 2-4 SAANICH EAST Century 21 Queenswood Realty 982 Mckenzie Ave, Anke Venema, 250-477-1100 $299,900

Saturday & Sunday 1-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty James Liu, 250 477-5353

SAANICH PENINSULA

3795 Burnside Pl, $549,900 Saturday January 4 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Jenn Raappana, 250-590-3921

Saturday Dec 21 1-4 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Patti Locke-Lewkowich, 250-477-7291

Saturday & Sunday 1-3 Holmes Realty Michele Holmes, 250-656-0911

17-2115 Amelia Ave, $349,000 Saturday, Dec. 21 & Sunday, Dec. 22 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Bill Knowles, 250-656-0131

110-10461 Resthaven, $164,900 Sun Dec 22, Sun Dec 29 & Sun Jan 5 11-1 Pemberton Holmes Rick Couvelier, 250-477-0921

9776 Fourth St.

3379 Vision Way, $339,900

Tuesday-Saturday 1-3 except Dec 22-Jan 6 Gordon Hulme Realty Don King 250-516-1202

Saturday Jan. 4 & Sunday Jan. 5 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Mike Hartshorne, 250-590-3921

WEST SHORE 2655 Sooke Rd, $219,900 Thursday thru Monday 1-4 Re/Max Camosun Brad Gregory, 250 744-3301

103-383 Wale Rd, $207,900 Saturday 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Kevin Seibel, 250-580-4878

3379 Vision Way, $339,900 Saturday, Dec. 28 & Sunday, Dec .29 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Mike Hartshorne, 250-590-3921

3467 Happy Valley Rd.

19-848 Hockley Ave, $59,500 Saturday, Dec. 21 11-1 Pemberton Holmes Ltd. Eileen Jespersen, 250-686-4820

24-848 Hockley Ave, $74,500 Saturday, Dec. 21 11-1 Pemberton Holmes Ltd. Eileen Jespersen, 250-686-4820

3377 Vision Way, $339,900 Saturday & Sunday Dec 28/29th & Jan 4/5th 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Jenn Raappana, 250-590-3921

3008 Dornier Rd.

Saturday, Jan. 4 & Sunday, Jan. 5 12-4 Saturday, Jan. 4 & Sunday Jan. 5 12-4 DFH Real Estate Ltd. DFH Real Estate Ltd. Mike Hartshorne, 250-889-4445 Mike Hartshorne, 250-889-4445

D ANIEL CLOVER BUYING OR SELLING CHOOSE A TOP REALTOR® 2239 Oak Bay Ave. Victoria, B.C. Cell: 250.507-5459 danielclover@shaw.ca

SOL

MLS AWARD WINNER 26 Years in a row

D

24 - 1525 COOPER RD MLS 331213 Adult 55+ park. This single wide home with a lg. addition offers 1125 sq. ft. of space with 3 bdrms & 2 full baths. The layout offers a bdrm on each end of the home. Lg. kit. with skylight includes 5 appliances & roomy eating area with laminate flooring. The living rm. has a built-in air cond. 2 barstools for breakfast bar. The mstr bdrm has an ensuite with soaker tub and walk in closet. New tile flooring in the foyer and laminate flooring in one of the bdrms. Two car parking & fenced yard. Small pets permitted.

410 - 50 SONGHEES RD MLS 329685 Stunning decor; beautiful inner harbour condominium is nothing more than spectacular as you will see when you view this work of skilled craftsmanship. Fine attention to detail is wonderfully demonstrated in this tastefully renovated home. From the brand new high end kitchen cabinetry to the 5 star hotel like bathrooms. It can be yours for this more than reasonable asking price. Everything has been renewed and no expense spared. Amazing location and the “world is your oyster”.

105 - 2829 ARBUTUS RD MLS 327642 Views of everything from the San Juan’s and Mt Baker to the ever changing ocean and island vistas; 18 acres of natural surroundings combined with the beauty of the professionally landscaped grounds. Meticulously maintained, gated community indoor pool, hottub and sauna too. Walking trails, tennis courts & more. 3 bdrms, spacious lr & dining room, gorgeous kit., 2 fp, hdwd floors, two sun-decks & a patio. Db garage with loads of extra parking & more storage than you’ll ever need.

211 - 50 SONGHEES RD MLS 329439 WATER VIEWS of Victoria’s Inner Harbour and Olympic Mountains; lovely vistas from this stunning SOUTH FACING condominium in Victoria’s world famous Inner Harbour. Lg END unit cond. offering 2 lg bdrms and two bathrooms. Wonderful floor plan is the beautiful and spacious open design FAMILY ROOM right off the kitchen. Don’t miss this rare opportunity. Stainless appliances as well! Great Views, downtown location, vacant and in move in condition! Excellent condition and is maintained impeccably!

413 - 50 SONGHEES RD MLS 330895 Lovely calming views of Victoria Inner Harbour, Parliament Buildings and Olympic Mountains are yours in this extra large, 1436 sq. ft., 4th floor, Inner Harbour condominium. Songhees Point complex features an impeccable depreciation report along with an ongoing commitment to easy care maintenance and high standard of living. Clean 2 bdrms, 2 baths, lg laundry rm. Large south facing mstr bdrm along with a balcony which conveniently bridges the living room and bedroom.

505 - 1433 FAIRCLIFF LANE MLS 330153 Best value in the complex!!! Million dollar view for only $249,900!!! Lovely south facing view, top floor home situated on a 2 acre parcel of land high atop of Moss Rock, popular,desirable Fairfield neighbourhood. Panoramic views of the ocean, the Olympic Mountains, Clover Point, cruise ships and sailboats; it’s an ever changing, therapeutic outlook, just feel the stress melt away. Imagine what a wonderful location for your retirement years or your “Home Away From Home”. Top floor, priced for immediate sale.

837 MANN AVE MLS 326680 Absolutely immaculate aptly describes this lovely, one level, home with many features. Naturally bright home due to its south facing back yard & 5 skylights; lg. windows and a glorious garden featuring a large modern patio & natural real rock fountain, peacefully & privately fenced. Open concept design kitchen, eating area and fam. rm; separate inline dr & lr for formal entertaining. $20,000 bathtub with side door, power lift seat & powerful massaging jets; there is a chair lift too in the garage.

1106 NEWTON PL MLS 330737 Pristine modern home with many features. Custom gourmet kit. with high end wood cabinets, lg. fr with fp, separate lr with fp, vaulted ceilings, lg. open sep. dr, gorgeous hd floors, classic staircase, 3 lg. bdrms and quality construction. Grand entrance area, 2nd fam rm, 4th bdrm or den, laundry and legal additional accommodation/inlaw suite. Rear lane access to lg db garage & private patio. The location is fabulous with easy access to schools, shopping etc. One of Brentwood’s finest developments!

1475 MILLSTREAM RD MLS 331119 Situated on pristine two acre parcels of property you will find is this lovingly maintained 3 bdrm 3 bath home. Beautifully manicured yard featuring a sprinkler system with Gazebo. Excellent floor plan with a large rec rm off the mstr bdrm & full four piece ensuite spac. kit. for even the most discerning of home chefs & a large separated dinning area.Lg. double garage (26’x21’) offers loads of height (10’+) with a couple of outbuildings. Tip top shape; just buy it and move right in.

3356 SEWELL RD MLS 325245 Quality built 2010 grand 4 bdrm plus large den/office home with a 1 bdrm legal suite. Main floor features open concept design with high ceilings, high-end flooring, lr fireplace, dining area, gourmet kit. with stainless steel appliances and gas stove, breakfast bar, powder rm, and laundry rm. Large deck with views, ozy up to the outdoor wood-burning fp. Mst bd with gas fp, juliet balcony, spa-like ensuite with soaker tub and separate shower. 1 bdrm legal suite with its own laundry located above double garage.


A16 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, December 20, 2013 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Merry Christmas from all of us! Lilydale Fresh Grade “A” Young Turkey

Grade “A” Turkey

Frozen, All Sizes While quantities last. Limit one per family order $2.16/kg

All Sizes While quantities last. $4.39/kg

Over Limit Price $1.39/lb, $3.06/kg

On Sale

1

On Sale

98

¢

99 Per lb

Per lb

With a minimum $50 family order (including turkey)

Green Giant Vegetables

Coke, Pepsi,

Available in the Meat Dept. 300g

Selected Flavours, Dasani or Aquafina Water 12 Pack or Glaceau Vitamin Water 4 Pack Selected

Assorted 750g

On Sale

3

On Sale

On Sale

4Each9

39

1

for

9Each9

Where this symbol appears, deposit & enviro levies are applicable.

Thrifty Kitchens Cranberry Orange Sauce

99

20

Weekly Specials in effect until 6pm Tuesday, December 24th, 2013

Christmas Store Hours

December 18th –23rd

December 24th

We’re open Boxing Day!

24 hour locations will remain open 24 hours

at all locations

24 hour locations will remain open 24 hours

6am–Midnight

6am–6pm

9am–6pm

Oak Bay News, December 20, 2013  

December 20, 2013 edition of the Oak Bay News