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SUMMERLAND REVIEW THE VOICE OF OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1908

VOLUME 66 - ISSUE

WHAT’S INSIDE:

WWW.SUMMERLANDREVIEW.COM

NO. 50 • S U M M E R L A N D, B.C. • T H U R S D AY,

DECEMBER

12,

2013

20

PA G E S

$1.15

INCLUDING

Growth plan received

GST

Proposal calls for removal of 87 hectares from Agricultural Land Reserve to accommodate future urban development by John Arendt

Hockey action

The Summerland Steam earned a win in an exciting overtime game on the weekend.

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Road safety

Students at Summerland Secondary School were given a strong message about the dangers of distracted driving.

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New commander

The 902 Summerland Air Cadets Squadron now has a new commander in place.

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Meeting Santa

Santa Claus made a special appearance at the Summerland Legion on Sunday.

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Basketball

A Summerland basketball team had a strong showing during a recent tournament.

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YOUR SMILE This year, in lieu of gifts, I’ve decided to give everyone my opinion.

Bell ringing

Carla McLeod Special to the Summerland Review

For the fifth year in a row, Dora Bystrom braves sub zero temperatures to stand and ring the bell, outside the Government Liquor Store in the Sungate Plaza in order to raise money for the Salvation Army. She has recently moved to Penticton after living in Summerland for the past 12 years. She enjoys doing this work because she likes helping people. This will be her last year, and she wanted to come back to Summerland because there are so many friendly, generous people here.

A report recommending the removal of some agricultural land to allow for densification in the downtown core did not receive unanimous support at the council table on Monday evening. The 95-page report for Summerland’s proposed Urban Growth Plan was the result of a year’s study by consultants. During that time, the consultants received input from around 1,300 people in the community, exceeding the goal of 1,000 people. The plan from the consultants is a change from the existing growth area in Summerland’s Official Community Plan. At present, the bulk of Summerland’s future growth is set for the Prairie Valley area, which had been proposed for the Summerland Hills development. Summerland Hills, a large golf resort and residential development, is no longer being considered. The new plan calls for the bulk of new development to go to the existing downtown area and lands nearby. Following this strategy would also involve the removal of 87 hectares from the Agricultural Land Reserve. Meanwhile, the Summerland Peter Hills area, the Deer Ridge Area and Hunter Hills are excluded Waterman from the growth area. Lands in the James Lake Industrial Area are also excluded, as is the Crescent Beach area. “The proposed Urban Growth Area is about half the size of the current area,” municipal planner Ian McIntosh said as he presented the plan. Coun. Peter Waterman, a retired agrologist, opposed the plan, since it would be one of the largest removals of land from the Agricultural Land Reserve in the Okanagan Valley. He added that the plan does not provide adequate support to Summerland’s economy. “There was an inadequate examination of demographic trends,” he said. “I really don’t feel there is going to be the kind of impact we would hope for.” See VIEWS Page 3

Electrical rates set to increase by John Arendt

Once again the cost of electricity will increase in the new year. On Monday, municipal council gave first

three readings to a bylaw to amend the fees and charges to deal with a rate increase from FortisBC. The proposed increase is 3.3 per cent and will

take effect on Jan. 1. The rate will apply to all customer classes. The increase in the cost of power purchased from FortisBC is estimated at $233,000.

For a Summerland residential customer who uses roughly 1,100 kilowatt hours a month, the cost under the existing rates is $123.24 plus tax. The increase tacks

on an additional $4.07 for a total of $127.31 plus tax. Last year, FortisBC proposed a rate increase of 6.5 per cent. See APPROVAL Page 3


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Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

Marijuana petition falls short of target by Jeff Nagel Black Press

Breakfast funds

Barry Newcombe of the Summerland Legion presents a $300 cheque to Andrea Devito, viceprincipal of Summerland Middle School, to assist in the costs of the school’s breakfast program.

The Sensible BC campaign to spark the decriminalization of marijuana in B.C. is officially up in smoke after falling short of its goal. Pot activists got 210,000 signatures or about two-thirds of the 300,000 needed – 10 per cent of voters in all 85 B.C. ridings –  for their initiative petition to potentially trigger a referendum. They had aimed for a target of 450,000 to provide a buffer against disqualified signatures. “It’s a pretty remarkable accomplishment,” said Sensible BC head Dana Larsen. “We’ve definitely demonstrated a high level of organization and support for this cause. Had we been operating under the rules of pretty much any other referendum system in the world, we would have qualified to be on the ballot.” He said the 4,500 registered petitioners – triple the number at the start of the 90-day

campaign –  reached the threshold required by Elections BC in 19 electoral districts and got at least eight per cent in five more. Successful local campaigns happened on much of Vancouver Island, the Kootenays and other parts of the Interior. But in the voterich Lower Mainland that holds the most districts, marijuana advocates came up short. They reached the 10 per cent threshold in just VancouverWest End and Vancouver-Mount Pleasant, with no other local wins in the rest of Metro Vancouver or the Fraser Valley. They came closest in the three North Shore ridings with eight per cent plus. Sensible BC aimed to compel the province to pass legislation banning police from expending any time and resources on simple marijuana possession. Larsen said canvassers were harrassed in some areas by opponents and at times by calls to

police as they tried to collect signatures on SkyTrain and BC Ferries. The outcome is nowhere near the 700,000 signatures gathered by Fight HST forces en route to their winning referendum. But Larsen argues the province must now look “very seriously” at the marijuana issue, particularly as states such as Washington and Colorado move to full pot legalization. He says history shows even failed campaigns can have impact. A prior initiative in 2002 pushing proportional representation got 98,000 signatures but led to a citizens assembly on electoral reform and ultimately two referendum questions on the issue. Signatures were being delivered to Elections BC Monday and Larsen said Sensible BC will take a break over Christmas before deciding when to mount a new petition campaign, along with other forms of political engagement.

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Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

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Comedy scene

Students from Summerland Secondary School’s Acting 11 class will stage an evening of sketch comedy on Friday, with proceeds to assist victims of Typhoon Haiyan. The evening of drama is at Centre Stage Theatre beginning at 7 p.m. From left are Makenzie Vandertoolen, Rhys Swenson, Vicky Friesen and Justine Houde.

Views mixed on Urban Growth Plan Continued from Page 1

Coun. Orv Robson said the plan is needed to bolster Summerland’s growth rate. In recent years, the community’s rate of growth has been less than one per cent a year. “We cannot sustain our services at a one per cent growth rate,” he said. He added that the plan is for a 30- to 50-year time frame. Coun. Robert “We cannot sustain our Hacking also supservices at a one per ported cent growth rate.” the plan Coun. Orv Robson since he believes merland has one- it will bring growth to third the popula- the community. “For tion of Penticton, he me, a one per cent said the commun- growth rate is simity has three times ply not what it takes the amount of road to keep Summerland infrastructure. “This viable,” he said. urban sprawl has got Mayor Janice Perto stop,” he said. rino said the existing Waterman said the proposed removal of land from the Agricultural Land Reserve for development would be an abuse of farm land. Coun. Martin Van Alphen, who farms in the Garnett Valley area, supported the plan since it would help to limit sprawling development in Summerland. Although Sum-

Approval needed for rate increase Continued from Page 1

The B.C. Utilities Commission rejected that amount and instead approved an increase of 4.2 per cent. In 2011, council approved an increase of four per cent because of FortisBC rate hike. This

increase took effect Jan. 1, 2012. This year’s proposed increase of 3.3 per cent is lower than the last few increases, but before the FortisBC rate hike can take effect, it must receive approval from the B.C. Utilities Commission.

Practice road safety Watch for pedestrians at crosswalks and around playground zones.

system of growth in area affected. Summerland has The resolution to proved to be expen- accept the report was sive. “We know carried with Waterwhat it costs to build man opposed. roads,” she said. “It has b e e n “We know what it costs h e a r t - to build roads. It has b r e a k - been heartbreaking to ing to see how we have been see how we have leapfrogging.” Mayor Janice Perrino b e e n leapfrogging.” Coun. Bruce HallBefore the growth quist and Coun. strategy is adopted, Lloyd Christopher- it will be presented to son were both absent council again, beginfrom the discussion ning with a draft veron the growth strat- sion in January. egy, since they both A public hearing own property in the on the Agricultural

Land Reserve exclusion is expected for February and a public hearing on the change to the community plan will be held in March. “There are at least two more opportunities for official public input,” McIntosh said. Those who live in the affected area will receive written notification of the proposal and the hearings. The changes will require a majority of full council, or at least four of the seven members of council, in order to take effect. A copy of the plan can be found on the

municipality’s website at www.summerland.ca/docs/ community%20

planning/Summerland%20UGS%20 FINAL%20REPORT. pdf.

LEGALLY SPEAKING...

A public service message from Bell, Jacoe & Company

Estate Litigation It is a sad sign of the times that Estate litigation is one of the fastest growing areas of law. This is partly due to the vast amount of wealth that the leading edge of the “Baby Boomers” is now transferring through to their offspring in their estates. Where money is involved unfortunately the bad side of human nature can take over. This wrongful behavior can take many forms, from one sibling taking over control of his or her parents affairs by a Power of Attorney and channeling the money to their own benefit to using undue influence to shape their parents Will in their favour. Equally as important in creating litigation has been the proliferation of second marriages and split families. Each side of the family can have very different legal rights to an estate depending on the circumstances. Great care and consideration must be taken when providing for your children and your spouse’s children. It is critical to seek advice from a Lawyer with training and experience in drafting wills in these circumstances.

the

Kathryn Robinson will be closed on Wednesday, December 25th and Thursday, December 26th. We will re-open on Friday, December 27th. We will be open Monday, December 30th, and Tuesday, December 31st, closed Wednesday, January 1st and will re-open Thursday, January 2nd, 2014. The deadline for word classifieds and display ads for Thursday, December 26th paper will be noon on Thursday, December 19th, 2013. The deadline for word classifieds and display ads for Thursday, January 2nd, 2014 paper will be noon on Friday, December 27th, 2013. Thank You

• LAWYER

Considerate, confidential and affordable legal services for the residents of Summerland and area.

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PUBLISHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Don Kendall EDITOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .John Arendt OFFICE MANAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nan Cogbill SALES MANAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jo Freed SALES ASSISTANT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pat Lindsay news@summerlandreview.com sports@summerlandreview.com ads@summerlandreview.com class@summerlandreview.com

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SUMMERLAND REVIEW A PART OF THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1908

WWW.SUMMERLANDREVIEW.COM

Published by the Summerland Review P.O. Box 309, 13226 North Victoria Road, Summerland, B.C. V0H 1Z0 (250) 494-5406

Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

Subscription rates:

Summerland $38.40 (includes GST) per year; $72.53 – two years; elsewhere in Canada $49.07 per year (includes GST). Seniors – $35.20 per year (Summerland). Single copy: $1.15 including GST. Visa accepted.

Authorized as second class mail by the Canada Post Office Dept., Ottawa and for payment postage in cash. Publications mail registration no. 0147 The Summerland Review reserves the right to refuse publication of any advertising or editorial submission at its discretion. Material submitted by columnists does not reflect the opinions of the Review or its employees.

EDITORIAL

our pick

The cost of electricity Once again electrical rates are set to increase for the coming year. Because of an increase in costs by FortisBC, the municipality will pass on a 3.3 per cent rate increase to Summerlanders in 2014. Under the agreement with FortisBC, the municipality purchases electricity from the power utility and then distributes it to customers in Summerland. Electricity is then charged on the municipality’s monthly utility bills. As a percentage of a total household income, the coming increase is small. Under the new rate, the monthly electricity bill for an average Summerland home will increase by a little more than $4. The FortisBC increase means the municipality has no other reasonable choice except to pass the increase on to its customers. Attempting to hold the rate steady would mean the municipality would have to look elsewhere to find the additional $233,000 the increase will require. Rate increases will be necessary from time to time as there are costs involved in supplying electricity. These costs will increase and system upgrades will be required from time to time. The concern is about the present system of passing on the electrical rate increases. It requires municipal council to formally approve a rate increase even though the factors which made the increase necessary were entirely outside of Summerland’s control. In essence, the rate change bylaw means our council must rubber-stamp a decision which has already been made without them. The rate change is from FortisBC and requires the approval of the B.C. Utilities Commission before it can take effect. As a result, these organizations, not the municipal councils, should bear the responsibility for the rate hikes.

On Saturday afternoon, the Summerland Community Choir performed a flash mob holiday song in Penticton at Cherry Lane Mall and at Wal-Mart. The recently formed 70-voice choir is something new for Summerland but the response from those who heard it was positive. Those involved in this choir have spent many hours preparing and the results of that effort were evident.

Ottawa puts on pipeline push VICTORIA – The federal government stepped up its sales pitch for new pipelines to the B.C. coast last week, as it prepares for the imminent release of the federal review panel’s report on the feasibility of the Enbridge Northern Gateway project. Tr a n s p o r t Minister Lisa Raitt and Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver arrived Tom Fletcher in Vancouver to release an expert panel’s report on the current state of tanker safety on the West Coast. It was the first of two reports that tell the Stephen Harper government in blunt terms how steep a hill it must climb to enable energy exports to Asia. Oliver gave a speech to the Vancouver Board of Trade the following morning, where he vowed to implement one of the panel’s key recommendations. Legislation is coming to ensure that polluters, not taxpayers, must pay for any environmental damage from resource development and transport. The panel was chaired by Gordon Houston, a former Prince Rupert harbourmaster and CEO of Port Metro Vancouver. Its  report  details the little-noticed fact that coastal waters around Victoria and Vancouver are already congested with shipping traffic, including Alaska oil tankers, and are at “very high risk” of an incident.

Of course that “very high risk” should be seen in the B.C. context, where there has never been a serious oil spill at sea in a century of continuous petroleum shipping. The report calls for potential polluters to show they are prepared for a “worst case” discharge like the 1989 Exxon Valdez grounding in Alaska. It tells Ottawa the Canadian Coast Guard must be properly funded to serve as incident command. Oliver recounted efforts made so far, including annual tanker inspections, increased aerial surveillance and marine markers. And he reminded his audience that Canada’s only energy export customer, the U.S., is about to surpass Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest petroleum producer. The second federal report was from Doug Eyford, a lawyer who has been meeting for months with aboriginal communities in northern B.C. and Alberta. He found, as Enbridge has reported, that many aboriginal communities are working with energy producers to get the economic activity they so desperately need. (Most urban people likely don’t believe this, because the conflict-addicted media report mostly protests.) Eyford’s report is no whitewash either. It reminds Ottawa that B.C.’s unresolved aboriginal title and a general lack of trust of both the energy industry and the federal government are key

obstacles to the largest economic opportunity in the world today, the rise of Asia. Eyford was dealing with the profusion of gas pipeline projects that are set to cross northern B.C.,  as well as the Enbridge and Kinder Morgan Canada oil proposals. The entrenched opposition is against oil, particularly heavy oil in tankers. Politics and protesters aside, these are the facts for B.C. The prosperous provinces in Canada today are Alberta, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland, based mainly on energy development. The rest are struggling. B.C. continues to lose skilled workers to Alberta, where oil sands development continues to expand despite the continuing chorus of U.S.-financed misrepresentation of its environmental impact. It’s a key moment in Canadian history. This is where we see if we can go beyond our status as a client state of the U.S. This year’s B.C. election, where pandering to urban protest backfired on the NDP, suggests  a new seriousness in the public mood. More people understand today that our comfortable modern society with free-access health care is a fragile thing. We have it better than most of the world, for now. Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Twitter: @ tomfletcherbc Email:  tfletcher@blackpress.ca

culls

In the coming weeks and months, the municipality will consider its urban growth strategy, which sets out a plan for future land use in Summerland. The strategy has some farreaching implications and its effects will last for many years. At times, concerns about some council decisions are not raised until after the hearings are over, at which time it is too late for the members of council to consider new information. Those who have concerns need to speak out during the hearings. This plan is far too important to ignore.

your views

If you wish to comment on anything you read in the newspaper, or any concern affecting Summerland, write a letter to the editor. We welcome diverse views and opinions. Letters must include your name and a telephone number where you can be reached. Please keep letters to 300 words or less. The Review reserves the right to edit letters for length, content or taste as well as the right to refuse publication of any letter. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities.


Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

Plan is a land grab

Dear Editor: I am very disappointed that Summerland municipal council has approved a motion to ask the Agricultural Land Commission to release farm land from the Agricultural Land Reserve. A significant portion of the Summerland’s flat farm land is earmarked for housing and is expected to become part of the urban growth area. The facts have been twisted to make it look like the community needs to build houses on farm land. That is simply not true. The ability to walk to town from your home may be desirable, but it does not trump farm land. Farm land is protected by provincial legislation so that future generations will have the option of growing and consuming local food. Each of us is only on this earth for a short time. We should be careful that the impact that we have, and the legacy we leave, does not damage the future of those who will come after us. As my 85-year-old neighbour told me as we left the council chambers on Monday, “They just don’t know what’s important.” Perhaps we should start listening to our elders. Jan Carlson Summerland

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Old sign should be removed Dear Editor: To the city of Summerland. Thank you for establishing the new RCMP station in Summerland. I can speak for most citizens of Summerland when I say

the new building is magnificent to look at and is much more modernized. Without question, the new building is far more appealing than the old station. November 2012, after the Remem-

brance Day ceremony in Memorial Park, concerns arose regarding the brutal state of the Canadian flag. Many citizens called it “horrific,” “disturbing” and even “disrespectful.” Well, as a confused

citizen, I am asking you today why the state of our old RCMP station is disrespected as it is. It once was a symbol of law and order. It once represented those brave enough to protect us. It once was

respected and treated with dignifying care. Regardless of it being an unused building today, I am asking you to please take down the RCMP sign respectfully as having it rot and be treated as a piece of

junk is unacceptable. The RCMP is a symbol of our country and if we eradicate that symbol, what are we doing as citizens of this beautiful country? Abhishek Lekhi Summerland

The early years

The gift of music

Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum

Hearing the songs of the season from this award winning group would certainly have been inspirational. In 1929 the Summerland School Choir, under the direction of Miss Ruth Dale and Mr. Howard Daniels, traveled to Kelowna for a music competition and came home to a very proud community with a trophy and a shield commemorating the highest marks ever achieved. (If you’d like to know the names of these gifted young people, drop by the museum.) As the holidays approach, why not give yourself a gift and take in some of the wonderful concerts celebrating the season? Music is a great way to catch the Christmas Spirit.

Urban Growth Area a disappointment

Dear Editor: They just don’t understand what’s important. At the council meeting on Monday night, a decision was made to once again amend the Official Community Plan, with 215 acres of flat, arable farmland are

slated for exclusion from the Agricultural Land Reserve. According to the ALR website, “The ALR is a provincial zone in which agriculture is recognized as the priority use. Farming is encouraged and non-agricultural uses are con-

trolled.” There are two councillors who are going to personally benefit financially if this goes through. As far as I can see, council will push this agenda as fast as they can in order to complete the changes before summer 2014

and certainly before the fall 2014 elections. I’m ready to protect the ALR, encour-

age farming, and work on alternative ways to develop and generate revenue for

our town. I can’t wait to get my hands dirty. Erin Carlson Summerland

Thanks for Christmas sign Dear Editor: I wish to send praises to our Summerland Credit Union for their street view window Christmas message reading, “Merry Christ-

WHAT IF.......? • Caring Professional Staff • Reception Facilities What would I do if a loved one were to pass away? • Celebration of Life Services What if I were to die somewhere else? What would my family do? • Grief Counselling What if... what if... what if? • 24 hour Service Brenda Ron Hamilton Call us to help you take care of these questions. • Cremation Crooker and Burial Options Available Brenda Hamilton Nico Altena NOW is the time to give yourself peace of mind. Nico Altena • Full Range of Pre-arrangement Services Manager/Funeral Director Funeral Director

mas and a Happy New Year.” Thank you very much and Merry Christmas. Lou Wolkowski Summerland

Providence

“Every Life Tells A Story”

Summerland’s Rosedale Chapel

250-494-7752 13205 Rosedale Avenue, Summerland


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Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

Change of command

Members of the 902 Summerland Royal Canadian Air Cadets Squadron salut as they march past Capt. Crystel Davidsen, the newly appointed commanding officer of the squadron, on Dec. 4. Davidsen replaces Capt. Phil Paterson, who had served as the commanding officer for the past two years.

Work finished under budget

Holiday baking

Peggy Barron picks out some holiday cookies at St. Stephen’s Anglican Church on Saturday afternoon during the church’s annual strawberry tea and bake sale.

Work on two municipal projects was completed below the amount in the budget. A re-roofing project at the Summerland Fire Hall was completed at a cost of $39,000. The budget for this

RDOS Holiday Hours and Information CHRISTMAS TREE DISPOSAL Natural Christmas Trees, free of contaminants, can be brought to any local landfill in the RDOS free of charge. Check with your local municipality or the RDOS for potential Christmas Street collection programs in your community.

REGIONAL DISTRICT OF OKANAGAN-SIMILKAMEEN HOLIDAY HOURS OF OPERATION The main office at 101 Martin Street will be closed over the upcoming holiday season from: December 25 to 27 and closed January 1 If you have an urgent matter please call the RDOS Emergency After Hours line at: 250-490-4141

LANDFILL REDUCED WINTER HOURS Campbell Mountain Mon to Sat 8:30 a.m - 4:45 p.m. Okanagan Falls Mon to Fri 10 a.m. - 1:45 p.m. Oliver Mon to Fri 12 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. Sat 10 a.m. - 3:45 p.m. Keremeos Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. All landfills will be closed Statutory Holidays and Boxing Day Contact the RDOS at 250-490-4129 for further information

REGIONAL DISTRICT OF OKANAGAN-SIMILKAMEEN DIRECTORS AND STAFF WISH EVERYONE A HAPPY HOLIDAY SEASON

Police rePort Vehicle crashes in vineyard

project was $45,000, municipal administrator Tom Day told council on Monday evening Repair work at Isintok Dam was also done for less money than anticipated. The budget for this project was $100,000, but the actual cost of the work was $75,000. The lake level was drawn down this fall to allow for the work to take place. Day said municipal staff will monitor the dam in spring to determine if additional work is required.

On Saturday at 8:50 p.m., police were called after a grey Honda Accord was found in a vineyard at the corner of Jones Flat Road and Victoria Road North. The driver of the van went off the road in a single vehicle accident and crashed into the vineyard. There owner of the property discovered the accident and called police. There was nobody in the vehicle when police arrived and the engine was cold. Police are continuing their investigation into the accident. The owner of the vehicle is from outside of Summerland, police say.

roadblocks in place

Police have set up their seasonal roadblocks to check for impaired drivers during the holiday season. So far, the road checks have gone without incident, Summerland RCMP say. “Everybody’s behaving,” said Sgt. Stephane Lacroix of the Summerland RCMP detachment. The checks will continue, especially during the weekends.

The Christian family of Sonoka Worship Centre wishes everyone a blessed, safe and Merry Christmas and a happy and healthy 2014. Services with Rev. Daniel Croft every Saturday evening at the Summerland United Church at 5:00 pm and followed by a pot-luck supper at 6:00 pm Christmas Eve is service only at 5:00 pm Ph: 250-486-0529


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Distracted driving risks shown Students and guest speaker present road safety message

Wednesday, Dec. 4 was DEAD Day at Summerland Secondary School. DEAD — Distractions Endanger All Drivers — was an awareness day highlighting the risks involved with youth and distracted driving.  Students in Grades 10 to 12 gathered at Centre Stage Theatre to watch three powerful  videos produced by the Civics 11 class. The topics were drinking and driving, drugging and driving and distracted driving.  Civics student Katie Grant said the 90-second videos “contained tragic scenes of car accidents that were meant to shock students.”  But the real shock arrived with the day’s guest speaker. 

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CounCil reporT The regular meeting of municipal council was held on Dec. 9 in council chambers. The mayor and all councillors were present.

Horse report received

A municipal staff report about roaming feral horses was received for information. The report is dated Nov. 28 and discusses the ongoing problem of feral horses in and near the community. There are an estimated 300 to 400 feral horses in the region on the west side of the Okanagan Valley, from West Kelowna to Okanagan Falls and Keremeos. The number of horses has been increasing in recent years. Problems with roaming horses have been reported since the 1950s.

Goals adopted

Council adopted its list of municipal goals and objectives for the coming year. Municipal administrator Tom Day said the objectives for the coming year have a focus on economic sustainability for the municipality.

Board appointments

Student presentation

Students from Summerland Secondary School’s Civics 11 class showed videos about the risks of distracted driving.

Greg Drew, a firefighter from Surrey, described the impact of losing his 17-yearold son, Jay, in a high speed accident. Drew, often crying himself during the speech, evoked tears from many students and teachers. 

He even presented the ashes of his son to show students the consequences of impaired and highspeed driving. He then asked students to go outside and view the wrecked car that his son drove on that ter-

rible night. Many students then spent the rest of the day hugging each other and reliving stories of car accidents affecting their family and friends.  Drew said he hugged more than 100 students after the

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Council gave final reading to a bylaw to rezone a portion of 9348 Alder St. from RSD2Residential Large lot to RSD1-Residential Medium Lot.

Transit fees adopted

Council approved the transit fees for the new scheduled transit service. A ride within Summerland is $2 for a one-way trip and to Penticton, the fare is $4 each way. A book of 10 tickets is available for the price of nine and a monthly transit pass is $50. There are no special rates for students or seniors.

YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION 13211 Henry Avenue 250-494-6451 • www.summerland.ca MAYOR: Janice Perrino COUNCILLORS: Lloyd Christopherson, Robert Hacking, Bruce Hallquist, Orv Robson, Marty Van Alphen, Peter Waterman

DISTRICT OF SUMMERLAND HOLIDAY SCHEDULE Municipal offices will be closed at 3pm on Tuesday, December 24th and will reopen on Thursday, January 2, 2014. The pool and fitness room will be open until 1:15pm on December 24th and closed the 25th, 26th and January 1st. The arena will be closed December 24th, 25th, 26th and January 1st. Please refer to their Winter Brochure for public skate and swim schedules. The Fire Hall office and the Landfill will be closed December 25th and 26th, and January 1st. Please Note: The Utility Bill due date will be Monday, December 23, 2013. If you are moving, please come in before closing on the 24th to advise moving details. After Dec. 24th you may visit our website or call 250-404-4047 to advise of moving details. Meter reading requests received Dec.30th - Jan.1st will be read on Jan. 2nd. For further details please visit our website. Council and staff of the District of Summerland wish everyone the best during the holiday season.

2014 COUNCIL MEETINGS Recommendation: THAT the Municipal Council meeting schedule for 2014 be adopted as follows and that all meetings take place in Municipal Council Chambers unless otherwise approved by Municipal Council:

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Save Up To

75% OFF MSRP

FREE Estimates FREE Installation Locally Owned / Operated for 28 Yrs

Imagination • Innovation • Inspiration

Zoning amended

SUMMERLAND BOTTLE DEPOT

Stress free gift giving!

www.blindsplus.ca

presentation. Another  Civics  student, Abhishek  Lekhi, said DEAD Day was a “powerful, emotional lesson for all of us, but especially for students in the early stages of learning to drive responsibly.”

Council approved appointments to the Okanagan Regional Library Board. Coun. Peter Waterman was appointed to the board for 2014 with Coun. Orv Robson as the alternate.

y! Call us toda 250.486.8282

please submit your letters to the editor

January 13, 2014 January 27, 2014 February 11, 2014* (Tuesday) February 24, 2014 March 10, 2014 March 24, 2014 April 14, 2014 April 28, 2014

May 12, 2014 May 26, 2014 June 9, 2014 June 23, 2014 July 14, 2014 July 28, 2014 August 25, 2014

September 8, 2014 October 14, 2014* (Tuesday) October 27, 2014 November 10, 2014 November 24, 2014 December 8, 2014 December 22, 2014

Council Meetings are held on the 2nd and 4th Monday of each month. *When a holiday lands on a Monday, the meeting is generally moved to the Tuesday. Council of the Whole Meetings commence at 8:30 a.m. followed by a Closed Session (if required). Regular Council Meetings commence at 7:00 p.m. Note: All meetings subject to cancellation if there are no business items. Background: Section 94 and 127 of the Community Charter require that Council adopt a schedule of the date, time and place of Regular Council meetings, and that this schedule be posted on the notice board at the Municipal Hall and published in a newspaper.


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Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

Youth make pies for food bank by Eric Scramstad

This December, the Summerland Asset Development Initiative Youth Club, together with the Legion and other volunteers from the community, helped

make around 100 pies for the Christmas hampers for the Summerland Food Bank. Thanks to all who came and gave a helping hand. This coming month, SADI will

hold a holiday party for members and their friends on Dec. 20 from 6 to 9 p.m. Bring an appetizer or a dessert please. During the holiday break, SADI will be closed from Dec. 23 to 27 and on New Year’s

Day, Jan. 1. Sign up to join SADI youth for boxing week shopping at Orchard Park Mall in Kelowna on Dec. 30. On Dec. 31 SADI youth will be going tobogganing. Please

bring your own sled if you can. On Jan. 2, SADI youth will go to Encore cinema in West Kelowna, choose from any movie being shown. On Jan. 3, join SADI youth as they

go up to Apex for the day. Day passes and rentals are on sale to go skiing and snowboarding or if you just want to stay in the village to try going tubing or ice skating. Please friend SADI

on Facebook to find out more what the youth club is up to this winter season. Eric Scramstad is the Youth Activities Coordinator at the Summerland Asset Development Initiative.

Helping you be a savvy energy user To further encourage energy conservation, FortisBC was required to implement the residential conservation rate — a two level rate structure. The two level rate structure explained kWh

Two level structure

Flat rate structure

2,500 2,000

Rate 2 13.54

cents/kWh

1,500

10.56

cents/kWh

1,000 500

Rate 1 9.09

cents/kWh

0 Interim rates as of January 1, 2014.

The first 1,600 kWh you use every two months are billed at a lower rate (9.09 cents). Your use above this amount is then billed at a higher rate (13.54 cents). If you use up to 2,500 kWh bimonthly, you’re paying less than you would if there was a flat rate (10.56 cents). Learn more at fortisbc.com/electricityrates.

Know what to expect Avoid seasonal fluctuations on your bill with FortisBC’s Equal Payment Plan.

Interesting facts:

71%

of our customers pay about the same or less under the residential conservation rate than they would under the previous flat rate structure.

0

The residential conservation rate is revenue neutral, meaning it does not increase FortisBC’s earnings.

Did you know? Your energy use increases in winter over summer by:1

Find ways to save

Since 1989, FortisBC PowerSense programs have helped customers save enough electricity to power:

FortisBC PowerSense has many no and low-cost home energy saving tips and programs designed to help you save. fortisbc.com/powersense

Keep the heat in Upgrading the insulation in your walls, basement and attic can reduce your energy bills by up to:

30% or 350/yr 2

$

1

LiveSmart BC rebates can help. fortisbc.com/livesmartbc

homes each year.

%

Why? Because on colder, darker winter days we: • turn up the thermostat • leave lights on longer • use space heaters

FYI

A sweater is better Set your thermostat to 20˚C when home and 17˚C when out or asleep.

Based on average 2012 electricity use for customers in FortisBC’s South Interior service area. 2 Source: http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/energy-efficiency/council-energy-ministers/188. FortisBC uses the FortisBC name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (13-372.2 12/2013) 1

35,000 We recently filed a progress report on the residential conservation rate with the BC Utilities Commission. Read the report at fortisbc.com/rcr or call us at 1-866-436-7847.


www.summerlandreview.com 9

Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

GRAND PRIZE $750 Shopping spree to be spent with the local participating merchants. A deluxe one night stay at the Summerland Waterfront Resort, a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Nesters Market, a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Summerland IGA and a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Zias Stonehouse.

Summerland

ENTRY FORMS AVAILABLE At: You could

Just Delicious

Japanese Bistro and Japanese grocery store

OPEN FOR LUNCH AND DINNER Gluten free menu available Patio open in Summer Lunch Specials

$30.00

Summerland • Sushi/Sashimi • Tempura • Teriyaki • Sake • Local Wine Selection

9917 Main Street, Summerland • 250-494-4692 • www.justdeliciousbistro.com

COUNTRY CORNER SUPPLIES

Summerland

Wagon Wheel Bistro Sponsored by: Contest closes December 14, 2013

WIN a Gift Certificate from the participating businesses.


10 www.summerlandreview.com

Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

www.summerlandreview.com 11

Dr. Grant Goods Dr. Kimberley Goods

Time for new eyeglasses?

SUMMERLAND

Please support our local Summerland Community Food Bank by dropping off non-perishable food items at Summerland IGA.

Stop by Summerland Optometry and check out our large frame selection and our everyday low prices

7519 Prairie Valley Rd. • Located in Summerfair Plaza

250-494-4376

Serving the Community of Summerland for over 37 years!

(250) 494-9266 13225 Victoria Rd. N. Summerland, BC

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8:00 am - 9:00 pm Locally owned and operated!

Santa buckS

Just Delicious

at

Japanese Bistro

Your Chance to Win

and Japanese grocery store

DECEMBER SPECIAL All Grocery Items

10% OFF

www.justdeliciousbistro.com menu on website

The

to be spent with the local participating merchants.

invites all our customers to come in to enter our draw to win a Shop Summerland $ 30.00 Gift Certificate. Whether you place a classified or display ad, renew or buy a new subscription you have a chance to win a $30.00 Gift Certificate or the main prize of $750.00 for the Shop Summerland Promotion.

Great selection for your last minute Christmas Shopping

Holiday Hours Sun., Dec. 22 - 9 am - 7 pm Mon., Dec. 23 - 8:30 am - 9 pm Tues., Dec. 24 - 8:30 am - 7 pm CLOSED December 25th - Chistmas Day Thurs., Dec. 26 - 10 am - 6 pm Tues., Dec. 31 - 10 am - 6 pm Wed., Jan 1 - 10am -6pm

10108 Jubilee Road 250-494-3155

ORINI T N S SA

Beyond Wrapture Day Spa

A deluxe one night stay at the Summerland Waterfront Resort, a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Nesters Market, a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Summerland IGA and a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Zias Stonehouse.

Contest closes December 14, 2013 COUNTRY CORNER SUPPLIES

at the Summerland Waterfront Resort

Cordially Invites You To...

We will be closed Dec. 24, 25, 26, 31, 2013 and Jan 1, 2014. See you in the New Year!

For a Traditional Christmas choose from our great selection of

Fresh Cut Christmas Trees Premium Fir - 2’ to 10’ tall as well as a good selection of artificial Christmas Trees pre-lit or plain

13008A Victoria Rd. North 12811 Lakeshore Drive South, Summerland, B.C. www.beyondwrapture.com 1.866.548.8899 or 250.448.8899

13229 HENRY AVE. • 250-494-7811

250-494-3063

you earn ONE Santa Buck

to be redeemed towards your food bill (excluding Tobacco products)

in the store the week of December 15th - 24th, 2013

open 7 days a week

1, c. De rts 013 2

9917 Main Street, Summerland • 250-494-4692

(excluding Tobacco products)

Sta

GRAND PRIZE $750 Shopping spree

A Gift Certificate from Just Delicious Bistro would be a welcome gift!

For every $25 spent

STONEHOUSE RESTAURANT Know which gift they really want for Christmas? Gift Certificate To From

Merry Christmas from Claude, Shannon, family and staff.

We are closed Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day. 14015 Rosedale Avenue Call for Reservations 250-494-1105 www.ziasstonehouse.com

Wagon Wheel Bistro European & Canadian Menu

Breakfast served all day • Lunch specials

ALL WEEK SPECIAL DEC. 13TH - DEC. 20TH

EGGNOG LATTE $3.50 LARGE MINTY MOCHA $3.95

250.494.8203 Winter Hours

Monday - Friday 8 am - 4 pm

9909 Main Street

7:30am - 9:00pm

Merry Christmas 13604the Victoria From staff Rd. and owners of

Summerland Monday - Saturday 9 am - 5:30 pm Sunday 10 am - 4 pm

BRING THISSeason COUPON IN Christmas Hours:

Monday 24 - 4 pm and spend $50.009 am(before taxes) Tuesday 25 CLOSED 26 CLOSED and receiveWednesday a FREE Thursday 27 CLOSED Thursday 1 CLOSED Kuraidori Curved Paring Knife. th

th

th

th

st

Offer expires Dec. 12, 2013. Limited Quantities

Great Gift Ideas for him or her this Season! Mon. - Sat. 9-5:30 PM ~ Sun. 10 - 4 PM

250-494-HOME (4663) Main Street Summerland


10 www.summerlandreview.com

Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

www.summerlandreview.com 11

Dr. Grant Goods Dr. Kimberley Goods

Time for new eyeglasses?

SUMMERLAND

Please support our local Summerland Community Food Bank by dropping off non-perishable food items at Summerland IGA.

Stop by Summerland Optometry and check out our large frame selection and our everyday low prices

7519 Prairie Valley Rd. • Located in Summerfair Plaza

250-494-4376

Serving the Community of Summerland for over 37 years!

(250) 494-9266 13225 Victoria Rd. N. Summerland, BC

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8:00 am - 9:00 pm Locally owned and operated!

Santa buckS

Just Delicious

at

Japanese Bistro

Your Chance to Win

and Japanese grocery store

DECEMBER SPECIAL All Grocery Items

10% OFF

www.justdeliciousbistro.com menu on website

The

to be spent with the local participating merchants.

invites all our customers to come in to enter our draw to win a Shop Summerland $ 30.00 Gift Certificate. Whether you place a classified or display ad, renew or buy a new subscription you have a chance to win a $30.00 Gift Certificate or the main prize of $750.00 for the Shop Summerland Promotion.

Great selection for your last minute Christmas Shopping

Holiday Hours Sun., Dec. 22 - 9 am - 7 pm Mon., Dec. 23 - 8:30 am - 9 pm Tues., Dec. 24 - 8:30 am - 7 pm CLOSED December 25th - Chistmas Day Thurs., Dec. 26 - 10 am - 6 pm Tues., Dec. 31 - 10 am - 6 pm Wed., Jan 1 - 10am -6pm

10108 Jubilee Road 250-494-3155

ORINI T N S SA

Beyond Wrapture Day Spa

A deluxe one night stay at the Summerland Waterfront Resort, a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Nesters Market, a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Summerland IGA and a $100.00 Gift Certificate to Zias Stonehouse.

Contest closes December 14, 2013 COUNTRY CORNER SUPPLIES

at the Summerland Waterfront Resort

Cordially Invites You To...

We will be closed Dec. 24, 25, 26, 31, 2013 and Jan 1, 2014. See you in the New Year!

For a Traditional Christmas choose from our great selection of

Fresh Cut Christmas Trees Premium Fir - 2’ to 10’ tall as well as a good selection of artificial Christmas Trees pre-lit or plain

13008A Victoria Rd. North 12811 Lakeshore Drive South, Summerland, B.C. www.beyondwrapture.com 1.866.548.8899 or 250.448.8899

13229 HENRY AVE. • 250-494-7811

250-494-3063

you earn ONE Santa Buck

to be redeemed towards your food bill (excluding Tobacco products)

in the store the week of December 15th - 24th, 2013

open 7 days a week

1, c. De rts 013 2

9917 Main Street, Summerland • 250-494-4692

(excluding Tobacco products)

Sta

GRAND PRIZE $750 Shopping spree

A Gift Certificate from Just Delicious Bistro would be a welcome gift!

For every $25 spent

STONEHOUSE RESTAURANT Know which gift they really want for Christmas? Gift Certificate To From

Merry Christmas from Claude, Shannon, family and staff.

We are closed Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day. 14015 Rosedale Avenue Call for Reservations 250-494-1105 www.ziasstonehouse.com

Wagon Wheel Bistro European & Canadian Menu

Breakfast served all day • Lunch specials

ALL WEEK SPECIAL DEC. 13TH - DEC. 20TH

EGGNOG LATTE $3.50 LARGE MINTY MOCHA $3.95

250.494.8203 Winter Hours

Monday - Friday 8 am - 4 pm

9909 Main Street

7:30am - 9:00pm

Merry Christmas 13604the Victoria From staff Rd. and owners of

Summerland Monday - Saturday 9 am - 5:30 pm Sunday 10 am - 4 pm

BRING THISSeason COUPON IN Christmas Hours:

Monday 24 - 4 pm and spend $50.009 am(before taxes) Tuesday 25 CLOSED 26 CLOSED and receiveWednesday a FREE Thursday 27 CLOSED Thursday 1 CLOSED Kuraidori Curved Paring Knife. th

th

th

th

st

Offer expires Dec. 12, 2013. Limited Quantities

Great Gift Ideas for him or her this Season! Mon. - Sat. 9-5:30 PM ~ Sun. 10 - 4 PM

250-494-HOME (4663) Main Street Summerland


12 www.summerlandreview.com

What’s up Summerland and region

Thursday

Al-Anon offers help to families and friends of alcoholics. Summerland Serenity Group meets Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. in the United Church hall. Call 250-490-9272 for more information. Beavers, Cubs, Scouts and Venturers meet at the Harold Simpson Memorial Youth Centre on Thursday evenings. Beavers meet from 6 to 7 p.m. Cubs meet from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Scouts meet from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Venturers meet

from 7:30 to 9 p.m. For details call Trent at 250494-1990. Be.Free, a 12-step Christ-centred recovery program that is not addiction specific, meets every Thursday at Summerland Alliance Church at 7 p.m. For more information contact the SAC office at 250-494-9975 and ask to speak to Pastor Rick. Come try your hand at an old art made new. The traditional Rug Hookers of the South Okanagan meet every Thursday from 1 to 4

SUMMERLAND

Ministerial Association

Church Page anglican church of st. stephen 9311 Prairie Valley Rd. (Stone Church in Summerland)

Sunday Services - 8:30 am & 10 am Office Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday - 9 am - 1 pm

250-494-3466 The Reverend Rick Paulin

www.summeranglican.ca modern clean banquet facility available

suMMerlanD baptist 10318 Elliott Street Two Services each Sunday 9:00am & 11:00am SBC Kids In Both Services Lead Pastor: Larry Schram Associate Pastor: Del Riemer For info or help call 250-494-3881 www.summerlandbaptist.ca

suMMerlanD pentecostal

9918 Julia Street Worship with us, Sunday at 10:30 am Loving God, Loving People Transitional Pastor: Rev. Dave Laity

250-494-8248 suMMerlanD uniteD church 13204 Henry Ave. Come Join The Circle

10:00 am Sunday Gathering with Children's Program Diversity, Respect, Community Service, Compassion. www.summerlandunited.bc.ca

suMMerlanD alliance

Real Life... Right Now! Morning Worship: 10:00am Children's Church & Nursery Be.Free Christ-centered 12-Step: Thurs @ 7 pm Pastor: Rev. Rick Gay Church Office: 250-494-9975

E p.m. at the Summerland Art Gallery on Main Street. Visitors always welcome. Lots of supplies available. Try your hand at this timeless art. For more information phone Marilyn at 250-494-6434 or Juliet at 250-494-1278. Euchre is played every second and fourth Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at the Seniors Drop-in Centre, 9710 Brown St. Lyme Disease support group meets on the second Thursday of the month at 1 p.m. at the A&W in Summerland. Everyone welcome. Pe a c h City Toastmasters meets Thursdays noon to 1 p.m. in Penticton at the United Church on Main and Eckhardt, Room 202. Call 250486-5313. Summerland Material Girls Quilt Guild meets the second and fourth Thursday of the month from September to May at 9 a.m. at the Harold Simpson Memorial Youth Centre, 9111 Peach Orchard Rd. For more information call Doris Flynn at 250-494-7262 or Annie Smirmaul at 250-4942286. Summerland Sportsmen’s Association meets every third Thursday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at Summerland Legion.The SSA focuses on fishing, shooting, hunting, archery and conservation and is affiliated with the B.C. Wildlife Federation. New members welcome. The Rug Hooking Circle meets every second and fourth Thursday of the month from noon to 3 p.m. at Leir House Arts and Cultural Centre, 220 Manor Park Ave., Penticton. Practice a traditional Canadian art form in a group setting. Host is certified teacher, fibre artist and published contributor Angela Possak. 250767-0206 or online rughookingteacher.ca. The Summerland Multiple Sclerosis Group meets on the first Thursday of every month at 10:30 a.m. at the MS office, 3373 Skaha Rd., Penticton. Everyone welcome. For more information call Sherry at 250-4936564. TOPS BC #725 Summerland meets every Thursday in the lower level of the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre, 9710 Brown St. Weigh-in is from 5:30

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to 6 p.m. and is followed by a meeting. For more information call Marlene Vancha at 250494-9565.

Friday

Bridge is played every Friday at 1 p.m. at the Seniors’ Drop-In Centre, 9710 Brown St. Phone 250-494-8164. Cribbage is played every Friday at 1:30 p.m. at the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre, 9710 Brown St. Tai Chi at the Seniors Drop-In Centre, Fridays at 10:30 a.m. and Tuesdays at 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Contact Nancy at 250-494-8902. The 890 Wing of the South Okanagan Air Force Association of Canada have a gettogether every Friday night from 4 p.m. at the clubhouse at 126 Dakota Ave. in Penticton. New members are welcome. For more information, phone Fred Monteith at 250-497-8490.

Saturday

Attention couples: The 2013-2014 season, sponsored by the Summerland Dance Club, has begun. Dances will be held at the Royal Canadian Legion’s Rosedale Room on Oct. 5, Nov. 9, Dec. 7, Jan. 11, Feb. 8, March 8, April 12 and May 10 from 8 to 11 p.m. Phone Anne Ling at 250-494-7168 or Ron Hack at 250486-6858 for more information.

Sunday

DivorceCare is for all who are suffering from the difficulties resulting from separation or divorce. Meeting at Summerland Baptist Church just inside the Victoria St. entrance on Sundays 5 to 7 p.m. A free course is offered. Please call 250-4943313 or just walk in. Jazz Vespers at St. Saviour’s Anglican Church in Penticton are held through the fall and winter on the third Sunday of each month at 4: 30 p.m. Vintage Car Club, South Okanagan Chapter, meets the last Sunday of every month at 2 p.m. in the Youth Centre on Peach Orchard Road. Anyone interested in vintage cars (cars which are 25 years or older) is invited to attend. For more information on the club phone 250-494-5473.

Monday

Dabber Bingo is played at the Senior Drop-in Centre, 9710 Brown St., every Monday at 1:30 p.m. 16 regular games, Lucky

s

Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

7, Odd/Even, Bonanza. Everyone is welcome. License #832873. Free Zumba classes for Summerland students Monday and Wednesday at Summerland Middle School gym from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Classes run to Dec. 18. Zumba is a Latin-inspired dance fitness program. Call 250-490-5639 for more information. Men — Love to Sing? Okanagan Christian Men’s Choir. This nondenominational choir invites you to join us, have fun, sing unto the Lord and enjoy the fellowship of other singers. Mondays 7 to 9 p.m. at Summerland Baptist Church, Fireside Room. For more information contact Hans at 250-494-7127. The South Okanagan Orchid Society meets the third Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Shatford Centre in Penticton. The group meets September to June. For more information, contact Joan at 250-494-4293. The Summerland Crokinole Club meets Monday nights at 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Summerland senior centre. Contact Darlene at 250-4949310.

Ave., Penticton. For more information, please visit www.pensar.com. Quest Society of Summerland meets on the third Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. in the meeting room at 9700 Brown St. (Parkdale Place). For more information phone Marilyn Topham at 250-4946434 or Joan Lansdell at 778-476-0596. South Okanagan Genealogical Society is open on Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Penticton Library Museum building. Contact Nola Reid at 250-492-0751. Summerland Kiwanis Club meets the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Kiwanis Lodge on Quinpool at 6 p.m. New members are welcome. Contact Tom Jacques at 250-494-4339. Summerland VIP (Visually Impaired Persons) members and friends meet the second Tuesday of the month at Parkdale Lounge. The Mental Wellness Centre, Summerland Branch, will be open the first, third and fourth Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to noon at the Summerland United Church. Inquiries welcome. Whist is played on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at 7 p.m. at the Seniors Drop-In Centre, 9710 Brown St.

Tuesday

Bridge games at St. Stephen’s Church Hall on Tuesdays beginning at 1 p.m. New players are always welcome. Refreshments served. Call 250-494-6116 or 250-494-5363. Dementia Caregiver Support Group meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.. at the IOOF Hall, 9536 Main St., Summerland. For information call Laurie Myres at 250-493-8182 or email lmyres@alzheimerbc.org. Summerland Caregiver Group meets on the first and third Tuesday of every month from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m. at the Summerland Health Centre. Call Julie Steele at 250-404-8072 for further information. Penticton Concert Band practices Tuesdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. New members welcome. Intermediate to advanced players. Call Gerald at 250-8092087. Penticton and District Search and Rescue is looking to fill some volunteer positions. There will be a recruitment open house on Tuesday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. at the SAR building, 251 Dawson

Wednesday

Summerland Air Cadets parade Wednesday nights, 18:15 to 21:30 hours at Harold Simpson Memorial Youth Centre, 9111 Peach Orchard Rd. All youth aged 12 to 18 welcome. Call the Air Cadet office at 250494-7988. Summerland Art Club meets every Wednesday, September to June, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the lower level of the Summerland Library on Wharton Street. Painters of all levels are welcome. Workshops available. For information call Mary at 250-494-5851. Summerland ATV Club meets on the first Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Summerland Library lower level. The club promotes responsible ridership including registration, insurance, safety certification and scheduled pleasure rides. Membership includes orchardists, farmers, ranchers and fun seekers of all ages

including those with disabilities. The Summerland Badminton Club plays every Wednesday at 7 p.m. all year. Shaun at 250-494-1513.

Upcoming

Monday, Wednesday and Friday of each week, Recope Society of Summerland offers medically supervised water therapy and land exercise programs helpful to clients with various medical conditions, such as joint replacements, stroke, back problems, arthritis, to name just a few. A medical referral is required. Call Maureen at 250-494-9006. Oldtimer Hockey Group for ages 55 to 85+ plays Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 8 to 9:30 a.m. For registration and details contact Wayne at 250-4947460. One-to-one dietitian and nurse appointments at Summerland Health Centre, 12815 Atkinson St., are available for people with diabetes or heart disease. The sessions can provide extra help with issues including learning about diabetes or heart health and how to manage the condition; understanding medication and starting or adjusting insulin; meter certification and how to use meter results; setting small, specific goals; tobacco dependence counselling and support in quitting; and solving problems with chronic conditions. To make an appointment call 250-770-3530 or 1-800-707-8550. Summerland Bakers is a new, fun baking club where it doesn’t matter if it didn’t turn out perfectly; we’ll eat it anyway! We meet monthly to share our creations, eat, laugh and take home heaps of leftovers. Email Sophia at pleasebringcake@ gmail.com for more information or join Summerland Bakers on Facebook. The Summerland Museum is creating a new Summerland wedding album and is in need of pictures. Bring in your wedding or anniversary photo for museum staff to scan and put into the album. The museum would also appreciate names, date and place of wedding and, any family history you would like to share. The museum is at 9521 Wharton St.


Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

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Carolling

Members of the 70-voice Summerland Community Choir performed at a flash mob in Penticton at Cherry Lane Mall and at Wal-Mart. The carollers, wearing scarves, included Dave Gregory, Rita Sundvick and Ericka Virgint.

Reviewing B.C.’s Liquor Policy In my last report, I mentioned the opportunity to provide input on the B.C. Liquor Policy Review. During the course of the review, my colleague, Parliamentary Secretary John Yap, met with a substantial number of interested stakeholders, including many from right here in the Okanagan. Overall, the review received more than 3,500 emails and 4,300 comments, an encouraging level of public participation. The recommendations have been forwarded to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General, Suzanne Anton. I have previously expressed my desire to see greater public reporting on individual MLA office expenses. The Comptroller of the B.C. Legislature has been working with MLA offices across the province towards a higher standard for public information. I look forward to seeing this long overdue process implemented as soon as possible. As the Chair of the Select Standing Committee on Finance and Government Services, our bipartisan committee held seventeen hearings in communities throughout B.C., including in Penticton.  In addition to public hearings, we received written comments and online sur-

veys, totalling nearly 700 submissions. The public consultation process culminated in a public report that made 73 recommendations to the Minister of Finance, available on the Legislature’s website. The top recommendation of the committee was that the B.C. Government must maintain a balanced budget and control spending, to keep our province on strong economic footing. We heard from numerous groups and individuals in every corner of the province; the most important priority for our government is to be responsible with taxpayers’ dollars. The report is a good read and is available online at bit.ly/1dVrron. It was important to me that our bipartisan committee work together and focus on the job that British Columbians elected us to do. In the spirit of cooperation, I was very pleased to see our report supported unanimously by committee members from both the Government and the Opposition. I would like to sincerely thank the other members of the committee, including the Clerks of the Committee and Legislative staff, who spent a great deal of time away from their families.  It is also important to recognize the many British Columbians who

took the time to submit suggestions, and actively participate in the future of our province. I am also involved with the B.C. Core Review, led by Minister Bill Bennett. Local residents of Penticton and the surrounding area will be familiar with this process, as Penticton’s Core Services Review has been widely recognized across British Columbia as an important process to find greater efficiencies in local government. Recently, the first decision made as a result of the Core Review process was announced, determining that the work done by the Pacific Carbon Trust and the B.C. Provincial Capital Commission will be transitioned into government and the bodies themselves will be dissolved, with a combined annual savings of roughly $6.6 million. The purpose of core review is to ensure the best possible use of government resources and respect for the interests of taxpayers, and these actions accomplish that goal. While there has been much speculation that the Agricultural Land Commission will be eliminated under core review, Minister Bennett was clear that the ALC will remain an independent entity, separate from government.  Further

Victoria Views

Dan Ashton updates on the Core Review process will be provided as they become available. November has been a busy but exciting month as your MLA. Please come

and visit the constituency office, located in Penticton at #210 – 300 Riverside Drive, or call with any questions or concerns at 250-487-4400. With the Christmas and holiday season almost upon us, please consider extending a helping hand to those in need. From the Ashton family and the staff at the constituency office, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Healthy and Happy New Year. Dan Ashton is the MLA for the riding of Penticton.

SEASON’S GREETINGS To our many fine customers and friends, we extend our very best wishes for a season filled with joy. Thanks for a great 51st year!

CHRISTMAS HOURS:

Open until 5:00pm daily until December 23 Open December 24, 9:30am - 3:00pm Closed Christmas and Boxing Day Open December 27-31, 10:00am - 4:00pm Closed January 1, 2014

www.summerlandreview.com 13

We find ourselves at the close of another year and I look back with gratitude. I am thankful for a loving family and friends, a great team that makes work feel like fun every day, great patients that feel like my extended family, and the best community to enjoy all of it in! I wish you all the joys of the season! From our family to yours,

Merry Christmas!

Dr. Cindee Melashenko

10098 Jubilee Rd W (corner of Kelly Ave & Jubilee)

250.494.8545 www.goldenpeach.net welcome@goldenpeach.net


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Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

Steam earn win in overtime action It was a winning weekend for the Summerland Steam as the team earned a pair of victories. The Junior B hockey team members flaunted their offensive talent in a Friday evening matchup against the visiting Castlegar Rebels, downing them 8-4 on the strength of some very strong offensive play. Newcomer Riley

Hunt led the way with a highlight reel, shorthanded goal early in the first and the Steam never looked back. Up 5-1 by the end of the second, they cruised to a solid 8-4 win as the two teams traded goals in the third frame. Daylan Roberston and Reid Brown potted two goals a piece, and Michael Winnitoy recorded a team high three points on the evening with a goal and 2 assists. Darren Hogg, in his first game back after a lower body  injury, was solid between the pipes, turning away 34 shots. On Sunday, the Steam took to the

Overtime goal

Sam Nigg waves to fans and KIJHL president, Bill Ohlhausen, after burying the winner in the second period of overtime for a win over the Kamloops Storm on Sunday.

ice again, the league Kamloops who were a 12-game

hosting leading Storm, sporting winning

streak. The teams came out skating hard; it was a physical and back and forth period

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with both sides trading chances, but neither finding the net. The second period was a wild one.   After Kamloops jumped out to a 3-0 lead by the middle of the period, the Steam stepped up and bat-

tled back hard. With 20 seconds to go in the frame, Sam Nigg buried one after a spectacular rush and narrowed Kamloops lead to 4-3.   The third period played out like the first with no scoring

until Kamloops took a tripping penalty with 1:28 to play. With the goalie out, the Steam played six on four until Kienan Scott roofed a rebound with 20 seconds remaining. After five minutes of four on four in the first period of overtime, the score remained knotted at 4-4. Then at 4:07, in the three on three second period of overtime, it was Nigg who thrilled the crowd once again with a nifty one on one move and quick screen shot that eluded the Kamloops netminder for the dramatic win. The Steam travel to Kamloops for a rematch next Saturday and then they place host to Spokane back in Summerland on Sunday.

Bobsleigh team competes in Utah Team Kripps continues to impress on the World Cup Bobsleigh Circuit. This past weekend World Cup #2 was held at Park City Utah, home of the 2002 Olympic Games. A cold front hit the area early on Friday, making conditions challenging, dry but extremely cold. Canada #3 (Justin Kripps and Bryan Barnett) proved they are a force to be reckoned with as they produced two consistent runs to place eighth. They rocketed past all three Russian teams, two of the German teams and Canada #2 to produce their best finish ever. The next day the snow moved in and the four-man race was held in near blizzard conditions. Again Canada #3, Team Kripps (Kripps, James McNaughton, Tim Randall and Barnett) demonstrated skill and consistency, finishing in ninth place, only   5/100th of a second behind Canada #2 in seventh place, and ahead of Canada#1 in 11th place. 

Training

Photo by Lascelles Brown

Justin Kripps and Bryan Barnett train for the two-man bobsleigh event.

USA #1 took the gold medal but USA #2 and #3 were well back in 13th and 15th places. Kripps is “very happy with our team and the runs,” but says “there is still lots of room for improvement and we know what to work on. We are very happy to be currently ranked

eighth in World Cup standings for fourman, and we hope to improve on our 11th standing in twoman.” The bobsledders move on to Lake Placid, New York this coming weekend for the next World Cup event. Full results can be found at www. fibt.com


Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

Summerland hosts stick curling event Summerland hosted the third annual Stick Curling Open Bonspiel last Saturday with 16 teams from Enderby, Salmon Arm, Armstrong, Kelowna, Vernon, Penticton and Summerland. As in years past,

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the Armstrong teams took most of the prize money. The Summerland teams of Hector Cartier/John Nicolson and Bill Moffat/ Murray Brown came second and fourth and in the “A” Division.

Scoreboard Curling Summerland Curling Club Results: Dec. 2 to 6 Monday morning senior men: Paul Cowen defeated Doug Steinke, Warren Parker defeated Bob Ezart , Stan Green defeated Hector Cartier, Lionel Coleman defeated Dale Abrey. Monday evening men: Brian Hodgson defeated Ken Rae, Stan Green defeated Gary Raymond, Steve Clement defeated Mike Lemke, Dale Abrey defeated Rick Drewnisz. Tuesday morning mixed: Jerry Lidin defeated Bob Ezart, Ev Gillespie defeated Bill Penman, Barb Ezart defeated Ian Rogers, Jim Hunt defeated Hector Cartier. Tuesday evening ladies: Betty Raymond defeated Harlene Knorr, Gail Ostaficiuk tied Lil Blashko, Judy Beck defeated Bev Skinner, Wendi Archer defeated Diana Leitch. Wednesday morning senior men: Warren Parker defeated Doug Steinke, Dale Abrey defeated Paul Cowen, Stan Green defeated Bob Ezart, Hector Cartier defeated Lionel Coleman. Wednesday evening men: Gary Wingerak defeated Eric Cooper, Dave Gartrell defeated Bob Walker, Louie Costa defeated Rick Drewnisz, Gary Raymond defeated Ken Rae. Wednesday late evening: Glen Brennan defeated Dave Tether. Thursday evening ladies: Diana Leitch defeated Bev Skinner, Betty Raymond defeated Rose McNeill, RoseMarie Fenrich defeated Ev Gillespie. Thursday afternoon senior men: Bob Ezart defeated Doug Steinke, Warren Parker defeated Dale Abrey, Hector Cartier defeated Paul Cowen, Stan Green defeated Lionel Coleman. Thursday evening open: Dale Abrey defeated Tony Blashko, Ken Rae tied Doug Patan, Eric Johnson defeated Russ Lemke, John Egyed defeated Glen Brennan. Thursday late evening: Jared St. John defeated Gary Raymond. Friday evening mixed: Dave Hood defeated Gavin Griffiths, Allen Tower tied Tracy Waddington, Blair Stuckey defeated Ian Rogers, Patty Eldridge tied Dan Laktin. Friday late evening mixed: Bob Wareham defeated Val Utigard, Sue Woods defeated Bonnie Young, Steve Favel defeated Louie Costa. Tip of the week: After all eight stones are thrown, the stones closest to the centre of button score, no stones are moved until the thirds decide the score.

Practice road safety Watch for pedestrians at crosswalks and around playground zones.

Tournament action

Summerland Atom Jets (Team #2) had a great weekend in Armstrong Nov. 22 to 24 when they participated in their first tournament of the season. After two wins, a tie and a loss, the team placed seventh overall. From the back are coach Dan St. Hilaire, safety person Paul Girard and manager Carmen Eberle, In the middle from left are Levi Doerksen, Brett Cerutti,  Connor McWatters, Logan Gottwald, Matthew Lowery, Kaylee Bird and Samuel Fortin. In front from left are Sydney St. Hilaire, Holden Girard, Andrew Read, Caitlyn Riddle, Logan Miller, Max Havers and Joshua Newton.

Basketball team competes during weekend tourney The Summerland Secondary Junior Boys basketball team bounced back from a tough loss to Princess Margaret last Thursday in early league action with a more spirited effort in a weekend tournament in Barriere. The tourney began with a game against Valleyview from Kamloops. The Junior Rockets dominated early and it proved to be a good first game with everyone on the team getting lots of floor time. The team pulled out   a 52-40 win and top scorers were Jared Breitkreuz with 16 points, Landon Brickenden with 15, Scott Richards contributed 10 and Shane Fofonoff with six.    Fofonoff was chosen as the game star as he was playing hard on defence, he lead the fast break many times, and trying still to shake that flu bug that he has had for over a week. Not easy to do.

The next game saw the Rockets go up against Pemberton, the team that beat them in the final of this tournament last year.   With improved defence and more intense team play, the team   easily defeated Pemberton by a score of 51-26. The top scorers in this one were Jared Breitkreuz with 21 points, Landon Brickenden with 14, and Shane Fofonoff, Spencer McIntosh, Scott Richards and Rylan van der Meulen with four points each.    Breitkreuz was chosen as the game star for this one as he was constantly leading the fast break, and his drives to the hoop helped to generate a lot of offence for the team. As a result of this win, the Rockets   made it to the final to play the host Barriere team — and battle the large crowd that came out to watch. They were ahead

at the first quarter, and tied 30-30 at the half, but in the second half Barriere was extremely hot with their shooting, while the Rockets cooled off a little.    The Barriere team   were shooting in the 55 to 60 per cent range, a pretty amazing feat in basketball. In the end, despite the Rockets strong efforts,  they lost 61-53.   The top scorers were Brickenden with an impressive 34 points, earning him the game star for this match. Breitkreuz added 10 points and Richards and McIntosh scored four points each. As a result of placing second, the team brought home a large second place trophy, and Brickenden was chosen to the tourney all-star team and was awarded the tourney MVP. All in all, a solid effort for the team and a great character builder in the early part of the season.

Summerland Steam Junior Hockey Club www.summerlandsteam.com

FEATURED PLAYER OF THE WEEK

#31 Brett Huber

Brett Huber (nicknamed Hubes) is 5’10” and weighs 175 lbs. His hometown is Calgary. He was born in 1994 and started playing hockey in 1997 at the Timbits level. He is currently in his second season playing goalie with the Summerland Steam. Brett’s favourite hockey memory is the Alberta Cup, Top 80 U16. His favourite pre-game meal is Kraft dinner. His favourite movie is 8 Mile, and his favourite song is “23” by Miley Cyrus. His favourite saying is, “Well done is better than well said.” In addition to playing hockey, Brett likes hanging out with the boys. He thinks the best thing about Summerland is the Summerland Steam. HOME GAME SCHEDULE

Dec. 15 Spokane Braves ~ 2pm Dec. 20 Chase Heat ~ 7:30pm Dec. 21 Kelowna Chiefs ~ 7:30pm SPONSORED BY:

Dine in or Take Out Open Tues. - Sat. at 4pm (250) 494-8711 Reservations Recommended

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Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

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Announcements

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Funeral Homes

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Credible Cremation

Philippine Disaster Relief Japanese dinner at the Holy Child Catholic Church hall. Dec 30, 2013, 6pm.

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

DABBER BINGO, Seniors Centre, 9710 Brown. Every Monday, 1:30PM. 16 regular games, Lucky 7, Odd/Even, Bonanza. Everyone welcome. License #832873.

Services Ltd.

Information

Lesley H. Luff Senior/Owner Licensed Director

NOTICE

Sensible pricing for practical people.

$990 + taxes

Basic Cremation No hidden costs.

24 Hrs 250-493-3912 New Location 101-596 Martin St., Penticton V2A 5L4 (corner of Martin and White)

www.crediblecremation.com

In Memoriam In loving memory of our dear mother & friend, Alice Wilson, who died December 18, 1994. The family & Joan Watson

Obituaries

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New to Summerland? - New Baby?

We’re proud to Welcome You Contact: Sheila Kuhre 250-494-4171

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca

Obituaries

Information

&

Obituaries

BEATON

Obituaries

Norman George

Obituaries

BURGESS (Powell)

Joyce Marianne Born September 12, 1919 in Paynton, Saskatchewan. Pre deceased by his loving wife, Lilian in 2008. Norman was born in a farm house on the prairies. He served in the Canadian Air Force from 1939-1946 and rose to the rank of Flying Officer during which time he met the love of his life Lilian. They returned from England to the family farm where he and Lilian lived until 1968. He served on the Paynton Municipal Council for several years.

Hague, Norman

May 5, 1954 - November 23, 2013 Hague, Norm Anthony, passed away peacefully on November 23, 2013 at the age of 59 years. He will be remembered and sadly missed by his loving wife, Lorraine Hague and daughters, Justine Hague and Courtney Hague. Norm’s witty sense of humour and kind heart will be greatly missed. Memorial tributes may be made to the Heart & Stroke Foundation, 4-1551, Sutherland Avenue, Kelowna, BC V1Y 9M9. Condolences may be sent to the family through www.providencefuneralhomes.com

Providence

In 1968 they moved to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and purchased MacKenzie’s Funeral Chapel. They resided in Prince Albert until retiring to Summerland in 1989. Norman was a long serving member of the Canadian Legion, the IOF, the Eastern Star and the Masons. Norman was an enthusiastic member of the GWRRA. Norman will be lovingly missed by his three sons; Chris (Barb) of Summerland BC, Derek (Joanne ) of Edmonton Alberta and Colin (Susan) of Dubai, UAE, six grandchildren; Jason (Paula), Shawndra (Bill), Connor, Sarah, Mark, Emma and three great grandchildren; Kurt, Peyton and Kai. A private family graveside service was held at Canyon View Cemetery in Summerland. A Celebration of Norm’s life will be held at the Summerland Legion on December 30, 2013 at 2:00 PM. Memorial Donations in Norm’s memory may be sent to the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #22, Summerland. Flowers are gratefully declined. Condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.hansonsfuneral.ca.

“Every Life Tells A Story”

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July 13, 1922 - Dec. 5, 2013

It is with much sadness that we announce the passing of Joyce Marianne (Powell) Burgess at the age of 91. Joyce was predeceased by her first husband Pat Powell in 1980, her sister Jean and brother Harry. She is survived by her husband Thomas William (Bill) Burgess, her children: Jennifer Maranduk, Dennis Powell (Pia), Patricia Johns (Rick), and Nicky-Jean Powell (Terry). She is also survived by her grandchildren: Carla McBeth (Gord), Jodie Copp, Thomas Kennedy, Heather Pederson (Nigel), Graydon Powell, Tansy Powell, Robin Pridy (Miles), Leif Priday (Jenn) and five great-grandchildren Dane McBeth, Cade McBeth, Jonah Copp, Juno Willey and Marvin Willey. She is also survived by many nieces and nephews. Joyce was born in Aberystwyth, Wales and emigrated to Canada from England in 1944 with her first husband Pat Powell. She was proud of her career as a registered nurse working in several hospitals and medical offices, including Copper Mountain, Hope, Campbell River and finally as a Director of Nurses in Summerland where she retired. She and Bill were married in Summerland and moved to Sheridan Lake in the Cariboo and then to 100 Mile House. Mom was an excellent quilter and crafter. She was a caring and loving wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. We miss her more than words can express. “Without a Shepherd, sheep are not a flock” No service by request. If you wish, donations can be made to Fischer Place - South Cariboo Health Foundation, Bag 399 100 Mile House, BC V0K 2E0 or the charity of your choice. 100 Mile Funeral Service Ltd. entrusted with the arrangements. 1-877-595-3243 Condolences can be sent to the family care of 100milefuneralservice@gmail.com

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Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

Engagements

Travel

Engagements

Schindel Kaufhold

www.summerlandreview.com 17

Trades, Technical

Legal Services

Pet Services

Misc. for Sale

AVAILABLE immediately for busy Volvo/Mack/HINO dealership located in KELOWNA, BC. Journeyman or equivelant experienced mechanic. Full time with competitive wages and benefits. Volvo/Mack an asset but will consider other OEM experience as equivelant. Forward resumes to jdiesel1@telus.net. or service@gemmdiesel.com Suitable applicants will be contacted for an interview. GPRC, FAIRVIEW Campus, Alberta needs Power Engineering Instructors. No teaching experience, no problem. Please contact Brian Carreau at 780-835-6631 and/or visit our website: www.gprc.ab.ca

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

Happy Hounds Homestay, not your ordinary kennel. Daycare &/or overnight. 250-809-1851 happyhoundshomestay.com

STEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or visit us online at: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

FIND A FRIEND

Appliances

Carriers Needed

2 Days a Week - Early Mornings

Summerland Area For more info please call the Circulation Department or email: circulation@pentictonwesternnews.com

250-492-0444 Ext: 219 or 205

Employment Business Opportunities GET FREE vending machines can earn $100,000.00 + per year. All cash-retire in just 3 years. Protected territories. Full details call now 1-866668-6629. Or visit us online at: www.tcvend.com

Help Wanted Experienced parts person required immediately for James Western Star in Williams Lake. Full time, competitive wages, benefits and signing bonus. Fax resume to 250-398-6367 or email: nwejr@jamesws.com

GENERAL LABOURERS

OIL & GAS INDUSTRY GUARANTEED Job Placement

• Labourers • Tradesmen • Class 1 Drivers

Call 24Hr. Free Recorded Message 1-888-213-2854

www.blackpress.ca

JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages from $32/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. Website: hannachrysler.ca. Fax 403-854-2845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

Services

Financial Services DROWNING IN debt? Cut debts more than 60% & debt free in half the time! Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll free 1-877-556-3500 BBB Rated A+ GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161. Your CHIP reverse mortgage rep is local at 250-809-1433.

Merchandise for Sale NEW & REBUILT APPLIANCES

HUGE SELECTION - LOWEST PRICES Rebuilt Appliances with Full Warranties

WASHERS from $299 WASHER/DRYER sets from $449 FRIDGES from $299 RANGES Ask about our from $299 6 month buyback

HD MECHANIC. Noble Tractor & Equip. is seeking a Journeyman or 4th year apprentice Service Technician for our Armstrong location. A self-starter with Ag tech background is desired. Interested candidates send resume to: nobletractor@telus.net, or mail: Noble Tractor & Equip, 4193 Noble Rd, Armstrong, BC V0E 1B4, fax: 250-546-3165

CENTURY PLAZA HOTEL Best Rates. 1.800.663.1818

Be Part of Our Team.

Merchandise for Sale

Timeshare

Travel

Help Wanted

Pets & Livestock

CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No risk program. Stop mortgage and maintenance Payments today. 100% money back guarantee. Free consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

We’re happy to announce the engagement of Dave Schindel, son of Wendy & Jerry Schindel, to Nicole Kaufhold; daughter of Sandi and Charlie Kaufhold, all of Summerland. Wedding to take place in the summer of 2014.

Help Wanted

Services

Employment

493-3011

492-7236

#180-1652 Fairview Rd

(across from Home Hardware)

STEEL BUILDING. “The big year end clear out!” 20x22 $4,259. 25x24 $4,684. 30x34 $6,895. 35x36 $9,190. 40x48 $12,526. 47x70 $17,200. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422 or online: www.pioneersteel.ca

Misc. Wanted Local Coin Collector Buying Collections, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins etc 250-499-0251 We pay cash! Bring in your unwanted or broken jewelry, gold dental crowns, silver cutlery and tea sets, Canadian and US silver coins, and war medals to Summerland Gold and Silver Exchange. We pay the highest prices! 13209 Victoria Road beside The Sweet Tooth. Locally owned and operated. 778-516-5888.

Free Items Medical Health VIAGRA 100mg or CIALIS 20mg. Generic. 40 tabs + 10 Free all for $99 including Free Shipping. Discreet, Fast Shipping. 1-888-836-0780 or metromeds.net

Super friendly cat, black and white, does not get along with other animals but loves people. Free to a good home. 778-516-0914

Fruit & Vegetables

Musical Instruments

Homemade apple juice. Certified. 5 litre box, $11.00 each. Phone 250-494-9372.

GUITAR & UKULELE LESSONS

Misc Services

Furniture

Christmas!! I can help set up your tree & decorations. Text Kathy(S’land) 250-809-4354 or email harber851@gmail.com

XMAS COMPANY COMING BRAND NEW QUEEN SET $200. Still in plastic, mfg. warranty. 250.870.2562

JAM NIGHTS SONGWRITING CIRCLE

Misc. for Sale

Painting & Decorating WWW.PAINTSPECIAL.COM

(1) 250-899-3163

3 Rooms For $299, 2 Coats Any Colour

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls. Cloverdale Premium Quality Paint. NO PAYMENT, until job is completed!

4 mud & snow tires, P175 70R13 820 on 4-hole rims. $125 OBO. 250-494-5484. 7’ artificial Christmas tree, $60. Summerland, cell phone 250-328-9646. HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper?

Summerland Sounds

250-494-8323

Real Estate Acreage for Sale 5.26 Acres Water, Power Private Paved Road, Mountain View awyler@xplornet.com 403-702-1622

SERVICE & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY QUALITY residential/commercial storage, Professional Wine Vaults, rates from $15.00/month 250-494-5444 • 9400 Cedar Ave. www.aaministoragewinecellar.com

DID YOU KNOW THAT...

...we ...we have contribute the best funds prices annually in town? to local Everysports Day! andCome to ourandRegional check usHospital? out!

14205 Rosedale Ave. • 250-494-9781 Specializing in flowers for every occasion

www.martinsflowers.com SUMMERLAND

#3-13604 Victoria Rd. N. in the Sungate Plaza

250-494-5432 or 1-877-494-5432 Flowers Sent Worldwide

Summerland residents turn to the pages of this paper to find professional and reliable local companies and service providers. To add it to your marketing mix, call 250-494-5406


18 www.summerlandreview.com

Transportation

Real Estate Mobile Homes & Parks

Thursday, December 12, 2013 Summerland Review

Auto Financing Auto

Financing

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HUGE DISCOUNTS on Canadian SRI homes. Order before interest rates jump! Immediate delivery or order now and lock in your savings. Call Don or Jesse at 1-866766-2214. Show homes & factory tours only at Lake Country Modular, 515 Beaver Lake Road, Kelowna. www.LCMhomes.com

Rentals Duplex / 4 Plex 1/2 duplex in S’land. Spacious 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath. Central location. NS, NP. $1000/mo + util. Avail Feb 1. Ref’s req’d. Phone 250-494-9081.

FIND A FRIEND

Affordable one bdrm duplex in Summerland. Close to town. Rent $550, utilities not included. Contact 250-494-0175 or 250-494-9757. Avail Jan 1.

Homes for Rent 2 bdrm fully furnished home in lower town across from beach. Avail Dec 1. Full time rental. $900/mo. Bill at 250-488-0393. 3 bdrm, 3 bath house in rural setting close to town. F/S, dishwasher, carport. NS. $1500/mo + util. Avail immed. Phone 250-494-4120.

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Suites, Lower Summerland Large 2 bdrm bsmt suite. Recent reno, lg windows, W/D, new F/S, walk to downtown. NP, NS. $700/mo + util. Call (new number) 403-235-5507.

Cars - Domestic 1979 CJ7 6-cylinder Jeep in running condition. Best offer. 250-494-5484.

Transportation

Auto Financing Need A Vehicle! Guaranteed Auto Loan. Apply Now, 1.877.680.1231 www.UapplyUdrive.ca

Trucks & Vans 1990 Chevy 1/2 ton pick-up short box, extra cab. Power steering, power brakes, dual fuel, winter & summer tires. 1988 5th wheel trailer, 25’, A/C & awning. Good condition. $6800 for both, OBO. Phone 778-516-0182.

Legal

Legal Notices Tarynn Parker. Contents of B34 will be sold on or before Dec 31,2013 for non-payment of rent. A & A Mini Storage. 250-494-5444

Auto Services

• Volkswagen & Import alley Repair Specialists • Auto Sales est • Used Auto Parts AUTOMOTIVE LTD.

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Summerland Review Thursday, December 12, 2013

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Sketch comedy raises funds for typhoon victims Why not start your weekend off with a little sketch comedy courtesy of Summerland Secondary School and help victims of Typhoon Haiyan at the same time? Students from the high school will be putting on a series of comedy sketches this Friday night at 7 p.m. at Centre Stage Theatre with all proceeds going to Philippine relief efforts. The Christmas season brings all sorts of special events with it. The Festival of Lights, various musical concerts, plays, the residential light up contest and the special Christmas trains run by the Kettle Valley Steam Railway. Apparently these Christmas runs were so popular this year that they added another one. These trains are a wonderful opportunity to see our community from a totally different perspective. You can enjoy Christmas lights, see snow covered vineyards and orchards and gain a glimpse into a bygone era when steam trains were how we shipped apples, peaches and other fruit to market and how Summerlanders traveled to the coast. Not only does the KVSR keep an important part of our cultural history alive they are a major tourist draw and therefore have an important impact on our community’s economic well

Arts PAlette

David Finnis being. Speaking of money approximately $1,100 was raised from ticket sales at The Christmas Carol, last Friday for the Summerland Food Bank and Resource Centre. If you missed a Christmas Carol (rumour has it this performance may become an annual tradition in Summerland) why not check out the classic Christmas show Miracle on 39th Street. This play is at St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Penticton December 13 and 14 at 7 p.m. and this Sunday, Dec. 15 at 2 p.m. Another classic of the season will be at the Cleland Theatre on Dec. 19 when the Okanagan Symphony Orchestra, a wonderful quartet of soloists and the OSO Chorus present Handel’s Messiah. Closer to home there will be an old fashioned carol singalong at Lakeside Presbyterian Church in historic Lowertown at 2 p.m. on Christmas Eve afternoon. Hear your favourite carols, the Quicksilver Flute Choir and

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the church’s magnificent organ. ooo If you know of an event you feel should be included in the Arts Palette or on the Arts Council’s online calendar, please email artspalette@summerlandarts.com or call 250-404-3225. The SCAC online Event Calendar is on the “News” page of summerlandarts.com Additional information can be found at facebook.com/SummerlandArts Keep up with current news by following @ artspalette The Arts Palette is written by David Finnis, Publicity Chair and President of the Summerland Community Arts Council, P.O. Box 1217, 9533 Main St., Summerland, B.C. V0H 1Z0.

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www.summerlandreview.com 19

A meeting with Santa

Hannah Ruttan, nine years old, tells Santa what is on her wish list during a special event which was held at the Summerland Legion on Sunday.

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Thursday, December 12, 2013  Summerland Review

Colin Powell, Owner IGA Summerland, Ingrid Wuensche of the Summerland Community Food Bank and Tye Powell.

IGA Summerland is proud to donate $903.00 to the Summerland Community Food Bank. Thank You to the Community of Summerland for supporting our barbeque at the Festival of Lights, with all the proceeds going to the Summerland Community Food Bank.

IGA would like to thank our loyal customers for their ongoing support and wish everyone a Safe and Enjoyable Holiday Season. 7519 Prairie Valley Rd., Located in Summerfair Plaza

250-494-4376 Serving the Community of Summerland for Over 37 Years!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8:00 am - 9:00 pm Locally Owned and Operated!

Summerland Review, December 12, 2013  

December 12, 2013 edition of the Summerland Review

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