Page 1

Tears and smiles

Cool cash

Father Jean-Marie Mouchet, Yukon’s beloved skiing priest, has passed away at 96.

Team Hilderman took first to win the Polar Eyes Cashspiel Sunday.

Pages 38-39

Page 68

Your Community Connection

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Friday, December 6, 2013

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Montessori Borealis pre-schoolers Gillian Ellis, left, Thomas Koepke and Mischa Ng-Schmidt brave the cold while sledding at Shipyards Park. Temperatures are expected to rise over the weekend.

Patrick Rouble’s return PAGE 7 Tenderized for your consumption.

VOLUME 53 • NUMBER 96

www.yukon-news.com


2

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Yukon Forum debate sours

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ukon’s legislative assembly has little to show for a 3.5hour debate on co-operation with First Nations. Wednesday’s motion was brought forward by interim Liberal Leader Sandy Silver, and it urged the government to set a date for the next Yukon Forum. The forum was established in 2006 by the Cooperation in Governance Act. Its purpose is for Yukon and First Nation governments to “discuss issues of common concern and identify opportunities and common priorities for co-operative action,” according to the act. The act also specifies that four meetings of the forum will be held each year, unless more or fewer are agreed upon. But only one forum has been held since Premier Darrell Pasloski’s Yukon Party government came to power in the fall of 2011. The government announced it had reached a new resource royalty deal in October 2012, and said the details would come out at the next Yukon Forum. The deal has still not been finalized. Chiefs gathered in Whitehorse in December of 2012 under the expectation that a Yukon Forum would take place. None did. The premier later said that

no formal notification of a forum had been given, and the chiefs had gathered independently for a separate meeting. In the legislature Wednesday, Pasloski said that the forum was intended to be a place to celebrate co-operation, not work towards it. “The forum was not intended to be a hall of debate. Certainly constructive debate is a component of forum discussions, as it is a component of most government-to-government discussions. But the forum was never intended to be a venue for parties to air their grievances against one another. It was intended to be a venue in which to celebrate our mutual successes, move forward our shared opportunities and agree on shared priorities. That is what the Yukon Forum is.” He listed, at length, work that continues in other areas of government in co-operation with First Nations. Pasloski also criticized the motion for failing to acknowledge that it is not up to the government to unilaterally set a date for the forum. Accordingly, he proposed an amendment to the motion so that it would instead urge the government to work with First Nations to plan for the next forum. Despite the fact that no member of the assembly took strong issue with the amendment, debate grew increasingly heated. Speaker David Laxton called

the heckling in the room “minor” when Yukon Party MLA Mike Nixon became distracted by it. “If it draws your attention, that’s unfortunate, but I would ask you to speak to me and ignore the heckling,” said Laxton. “Imagine the difficulty you would have if you were in the House of Commons with 308 people constantly talking and heckling.” But only minutes later, Laxton felt the heckling became disruptive enough to intervene. “There is quite an amount of heckling going on, on both sides. The heckling is not part of the discussion or the debate at hand. It doesn’t help. It doesn’t lead to anything positive on both sides of the House.” When a member threw a pen and gestured in Laxton’s direction, he had quite enough. “Throwing your pen and gesturing like that when I’m in the middle of making a statement … I take offence to that. That’s directed at me personally. Please have your seat. … I’m going to caution everybody right now. My foot is sore. I’m irritated. The actions of the members in this assembly are at an all-time low right now with this debate and there is no need for it. Choose your words carefully. Think before you speak.” Debate adjourned at 5:30 p.m., before a vote could be called on the motion. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com


Friday, December 6, 2013

3

Yukon News

Morris seeks to reclaim LFN chief’s seat Jesse Winter

mately two hours in total.” The Liard Aboriginal Women’s Society at the time called the aniel Morris wants to be attack “a horrific act of domestic chief of the Liard First Naviolence.” tion again, but he may seem like a At his trial, Morris pleaded long shot. guilty to assaulting his wife, as Morris was chief once before, well as uttering death threats and but he was removed from office forcible confinement. He was in disgrace in 2003 following a sentenced to two years probation conviction for brutally assaultfor his crimes. ing his then-estranged wife and Earlier this month he circuthreatening another man with a lated an apology letter in Watson loaded rifle. Lake. The News made repeated at“I admit and do blame myself tempts to reach Morris for over a for hurting my family. I do blame week, but he did not respond to myself for hurting my people and requests for comment. the anger I caused in our comAfter returning home one munity. I regret my unfair actions spring evening in 2003, Morris and my unfair behaviour,” the discovered that his wife was miss- letter reads. ing. According to court records, It goes on to say that Morris Morris grabbed his .30-30 rifle has taken an anger management and four live shells, climbed into program and counseling, and that his truck and headed to Lower his family is back together again. Post, B.C., to look for her. But that apology has little He found her there in a car meaning in the eyes of the First with another man whom court Nation’s current chief. records did not identify. Morris “He’s apologizing for what he cocked the rifle and threatened to did to his wife in 2003 and said kill the man with it, court records he’s taken anger management state. classes, but I know that the last He then forced the man from time that he ran, in 2010, and lost, the vehicle and ordered his wife to he came up to me and threatened drive back towards Watson Lake. me and I had to get a peace bond As the other man fled, he heard against him,” said Liard McMorris yell, “I’m going to kill you” Millan. at his wife, court records said. After the last election, there Once on the road, Morris folwas a push to have the LFN genlowed his wife in his pickup until eral assembly consider changing they reached a gravel pit near the the election rules to prevent conentrance to Lower Post. Morvicted criminals from running for ris hauled his wife from the car, office. But the proposal was never marched her into a nearby sand followed up, McMillan said. pit and began to beat her. “We should have done it, but “She pleaded with him to stop we never did. I have to take the and at one point agreed to have blame for that. It’s just somesexual intercourse with him if he thing that our council never did,” would stop beating her,” court McMillan said. He did point out records said. “After the sexual that while Morris was facing the intercourse, the respondent (Mor- criminal charges before his conris) continued to assault her. The viction, the LFN government paid assault continued for approxihis legal expenses. McMillan is News Reporter

D

Government forges ahead on Atlin Lake campground

Mike Thomas/Yukon News

Former Liard First Nation chief Daniel Morris, seen here in 2003, is running for chief again, despite his criminal history.

not seeking re-election as chief. In an unrelated matter, Morris is also accused by the First Nation of having taken nearly $250,000 in inappropriate loans from the LFN government while he was chief. McMillan tried to get the RCMP and Aboriginal Affairs – which funds a significant portion of the First Nation’s budget – to investigate the loans. McMillan personally supplied the RCMP with seven bankers’ boxes full of documents that he says back up the allegations, and the police

BRIEFS

wound up seizing dozens more. The First Nation hired FJD & Company to conduct a forensic review of the governments books. That report alleges that Morris took $150,000 in improper loans, and also signed himself $36,000 in cheques in a single day. The FJD & Company report also said that Morris received more than $67,000 in reimbursement of income taxes withheld from his salary. Another auditing firm, KPMG, later determined these repayments were part of a broader arrangement that saw

more than $1.5 million set aside for Revenue Canada instead of being disbursed to band members. But he was never charged with anything. Aboriginal affairs hired financial firm KPMG forensic to review the FJD report. KPMG confirmed FJD’s findings that Morris took the money, but found there was no way to prove that it was Aboriginal Affairs money he took because money from a variety of sources all went into the same bank account. In the end, Aboriginal Affairs closed the file without ordering a full forensic audit. In his apology letter, Morris said he never stole any money, but was in fact made the scapegoat for other councillors’ unethical financial behaviour. “I did not steal or take any money or funding from the Liard First Nation office. When I was chief, our government at that time helped out members. We gave out loans to members … some paid up their loans and some is still outstanding, and I took the rap for that,” the letter reads. His letter doesn’t mention anyone else by name, or explain any of the details of the KPMG report, and it claims that Aboriginal Affairs exonerated him because he wasn’t charged with fraud. The whole thing rings false for McMillan. “He’s basically denied doing anything wrong with the money that he took. He’s saying Indian Affairs cleared his name. They didn’t clear his name. They simply looked for and found a loophole so they could wash their hands of it and avoid major embarrassment in Ottawa,” he said. Advance polls for the election were held on Dec. 2. The final poll will be on Dec. 16. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

“This government has a record of burying controversial items by announcing them on a Friday of a value and value to the community long weekend or during a holiday Construction is scheduled to Conrad. The potential campThe Yukon government reperiod. Mr. Speaker, is it this govof Ross River of the Ross River grounds at Conrad and Atlin do begin this spring. sponded to a petition this week ernment’s intention to announce suspension bridge.” not have to be mutually exclu(Jacqueline Ronson) asking for the government to its own unilateral land use plan The government won’t make sive. There is certainly a need for develop a campground at the for the Peel watershed during the any decisions until it gets the multiple new campgrounds in the Government waits Conrad historic site near Carcross southern Yukon. Yukoners and holiday period?” asked NDP Opsecond opinion, he said. for second opinion instead of the planned location at visitors alike would benefit greatly position MLA Kate White in the “Once that report has been Atlin Lake. on Ross River bridge received and given consideration legislature Tuesday. by the development of both of The proposed Atlin Lake by department staff, we will be these campgrounds.” “What I’ll commit to is ancampground has come under sharing that with the community nouncing the final Peel waterThe Yukon Environmental The government is waiting to controversy as the local Taku of Ross River, including the Ross and Socio-economic Assessment shed plan when it is ready,” said hear if the Ross River bridge can River Tlingit First Nation says it River First Nation, prior to makBoard recently recommended that be salvaged. Resource Minister Scott Kent. must have a land claims agreethe Atlin Lake campground go The government is in a final An engineering report released ing a decision about what steps to ment before it can accept more take with regard to this bridge.” ahead under certain mitigating round of consultation with afearlier this year asserted that the development on its traditional (Jacqueline Ronson) conditions. fected First Nations. Those talks footbridge is beyond saving, and territory. The government is currently were initially scheduled to wrap must be demolished. reviewing the recommendations, The possibility for collaboratup in March. Under pressure from local resiGovernment mum and will soon issue a decision ing on a campground at Conrad Discussions appear to be at dents, the government has hired on Peel plan status is outlined in the government’s fi- document. a stalemate, with First Nations an engineer to review that report “The Yukon government will nal agreement with the Carcross/ threatening legal action if the and give an independent opinion. take the proposed mitigations Tagish First Nation. With less than a month before Yukon government pushes ahead Community Services Minister suggested by YESAB into account Brad Cathers responded this week the staking ban for the Peel waEnvironment Minister Currie with its own plans, and the govand also consider any additional Dixon said both campgrounds ernment unwilling to accept the to a petition calling for the bridge tershed expires, the government First Nations input that is provid- to be saved. won’t say how work on the region’s planning commission’s recommay be eventually developed. land use plan is progressing. “We are committed to working ed in the context of the proposed mended plan. “We thank the Yukoners who It also won’t say if the prohibicollaboratively with the Carcross/ mitigations identified by YESAB December 19 will be the last have expressed their interest in as we prepare our decision docu- this bridge and who have extion on staking will be extended day of the fall legislative sitting. Tagish First Nation if we do go ment,” said Dixon. pressed their views of the heritage past December 31. (Jacqueline Ronson) down the road of developing


4

Yukon News

Leef critical of fellow MP’s Reform Act

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onservative backbench MP Mike Chong’s proposed socalled Reform Act bill is stirring quite the debate in Ottawa. If passed, the bill private members bill would rebalance the internal power of a political party, giving more weight to MPs and at the expense of the party executive. It also lays out tools for calling a leadership review and removing a party leader. While Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his cabinet have yet to comment formally about the bill, many MPs are already giving it a vigorous debate. Yukon’s MP Ryan Leef said while he hasn’t had a chance to read the entire four-page document, he supports the spirit and intent of the bill. Some of the details, however, worry him. “The preamble of the bill is actually an interesting statement and one that I don’t think anyone would disagree with,” Leef said. “But I haven’t made any sort of concrete decision about whether it’s something I would support.” Leef’s biggest beef is with the threshold of MPs needed to call a leadership review. The bill says if 15 per cent of a caucus group is unhappy with a party leader, they can call a review. That would then lead to a vote by the entire caucus, so the dissenting 15 per cent can’t actually force a leader out on their own, but even the perception of internal strife caused by a review could damage a ursd

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MP Ryan Leef hasn’t decided whether to support Michael Chong’s private member’s bill, dubbed the Reform Act.

party, Ryan said. “I think that number is pretty small. That could mean that the Liberals could trigger a leadership review with just four of their MPs. In a 100-person caucus, it’s 15 people.” Leef worried that such a small percentage of MPs could use a leadership review for personal gain, attempting to publicly wound a leader they are unhappy with even if they know an actual vote on their leadership isn’t likely to succeed. “It’s not hard to imagine if 15 or 30 people who are emotionally invested in an issue. It runs the danger of small factions of a party forcing you into a review,” he said. That said, Leef was clear that he isn’t discounting the bill outright. He just thinks there may be better, non-legislative ways to achieve the same ends. “I see what he’s trying to drive at, but I think there may be some other ways that we can get this done. A Bean North day is a good day.

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Some people think that the leadership choice and nomination of a candidate should be up to the voters to decide, not Elections Canada,” he said. Another part of Chong’s proposal would see party leaders give up the signing authority over an election candidate’s nomination papers, allowing each party’s riding association to choose who runs. “At the end of the day, the only people who will decide how the parties go about electing or nominating their candidates should be left up to the party,” Leef said. Harper hasn’t said whether he will allow a free vote on Chong’s bill. Parliamentary tradition is for MPs to vote their conscience on private members bill, but it isn’t known yet whether that will be extended to Harper’s cabinet as well. Leef said he will definitely vote his conscience on Chong’s bill after he has time to study it more carefully, and get feedback from his constituents in the Yukon. Leef said he’s never experience any of the top-down pressure from his party leader that other MPs from all three parties have expressed concern over. He also pointed out that when it comes to party discipline, the Conservatives have had more free votes in recent years than either the Liberals or the NDP.

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Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Paramedic program flatlines Ashley Joannou News Reporter

A

Yukon College program, trumpeted as an opportunity for paramedics to be trained locally, has been cancelled. Days before it was scheduled to begin, students registered in the Primary Care Paramedic certificate program were told it wasn’t going to happen. People’s lives were organized with the expectation of starting class, said would-be student Fabienne Brulhart. “You undergo a very lengthy process in order to get here and basically the Friday before, the program gets cancelled. That’s where I feel the biggest frustration,” she said. The Primary Care Paramedic certificate is a joint program between the Justice Institute of British Columbia and the college. It was scheduled to start this Monday. The cost of the five-month course, which includes both an in-class and online portion, was to be covered by the students’ tuition of $11,500 each, explained Dan Anton, the college’s chair of continuing education. When two of nine students dropped out at the last minute and there was no wait-list to draw on, the program was not financially viable, he said. “We needed nine to run this. Within the last two weeks one of the students did not follow through on their needing a prerequisite, and then immediately following that last week the final individual was saying their plans had changed.” Meanwhile Brulhart was unaware of the precarious position her program was in and spent time preparing. She took the emergency medi-

ing on other resources to pay for it,” he said. “There was no budget allocation for this program. We had modelled it on student tuition covering the cost of production.” When the program was first announced, it was described as a chance for students from Outside to learn in the Yukon and avoid long waitlists that exist from programs in other jurisdictions. That never happened. “We had only a couple of inquiries from the South. Our tuition is significantly higher up here when measured against the tuition in B.C. The further south you go the less expensive it gets. They have larger classes, upwards of 30 people,” Anton said. “When people look north they couldn’t balance our tuition fees with their options in the south that just seems like a barrier.” Brulhart said she’s seen tuition in British Columbia for $4,100. Ian Stewart/Yukon News Anton said he feels horrible for Fabienne Brulhart is one of several Primary Care Paramedic students left hanging by Yukon what has happened and is workCollege’s last-minute decision to cancel the program. ing with the students left in the aftermath. With all the work they’ve done, students. cal responder course – an 80-hour the program. the students would be pre-qualiWhile much of that money “What happens now is that prerequisite required for the fied to apply for the same prowas spent on start-up costs and program – and put her children in they tried to accommodate two gram run out of British Columbia equipment, the program is still an or three people that probably daycare. expensive one to run, Anton said. in a few weeks. weren’t fully committed and the Students took a written test “The JIBC is well aware of our This year’s course received no other people have to live with the and were interviewed by a panel. circumstances up here, they know outside funding and was supposed consequences,” she said. Brulhart also completed a the individuals. I have expressed Anton said the two people who to be covered only by tuition. physical, bought a uniform and to each student that if they would It was scheduled to be delivered left the program had been condibooks, and got all the required like to contact our contact there, tionally accepted with the under- by a local instructor trained by the immunizations. She left her job. they will ensure that they are in standing they would complete any justice institute. “For me, I’m a mom of two the loop for the seat assignments. After that instructor backed kids. This took me one and a half requirements before class started. This isn’t a full stop with their out this summer, the college “In an effort to accommodate years to make sure that I had all ability to obtain this training. It is would have been forced to spend all the candidates, we wanted to my pieces of the puzzle in place. a full stop with it to run in White$104,000 to fly in a trained one Once you have a more set life it’s move forward,” he said. horse at this time.” When the program was run for from B.C., Anton said. not just up and go,” she said. Anton said he will also be Without nine students there the first time last year, the college Some students have already reviewing the program to decide just wasn’t enough money. met with Anton to express their received $276,000 from the terwhat happens next and if any ritorial government’s Community “We wouldn’t even come close changes can be made to increase concerns. Other meetings are to covering the direct cost for the interest to create a pool of stuDevelopment Fund and $40,000 planned for next week. from the education program com- JI (justice institute) which would Brulhart said she feels like she dents on a wait-list. mean the college is somehow subwas “basically babysitting” people mittee of the Volunteer AmbuContact Ashley Joannou at sidizing the delivery of this, drawwho weren’t committed to taking lance Society plus tuition from ashleyj@yukon-news.com

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6

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

F.H. Collins project questioned Jesse Winter News Reporter

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he Yukon government fended off more questions about the F.H. Collins reconstruction project in the legislature this week, though not all of them were well researched. The NDP peppered Education Minister Elaine Taylor and Public Works Minister Wade Istchenko with concerns that the new school is too small, and that the government will end up paying too much for it. “Ten years and waiting,” said the NDP’s education critic, Jim Tredger. “The school we are buying off the shelf from Alberta is 2,500 square metres smaller than the previously tendered design. There are increasing concerns that Yukon Party’s latest redesign of the latest redesign of F.H. Collins will be inadequate to meet the curriculum and programming needs of students at F.H. Collins.” The new school design is borrowed from Mother Margaret Mary Catholic High School in Terwilliger, Alberta. Right now there are only about 430 students at the Alberta school, and 629 students enrolled at the current F.H. Collins, which Tredger said is proof that the government hasn’t planned well. “We are now talking students – not sardines. There is a reason Mother Margaret Mary school has 430 students … will this minister tell this House how a school that is modeled for 430 students will meet the needs of over 700 Yukon students and meet the education requirements of the 21st century?” Tredger asked. But Tredger is wrong, as Education Minister Elaine Taylor pointed out.

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

The Yukon government continues to face questions about its handling of the new F.H. Collins Secondary School project. The new school was originally slated to open this fall.

Mother Margret Mary is designed for 750 students. It was built as part of a four-school expansion, not as a replacement for an existing building, according to the Alberta Department of Education. It was finished in 2012 and only has 450 students because it hasn’t reached its capacity yet. The new F.H. Collins design also has a capacity of 750 students. According to the Yukon Education Department, once the new school is finished, Whitehorse will have a recommended high school student capacity of 2,308 at F.H. Collins, Vanier Catholic and Porter Creek secondary schools. That’s still 758 spaces more than Whitehorse’s current student population. In 2009, as part of the planning process for the new F.H. Collins, the department modelled the expected student growth as far out as 2020. When checked against its prediction for 2013, the model was only off by nine students. The NDP also questioned the government’s budgeting prac-

tices for the new school. In the spring, the government deep-sixed the original, Yukon-designed version of F.H. Collins after failing to include three major components in its approved budget. When bids, which included those components, came back over the management board-approved $38.6-million budget, the government decided to import the Alberta design instead. The new design is an entirely different, much simpler school. It was built in 2012 in Alberta for $21 million. But as Premier Darrell Pasloski explained in the legislature, while planning for the Yukon version to be built here, the government chose not to re-evaluate the budget, and left it at $38.6 million. “This is really quite amazing,” said NDP Leader Liz Hanson. “The premier is standing here before this House – before the public and before the voters – and saying that, yes, spending the same amount of money – $38.6 million – for an

off-the-shelf design and smaller school from Alberta is fiscally responsible.” The NDP’s Louis Moorcroft accused the government of failing even to acquire a professional estimate for the new school’s cost. No one from the government side of the House disputed the point. Instead, Public Works Minister Wade Istchenko accused Moorcroft of ignorance in government procedure. “The member opposite is unable to distinguish and grasp how government functions. The contract has been put out – or tenderized to it. It’s the responsibility of the department officials with the expertise in those areas to make sure that this comes across,” Istchenko said. Public Works spokeswoman Kendra Black explained that, unlike the original design, the government didn’t get separate professional estimates done. Instead, the project costs were evaluated by Barr Ryder Architects as part of its $900,000 contract as the bridging consultant on the project. “Barr Ryder supplied the department with an order-ofmagnitude cost estimate that is within the current estimated budget,” Black said, adding that the government hopes competitive bidding from contractors will keep the price close to the estimate. Order-of-magnitude estimates are comparative, she said, based on the consultants’ own experience with similar projects, as well as current pricing. Black would not say how close Barr Ryder’s estimate was to the $38.6-million mark for fear of compromising the tendering process. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

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7

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Rouble joins, and chairs, land use planning council Jacqueline Ronson News Reporter

P

atrick Rouble, former Yukon Party minister for Energy, Mines and Resources, is the newest member of the Yukon Land Use Planning Council. He was appointed by the federal government in September, and made chair last month by the council’s other two members. Interim Liberal Leader Sandy Silver says the appointment is illadvised, given Rouble’s documented opposition to the Peel planning commission’s recommended plan for the watershed. “Mr. Rouble’s influence is one of the reasons we are in the mess in the Peel in the first place and I therefore cannot support this appointment,” wrote Silver in an open letter. “I would urge the government of Yukon to ask their federal colleagues to rescind the appointment.” Affected First Nations as well as Liberal and NDP parties have rallied in support of the planning commission’s final recommended plan, released in 2011, which would see 80 per cent of the watershed withdrawn from development, including roads. But the Yukon Party government is intent on changing the plan so that development is not ruled out, but rather actively managed on a case-by-case basis. New concepts released last year would see between 23 and 42 per cent of the watershed withdrawn from staking. Road

Yukon MP Ryan Leef stands up for Santa In an amusing spat over Arctic sovereignty rhetoric on Thursday, Yukon MP Ryan Leef criticized Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau for not caring enough about Canada’s Arctic borders. “Unfortunately, the Liberal

Mike Thomas/Yukon News

Former Yukon Party minister Patrick Rouble now chairs the Yukon Land Use Planning Council.

access would not be ruled out anywhere in the watershed. As a result of this disagreement, the plan is currently in limbo. The government is in its final consultation with affected First Nations, with little progress to report. Those consultations were originally scheduled to end in March of this year. Now, the government won’t say when those talks will wrap up, and

have and all of the good work being done, that they’re making the best decisions that they believe possible.” The council’s former chair, Ian Robertson, wrote a letter criticizing the government’s handling of the Peel plan before he left the office. “The council believes that the regional land use planning program is in trouble,” wrote Robertson in April.

Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

BRIEFS

As he left the House of Commons on Wednesday, Trudeau was asked whether he thinks the North leader is as soft on Canadian sover- Claus his rightful citizenship?” Leef owned seabed. Pole is within Canada’s borders. eignty as he is on crime. Yesterday asked in the House of Commons. The United Nations asked all “I’m going to defer to the the Liberal leader refused to stand the countries with competing On Wednesday, a report from scientists,” Trudeau replied. “I trust up for Canada’s northern soverArctic borders to submit claims for Canadian scientists working on our scientists and oceanographers eignty when he said that the North the pole, which it will then evaluCanada’s Arctic sovereignty claim Pole is not Canadian. How can he, ate before deciding where to draw in terms of how we’re mapping it,” was released that questioned Trudeau said. this close to Christmas, deny Santa the line. (Jesse Winter) whether the pole is on a Canadian-

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the staking ban for the area is set to expire at the end of this month. Rouble believes the government is doing their best to come up with an appropriate plan for the Peel, he said in an interview last week. “I know, probably better than most folks, how challenging and difficult it can be, making those decisions. But I have faith in them, that based on the information that they

“A number of negative precedents may have been set that undermine the trust and public confidence required to sustain an effective land use planning program.” Rouble said he looks forward to meeting with Robertson and discussing his ideas and concerns. The land use planning council’s role is primarily one of administration and co-ordination, he said. His background in business administration and experience working with First Nations make him well-suited for the role, said Rouble. Several First Nation chiefs have recently spoken out about the lack of progress on land use planning in the territory, first mandated by the Umbrella Final Agreement in 1990. Only the North Yukon region has a finalized land use plan to date. Rouble said he is hopeful that the process will be improved and progress will be made. “I’m eternally optimistic about this. That’s the reason why I got involved in community leadership in my community, and that’s the reason I got involved in this board. It’s a very important issue for the territory, it’s one of those things where I think everyone will agree that this all would have been better if it had been done 20 years ago. I don’t want to be sitting in a chair similar to this 20 years from now saying, ‘Boy, I wish they had done that 20 years ago.’”

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8

Opinion

Yukon News

EDITORIAL

Friday, December 6, 2013

INSIGHT

LETTERS

EDITORIAL Free our MP: support the Reform Act

Y

ukon MP Ryan Leef has a chance to help repair our damaged political system. But he needs some prodding in order to do it. The opportunity arises from a private member’s bill tabled this week by Michael Chong, one of Leef ’s fellow Conservative backbenchers. Dubbed the Reform Act, the draft law aims to empower MPs and somewhat weaken party leaders. It could be a real game changer. The bill would deprive party leaders of one powerful weapon they wield to keep their MPs in line – a veto over who receives the party nomination in each riding. Approval of nominations would instead revert back to individual riding associations. The bill would also codify the rules in which a party caucus may expel and re-admit members, or give their party leader the boot. All these measures could be triggered by a petition signed by 15 per cent of caucus, followed by majority consent during a secret-ballot vote. Chong insists his bill is not an effort to depose Prime Minister Stephen Harper, and to diffuse any such interpretation, it would not take effect until after the next election. The aim of the bill, instead, is to restore what Chong sees as the proper workings of a Westminster parliamentary system such as our own. He points to other Westminster democracies, such as Britain, where MPs currently wield such powers. There, prime ministers fear the real possibility of an uprising by their own backbench, and government MPs outside of cabinet aren’t afraid ask real questions of ministers in Parliament – as opposed to the canned schlock rehearsed by backbenchers like Leef. The downfall of Leef ’s

predecessor, the Liberals’ Larry Bagnell, may well have played out very differently under this proposed set of rules. After voting against his party’s long-gun registry on several occasions, Bagnell eventually joined the pack, after being told that doing otherwise would result in his expulsion from caucus. Many Yukoners later cited Bagnell’s propping up of the gun registry as why they abandoned supporting him. These new rules could also conceivably allow Leef to open his mouth without first consulting the Prime Minister’s Office – a request he’s presumably still waiting to hear back on for this matter, as his position remains unclear for now. In fairness to Leef, some thoughtful objections to Chong’s bill have been raised. It’s inconsistent to have party leaders picked by the membership (or in the case of the Liberals, anyone who chooses to cast a vote) but expelled by caucus. The threshold to trigger a leadership vote amounts to just a handful of MPs for small parties, like the much-diminished Liberals, creating the potential for undesirable turmoil. And parties could be vulnerable to pressure groups hijacking weak riding associations. It’s also been noted that a majority of a party’s MPs are already empowered by parliamentary convention to oust an unwanted leader, should they choose. If our MPs are disappointing in their general spinelessness, the real solution is for the public to communicate that we expect our politicians to grow some spines. But, given the culture of conformity within our major federal parties today, it looks like a legislative nudge may be needed for this to happen. Leef, dutifully reading the Publisher

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Prime Minister’s Office talking points, notes that both the Liberals and NDP actually vote as a herd more often than the Conservatives. That may be true, but the reality is that all parties see their members vote as a bloc the overwhelming majority of the time. Many private member’s bills fail, but the Reform Act has a real chance of becoming law, with both opposition parties making warm sounds about it, and a handful of Conservative backbenchers openly expressing their support. Leef should, too. This is not one of those disingenuous pleas for our MP to commit political suicide by, say, voting against his government’s budget. He says he expects to be able to vote freely on the matter. He just hasn’t made up his mind. Clear support from his constituents could help settle the matter. So if you’re unhappy with how MPs are often relegated to behaving like trained seals, with how the prime minister wields too much power, and with how party posturing tends to trump constituency concerns, take a few minutes to tell Leef to support the Reform Act. You can reach his Ottawa office at (613) 995-9368, his Whitehorse constituency office at (867) 668-6565, or send him an email at ryan.leef@parl.gc.ca. (JT) Reporters

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LETTERS Rein in our PM Open letter to MP Ryan Leef: Please support Conservative MP Michael Chong’s private member’s bill that would bring the prime minister and party leaders’ roles back to where it ought to be. The prime minister should just be first amongst equals, not have chief executive power that Mr. Harper and his PMO have right now. This authoritative regime we have in place right now is resulting in massive omnibus bills that have endangered our environment, overwhelmed our criminal justice system and created a sense of entitlement that is destroying our international reputation. The subsidies to the oil and gas industries keep flowing and there are massive cutbacks in science, environment, heritage, arts, renewable energy, health care, parks,

transportation safety… I could go on and on. Now we see this blind ambition manifesting in corruption associated with the Senate, electoral fraud, RCMP investigations getting closer and closer to the leader of your party, and underfunded inspectors in many crucial sectors, such as transportation, habitat protection, food safety, and our crumbling infrastructure. In the Yukon context that would free you up to do your job and freely represent all Yukon constituents, something you promised over and over in the last election and since, but have rarely been able to deliver on. This private member’s bill isn’t the whole answer but it is a good start. Sally Wright Kluane Lake

Quote of the Day “Mr. Rouble’s influence is one of the reasons we are in the mess in the Peel in the first place and I therefore cannot support this appointment.” Interim Liberal Leader Sandy Silver on the appointment of Patrick Rouble, former Yukon Party minister for Energy, Mines and Resources, to the Yukon Land Use Planning Council. Page 7

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9

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

INSIGHT

Set my people free white people in prison than in 2003, even though 2,100 more Canadians are incarcerated. by AL POPE The numbers look even better if you’re an educated, well-paid white man in good mental health. Nearly half of today’s prisoners have accessed mental health services, and 80 per cent have substance abuse issues. The average prisoner has a Grade 8 education. The number of women in here’s great news for white prison has increased by 40 per Canadians this week. Corcent in five years. The numrectional Investigator of Cana- ber of aboriginal women has da Howard Sapers released his increased by more than 80 annual report on Tuesday, and per cent in 10 years. Of those it reveals that despite the govincarcerated women, 85 per ernment’s get-tough-on-crime cent have been the victims of agenda, the prison system is physical abuse and 68 per cent locking up fewer Caucasians have been sexually assaulted. than it did 10 years ago. Black people make up nine In the past decade, while per cent of the prison populaConservative policies have tion, though only three per cent swelled prison populations, the of Canadians are black. For proportion of prisoners who aboriginal people, the numbers share Justice Minister Peter are even more striking: 21 per Mackay’s skin tone has dropped cent of prisoners, but only 4.3 by 13 per cent. While whites per cent of the population. As make up about 85 per cent Sapers reports, “if not for these of the general population, we subgroups, the offender popurepresent only 61 per cent of lation growth rate would have prisoners. In absolute numbers, flatlined some time ago.” there are three per cent fewer

NORDICITY

T

Sapers suggests that these figures, rather than being good news for the dominant culture, indicate a problem in the system. “Beyond rising inmate counts and costs, Canadians should be interested in who is ending up behind bars. Questions about whom we incarcerate, for how long and why are important public policy issues,” he says. But the Conservative government has no interest in black or aboriginal people. According to Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney, “The only minority I would say we are interested in are the criminals.” Can you guess what colour Blaney is? It’s always good to be free, but the white middle class have particular reason to celebrate their un-incarcerated state because, as Sapers outlines in his report, “To make sure that inmates are not ‘coddled’ has meant making prisons more austere, more crowded, more unsafe and ultimately less effective.” Among the growing dangers faced by prisoners he lists “increases in assaults, in use of force, in lockdowns, in

gang membership, in self-harm incidents, in placement in segregation.” While taking TVs out of prisons, reducing yard time, double-bunking inmates in single cells, cutting pay for prison work, and making inmates pay for phone calls, those fabulous money-managers in the government have managed to increase the correctional budget by 40 per cent, or $2.6 billion in five years. This is a remarkable achievement, particularly in light of the fact that crime rates had been dropping for years before the Harper government ever came to power. Sapers says, “crowding, too much time spent in cells; lack of contact with the outside world, lack of program capacity, the paucity of meaningful prison work or vocational skills training and polarization between inmates and custodial staff ” are dragging the system back 40 years, to a time of deadly prison riots. Not to worry, the purchase of pepper spray has not been affected by budget cuts. If you are one of the un-

fortunate white people who does end up in prison, take heart. According to Sapers, “(Blacks and aboriginals) are over-represented in maximum security institutions and segregation placements. They are more likely to be subject to use of force interventions and incur a disproportionate number of institutional disciplinary charges. They are released later in their sentences and less likely to be granted day or full parole.” According to Sapers, higher rates of incarceration, longer sentences, and tougher prison conditions do nothing to lower crime rates or increase public safety. In fact, they make matters worse, because they make it more difficult to rehabilitate prisoners and reintegrate them into society. But really, what does it matter? Most of the damage done is done to minority groups, and as Blaney says, who cares about them? It’s still a great country to be white in. Al Pope won the Canadian Community Newspaper Award for best columnist in 2013. He also won the Ma Murray Award for Best Columnist in B.C./Yukon in 2010 and 2002.

What’s he saying? The truth about methadone Patricia Bacon

T

here’s been a lot of talk lately by the minister of justice about methadone maintenance therapy and the Whitehorse Correctional Centre. The issue is the decision by the Justice Department in 2012 to stop methadone treatment for prisoners and without the consent of the prisoners, force them into medical detox. Minister Mike Nixon gives three reasons for his decision: 1) that the people who were on methadone therapy when entering WCC were using more than one drug creating a potentially “lethal” situation; 2) that WCC doesn’t have the qualified staff to administer the program; and 3) that prisoners given methadone can vomit it up and sell it to other prisoners. Let’s take a closer look at his reasons and translate them into something real for readers.

Anti-sealing cartoon misses the mark Re: Wyatt’s World Cartoon (Yukon News, Dec. 4).

You would expect misinformation on the Atlantic seal hunt to come from urban animal activists who are disconnected from nature, but coming from a Yukon news-

On the issue of using more than one drug (poly-substance use) and the risks with giving methadone to someone using multiple drugs, the minister’s statements fail to recognize available science and the best practice guidelines. According to Health Canada, it is very common among people who are addicted to opioids to also use other drugs including marijuana and cocaine. Best practice guidelines state that while multiple drug use is not ideal, we should manage it through individualized health plans rather than deny treatment. This is current practice in both community settings and other jails in Canada. The reality of the likelihood of multiple drug usage by people on methadone must be well understood. The minister’s position that poly-substance use makes methadone treatment impossible in a prison setting suggests that WCC isn’t

paper? This is really worrisome. Your Wyatt’s World cartoon is totally off the mark. First, and not that it is wrong to hunt young animals, but white coat seals (or what activists and Wyatt call “baby seal”) have not been hunted since 1987. Second, the Atlantic seal hunt is at least as highly regulated as moose or bear hunting in the

able to provide the same standard of care as other facilities across Canada. Is this the message the minister wants Yukoners to have? That WCC is unable to meet basic standards of health and safety that are on par with other jails in Canada? On the issue of no qualified staff: the WCC does not have qualified staff because they stopped the methadone program in March 2012. Staff that were qualified have since left WCC. New staff haven’t been required to become qualified in methadone management because there is no program. However, the WCC would have qualified staff if they had a methadone policy because the jail would provide training to the current staff or hire appropriately trained staff. The argument that this cannot be done because there are no qualified people to do the work suggests that the WCC never

BRIEFS Yukon. Harvest limits represent four to five per cent of the seal herd. Professional seal hunters must be trained, licensed and certified to kill seals. Third, the seal hunt is an ecologically sustainable use of an over-abundant species, and unlike

has or never adopts any policies that ever require any type of training. Is this the message the minister wants Yukoners to have? That WCC is unable to meet standards of health and safety because they do not have any training protocols for its staff? Finally, I apologize for raising the issue of regurgitation when you, dear reader, might be trying to enjoy your morning muffin – however since the minister raised it… Methadone is a drug that is given in liquid form under the supervision of a pharmacist or nurse. Small amounts of liquid is metabolized in the body fairly quickly. Previously consumed methadone does not become a currency in prison if the drug is taken in the presence of a health professional, away from other prisoners, and the prisoner is monitored for a short period before being taken back to the cells.

It is a supervision issue. Is this the message the minister wants Yukoners to have? That WCC is unable to meet basic standards of supervision? It is not dangerous to give methadone to people who are in jail. It is a standard of practice in all prisons and jails across Canada, with the exception of the WCC. Methadone maintenance therapy is recognized as a legitimate health treatment intervention that stabilizes lives, reduces risk of HIV and hepatitis C, and has better long-term treatment success than detox. Methadone maintenance is also highly effective in reducing criminality and recidivism. Isn’t that something the minister could get behind? His excuses for not providing methadone to Yukoners in jail are short on evidence and long on hyperbole.

culls, the hunt is an economic contributor to local communities. By supporting the seal hunt, the Government of Canada also supports all wildlife hunting. If Canada accepts the EU argument that the seal hunt is immoral, it won’t be long before activists and their political allies start coming after Yukon hunters and trappers. If you want to know more

about the seal hunt, go to www. sealsandsealing.net. If you believe that the EU should not be imposing its morals on the rest of the world, sign the petition at: www.gopetition.com/petitions/ reverse-discriminatory-wto-sealban-ruling.html

Patricia Bacon is executive director of Blood Ties Four Directions Centre.

Eldred Woodford, Chairman Canadian Sealers Association


10

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

LETTERS

Wyatt’s seal cartoon was an abomination

adian Arctic. It is an ethical, humane, sustainable, and intensely monitored activity. Wyatt, an ex-patriot of the Yukon, owes our premier, our aboriginal and Inuit populations who depend on the seal hunt as a way of life and tradition, members of the Yukon legislature who collectively supported the recent motion, and indeed all Canadians who have to fight against the radical and extreme propaganda that continues to hurt Canadian sealers from abroad an apology. I urge editor John Thompson to pull this cartoon from his online paper and censor this kind of disrespectful submission to the News. I also call on the leader of the NDP, Liz Hansen, and the leader of the Liberal Party, Sandy Silver, to take a stand on this deeply disturbing “characterization” and attack on the office of the premier.

cost of the new “free” design and subsequent redesign and delay in tendering of a building that has less room than the current building Re: the “political cartoon” by and is so special that only a limited Wyatt (Yukon News, Dec. 4). number of Outside contractors To put it lightly, the “character could even be considered for the and script” of the submission construction? was gross, wrong, and completely Apparently Yukon government unacceptable. It showed clear job security extends to even the most ignorance of an issue of national incompetent of those in upper manimportance and did so in a deagement who would even consider grading and utterly disrespectful that it would be OK to run a high manner. school in northern Canadian winter What did it show? The cartoon without the benefit of a gymnasium (and I use that description with because somehow that would be of caution) depicted the premier of service to Yukoners. the Yukon, waist-deep in blood Was there ever a cost-benefit wearing a seal tie with a baby seal analysis done regarding the need to at the end of the tie, dripping replace this building? Who decided blood. that we need this? The reasons that The premier holds the highest I have heard for having to replace elected office in our territory, and it are, in my opinion, questionable. has earned a measure of respect Most have to do with the fact that far greater than that provided in most, if not all, of the buildings this ridiculous depiction that is systems are dated and in need of neither funny, nor art, and is, to replacement. say the least, a long way from the Ryan Leef I have never heard that the actual view point of Canadians or the MP, Yukon building itself is in any way comreality of the Canadian seal hunt. promised. I attended and graduated Facts: The motion tabled in from F.H. Collins and have been Make F.H. Collins the Yukon legislature supporting working on it ever since. I have been a historic site the Canadian seal industry passed in every nook and cranny of the unanimously – meaning all parbuilding. It’s old, no doubt about ties in the legislature supported it. I am writing to express both my disgust and my dismay over the han- it. But concrete footings are solid Furthermore, the outlanddling of the F.H. Collins High School and relatively crack free, the walls ish comment that accompanies are solid dry fir timber as are the “project.” I use the word project Wyatt’s abomination suggests, roof trusses which are solidly bolted lightly. After all, wasn’t the original wrongly, that Canada allows the together. We couldn’t afford to build killing of white coat (baby) seals. tender submission date passed and like this in todays construction then subsequently cancelled without Canada does not allow the harvest environment. ever hiring a project manager? of baby seals and hasn’t since the Where I am going with this is to That said, I find myself pon1980s. propose that F.H. Collins does not dering the whole affair whenever The seal hunt in Canada is, in need to be replaced. It need renovathe subject is broached. Weren’t two many cases, the only viable source tions. of income for our aboriginal and consecutive Yukon Party election Any cost savings that might have victories essentially achieved based Inuit people living in the Canbeen realized by building replaceon a promise of an as yet unbuilt ment, I believe, have long since school replacement? And when the vanished in the fiasco that has been original tender was cancelled and the original design was scrapped, did plaguing both the citizens and the government for way too long. anybody lose their jobs? And what Building systems can and should be was the cost of that design? replaced when they have surpassed I suspect that it far exceeded the total annual income of several their best before date. There are • Hand Saws • Chain Saws households. And what has been the many qualified local contractors that • Circular Saws • Carbide Saws • Lawn Mowers • Grass Shears could be employed for this type of • Scissors • Hair Clipper Blades work. These are same people that • Knives • Axes • Chisels Advertising would be responsible for the con• Planer Knives • Meat Grinder Blades tinued maintenance for many years • Meat Saws • Skates We SHArPen ALL THeSe & More 6149 - 6TH Ave., WHiTeHorSe (4 blocks from Main, on 6th Ave.)

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minister has taken this to the extreme, but the truth is, there’s nothing in our system at the moment to stop him. The Reform Act would change that! It would make sure our MPs can speak more freely without fear of retribution from prime ministers or party leaders, by putting power back in the hands of local constituencies. It would give our MPs the power to remove an abusive party leader – a vital democratic safety valve in between normal leadership races. Finally, it would allow Dave Paquet our MPs – not party leaders – to Whitehorse have the final say on whether a given MP should be permitted to Support the Reform Act sit in their caucus. Already, the Reform Act is Canadian politics has been excitgaining momentum right across ing lately, with lots of focus on spending scandals, PMO manipu- the political spectrum, with lation and crack-smoking mayors support from a wide range of Conservative, NDP, Liberal, and (all alleged, of course!). But even Green MPs. more exciting, to me and to the I urge you to go to www.reforfuture of our country, is the Reform Act. It is a private members’ mact2013.ca to get more informabill in Parliament that would shift tion, and to show Conservative backbencher Michael Chong, the balance of power, giving our individual MPs more freedom to who proposed the bill, that you do their jobs and freely represent support what he’s trying to do. Please also go to www.leadnow.ca/ us. If you’re like me, you find that reform-act to show your support for the bill – over 10,000 people Canadian politics is overwhelmsigned it within a day of the bill ingly skewed towards control being introduced in the House! by the leader of a party. MPs Please also write to Ryan Leef at are “whipped” (isn’t that an apt description!) to vote according to Ryan.Leef@parl.gc.ca and tell him you’re depending on him to vote how their leader wants them to in favour of it. vote. They can be removed from Let’s take this rare opportuncaucus if they refuse. The effect ity to fix our democracy and run is that, in general, MPs focus on pleasing their party leader, rather with it, folks! than taking their constituents’ Tanya Van Valkenburg concerns to the party. This hapWhitehorse pens across the main political parties, not just with the Conservatives. In praise of local veggies Some might say that former Yukon MP Larry Bagnell lost I would like to congratulate all support before the last election those Yukon farmers who have because he was “whipped” to support the long-gun registry, which produced food this year. The carmany of his constituency wanted rots, parsnips, beets and turnips are still available to eat and taste scrapped. He himself stated that far better than any of the importhe would have voted against it ed vegetables. if he could have without being I haven’t had to buy potatoes removed from caucus. In a majority government situ- yet, but I know they are also availation, where MPs are “whipped,” able. Congratulations to Superthe Prime Minister’s Office acts store and others for selling locally effectively as a dictatorship. This produced food. is allowed within our political system. Many people have comMike Gladish mented that the current prime Valleyview to come. I propose that F.H. Collins be declared a historic site. Something about this building doesn’t want to be torn down. Almost every person in the Yukon over a certain age went to F.H. Collins as well as a large number who still do. It is in an ideal location, it isn’t too hard to look at and many of its students have gone on to achieve great accomplishments. If this doesn’t qualify as heritage, I don’t know what would.

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Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

South Africa celebrates Mandela Christopher Torchia and Jason Straziuso The Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG outh Africans erupted in song, dance and tears on Friday in public and emotional celebrations of the life of Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid leader who bridged this country’s black-white divide and helped avert a race war. Fellow anti-apartheid leaders like retired archbishop Desmond Tutu called for the 51 million South Africans to adhere to the values of unity and democracy that Mandela embodied. The tributes to Mandela that came from people across the spectrum showed that he had affected people deeply. “What I liked most about Mandela was his forgiveness, his passion, his diversity, the pact of what he did,” said Ariel Sobel, a white man who was born in 1993, a year before Mandela was elected president. “I am not worried about what will happen next. We will continue as a nation. We knew this was coming. We are prepared.” Sobel was with a crowd of people who had gathered at Mandela’s home in the leafy Johannesburg neighbourhood of Houghton where Mandela spent his last sickly months. A dozen doves were released into the skies and people sang tribal songs, the national anthem, God Bless Africa – the anthem of the antiapartheid struggle – and Christian hymns. Many wore traditional garb of Zulu, Xhosa and South Africa’s other ethnic groups. One carried a sign saying: “He will rule the universe with God.” In Soweto, the rough-andtumble black township where

S

Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press

Nelson Mandela in 2001. The former South African president, who spent much of 2013 in and out of the hospital, died Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 at age 95.

vice is to be held on Tuesday in FNB Stadium in Johannesburg. Mandela’s last public appearance was at the same stadium in 2010 for the closing ceremony of the soccer World Cup. Mandela’s body will then lie in state in Pretoria for three days. Sunday marks a national day of prayer and reflection. “We call upon all our people to gather in halls, churches, mosques, temples, synagogues and in their homes for prayer services and meditation, reflecting on the life of Madiba and his contribution to our country and the world,” Zuma said, using Mandela’s clan name. Zuma had announced late Thursday that Mandela, who had

Mandela used to live, pockets of dancers and singers shuffled through the street, celebrating Mandela’s life. Dozens of kids held oversized pictures of the anti-apartheid icon. “I’m sorry, I’m too emotional. The tears come too easily,” Themba Radebe, a 60-year-old who was filming the street celebration with his phone, told a reporter. He later decided to share his thoughts. “This is a celebration of the death, because we knew he was an old man,” said Radebe, whose eyes sparkled with shallow tears. “He brought a lot of changes to our community, because I grew up in apartheid. It was a very bad situation.” President Jacob Zuma announced that Mandela is to be buried during a state funeral in his rural home town of Qunu on Sunday, Dec. 15. A memorial ser-

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the values of unity and democracy that he embodied. He recalled the early 1990s when South Africa teetered on the brink of a race war. “All of us here in many ways amazed the world, a world that was expecting us to be devastated by a racial conflagration,” Tutu said. He recalled how Mandela helped unite South Africa as it dismantled apartheid, the cruel system of white minority rule, and prepared for all-race elections in 1994. In those elections, Mandela, who spent 27 years in prison, became South Africa’s first black president. “God, thank you for the gift of Madiba,” said Tutu in his closing his prayer.

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been in and out of the hospital four times since February 2011, was dead. He was last admitted in June with a recurring lung infection from which he never recovered, though he was released in September to convalesce at home. After midnight, a black SUVtype vehicle containing Mandela’s coffin, draped in South Africa’s flag, pulled away from Mandela’s home, escorted by military motorcycle outriders, to take the body to a military morgue in Pretoria. In a church service in Cape Town, Tutu, who like Mandela was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, said Mandela would want South Africans themselves to be his “memorial” by adhering to

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Liz Hanson with Ben Kolisnyk and Amber Ruddy from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

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Liz Hanson with Canada World Youth program coordinator Simon Schachner

Yukon News

j k l m v b x WHITEHORSE g j k l m v b WEATHER s g j k l m v 5-Day Forecast f s g j k l m

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Yukon NDP Holiday Open House

toNIGHt

j -11°C

Come join Yukon NDP MLAs to celebrate the holidays at our annual Open House. Snacks, refreshments, door prizes and music by the one and only Kevin Barr will make for an event to remember!

toDay’s Normals

satUrDay

-6°C k low -8°C high

We also have a Mitten Drive Christmas Tree: Bring a pair of mittens to donate to a local charity!

-20.0°C °C Low: -27.6

What: Yukon NDP Open House

High:

sUNDay

Sunrise:

moNDay

Recreational Projects Program

12:15 Moonset: 21:26

°C -6 w °C low -15

Moonrise:

high

FALL 2013 RECIPIENTS

tUesDay

-11 q low -24°C q z x b v

The Yukon Lottery Commission is reinvesting $312,881 of lottery revenues into Yukon communities with funding assistance to art, sport and recreation projects.

°C

high

w e q w zjq x z -15/-20 b x OLD CROW

r e w q z

Organization

i u o p r i u o e yUKoN r i u communities w e r i q w e r

j -17/-24 o -17/-22 j o j -22/-32 -13/-20 -14/-20 o e o -9/-17 -18/-27 -29/-39 DAWSON

MAYO

BEAVER CREEK

CARMACKS

ROSS RIVER

WHITEHORSE

HAINES JUNCTION

WATSON LAKE

caNaDa/Us

Vancouver Victoria

Edmonton Calgary Toronto

Yellowknife

-2°C -1°C -26°C -26°C 1°C -19°C

When: Friday December 13th from 11:30 to 2 pm

Where: Yukon NDP Caucus office at the Legislative Assembly (lower level)

09:51 Sunset: 15:52

°C -4 q °C low -7

high

Friday, December 6, 2013

Skagway Juneau

Grande Prairie Fort Nelson Smithers

Dawson Creek

-5°C -4°C -29°C -27°C -16°C -26°C

Project

Approved Contribution

L’Association franco-yukonnaise .................................30th Anniversary of La Cabane à Sucre..........................$5,542 Blue Feather Music Society ............................................“Dreamspeak” Blue Feather Music Festival ................ $14,950 Community Choir of Whitehorse Society ................Choir Costumes ...................................................................$6,742 Dawson City Museum Society ......................................The Break-Up Comedy Festival 2014............................ $15,430 Dawson City Ski Association..........................................All-terrain Vehicle .................................................................$6,236 Dog Powered Sports Association of Yukon..............2014 River Runner 120 Dog Sled/Skijoring Race..........$4,846 Golden Age Society ..........................................................Seniors’ Dawson City Bus Trip ...........................................$1,969 Guild Society ......................................................................Production and Tour: “Often I Find That I am Naked” ...................................... $19,015 Gwaandak Theatre Society ............................................Production and Tour: “The Hours That Remain“....... $15,926 Klondike Highland Dance Club ....................................Workshops and Highland Dance Regalia......................$3,305 Learning Disabilities Association of Yukon ..............LDAY Summer/Winter Camps ........................................ $10,000 Mountain View Golf Club................................................Multi-purpose Rough Mower ......................................... $16,540 Music Yukon.........................................................................2014 Arts in the Park ........................................................ $25,124 Second Opinion Society..................................................Second Opinion Cross Country Ski Program.................$3,431 Snowboard Yukon .............................................................Jib Park Setup and Weekend Camps...............................$2,163 Top of the World Highland Games Association ......2014 Top of the World Highland Games ..................... $17,900 Watson Lake Ski Club.......................................................Snow Machine.......................................................................$8,190 Whitehorse Curling Club.................................................Portable Signage ..................................................................$2,462 Yukon Breeze Sailing Society .......................................Sailing Equipment............................................................. $14,394 Yukon First Nations Culture and Tourism Association ................................................2014 Adäka Cultural Festival.......................................... $20,000 Yukon Music Camp Society............................................2014 Yukon Summer Music Camp................................ $12,305 Yukon Quest International Association .....................2014 Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race ....... $15,873 Yukon Sourdough Rendezvous Society....................Rendezvous Festival — 50th Anniversary and Reunion........................................................................ $70,538

Applications to the Recreational Projects Program are accepted on April 15th and October 15th. For further information on this and other Lotteries Yukon programs visit our website at lotteriesyukon.com or call 633-7890 or 1-800-661-0555.

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Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

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o f m in d · · ·

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dep

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2012 honda civic

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Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

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Offer(s) available on select new 2014 models through participating dealers to qualified customers who take delivery by January 2, 2014. Dealers may sell or lease for less. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. All offers are subject to change without notice. Vehicles shown may include optional accessories and upgrades available at extra cost. All pricing includes delivery and destination fees up to $1,665, other fees and certain levies (including tire levies) and $100 A/C charge (where applicable) and excludes licensing, registration, insurance, other taxes and variable dealer administration fees (up to $699). Other dealer charges may be required at the time of purchase. Other lease and financing options also available. **0% purchase financing is available on select new 2013/2014 Kia models O.A.C. Terms vary by model and trim, see dealer for complete details. ¤“Don’t Pay Until Spring” offer (150-day payment deferral) applies to purchase financing on select new 2014 models. No interest will accrue during the first 120 days of the finance contract. After this period, interest accrues and the purchaser will repay both the principal and interest monthly over the contract’s term. Cannot be combined with “up to $750 customer bonus”. §Up to $750 customer bonus is available on 2014 Cadenza ($750), 2013/2014 Rio4&5 door ($200), 2013/2014 Soul ($250), 2014 Forte ($250), 2013/2014 Optima/Optima Hybrid ($300), 2013/2014 Sportage ($300), 2014 Sorento ($375), 2014 Rondo ($300), 2014 Sedona ($400). Savings cannot be combined with Don’t Pay Until Spring offer, customer has the option of additional cash savings or payment deferral. Offer only available on finance terms, not cash or lease offers. ≠Bi-weekly finance payment O.A.C. for new 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE)/2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E) based on a selling price of $28,460/$23,460 is $156/$125 with an APR of 0% for 60/84 months, amortized over an 84-month period. Offer includes $0/$750 loan savings. Estimated remaining principal balance of $8,131/$0 plus applicable taxes due at end of 60-month period. Retailer may sell for less. See dealer for full details. Cash purchase price for the new 2014 Forte LX MT (FO541E) is $13,480 and includes a cash savings of $4,000 (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers). Retailer may sell for less. ‡$4,000 cash savings on the cash purchase of an eligible new 2014 Forte LX MT (FO541E) from a participating dealer between December 3, 2013-January 2, 2014, is deducted from the selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers including the Don’t Pay Until Spring offer. Some conditions apply. ∞NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Phase 1: the mail-in entry period for phase I begins on October 29, 2013, at 12:00:01 a.m. Eastern Time and ends on November 27, 2013, at 11:59:59 p.m. ET. The vehicle purchase entry period for phase I begins on November 1, 2013, at the start of regular business hours at participating Kia dealerships in Canada and ends at the close of regular business hours at participating dealerships on November 30, 2013. Phase 2: the mail-in entry period for phase 2 begins on November 26, 2013, at 12:00:01 a.m. Eastern Time and ends on December 26, 2013, at 11:59:59 p.m. ET. The vehicle purchase entry period for phase 2 begins on December 1, 2013, at the start of regular business hours at participating dealerships and ends at the close of regular business hours at participating dealerships on December 31, 2013. Open to age-of-majority residents of Canada. 60 Prizes (30 attributed to Phase 1 and 30 attributed to Phase 2), each consisting of a cheque that may range in value from $15,350 to $46,859. Odds of winning a Phase 1 Prize depend on the number of eligible Phase 1 Entries received before the applicable Phase 1 Draw Date. Odds of winning a Phase 2 Prize depend on the number of eligible Phase 2 Entries received before the applicable Phase 2 Draw Date. Skill-testing question required. For full contest rules and no-purchase entry details, visit www.kia.ca. ΔModel shown Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for 2014 Sorento 3.3L EX AT AWD (SR75HE)/2014 Forte SX (FO748E)/2014 Rondo EX Luxury (RN756E) is $34,195/$26,195/$32,195. Highway/city fuel consumption is based on the 2014 Sorento LX 2.4L GDI 4-cyl (A/T)/2014 Forte 1.8L MPI 4-cyl (M/T)/2014 Rondo 2.0L GDI 4-cyl (M/T). These updated estimates are based on the Government of Canada’s approved criteria and testing methods. Refer to the EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on driving habits and other factors. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of printing. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. Kia is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation.


Friday, December 6, 2013

Yukon News

Thanks for brightening our night, Whitehorse.

As a new wireless provider in town, we’d like to thank you for making us feel welcome. In case you didn’t make it to the tree lighting at Winterval, visit us online and vote for a local charity that could use a helping hand. Cast your vote at telus.com/votewhitehorse

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TELUS, the TELUS logo, the future is friendly and telus.com are trademarks of TELUS Corporation, used under licence. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © 2013 TELUS.

15


16

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Federal panel says time to upgrade tanker ship oil-spill rules The Canadian Press VANCOUVER otential polluters should be prepared for a worst-case scenario and face unlimited liability in the case of an oil spill from one of their tanker ships, a governmentappointed panel recommends. The three-member panel of experts has delivered a report with 45 recommendations for improving Canada’s preparedness for oil spills from tankers and barges. It’s the first major review of Canada’s ship-source oil-spill regime since it was implemented in the mid-1990s and forms a key part of the federal Conservative government’s efforts to reassure Canadians about the impacts of an energy resource boom. The 66-page report notes that two current pipeline proposals alone – by Enbridge and Kinder Morgan – could bring another 600 tankers through British Columbia waters, while posing new hazards by transporting diluted bitumen and liquefied natural gas. “The very appointment of this panel demonstrates our commitment to protect Canadians and our environment,” Transport Minister Lisa Raitt said Tuesday at a news conference in Vancouver. “The panel’s independence and its investigation and the extent of its work shows that we are serious about obtaining clear advice in a timely manner.” Raitt listed a series of actions she said the government has already taken to improve tanker safety, including a promise to increase inspections of foreign tankers and a study on the behaviour of diluted bitumen in sea water. Raitt said the goal of the panel’s report is to improve on “an already robust tanker safety system.”

P

federal government is serious about the safety and movement of tankers up and down the coast. “The evidence shows that as we put forward our concerns, the federal government has responded,” she added. However, Art Sterritt, executive director of the Coastal First Nations, a group that has openly opposed the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline, said the federal government’s readiness for an oil spill is dismal. He said during one exercise in Vancouver’s harbour last week, crews took six hours to get booms out into the water. “We get no comfort on the prevention side, we get no comfort on the readiness side, and there is no response for an oil spill of the tanker,” he said. Alexandra Woodsworth, a spokeswoman for the Georgia Strait Alliance, said in a statement Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press the Salish Sea is already in the Transport Minister Lisa Raitt, left, and Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver respond to an oil highest-risk category for an oil spill, without taking into consideratanker safety report during a news conference in Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday. tion the increase in tanker traffic expected with the Kinder Morgan “This is what British ColumThe study recommends remov- emergency responses to spills. pipeline expansion. bians expect and this is what we “In our view, the current ing the current $161-million liabil“When it comes to oil spill will deliver. On this there can be no response time planning standards ity limit for each spill in favour of response, we need prevention compromise.” an unlimited liability for polluters. will not ensure the best possible because there is no cure. And the Raitt said she will now study “We feel that potential polluters outcomes in some spill scenarios.” best way to minimize the risk of The panel also says current plan- the report, speak with stakeholdshould be prepared, through their ning is “particularly lacking” in the ers about their views and discuss it polluting our waters is to stand up contracted Response Organizafor our coast and our communities with her colleagues in cabinet. area of cleaning and rehabilitating tions, to respond to a worst-case The report is the first of two that and say no to Kinder Morgan.” oiled wildlife and the management discharge, whether it be the full Caitlyn Vernon, a spokeswoman the government commissioned of oily waste from spill recoveries. cargo of a tanker or a complete from the three-member panel back for the Sierra Club BC, said in a The experts also recommend release of bunker fuel on board a statement while her organization in March. increased resources for the coast vessel,” it says. agrees more improvements are A second study will deal with guard, Environment Canada and Its executive summary makes the point even more clearly: “Can- Transport Canada to help improve spill hazards in the Arctic as well as needed to deal with the existing tanker traffic on the coast, no an examination of hazardous and the system. adian taxpayers should not bear amount of safety precautions can noxious spills – such as bitumen Joe Oliver, minister of Natural any liability for spills in Canadian Resources, said the federal govern- and liquefied natural gas – on mar- justify increasing tanker traffic. waters.” “Regardless of who pays for oil ine environments. The report recommends annual ment is committed to world-class British Columbia Environment spill cleanup efforts, it is British spill training exercises, and regional safety for the transportation of Columbians who will live with the Minister Mary Polak said she has natural resources by pipeline, rail risk assessments based on local consequences.” a “high degree of confidence” the or tanker. geography. And it calls for faster

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December 6th is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada. Established in 1991 by Parliament, December 6th marks the anniversary of the murders in 1989 of 14 young women at L’École Polytechnique in Montréal. They were killed because they were women. December 6th represents an opportunity for Canadians to reflect and speak out about violence against women in our society. It is also an opportunity to consider the women and girls for whom violence is a daily reality, and to remember those who have died as a result of gender-based violence. And finally, it is a day on which communities and individuals can consider actions to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls. Violence in our communities is everyone’s issue. I encourage us all to speak out against violence when we see it happening and to be active agents for progressive lasting change in our community.

Elaine Taylor

Minister responsible for Women’s Directorate

Women’s Directorate Government

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Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Info watchdog investigating ‘non existent’ Senate scandal emails Canadian Press OTTAWA he federal information commissioner has launched an investigation into the mysterious disappearance and reappearance of emails related to the Senate expenses scandal. Suzanne Legault’s office confirms an investigation has been initiated in response to a complaint from deputy Liberal leader Ralph Goodale. Goodale had submitted an access-to-information request to the Privy Council Office, seeking all emails, correspondence and other records related to former prime ministerial chief of staff Nigel Wright’s deal to pay Sen. Mike Duffy $90,000 so that he could reimburse the Senate for invalid living expense claims. Among other things, he specified all records from or to Benjamin Perrin, former legal counsel in the Prime Minister’s Office. The PCO, which provides bureaucratic support to the PMO, eventually responded in late June that, after a thorough search, no records were found. Since then, however, documents obtained by the RCMP from the PMO and filed in court, have disclosed hundreds of emails exchanged between Wright, Duffy, Perrin, various other top aides in the PMO and several senators. Moreover, PCO acknowl-

T

edged Sunday that it mistakenly told the RCMP that Perrin’s emails had been deleted when he left the government’s employ in March, according to standard practice. In fact, Perrin’s emails had been preserved because of his involvement in an unrelated legal matter. That development has prompted Goodale to write Legault again today, arguing that her investigation is even more crucial now, given the “absolute relevance of the Perrin documentation and the spotty record of PCO in handling this hugely important and sensitive

file.” He says it’s important to ensure that PCO is able to maintain and retrieve records “free from political interference.” Last spring, Perrin denied any role in the Wright-Duffy affair. But the email trail disclosed by the RCMP shows he was intimately involved in negotiating a deal with Duffy’s lawyer, under which Duffy agreed to repay his expenses on condition that he be fully reimbursed, that an audit into his expenses be halted and a Senate report on his expense claims be whitewashed.

Sean Kilpatrick The Canadian Press

Senator Irving Gerstein walks with an aide in Ottawa on Wednesday.

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Yukon News

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19

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Sea lions looking for love may end up lunch for transient killer whales: study Dene Moore

make some noise. “Our study found that transient killer whales frequently VANCOUVER caught prey in near-complete n the killer whale world, a darkness,” Deecke said in an noisy seal make a fine meal, email to The Canadian Press. says new research into the huntIt told the team that the ing practices of transient orcas whales were not relying on vioff the Pacific coast. sion, he said. A study by the Vancouver The group suspected the Aquarium a few years ago whales were using their keen revealed that transient orcas do hearing to target their next meal not, as once believed, hunt usand a juvenile orca provided ing echolocation to target prey, some compelling evidence as measuring the bounce of their own calls back to them in order he hunted all night in a glacial fiord off southeast Alaska. to hone in on dinner. That left Soon after tagging, the tag’s biologists wondering just how they do hunt. “Because transient don’t echolocate we did not know what senses they use to find prey,” said Volker Deecke, a researcher at the Centre for Wildlife Conservation at the University of Cumbria in the United Kingdom and a former research associate at the Vancouver Aquarium. The waters off British Columbia and Alaska are home to two types of killer whales – the resident whales that feed solely on fish, and the transient whales that travel the waters more freely and feed on other mammals like porpoise and harbour seals. Using acoustic recording tags stuck to 13 transient All Kids killer whales with suction cups, Outerwear TIS THE SEASOn PRICE From Jupa, The the team led out of Cumbria North Face, Loki % recorded the mammals in the and Marmot OFF ocean off the coast of Alaska for up to 16 hours at a time. They wanted to know if the Mammut Men’s & whales were hunting with their Women’s sight, picking prey silhouetted Blask against the surface, or listening Softshell for their soon-to-be lunch to Jacket Canadian Press

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hydrophones picked up the distant roars of a male harbour seal trying to attracted a mate. “Over the next 30 minutes the roars got louder until at some point the tag recorded three loud roars where the whale must have been within a few hundred metres of the seal at the most,” Deecke said. “Exactly 27 seconds later, the tag recorded all the signs of a predation event – the sounds of whales ramming the prey, bones snapping and flesh ripping. No more roars after that.” While not direct evidence

that the transient whales eavesdrop to find food, it’s an important clue in the puzzle, suggested Lance Barrett-Lennard, the marine mammal scientist at the Vancouver Aquarium who conducted the earlier research on echolocation. “We, as humans, are putting a lot of noise in the water. Sound carries so well in water, it carries great distances,” he said. “A critter like a transient killer whale, that makes a living by listening for very quiet sounds, is at a real disadvantage when we humans introduce a

lot of noise.” Noise from boats and other human activity also affects resident orcas, but they’re generally more chatty and ramp up their own vocalizations to compensate for noise, he said. “But transients don’t do that,” Barrett-Lennard said. “They’re just passively listening for the sounds of prey, so we think the boat noise is a much more serious problem for transients.” Deecke presented the findings Tuesday to the Acoustical Society of America at a meeting in San Francisco.

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20

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Federal government seeks leave to appeal ‘60s scoop’ lawsuit Diana Mehta

An Ontario court certified the case in July, but the federal government will ask WednesTORONTO day for leave to appeal that arcia Brown Martel feels decision. like she grew up alone. Martel finds the governAfter being taken by child ment’s attempts at fighting the welfare authorities from her case frustrating. aboriginal family and being “This is to change how adopted into a non-indigenous Canada addresses its children,” home, she lost her distinct she said of the lawsuit. “When language, traditions and ties to Canada chooses to appeal ... her community, resulting in a they are appealing a fact of crushing sense of isolation. history.” The now-50-year-old says According to its notice askshe wants to make sure no ing for leave to appeal, the govother child in Canada shares ernment argued “there appears her experience, which is why to be good reason to doubt the she became the representacorrectness” of the court order tive plaintiff in a class action which certified the lawsuit as a lawsuit that claims a devastatclass action. ing loss of cultural identity was Among its arguments, it said suffered by Ontario victims of the judge erred “in impropthe so-called “60s scoop.” erly conflating the allegedly Her hopes of having the protected interest of cultural lawsuit set a precedent, howor aboriginal identity and the ever, now lie with a judge who plaintiffs’ claim for compensawill hear arguments this week tion for physical and psychoon whether the federal govlogical harm.” ernment should be allowed to Martel was taken by child appeal a court decision that welfare services from her home gave the case the green light to on an Ontario First Nations proceed. reserve as a young child. She The lawsuit against the was adopted into a non-indigCanadian government refers enous family at the age of nine, to a period of time between at which point her aboriginal the 1960s and the 1980s when name was changed. thousands of aboriginal chil“I lost my language, I lost my dren were taken from their ability to communicate with homes and placed with nonmy elders, I lost a lot,” said the native families by child welfare woman who only found out services. None of its claims years later that a federal register have been proven in court. listed her as deceased under the Canadian Press

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name she had been born with. Martel cut ties with her adoptive family after she turned 18 and eventually returned to the reserve where she had been born. After years of slow and often painful re-integration, she is now the chief of the Beaverhouse First Nation in northern Ontario’s Kirkland Lake region. “I was an outsider. Those people didn’t know me,” she said. “I worked my way into the hearts of the community, one person at a time.” Throughout her childhood, Martel wasn’t given much of an explanation about why she was no longer with her biological family. “’Aboriginal people were always drinking and they couldn’t look after their children anymore’ – that’s what I was told,” she said. “When I was about 12 I kind of wondered how is it possible that thousands of aboriginal people with families across the country could not look after their children anymore, how did that happen in one generation?” The period covered by the suit stretches from December 1965 – when the federal government signed an agreement with Ontario known as the Canada-Ontario Welfare Services Agreement – until December 1984, when aboriginality was made an important factor in child protection and

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placement practices through the Child and Family Services Act. In a written decision from Ontario’s Superior Court of Justice which certified the lawsuit, a judge said the federal government was wrong to argue that the 60s scoop could not be questioned or challenged because all placement of children followed orders from courts that were supposed to act in the children’s best interests. “The plaintiffs are not challenging the actual court decisions that allowed the aboriginal children to be placed in non-aboriginal homes. There is no collateral attack in this proposed class action on the judicial decisions,” wrote Justice Edward Belobaba. “The plaintiffs are alleging that the Federal Crown had a duty or responsibility to protect and preserve the Indian children’s culture and identity both when entering into the 1965 Agreement, and after the children were placed in the non-aboriginal homes, and failed to do so.” In certifying the suit, Belobaba narrowed the definition of those who could join the proceedings to children taken from Indian reserves in Ontario who were placed in nonaboriginal homes where they were not raised with aboriginal customs. The lawsuit is being hailed by the plaintiffs’ lawyer as a landmark case. “A lost generation of children of the 60s scoop means children who lost their identi-

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ties, lost connection with their culture, with their traditions, with their language,” said Jeffery Wilson. “It’s important not only for First Nations children, it’s important for children of all peoples all around the world that there should not be political solutions or expedient solutions that result in the loss of cultural identity for children.... The issue is this should not ever happen again. These people have suffered remarkable pain.” The case has been working its way through the courts for over three years. Plaintiffs asked for permission to put the case forward as a class action in February 2009, but the federal government successfully appealed certification of the proceedings, largely on a procedural point. A new hearing was then ordered in January this year. In July, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice certified the case after dismissing a Crown motion asking for the suit to be quashed. If the government is granted leave to appeal after this week’s hearing, Wilson said the case will enter another round of legal wrangling which will likely run well into 2015. “We’re spending a lot of taxpayer dollars and a lot of time on procedural points when Canada indicated at court that they regretted what happened and so the larger issue is why aren’t the parties sitting down and attempting to resolve this issue,” he said. “It is slow or frustrating for a lot of the potential claimants.”

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21

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Canada to file Arctic seafloor claim this week Bob Weber Canadian Press

S

ome time this week, Canada is expected to make its case to the world to dramatically expand its boundaries by an area equivalent to the size of all three Prairie provinces. Canada’s deadline is Friday to apply to a United Nations commission for exclusive rights to what is likely to be another 1.7 million square kilometres of Arctic seafloor. The application under the Convention on the Law of the Sea will be the culmination of a decade of work and more than $200 million in public money. The lines on the map will have been drawn by scores of scientists working everywhere from Ottawa labs to ice camps off the northern shores of Ellesmere Island, peering under the stormy black waters to discern the shape and composition of sea floor thousands of metres below. The effort required more than a dozen icebreaker voyages, as well as trips by helicopters, airplanes and an unmanned, remote-controlled submarine that spent days under the ice. With the co-operation of three Arctic neighbours – Denmark, Russia and the United States – more than 18,000 kilometres of sea-floor data was collected from a part of the globe less familiar than the surface of the moon. “It was a huge effort and enormously challenging,” said Michael Byers, an expert on Arctic and international law at the University of British Columbia. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea governs which nations exert what kinds of controls over their surrounding waters. In addition to the 22-kilometre territorial waters and the 370-kilometre exclusive economic zones, coastal countries are allowed to claim additional sea floor if

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they can show their continental shelf extends beyond the economic zone. Canada has previously released maps on the likely boundaries of its claim. Russia filed its claim in 2002 and Denmark released its last week. The U.S. has not signed the convention, but has agreed to follow most of its articles. Its boundary dispute with Canada involves the exclusive economic zone and doesn’t directly impact Friday’s claim. Conflicts are likely to be few. One calculation puts the amount of overlap between claims at a mere 75,000 square kilometres out of millions and millions.

Rob Huebert, an Arctic expert at the University of Calgary, will be watching to see if Canada stretches its claim past the North Pole. The geologic justification – an undersea mountain range called the Lomonosov Ridge that stretches north from Ellesmere Island – is there, he said. “I don’t think there’s something magical that stops (the claim) at the North Pole,” he said. Canadian officials have acknowledged mapping flights over the top of the world and into Russia’s claim, which does stop at the pole. But Byers said there’s no evidence that Canada has collected

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the kind of data it would need to challenge Russia. “We may have some small overlaps in the middle, but for the most part there will not be any overlap between the Russian submission on the one side and the Canadian and Danish submissions on the other,” he said. It all depends on how valuable Canadian officials think that real estate is, said Huebert. “Maybe it’s simply not worth it. Maybe we said, ‘You know what, for the sake of international peace and stability, it’s not important. We’ll only do our science up to that and that will be the basis of our claim.’ “(But) it means we didn’t go

as far as we could.” Whether or not Canada will claim the North Pole, a decision on its fate is still probably 20 years off. Just checking the science on Canada’s claim will likely take five years, said Huebert. And there isn’t any particular rush, said Byers. These claims cover some of the remotest and harshest points on the planet and commercial exploitation of resources is a long ways off. But just getting to the point where countries have filed claims is a triumph, he said. “In this former Cold War frontier we have an agreed set of rules. That has a huge payoff.”

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Yukon News

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23

Yukon News

Ford talks football, pivots around pointed questions with radio Sports Junkies Alexander Panetta

weight before he joined them on the air, describing him as having a “quadruple-chin.” WASHINGTON They also shared a laugh over quartet of self-described one of the new allegations – that “knuckleheads” celebrated a Ford is believed to have offered journalistic touchdown Thursday purported gang members $5,000 as they nabbed a timely, unexand a car in exchange for a video pected interview with Rob Ford. that purportedly shows the mayor The Washington, D.C., sports- smoking crack cocaine. radio hosts described how they’d The latest allegations, which sent the Toronto mayor an invita- have not been proven in court, are tion a few weeks back, mainly as a contained in wiretap summaries lark, to offer football predictions put together as part of a guns and on their show. gangs investigation that were in a But to their great surprise Ford police document released Wedagreed to appear once a week on nesday. The Sports Junkies, a CBS mor“(Wow), $5,000!” one of the ning radio show on WJFK-FM. hosts exclaimed, sarcastically. Little did they know the first It wasn’t all laughter and levity, show would end up airing one though. day after a fresh eruption of The hosts acknowledged the explosive allegations about Ford, seriousness of the allegations and leaving them with an unanticisaid they had a duty to address pated news exclusive. them on the air, if only in passing. Before they knew it, the hosts But they made it clear that they’d told listeners, CNN was asking invited Ford onto their show to to send a camera crew into their talk football, and that’s what they studio to tape their segment on mostly planned to do. NFL football picks. “We’re not the Smoking Gun. “We’re happy to be joined by We’re not 60 Minutes,” one host the most controversial political said. figure in the world right now,” “We’re four knuckleheads who one said as he introduced Ford. want to have this larger-than-life Barely a minute earlier, they’d personality on.... We’re not going been mocking him. to backstab the guy. We’re not the The hosts made fun of Ford’s The Canadian Press

A

moral police.” Ford has admitted to smoking crack cocaine in the past, “probably in one of my drunken stupors,” and has apologized for it, but says he does not use the drug and is not an addict. When the hosts did ask about the latest court documents, Ford dismissed the allegations as an “outright lie” and referred any further questions on the subject to his lawyer. In the end, they mostly talked football. Ford wound up impressing them with his knowledge of the sport and offered predictions on all of this week’s games, going beyond the few picks the hosts had asked him to make. Ford explained that he’d coached for 22 years. He said his admiration for the Washington Redskins stemmed from his stint at a pro football camp years ago. He also revealed that he bets regularly on NFL football through the provincial lottery board. His hosts, who were taping their show from an Atlantic City casino, expressed support for Canada’s legal sports gambling. The mayor was asked about an embarrassing viral video that shows him tumbling to the ground while preparing to pass a

football. “I’m not a quarterback,” Ford said. “I was a centre.” He denied stealing anyone’s seat at a recent Buffalo Bills game in Toronto and said he’d been escorted to that spot by an usher. He also said he enjoyed having people come up to him throughout the game to have their picture taken with him. “I’m really humbled by all the support,” he said, describing himself as a historically great mayor for keeping taxes low, returning people’s phone calls, and maintaining labour peace. “I have a lot of supporters in Toronto.” But he said he knew he was taking a risk at the Bills game, as a politician in a public venue, by digging into a proffered helping

of chicken wings with so many photographers present. “I dipped into those hot wings and they got me – whammo!” Ford also fielded some political questions. Asked for his opinion about U.S. President Barack Obama, Ford said he liked him personally, but not his politics. In another recent U.S. media interview, Ford’s brother Doug described the mayor as “the white Obama.” It turns out that the white Obama doesn’t actually like Obamacare: Ford said he doesn’t support an extension of public health care. He said he’s a conservative and, if he were American, he’d be a Republican. “I can’t get my head around (what Obama’s doing on health care),” he said.

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24

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Saskatoon couple can’t bring adopted son to Canada Chris Purdy Canadian Press

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aheeda Afridi was proud when she became a Canadian citizen nearly a decade ago, but now feels only anger and frustration over a bureaucracy that she says has abandoned her and her adopted son overseas. The Saskatoon woman and her husband, unable to have children of their own, became guardians of her nephew in Pakistan shortly after he was born there in 2010. But the family has been unable to bring the boy to Canada. Caught in the middle of changing and confusing Canadian rules around the adoption of Pakistani children, Afridi hasn’t been back to Saskatoon since she and her husband first went to Pakistan to get the child three years ago. She won’t leave without her little boy, Ajjab. She says she’d die first. “I cannot sleep at night. Every night it spins around in my mind: What is going to happen? Are we going to be home soon? When are we going to go back?” Afridi, 38, told The Canadian Press in a phone interview from Ankara, Turkey. “We’re treated like secondclass citizens. Nobody cares and nobody worries about you and nobody gives a darn where you are.” Afridi had been living with family in Pakistan under conThe new Yukon home of

stant threat of violence from the Taliban and bomb attacks. She and Ajjab were recently able to fly to Turkey on a visitor’s visa. She says that visa expires in mid-December and she doesn’t know what she’ll do then. She hopes she and her son won’t have to return to Pakistan. “I hope finally we can get home soon.” Afridi moved from Pakistan to Saskatoon in 1999 to be with her husband, Ashfaq Afridi, who was already a Canadian citizen. She gained her citizenship a few years later. The couple tried for nearly a decade to have a child, then looked into adoption. They were suitable candidates. She had a job at a daycare and he worked as a security guard. They had their own home. Saskatchewan social workers approved them as adoptive parents through a home study. All they needed to complete the dream was a baby, she says. In late 2009, she learned that her sister in Pakistan, pregnant with a seventh child, had become a widow and would struggle financially to care for another baby. The couple offered to adopt the child and flew to Pakistan a few weeks after the boy was born in 2010. Afridi says her husband returned to work in Saskatoon while she stayed in Pakistan to do the paperwork. Authorities there granted them custody and the couple started working to get everyone home. It turned into a lengthy, complicated mess. In 2012, after

officially closed its doors to children from Pakistan. Adoption authorities in all provinces decided to no longer approve adoptions from the Asian country. Amirzadeh says it’s heartbreaking for her clients. “It’s a very difficult situation for them because in some ways they have done everything right.” She says Waheeda Afridi also has health problems – a collapsed uterus and painful fibroids. She needs surgery but can’t afford medical care in a foreign country. “She is Canadian. She should be able to jump on the plane and come to Canada, but her three-year-old son has a Pakistani passport. And our government isn’t really being kind to that little toddler.” Saskatchewan officials say they support the child coming to the province and are encouraging Ottawa to allow it. Amirzadeh says it’s not enough. She suggests if the province really supports the family, it should push harder. Ashfaq Afridi recently flew to Turkey to aid his ailing wife and The Canadian Press see their boy for the first time Ajjab Afridi is carried by his adoptive mother Waheeda Afrisince he was a newborn. di, who feels anger and frustration over a Canadian bureauIt took awhile for the man cracy that she says has abandoned her and her son overseas. and child to bond, but Ajjab now calls his father Baba. nearly two years, Canada denied Canada and Pakistan have “legal His mother, Mama, says the the couple’s application for a incompatibilities.” boy is an average kid who sings permanent residence applicaSaskatoon lawyer, Haidah Itsy Bitsy Spider, knows his tion for their child. Amirzadeh, says she helped the English alphabet and likes to A spokeswoman with the couple file further applications watch Calliou, a popular Canafederal Immigration Departfor temporary residence visas dian children’s TV series. ment says she can’t comment and permits for the child, but He’s also been told about on the case because it’s before they were all denied. The Afcold, fluffy stuff called snow the court. But, in general, Sonia ridis are now seeking a judicial and how someday he’ll get to Lesage says adoption rules in review before the federal court. see it in Canada. His mother In 2012, 22 children adopted hopes she hasn’t lied. in Pakistan were allowed into “What’s wrong with CanaCanada through permanent da?” says Afridi. “Why are they residency or citizenship. making such a huge issue about But in July 2013 Canada the child?”

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• Extraction of natural gas will involve fracking – since Yukon’s fossil geology is mostly shale formation. • Fracking will turn clean water into chemical waste. Methane from fracking and leaking wells will pollute our water and accelerate climate change. • Transportation and storage of natural gas will need lots of energy – since it has to be transformed into and kept in a liquefied state. • Replacing Diesel generators with Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) plants in Whitehorse and Watson Lake doesn’t make sense - environmentally and economically.

Let’s start making sense: BAN FRACKING IN THE YUKON now – and invest in Renewable Energy. • Sign our NEW PETITION to BAN LNG AND FRACKING IN THE YUKON at local stores. • Attend the YESAB public meeting on project # 2013-0115 Whitehorse Diesel Natural Gas Conversion Project, Wednesday, December 11, 2013 at 5.30 p.m. at the Westmark Hotel. • Phone or email Scott Kent, Minister of Energy, Mines & Resources or your local MLA. • Check it out online: yukonersconcerned.ca This ad has been paid for by concerned residents of the Yukon.

OBJECTIONS TO LIQUOR LICENCE RENEWALS Any person wishing to object to the renewal of any liquor licence may do so, in writing, not later than January 2, 2014. PLEASE FORWARD WRITTEN OBJECTIONS, WITH REASONS TO: THE PRESIDENT YUKON LIQUOR CORPORATION 9031 QUARTZ ROAD WHITEHORSE, YUKON Y1A 4P9 A copy of the written objection must also be served by the objector on the licensee, either in person or by registered mail. THIS NOTICE IS PUBLISHED IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 3(3) OF THE YUKON LIQUOR REGULATIONS.


25

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Ex Harper appointee: Canada ‘rogue state’ on environment ‘On climate, Canada is a rogue state. It’s accelerating the global tragedy… The U.S. government should reject Keystone XL and explain to the Canadian government that it hopes to join with Canada (on a global climate plan).’ Alexander Panetta Canadian Press

WASHINGTON former Harper government appointee used a keynote speech at a Washington event Monday to trample Canadian authorities’ message on oil pipelines and described the country as an environmental “rogue state.” Mark Jaccard was one of the first people nominated by the Conservatives to the environmental file when he was named in 2006 to the federal government’s now-defunct National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy. Seven years later, the environmental economist delivered a lengthy rebuke of Canada’s climate-change performance at Monday’s event while the Obama administration grapples with whether to approve the Alberta-U.S. pipeline. Jaccard, an adviser to different governments and a professor at B.C.’s Simon Fraser University, said he doesn’t want the oilsands shut down – he just doesn’t want them to grow. “On climate, Canada is a rogue state,” Jaccard said. “It’s accelerating the global tragedy ... The U.S. government should reject Keystone XL and explain to the Canadian government that it hopes to

A

join with Canada (on a global climate plan).” That message stands in sharp contrast to that of the Canadian government, which has spent millions to publicize the benefits to both countries of developing the oilsands. Jaccard was the headline speaker at a summit tied to a well-connected Democratic donor, the so-called “green billionaire” Tom Steyer, and attended by a number of U.S. media outlets. Jaccard has become an increasingly bitter critic of the federal government. He was also arrested last year after joining a blockade on a train carrying U.S. coal from B.C. His disenchantment with the Conservative government reached a boil after the 2011 election, Jaccard said in an interview after his speech. He said he tried to work with the government – not only at the Round Table, but as an adviser to then-environment minister Rona Ambrose. But after the Conservatives won a majority in 2011, the rhetoric hardened, the Round Table vanished and it became clear they had no interest in tackling climate change, Jaccard said. “In 2011, the gloves came off.” In his career as an author,

academic, and adviser to different governments since the Mulroney era, Jaccard also criticized the Liberals for a climate approach he still derides as a “labels-on-fridges-andRick-Mercer-ads” strategy to encourage behaviourial change. More drastic policies are in order, he told his audience: greenhouse-gas emissions need to drop 50 to 75 per cent by 2050 to limit temperature growth to a 2C target – an impossible task with a growing oilpatch, Jaccard said. The event, and the choice of location, were designed to arm-twist the Obama administration as it faces its Keystone dilemma. It was in the same Georgetown neighbourhood that President Barack Obama delivered a speech last June saying Keystone will not be approved if it risks significantly increasing greenhouse-gas emissions. The title of Monday’s event was, “Can Keystone Pass The President’s Climate Test?” One speaker after another suggested that, no, Keystone cannot clear the bar set by Obama. In the hallways, the many Obama supporters speculated about when the long-awaited decision might finally come down. And some suggested they’ve become increasingly hopeful the project will be

blocked, given Obama’s choice of words. Former Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm even allowed herself to daydream about what an eventual presidential rejection might sound like. A decision is expected in early 2014. “I think he could deliver a speech that could give him a legacy he would be proud of,” Granholm, the event moderator, said from the stage. Earlier, Steyer described Keystone as a logical investment for the oil industry that would drive up the value of Canadian oil and ramp up development – which is precisely why he believes it shouldn’t be allowed to proceed. “(Keystone) is a literal and a figurative line in the sands,” Steyer said. “Keystone is the economic key to unlocking the tarsands and, as such, it fails the president’s test.” The other side of the Keystone debate was not represented at the event. TransCanada boss Russ Girling and Gary Doer, Canada’s ambassador to the U.S., both declined to attend. The federal government later

issued a lengthy statement condemning the characterization as a “rogue state.” Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver said that, whether or not Keystone goes ahead, the Canadian oil industry will represent a minuscule fraction of global emissions. His statement also noted that 62 per cent of Canada’s electricity is generated from renewable sources – first in the G8, compared with 12 per cent in the U.S. Canada has taken action to shut down coal plants, the largest source of greenhouse gases in the world, he added. While the Obama administration has taken steps to impose emissions restrictions and is believed to be planning more, coal remains an important source of energy in the U.S. TransCanada, for its part, dismissed Monday’s event as a sham. It said the project had been reviewed for five years by nearly two dozen state and federal agencies and that the “professional opponents” of Keystone are obscuring the central question: “about where America wants to get a source of oil from that it clearly needs.”

GEOG 290

Climate Change in the Circumpolar World Tuesday evenings 7-10 pm, January 7 to April 22, 2014

Climate change is a critical topic for the North. Once again, Yukon College is offering a course on Climate Change in the Circumpolar World. The 3-credit course, GEOG 290, looks at the science and local knowledge of climate, where we are coming from and where we are going. It examines the impacts of a warming globe on the North and how the North feeds back to the entire planet. The course addresses responses to climate change from adaptation to mitigation and from the personal to the political. Climate change is cross cutting and this course is ideally suited for decision makers, policy advisors, resource managers and students of science, circumpolar studies and renewable resources. Climate change affects many fields and this course is designed to provide a solid foundation of this crucial topic.

To register call 668-8710. Prerequisite: Second year or higher standing in a Liberal Arts or Science program or permission of the instructor.


❄ Yukon News

Craig Wong

Canadian Press

M

in new ways as they face tighter margins. “There are a number of proven OTTAWA technologies and things that are ining companies need to out there today that radically innovate and consider struc- change the way ore is extracted tural changes to deal with volatile and change the way mining occurs. commodity markets, a report “We think this is the opportusuggests. nity to embrace that innovation, to The report by audit and conget to that point of sustainability.” sulting firm Deloitte says mining Beier says it is about more than companies are facing a seismic just bringing in more technology, shift in the industry. but also re-examining the underlyJurgen Beier, a national mining process. ing practice leader at Deloitte, says Mining companies have mining companies need to think struggled through a difficult year

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26 Friday, December 6, 2013

Mining companies need to innovate to survive: Deloitte report says “Mining companies really need to be much more nimble than they have been historically,” he said. “While we do think the longterm demand picture is good, I think the mining companies are going to have to learn to survive with smaller margins.” Mines are becoming more remote and harder to build, ore grades are lower and it is becoming more difficult to find workers, Beier said. “It is becoming much more difficult to mine and extract minerals out of the ground.”


27

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

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Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Fixing First Nations relationships key to energy development Lauren Krugel Canadian Press

LAKE LOUISE, Alta. overnments and industry must fix their relationships with First Nations communities if large-scale energy projects are to move forward in Canada, speakers at a business forum in Lake Louise, Alta., said Friday. The warnings, from both First Nations and industry leaders, came as regulators are expected to rule within weeks on a the contentious Northern Gateway pipeline proposal by Enbridge Inc. Miles Richardson, former president of the Haida Nation in northwestern British Columbia, said aboriginal right and title must be recognized. “Canada needs to build a constructive relationship with the Pacific Rim. Canada needs markets for our energy and abundant resources around the Pacific Rim. We’re all a part of

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that,” said Richardson, who was also chief commissioner of the B.C. Treaty Commission. “And if you move goods ... from the east of Canada over to the Pacific Rim, who’s there? In B.C., the First Nations are there and I want you all to understand that the situation of First Nations in B.C. is unique in this country. The situation of First Nations in B.C. is unique for one reason – we have never concluded treaties.” Richardson told the audience populated with prominent corporate leaders: “You need to, as a business community, push the federal Crown.” A joint review panel decision on Northern Gateway, which would ship 525,000 barrels of oilsands crude per day to the northern B.C. port city of Kitimat, B.C., is expected by year-end. Proponents of the project say Northern Gateway would be a crucial link to Asian countries

hungry for Canadian energy, diversifying markets and providing a big economic boost for the country. But environmental groups, several First Nations communities and other opponents say those benefits are far outweighed by the risk of a spill from the pipeline itself or from supertankers traversing inhospitable coastal waters. Enbridge CEO Al Monaco said his company has a “ways to go” toward building more support that goes beyond winning regulatory approval, adding that about 26 agreements have been signed with First Nations communities. “What I do is look at things that we can control and certainly having a very thorough application, making sure we’re speaking to people in the community, making the project the safest it can be and making sure we’re looking after the environment – those are the things

that we can do,” Monaco told reporters. “Obviously there are some broader issues with First Nations rights and title that the government is looking after.” Ian Anderson, who heads up the Canadian division of U.S. pipeline giant Kinder Morgan, said First Nations issues need to be addressed. His company is planning to nearly triple the size of its Trans Mountain oil pipeline between Alberta and the B.C. Lower Mainland, also with an eye to expanding Canada’s oil export reach to Asian markets. “Facing up to our situation … is mission critical. It’s not someone else’s problem to solve. It’s our issue to resolve – all of us,” he said. “Governments, industry, average citizens, members of the public – we all have to recognize that there is work to be done to advance the ball down the field, one step at a time,

but in a very committed way,” Anderson added. “We’ve got to listen. We’ve got to learn. We’ve got to help create economic certainty for industry for our country, but only through hard work with our First Nations communities to make them partners in what we’re trying to accomplish.” Douglas Bloom, president of Canadian LNG at Spectra Energy, said First Nations “discontent” gets noticed on the world stage. For companies looking to build multibillion-dollar liquefied natural gas facilities on the B.C. coast, that’s a concern. “First Nations issues in Canada are important, complex and not likely to be solved in the short run,” said Bloom. “But it’s during that short run that we must convince customers and investors that these projects can be done, and to do this we must ensure that First Nations benefit economically from these developments.”

Teslin Tlingit Heritage Centre ExprEssion of intErEst rEsEarch and plan Exhibition for thE tEslin tlingit hEritagE cEntrE The Heritage Department of the Teslin Tlingit Council has received funding from the Community Development Fund CDF to research and plan a permanent exhibition on the Teslin Tlingit 200 year journey to re-establishing self-government. The year 2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the effective date of Self-government and marks the 42 years of beginning the Land Claims Negotiations. The Exhibition has a working title “Self-Government to Self-Government” and will explore the history of the Teslin Tlingit people as they experienced the transitions from being a Clan Based Self-Governing coastal people migrating to the interior of northern western North America and being transformed into a Canadian Indian Act Band emerging into a modern 21st Century Clan-Based Self-Governing First Nation. The Exhibition it will be a permanent interactive multi-media and new media display using video footage, sound recordings, photographs, maps, documents, artifacts and a scale model of the Teslin Tlingit Traditional Territory. It will be a memorial piece recognizing the contributions and sacrifices of the many people and families who worked on land claims. We are looking for professional(s) experienced in exhibition research, planning and design. They will be researching the Teslin Tlingit First Nation history and their Political Evolution. They will be expected to develop the exhibition storyline and fleshing out the main historical themes and the overall narrative, identify and gain access to exhibition support materials, conducting interviews and gathering firsthand accounts from TTC Citizens and people associated with the Land Claims process. They will also help in planning and designing of the Exhibition, including the use of standard exhibit techniques and the selection of new media to support the telling of the story. We anticipate a great deal of consultation with elders and community members. Interested parties please submit proposal, complete with budget, timelines, resumes of principals and references on or before 4:00 PM, January 6th, 2014 to the Department of Heritage, Teslin Tlingit Council, PO Box 133 Teslin Tlingit Council. Email proposals are acceptable to tip.evans@ttc-teslin.com

Sometimes the the best Sometimes bestpresents presents don't come come in don't in aabox. box. Your local Tim Hortons invites you to a Free Holiday Skate. It’s

Your local Tim Hortons invites you to a Free Holiday Skate. It’s our way of saying thank you and happy holidays. Please join us on our way ofDecember saying thank you and happy- 2:30pm holidays. us on Sunday, 8th from 12:30pm at Please Canadajoin Games Sunday, December 8th from 12:30pm 2:30pm at Canada Games Centre. Centre.

contact tip Evans, director of heritage teslin tlingit council

box 133 teslin, Yukon Y0a 1b0

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© Tim Hortons, 2010

© Tim Hortons, 2010

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Friday, December 6, 2013

Yukon News

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30

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Nuclear deal with Iran may cause oil prices to fall on easing tensions Jonathan Fahey

ment and how it is implemented.” Iran reached an agreement with the U.S. and five other world powers NEW YORK to freeze its nuclear program for six orld oil prices could be head- months while the two sides work ed lower after the preliminary on a more permanent deal covering nuclear deal between Western naIran’s development of nuclear techtions and Iran, even though the deal nology. In exchange, some sanctions does not loosen sanctions on Iran’s against Iran will be relieved, and it oil exports. will get access to some frozen overIn the short term, the deal may seas assets, including $4.2 billion in make it easier for Iran to sell the oil oil revenue. it is already allowed to sell under Kevin Book, an analyst at the sanctions, which would increase ClearView Energy Partners in Washsupplies on the world market. And ington, predicts the price of Brent the newfound co-operation between Crude, an international benchmark Iran and the West eases tensions used to price oil used by many U.S. that pushed oil prices higher in refineries, could fall to $90 a barrel recent years. by the end of next year if talks yield But the deal, described by both a final agreement. sides as only a first step, raises the Analysts caution, though, that if possibility that a more comprehen- talks on a final deal fall apart – or sive agreement would eventually al- even appear to be faltering – oil low Iran to restore oil production to could instead rocket higher. Iran pre-sanctions levels. That could add and the West have been seemingly 1 million barrels per day of oil to close to an agreement on nuclear world markets – enough to meet the issues in the past, only to abanentire global growth in demand for don talks and descend deeper into 2014 projected by the International acrimony. Energy Agency. “Even the slightest hint of an un“The initial reaction is going to raveling of the Geneva accord could be a more stable oil market,” says restore a vibrant risk premium to Anthony Cordesman, a Middle East crude,” Book says. and energy expert at the Center for But oil prices appear to be headStrategic and International Studies ed lower for now, in part because in Washington. “But everything will the prospect of more Iranian oil is coming at a time when production depend on if there’s a final agreeAssociated Press

W

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Oil pumps work in the desert of Sakhir, Bahrain. Oil prices could be headed lower after the preliminary nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers, even though it does not loosen sanctions on Iran’s oil exports.

is rising in the U.S., Canada, and elsewhere, helping global supply growth outpace the growth in demand. The average price of Brent crude so far this year is three per cent below last year’s average, and it’s on track for its lowest average price since 2010. Lower prices of Brent crude have helped reduced U.S. retail gasoline prices this year, which are also on track for their lowest annual average since 2010. A further reduction in oil prices could bring additional relief to drivers. “The perception, whether accurate or not, that next year’s surplus could be supplemented by additional Iranian barrels will be bearish for prices,” says Judith Dwarkin, director of energy research at ITG Investment Research. Iran produces 2.7 million barrels of oil per day, three per cent of world demand that averages 91 million barrels per day. Iran was once

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the world’s third largest oil exporter, but since 2012, when Western nations expanded economic sanctions against the country to include oil, its exports have dropped 60 per cent to less than 1 million barrels per day. Limited exports were allowed to continue to some countries, especially in Asia, that rely on Iranian crude. This weekend’s preliminary deal does not change those sanctions, which the White House says cost Iran up to $5 billion per month. The deal, the White House says, allows “purchases of Iranian oil to remain at their currently significantly reduced levels.” But the Geneva deal may make it easier for Iran to sell the oil allowed under the sanctions. ClearView’s Book estimates that Iran could increase sales by about 285,000 barrels per day over the next month before reaching the 1 million barrel per day limit allowed by the sanctions.

While modest, that could help lower global prices by making up for a sharp drop in Libyan crude exports in recent months caused by civil unrest. The simple fact that the two sides reached any agreement at all will also help reduce prices. Oil has been more expensive in recent years in part because traders worried that the heightened tensions between Iran and the West would lead to a sudden interruption of oil supplies. Iran in the past has threatened to block or attack oil shipments through the Strait of Hormuz, a narrow passage in the Persian Gulf through which one-fifth of the world’s oil passes. Also, traders worried that the West would further tighten limits on Iran’s oil exports. While those limits won’t be loosening soon, the threat of even less Iranian oil on the world market has all but evaporated – for now.

To All Selkirk First Nation Citizens residing in Whitehorse: Please join Selkirk First Nation Chief and Council for a

Celebration

A Family Christmas Thursday, December 12th at the High Country Inn Banquet Room Doors open at 5:00 pm, with dinner and a visit from Santa to follow! Important: Please confirm your attendance and register your children with Bonnie @334-8479 by Monday, December 9th.


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Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

HURRY IN TODAY!

2013

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Hurry in. And get a great deal today. Mic Mac Toyota 6111-6th Avenue at Main Street 667.7202 • Fax 668.5182 • Email: sales@micmac.toyota.ca Toll free: 1.877.667.7202 • www.micmactoyota.ca REgulaR HouRs salEs: Monday to Friday 8:30 to 5:30 • saturday 10:00 to 4:00 PaRTs & sERvicE: Monday to Friday 8:00 to 5:00 • saturday 9:00 to 1:00 all offers are valid at participating dealers from september 4, 2013 to september 30, 2013 but are subject to change without notice, quantities of certain vehicles are limited and dealer trade may be required. Dealer trade availability may also be limited and will vary by model. some conditions apply. see your Toyota dealer for complete details on all offers.


32

Yukon News

Feel like a small fish in a big pond?

Friday, December 6, 2013

Alberta biogas company hopes to turn manure into money

Stand out from the crowd and be seen! Advertise your business in the Yukon News. Phone: 867-667-6283 • Fax: 867-667-3755

Once school starts, the action never stops! That’s why we’re getting the flu shot — and not missing a moment. Kids who don’t like needles can get the flu mist vaccine this year, available in limited quantities.

cial Services Corporation. It is also received $8.2 million LETHBRIDGE, Alta. from Alberta’s Climate Change and company in southern Alberta Emissions Management Corporahopes to turn manure and tion (CCEMC). other farm waste into money, with “The returns on these facilities government help. can’t compete with oil and gas so Lethbridge Biogas LP says its we needed to find partners who $30-million plant, which produces were interested in this type of venelectricity, is the largest project of ture,” Michalski said Wednesday at its type in Canada. the opening of the plant. Stefan Michalski, a comThe CCEMC is a non-profit corpany spokesman, says it can make poration that gets its money from a enough electricity to power 2,800 fee that companies pay the Alberta homes, and has the capacity to government when they exceed expand. greenhouse gas emission limits. He says the anaerobic digester CCEMC estimates the plant will plant is already selling the power it reduce Alberta’s carbon dioxide generates into Alberta’s electricity emissions by more than 224,000 grid. tonnes by 2020. Michalski says the private comLethbridge Biogas says it has pany is being financially supported the capacity to process more than by a $6.4-million grant from Al100,000 tonnes of farm waste per berta Energy and a $5 million loan year – enough to fill more than from Alberta’s Agriculture Finan3,300 tanker trucks. Canadian Press

A

CARCROSS M–Th: from Oct 21 9am –11am, 1:30pm –3pm Carcross Health Centre DAWSON M, W, Th & F: from Nov 22 9am –12noon, 1pm –5pm Dawson Health Centre T: from Nov 22 9am –12noon Dawson Health Centre Dawson Health Centre will be closed for a week from Dec 9–Dec 13 OLD CROW M–Th: from Oct 21 9am –12noon, 1pm –4pm Old Crow Health Centre F: from Oct 25 9am –12noon Old Crow Health Centre PELLY CROSSING T–F: from Oct 22 9am –11am, 2pm –4pm Pelly Crossing Health Centre ROSS RIVER During usual AM and PM Walk-in Clinics – M–F: 8:30am –11:30am and M–Th: 3pm –4pm; and Wednesdays from 1pm –3pm WATSON LAKE T: from Dec 6 1pm –4pm Health Centre Drop-in Clinic WHITEHORSE M–F: from Oct 21 9am –11:30am, 1pm –4pm Kwanlin Dün Health Centre F: Dec 6, 13, 20 & 27 9am –4pm Whitehorse Health Centre

To see a complete schedule visit yukonflushot.ca NOTE: A bilingual nurse will be on duty at most Whitehorse flu clinics.

YUKON NEWS: 6 December

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33

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

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34

Yukon News Golden Horn Volunteer Fire Department

Would like to wish you a safe and happy winter season and reminds you to… • Ensure your driveway is clear of snow to allow safe and efficient efficient access for fire fighting vehicles • Mark your driveway with at least 6” high visible numbers • Test your smoke and CO alarms/detectors • In case of fire remember to get out and stay out! Contact us at 667-3465 or goldenhorn.fire@gmail.com to become a member

Friday, December 6, 2013

Amazon.com considering using unmanned aircraft to deliver purchases Scott Mayerowitz

the roads or skies without hitting Manhattan will be much trickier. But the savings of such a delivery anything? And, if an accident system only come in large, urban does occur, who is legally liable? NEW YORK areas. Then there are the security mazon.com is working on a issues. Delivering packages by Besides regulatory approval, way to get packages to cusAmazon’s biggest challenge will drone might be impossible in a tomers in 30 minutes or less – via city like Washington D.C. which be to develop a collision avoidself-guided drone. ance system, said Darryl Jenkins, has many no-fly zones. Consider it the modern a consultant who has given up on Bezos founded Amazon.com version of a pizza delivery boy, the commercial airline industry in 1994 after quitting his job at minus the boy. and now focuses on drones. a Wall Street hedge fund. With Amazon.com said it’s workWho is to blame, Jenkins Bezos’ parents and a few friends ing on the so-called Prime Air asked, if the drone hits a bird, as investors, Amazon began opunmanned aircraft project in its erating out of the Bezos Seattle crashes into a building? Who is research and development labs. going to insure the deliveries? garage as an online bookseller But the company says it will take on July 16, 1995. The first book There are also technical years to advance the technology questions. Who will recharge sold on the site was Douglas and for the U.S. Federal Aviation Hofstadter’s Fluid Concepts and the drone batteries? How many Administration to create the nec- Creative Analogies: Computer deliveries can the machines make essary rules and regulations. Models of the Fundamental Mech- before needing service? The project was first reported anisms of Thought. In the nearly “Jeff Bezos might be the single Sunday by CBS’ 60 Minutes. person in the universe who could two decades since, Amazon has Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said make something like this hapgrown to become the world’s in a primetime interview that largest online retailer, selling ev- pen,” Jenkins said. “For what it while the octocopters look like erything from shoes to groceries worth, this is a guy who’s totally something out of science fiction, to diapers and power tools. changed retailing.” there’s no reason they can’t be The biggest losers could be Amazon’s business plan has used as delivery vehicles. package delivery services like the been to spend heavily on growBezos said the drones can ing its business, improving order U.S. Postal Service, FedEx and carry packages that weigh up to UPS. fulfilment and expanding into five pounds, which covers about new areas. Those investments FedEx spokesman Jess Bunn 86 per cent of the items Amazon have come at the expense of said in an email: “While we can’t delivers. The current generation speculate about this particular consistent profitability. Invesof drones the company is testing tors have been largely forgiving, technology, I can say that makhas a range of about 10 miles (16 focusing on the company’s long- ing every customer experience km), which Bezos noted could outstanding is our priority, and term promise and double-digit cover a significant portion of the revenue growth. Though it could anything we do from a technolpopulation in urban areas. be years before it’s reality, drone- ogy standpoint will be with that While it’s tough to say exactly powered delivery fits well into in mind.” how long it could take the project the company’s plans of making The U.S. Postal Service to get off the ground, Bezos told delivery as convenient – and fast wouldn’t speculate about using 60 Minutes that he thinks it could – as drones for mail delivery. Spokesadpossible. 2 REVISED for Yukon News happen in four or five years. woman Sue Brennan referred any One of the(6biggest promises 3 columns inches) by 3 inches Unlike the drones used by the for civilian questions to Amazon. drone use has been in to run Friday, December 6 military, Bezos’ proposed flying Amazon, one of the Postal agriculture. machines wouldn’t need humans The unmanned aircraft can fly Service’s major customers, recontact to: FOYAS, c/o Patricia Halladay, phone 667-6089 sitting in a distant trailer to and billover cently partnered with the agency large fields and search out control them. Amazon’s drones bugs, rodents and other animals to begin delivering packages on Sunday in major metropoliwould receive a set of GPS cothat might harm crops. Then, tan areas. Sunday service will ordinates and automatically fly thanks to GPS, another drone be available to Amazon Prime to them, presumably avoiding could come back and spread buildings, power lines and other pesticide on that small quadrant members in the New York and Los Angeles areas first, followed obstacles along the way. of the field. Agriculture is also seen as the by other large cities next year. Drone delivery faces several Amazon’s stock dipped 25 most-promising use because of legal and technology obstacles similar to Google’s experimental the industry’s largely unpopulat- cents, or less than one per cent, driverless car. How do you design ed, wide open spaces. Delivering to $393.37 in Monday afternoon’s trading. Amazon packages in midtown a machine that safely navigates Canadian Press

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AuDitions WiLL Be sCheDuLeD… Monday december 9th And tuesday, december 10th Between 6pm – 10pm

Auditions

Book of EsthEr

ChARACteRs: (approximate age only) esther Dalzell 15-17 Anthea Dalzell 40-50 seth Dalzell 40-50 todd Wishart 40-50 A.D. 15-17

By Leanna Brodie Directed By: Clinton Walker

AuDition ContACt: Kcrae18@gmail.com For a copy of the play, an audition time, and an audition form. ReheARsALs WiLL Begin: Jan. 9th (tue – Fri evenings 6pm-10pm, and sat/sun 10am-6pm) shoW DAtes ARe: February 13 – March 1st Wed – sat 8pm

Lights of Life A holiday tradition to remember the life of a loved one. Write the name of your loved one on a Lights of Life tag and hang it on the tree. This is a simple and meaningful ritual that the whole family can take part in.

OPENING CEREMONY Thurs Dec. 12, 12:15pm

YT in 3D

Elijah Smith Bldg. featuring the Persephone Singers

Stereo photos from Yukon We’ll provide the glasses.

Visit the Lights of Life trees at the Elijah Smith Building December 12 to 20 Lights of Life Trees are also available at other Whitehorse locations and in many Yukon communities. Please visit our website for a list of all tree locations and tips on handling the holidays when you are grieving.

For more information 667-7429

www.hospiceyukon.net

Hougen Heritage Gallery, Arts Underground Tuesday to Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Extended to the end of February 2014

Come and see a 3D version of this glass plate stereoscopic slide. Yukon Archives, Louis Jacquot fonds, 89/42 #17

Tourism Culture Tourismand and Culture Yukon YukonArchives Archives

Tourisme et Culture Archives du Yukon


35

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Thugs in east China harass lawyers for defending rights activists, as China hails rule of law Gillian Wong

relatives as they approached the court, hurling abuse – and clumps of mud – at them. The BEIJING court barred most of the public bout 200 thugs harassed from attending the trial. lawyers and relatives of “They called us traitors, three civil rights activists scumbags and hooligans,” Pu outside a courthouse in eastern said. “Today is China’s constiChina on Wednesday, as top tution’s anniversary. But we judges in the capital marked see how Xinyu is treating us. the anniversary of China’s None of our rights have been constitution by hailing the rule respected.” of law. At this time last year, newly The three activists were appointed Communist Party standing trial in the city of leader Xi Jinping, who is now Xinyu on illegal assembly China’s president, marked the charges that supporters say anniversary of the constituwere trumped up to punish tion by pledging to uphold the them for being part of a group rights of Chinese citizens and that urges citizens to embrace urging officials to build confitheir constitutional rights. dence in the law. The trial’s second day, ironiXi’s remarks last December cally, coincided with the 31st prompted the country’s libanniversary of China’s constitu- eral intellectuals, activists and tion, and top judges in Beijing others to advocate that China marked the day with pledges adopt constitutionalism – in to promote the rule of law and which the government’s power judicial transparency. is restricted by the country’s In Xinyu, lawyer Pu Zhiqiang laws. said the thugs surrounded six The three Xinyu activists – Liu Ping, Wei Zhongping attorneys and the defendants’ Associated Press

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and Li Sihua – are among those who sought to push the party’s new leadership to live by the promises laid out in the constitution, which guarantees freedoms of speech, assembly, religion and other rights that in reality are rarely protected in China. The three are part of the New Citizens Movement, a loose network of campaigners who have lobbied for officials to declare their assets to help curb corruption. Participants have held small, peaceful demonstrations and organized dinner parties. The three activists are accused of “illegal assembly” – a charge their lawyers say stems from a photo of them holding signs calling for the release of other protesters – and other charges. A woman surnamed Peng who answered the phone at the Xinyu public security bureau said police had not received any reports of anyone being harassed at the courthouse.

We need your songs about the Yukon! The Whitehorse Community Choir is underway with a project to develop a full concert program of new and original compositions that reflect the lives, history, diverse cultures, land, and people of the Yukon and we need your help. We are currently searching for any and all songs, lyrics, and poems, both existing and new pieces about the Yukon by Yukoners. We welcome all Yukon artists; men, women, and children of all ages, the francophone community, First Nations, artists from the communities, etc.

We are asking the people of the Yukon to help us with this. Once collected, 15 songs will be chosen and crafted into choral pieces for a world premiere in the Yukon in spring 2015. The second phase, is to further refine these songs into a concert program and apply to perform them on a national stage at the 2015 PanAm games in Toronto.

Anyone can apply. PleAse resPONd TO susannehingley@hotmail.com or by mail to 42 Firth road, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 4r6 bY JANuArY 10Th. If you have questions, please talk to susanne hingley, Project Manager at 335-7775. Please help us put together a collection of fantastic Yukon songs.


36

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Number of European fighters in Syria rises sharply Lori Hinnant And Jan M. Olsen

through online rebel videos. He made two trips into Syria that Associated Press totalled a little more than one month. He drove trucks carrying COPENHAGEN, Denmark relief supplies and transported new wave of Europeans is people, he said, but never fought. heading to Syria, their ranks Nevertheless, he posted photosoaring in the past six months as graphs online of himself with tales of easy living and glorious heavy weapons. martyrdom draw them to the “It is my duty to travel down rebellion against Bashar Assad. there. This is a Muslim cause,” The western Europe-based said the young man, a Muslim rebels, mostly young men, are convert who did not want to be being recruited by new networks identified for fear of pursuit by that arrange travel and comfort- authorities. able lodging in the heart of rebel On his third trip this year, he territory, and foster a militant said, he was stopped at passport form of Islam that Western secu- control in Istanbul and sent back rity officials fear will add to the to Denmark. No reason was terror threat when the fighters given, but he believes his time return home. with the opposition put him on The 11 western European the intelligence community’s countries with the biggest conradar. He described being questingents in Syria are estimated tioned multiple times by Danish to have some 1,200-1,700 people intelligence agents, including at among rebel forces, according to the Copenhagen airport after government and analyst figures returning from Syria for the first compiled by The Associated time. Press. That compares to estimates “Right now, I cannot go to of 600-800 from those countries Syria,” he said. “I wanted to help in late spring. with humanitarian work and The surge has occurred fight.” particularly in France, Germany, Recruitment drives targeting Belgium and Sweden. It reflects people like the Dane are growing the increasing ease of travel to in intensity. The Islamic State of Syria’s front lines and enthusias- Iraq and the Levant, one of two tic sales pitches by the first wave main al-Qaida linked groups of European volunteers. fighting in Syria, is producing A 21-year-old Dane became a video featuring a battalion interested in Syria during a of British fighters “who will be prison term in Denmark for talking to other British Muslims assault and robbery, mainly

A

AP Photo

A 21-year-old from Denmark poses for a photo as he sits on a Soviet-made anti-aircraft gun in Syria near Aleppo. A wave of European fighters are being drawn to the rebellion against Bashar Assad.

to try and motivate, inspire and recruit them,” said Shiraz Maher, a researcher at the Londonbased International Center for the Study of Radicalization. In France, authorities in recent weeks say they have dismantled two networks of former fighters who have returned from Syria to recruit. Governments have reported no examples of ex-fighters from Syria creating trouble on their return. But France remains haunted by the case of Mohammed Merah, a French youth of Algerian descent who trained in

Pakistan and returned to southern France to attack a Jewish school and kill seven people in 2012. The French government has since outlawed training in terrorism camps abroad. The United States has also sounded the alarm about young Americans headed to Syria. But distance and expense have kept the numbers from the U.S. far lower: about 20 American citizens, according to the ICSR. For the Syrian rebels, attracting fresh bodies for the fight has become a matter of urgency as Assad makes gains in the civil

war with the help of Iran and Shiite militant group Hezbollah. And despite their lack of battlefield experience, Europeans are also a powerful propaganda tool for a rebel force that is trying to show that its appeal goes wider and deeper than the Middle East. The Europeans have the added potential of being able to raise money in places far wealthier than Iraq, Afghanistan and Chechnya, where many of the other foreign rebels have their roots and fighting background. Many, if not most, are from second-generation immigrant families from outside Europe with parents who describe themselves as secular and fully integrated. Others – like the Dane – are converts with no prior ties to Islam. France has counted between 300 and 400 European rebel fighters in Syria; Germany has counted more than 220; Belgium puts its number at 150-200, according to the International Center for the Study of Radicalization, citing recent figures that double previous estimates. Sweden is about to double its estimates to 150-200, according Magnus Ranstorp, a terrorism specialist with the Swedish National Defence College. Britain’s total has stayed stable at less than 150, according to recent estimates from U.K. security officials. The Netherlands estimate, which offi-

Yukon College would like to thank the generous door prize donors for their role in our fabulous 50th Anniversary Party!!


cials said is rising rapidly, is 100200, according to government and analyst figures. Denmark’s intelligence service estimates “at least 80” fighters from there – with similar numbers from Spain, Austria and Italy. Norway believes about 40 of its citizens have left for Syria in the past year. “More Europeans have gone to Syria than have gone to all the other conflict zones put together,” including Iraq and Afghanistan, said Thomas Hegghammer, an analyst at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment. “It’s hard to overstate the importance of this for the future of Islamic radicalism in Europe. They’re radicalizing and training a whole new generation of militants.” Ranstorp agreed: “In the last two months, there has been an acceleration in the number of people going to Syria.” The first Europeans to leave for Syria tended to do so haphazardly – catching a flight to Turkey, hopping a bus and hoping for the best. That’s how the 21-year-old Danish man first went, meandering into a refugee camp and stumbling upon people who told him where to go. Those men are returning home or contacting friends and acquaintances by Skype, Facebook, text message, YouTube, or word of mouth to encourage them to follow. They provide the travel arrangements, and say the life of a fighter in Syria is one of comfort punctuated by the adventure of war. “I talk to fathers and mothers of young people who have left my

37

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013 city. It’s all well-organized. The air tickets are paid for,” said Hans Bonte, mayor of Vilvoorde, a city of 41,000 in Flemish-speaking Belgium that has seen at least 22 young people leave for Syria, including the most recent group in early November. Bonte, who is chief of security for his town as well as a federal lawmaker, speaks at length to each family and is in constant touch with both them and Belgium’s intelligence services. Bonte said Belgians who are leaving are younger now – teenagers instead of men in their late 20s, and adolescent girls are beginning to appear among the lists of the missing. “It’s a process of following others (who) are trying to convince people to go over there. They are telling stories that it’s fun over there ... they are living in a villa with a pool.” One Vilvoorde mother, whose older son had already left for Syria, was sleeping on her front steps to keep her 15-year-old from slipping out to follow his brother, Bonte said. One night this fall, the boy pushed his mother aside – threatening to kill her if she stopped him from joining the fight in Syria – and stepped into a waiting car. She has heard from neither son since. Syrian Deputy Foreign Minister Faisal Mekdad said the Assad government is discussing the issue with Western officials “and there is co-operation,” although he did not name any countries. And authorities have encountered teens trying to board airplanes, including some carry-

ing large amounts of cash for the rebellion, said Martin Bernsen, a spokesman for the police security services. “Of course it is difficult to prove where the money goes,” Bernsen said, “so we are worried that it goes to terror-related activities.” Hegghammer said Syria has worrisome parallels with Afghanistan of the 1980s, where a young Osama bin Laden was among thousands of Muslims to wage battle against Soviet forces. “The gross number of departures is so high that almost whatever the return rate is, you’re going to have substantial numbers of terrorists,” he said. Recent comments from Andrew Parker, director general of British intelligence agency MI5, underscore those concerns. “A growing proportion of our casework now has some link to Syria, mostly concerning individuals from the UK who have travelled to fight there or who aspire to do so,” Parker said in a recent speech. Maher, who is in regular contact with a contingent of Britons in Syria, said their cheery photos of fighters living bachelor-pad style in comfortable houses, with all the food they can eat and all the weaponry they could hope for, will continue draw ever larger numbers. “They send pictures of sweets – of candy – and of pop. You can get all this out there. It’s not a life full of privation,” Maher said. “You get this comfortable life in Syria with the option, the possibility to die a martyr.”

15th Dec 2013

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36

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Number of European fighters in Syria rises sharply Lori Hinnant And Jan M. Olsen

through online rebel videos. He made two trips into Syria that Associated Press totalled a little more than one month. He drove trucks carrying COPENHAGEN, Denmark relief supplies and transported new wave of Europeans is people, he said, but never fought. heading to Syria, their ranks Nevertheless, he posted photosoaring in the past six months as graphs online of himself with tales of easy living and glorious heavy weapons. martyrdom draw them to the “It is my duty to travel down rebellion against Bashar Assad. there. This is a Muslim cause,” The western Europe-based said the young man, a Muslim rebels, mostly young men, are convert who did not want to be being recruited by new networks identified for fear of pursuit by that arrange travel and comfort- authorities. able lodging in the heart of rebel On his third trip this year, he territory, and foster a militant said, he was stopped at passport form of Islam that Western secu- control in Istanbul and sent back rity officials fear will add to the to Denmark. No reason was terror threat when the fighters given, but he believes his time return home. with the opposition put him on The 11 western European the intelligence community’s countries with the biggest conradar. He described being questingents in Syria are estimated tioned multiple times by Danish to have some 1,200-1,700 people intelligence agents, including at among rebel forces, according to the Copenhagen airport after government and analyst figures returning from Syria for the first compiled by The Associated time. Press. That compares to estimates “Right now, I cannot go to of 600-800 from those countries Syria,” he said. “I wanted to help in late spring. with humanitarian work and The surge has occurred fight.” particularly in France, Germany, Recruitment drives targeting Belgium and Sweden. It reflects people like the Dane are growing the increasing ease of travel to in intensity. The Islamic State of Syria’s front lines and enthusias- Iraq and the Levant, one of two tic sales pitches by the first wave main al-Qaida linked groups of European volunteers. fighting in Syria, is producing A 21-year-old Dane became a video featuring a battalion interested in Syria during a of British fighters “who will be prison term in Denmark for talking to other British Muslims assault and robbery, mainly

A

AP Photo

A 21-year-old from Denmark poses for a photo as he sits on a Soviet-made anti-aircraft gun in Syria near Aleppo. A wave of European fighters are being drawn to the rebellion against Bashar Assad.

to try and motivate, inspire and recruit them,” said Shiraz Maher, a researcher at the Londonbased International Center for the Study of Radicalization. In France, authorities in recent weeks say they have dismantled two networks of former fighters who have returned from Syria to recruit. Governments have reported no examples of ex-fighters from Syria creating trouble on their return. But France remains haunted by the case of Mohammed Merah, a French youth of Algerian descent who trained in

Pakistan and returned to southern France to attack a Jewish school and kill seven people in 2012. The French government has since outlawed training in terrorism camps abroad. The United States has also sounded the alarm about young Americans headed to Syria. But distance and expense have kept the numbers from the U.S. far lower: about 20 American citizens, according to the ICSR. For the Syrian rebels, attracting fresh bodies for the fight has become a matter of urgency as Assad makes gains in the civil

war with the help of Iran and Shiite militant group Hezbollah. And despite their lack of battlefield experience, Europeans are also a powerful propaganda tool for a rebel force that is trying to show that its appeal goes wider and deeper than the Middle East. The Europeans have the added potential of being able to raise money in places far wealthier than Iraq, Afghanistan and Chechnya, where many of the other foreign rebels have their roots and fighting background. Many, if not most, are from second-generation immigrant families from outside Europe with parents who describe themselves as secular and fully integrated. Others – like the Dane – are converts with no prior ties to Islam. France has counted between 300 and 400 European rebel fighters in Syria; Germany has counted more than 220; Belgium puts its number at 150-200, according to the International Center for the Study of Radicalization, citing recent figures that double previous estimates. Sweden is about to double its estimates to 150-200, according Magnus Ranstorp, a terrorism specialist with the Swedish National Defence College. Britain’s total has stayed stable at less than 150, according to recent estimates from U.K. security officials. The Netherlands estimate, which offi-

Yukon College would like to thank the generous door prize donors for their role in our fabulous 50th Anniversary Party!!


cials said is rising rapidly, is 100200, according to government and analyst figures. Denmark’s intelligence service estimates “at least 80” fighters from there – with similar numbers from Spain, Austria and Italy. Norway believes about 40 of its citizens have left for Syria in the past year. “More Europeans have gone to Syria than have gone to all the other conflict zones put together,” including Iraq and Afghanistan, said Thomas Hegghammer, an analyst at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment. “It’s hard to overstate the importance of this for the future of Islamic radicalism in Europe. They’re radicalizing and training a whole new generation of militants.” Ranstorp agreed: “In the last two months, there has been an acceleration in the number of people going to Syria.” The first Europeans to leave for Syria tended to do so haphazardly – catching a flight to Turkey, hopping a bus and hoping for the best. That’s how the 21-year-old Danish man first went, meandering into a refugee camp and stumbling upon people who told him where to go. Those men are returning home or contacting friends and acquaintances by Skype, Facebook, text message, YouTube, or word of mouth to encourage them to follow. They provide the travel arrangements, and say the life of a fighter in Syria is one of comfort punctuated by the adventure of war. “I talk to fathers and mothers of young people who have left my

37

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013 city. It’s all well-organized. The air tickets are paid for,” said Hans Bonte, mayor of Vilvoorde, a city of 41,000 in Flemish-speaking Belgium that has seen at least 22 young people leave for Syria, including the most recent group in early November. Bonte, who is chief of security for his town as well as a federal lawmaker, speaks at length to each family and is in constant touch with both them and Belgium’s intelligence services. Bonte said Belgians who are leaving are younger now – teenagers instead of men in their late 20s, and adolescent girls are beginning to appear among the lists of the missing. “It’s a process of following others (who) are trying to convince people to go over there. They are telling stories that it’s fun over there ... they are living in a villa with a pool.” One Vilvoorde mother, whose older son had already left for Syria, was sleeping on her front steps to keep her 15-year-old from slipping out to follow his brother, Bonte said. One night this fall, the boy pushed his mother aside – threatening to kill her if she stopped him from joining the fight in Syria – and stepped into a waiting car. She has heard from neither son since. Syrian Deputy Foreign Minister Faisal Mekdad said the Assad government is discussing the issue with Western officials “and there is co-operation,” although he did not name any countries. And authorities have encountered teens trying to board airplanes, including some carry-

ing large amounts of cash for the rebellion, said Martin Bernsen, a spokesman for the police security services. “Of course it is difficult to prove where the money goes,” Bernsen said, “so we are worried that it goes to terror-related activities.” Hegghammer said Syria has worrisome parallels with Afghanistan of the 1980s, where a young Osama bin Laden was among thousands of Muslims to wage battle against Soviet forces. “The gross number of departures is so high that almost whatever the return rate is, you’re going to have substantial numbers of terrorists,” he said. Recent comments from Andrew Parker, director general of British intelligence agency MI5, underscore those concerns. “A growing proportion of our casework now has some link to Syria, mostly concerning individuals from the UK who have travelled to fight there or who aspire to do so,” Parker said in a recent speech. Maher, who is in regular contact with a contingent of Britons in Syria, said their cheery photos of fighters living bachelor-pad style in comfortable houses, with all the food they can eat and all the weaponry they could hope for, will continue draw ever larger numbers. “They send pictures of sweets – of candy – and of pop. You can get all this out there. It’s not a life full of privation,” Maher said. “You get this comfortable life in Syria with the option, the possibility to die a martyr.”

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38

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Friday, December 6, 2013

LIFE

LIFE

Skiing, God and Father Mouchet

The trail ends for last Yukon Oblate Michael Dougherty Special for the News

T

Mike Thomas/Yukon News

Father Jean-Marie Mouchet skis during the Canada Winter Games in 2007. Mouchet started the Territorial Experimental Ski Training program at Inuvik in the 1950s, introducing aboriginal youth to the sport.

Pavlina Sudrich

tween Old Crow and Inuvik. Twenty years ago he received the Order of Canada “in recogni’m at 1,900 metres on a British tion of his half-century of dedicaColumbia mountain when I find tion to the people of the North.“ out Father Mouchet has died. Part Until last year people in Whiteof me feels gutted, but another horse could glance him on cold part feels a deep building joy. The early mornings shuffling on his classic track I’m skiing on is hard- classic skis up and down the gruelpacked today and deep groves of ing 7.5-km trail. He was 96. fresh corduroy glint like crocodile Glenna Tetlichi Frost was with teeth against the sun. I make a bid Father when he died. Their relafor the summit. tionship began decades ago when The legend of Father Mouchet Father Mouchet taught her mother is widespread throughout the how to ski in Old Crow. North. He was a French Oblate “I don’t know how he got the Priest who fought Nazis on a pair equipment but he lobbied someof skis during the Second World one and got it. They were so heavy, War. He immigrated to Canada after the war and in the mid-1950s we called them army skis,” she remembers, laughing. was sent to Old Crow to convert It wasn’t long before Frost the Gwich’in people to a Western and her friends were skiing. In concept of God. the First Nation people, Father Finding the Anglican church found natural athletes. As he once doing a thorough enough job, recalled, “they were trappers, they Father turned his attentions to were hunters. They were living in another form of conversion and the very cold climate doing ordininstead taught the people of Old Crow to cross-county ski. In 1960s ary work, like cutting and packing wood and going down to the river he formed the Territorial Experimental Ski Training program with to bring water up. It gave them the heavy wooden skis donated by the right components.” They had the physical talent, U.S. Air Force and a big, drafty but for athletes like Frost, skiing warehouse in Inuvik as a home with the TEST program was about base. By the 1970s, the Canadian something greater. National Ski Team was filled with “Skiing was like fun for us,” athletes Father had produced beSpecial for the News

I

Yukon News

said Frost. “Not like the other hard physical work that we had to do. When we started travelling for races, what a gift that was. We got to see that there was an outside world. That experience prepared us for when we had to leave our homes for school in Whitehorse.” Angus Cockney was another TEST athlete who began skiing with Father Mouchet in Inuvik in 1963. He remembers him as being an odd priest. “He didn’t look like a priest. He dressed like a human being. In residential school it was really hard to trust anyone, but when Father came in … we thought he was different from the others. It didn’t take long for us to trust him.” Cross-country skiing became an incredibly important part of Cockney’s life. “For me back then, being in that system, skiing became my escape hatch from the abuse that happened at that school. For me skiing was a way out. I adopted it as a lifestyle and I’m glad my kids did, too.” Cockney’s son, Jess, now races regularly on the World Cup circuit. Gary Baillie, a former National Ski Team athlete who began skiing with Father at the age of eight, recalls the tough lessons of the TEST program. “It was all charac-

ter building. The aim of the TEST program was to develop character in young children through crosscountry skiing. People who have good work ethic, and know how to be healthy and how to live well will be successful in their rest of their lives.” Bailey is now the coach of the Kwanlin Koyotes. He credits Father for changing his life in a positive way. In a time when Canada’s relationship with religion was growing increasingly tenuous, Father Mouchet established relationships of profound respect that would last lifetimes. “I’m getting a lot of phone calls,” Frost said. “A lot of people are mourning for Father Mouchet in their community. We’re grieving. We’ve lost a family member. That speaks for itself. That’s how much he impacted Old Crow.” Here on the side of this snowblown mountain, I’m struggling through the last section of switchback trail. At this elevation my breath comes in short bursts, white in the cold morning air. In the last two weeks of his life I was fortunate enough to see Father every day. We shared breakfast and spoke about trail conditions, about the athletes we’ve known over the

years, and of course, about skiing. In our last conversation before I left to meet my ski team in Silverstar, B.C., Father reminded me that skiing was another form of prayer. When I crest the summit the sun pours out, lighting the clouds below me with fire. The First Nations say when a respected elder passes away and arrives in paradise, that person sends days of sunshine to where they left. Today it seems that both Father and I have skied our way to paradise. When my team – a pack of laughing teenagers who love skiing – find me, we descend the mountain together. Saturday they will race with Whitehorse’s Knute Johnsgaard, one of Father’s last athletes. Angus Cockney will join us, and in Europe his son will race another World Cup. In Whitehorse, the ski club will be packed and on the trails he built himself, Gary Bailey will go for a ski. Father’s legacy continues to live and breathe on ski trails around the world. Pavlina Sudrich is a born-and-raised Whitehorse skier and coach who, like many in the North, first learned to ski with Father Mouchet. She is now the head coach of the Ontario provincial ski team.

he long trail for JeanMarie Mouchet, the last member of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate in the Yukon, ended on Monday, December 2. He died at 96 years surrounded by friends at the Copper Ridge Place long-term care facility in Whitehorse, after struggling since the end of August with the debilitating consequences of a fall. His passing marks another milestone on the collective journey of Yukoners, the end of 115 years of continuous Oblate presence in the territory. The first Catholic missionary to arrive in the Yukon was an Oblate, Father Gascon, in 1861. But the Oblates would only establish a permanent Yukon presence following the Klondike gold strike. Log and tent churches quickly sprang up in settlements across the territory. Oblates mushed and packed into First Nations seasonal encampments as well. They had their own trail markers to assist them in finding their way. One of the Oblate rules reads, “Whoever wishes to become one of us must have an ardent desire for his own perfection, and be enflamed with the love for Our Lord Jesus Christ and his Church and a burning zeal for the salvation of souls.” Sharing these spiritual gifts, many Europeans and North Americans would come to serve in the Yukon, JeanMarie Mouchet among them. He would join them after his February, 1945 ordination in France. His trail, though, began on May 1, 1917 in Malbuisson, a small community on the edge of the Jura Mountains bordering Switzerland. Early into his teen years he felt a vocation to the priesthood. He pursued this calling with the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate whom he learned about from the adventure-filled stories told by clergy visiting his family. The Oblates’ particular call to be “in solidarity with those who are poor and most abandoned in our world” must have attracted him also. Young, newly arriving Oblates like Jean-Marie Mouchet were met by Jean-Louis Coudert, Yukon’s Oblate bishop. He gave them a toolbox and the charge “to go build the church.” With no experience of

39

contemplation of and engagement with the people and the land. The exertion of his mind and muscles continued to shape his unique vision of a way he could be present to the people of Old Crow and the North. His well-known Territorial Experimental Ski Training program (TEST) emerged. Father Mouchet possessed the ability to share his vision with others who would come to build on his passion for developing the full potential of youth using skiing as a tool. Many honours would eventually flow to him as a result of his years of dedicated service. With a militant modesty, he emphasized the work ahead rather than achievements of the past. In our increasingly “polluted and overcrowded” world he saw “the idea of a simple life” with a “balance between nature and man” revealing its value to him in this isolated northern community. However, he saw the intrusion of negative aspects of the modern world and its technologies threatened it and ultimately all of us. With his Oblate zeal, whether in Old Crow, Teslin, Whitehorse or Carcross, he refused to give up despite the forces working against his dream. Even in his last months, Pere Mouchet continued to seek ways to energize initiatives to engage youth. New proposals and reworking of old ideas preoccupied him. Physically he always challenged himself, as he did the generations of youth with whom he worked. At 93 years of age he set a goal for himself of skiing 2,000 kilometres over the winter season. He achieved this and much more with his faith-filled determination. Father Mouchet, zealous, faithful, visionary and activist, remained in his adopted land until the end of his trail. He, as Derek Crowe/Yukon News the many other Yukon Oblates Father Jean-Marie Mouchet in 2002. Mouchet died in Whitehorse at age 96 on Monday. before and after him, came following the lived example of the people’s traditions often a mission? What is opening First Nations cultures or realthe Oblate founder, St. Eugene ity of the country and climate, before my eyes would certainly obscured by visible signs of de Mazenod. He chose to offer reject any attempt at superior- their material poverty to the Father Mouchet set out first his life in service, faith and ity on my part. The land is too outsider. These and the rigours prayer among us. He truly for Telegraph Creek, British strong and too powerful to ac- of mountain trails challenged Columbia. lived the pledge, as the mission cept anyone who would come his European categories and How did he feel charting statement of the Anglo-Irish claims. with a will. Humility should a new trail for himself? He Oblate province in part reads, In 1954 Bishop Coudert shape my attitude. Listening is wrote down the reflections of “We commit ourselves to transferred him to Old Crow. the only stance.” a 30-year-old travelling to his building a new society in the The fact of the Anglican Father Mouchet arrived at first post in the opening chaplight of Gospel values – a way Church being already wellter of his 2002 book, Men and a time in the North when the of being where justice, peace, established there left him to world was rapidly changing Women of the Tundra. love, forgiveness and hope are around First Nations peoples. evolve another way to witness commonplace.” “Why do I come here? The to his faith. question is not easy to answer. He came to respect and Mahsi’choo, merci and In his memoir he tells of his thanks, Father Mouchet! Am I an intruder? A man with learn from the strength of


38

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Friday, December 6, 2013

LIFE

LIFE

Skiing, God and Father Mouchet

The trail ends for last Yukon Oblate Michael Dougherty Special for the News

T

Mike Thomas/Yukon News

Father Jean-Marie Mouchet skis during the Canada Winter Games in 2007. Mouchet started the Territorial Experimental Ski Training program at Inuvik in the 1950s, introducing aboriginal youth to the sport.

Pavlina Sudrich

tween Old Crow and Inuvik. Twenty years ago he received the Order of Canada “in recogni’m at 1,900 metres on a British tion of his half-century of dedicaColumbia mountain when I find tion to the people of the North.“ out Father Mouchet has died. Part Until last year people in Whiteof me feels gutted, but another horse could glance him on cold part feels a deep building joy. The early mornings shuffling on his classic track I’m skiing on is hard- classic skis up and down the gruelpacked today and deep groves of ing 7.5-km trail. He was 96. fresh corduroy glint like crocodile Glenna Tetlichi Frost was with teeth against the sun. I make a bid Father when he died. Their relafor the summit. tionship began decades ago when The legend of Father Mouchet Father Mouchet taught her mother is widespread throughout the how to ski in Old Crow. North. He was a French Oblate “I don’t know how he got the Priest who fought Nazis on a pair equipment but he lobbied someof skis during the Second World one and got it. They were so heavy, War. He immigrated to Canada after the war and in the mid-1950s we called them army skis,” she remembers, laughing. was sent to Old Crow to convert It wasn’t long before Frost the Gwich’in people to a Western and her friends were skiing. In concept of God. the First Nation people, Father Finding the Anglican church found natural athletes. As he once doing a thorough enough job, recalled, “they were trappers, they Father turned his attentions to were hunters. They were living in another form of conversion and the very cold climate doing ordininstead taught the people of Old Crow to cross-county ski. In 1960s ary work, like cutting and packing wood and going down to the river he formed the Territorial Experimental Ski Training program with to bring water up. It gave them the heavy wooden skis donated by the right components.” They had the physical talent, U.S. Air Force and a big, drafty but for athletes like Frost, skiing warehouse in Inuvik as a home with the TEST program was about base. By the 1970s, the Canadian something greater. National Ski Team was filled with “Skiing was like fun for us,” athletes Father had produced beSpecial for the News

I

Yukon News

said Frost. “Not like the other hard physical work that we had to do. When we started travelling for races, what a gift that was. We got to see that there was an outside world. That experience prepared us for when we had to leave our homes for school in Whitehorse.” Angus Cockney was another TEST athlete who began skiing with Father Mouchet in Inuvik in 1963. He remembers him as being an odd priest. “He didn’t look like a priest. He dressed like a human being. In residential school it was really hard to trust anyone, but when Father came in … we thought he was different from the others. It didn’t take long for us to trust him.” Cross-country skiing became an incredibly important part of Cockney’s life. “For me back then, being in that system, skiing became my escape hatch from the abuse that happened at that school. For me skiing was a way out. I adopted it as a lifestyle and I’m glad my kids did, too.” Cockney’s son, Jess, now races regularly on the World Cup circuit. Gary Baillie, a former National Ski Team athlete who began skiing with Father at the age of eight, recalls the tough lessons of the TEST program. “It was all charac-

ter building. The aim of the TEST program was to develop character in young children through crosscountry skiing. People who have good work ethic, and know how to be healthy and how to live well will be successful in their rest of their lives.” Bailey is now the coach of the Kwanlin Koyotes. He credits Father for changing his life in a positive way. In a time when Canada’s relationship with religion was growing increasingly tenuous, Father Mouchet established relationships of profound respect that would last lifetimes. “I’m getting a lot of phone calls,” Frost said. “A lot of people are mourning for Father Mouchet in their community. We’re grieving. We’ve lost a family member. That speaks for itself. That’s how much he impacted Old Crow.” Here on the side of this snowblown mountain, I’m struggling through the last section of switchback trail. At this elevation my breath comes in short bursts, white in the cold morning air. In the last two weeks of his life I was fortunate enough to see Father every day. We shared breakfast and spoke about trail conditions, about the athletes we’ve known over the

years, and of course, about skiing. In our last conversation before I left to meet my ski team in Silverstar, B.C., Father reminded me that skiing was another form of prayer. When I crest the summit the sun pours out, lighting the clouds below me with fire. The First Nations say when a respected elder passes away and arrives in paradise, that person sends days of sunshine to where they left. Today it seems that both Father and I have skied our way to paradise. When my team – a pack of laughing teenagers who love skiing – find me, we descend the mountain together. Saturday they will race with Whitehorse’s Knute Johnsgaard, one of Father’s last athletes. Angus Cockney will join us, and in Europe his son will race another World Cup. In Whitehorse, the ski club will be packed and on the trails he built himself, Gary Bailey will go for a ski. Father’s legacy continues to live and breathe on ski trails around the world. Pavlina Sudrich is a born-and-raised Whitehorse skier and coach who, like many in the North, first learned to ski with Father Mouchet. She is now the head coach of the Ontario provincial ski team.

he long trail for JeanMarie Mouchet, the last member of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate in the Yukon, ended on Monday, December 2. He died at 96 years surrounded by friends at the Copper Ridge Place long-term care facility in Whitehorse, after struggling since the end of August with the debilitating consequences of a fall. His passing marks another milestone on the collective journey of Yukoners, the end of 115 years of continuous Oblate presence in the territory. The first Catholic missionary to arrive in the Yukon was an Oblate, Father Gascon, in 1861. But the Oblates would only establish a permanent Yukon presence following the Klondike gold strike. Log and tent churches quickly sprang up in settlements across the territory. Oblates mushed and packed into First Nations seasonal encampments as well. They had their own trail markers to assist them in finding their way. One of the Oblate rules reads, “Whoever wishes to become one of us must have an ardent desire for his own perfection, and be enflamed with the love for Our Lord Jesus Christ and his Church and a burning zeal for the salvation of souls.” Sharing these spiritual gifts, many Europeans and North Americans would come to serve in the Yukon, JeanMarie Mouchet among them. He would join them after his February, 1945 ordination in France. His trail, though, began on May 1, 1917 in Malbuisson, a small community on the edge of the Jura Mountains bordering Switzerland. Early into his teen years he felt a vocation to the priesthood. He pursued this calling with the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate whom he learned about from the adventure-filled stories told by clergy visiting his family. The Oblates’ particular call to be “in solidarity with those who are poor and most abandoned in our world” must have attracted him also. Young, newly arriving Oblates like Jean-Marie Mouchet were met by Jean-Louis Coudert, Yukon’s Oblate bishop. He gave them a toolbox and the charge “to go build the church.” With no experience of

39

contemplation of and engagement with the people and the land. The exertion of his mind and muscles continued to shape his unique vision of a way he could be present to the people of Old Crow and the North. His well-known Territorial Experimental Ski Training program (TEST) emerged. Father Mouchet possessed the ability to share his vision with others who would come to build on his passion for developing the full potential of youth using skiing as a tool. Many honours would eventually flow to him as a result of his years of dedicated service. With a militant modesty, he emphasized the work ahead rather than achievements of the past. In our increasingly “polluted and overcrowded” world he saw “the idea of a simple life” with a “balance between nature and man” revealing its value to him in this isolated northern community. However, he saw the intrusion of negative aspects of the modern world and its technologies threatened it and ultimately all of us. With his Oblate zeal, whether in Old Crow, Teslin, Whitehorse or Carcross, he refused to give up despite the forces working against his dream. Even in his last months, Pere Mouchet continued to seek ways to energize initiatives to engage youth. New proposals and reworking of old ideas preoccupied him. Physically he always challenged himself, as he did the generations of youth with whom he worked. At 93 years of age he set a goal for himself of skiing 2,000 kilometres over the winter season. He achieved this and much more with his faith-filled determination. Father Mouchet, zealous, faithful, visionary and activist, remained in his adopted land until the end of his trail. He, as Derek Crowe/Yukon News the many other Yukon Oblates Father Jean-Marie Mouchet in 2002. Mouchet died in Whitehorse at age 96 on Monday. before and after him, came following the lived example of the people’s traditions often a mission? What is opening First Nations cultures or realthe Oblate founder, St. Eugene ity of the country and climate, before my eyes would certainly obscured by visible signs of de Mazenod. He chose to offer reject any attempt at superior- their material poverty to the Father Mouchet set out first his life in service, faith and ity on my part. The land is too outsider. These and the rigours prayer among us. He truly for Telegraph Creek, British strong and too powerful to ac- of mountain trails challenged Columbia. lived the pledge, as the mission cept anyone who would come his European categories and How did he feel charting statement of the Anglo-Irish claims. with a will. Humility should a new trail for himself? He Oblate province in part reads, In 1954 Bishop Coudert shape my attitude. Listening is wrote down the reflections of “We commit ourselves to transferred him to Old Crow. the only stance.” a 30-year-old travelling to his building a new society in the The fact of the Anglican Father Mouchet arrived at first post in the opening chaplight of Gospel values – a way Church being already wellter of his 2002 book, Men and a time in the North when the of being where justice, peace, established there left him to world was rapidly changing Women of the Tundra. love, forgiveness and hope are around First Nations peoples. evolve another way to witness commonplace.” “Why do I come here? The to his faith. question is not easy to answer. He came to respect and Mahsi’choo, merci and In his memoir he tells of his thanks, Father Mouchet! Am I an intruder? A man with learn from the strength of


40

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Dance/movement therapy enjoying growth spurt in Canada TORONTO ver since Kelly Marie was young, she loved to dance. At four, she was learning ballet and jazz dance; by 13, she was dancing competitively. “It became an integral part of me and it’s something that I couldn’t imagine living without,” said Marie, 24. “Dance was always an outlet. For me, being able to go to dance every night as a teenager helped me work through a lot of stuff that I didn’t really understand.” She pursued her love for the art form through her studies, attending York University for a bachelor’s degree in dance. But when she came across dance therapy in her fourth year, while looking to simply fulfil a thesis project, even she didn’t foresee dance being involved in helping her deal with some mental health issues that had begun to creep in. “I didn’t come into (dance therapy) for necessarily specific therapy reasons, at first. But like anyone, they came up,” she said. At the outset, Marie had no idea what she was getting into. Little wonder, since within Canada, dance/movement therapy, or

E

DMT, remains a niche practice in the realm of psychotherapy. The plot of Silver Linings Playbook it is not: premised around the integration of the body and mind, the practice believes that the health of one means the health of the other. While dance does have natural therapeutic qualities, dance therapy is different: it deploys movement for a vast number of specific purposes. Sometimes, after an improvised dance while thinking of a particular element of a trauma, clients unpack the reasons behind a particular movement with their therapists; other times, it’s used to try to better access the mind among patients with Alzheimer’s. “It’s just like what’s happening in the education system: every child does not have the same learning style or learning needs,” said Megan English, a Torontobased private practitioner. “So if we think of psychotherapy as a learning process, which I think it is, it’s a process of change which involves learning, then that must carry true for people engaging in therapy. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution.” Practitioners say DMT is enjoying something of a growth

spurt in Canada. There are now 19 registered dance therapists in Canada, a number that is still small but has grown from 14 in three years. English says she’s receiving more requests than ever to be a clinical supervisor for students, a necessary condition to complete a degree. And in Montreal, Les Grands Ballets recently announced a new National Centre for Dance Therapy, which will undergo three first-of-their-kind pilot projects over the next few years to provide much-needed quantitative research, as well as provide the country’s first homegrown graduate-level dance therapy training program. Mary Moncrieff, a dance/ movement therapist at Ottawa’s Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre, recently went to a conference in New York and said she couldn’t remember the last time she saw so many young people attend. She credits the resurgence to a change in how society as a whole looks at the body. “People are looking at trauma, people are looking at physical health, at awareness of the body, and there’s a lot more readiness from the population to attend to the body and their life in gen-

eral,” she said. “And on top of that, dance itself appears to have risen in profile. You can take it in a tacky way, like with shows like ‘So You Think You Can Dance,’ or how Ellen (DeGeneres) dances, or with Zumba, but the fact is, people are allowing themselves to dance.” The growth that the 60-yearold Moncrieff has seen, while slight, is particularly remarkable because of the odds stacked against dance therapy: a lack of awareness, a paucity of evidencebased research, and the lack of a coherent body to train and represent Canadian therapists. “I think it should be in every hospital and be an everyday program, and it’s not,” said Andreah Barker, 36, who works in dance/ movement therapy at Toronto’s Baycrest Centre. Barker, who wrote a research thesis on the history of dance therapy, said it was first conceived in the 1940s in the United States to treat non-verbal war veterans, a tradition that explains why the practice is more common there. Most Canadian DMT therapists take their cues from the best practices and ethics of the American Dance Therapy As-

sociation, she said; there is no such regulatory body for Canadian therapists. (A Canadian association was founded in 2011, but a spokesperson said that the creation of a regulatory body is still “in the works.”) While it did gain some ground in Canada during the 1970s, according to Barker, it faded in large part because the country lacked a developmental pipeline: until the Grands Ballets program was announced, those interested in pursuing dance therapy had to go to places like the U.S. and England because there were no homegrown master’s degree or diploma-granting programs. “I think it’s important to have a Canadian standard of practice,” said Barker. “I think our system is very different from the American system, and I think that people who practise here should train here rather than follow an American way of doing things.” There are also questions as to whether mainstream psychologists see dance therapy as a viable complement to more traditional therapy techniques. Dr. Martin Antony, a professor of psychology at Ryerson University, says there is a lack of evidence-based research that dance therapy

Christmas

Sale! Cathway Water Resources

R FLOO S L MODE ting star as as low $

! 4,000

160 hillcrest Drive 668-5689 Sunday Service 10:00 a.m. Pre-Service Prayer 9:00 a.m. Family Worship & K.I.D.S. Church

We have the parts and the know-how! Come check out the choices and talk to us about your hot tub needs!

Grace Community Church 8th & Wheeler Street

Church Of The Nazarene

601 Main Street 667-2989

Pastor Paul & Moreen Sharp 667-2134 10:30 aM FaMILY WoRShIP WeeKLY CaRe GRoUP STUDIeS Because He Cares, We Care.

The Salvation Army

311-B Black Street • 668-2327

Sunday Church Services: 11 am & 7 pm eveRYoNe WeLCoMe

Our Lady of Victory

wa t e r y a w h

Cathway Water Resources 101B Copper Road, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 2Z7 www.cathwaywater.ca | (867)-668-7208 | Email: info@cathwaywater.ca

(Roman Catholic)

1607 Birch St. 633-2647

Saturday evening Mass: 7:30 p.m.

o u rc e s

www.beachcomberhottubs.com

Yukon Energy Corporation is proposing the construction of a new natural gas-fired generating station and associated activities adjacent to Yukon Energy Corporation’s existing primary power generating station, the Whitehorse Thermal Generating Station. The Expanded Site Area will produce 13.2 MW, which will provide an additional 4.1 MW to the Yukon electrical grid upon the decommissioning of the two diesel generators (9.1 MW capacity) they intend to replace. The Project is subject to a Screening by the Executive Committee of YESAB under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act (YESAA). The Project is currently open to public comment until December 20, 2013.

Please join  us  for  this  public  meeting  to  learn  more  about  this  proposed  project  and  share   your  interests  with  the  assessment  team.    

Wednesday December  11,  2013   Westmark  Hotel,  Whitehorse      

Open house:  5:30pm  to  6:00pm   Presentations  and  discussion:  6:00  pm  to  8:30  pm     For  more  information  call  867  668  6420.  

Make Your Voice Count Visit the YESAB Online Registry: www.yesab.ca/registry

11 PoPlar rd. (Porter Creek IndustrIal Park) (867) 334-4608

(Union of Methodist, Presbyterian & Congregational Churches) 10:30 a.m. - Sunday School & Worship Service Rev. Beverly C.S. Brazier

Low-Cost operation

Visit Beachcomber Hot Tubs online:

open Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon

Yukon Bible Fellowship

Tests show Beachcomber’s largest size hot tub uses 33.5% less energy than the industry standard.

Proposed Whitehorse Diesel – Natural Gas Conversion Project

Seasonal Change-over Certified Vehicle Inspection

Whitehorse United Church

at

PUBLIC MEETING

Wide Selection of Quality uSed tireS

We service ALL MAKES & MODELS of Hot Tubs!

res

Enjoy a vacation in your own backyard!

Quality used tires

deliver it, so there’s something concrete that can be shown, and with dance and movement, it’s often happening in the moment, so to document those things is a little bit more challenging. It’s not that it’s not possible, it’s just more challenging.” Moncrieff agrees that the work will eventually pay off: “I often think of occupational and physical therapy and what they’ve gone through for so many years to prove themselves.” As for Marie, whose treatment has now shifted to more traditional therapy, she says she could not have got to where she is today without dance therapy. “I think if I sat down or just laid down on a couch like the traditional stereotype, I don’t think I would have gotten this far ... it would have been too intense,” she said. “It really improved me as a person, in a lot of really minute ways. As long as you’re coming into it with an open mind, it’s absolutely beneficial. And I think it’s beneficial in lots of ways that someone’s not going to expect.”

Religious Organizations & Services

Yes we can!

c

Adrian Lee Canadian Press

really works, beyond dance’s natural therapeutic qualities. “What we’d need to see is a study that looks at traditional therapy without dance therapy and traditional therapy with dance therapy, and there is nothing. I haven’t seen any studies like that,” he said, citing cost as a possible reason. “My guess is that mainstream psychologists don’t know a lot about it.” Christian Senechal, director of Les Grands Ballets’ National Centre for Dance Therapy, agrees research is needed for credibility and funding. “We need quantitative research to have some proof, and we are trying to build our research around that,” he said. “All the projects we have now, we are trying to create quantitative data.” English said dance therapy is up against techniques that have been around longer, and that collecting data about something so organic has proven tricky. “Cognitive behavioural therapy has been successful in creating almost a manual to

41

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Confessions before Mass & by appointment. Monday 7:00 PM Novena Prayers & adoration Tuesday through Friday: Mass 11:30 a.m.

ALL WeLCOMe

TRINITY LUTHeRAN 4th Avenue & Strickland Street

668-4079 tlc@northwestel.net Sunday worship at 10:00 am Sunday school at 10:00 am

Pastor Deborah Moroz pastor.tlc@northwestel.net

eVeRYONe WeLCOMe!

Riverdale

Baptist Church

Canadian Baptist Ministries

15 Duke Road, Whse • 667-6620 Sunday Worship Service: 10:30 AM ReV. GReG ANDeRSON

www.rbchurch.ca

FoURSqUaRe ChURCh

PaSToR RICK TURNeR

2111 Centennial St. (Porter Creek) Sunday School & Morning Worship - 10:45 am

Call for Bible Study & Youth Group details

PaSToR NoRaYR (Norman) haJIaN

www.whitehorsenazarene.org 633-4903

First Pentecostal Church 149 Wilson Drive 668-5727

Sunday 10:00am Prayer / Sunday School 11:00 am Worship Wednesday Praise & Celebration 7:30 pm Pastor Roger Yadon

Whitehorse

Baptist Church 2060 2nD AvEnuE • 667-4889

Pastor Mark Carroll Family Worship at 11:00 am Sunday School 9:45 am

St. Nikolai Orthodox

Christian Mission

Reader Service Sundays 10:30 am 332-4171 for information

www.orthodoxwhitehorse.org

Quaker Worship Group ReLIGIoUS SoCIeTY oF FRIeNDS Meets regularly for Silent Worship. For information, call 667-4615 email: whitehorse-contact@quaker.ca

website: quaker.ca

Seventh Day Adventist Church

Rigdrol Dechen Ling,

Vajra North Buddhist Meditation Society Meditation Drop-in • Everyone Welcome!

403 Lowe Street

Mondays 5:15 to 6:15 PM

www.vajranorth.org • 667-6951

Christ Church Cathedral Anglican

eCKANKAR

Religion of the Light and Sound of God

For more information on monthly activities, call (867) 633-6594 or visit www.eckankar-yt.ca www.eckankar.org ALL ARe WeLCOMe.

Church of the Northern Apostles

An Anglican/episcopal Church Sunday Worship 10:00 aM

1609 Birch St. (Porter Creek) 633-5385 “We’re open Saturdays!” Worship Service 11:00 am Wednesday 7:00 pm - Prayer Meeting All are welcome.

oFFICe hoURS: Mon-Fri 9:00 aM to 12 Noon

Sacred Heart Cathedral

TAGISH Community Church

Box 31419, Whitehorse, YT Y1a 6K8 For information on regular community activities in Whitehorse contact:

www.tagishcc.com

The Church of Jesus Christ of

(Roman Catholic)

4th Avenue & Steele Street • 667-2437 Masses: Weekdays: 12:10 pm. Saturday 5 pm Sunday: 9 am - english; 10:10 am - French; 11:30 am english

Bethany Church

Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada early Service 9:00 - 10:00 am Family Service 10:30 am - Noon Filipino Service 4:00 - 5:00 pm Sunday School ages 0-12

91806 alaska highway

Ph: 668-4877 • www.bethanychurch.ca

The Temple of Set

The World’s Premier Left hand Path Religion

a not-for-prophet society. www.xeper.org

canadian affiliation information: northstarpylon@gmail.com

4Th aveNUe & eLLIoTT STReeT Services Sunday 8:30 aM & 10:00 aM Thursday Service 12:10 PM (with lunch)

668-5530

Meeting First Sunday each Month Details, map and information at:

867-633-4903

Calvary Baptist

1301 FIR STReeT 633-2886

Sunday School during Service, Sept to May

THe ReV. ROB LANGMAID

45 Boxwood Crescent • Porter Creek 633-4032 • All Are Welcome

Bahá’í Faith

whitehorselsa@gmail.com

Latter Day Saints

108 WICKSTROM ROAD, WHITeHORSe

1-867-667-2353

Sunday Sacrament Service starts at 10:00 AM Sunday School at 11:00 AM and Priesthood hour will be from 12:00 to 1:00 PM

Northern Light Ministries Dale & Rena Mae McDonald Word of Faith Ministers & Teachers. check out our website!

Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor L.e. harrison 633-4089

www.northernlightministries.ca

St. Saviour’s

1154c 1st Ave • Entrance from Strickland

Regular Monthly Service: 1st and 3rd Sundays of the Month 11:00 AM • All are welcome. Rev. David Pritchard 668-5530

For further information about, and to discover Islam, please contact: Javed Muhammad (867) 332-8116 or Adil Khalik (867) 633-4078 or send an e-mail to info@yukonmuslims.ca

Anglican Church in Carcross

or call 456-7131

Yukon Muslim Association www.yukonmuslims.ca


40

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Dance/movement therapy enjoying growth spurt in Canada TORONTO ver since Kelly Marie was young, she loved to dance. At four, she was learning ballet and jazz dance; by 13, she was dancing competitively. “It became an integral part of me and it’s something that I couldn’t imagine living without,” said Marie, 24. “Dance was always an outlet. For me, being able to go to dance every night as a teenager helped me work through a lot of stuff that I didn’t really understand.” She pursued her love for the art form through her studies, attending York University for a bachelor’s degree in dance. But when she came across dance therapy in her fourth year, while looking to simply fulfil a thesis project, even she didn’t foresee dance being involved in helping her deal with some mental health issues that had begun to creep in. “I didn’t come into (dance therapy) for necessarily specific therapy reasons, at first. But like anyone, they came up,” she said. At the outset, Marie had no idea what she was getting into. Little wonder, since within Canada, dance/movement therapy, or

E

DMT, remains a niche practice in the realm of psychotherapy. The plot of Silver Linings Playbook it is not: premised around the integration of the body and mind, the practice believes that the health of one means the health of the other. While dance does have natural therapeutic qualities, dance therapy is different: it deploys movement for a vast number of specific purposes. Sometimes, after an improvised dance while thinking of a particular element of a trauma, clients unpack the reasons behind a particular movement with their therapists; other times, it’s used to try to better access the mind among patients with Alzheimer’s. “It’s just like what’s happening in the education system: every child does not have the same learning style or learning needs,” said Megan English, a Torontobased private practitioner. “So if we think of psychotherapy as a learning process, which I think it is, it’s a process of change which involves learning, then that must carry true for people engaging in therapy. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution.” Practitioners say DMT is enjoying something of a growth

spurt in Canada. There are now 19 registered dance therapists in Canada, a number that is still small but has grown from 14 in three years. English says she’s receiving more requests than ever to be a clinical supervisor for students, a necessary condition to complete a degree. And in Montreal, Les Grands Ballets recently announced a new National Centre for Dance Therapy, which will undergo three first-of-their-kind pilot projects over the next few years to provide much-needed quantitative research, as well as provide the country’s first homegrown graduate-level dance therapy training program. Mary Moncrieff, a dance/ movement therapist at Ottawa’s Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre, recently went to a conference in New York and said she couldn’t remember the last time she saw so many young people attend. She credits the resurgence to a change in how society as a whole looks at the body. “People are looking at trauma, people are looking at physical health, at awareness of the body, and there’s a lot more readiness from the population to attend to the body and their life in gen-

eral,” she said. “And on top of that, dance itself appears to have risen in profile. You can take it in a tacky way, like with shows like ‘So You Think You Can Dance,’ or how Ellen (DeGeneres) dances, or with Zumba, but the fact is, people are allowing themselves to dance.” The growth that the 60-yearold Moncrieff has seen, while slight, is particularly remarkable because of the odds stacked against dance therapy: a lack of awareness, a paucity of evidencebased research, and the lack of a coherent body to train and represent Canadian therapists. “I think it should be in every hospital and be an everyday program, and it’s not,” said Andreah Barker, 36, who works in dance/ movement therapy at Toronto’s Baycrest Centre. Barker, who wrote a research thesis on the history of dance therapy, said it was first conceived in the 1940s in the United States to treat non-verbal war veterans, a tradition that explains why the practice is more common there. Most Canadian DMT therapists take their cues from the best practices and ethics of the American Dance Therapy As-

sociation, she said; there is no such regulatory body for Canadian therapists. (A Canadian association was founded in 2011, but a spokesperson said that the creation of a regulatory body is still “in the works.”) While it did gain some ground in Canada during the 1970s, according to Barker, it faded in large part because the country lacked a developmental pipeline: until the Grands Ballets program was announced, those interested in pursuing dance therapy had to go to places like the U.S. and England because there were no homegrown master’s degree or diploma-granting programs. “I think it’s important to have a Canadian standard of practice,” said Barker. “I think our system is very different from the American system, and I think that people who practise here should train here rather than follow an American way of doing things.” There are also questions as to whether mainstream psychologists see dance therapy as a viable complement to more traditional therapy techniques. Dr. Martin Antony, a professor of psychology at Ryerson University, says there is a lack of evidence-based research that dance therapy

Christmas

Sale! Cathway Water Resources

R FLOO S L MODE ting star as as low $

! 4,000

160 hillcrest Drive 668-5689 Sunday Service 10:00 a.m. Pre-Service Prayer 9:00 a.m. Family Worship & K.I.D.S. Church

We have the parts and the know-how! Come check out the choices and talk to us about your hot tub needs!

Grace Community Church 8th & Wheeler Street

Church Of The Nazarene

601 Main Street 667-2989

Pastor Paul & Moreen Sharp 667-2134 10:30 aM FaMILY WoRShIP WeeKLY CaRe GRoUP STUDIeS Because He Cares, We Care.

The Salvation Army

311-B Black Street • 668-2327

Sunday Church Services: 11 am & 7 pm eveRYoNe WeLCoMe

Our Lady of Victory

wa t e r y a w h

Cathway Water Resources 101B Copper Road, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 2Z7 www.cathwaywater.ca | (867)-668-7208 | Email: info@cathwaywater.ca

(Roman Catholic)

1607 Birch St. 633-2647

Saturday evening Mass: 7:30 p.m.

o u rc e s

www.beachcomberhottubs.com

Yukon Energy Corporation is proposing the construction of a new natural gas-fired generating station and associated activities adjacent to Yukon Energy Corporation’s existing primary power generating station, the Whitehorse Thermal Generating Station. The Expanded Site Area will produce 13.2 MW, which will provide an additional 4.1 MW to the Yukon electrical grid upon the decommissioning of the two diesel generators (9.1 MW capacity) they intend to replace. The Project is subject to a Screening by the Executive Committee of YESAB under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act (YESAA). The Project is currently open to public comment until December 20, 2013.

Please join  us  for  this  public  meeting  to  learn  more  about  this  proposed  project  and  share   your  interests  with  the  assessment  team.    

Wednesday December  11,  2013   Westmark  Hotel,  Whitehorse      

Open house:  5:30pm  to  6:00pm   Presentations  and  discussion:  6:00  pm  to  8:30  pm     For  more  information  call  867  668  6420.  

Make Your Voice Count Visit the YESAB Online Registry: www.yesab.ca/registry

11 PoPlar rd. (Porter Creek IndustrIal Park) (867) 334-4608

(Union of Methodist, Presbyterian & Congregational Churches) 10:30 a.m. - Sunday School & Worship Service Rev. Beverly C.S. Brazier

Low-Cost operation

Visit Beachcomber Hot Tubs online:

open Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon

Yukon Bible Fellowship

Tests show Beachcomber’s largest size hot tub uses 33.5% less energy than the industry standard.

Proposed Whitehorse Diesel – Natural Gas Conversion Project

Seasonal Change-over Certified Vehicle Inspection

Whitehorse United Church

at

PUBLIC MEETING

Wide Selection of Quality uSed tireS

We service ALL MAKES & MODELS of Hot Tubs!

res

Enjoy a vacation in your own backyard!

Quality used tires

deliver it, so there’s something concrete that can be shown, and with dance and movement, it’s often happening in the moment, so to document those things is a little bit more challenging. It’s not that it’s not possible, it’s just more challenging.” Moncrieff agrees that the work will eventually pay off: “I often think of occupational and physical therapy and what they’ve gone through for so many years to prove themselves.” As for Marie, whose treatment has now shifted to more traditional therapy, she says she could not have got to where she is today without dance therapy. “I think if I sat down or just laid down on a couch like the traditional stereotype, I don’t think I would have gotten this far ... it would have been too intense,” she said. “It really improved me as a person, in a lot of really minute ways. As long as you’re coming into it with an open mind, it’s absolutely beneficial. And I think it’s beneficial in lots of ways that someone’s not going to expect.”

Religious Organizations & Services

Yes we can!

c

Adrian Lee Canadian Press

really works, beyond dance’s natural therapeutic qualities. “What we’d need to see is a study that looks at traditional therapy without dance therapy and traditional therapy with dance therapy, and there is nothing. I haven’t seen any studies like that,” he said, citing cost as a possible reason. “My guess is that mainstream psychologists don’t know a lot about it.” Christian Senechal, director of Les Grands Ballets’ National Centre for Dance Therapy, agrees research is needed for credibility and funding. “We need quantitative research to have some proof, and we are trying to build our research around that,” he said. “All the projects we have now, we are trying to create quantitative data.” English said dance therapy is up against techniques that have been around longer, and that collecting data about something so organic has proven tricky. “Cognitive behavioural therapy has been successful in creating almost a manual to

41

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Confessions before Mass & by appointment. Monday 7:00 PM Novena Prayers & adoration Tuesday through Friday: Mass 11:30 a.m.

ALL WeLCOMe

TRINITY LUTHeRAN 4th Avenue & Strickland Street

668-4079 tlc@northwestel.net Sunday worship at 10:00 am Sunday school at 10:00 am

Pastor Deborah Moroz pastor.tlc@northwestel.net

eVeRYONe WeLCOMe!

Riverdale

Baptist Church

Canadian Baptist Ministries

15 Duke Road, Whse • 667-6620 Sunday Worship Service: 10:30 AM ReV. GReG ANDeRSON

www.rbchurch.ca

FoURSqUaRe ChURCh

PaSToR RICK TURNeR

2111 Centennial St. (Porter Creek) Sunday School & Morning Worship - 10:45 am

Call for Bible Study & Youth Group details

PaSToR NoRaYR (Norman) haJIaN

www.whitehorsenazarene.org 633-4903

First Pentecostal Church 149 Wilson Drive 668-5727

Sunday 10:00am Prayer / Sunday School 11:00 am Worship Wednesday Praise & Celebration 7:30 pm Pastor Roger Yadon

Whitehorse

Baptist Church 2060 2nD AvEnuE • 667-4889

Pastor Mark Carroll Family Worship at 11:00 am Sunday School 9:45 am

St. Nikolai Orthodox

Christian Mission

Reader Service Sundays 10:30 am 332-4171 for information

www.orthodoxwhitehorse.org

Quaker Worship Group ReLIGIoUS SoCIeTY oF FRIeNDS Meets regularly for Silent Worship. For information, call 667-4615 email: whitehorse-contact@quaker.ca

website: quaker.ca

Seventh Day Adventist Church

Rigdrol Dechen Ling,

Vajra North Buddhist Meditation Society Meditation Drop-in • Everyone Welcome!

403 Lowe Street

Mondays 5:15 to 6:15 PM

www.vajranorth.org • 667-6951

Christ Church Cathedral Anglican

eCKANKAR

Religion of the Light and Sound of God

For more information on monthly activities, call (867) 633-6594 or visit www.eckankar-yt.ca www.eckankar.org ALL ARe WeLCOMe.

Church of the Northern Apostles

An Anglican/episcopal Church Sunday Worship 10:00 aM

1609 Birch St. (Porter Creek) 633-5385 “We’re open Saturdays!” Worship Service 11:00 am Wednesday 7:00 pm - Prayer Meeting All are welcome.

oFFICe hoURS: Mon-Fri 9:00 aM to 12 Noon

Sacred Heart Cathedral

TAGISH Community Church

Box 31419, Whitehorse, YT Y1a 6K8 For information on regular community activities in Whitehorse contact:

www.tagishcc.com

The Church of Jesus Christ of

(Roman Catholic)

4th Avenue & Steele Street • 667-2437 Masses: Weekdays: 12:10 pm. Saturday 5 pm Sunday: 9 am - english; 10:10 am - French; 11:30 am english

Bethany Church

Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada early Service 9:00 - 10:00 am Family Service 10:30 am - Noon Filipino Service 4:00 - 5:00 pm Sunday School ages 0-12

91806 alaska highway

Ph: 668-4877 • www.bethanychurch.ca

The Temple of Set

The World’s Premier Left hand Path Religion

a not-for-prophet society. www.xeper.org

canadian affiliation information: northstarpylon@gmail.com

4Th aveNUe & eLLIoTT STReeT Services Sunday 8:30 aM & 10:00 aM Thursday Service 12:10 PM (with lunch)

668-5530

Meeting First Sunday each Month Details, map and information at:

867-633-4903

Calvary Baptist

1301 FIR STReeT 633-2886

Sunday School during Service, Sept to May

THe ReV. ROB LANGMAID

45 Boxwood Crescent • Porter Creek 633-4032 • All Are Welcome

Bahá’í Faith

whitehorselsa@gmail.com

Latter Day Saints

108 WICKSTROM ROAD, WHITeHORSe

1-867-667-2353

Sunday Sacrament Service starts at 10:00 AM Sunday School at 11:00 AM and Priesthood hour will be from 12:00 to 1:00 PM

Northern Light Ministries Dale & Rena Mae McDonald Word of Faith Ministers & Teachers. check out our website!

Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor L.e. harrison 633-4089

www.northernlightministries.ca

St. Saviour’s

1154c 1st Ave • Entrance from Strickland

Regular Monthly Service: 1st and 3rd Sundays of the Month 11:00 AM • All are welcome. Rev. David Pritchard 668-5530

For further information about, and to discover Islam, please contact: Javed Muhammad (867) 332-8116 or Adil Khalik (867) 633-4078 or send an e-mail to info@yukonmuslims.ca

Anglican Church in Carcross

or call 456-7131

Yukon Muslim Association www.yukonmuslims.ca


42

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Kidney failure rates higher among First Nations diabetics

Bachelor of Social Work Program

iNfORmAtiON SeSSiON October 23rd, November 6th or December 11th 12:00pm or 6:00pm Room A2210, Yukon College Find out what courses to take this January for a September 2014 start.

Helen Branswell

katchewan, found that the mean age for developing diabetes among First Nations people was TORONTO 47. new study says First Nations The mean age at which nonadults who develop Type aboriginal people develop Type 2 diabetes was 61 years old. 2 diabetes do so more than a Diabetes and high blood decade earlier than non-native people, and have double the risk pressure are common causes of kidney disease, which can lead to of going on to develop kidney end-stage renal failure after years failure. of progressive decline in kidney The study, which looked at function. Type 2 diabetes cases in SasThe study’s authors say that because First Nations people develop diabetes at a younger age, they are more likely to get to the point where they develop renal failure. They found that end-stage disease occurred in 2.4 per cent of First Nations people who had diabetes, compared to less than one per cent in non-aboriginal people with diabetes. The study, which looked at 25 Canadian Press

Applications can be downloaded off the YC website – http://www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/programs/info/bsw March 28th 2014 application deadline for a September 2014 start.

A

for more information contact : 668-8845 or djennejohn@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Interior Heavy Equipment Operator School

years worth of diabetes cases, was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. The authors called the implications of their findings “sobering.” “Among First Nations adults, Type 2 diabetes is increasingly occurring during younger decades of life. Among First Nations children, the prevalence of diabetes tripled between 1980 and 2005, and the offspring of these individuals are in turn experiencing an even higher risk of childhood Type 2 diabetes,” they said. “Without substantial improvements in the prevention and treatment of this disease, this pattern will likely translate into increasing numbers of First Nations people with diabetes-related end-stage renal disease and possibly other chronic diabetic complications.”

Pre-Made Gift Baskets & Gift Certificates available in-store.

NO SIMULATORS START WEEKLY. YEAR ROUND.

NEVER SHARE MACHINES GET TRAINED. GET WORKING.

ENDORSED BY INDUSTRY  FREE Site Tours  Job Boards  Funding Options

BodyScents

Call for details

Toll Free: 1-866-399-3853

For all your bath and body needs

“The Luxury You Deserve”

Exclusively available at Body Scents

10AM - 6 PM Mon-Sat 9-106 Main St (next to CIBC) • 668-3456

SPECIALTY ENGRAVING

HIGHLIGHTS • 2 nights in Paris, the City of Lights • 6 night Seine River cruise on MS France • 4 nights in Bayeux, first town in France to be liberated • Juno Beach D-Day commemoration on June 06, 2014 • Canadian Cemetary in Beny sur Mer • War Memorial in Caen • Unesco site of Mont St Michel • St Malo, the town Jacques Cartier lived and sailed from • Monet’s house and garden in Giverny

GROUP SPACE ON HOLD! 5 cabins/10 seats available until 13 Dec. 13 Presented by Connaissance Tours

Departs toronto 30 May until 10 June Tour Price: $5990 plus air taxes

add-on from Whitehorse available

Please contact: Faro travel services ltd. DBa Marlin travel 2101A Second Avenue, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 1B8

867-668-2867

denis.obrien@marlintravel.ca www.marlintravel.ca/1590

special fall hours: until December 14, we are open on Saturdays! Monday to Friday 8:30am to 5:30pm

saturday 10:00am to 2:00pm

207 Main St. 668-3447

Looking for New Business / Clients? Advertise in The Yukon News Classifieds!

Take Advantage of our 6 month Deal... Advertise for 5 Months and

Get 1 MONTH OF FREE ADVERTISING Book Your Ad Today! T: 667-6285 • F: 668-3755 E: wordads@yukon-news.com

Good Night! Wind up your day with everything you need. 867-667-6283


43

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Tourism Times TIA Yukon, Chair

Neil Hartling

As I told the nearly 100 delegates who came out to the TIA Yukon Fall Round Up in October: Tourism in the Yukon these days is “Living the Dream”. Yes, there are challenges, and I know that some sectors may not be performing as well as others, but in general our numbers and revenues are hitting record highs. We can likely expect this growth to continue into next year with air access to the Yukon becoming even easier and more affordable. Air North’s recent announcement of flights from Ottawa via Yellowknife twice a week beginning early next year will create the Yukon’s first gateway in the east and make government conferences that much more appealing. It’s this kind of visionary, out of the box thinking that we often see coming from our industry that keeps tourism a pillar of our economy.

and will work with them on any problems that arise moving forward. We have also lent our voice to the discussion on CANNOR’s future, which is critical to the development of all industries in the north. We hope to hear an announcement before the New Year about decisions pertaining to these funds. Our industry has identified new directions and seized them, from transportation, accommodation, marketing, culinary and many other parameters; we have “flown in formation” fine-tuning our efforts to collectively benefit the territory. On behalf of the TIA Yukon board of directors, have a safe and happy holiday season!

At TIA we are constantly keeping a close eye on any issues that may pose a threat to our industry’s prosperity. We are closely watching the development of the Air North and Holland America Dawson to Fairbanks flights

Minister of Tourism and Culture

Mike Nixon As Minister of Tourism and Culture, I have the honour to work with dedicated individuals in the public and private sectors who believe in Yukon as a tourism destination. At this special time of year, I extend warm holiday wishes to you, and thank you for your continued commitment to an industry important to Yukon’s economic stability and growth. We know Yukon is a spectacular place to live and work. Tourism marketing and partnerships strengthen Yukon’s attraction and help to make our territory a much sought after destination. This year we celebrated the first ever Premier led tourism trade mission to Europe, Air North Yukon’s Airline interline agreement with Condor, and the nomination of three tourism businesses for national tourism awards. Yukon was recognized by Lonely Planet, Reader’s Digest and Outside Magazine as a major outdoor travel destination. Montana Mountain in Carcross grew in stature as a world class mountain biking venue. The Klondike Gold Rush theme park Yukon Bay at the Hannover Zoo in Germany continued to draw crowds.

All of this is integral to the health of Yukon’s tourism and culture sectors. Added to that is the ongoing support of the many individuals and businesses who believe in Yukon as the place to be for holidays, meetings and conventions. Thank you to TIA Yukon board and members, the Tourism Marketing Committee, NGOs, tour operators, local government agencies and the many others who help to promote Yukon as a world class travel destination. I wish you, and yours, a safe and happy holiday. I look forward to 2014 where our combined energies and ideas will take us forward into another great year.

Tourism and Culture

The growing use of social media across all demographics is helping us to share the good news about Yukon across competitive global markets. The improved travelyukon.com consumer website provides links to tourism businesses, operators, natural attractions, and so much more.

#3-1109 First Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5G4 Phone (867) 668-3331 • Fax (867) 667-7379 info@tiayukon.com • www.tiayukon.com


44

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Friday, December 6, 2013

Yukon News

Season’s Greetings… Yukon Historical & MuseuMs association Season’s greetings on behalf of the Yukon heritage community! As we reflect, it has been a busy and productive year for YHMA and its members. January brought us our new Executive Director, Nancy Oakley, who has been kept busy as she settles in to our offices in the historic Donnenworth House. May saw over 250 museum professionals from across Canada descend on Whitehorse to attend the Canadian Museums Association conference. Yukon heritage was showcased in a big way as attendees were given a warm, Yukon welcome at the conference and on several highly popular study tours to the communities. In June, we unveiled new marketing for Yukon heritage

2013 has been a very productive year for the YFNTA. We have lots of exciting news to share including our new name -- the Yukon First Nations Culture & Tourism Assn. (YFNCT). This year, we set out to build a stronger organization with dual mandates: to foster the development of Yukon First Nations arts and culture, and to expand opportunities in the cultural tourism sector. We have made great progress in reaching this goal. Our year started off with a complete office upgrade to support our expanded mandate and programming. Thanks to funding assistance from Yukon Economic Development and CanNor, we have been working on a variety of projects that will lay a solid foundation for YFNCT. We worked with a small team to build an extensive database of stakeholders within the cultural and tourism sectors. We are just putting

attractions: with an updated strategy and an attractive new Heritage Yukon brand, we continue to encourage both residents and visitors alike to connect with our heritage at museums, cultural and interpretive centres. July saw the collective fruits of our labours realized with the inaugural Yukon Culinary Festival. YHMA collaborated with the Boreal Gourmet, TIA Yukon, Yukon Quest, the local Filipino community and others to present a ‘taste and tell’ demonstration of the Yukon’s rich culinary heritage.

available, demonstrating the importance of the Yukon cultural sector to both community and economy. YHMA continues to be a voice for Yukon heritage, representing the territory in various national and international circles, such as the Heritage Canada Foundation conference held in Ottawa in October. On behalf of the Board and staff of YHMA, all the best for the holiday season, and here’s to a happy and healthy New Year!

In September, Culture Days and Doors Open activities were held across the territory. Residents were encouraged to be tourists in their own town. YHMA and several of its members hosted many of the over fifty free activities

the finishing touches on our new logo and website, as well as a business plan which will include our new membership structure and programs for members. Our new website has been designed to serve as a virtual hub for all our stakeholders and partners, and a place where visitors can learn about Yukon First Nation communities and culture. We also worked with many partner organizations to present National Aboriginal Day and the 3rd annual Adäka Cultural Festival at the beautiful Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre. Attendance at both events far exceeded expectations and saw an increase in the number of visitors from outside Yukon. We have received amazing feedback from our local and visiting audience about these events. In July and August, we showcased the work of 10 visual artists at the Pacific Northwest Economic Region Summit in Anchorage,

Alaska and participated in the Premier’s tourism trade mission to Europe. We are very excited about the coming year and look forward to unveiling our new logo, website and membership program and working closely with all our stakeholders. On behalf of the YFNCT board and staff, I’d like to send everyone holiday greetings and best wishes for the coming year. Shirlee Frost Board President Yukon First Nations Culture and Tourism Assn.

wilderness tourism association of the yukon

2013 has been another great year for the staff and Board of Directors of the Wilderness Tourism Association of the Yukon (WTAY). The year started with a change in staff. In late 2012, Justine Hobbs left in order to pursue other interests. Chris Wilkinson took over the position of Office Manager in December 2012. The Board of Directors also said goodbye to Christoph Altherr, Joost Van Der Putten, and Anne Tayler, who all stepped down from the board. Trevor Braun was good enough to step up and fill one of the empty seats. Through 2013, WTAY has strived to meet its mandate as the collective voice of the wilderness tourism sector. One of the bigger issues that came across our plate in 2013

was the Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan to which WTAY presented feedback through the Yukon Government consultation process. WTAY’s position is, and will remain, that we fully support the original planning commission’s findings, and what is known as the 80% Protection plan. WTAY will continue to be involved in the process using all our resources to ensure the wilderness operators are represented in this issue. WTAY has also continued to tirelessly promote the Yukon to adventure and wilderness seekers, by working with OTC to run the Yukon Wild Cooperative Marketing Program. Using the tagline “Experts know the best spots”, Yukon Wild has promoted members through FAM tours, adverts

in national publications, social media, and sponsorship of events such as Yukon Quest. Looking forward, WTAY has some exciting projects in the pipeline, including a complete re-working of our Code of Conduct, designed to make the Yukon adventure sector stronger and safer. Look out for this being promoted in the spring. The WTAY staff and Board of Directors would like to take this opportunity to wish all our members and partners a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year, and we look forward to a great 2014.

Now that winter is in full swing, the Yukon Outfitters Association (YOA) is getting ready for the holiday season by buckling down in our offices to reflect on our past fall season, sharing our stories and getting ready for the winter show season. Once again, the members of our outfitting association had another successful season thanks to unbelievable weather, hardworking crews and a good mix of Canadians and international guests who were new to hunting in the Yukon and the repeats who came back to visit and have more adventures with us, too. Members especially want to thank the many Yukon businesses that support each outfitter, guide, expeditor or hunter whether it is the hotels, restaurants, service stations, stores, transportation, industrial supplies, farms or that one Yukoner who went out of their way. This does not go unnoticed; many of our guests are world travellers who appreciate ‘Yukon hospitality’. If we hear about it, you bet they go back home and tell their friends. They return with more family and friends to have them share in another great Yukon experience. In turn, we try our best to support you whenever we can. The YOA is currently celebrating 50 years as an association; however, outfitting continues to be sustainable and has been a viable part of Yukon’s economy and rich history since the early 1900’s. With that said, we continue our longstanding tradition of taking time out to host our annual Wild Game Round Up, held at the end of the year, where we will once again celebrate our successes with many stories, dancing and enjoying our well-prepared, wild game dinner. See you there! Teena Dickson TIA Yukon Board of Director’s Representative

Greetings from the Klondike. 2013 is winding down and it’s a good time to look back with year-end perspective on successes, challenges and opportunities. x As always, Dawson lived up to its well-deserved reputation for unsurpassed variety, quality and quantity of festivals, events and activities during the year. Actually, too many to list here so please visit dawsoncity.ca for much more information. Plus, don’t forget our anchor ‘yukonic’ attractions: Tombstone Territorial Park & the Dempster Highway corridor, Gold Fields, Klondike National Historic Sites, Dänojà Zho Cultural Centre, Dawson Museum and Gerties, to name a few. Talk about marketing pillars and outstanding

universal values! Although there is ever growing upside in winter tourism, summertime (which didn’t really start until June this year) is still a sweet spot. We’re good at coping but wouldn’t it be great if our four wonderful seasons came and went on schedule, without unwanted, weather-related ‘special events’. And, we hear overall Yukon tourism is increasing. Won’t it be great when Dawson gets back to visitation levels of the gold rush centennial years? On that note, KVA spent a lot of 2013 renewing a forward-looking marketing plan including the website overhaul in progress. We continue to evolve and adapt in a changing marketplace.

Finally, we value Parks’ so much, wouldn’t it be great if KNHS visitor programs and season were not ‘under siege’. Sadly, 2013 marked the passing of three greatly respected Dawsonites: Bill Bowie, Dick North and Ken Snider. In different ways their unique lives and diverse accomplishments reflect true Klondike spirit and each of them was a champion of Yukon tourism. On behalf of Klondike Visitors Association and Dawson City’s visitor industry, we wish you the very best of the Holiday Season and a Happy New Year. Web: dawsoncity.ca

FB: Dawson City, Yukon

Twitter: @dawsoncityyukon

#3-1109 First Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5G4 Phone (867) 668-3331 Fax (867) 667-7379 • info@tiayukon.com • www.tiayukon.com

245


44

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Friday, December 6, 2013

Yukon News

Season’s Greetings… Yukon Historical & MuseuMs association Season’s greetings on behalf of the Yukon heritage community! As we reflect, it has been a busy and productive year for YHMA and its members. January brought us our new Executive Director, Nancy Oakley, who has been kept busy as she settles in to our offices in the historic Donnenworth House. May saw over 250 museum professionals from across Canada descend on Whitehorse to attend the Canadian Museums Association conference. Yukon heritage was showcased in a big way as attendees were given a warm, Yukon welcome at the conference and on several highly popular study tours to the communities. In June, we unveiled new marketing for Yukon heritage

2013 has been a very productive year for the YFNTA. We have lots of exciting news to share including our new name -- the Yukon First Nations Culture & Tourism Assn. (YFNCT). This year, we set out to build a stronger organization with dual mandates: to foster the development of Yukon First Nations arts and culture, and to expand opportunities in the cultural tourism sector. We have made great progress in reaching this goal. Our year started off with a complete office upgrade to support our expanded mandate and programming. Thanks to funding assistance from Yukon Economic Development and CanNor, we have been working on a variety of projects that will lay a solid foundation for YFNCT. We worked with a small team to build an extensive database of stakeholders within the cultural and tourism sectors. We are just putting

attractions: with an updated strategy and an attractive new Heritage Yukon brand, we continue to encourage both residents and visitors alike to connect with our heritage at museums, cultural and interpretive centres. July saw the collective fruits of our labours realized with the inaugural Yukon Culinary Festival. YHMA collaborated with the Boreal Gourmet, TIA Yukon, Yukon Quest, the local Filipino community and others to present a ‘taste and tell’ demonstration of the Yukon’s rich culinary heritage.

available, demonstrating the importance of the Yukon cultural sector to both community and economy. YHMA continues to be a voice for Yukon heritage, representing the territory in various national and international circles, such as the Heritage Canada Foundation conference held in Ottawa in October. On behalf of the Board and staff of YHMA, all the best for the holiday season, and here’s to a happy and healthy New Year!

In September, Culture Days and Doors Open activities were held across the territory. Residents were encouraged to be tourists in their own town. YHMA and several of its members hosted many of the over fifty free activities

the finishing touches on our new logo and website, as well as a business plan which will include our new membership structure and programs for members. Our new website has been designed to serve as a virtual hub for all our stakeholders and partners, and a place where visitors can learn about Yukon First Nation communities and culture. We also worked with many partner organizations to present National Aboriginal Day and the 3rd annual Adäka Cultural Festival at the beautiful Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre. Attendance at both events far exceeded expectations and saw an increase in the number of visitors from outside Yukon. We have received amazing feedback from our local and visiting audience about these events. In July and August, we showcased the work of 10 visual artists at the Pacific Northwest Economic Region Summit in Anchorage,

Alaska and participated in the Premier’s tourism trade mission to Europe. We are very excited about the coming year and look forward to unveiling our new logo, website and membership program and working closely with all our stakeholders. On behalf of the YFNCT board and staff, I’d like to send everyone holiday greetings and best wishes for the coming year. Shirlee Frost Board President Yukon First Nations Culture and Tourism Assn.

wilderness tourism association of the yukon

2013 has been another great year for the staff and Board of Directors of the Wilderness Tourism Association of the Yukon (WTAY). The year started with a change in staff. In late 2012, Justine Hobbs left in order to pursue other interests. Chris Wilkinson took over the position of Office Manager in December 2012. The Board of Directors also said goodbye to Christoph Altherr, Joost Van Der Putten, and Anne Tayler, who all stepped down from the board. Trevor Braun was good enough to step up and fill one of the empty seats. Through 2013, WTAY has strived to meet its mandate as the collective voice of the wilderness tourism sector. One of the bigger issues that came across our plate in 2013

was the Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan to which WTAY presented feedback through the Yukon Government consultation process. WTAY’s position is, and will remain, that we fully support the original planning commission’s findings, and what is known as the 80% Protection plan. WTAY will continue to be involved in the process using all our resources to ensure the wilderness operators are represented in this issue. WTAY has also continued to tirelessly promote the Yukon to adventure and wilderness seekers, by working with OTC to run the Yukon Wild Cooperative Marketing Program. Using the tagline “Experts know the best spots”, Yukon Wild has promoted members through FAM tours, adverts

in national publications, social media, and sponsorship of events such as Yukon Quest. Looking forward, WTAY has some exciting projects in the pipeline, including a complete re-working of our Code of Conduct, designed to make the Yukon adventure sector stronger and safer. Look out for this being promoted in the spring. The WTAY staff and Board of Directors would like to take this opportunity to wish all our members and partners a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year, and we look forward to a great 2014.

Now that winter is in full swing, the Yukon Outfitters Association (YOA) is getting ready for the holiday season by buckling down in our offices to reflect on our past fall season, sharing our stories and getting ready for the winter show season. Once again, the members of our outfitting association had another successful season thanks to unbelievable weather, hardworking crews and a good mix of Canadians and international guests who were new to hunting in the Yukon and the repeats who came back to visit and have more adventures with us, too. Members especially want to thank the many Yukon businesses that support each outfitter, guide, expeditor or hunter whether it is the hotels, restaurants, service stations, stores, transportation, industrial supplies, farms or that one Yukoner who went out of their way. This does not go unnoticed; many of our guests are world travellers who appreciate ‘Yukon hospitality’. If we hear about it, you bet they go back home and tell their friends. They return with more family and friends to have them share in another great Yukon experience. In turn, we try our best to support you whenever we can. The YOA is currently celebrating 50 years as an association; however, outfitting continues to be sustainable and has been a viable part of Yukon’s economy and rich history since the early 1900’s. With that said, we continue our longstanding tradition of taking time out to host our annual Wild Game Round Up, held at the end of the year, where we will once again celebrate our successes with many stories, dancing and enjoying our well-prepared, wild game dinner. See you there! Teena Dickson TIA Yukon Board of Director’s Representative

Greetings from the Klondike. 2013 is winding down and it’s a good time to look back with year-end perspective on successes, challenges and opportunities. x As always, Dawson lived up to its well-deserved reputation for unsurpassed variety, quality and quantity of festivals, events and activities during the year. Actually, too many to list here so please visit dawsoncity.ca for much more information. Plus, don’t forget our anchor ‘yukonic’ attractions: Tombstone Territorial Park & the Dempster Highway corridor, Gold Fields, Klondike National Historic Sites, Dänojà Zho Cultural Centre, Dawson Museum and Gerties, to name a few. Talk about marketing pillars and outstanding

universal values! Although there is ever growing upside in winter tourism, summertime (which didn’t really start until June this year) is still a sweet spot. We’re good at coping but wouldn’t it be great if our four wonderful seasons came and went on schedule, without unwanted, weather-related ‘special events’. And, we hear overall Yukon tourism is increasing. Won’t it be great when Dawson gets back to visitation levels of the gold rush centennial years? On that note, KVA spent a lot of 2013 renewing a forward-looking marketing plan including the website overhaul in progress. We continue to evolve and adapt in a changing marketplace.

Finally, we value Parks’ so much, wouldn’t it be great if KNHS visitor programs and season were not ‘under siege’. Sadly, 2013 marked the passing of three greatly respected Dawsonites: Bill Bowie, Dick North and Ken Snider. In different ways their unique lives and diverse accomplishments reflect true Klondike spirit and each of them was a champion of Yukon tourism. On behalf of Klondike Visitors Association and Dawson City’s visitor industry, we wish you the very best of the Holiday Season and a Happy New Year. Web: dawsoncity.ca

FB: Dawson City, Yukon

Twitter: @dawsoncityyukon

#3-1109 First Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5G4 Phone (867) 668-3331 Fax (867) 667-7379 • info@tiayukon.com • www.tiayukon.com

245


46

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

TIA Yukon, Executive Director

Blake Rogers The holiday season and the lead up to the New Year always causes us to reflect on the year that’s past and look at the year ahead. This past year at TIA Yukon, we’ve continued to advocate for the need to sustain the tourism product that our territory offers, while drawing attention to the impact of film on tourism and emerging trends like culinary tourism. As we move forward into 2014, TIA Yukon will continue to support the Yukon’s traditional tourism product, continue to support the industry’s interest in developing new product, and continue to look for emerging trends that can help support tourism in the territory.

Last week, TIA Yukon joined forces with Nakai Theatre and the Yukon Convention Bureau to host our annual Holiday Open House. It was great to see everyone in the lead up to the holiday season and get into the festive spirit!

In October, TIA Yukon hosted our annual Fall Round Up at the Transportation Museum. It was both fun and informative, with talks from Air North, Yukon’s Airline, each member of the TIA Yukon board, Minister Nixon and the Premier. Almost 100 people attended.

On behalf of the TIA Yukon staff, Season’s Greetings and Happy New Year!

For the Yukon Convention Bureau (YCB), 2013 certainly has proven to be a year of success in further establishing Yukon as the destination for outside organizations to hold their conferences and business events. In 2013, Yukon saw an upswing of interest in convention and event organizers not only considering but choosing Yukon as a unique destination to host their meetings and events.

With over five thousand delegates attending events we have organized so far this year, YCB is well on its way to achieving an estimated $5 million dollar injection into Yukon’s economy. Our crowning achievements this year include attracting the Canadian Association of Mutual Insurance Companies (CAMIC) annual Convention and Trade Show, the Canadian Museum Association (CMA) Convention, The Conference Board of Canada annual conference/trade show and the Assembly of First Nations – Annual General Assembly. The picture for 2014 looks just as bright with Yukon being chosen as the destination for many national business events. These events will surely bring extensive national coverage, which only boosts the exposure that Yukon is the place to be!

YCB’s continuous message being: traveling to an event or hosting an event in Yukon is affordable. YCB continues to produce extensive research, which says Yukon is attractive, accessible, and affordable. Utilizing this research data, YCB offers a cost comparison analysis to its stand-alone marketing bid package. These cost comparison packages have the stats which back up a long-time secret that Yukon is not only a great value, but its a great place for people to experience and do business while they’re visiting the Yukon. Recently, Air North, Yukon’s Airline, has announced direct service from Whitehorse to Ottawa. This new route will offer key MICE markets, direct and affordable service, further establishing Yukon as a top contender for convenient and affordable access. YCB actively pursues business and, earlier this year, attended trade shows in its key target markets including Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto and Ottawa. These trade shows allow us to display the special energy of the Yukon and establish real time, face-to-face relationships with our prospective clients.

At the time of this writing, three Yukon operators have been shortlisted for Canadian Tourism Awards – and hopefully by today all three have won. Congratulations to Carcross Tagish Management Corporation, Ceasar Lake Outfitters, and Canadian River Expeditions for the work they have done to set the bar high, not just in the Yukon, but on a national scale!

YCB’s target markets, which include Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto and Ottawa, are changing. Our incentives attract producers, corporations and associations, who are looking for value and most of all that renowned “Yukon experience” that many only dream of. With the hard work, dedication, and cooperation of our partners and sponsors, we are more than confident YCB will help visitors reach the Yukon to Experience the Rush in 2014. From the Board of Directors and YCB staff: Happy Holidays! May the New Year bring health, happiness and prosperity to all.

Individuals could receive up to $3,000 per year and businesses/groups up to $5,000 per year for tourism-related training in: 1. Entry-level skill development 2. Seasonal employment training and (re)certification 3. Professional skills enhancement and development The YTTF may cover up to 75% of eligible costs incurred for training that meets fund criteria. You must apply to the fund before training begins and application approvals will occur only 4 times a year. THE NExT APPLICATION DEADLINE IS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2014 AT 5:00 P.M. There is also an opportunity to represent your sector of tourism on this committee as a member. The YTTF review committee is comprised of between five to seven members and is looking to diversify so as to be responsive to industry and employee training needs.

Call 668-3331 or visit www.tiayukon.com for information and applications.

#3-1109 First Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5G4 Phone (867) 668-3331 • Fax (867) 667-7379 info@tiayukon.com • www.tiayukon.com


47

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Fertility doctors report an epidemic of twins

What’s New?

Marilynn Marchione Associated Press

BOSTON octors are reporting an epidemic – of twins. Nearly half of all babies born with advanced fertility help are multiple births, new federal numbers show. In the five years since the “Octomom” case, big multiple births have gone way down but the twin rate has barely budged. Twins aren’t always twice as nice; they have much higher risks of prematurity and serious health problems. Now fertility experts are pushing a new goal: One. A growing number of couples are attempting pregnancy with just a single embryo, helped by new ways to pick the ones most likely to succeed. New guidelines urge doctors to stress this approach. Abigail and Ken Ernst of Oldwick, N.J., did this to conceive Lucy, a daughter born in September. Using one embryo at a time “just seemed the most normal, the most natural way” to conceive and avoid a highrisk twin pregnancy, the new mom said. Not all couples feel that way, though. Some can only afford one try with in vitro fertilization, or IVF, so they insist that at least two embryos be used to boost their odds, and view twins as two for the price of one. Many patients “are telling their physicians ‘I want twins,”’ said Barbara Collura, president of Resolve, a support and advocacy group. “We as a society think twins are healthy and always come out great. There’s very little reality” about the increased medical risks for babies and moms, she said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s most recent numbers show that 46 per cent of IVF babies are multiples – mostly twins – and 37 per cent are born premature. By comparison, only three per cent of babies born without fertility help are twins and about 12 per cent are preterm. It’s mostly an American problem – some European countries that pay for fertility treatments require using one embryo at a time. The American Society for Reproductive Medicine is trying to make it the norm in the U.S., too. Its guidelines, updated earlier this year, say that for women with reasonable medical odds of success, those under 35 should be offered single embryo transfer and no more than two at a time. The number rises with age, to two or three embryos for women up to 40, since older women have more trouble conceiving. To add heft to the advice, the

December 9 Regular Council Meeting Please note this is the last council meeting of 2013. The first council meeting of 2014 will be on January 6.

D

City Council will meet at 5:30pm to discuss: Snow & Ice Control and Transportation Maintenance Policies; Public Input Report – 2014-2017 Capital Budget; Public Hearing Report – Zoning Amendment (6th Avenue); Public Input – Conditional Use (33 Levich Drive). Bylaw Readings as follows:

Julio Cortez/AP Photo

Ken and Abigail Ernst with daughter Lucy, who was concieved through in vitro fertilization.

guidelines say women should be counselled on the risks of multiple births and embryo transfers and that this discussion should be noted in their medical records. “In 2014, our goal is really to minimize twins,” said Dr. Alan Copperman, medical director of Reproductive Medicine Associates of New York, a Manhattan fertility clinic. “This year I’m talking about two versus one. Several years ago I was talking about three versus two” embryos. The one-at-a-time idea is catching on. Only four per cent of women under 35 used single embryos in 2007 but nearly 12 per cent did in 2011. It’s less common among older women, who account for fewer IVF pregnancies, but it is gaining among them, too. “Patients don’t really want multiples. What they want is high delivery rates,” said Dr. Richard T. Scott Jr., scientific director for Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, which has seven clinics in that state. Better ways to screen embryos can make success rates for single embryos nearly as good as when two or more are used, he contends. The new techniques include maturing the embryos a few days longer. That improves viability and allows cells to be sampled for chromosome screening. Embryos can be frozen to allow test results to come back and more precisely time the transfer to the womb. Taking these steps with single embryos results in fewer miscarriages and tubal pregnancies, healthier babies with fewer genetic defects and lower hospital bills from birth complications, many fertility specialists say. Multiple studies back this up. In May, doctors from the New Jersey clinics did the kind of research considered a gold standard. They randomly assigned 175 women to have either a single embryo transferred after

chromosome screening or two embryos with no screening, as is done in most IVF attempts now. Delivery rates were roughly equivalent – 61 per cent with single embryos and 65 per cent with doubles. More than half of the double transfers produced twins but none of the single ones did. Babies from double transfers were more likely to be premature; more than one-third spent time in a neonatal intensive care unit versus eight per cent of the others. Chromosome testing and freezing embryos adds about $4,000 to the roughly $14,000 cost for IVF, “but the pregnancy rates go up dramatically,” and that saves money because fewer IVF attempts are needed, Scott said. Using two or more embryos carries a much higher risk of twins and much higher rates of cerebral palsy and other disorders. After explaining the risks, “this is the easiest thing in the world to convince patients to do,” Scott said of screening and using single embryos. But Dr. Fady Sharara of the Virginia Center for Reproductive Medicine in Reston, Va., found otherwise. For a study, he offered 48 couples free medications and embryo freezing if they would agree to transfer one at a time instead of two. Eighteen couples refused, including one-quarter of those whose insurance was covering the treatment. Some who refused said they viewed twins as two for the price of one. “I tell my patients twins are not twice the fun,” Shahara said. “One is hard enough. Two at a time is a killer for some people. Some marriages don’t survive this.” The New Jersey couple who had a daughter using a single embryo has eight more frozen embryos. When it’s time to try again, Abigail Ernst said, “we would do the same thing” and use one at a time.

2013-54 – Fees & Charges Amendment (Misc.) – 3rd 2013-55 – Interim City Manager – 3rd 2013-56 – Sewer & Storm Utility Bylaw – 3rd 2013-57 – Water Utility Bylaw – 3rd 2013-51 – Zoning Amendment (6th Avenue) – 2nd & 3rd 2013-53 – 2014-2017 Capital Budget – 2nd & 3rd Agenda packages are available at whitehorse.ca/agendas

Council & Senior Management (CASM) For a complete meeting list please visit whitehorse.ca/CASM

Copper Haul Road Gates Closed Please note that the Copper Haul Road gates are now closed until April 1, 2014.

Sidewalk Snow & Ice Removal Residential home owners and downtown business owners are reminded of the Maintenance Bylaw 2011-03 to ensure sidewalks boarding their properties are kept clear of ice and snow. Businesses are required to clear snow down to the pavement on sidewalk and lane crossings by 11 am the day after a snowfall. Residential properties are required to have snow removed from their sidewalks within 48 hours of a snowfall. The Bylaw Department wishes to remind everyone that shovelling snow on the road or your neighbour’s property is not permitted, however, businesses can push the snow to the curb’s edge. Please call 668-8317 for further info or questions.

Join a City Committee or Task Force Are you able to contribute your time to some important volunteer work? Want to use your talents and insights to make a difference in our community? The City is seeking applications from interested Whitehorse residents as follows:

Parks and Protected Areas Bylaw Task Force Calling out all community associations and stakeholders for a seat on this Task Force, which will meet several times in 2014 to assist with recommendations for a new Bylaw. Application forms and supporting information may be downloaded at whitehorse.ca/bylawinput or picked up at the Public Safety Building, 305 Range Road. Please respond by December 13.

Finance Committee The responsibility of this Committee is to consider and assess the financial implications of existing and proposed policies, programs and actions, and to recommend to Council the measures or adjustments required to make the best use of the City’s financial resources. For more information and an application form, visit whitehorse.ca/financecommittee or call the Manager, Financial Services at 336-0011. Please apply by January 10, 2014.

www.whitehorse.ca


48

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

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49

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Consumers push for changes to chemical makeup of toiletries Bruce Cheadle

because they did not publicly post policies on eliminating toxins such as triclosan and phthalates OTTAWA from their products. n environmental group has “The good news is that some ranked Canada’s five largest companies are listening to the cosmetics companies based on growing concerns from their potentially harmful ingredients in customers about the risks of these their products. chemicals,” Maggie MacDonald of The report from TorontoEnvironmental Defence said in a based Environmental Defence release. says the big five all have issues “Others need to take the old with chemicals that could be saying to heart – the customer is harmful to human health, but always right – and act to remove some are doing better than others. harmful chemicals.” And it says public pressure is Procter and Gamble anbeginning to exert influence on nounced in September that it the ingredients companies use in would eliminate triclosan, a comeverything from shampoo and monly used anti-bacterial agent, moisturizers to toothpaste and and phthalates from its personaldeodorant. care products in 2014. Citing publicly available inJohnson and Johnson commitformation and using a basket of ted in 2012 to remove triclosan, five common products, Enviphthalates, formaldehydes and ronmental Defence looked for parabens from its adult toiletries what it called the “toxic 10” – 10 and cosmetics. chemicals that have faced internaWal-Mart Stores, meanwhile, tional scrutiny for their proven or announced this fall that it would potential health hazards. be working toward reducing The study ranked Proctor and chemicals starting in January, and Gamble best among Canada’s big promises a public report in two five cosmetics companies, folyears on how it has fared. lowed by Johnson and Johnson, Health Canada and Environand Unilever. ment Canada proposed in 2012 Estee Lauder and L’Oreal that industry should voluntarily cut the amount of triclosan it rounded out fourth and fifth uses, particularly in personal-care place, respectively, principally Canadian Press

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50

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

THE

ARTS

Artists away from the noise Meg Walker Special for the News

A

rtists, like everyone else, work better when they’re well-fed. So say Jane Isakson and Jennifer Walden, two painters with solo exhibitions at the Yukon Arts Centre. The topic arose on opening day because Isakson’s From the Outer Edges and Walden’s The Land at the End of the Sticks were begun during artist residencies in remote geographic locations. Both painters regularly spend time in the wilderness. But it’s difficult to go out to remote locations and paint. “Usually you’re going out with a group of people, and you’re hiking through,” says Isakson, a Whitehorse-based painter. “You can get inspired, but at a residency you have a focused time in a set place to paint. And you’re supported in doing it. Your meals are looked after and you can lose yourself in the work.” Walden agrees. “When I go out near Yellowknife, where I live, I need my lunch and the canoe I’m moving around. I’m lucky if I can squeeze in a pencil sketch.” In contrast, when Walden was invited to the Dechen La Wilderness Retreat in late summer 2012, her gear was mostly paint and equipment – not food. Playfulness aside, the paintings in these exhibitions are deeply considered large-scale works. Both artists offer emotionally thoughtful translations of remote locations that few people can see first-hand. From the Outer Edges displays Isakson’s works inspired by time in three national parks: Gros Morne in Newfoundland (2008), Ivvavik in the Yukon (2009), and Gwaii Haanas in Haida Gwaii (2010). The paintings are grouped in the gallery by their geographic locations. Isakson’s attention to subtle colour shifts is sophisticated. She differentiates the silky grays of West Coast mist against cedars from the purple-hued fogs of East Coast haze against steep rocks. In paintings from Ivvavik, low-angled yellows of northern sunlight form pale highlights against the rich greens of the Mackenzie Delta. The skies are always surprising in Isakson’s works in this show. She builds angular planes of distinct colour in the landscapes below, and then forms triangular and lozenge-shaped masses of muted colours in the skies. At times the shapes tease: an angled blue sky form first looks like a mountain peak, then a patch of cloud, then a temperature gradient change in the air. It could also be a splash of water coming up from the foreground. The total effect combines the

“Every time I went to put together a composition, I had my own photographs to go to,” she explains. “And there’s such a difference. Instead of looking at someone else’s photography, this way there’s a direct emotional contact. You were standing there. I found that made an incredible difference in how I was able to express myself on canvas.” Born in Ottawa, at age 13 Walden moved with her mother to East Africa and then South India. The international years gave her an early appreciation for lush colours and nearly-pristine animal habitats. As a young adult, she studied in Cuzco, Peru, with a painter named Marcos Ramos. She learned about natural pigments from the forest, but she also saw how he used art-making to involve youth in environmental issues. On her return to Canada, Walden earned an education degree and then moved to Yellowknife in 2002. She started an art program at an elementary school there and kept painting, focusing Ian Stewart/Yukon News mostly on wildlife. After her first Top, Yellowknife artist Jennifer Walden’s monumental landscape series, Land at the End solo show in 2007, she turned to of the Sticks, is on display at the Yukon Arts Centre gallery. Bottom, Whitehorse’s Jane painting full time. Isakson brings a geometric touch to her landscape series, From the Outer Edges. The “powerful experiences” Walden drew from the Mackenzie Mountain Barrens now burst out into vivid, rhythmic canvases for The Land at the End of the Sticks. In particular, there are three three-panel paintings in the exhibit that are 10 by 12 feet. The towering canvases immerse the viewer in Walden’s fascination with texture and colour. The triptych Cotton Grass Haven, for example, shows dramatic mountain peaks in its top third. But the foreground, filled with bas-relief stalks and puffs of cotton grass, also offers plenty to linger on. So does the midground, where bands of red and green grasses stream across the canvas at about waist-height. “Rarely am I trying to capture ‘the mountain,’” she comments. “What I’m really trying to do is capture the wind, the light, or how I felt at that time of day. The Dechen La Lodge and Wilderness mountain becomes a vehicle to through studies at the Univerpleasure of turning a kaleidoexpress something else.” scope with the thoughtful experi- sity of Alberta, she moved to the Retreat. The family-run lodge is The Land at the End of the Yukon and completed the degree between the Selwyn and Mackence of watching cloud formaSticks and From the Outer Edges enzie mountains, in the Northtions that will affect your hiking from a distance. That’s when are visual documents of gratefulwest Territories near the Yukon or canoeing plans later in the day. landscape painting took over. ness for pristine wilderness areas. border. A partnership with the “In a way, the sports career Isakson, a former Albertan, They can be seen at the Yukon Kaska First Nation, it takes its spent close to a decade as a mem- gave me the courage to do the Arts Centre until February 22, name from the Kaska phrase for 2014. art,” she says. Professionals in ber of the Canadian Biathlon the area, translating as “The Land both fields had advised her that Team, participating in the 1992 In a time when Canadians at the End of the Sticks.” she wasn’t cut out for the work. and 1994 Winter Olympics. face challenging questions about Walden spent her eight days “The moral of the story is, you Subtle distinctions now found land use – from pipeline proposthere going for long hikes, takhave to be careful about listenin her art between snow, snowals to watershed protection – the ing more than 2,000 photos ing to anybody! But what sport shade, horizon and sky would emotional thoughtfulness of and making small paintings on have once been tools for compe- taught me is that it’s a matter of these landscape paintings offer a putting in time. If you put in the her portable easel. Back home, tition. welcome addition to the convershe spent 18 months turning work, you will go someplace.” Retiring from skiing, Isakson sation. those compact images into large Caribou were a main feature decided in 1998 that it was time Meg Walker is an artist canvases. of Walden’s experience at the for a fine arts degree. Halfway and writer in Dawson City, Yukon.


Friday, December 6, 2013

51

Yukon News

SILVER SPONSORS .

The Yukon Chamber of Mines thanks the following partners, sponsors and companies who came together this year to make the 41st Annual Yukon Geoscience Forum & Trade Show a success. The Yukon Chamber of Mines also wishes you and yours a very y happy, ppy healthy y and safe holiday y season and looks forward to seeing you at the next Yukon Geoscience Forum- November 16th to 19th, 2014. For more information about the Yukon Chamber of Mines, please visit www.yukonminers.ca or call 867-667-2090.

COPPER SPONSORS Northern Allied Workers Association

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52

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Egypt’s best known satirical poet Ahmed Fouad Negm dies at 84 Hamza Hendawi

like the humiliating defeat at the hands of Israel in 1967, the 1979 peace treaty with Israel and CAIRO, Egypt the authoritarian rule of Hosni hmed Fouad Negm, Egypt’s Mubarak. “poet of the people” whose Negm shot to fame in the sharply political verses in col1970s and the 1980s when his loquial Arabic skewered the poetry was sung by blind mucountry’s leaders and inspired sician Sheik Imam Issa who protesters from the 1970s through played the oud, a lute-like Arabic the current uprisings, has died. instrument. The duo, who mostly He was 84. performed in popular coffee Negm died Tuesday at his houses and to university students, home in Cairo, said his close inspired generations of youth friend and publisher Mohammed aspiring for change. Hashem, director and owner of Negm was a firm supporter of Merit publishing. the 2011 uprising that toppled Known as the “poet of the the Mubarak regime. His verse is people,” Negm’s use of colloquial often littered with expletives or Egyptian Arabic endeared him to obscene puns, a trait that charachis countrymen who saw in his terizes the language of the street verse an unvarnished reflection in Egypt, a nation of 90 milof how they felt about milestones lion people who are sometimes in their nation’s recent history derided for corrupting the Arabic Associated Press

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language. “A judge once told me that my poetry was crude,” Negm recalled. “I asked him: ‘Is it more crude than what is happening in Egypt?’ The judge laughed.” His poetry communicated the sentiments of marginalized Egyptians and shocked officialdom. His poems lampooned an elite seen as co-opted by successive regimes or isolated from the rest of the nation, although one of the country’s top businessmen was a vocal fan. His verse also reflected both a love for his country and scathing criticism of its ills. “We are a society that only cares about the hungry when they are voters and only cares about the naked when they are women,” he once said, suggesting that people care more about “morality” than ensuring everyone can afford clothes. A self-proclaimed secularist, Negm was a harsh critic of Islamists. They did not like him either. “Thank God for the blessing that is his death,” said an anonymous posting on an Islamist website on Tuesday. Negm had been scheduled to travel to Amsterdam later this month to receive the Prince Claus Award, one of the Netherlands’ top cultural prizes. “Negm is both an icon and a folk hero, renowned in literary circles for the quality, lyricism and beauty of his work, from love songs to radical satires that take the complex, highly nuanced vernacular Arabic to unprecedented poetic levels,” according to the citation of the prize, awarded by the Dutch Prince Claus Fund. “He is celebrated on the streets of Cairo and across the Arab world for giving voice to the spirit of the people’s movement for social justice.” Negm had little formal education. Over the course of his life he took jobs as a house servant and

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Renowned Egyptian poet Ahmed Fouad Negm, outside his home in Cairo, has died at 84.

a postal worker. He was jailed for a total of 18 years for his political views under the rule of former presidents Gamal Abdel-Nasser and Anwar Sadat. He saved his harshest criticism, however, for Mubarak, who ruled Egypt for 29 years but never jailed the poet. “Compared to Mubarak, AbdelNasser was a prophet and Sadat was a very kind man,” he said in 2006. His poetry took added significance during the years of Mubarak’s rule, when its sense of deep-seated dissatisfaction spoke to growing numbers of Egyptians and their seething anger with that era’s corruption, heavy-handed police tactics and broken promises of reform. Negm’s appearance and lifestyle matched the bluntness and the nature of his verse, immersed in the language of the poor. He wore a galabiya, a flowing Egyptian robe, at all times. His last home was a small apartment in a government housing project given to him by authorities when he lost his humble home in a 1992 earthquake. “Poverty is my choice. My whole family is poor, so why should I be different?” he said.

“I live with people, eat what they eat and am surrounded by the same pollution and garbage,” said Negm, who in recent years sported a mass of silver hair, a face deeply lined by age and decades of heavy cigarette smoking. Negm held court at the roof of his ramshackle apartment building. To get there, visitors had to climb up a wooden ladder and through a narrow hatch to the dun-colored shack with bright blue window frames. Scrawled on one of the walls was “Poetry is like a horse that freely roams the world despite the prison bars.” He is the father of prominent activist and columnist Nawara Negm, an iconic figure of the 2011 revolt that toppled Mubarak. He has two other daughters in addition to Nawara, Zeinab and Afaf. “You may not find in the life of your father something to brag about, but you will certainly not find anything that you will be ashamed of,” he wrote in the dedication of a book of his verses to his three daughters. His funeral was held on Tuesday at the historic Imam Hussein mosque in the medieval section of the Egyptian capital.

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53

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

We know that we have probably missed someone! So many local heroes help us with the campaign that it is hard to keep track. Thank you to everyone who contributed to the 2013 United Way Yukon Workplace Campaign

160,000!

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and enlisted 80 new everyday heroes! People who donated at least $1/day for the year

WorkpLaCe Coordinators Yukon Government

Government of Canada

• Gillian McKee • Dianne McPhee • Donna Milne • Thurikah Nathan • Judy Pelchat • Angela Sale-Roche • Kerri Scholz • Jan Slipetz • Jean- Sebastien Blais • Miriam Smith • Claudia Morgan • Melissa Madden • Randi Cave • Andrea Staples • Bonnie Venton-Ross • Brian Bonia – Yukon College

• Christina MacNeil • Debbie Verhalle • Ellen Andison • Peter Garrett • Elizabeth Gilbert • Karen Riemer • Kyla Wirth • Linda Moen • Pauline Livingstone • Loree Mann • Lorraine Donovan • Jillian MacIssac • Monique Girard • Ellen Sedlack

Corporations and other organizations Northwestel - Leslie McRae • CIBC – Lance Bevilacqua, Christopher Tessier • BMO – Vincent Shenk • EBA - Briar Young • Royal Bank – Nicole Hebert • Scotia Bank – Doug Jantzen • City Of Whitehorse - Brian Crist

special thanks goes to the department’s below: • • • •

Yukon Government Department of Justice and PSC for organizing the United Way Breakfast and Silent Auction which raised over $17,000 The RCMP who quadrupled their donation total from 2012 EMR, YG who tripled their donation total from 2012 and added over 20 Everyday heroes! Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada whose team did an amazing amount of work organizing events and getting people involved.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THIS YEAR’S TOP WORKPLACES BY PER CAPITA DONATION: • • • •

Service Canada Justice Canada Worker’s Compensation Board Public Service Commission

AND OUR TOP WORKPLACES BY DONATIONS TOTAL: • • • •

United Way of Yukon communications powered by “Latitude Wireless”

This year we raised over

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada Yukon College Energy Mines and Resources Health and Social Services Special Thanks to Yukon News for providing free ad space throughout the campaign! Thank you to all the unmentioned volunteers and supporters who made this campaign a success.

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fLaG raisinG Premier Darrel Pasloski Mayor Dan Curtis Councilor John Streicker Councilor Jocelyn Curteanu honorarY CampaiGn Chair Larry Bagnell media and promotion sUpport Zvonko Jovanovic -Yukon News Heidi Neufeld – Yukon News Cathy Robertson – Copy Copy Eva Birdman - CKRW

The Deli Karen Riemer Line Gagnon Dr. Martina Knopp Holistic Haven Inspired Interiors Aroma Borealis Gwen Wally Pauline Sydney Java Connection Blue Betty Car Wash Linda Anton Mary Louise Boylan Karen Riemer Whitehorse Woofers Dog Club Health Canada Service Canada

United WaY of YUkon board of direCtors Leslie McRae, President Dave Whiteside Joanne Oberg Hillary Aitken Justin Gorczyca Peter Woodruff United WaY of YUkon – CampaiGn Cabinet Dave Whiteside, Chair Brian Bonia Colleen Mador Ellen Sedlack Monique Chatterton Roslyn Woodcock Larry Bagnell

Your donations during the United Way of Yukon workplace campaign support local programs and services here in Yukon.

Together, we are making a difference!

For more information, visit our website: www.yukon.unitedway.ca or telephone 867-667-2003

Cardinal Contracting

Stantec EDI and Environment Canada Ball Hockey Tournament EDI Environmental Dynamics Inc G&P Distributing Inc.

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Thanks to any unmentioned donors and volunteers who gave to this year’s campaign.


54

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Please touch! Blind visitors feel ancient objects on tactile museum tours Kathy Matheson

birth, the high school student says the exhibits are so sight-dependent PHILADELPHIA that he can’t enjoy them. But he’s making an exception for ngel Ayala has never been a big fan of museums. Blind since the Penn Museum, an archaeology Associated Press

A

Special Olympics Yukon is looking for Volunteers to help out with the following sports: • •

Cross Country skiing 5 Pin Bowling

no experience is necessary, just the willingness to help our athletes train and compete in the sports they enjoy to play!

Call Us: 668-6511

join us for our annual

Yukon Author

Book Signing ExtrAvAgAnzA! SAturdAY, dEcEmBEr 7th from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm

Patricia robertson Astrid zoer david thompson marcelle dube Linda Johnson helene dolbrowsky Eleanor millard Pat & Alex van Bibber claire Eamer

and anthropology centre that offers touch tours for the blind and visually impaired. Ayala can now feel the eroded limestone of an ancient Egyptian sarcophagus and the intricate hieroglyphs on the statue of a pharaoh. “When I touch things, it’s my version of a sighted person’s eyes. It tells me way more than a person describing it would ever,” Ayala said. The institution, which is part of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, began offering the tours last year in an effort to make their extensive collections more accessible. Museums should serve the community at large, and that includes the unsighted as well as the sighted, said program co-ordinator Trish Maunder. “Just because a person has low vision or can’t see, doesn’t mean that they’re not completely interested in culture or learning about ancient artifacts,” Maunder said. Most major U.S. metro areas have at least one museum that offers some type of hands-on experience, from touching objects with bare hands or gloves to feeling replicas, according to Art Beyond Sight, a group that makes visual culture accessible to the blind and visually impaired. Such accommodations began well before the Americans with Disabilities Act and have increased as museums “have transformed from institutions that house objects to institutions that work with audiences,” said Nina Levent, executive director of the New York-based art

organization. Museums that don’t offer tactile tours often have personal or audio guides for the blind. But Levent contends that developing touch components can benefit a wide range of visitors, including children’s groups and students with learning disabilities. “I’d be hard-pressed to Jacqueline Larma/ AP Photo think of an audience that Visually impaired high school studoes not want to touch,” Levdents touch a replica of a mummy ent said. at the Penn Museum in PhiladelThe Penn Museum has phia. The museum began offering held hands-on tours twice touch tours in 2012 as part of an each Monday – when the building is otherwise closed – initiative to make their extensive collections more accessible. for the past two fall seasons. Ayala’s recent visit came the mummification process – and during a field trip with about a dozhandled facsimiles of relics found in en classmates from the Overbrook tombs. They also felt ancient linen, School for the Blind. The students smelled scented oils and touched a got to feel a quartzite likeness of Ramesses II, a black basalt statue of reproduction of a mummy. Overall, the museum is engaging the goddess Sakhmet and two stone with nearly 250 blind or visually coffins. Smaller reproductions of the pharaoh and deity were available for impaired people this fall, up about 32 per cent from last year, Maunder those not tall enough to touch the said. Educators are already planning tops of the statues. next season’s curriculum on ancient Students sanitized their hands Rome. before feeling the pieces, which The response from participants were pre-selected by conservators. has been encouraging, said docent Though thousands of years old, Austin Seraphin, who is also blind the artifacts shouldn’t be damaged and helped develop the tour. by clean fingers and a light touch, “Everyone seems really happy,” Maunder said. Seraphin said. “We asked them to The free tours include a classfill out surveys and reportedly we’ve room lesson on how Egyptians been getting universally positive prepared a body for burial. Students jiggled a gelatin mould of the reaction. The one complaint we get brain – which is removed during is that students wish it were longer.”

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55

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Tourists return to Baja as crime dips

Northern Cultural Expressions Society

Christmas Shopping December 10th-20th 2013 Open 9am -5pm after hOurs can be arrangeD

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Handmade carvings Original Paintings Prints Jewellery Cards T-shirts Toques Mugs Fleece vests

Gregory Bull/AP Photo

A souvenir shop in Tijuana, Mexico. After years of violence, tourists have been lured back by the exploding fame of local chefs, boutique hotels and a burgeoning art scene.

Julie Watson Associated Press

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McDonalds. call 633-4186 for more information. said Terry Thornton, senior vicepresident of itinerary development. Derrik Chinn, a former San Diego newspaper reporter who moved to Tijuana in 2009, has seen business for his tour company, Turista Libre, double in the past two years. His tours promise “no gringo stereotypes,” which have built the misguided image that the city is nothing more than a mecca of brothels and tasteless souvenirs, like the shellacked, sombrero-wearing reptiles holding up tequila shots hawked by vendors among the lines of idling cars waiting to cross back into the United States. Chinn’s trips cater to everyone You’re paying down your mortgage. from thrill-seekers who delight in hurtling down a giant waterslide at You’re saving for your child’s education. a Baja water park or in watching a match of masked wrestlers being catapulted out of the ring to art and music enthusiasts eager to catch one of Tijuana’s chamber opera perLet’spaying help you create your financial strategy You’re down your mortgage. formances or learn about its 1930s before theyour RRSP contribution deadline. covered alleyways beingYou’re revived by paying You’re saving for your child’s education. down mortgage. artists. Call me today. You’re paying down your mortgage. You’re saving for your child’s education. Even so, Johnson has many friends who are still afraid to go You’re Kevin saving for your child’s education G Moore back. Others dread the wait at the Financial U.S. border crossings, frequently Let’s help you createAdvisor your financial strategy . hours long. the RRSP contribution 307 Jarvis Street, Ste deadline. 101b The U.S. government’s latest helpbefore Let’s you create your financial strategy Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2H3 travel advisory tells Americans to Call me today. Let’s help you create your financial stra “exercise caution in thebefore northern the RRSP contribution 867-393-2587 deadline. before RRSP contribution deadline. state of Baja California, particularly Kevinthe G Moore www.edwardjones.com Call me today. at night.” It notes there were 278 Member – Canadian Investor Protection Fu Call Financial me today. Advisor homicides in Tijuana from January . to June 2013 and that some assasAdvisor 307 Financial JarvisKevin Street,G Ste 101b Moore IRT-8192-C sinations were in areas frequented . Financial Advisor Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2H3 by U.S. citizens. AdvisorSte 101b . 307Financial Jarvis Street, . Tijuana’s Mayor Carlos Busta867-393-2587 307 Jarvis Street, Ste mante objected to the advisory, not307101b Jarviswww.edwardjones.com Street, 101b Whitehorse, YT Y1ASte 2H3 Whitehorse, YT Y1AWhitehorse, 2H3 Member ing the city’s crime rate has dropped – Canadian Investor Protection Fund YT Y1A 2H3 867-393-2587 by 25 per cent since 2010 following 867-393-2587 867-393-2587 a purge of corrupt police. www.edwardjones.c IRT-8192-C www.edwardjones.com Johnson said he and his wife www.edwardjones.com Member – Canadian Investor Member – Canadian Investor Protection Fund Investor Pro Member – Canadian have never felt any danger since returning on multiple trips. “You do get kind of aggressive IRT-8192-C IRT-8192-C IRT-8192-C vendors who fight for the few tourists who are there,” he said. “But it’s more entertaining than scary.”

Are you Are ready? Are Are you youAre you ready? ready? you ready? But what about your future? ready? You’re paying down your mortgage.

You’re saving for your child’s educatio

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SAN DIEGO an Johnson hadn’t crossed the U.S.-Mexico border in years despite the fact the San Diego native lives 20 minutes away by car and spent most of his life making weekend runs for Baja California’s surf and fish tacos. “Everybody was scared,” Johnson said of San Diegans’ impression of their Mexican neighbour after violence spiked about eight years ago. But now Johnson, like an increasing number of Americans, is being lured back by a region that has transformed itself while fighting the drug war. Once centred on timeshares and rowdy bars largely frequented by Americans and Canadians, northern Baja California’s tourism industry is rebounding with the exploding fame of local chefs, the expansion of boutique hotels and a burgeoning art scene creating a buzz in travel magazines. This year, foreigners made up more than 45 per cent of all visitors, after dropping to a low of less than 25 per cent when cartels unleashed unprecedented bloodshed, leaving beheaded bodies on Tijuana’s streets. Sport fishing licenses – which are almost exclusively sought by Americans – have increased more than 75 per cent during that time, according to Baja California’s tourism department. Homicides in the state fell sharply, from 1,528 in 2010 to 584 in 2012, according to the latest figures from Mexico’s National Statistics and Geography Institute. But the biggest jump in foreign tourism came after the region’s nouveau cuisine, called Baja Med, caught the attention of celebrity chefs like Anthony Bourdain and Rick Bayless, said Baja California’s former Tourism Secretary Juan Tintos, who retired on Nov. 1. Baja Med combines the region’s

seafood, cactus pads and chiles, with Mediterranean flavours, such as olive oil, vinaigrettes, and sun-dried tomatoes. Foodies from San Francisco to Brooklyn have followed the celebrity chefs in a deepening path to Baja’s chic restaurants, like Javier Plascencia’s Mision 19 in Tijuana that offers panoramic views of the borderlands while serving tamarind Martinis topped by whipped coconut milk. “The world of gastronomy has helped us transcend the border,” Tintos said. “It has helped people overcome their fears.” The more sophisticated travel industry is largely the result of the industry turning to the domestic market to make up for the lost tourist dollars from foreigners. A string of boutique hotels that mix traditional Spanish architecture with modern twists have opened in the wine-growing region of Valle de Guadalupe, a region nicknamed the Napa of Baja that is little more than an hour’s drive from the border. Some offer wine-making, cooking and yoga classes or tours to tasting rooms where visitors can enjoy seafood caught off nearby Ensenada’s coast, homemade cheeses made at the surrounding ranches paired with local wines. The Mexico City boutique hotel developer, Grupo Habita, opened Endemico, a sleek cluster of wood-and-steel cabins perched among giant boulders with a sweeping view of the valley. Along the coast, Ensenada has gone from Mexico’s sixth cruise ship destination in 2010 to its second this year. It is surpassed only by Cozumel, Tintos said. The number of ship passengers visiting the port is expected to double from 339,000 in 2013 to more than 700,000 next year, based on the cruises’ contracts. Carnival Cruise Lines plans to make 200 calls a year to Ensenada starting in January when it will add a second ship to operate three- and four-day cruises from Long Beach,

Come in for a personalized tour of the studio.

suite 9 b Yukon Inn plaza, across the street from


56

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

It is with great appreciation that WHITEHORSE MINOR SOCCER says

Thank You

to all its Sponsors, Coaches, Coordinators and other volunteers. It takes many special people to make WMS happen and here they all are:

SPONSOR ADORNA Landscaping All Terrane Exploration All Yukon Refridgeration Alpine Aviation Angelina’s Toy Boutique Boston Pizza Budget Plumbing and Heating Builders Supplyland Claimspro Coates Services Coldwell Banker Creative Works Psychological Services Dandelion Dental Dermal Skin & Laser Centre

Dirkbuilt Contracting Duncan’s Ltd. Eagle Constructions Earth Tek Drilling Ltd. Energy North Envirolube Epic Pizza Fenix House Home Sweet Home Baking Jacob’s Industries Kilrich Industries Klondike Business Solutions La Bicicletta B+B Lanix Property Management Locksmith Services

Medicine Chest Mic Mac Toyota Murraya Dental Northern Lights Optometry Nuway Crushing Professional Corporation (Wolverines) Rapidfire Roofing Robert Service Campground Royal Flush Plumbing Sale Salvage Sphinx Orthodontics Sportslife Take 5 Mobile Massage The Deli

The Eagles The Electrical Shop The Soccer Shoppe Tim Hortons Titan Gaming Total Soccer Consulting Whitehorse Elks Whitehorse Firefighters Association Whitehorse Star Woodhouse Business Consulting Yukon Host.com Yukon News Yukon Outfitters Association Yukon Pump Yukon Yamaha

Diane Pawluk Dom Pehar Doug Petriw Doug Terry Eckhard Krabel Ed Krahn Edwin Vanderkley Elise Guillemette Emily Dorosz Eric Hoenisch Eric Schroff Gary Rusnak Geof Harries Gerard Dinn Grant Zazula Guilano Rayo Haider Rajab Heather Swystun Hector Lang Jamie McLelland Jan Aalt van den Horn Jason Chalifour Jason Legault Jay Timmons Jen Stanyer

Jen Whipple Jennifer McDougall Jenny Pope Jessica Woodhouse Joe Morrison Jolene Jacobs Jonathan Stockdale Juergen Korn Julian Fraser Justin Hendrie Karen Baxter Keith Maguire Kim Corrothers Kirsten Pattimore Kurt Bringsli Lindy Dunlop Lorne Harris Mark London Mark Peterson Megan Lanigan Michael Prochazka Mike Gill Neil McGrath Nils Clarke Patrick Jackson

Paul Kishchuk Phil Willoughby Rob Horne Roger Hanberg Ross Lindley Ryan Parry Saleem Dar Sarah Hanson Scott Wood Sean McCarron Sean McLeish Shaunagh Stikeman Steve Fecteau Swapan Chowdhury Tania Stalder Theresa Murrey Thomas Jung Tim Sellars Travis Banks Travis Richie Tyler Bradford Vanessa Younker Wayne Cousins Willy McKenna

COACHES Alison Ott Andrea Fischer Andrea Wilson Ann Chapman Arlo O’Riordan Brian Gillen Brian Young Brittany Milner Bruce Bennett Cavell Burley Chad Warren Charlene Torgerson Chris Ross Colin McDowell Colin Nash Colleen Benoit Colleen Latham Craig Charlton Craig Duncan Craig Nicholson Dale Cheesman Dan Shier Dave Albisser Dean Faragher Derek Parker

COORDINATORS Amy Stuart, Anne Savoie, Derek Parker, Grant Zazula, Karen Clyde, Kirsten Pattimore, Lindy Dunlop, Marie Cairns, Maura Sullivan, Maureen Johnstone, Paul Kishchuk, Steve Cash, Susan Skaalid

OTHER HELPERS WERE… Boris Hoefs (and his brothers and sister in law), Chris Donohoe, Gerry Thick, Intersport, Jacobs Industries, Joanne Organ, Locksmith Services, Paul Kishchuk, Stan Dorosz, We also thank Johnny Nunan and Kim King from the Yukon Soccer Association for their friendly cooperation

Happy Holidays and a very Happy New Year to everybody… INCLuDING OuR REFEREES, OuR PLAYERS AND THEIR FAMILIES. If we missed anyone please call 667-2445 so we can make it right next time.


57

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Reprimanded polar bear scientist settles complaint, retires Becky Bohrer

They said their findings suggested drowning-related deaths of polar bears may increase in the future if JUNEAU, Alaska the regression of pack ice or periods n Alaska scientist whose observa- of longer open water continues. The tions of drowned polar bears observations helped make the polar helped galvanize the global warming bear a symbol for the climate change movement has retired as part of a movement. settlement with a federal agency he Following the investigation, says tried to silence him to protect its BOEM ultimately found no evidence political goals. of scientific misconduct. But MonCharles Monnett was briefly susnett was reprimanded for improper pended in 2011 during an inspector release of emails that were later used general’s investigation into a polar by an appeals court to strike down an bear research contract he managed Arctic oil and gas exploration plan while working with what is now approved by BOEM. known as the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Monnett returned to work, but Energy Management, or BOEM. An his prior research work focusing on Interior Department employee had Arctic issues had been reassigned, alleged Monnett wrongfully released said Jeff Ruch, executive director of government records and that he and the watchdog group Public Employanother scientist intentionally omit- ees for Environmental Responsibility, ted or used false data in an article on which helped Monnett with his case polar bears. and a complaint filed last year. In 2004, during an aerial survey Under the settlement, signed in of bowhead whales, Monnett and October but released Wednesday by another researcher saw four dead Public Employees for Environmental polar bears floating in the water after Responsibility, Monnett will receive a storm, observations that were later $100,000 but cannot seek Interior detailed in a peer-reviewed article. Department work for five years. His They said they were reporting, to retirement was effective Nov. 15, at the best of their knowledge, the first which point the agency agreed to observations of the bears floating withdraw the letter of reprimand dead and presumed drowned while and give Monnett a certificate for his apparently swimming long distances. work on the tracking project. The Associated Press

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THE LAW LINE

The settlement does not constitute any admission of liability, including any admission that federal employees “treated Monnett in a discriminatory or retaliatory manner.” BOEM spokeswoman Connie Gillette said by email she could not comment on personnel matters but said sound science is the foundation of BOEM’s decision-making, and the agency takes the integrity of it scientists and reliability of their work very seriously. Monnett, in a release, said the

PreAuthorized Payment

Online/ Telephone Banking

Mail

Financial Institution

agency tried to silence and discredit him “and send a chilling message to other scientists at a key time when permits for oil and gas exploration in the Arctic were being considered. They failed on the first two goals, but I believe that what they did to me did make others afraid to speak up, even internally.” He said he could not, in good conscience, “work for an agency that promotes dishonesty, punishes those who actually stand up for scientific

Bill Payment Options are Changing Effective March 14, 2014 Yukon Electrical will no longer accept bill payments at the Yukon Electrical offices. Customers can still pay their bill by the following methods: ü Pre-authorized payment ü Online or Telephone Banking ü Mail ü Financial Institution Customers can continue to come into our office for questions about their statements, turning service off or on and other questions they may have about electricity safety or conservation. Watch for the new e-bill option coming in 2014! For more information please contact 633-7000 or 1-800-661-0513.

The LAW LINE is a phone service staffed by a lawyer giving free basic information about the law. Call the LAW LINE with your questions on family law, criminal law, bankruptcy, pardons, wills and more.

CALL TOLL FREE 1-866-667-4305

This service is paid for by the taxpayers of Canada and is delivered by Yukon Public Legal Education Assoc. with funds from the Depts. of Justice Canada and Govt. of Yukon.

C

hristmas Time is… is Jamaica Blue Mountain Time. A Yukon Tradition This extraordinary coffee is grown in the majestic Blue Mountain Range in Jamaica reaching approximately 7,402 feet at the highest peak, thus making it is one of the highest grown coffees in the world. An incredible mix of rich soil, cool and misty conditions, high rainfall and good soil drainage combined with expert care and stringent quality control results in one of the smoothest and richest coffees in the world. The coffee is certified by our roaster and ourselves to be authentic Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee. The coffee itself is medium roasted in small batches using a Probat roaster. It offers good acidity, medium body and a good solid cup with beautiful aroma. It is as good a coffee as has come out of Jamaica in many years. We have limited quantities available, with a 200g or larger purchase at $18 per 100g while quantities last.

The Best For Your Kitchen Since 1974

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integrity, and that cannot tolerate scientific work not pre-shaped to serve its agenda.” “I am a very strong believer in transparency in the scientific process,” he said in a phone interview. “And I think it’s very hard, certainly in the Department of Interior, to pursue science in that fashion.” Ruch said Monnett, 65, is exploring his future options. He said he left his federal job with a fully vested pension.

Don’t let your child miss a moment because of the flu. There are limited amounts of flumist nasal spray still available for children aged two to 17 years. See the clinic schedule at yukonflushot.ca


58

Yukon News

Researchers fear snakehead invasion

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could survive in Canadian waters. BURNABY, B.C. The snakehead can slither nightmarish fish pulled overland and has a lung that from a pond in a suburallows it to survive out of waban Vancouver park last year ter for short periods, but the likely wouldn’t have survived researchers found no evidence a Canadian winter, but scien- of eggs in the Burnaby pond tists remain concerned about where it was found, confirmed North America’s vulnerability it was not born there, and say to invasion from non-native the creature’s internal tissues species. match those of less hardy Scientists from Simon blotched snakeheads that at Fraser University, the univer- the time could be purchased sities of British Columbia and in Greater Vancouver. Guelph, as well as the B.C. Discovery of the voracious Ministry of Environment ex- fish raised concerns that it amined the half-metre-long, could invade the Fraser River, 3.7-kilogram fish and deterthreatening salmon stocks mined the toothy monster and other native species, so was a blotched snakehead, not the environment ministry the northern species which banned possession, transport tolerates cold conditions and and breeding of all species of Canadian Press

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snakeheads. The United States did the same more than a decade ago, yet scientists say invasions of the voracious fish are still reported and various snakehead species are now well established in the fresh waters of Hawaii, Florida and the eastern U.S. The study, published online in the Management of Biological Invasions Journal, urges continued monitoring and rapid response planning to deal with invasive species and says public education is key to highlighting the severe environmental and economic consequences linked to release of any non-native species of fish.

Bird makes its own nature film

Horwood’s Mall, 1st & Main Street | 393.4967

See us on Facebook

Friday, December 6, 2013

reveals the sea eagle’s caper. The bird’s flapping wings can SYDNEY, Australia be seen as it grabs the device brazen bird snatched and takes off, and the eagle a video camera that later poses for a selfie, poking was recording crocodiles its face into the camera lens. in northwest Australia and Rangers set up the motioncaptured fascinating footage sensor camera along the of its 110-kilometre (70-mile) Margaret River in May, hoping journey across the country’s to record images of crocodiles. remote landscape. The camera, which is about 10 Wildlife rangers in Western to 15 centimetres long and five Australia’s Kimberly region re- centimetres wide, disappeared leased video on Monday that soon after and the rangers Associated Press

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figured it had fallen into the water. The rangers recently found out that the device had been found near the Mary River, about 110 kilometres away, ranger Roneil Skeen told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. When they examined the video inside, the real culprit was revealed. The rangers plan to bolt down their cameras from now on, Skeen said.

Important Notice for all Kwanlin Dün Citizens: The draft Settlement Land Act for Kwanlin Dün First Nation has passed first reading and is open for Citizen review and feedback. The purpose of this Act is to provide for comprehensive and integrated decision-making with respect to the use, management and disposition of interests in Settlement Land and Resources, in a fair and efficient manner that includes full consideration of economic, environmental, social, cultural, traditional and historic values.

In designing the Arctic Mule (originally called the Mackenzie Freighter), we worked closely with avid outdoorsmen in the Arctic regions who had a requirement for an extra large capacity sleigh that was extra tough. Their knowledge combined with our years of experience repairing damaged sleds has enabled us to identify weak areas in most designs. With this in mind, we’ve added extra structural strength into the Arctic Mule and have developed the ultimate in large capacity sleighs.

The separate compartment at the rear of the sleigh holds four 5-gallon fuel containers securely, with no danger of contaminating the rest of the load.

Learn more about the Act by attending an information session: Date: Monday, December 16th Time: 7:00 p.m. Location: Nàkwät’à Kù Potlatch House Copies are available at the main Admin office at 35 McIntyre Drive or online at www.kwanlindun.com. Comments may be submitted directly to KDFN or via email to governance@kwanlindun.com.

The deadline to submit comments is 4:00p.m. Dec 20th. Want to get involved with the Humane Society?

49D MacDonald Road, Whitehorse, YT Telephone: 867-393-2467 • Fax: 867-393-2365 Toll-free: 1-866-324-0558 • fnf@northwestel.net

Become a volunteer and join the Board, walk dogs or help with a fundraiser; it all helps!

Call 633-6019 today to find out how you can become involved!


59

Yukon News

archbould.com

Friday, December 6, 2013

Plan your studies! AcAdEMIc ANd cAREER BuSINESS AdMINISTRATION

Certificate and diploma programs preparing students for administrative management careers in business and government. cIRcuMPOLAR STudIES

Multidisciplinary degree program focusing on the Circumpolar World. Delivered through the University of the Arctic, an international network of colleges and universities, including Yukon College. Courses are university transferable. EARLy chILdhOOd dEVELOPMENT

MuLTIMEdIA cOMMuNIcATION

Certificate program combining ingenuity and technology to teach effective communication strategies through web, audio, video and print-based media. NORThERN FIRST NATIONS STudIES

Multidisciplinary diploma program raising awareness of the cultures, history, accomplishments, and political and national concerns of First Nations and other indigenous peoples of Yukon, the Canadian North, and the Circumpolar World. Courses are university transferable.

Certificate and diploma programs providing opportunities for students to develop the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to provide and evaluate quality early childhood experiences for young children and families.

NORThERN JuSTIcE ANd cRIMINOLOgy

ENVIRONMENTAL ANd cONSERVATION ScIENcES

NORThERN OuTdOOR ANd ENVIRONMENTAL STudIES

Degree program offering a northern perspective on issues such as wildlife conservation, land use and resource management under modern treaties, changes in water quantity and quality, climate change and energy needs. FIRST NATIONS gOVERNANcE ANd PuBLIc AdMINISTRATION

Ten-course certificate program focusing on the professional development of executive and senior management staff to enhance the operations of First Nation governments. gENERAL STudIES

Flexible certificate and diploma programs that integrate general knowledge and intellectual skills with specific occupational or professional skills. Courses are university transferable. hERITAgE ANd cuLTuRE

Certificate program focusing on Yukon First Nations heritage and culture, leading to degree work in the social sciences and humanities as well as careers in heritage and culture interpretation, management and preservation. Courses are university transferable. hERITAgE ANd cuLTuRE ESSENTIAL SkILLS

Completion certificate program teaching employability skills through community-based heritage management and interpretation. Delivered in partnership with local First Nations. Registration throughout the year.

Certificate and diploma programs in justice and criminology in a northern context, leading to degree programs or entry-level employment in criminology and fields related to criminal justice. Courses are university transferable.

cOLLEgE AccESS PAThWAyS

Upgrading courses offered in math, sciences, English, computers, etc. that provide the prerequisites for programs at Yukon College and other institutions. dROP-IN cENTRE

Academic skill development, College Preparation English and math courses, University level math 100/101/105, pre-apprentice math and science courses, and Communications 192 offered through individualized, self-paced study. GED tutoring also available. Registration throughout the year. duAL cREdIT

Multidisciplinary diploma program offering options for exploring contemporary northern environmental issues, outdoor activities and human/environment relationships. Customizable. Courses are university transferable. NORThERN ScIENcE

ENgLISh AS A SEcONd LANguAgE (ESL)

Diploma program delivering a strong northern science focus. Prepares students for scientific or technical work in a northern environment.

English language training for non-native speakers of English. Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 3-5 required for Intermediate ESL. CLB 6-8 required for

Advanced ESL. Registration throughout year for non-credit section. For more information go to: www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/international. SkILLS FOR EMPLOyMENT: INTROducTION TO ESThETIcS OR INTROducTION TO EcOTOuRISM

Introduction to Esthetics: develop workplace essential skills needed for employment and/or further training through hands on introduction of fundamental skills and concepts in esthetics, classroom instruction in literacy, numeracy and computer use. Introduction to Ecotourism: develop workplace essential skills needed for employment and/or further training while learning about the ecotourism industry, classroom instruction in literacy, numeracy and computer use. TARgETEd INITIATIVE FOR OLdER WORkERS

Fifteen-week program integrating mature workers (ages 55-64) into new employment opportunities. No cost, stipend provided. WORkINg ANd LEAdINg

Twelve-week transition program for unemployed youth (ages 15-30). No cost, stipend provided. Registration throughout the year. Program subject to funding.

NORThERN STudIES

Flexible, self-directed multidisciplinary diploma program focusing on northern issues. Courses are university transferable. PuBLIc AdMINISTRATION

Master’s degree program preparing students for leadership at all levels of government and in non-profit organizations. Delivered via satellite and over the internet by the University of Alaska Southeast, to students in Alaska and Yukon. RESTAuRANT OPERATIONS

Combines both the Culinary Arts and Food and Beverage Operations programs with a Capstone project where students will research, plan and carry out an event that incorporates all aspects of food and beverage operations. ScIENcE

Certificate or diploma programs preparing students for a career in information technology and related fields. All courses are available online. LIBERAL ARTS

WOMEN’S ANd gENdER STudIES

Certificate and diploma programs in the social sciences and humanities that build transferrable skills for future career and educational pursuits, foster social responsibility and cultural sensitivity, and instil independent reasoning and critical thinking skills. Courses are university transferable.

cOLLEgE ANd uNIVERSITy PREPARATION

Courses that allow secondary students to earn post-secondary credits while still in high school. Credits can be transferred to other Canadian universities and colleges. Courses may also be eligible for elective credit at the secondary level; check with high school counsellors to determine eligibility. Dual Credit Handbook available at: www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/programs/info/dc.

Courses are available in mathematics and in the earth, life and physical sciences. Certificate of Science is available for students who wish to transfer into an Engineering program, or into the second year of a Bachelor of Science program at a Canadian university.

INFORMATION ANd cOMMuNIcATION TEchNOLOgy

Credit Programs and WorkPlaCe PreParation

Certificate and diploma programs looking at the lives, contributions and experiences of women; the social construction of men and masculinity; and the development and impact of gender roles in a changing world. Courses are university transferable.

PROFESSIONAL ANd PERSONAL dEVELOPMENT ENhANcEd LANguAgE TRAININg

Fifteen-week program designed to improve the employability for newcomers to Canada. Registration throughout the year. No cost. Program is subject to funding. FIRST NATIONS cOMMuNITy SERVIcES AdMINISTRATION

PARTNERS FOR chILdREN

Provides relevant and accessible workshops, training and support on early childhood development. Information relates to the health and development of children ages 0-6, their families and communities.

Twelve online courses providing training for First Nation government employees in community service areas. Registration throughout the year. FIRST NATIONS LEAdERShIP TRAININg

Five integrated courses providing the essentials of governance and public administration for First Nation leaders. Contract training or individual tuition. Registration throughout the year.

Programs start January 6th unless otherwise stated.

For complete program information go to www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/programs To apply call the Whitehorse Ayamdigut Admissions Office at 867.668.8710, toll free 1.800.661.0504 or go online to www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/apply


60

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Scientists recover 400,000-year-old DNA from human forerunner Malcolm Ritter

cave in northern Spain. It is among thousands of fossils from at least 28 individuals to NEW YORK be recovered from a chamber cientists have reached called the “Pit of the Bones.” farther back than ever into The remains are typically clasthe ancestry of humans to re- sified as Homo heidelbergencover and analyze DNA, using sis, but not everybody agrees. a bone found in Spain that’s The age of the bones has estimated to be 400,000 years been hard to determine. A old. So far, the achievement rough estimate from anahas provided more questions lyzing the DNA is around than answers about our an400,000 years, which supports cient forerunners. what Meyer said is the curThe feat surpasses the rent view of the anthropoloprevious age record of about gists excavating the site. Todd 100,000 years for genetic ma- Disotell, an anthropology terial recovered from memprofessor at New York Unibers of the human evolution- versity, said geological techary line. Older DNA has been niques suggest the remains are mapped from animals. older than 300,000 years but Experts said the work it’s not clear by how much. By shows that new techniques for comparison, modern humans working with ancient DNA arose only about 200,000 may lead to more discoveries years ago. about human origins. The researchers mapped alResults were presented on- most the complete collection line Wednesday in the journal of so-called mitochondrial Nature by Matthias Meyer and DNA. While the DNA most colleagues at the Max Planck people know about is found Institute for Evolutionary in the nucleus of a cell, mitoAnthropology in Leipzig, chondrial DNA lies outside Germany, with co-authors in the nucleus. It is passed only Spain and China. from mother to child. They retrieved the DNA Researchers used the DNA to construct possible evolufrom a thighbone found in a Associated Press

S

prehensive information about evolutionary relationships between species, perhaps telling a story much different from the mitochondrial DNA evidence, Meyer said. Nucleus DNA is harder to recover, but Meyer said he’s optimistic that some small fraction might be retrievable. He also noted that the cave has acted as “the perfect fridge” to preserve the DNA for eons, and said it will be hard to find comparable situations elsewhere. Experts in ancient DNA called the new paper exciting Madrid Scientific Films, Kennis & Kennis/AP Photo because it showed scientists This artist’s rendering show Sima de los Huesos hominids, can recover older DNA than who are estimated to have lived approximately 400,000 many had thought outside years ago. the deep freeze of permafrost areas. Much of human evotionary family trees that ininstead showed a closer relalution happened in warmer clude the Spanish individuals tionship to Denisovans, who places. and two groups that showed lived in Siberia and appar“We had been operating for up much later: Neanderthals ently elsewhere in Asia, far a while under the assumption and an evolutionary cousin of from the Spanish cave. Scienthat the oldest DNA we’re Neanderthals called Denisotists are uncertain of how to going to get is about 100,000 vans. They assumed the DNA explain that, Meyer said. years,” said Disotell. Now, “we would show similarities to The picture should get might take a shot at some Neanderthal DNA, since the clearer if scientists can recover older samples that we just Spanish fossils have anatomi- the other kind of DNA, found never would have bothered cal features reminiscent of in the nucleus, from the Span- with in the past.” Neanderthals. ish bones, he said. Nucleus In warm places like Africa, But surprisingly, the DNA DNA would give more comwhere DNA does not preserve well, even getting genetic material that is just tens of thousands of years old would be an advance, said David Reich of Harvard Medical School.

Be a Snow Angel...

Bring your family to the little town of Bethlehem for an evening full of crafts, shops, food & fun! Where: Elijah Smith School When: Saturday, December 7th Doors are open: 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm Admission: FREE! Please call (867) 667-4889 or email admin@whbc.ca for more information! Hosted by: Whitehorse Baptist Church

For some people, particularly seniors and persons with disabilities, shovelling snow can be difficult and even dangerous. Copper Ridge, Porter Creek and Riverdale Associations are looking to create a list of volunteers (Snow Angels) and persons in need of assistance. With your help, they can start to make those connections. If you are looking to volunteer or if you need assistance, please get in touch! Copper Ridge: copperridgena@gmail.com Porter Creek: pcsnowangels@gmail.com Riverdale: kat_fish7@hotmail.com

www.whitehorse.ca


61

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Acidifying Arctic Ocean threatens food web in the North

Think small Are you looking to start or expand your Yukonbased business? If so, a small loan can make a big difference with the Yukon Micro Loan Program. The Yukon Micro Loan Program lends small amounts of money starting at $3,000 for a first loan -- to individuals who want to start, maintain or expand small businesses. Those who repay their loans in a timely fashion may qualify for interest rate reductions on subsequent loans up to $12,000. Micro Loans can be used for business purposes such as: • Buying or leasing equipment, tools or computers • Making leasehold improvements • Purchasing materials, supplies and inventory • Paying first and last month’s rent on a commercial space • Marketing and advertising • Establishing or rebuilding credit history

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Ice floes in Baffin Bay above the Arctic Circle. Research conducted at an ice camp high in the frozen North suggests climate change is threatening the Arctic Ocean’s food web by making those waters more acidic.

They took samples of copepods and exposed them to sea water in which the acidity Scientists huddled in a sea had been increased to levels ice camp on the Arctic Ocean expected in about 100 years. have produced new evidence “We’re putting animals in that climate change could be a time machine and transthreatening the food web in porting them 100 years into the Far North. the future,” said Lewis. The researchers found that The copepods who stayed at shrimp-like creatures eaten by one depth didn’t do well at all. everything from fish to whales “They were really suffering,” are likely to react poorly to Lewis said. increasingly acidic water Even the ones who swam caused by high levels of carbon up and down and were accusdioxide in the atmosphere. tomed to different pH levels “There were certainly poswere noticeably harmed. Their sibilities for these animals to young, it seems, don’t move be affected,” said Ceri Lewis of around and aren’t as adaptthe University of Exeter, lead able. author of a paper published “We did see mortalities,” this week in the Proceedings of said Lewis. “They were quite the National Academy of Scisensitive.” ences. “They’re one of the key Lewis cautioned that her excomponents of the Arctic food periment amounted to “shock web.” treatment” for the copepods. Lewis and her colleagues In real life, the tiny creatures spent months at a time on the will have a century to get used sea ice off Ellef Ringes Island, to a more acidic environment. which is west of Ellesmere But, she said, 100 years isn’t Island and just south of the very long. magnetic North Pole. “In terms of evolutionary They were studying the effect of pH levels on different types of the tiny crustaceans called copepods. They found WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY some stayed at one depth, while others moved up and down, which exposed them to Advertise your Home different pH levels. in 3 issues (3 consecutive weeks) The levels are a measure for only $60+GST of acidity or alkalinity. The PHONE: 867-667-6283 lower the pH, the more acidic a substance. Bob Weber

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adaptation, that’s not very much.” The stakes are high. The Arctic Ocean is acidifying faster than any other on Earth and all oceans are gradually losing pH. Copepods are one of the foundations of the marine ecosystem. It’s been two years since Lewis folded away her tent, rolled up her sleeping bag and left the Ellef Ringes ice camp, so memories of the hardships are gradually fading. “It hurt my fingers a lot on the days where I worked with sea water at -40, but you forget that quickly and you just remember how beautiful it was,” she said. “It was a really tough two months doing the work, but you forget that bit and just remember all the amazing moments. “I fell in love with the Arctic. My colleagues are desperately trying to get some money together to come back. But I don’t think it will be an ice camp. “Unfortunately.”

Chief & Council Meeting in Whitehorse Tuesday Dec 17, 2013 12:00 pm WhiTehorse high Country inn Christmas Dinner and Festivities begin at 4:00pm Bring the kids to meet

Drin hozo Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Citizens! The next Chief and Council meeting is held on

santa & Mrs. Claus P.O. Box 599 Dawson City, Yukon Y0B 1G0 Phone: (867) 993—7140 Fax: (867) 993—6553 andrea.moses@trondek.ca

Tuesday Dec 17 at 12 noon in the Conference Room at High Country Inn.

Chief Eddie Taylor welcomes all Whitehorse-area Citizens to come on out, have a bite to eat, and participate in your government!

trying to find a great local deal? You can find all the display ads in this newspaper online at our website: www.yukon-news.com Just click on the Marketplace tab and all the ads will be sorted and categorized for easy viewing. Hassle free shopping, so you can find what you need fast!


62

Yukon News Yukon Amateur Speed Skating Association and Whitehorse Rapids Speed Skating Club

Arctic Winter Games Short Track Time Trials 5:30 pm Sunday, December 8

ATCO Ice Surface – Canada Games Centre

Info: Phil Hoffman 633-5984

Friday, December 6, 2013

Grinding fish heads for the goodness within

Open to athletes born between July 1, 1994 and June 30, 2002

by Ned Rozell

NIKISKI

‘Tis the Season for Christmas Trees

ALASKA

Looking for that special tree this Christmas? Each year, Yukon households can cut a maximum of two Christmas trees from Yukon public land for the holidays. When looking for your Christmas tree, please respect property rights and do not cut trees within municipal boundaries. For tree-cutting tips and a special map of the Fish Lake area, go to: www.forestry.gov.yk.ca If you need more information on a suitable place to cut your tree, contact the Forest Management Branch at 1-800-661-0408, ext. 3999 or visit your community Compliance Monitoring and Inspections office …and have a safe and happy holiday season.

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SCIENCE I

n a chilly building across Cook Inlet from the white pyramid of Mount Redoubt rest a few dozen plastic-lined cardboard totes filled to the brim with an amber liquid. Each chest-high cube holds about a ton of fish oil extracted this summer from the heads of salmon. It’s a product that would have been lost to the Kenai River if Pat Simpson had not recovered it. Simpson, 49, is a fishermanturned-entrepreneur who has for the past few summers purchased salmon heads from fish processors who do business here in this small industrial town north of the Kenai River. Using precision equipment made in Europe, Simpson’s team steams and grinds the heads of pink, chum and red salmon to render a product now available in box stores as 90-count bottles of “Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil” gel tablets. “We sold all our fish oil the first three years (to companies that put it in capsules and sold it to large retailers),” Simpson said at his Nikiski plant, shut down and unheated for the offseason. Simpson’s venture with his company Alaska Marine Nutrition is part of a dream to enable fish processors in remote places to use the oiliest part of a salmon – its head – a portion of the fish prized in other cultures but often returned to the ocean in Alaska fisheries. Simpson first sensed an opportunity to extract and sell fish oil when he was a boy growing up in Cordova. There, as in many rural Alaska places where commercial fishermen catch salmon, processors kept the high-value filets but ground up the carcasses and released the slurry back into the ocean. With all the recent publicity on the health benefits of the omega-3 fatty acids in salmon oil, Simpson calculated the amount of wild Alaska salmon heads that made their way to fish processors near the mouth of the Kenai River. The numbers worked for him. He approached the owners of the area’s seven fish-processing plants and told them he’d buy their fish heads. They agreed to fill Simpson’s totes with fish heads during the intense midsummer commercial salmon fishing season. He and his partners, his dad Ken Simpson and Richard Mullins,

Photos by Ned Rozell

Pat Simpson of Anchorage holds up sockeye salmon oil he extracted from fish heads processed at his Nikiski plant.

Photos by Ned Rozell

Oil tablets produced from Alaska salmon fish heads.

purchased a fish-processing facility in Nikiski and converted it to hold the specialized equipment used to extract oil from fish heads. Their plant stands amid refineries processing natural gas and oil from Cook Inlet rigs and metal-sided buildings of contractors who support the oil industry. “We seem a little out of place here,” Simpson said at his 12-acre facility, which includes his processing plant, office and bunkhouse for summer workers. Simpson grew up working on his father’s tender boats every summer. There, he and his crewmates would motor over to commercial fishing boats, pick up salmon and carry the fish to local processing plants on shore. Sometimes he would travel as far from Cordova as Bristol Bay, a six-day trip. On those trips, he learned his future was not on the decks of boats. “I’d be lucky if I wasn’t throwing up half of that,” he said of the long run to Bristol Bay. “To be a successful fisherman, you have to be able to work in lousy weather.” Simpson looked to another passion, computer science. He went to the University of California at San Diego for college. After having success developing sonar devices for the military and the fishing industry, he returned to Alaska, longing to

be connected to the industry he knew best. That’s when he saw there might be a niche on the west side of the Kenai Peninsula. Of the more than 200 fish processors scattered throughout the state, only about half of them recover the fish heads and guts. The fishing industry produces and dumps back to the ocean more than 1 million metric tonnes of fish waste each year. He sees a chance for them to get more out of the fish they’re catching. He’s started with extracting fish oil, but wants to produce more from the fishwaste stream, including fishmeal made up of ground-up fish carcasses and bones. That’s in the future for Simpson, but for now he’s pulling out the best fish oil he can and hustling to sell it to distributers in the Lower 48. Back in his home office in south Anchorage, Simpson pulled a Mason jar of chum salmon oil from a shelf. He opened the jar of viscous, reddish blond liquid and took a swig. “I wanted to build something I could hold in my hand,” he said. “Wild Alaska salmon oil – that’s our oil. It’s very gratifying to produce.” Since the late 1970s, the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute has provided this column free in co-operation with the UAF research community. Ned Rozell is a science writer for the Geophysical Institute.


Friday, December 6, 2013

r u o j n Bo

Atelier sur la relation de soin Le mardi 10 décembre a lieu le quatrième et dernier atelier sur la prévention d’abus et d’exploitation envers les personnes aînées. Cet atelier porte un regard sur l’approche de la personne aidante dans un contexte de vulnérabilité. Dès 18 h 30, au Centre de la francophonie. Rens. : Patricia 668-2663, poste 320; pbrennan@afy.yk.ca Cafés-rencontres du mois de décembre Vendredi 6 décembre : Menu mexicain avec tortillas, purée de frijoles et churros. Dès 19 h, projection du film Revolution. Vendredi 13 décembre : souper au profit du voyage de fin d’année des 9e et 10e années de l’Académie Parhélie. Un menu savoureux avec fricot au poulet, pouding chômeur et autres délices. Vendredi 20 décembre : souper de Noël et surprises! De 17 h à 19 h au Centre de la francophonie. Rens. : Julie 668-2663, poste 560; jplaisance@afy.yk.ca Concert Sylvie Painchaud vous livre ses chansons francophones lors d’un concert intime, au Centre de la francophonie. Découvrez ses textes poétiques, émouvants et souvent teintés d’humour. Cette fois-ci, elle choisit de se faire accompagner par plusieurs invités spéciaux : Claude Gosselin, Derek Holmes, ou encore kiki de la Rochefoucault. Venez les écouter le samedi 7 décembre dès 20 h. Rens. : Virginie 668-2663, poste 221; vhamel@afy.yk.ca Chorale de Noël Une messe de Noël en français aura lieu à la cathédrale le 24 décembre. Petits et grands sont les bienvenus pour former le cœur de chant. Les répétitions ont lieu chaque dimanche à 11 h 15 au sous-sol du presbytère et le samedi 21 décembre à 13 h à la cathédrale. Rens. : Sylvie 335-2336; sylvieyukon@gmail.com Appels aux artistes Whitehorse Nuit Blanche Un événement d’art contemporain gratuit, nocturne et accessible aux piétons! Une invitation aux artistes de toutes cultures et tous genres à transformer Whitehorse pour une nuit avec des oeuvres in situ, des installations d’art contemporain et des performances originales. Faites-nous voir des endroits familiers sous une nouvelle lumière, d’une autre manière ou dans un contexte différent! Le 5 juillet et 6 juillet 2014. La date limite de dépôt des candidatures est le 15 janvier 2014. Rens. : whitehorsenuitblanche@hotmail.com

63

Yukon News Food Bank Society oF WhitehorSe

Open HOuse & AGM When: Wednesday, December 11th

New Projects Open for Comment 306 aLeXander Street Info: 393-2265

Open HOuse 4-6pm AGm 6pm

The board and staff will be honouring our outstanding volunteers and corporate donors. stop by and help us say thanks to the people that make our community food bank work.

Email: office@whitehorsefoodbank.ca

New Projects Open for Public Comment PROJECT TITLE

CLOSEST COMMUNITY

SECTOR

PROJECT #

DEADLINE FOR COMMENTS

(Assessment Office) New Projects Open for Public Comment

Placer Mining Camp- Pesapie Claim, Boutlier Road

Dawson City (Dawson City)

Mining- Placer

2013-0151

December 16, 2013

Placer Mine- Miller Creek and 60 Mile River

Dawson City (Dawson City)

Mining- placer

2013-0158

December 17, 2013

Marshall Creek – Gravel Quarry

Haines Junction (Haines Junction)

Residential, Commercial and Industrial Land Development

2013-0156

December 13, 2013

Placer Mining Thunder Gulch/Lightning Creek

Keno City (Mayo)

Mining – Placer

2013-0153

December 16, 2013

Placer Mining on Cottoneva Creek

Whitehorse (Whitehorse)

Mining - Placer

2013-0148

December 20, 2013

To get more information and/or submit comments on any project Visit – www.yesab.ca/registry OR Call Toll Free 1-866-322-4040

ck Away. li C e n O . r e p Newspa y it n u m m o C Your

m o c . s w e n n www.yuko

AFY et Arts Underground L’AFY est à la recherche d’artistes visuels pour une exposition aux galeries Edge et Focus, à Arts Underground, du 10 janvier au 1er février 2014. Quatre à cinq artistes francophones ou francophiles exposeront de 6 à 10 œuvres chacun. Les œuvres de tous matériaux seront considérées. La date limite de dépôt des candidatures est le 15 décembre 2013. Rens. : Geneviève 668-2663, poste 850; ggagnon@afy.yk.ca

Retrouvez votre association francophone sur Facebook : AFY.Yukon Présentée par l’Association franco-yukonnaise 302, rue Strickland, Whitehorse (Yukon) Y1A 2K1 Tél. : (867) 668-2663 Courriel : afy@afy.yk.ca www.afy.yk.ca

To get more information and/or submit comments on any project


64

Yukon News

New book revisits the ‘Lost Patrol’

Avalanche Training A gift that can save a life.

• Youth Avalanche Awareness December 22 • Companion Rescue Skills January 19th • Avalanche Skills Training Level 1 January 25,26th For additional course dates and information email info@avalanchenorth.ca or call 633-2199

Friday, December 6, 2013

HISTORY

HUNTER by Michael Gates

BLUE CHRISTMAS a service of understanding and quiet hope

Sunday, December 8 • 7 pm WHITEHORSE UNITED CHURCH 6th & Main (downtown) elevator access All are welcome. “Comfort, comfort my people”

Looking for a Christmas present? Get a Tatshenshini Rafting day trip voucher for summer 2014! Ice rescue courses: Dec. 17 and 18th or Feb. 17th and 18th.

Tatshenshini Expediting Ltd. 101 Jarvis St. • Call Kevin at 332 4252 www.tatsheninshiniyukon.com

H

ere is a new northern book that was brought to my attention, just in time for Christmas. Death Wins in the Arctic, a book written by B.C.’s Kerry Karram and published by Dundurn Press of Toronto, is a narrative of the ill-fated “Lost Patrol” of 1911, and the subsequent search to find the missing party. Karram has a son who is a member of the Mounted Police. It was during a visit to Regina to attend her son’s graduation that she was first introduced to the tragic diary of Inspector Francis Fitzgerald, the leader of an ill-fated winter patrol from Fort McPherson to Dawson City. She was captivated by the gripping account and decided to write a book about it. Based upon the Fitzgerald diary and other documents detailing the events of the illfated patrol, Karram weaves a colourful day-by-day account of the patrol, leading to its sad conclusion. She details the harsh weather, the brutal travelling conditions and the numbing routine as the party struggles against blizzards and extreme Arctic conditions to find the trail and arrive in Dawson City. On December 21, 1910, four men of the Royal North West Mounted Police departed Fort McPherson on their annual winter patrol. This year, however, they were traveling in the opposite direction from the usual trip from Dawson. The party consisted of Inspector Fitzgerald, Constables Richard Taylor and George Kinney and Special Constable Sam Carter. In addition to carrying 20 kilograms of mail and dispatches, these men had an additional

Beautiful Ornaments & 2014 Calendars

purpose for their patrol: to serve as part of the Mounted Police contingent to attend the coronation of King George V, in England in June of 1911. With them, for a few days, they had Esau George, a native guide, who had been hired along the way, after they had missed a turn on the trail. Despite this alarming miscue, Fitzgerald was confident they could find their way, so he did not retain George to accompany

Upcoming workshop – Saturday, December 7 from 9:00am - 1:00pm

Positive Guidance Strategies for Infants and Toddlers This workshop will be helpful for parents, educators, caregivers and anyone else wanting to better understand how to engage in healthy discipline with the little ones in their life. We will consider different strategies as related to a variety of behaviours and situations, and their relationship to brain development. The workshop is FREE. Registration is required: 668-8781.

ster’s search is as gripping as misplaced his trip over the trail formed, if less detailed account that of the Fitzgerald patrol. from Edmonton to Fort Selkirk in Dick North’s classic work, They battle overflows, temThe Lost Patrol. Let’s hope that by a decade. peratures reaching minus 45 more Yukon books are written By the conclusion of the Celsius, and rough trails, but in the future, if not by people story, I was left questioning the who actually live here, then at eventually begin finding clues accuracy of other facts scatto the Fitzgerald patrol: first, a tered throughout the narrative. least by people more informed cached toboggan and seven sets Clearly, an editorial review by a of Yukon history. Michael Gates is a Yukon historian of harnesses and dog bones; knowledgeable Yukon historian and sometimes adventurer based in then, the RNWMP dispatch bag would have given this interestWhitehorse. His latest book, Daland a mail sack. ing story greater factual credton’s Gold Rush Trail, is available in Other equipment was found ibility. Yukon stores. You can contact him at abandoned beside the trail; then msgates@northwestel.net I much prefer the better inthe frozen remains of Constable Kinney and Taylor are found beside a burned out campfire. ABEst large kettle contained the parAnD… SaShimi • Tempura • robaTa • bbq • Teriyaki! tially cooked sled harness that revealed the level of desperation Private room for of the dying men. Large grouPs. S Karram speculates about the ope N 7 Day ! thoughts and actions of the two a We e k Mon. - Fri. 11:00-3:00, parties as each approached its Sat: 12pm-3pm distinct destiny. I found this Free Delivery approach thoughtful and enjoyDowntown & Riverdale on food orders $45 or more Mon. - Sat. 4:30-10:00 able, and it sustained my interSun. 4:00-10:30 In Porter Creek, Crestview, Granger, KK, Hillcrest, est. The narrative is supported Takhini on food orders $70 or more. in its 232 pages by 35 wellTAKE OUT 10% DiscOUnT chosen though murky photoon pick-ups $40 and over! graphs of dog mushing and trail conditions, as well as key individuals and places associated with the story. These visual Japanese prompts enhance the descripRestaurant tions contained in the story. Two maps accompany the 404 Wood text. The first one provides an overview of the trail from McFuLLy LiCeNSeD (867) 668-3298 Pherson to Dawson with significant places and events identified along the route. The second is a more detailed map of the missed trail and the actual route followed by the doomed party. At the end of the book are brief chronologies of the careers of Fitzgerald and Dempster, endnotes, a bibliography and an index. Although I enjoyed the story, and found it to be a good read, Lots of other I was put off by the frequent great gift misstatements of fact that were ideas! scattered throughout the text. This is a common flaw in books Don’t Plush Forget: where the author does not have Ou Stuffe d Ani r a strong foundation in Yukon mals history. In the foreword by Corporal Sean Chiddenton, for example, gold was said to have been discovered in 1898, which misses the mark by two years. 206 Main St • WhitehorSe • 456-4228 Reference is made to the boundHOLIDAY HOURS: MONDAY-SATURDAY 9-8 • SUNDAY 9-6 ary dispute having started in 1903, when it actually began in 1898 and was resolved five years later. On page 78, the caption inJapan Receptive correctly identifies an RNWMP officer overseeing the packing of Tour Operators Marketplace supplies on the Chilkoot trail. InvItatIon to PartIcIPate The photo was taken in 1898, six years before the name of the Tuesday, January 28, 2014 NWMP was changed. Captions VanCouVer, BC for photographs on the next two pages get this fact correct, Meet with companies that sell tour products for the although the caption for the Japan market to showcase your business and tourism experiences. image on page 80 incorrectly identifies some of the mounted Trade-ready Yukon tourism businesses working policemen as members of the in the tourism sector are invited to apply. Yukon Field Force. On pages 164 and 165, InTeresTeD In parTICIpaTIng? reference is made to the infamApplication Deadline: 5:00 pm Friday, December 13, 2013 ous O’Brien murder case, and misplaces the event by several For guidelines and application information hundred kilometres, stating that Contact the Department of Tourism and Culture it occurred on the very route www.travelyukon.com/industry followed by Corporal Dempster or call 867-667-8410 or en route to the Wind River. In toll free 1-800-661-0408, ext. 8410 the chronology of Fitzgerald found in Appendix “A,” it has

Best sushi in Town

Death Wins in the Arctic, a new book by B.C. author Kerry Karram, is now available in Whitehorse for Christmas shoppers.

Christmas Party and Open House Join us for some holiday cheer! Thursday, December 12, 2013 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm Yukon Inn – Fireside Room

Happy holidays from the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board & the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee!

them for the remainder of the journey. Special Constable Carter had also been over the trail before, though in the opposite direction. Near the mouth of Mountain Creek, George was paid for his work, and he then returned to his home encampment. He was the last person to see the Mounties alive. Six weeks later, in February, Esau George arrived in Dawson City, but the Mounted Police patrol had not. The Mounties should have reached their destination by the third week of January. Alarmed that the patrol had not yet arrived in Dawson, Superintendent Snyder sent out a search party under the command of Corporal W. J.(Jack) D. Dempster to find the missing patrol. I particularly liked the way in which Karram describes the growing concern for the late patrol when other parties arrive in Dawson after having travelled over the same trail that the Fitzgerald party should have followed. It was Dempster, himself a veteran of several patrols over this route, who uncovered the grisly facts: the members of the Fitzgerald patrol had become lost, ran out of food, and perished in their attempt to return to McPherson. Karram’s account of Demp-

65

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

ArchitecturAl SAlvAge t he Gif Give tf n i -a-k d one-o ristmas! this Ch • • • •

Unique Home Furnishings Brewery Boxes & Neat Stuff Antiques & Artifacts Wood Fired Cedar Hot Tubs!

ed Wed., Thurs., Fri. and Sat. 10 am to 5:30 pm eXtend s or by appointment at 333-2489. hoUr 119 Platinum Road • 668-7216

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Yukon News

New book revisits the ‘Lost Patrol’

Avalanche Training A gift that can save a life.

• Youth Avalanche Awareness December 22 • Companion Rescue Skills January 19th • Avalanche Skills Training Level 1 January 25,26th For additional course dates and information email info@avalanchenorth.ca or call 633-2199

Friday, December 6, 2013

HISTORY

HUNTER by Michael Gates

BLUE CHRISTMAS a service of understanding and quiet hope

Sunday, December 8 • 7 pm WHITEHORSE UNITED CHURCH 6th & Main (downtown) elevator access All are welcome. “Comfort, comfort my people”

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H

ere is a new northern book that was brought to my attention, just in time for Christmas. Death Wins in the Arctic, a book written by B.C.’s Kerry Karram and published by Dundurn Press of Toronto, is a narrative of the ill-fated “Lost Patrol” of 1911, and the subsequent search to find the missing party. Karram has a son who is a member of the Mounted Police. It was during a visit to Regina to attend her son’s graduation that she was first introduced to the tragic diary of Inspector Francis Fitzgerald, the leader of an ill-fated winter patrol from Fort McPherson to Dawson City. She was captivated by the gripping account and decided to write a book about it. Based upon the Fitzgerald diary and other documents detailing the events of the illfated patrol, Karram weaves a colourful day-by-day account of the patrol, leading to its sad conclusion. She details the harsh weather, the brutal travelling conditions and the numbing routine as the party struggles against blizzards and extreme Arctic conditions to find the trail and arrive in Dawson City. On December 21, 1910, four men of the Royal North West Mounted Police departed Fort McPherson on their annual winter patrol. This year, however, they were traveling in the opposite direction from the usual trip from Dawson. The party consisted of Inspector Fitzgerald, Constables Richard Taylor and George Kinney and Special Constable Sam Carter. In addition to carrying 20 kilograms of mail and dispatches, these men had an additional

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purpose for their patrol: to serve as part of the Mounted Police contingent to attend the coronation of King George V, in England in June of 1911. With them, for a few days, they had Esau George, a native guide, who had been hired along the way, after they had missed a turn on the trail. Despite this alarming miscue, Fitzgerald was confident they could find their way, so he did not retain George to accompany

Upcoming workshop – Saturday, December 7 from 9:00am - 1:00pm

Positive Guidance Strategies for Infants and Toddlers This workshop will be helpful for parents, educators, caregivers and anyone else wanting to better understand how to engage in healthy discipline with the little ones in their life. We will consider different strategies as related to a variety of behaviours and situations, and their relationship to brain development. The workshop is FREE. Registration is required: 668-8781.

ster’s search is as gripping as misplaced his trip over the trail formed, if less detailed account that of the Fitzgerald patrol. from Edmonton to Fort Selkirk in Dick North’s classic work, They battle overflows, temThe Lost Patrol. Let’s hope that by a decade. peratures reaching minus 45 more Yukon books are written By the conclusion of the Celsius, and rough trails, but in the future, if not by people story, I was left questioning the who actually live here, then at eventually begin finding clues accuracy of other facts scatto the Fitzgerald patrol: first, a tered throughout the narrative. least by people more informed cached toboggan and seven sets Clearly, an editorial review by a of Yukon history. Michael Gates is a Yukon historian of harnesses and dog bones; knowledgeable Yukon historian and sometimes adventurer based in then, the RNWMP dispatch bag would have given this interestWhitehorse. His latest book, Daland a mail sack. ing story greater factual credton’s Gold Rush Trail, is available in Other equipment was found ibility. Yukon stores. You can contact him at abandoned beside the trail; then msgates@northwestel.net I much prefer the better inthe frozen remains of Constable Kinney and Taylor are found beside a burned out campfire. ABEst large kettle contained the parAnD… SaShimi • Tempura • robaTa • bbq • Teriyaki! tially cooked sled harness that revealed the level of desperation Private room for of the dying men. Large grouPs. S Karram speculates about the ope N 7 Day ! thoughts and actions of the two a We e k Mon. - Fri. 11:00-3:00, parties as each approached its Sat: 12pm-3pm distinct destiny. I found this Free Delivery approach thoughtful and enjoyDowntown & Riverdale on food orders $45 or more Mon. - Sat. 4:30-10:00 able, and it sustained my interSun. 4:00-10:30 In Porter Creek, Crestview, Granger, KK, Hillcrest, est. The narrative is supported Takhini on food orders $70 or more. in its 232 pages by 35 wellTAKE OUT 10% DiscOUnT chosen though murky photoon pick-ups $40 and over! graphs of dog mushing and trail conditions, as well as key individuals and places associated with the story. These visual Japanese prompts enhance the descripRestaurant tions contained in the story. Two maps accompany the 404 Wood text. The first one provides an overview of the trail from McFuLLy LiCeNSeD (867) 668-3298 Pherson to Dawson with significant places and events identified along the route. The second is a more detailed map of the missed trail and the actual route followed by the doomed party. At the end of the book are brief chronologies of the careers of Fitzgerald and Dempster, endnotes, a bibliography and an index. Although I enjoyed the story, and found it to be a good read, Lots of other I was put off by the frequent great gift misstatements of fact that were ideas! scattered throughout the text. This is a common flaw in books Don’t Plush Forget: where the author does not have Ou Stuffe d Ani r a strong foundation in Yukon mals history. In the foreword by Corporal Sean Chiddenton, for example, gold was said to have been discovered in 1898, which misses the mark by two years. 206 Main St • WhitehorSe • 456-4228 Reference is made to the boundHOLIDAY HOURS: MONDAY-SATURDAY 9-8 • SUNDAY 9-6 ary dispute having started in 1903, when it actually began in 1898 and was resolved five years later. On page 78, the caption inJapan Receptive correctly identifies an RNWMP officer overseeing the packing of Tour Operators Marketplace supplies on the Chilkoot trail. InvItatIon to PartIcIPate The photo was taken in 1898, six years before the name of the Tuesday, January 28, 2014 NWMP was changed. Captions VanCouVer, BC for photographs on the next two pages get this fact correct, Meet with companies that sell tour products for the although the caption for the Japan market to showcase your business and tourism experiences. image on page 80 incorrectly identifies some of the mounted Trade-ready Yukon tourism businesses working policemen as members of the in the tourism sector are invited to apply. Yukon Field Force. On pages 164 and 165, InTeresTeD In parTICIpaTIng? reference is made to the infamApplication Deadline: 5:00 pm Friday, December 13, 2013 ous O’Brien murder case, and misplaces the event by several For guidelines and application information hundred kilometres, stating that Contact the Department of Tourism and Culture it occurred on the very route www.travelyukon.com/industry followed by Corporal Dempster or call 867-667-8410 or en route to the Wind River. In toll free 1-800-661-0408, ext. 8410 the chronology of Fitzgerald found in Appendix “A,” it has

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Death Wins in the Arctic, a new book by B.C. author Kerry Karram, is now available in Whitehorse for Christmas shoppers.

Christmas Party and Open House Join us for some holiday cheer! Thursday, December 12, 2013 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm Yukon Inn – Fireside Room

Happy holidays from the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board & the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee!

them for the remainder of the journey. Special Constable Carter had also been over the trail before, though in the opposite direction. Near the mouth of Mountain Creek, George was paid for his work, and he then returned to his home encampment. He was the last person to see the Mounties alive. Six weeks later, in February, Esau George arrived in Dawson City, but the Mounted Police patrol had not. The Mounties should have reached their destination by the third week of January. Alarmed that the patrol had not yet arrived in Dawson, Superintendent Snyder sent out a search party under the command of Corporal W. J.(Jack) D. Dempster to find the missing patrol. I particularly liked the way in which Karram describes the growing concern for the late patrol when other parties arrive in Dawson after having travelled over the same trail that the Fitzgerald party should have followed. It was Dempster, himself a veteran of several patrols over this route, who uncovered the grisly facts: the members of the Fitzgerald patrol had become lost, ran out of food, and perished in their attempt to return to McPherson. Karram’s account of Demp-

65

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

ArchitecturAl SAlvAge t he Gif Give tf n i -a-k d one-o ristmas! this Ch • • • •

Unique Home Furnishings Brewery Boxes & Neat Stuff Antiques & Artifacts Wood Fired Cedar Hot Tubs!

ed Wed., Thurs., Fri. and Sat. 10 am to 5:30 pm eXtend s or by appointment at 333-2489. hoUr 119 Platinum Road • 668-7216

TEHORSE

EN TS : W HM A PR ES

Y IN WHI HOCKEY DA M U S TA N G

Support your

S N IG H T

of the game ate Yukon’s love d fundraisers!

s and celebr local Mustang

ekend full of n and FREE, we

at this fu

events an

exciting hockey

WHITEHORSE TAM NORCOPE BAN MUSTANGS H O ST TH E

PORT ALBERNI BULLDOGS

ADMISSION

by donation to the food ba nk.

DECEMBER

6, 7 & 8 Takhini Are n

a

PORT ALBERNI BULLDOGS BROUGHT TO YOU BY GENERAL ENTERPRISES

good design for good people

live wear give

25%off!

whether you celebrate Hanukkah, Christmas, Winter Solstice or Festivus for the Restofus,

WE HAVE GOT YOU COVERED” tues-thurs 11-5 • fri 11-6 • sat 11-5 • sun 11-3

HORWOOD'S MALL • FIRST + MAIN

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66

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Dinner table whispers are saved for special times to continue any kind of communication. Despite that our respective lives have taken us in different directions, I still enjoy sending out a greeting once a year. But I respect that others may not share my feelings, and that by Judith my card may become a bother Martin and a burden rather than being seen as a friendly greeting. So, is this the new etiquette rule — if you don’t get a Christmas card, but get a New Year’s card instead, it means you weren’t DEAR MISS MANNERS: Is it on their Christmas card list to impolite to whisper at the dinner begin with, and they are trying to table? tell you (hint, hint) to stop sendGENTLE READER: Yes, but ing unwanted cards? DEAR MISS MANNERS: After Miss Manners admits that there GENTLE READER: For somethe start of each new year, I look are exceptions. You are allowed to one so heavily invested in an act over the holiday cards we have whisper, “I think there might be of friendship, you have a rather just received. Every once in a DEAR MISS MANNERS: some food caught on your teeth” unfriendly attitude. Why does it while I notice that someone has When my husband and I went or, “If you don’t stop putting your matter whether your friends greet not, for the second year in a row, on a cruise, we were seated with hand on my knee I’m going to returned our Christmas greeting, you on one holiday or week than several other couples at a large stab you with my fork.” and I come to the realization that another? round table for dinner. The othOh, yes, you explained. They we have obviously been removed ers had arrived before we did and, DEAR MISS MANNERS: I like only appear to be greeting you. from their card list. I graciously as there was a bread basket on the to give gifts that have meaning Actually, they were caught trying table, they had chosen their bread accept (is there another alterto me with the receiver in mind. to get rid of you. native?) this fact and allow the plates. What should be the purpose beWell, maybe not. Maybe they yearly card swap to cease. However, some of them had hind the type of gift that is given? decided that the New Year, rather But this year I was confronted taken the one on the right side of For example, this Christmas than a religious holiday, was a with a brand-new scenario. Two their place setting. My husband I mailed religious gifts to family families with whom we exchange more suitable time to greet their was seated on my right and he and did not receive one thankChristmas greetings did not send friends. Maybe they were just late correctly chose the bread plate you, but did receive raves for the us Christmas cards. Instead, a full getting out cards. Maybe they had to his left, which left me with no doghouse I built for my neighlost your address until your card week after New Year’s Day, they bread plate. bor’s dog, aside from my neigharrived. each sent a “Happy New Year” How should I have handled bor. Another Gentle Reader wrote card. I am quite positive it is not this situation? The woman to my What should be the motivaMiss Manners: “Our family has because they do not celebrate left had an unused bread plate to tion in choosing a gift? Need or found the tradition of a twelveher left, so I asked if I might have Christmas. want? Sharing an interest? day Christmas can solve many I am not terribly surprised that one. This clued her in that GENTLE READER: Building holiday problems. Sitting down that they would choose not to she had chosen the wrong one, that doghouse was a spectacuwith a cup of tea or eggnog a day exchange cards. There are some but it wasn’t made into a big deal. lar present, and Miss Manners or two after the event to write people, like these two families, It seems that many people, doesn’t wonder that it attracted thanks and catch up with friends who we do not see during the even well-educated adults, are admiration beyond that of the in a newsy letter can be very course of the year, and I can unaware or forgetful that their recipient. She trusts that the dog relaxing after the pre-Christmas understand if they see no reason bread plate is to the left of their has been licking your hand in

MISS

MANNERS

gratitude. But unless your relatives are simply too rude to acknowledge presents, something must have gone wrong. With religious items, that can easily happen. Even if you chose presents that you know to be in keeping with their beliefs and practices, the implication can arise that you have something in mind besides just pleasing them — that you want to change or expand these in some way. It is an extremely sensitive area, and while your relatives were deeply remiss in failing to acknowledge your presents, Miss Manners supposes they were flummoxed about how to do so.

place setting. I didn’t want to embarrass anyone by saying, “Your bread plate is the one to your left,” but I did want to have some bread and butter with my dinner. GENTLE READER: But you did get your bread and butter, and the lady to your left does not seem to have died of humiliation. Miss Manners is gratified to know that your effort to acquire a plate unobtrusively triumphed over your impulse to criticize the manners of people who might then be tempted to pitch you overboard.

Softgoods Buyer Wanted

We are the Taku Sports Group, a group of sports companies that cater to a wide range of sports and outdoor enthusiasts in the Yukon. We have 4 stores encompassing 30,000 square feet of retail space, located in downtown Whitehorse, Yukon.

On behalf of the residents of Porter Creek, the Porter Creek Community Association thanks the Government of Yukon’s Protective Services Division and the FireSmart Program for their contributions, support, and assistance throughout the 2013 Porter Creek FireSmart Project.

We are looking for a softgoods buyer, to be located in Whitehorse, Yukon. Responsibilities include: Managing product assortment in order to identify and address opportunities; • Negotiating product costs, terms; • Identifying items to maximize promotional and marketing opportunities; • Participating in product pricing strategies to achieve specific margin objectives, and recommend appropriate markdowns; • Traveling to trade shows across Canada and the US.

expeRience/education RequiRed: • Minimum 2 years related retail buying experience; or equivalent combination of education and experience. • Effective communication, analytical, negotiation and organizational skills. • Completely comfortable working with Excel and Word. We offer a highly competitive salary and benefits package. If this opportunity appeals to you, please send your resume to chougen@hougens.com or fax 867-667-7282.

Evening ESL Classes to Improve Your Academic Reading, Writing and Speaking Skills

Do you need to improve your skills to take academic courses at Yukon College? This is a 15-week program from January 6 to April 23, 2014 Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm Students need a Canadian Language Benchmark of 5 and above to qualify. For more information and to register please contact: School of Academic and Skill Development 867-668-8850 or Cathy Borsa at 867-668-5260

Families in the Backcountry Does “the pass” sound enticing to you and your buddies during Christmas break?

Are your kids dreaming of a white Christmas in the backcountry?

Let’s talk! Free evening backcountry awareness session for parents and their kids at the Canada Games Centre Wednesday, December 18th from 6:30 to 8:30 PM.

bustle. “Writing a greeting for the New Year can solve the problem of friends and colleagues who do not celebrate Christmas. Inviting family who can’t arrange for a Christmas Day visit to have another holiday meal (perhaps serving three French hens) is wonderful. And finish with an evening at the theater with friends whose schedule is too busy for you to get together sooner. (Mr. Shakespeare wrote a lovely play for just this occasion: ‘Twelfth Night.’)” Miss Manners hopes these people are not on your list of people to ignore next year. DEAR MISS MANNERS: I attended an exclusive dinner that was clearly identified on the highly sought-after invitation as “white tie.” Although the men in attendance were all clad according to the formality requirements — white tie and tails, not tuxes — several women actually arrived in short cocktail dresses, and one was even in a short cocktail-type suit. I won’t even talk about the women who wore dress pants! To make matters worse, some of the women members of the organization hosting the dinner were among those in short cocktail dresses. Although the organization threatens to turn improperly dressed men away at the door, there has been no such threat for women offenders. But I have to wonder, is their fashion faux pas not as bad? Am I hopelessly mired in the past to believe that “white tie” remains the most formal of the formal events and, as such, demands long dresses, not short — and certainly not pants — for women? GENTLE READER: You do have a point, even one with which Miss Manners agrees. But you would be wise not to press it. Since the 19th century, it has been thought that the proper sartorial division between the genders is that the gentlemen should be dressed conventionally, distinguished only by the perfection of their tailoring, while ladies should indulge in fanciful variety. You don’t need Miss Manners to tell you that there have been revolts in both ranks. There are gentlemen who insist on dolling up their evening clothes with strange vests, perky ties, peeking non-handkerchiefs and such. And ladies who seek a standard evening uniform of little black dresses or trousers. (Please send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, www. missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.)

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67

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

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Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

SPORTS AND

RECREATION

Hilderman gets the big cheque at cashspiel

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Team Hilderman second Doug Hamilton takes a shot during the final of the Polar Eyes Cashspiel at the Whitehorse Curling Club on Sunday. Hilderman defeated Team Smallwood 8-7.

Tom Patrick

extra. “We just tried to get a lot of rocks in play and we were looking eam Hilderman took in the for a mistake,” said Hilderman. gravy on Sunday. “The opposing skip there was The Whitehorse rink took first throwing a guard and it just over to pocket a cheque for $1,800 at curled a little and it gave me an the Polar Eyes Cashspiel at the open hit for my four. Whitehorse Curling Club on “It didn’t react like it should. It Sunday. was a good break for us.” “This is my seniors team – “The game was good, everyone we’re all over 50 – and we threw threw great,” said Smallwood skip this team together this year to Scott Odian. “We just didn’t get take a run at nationals,” said skip enough points in the end. George Hilderman. “We’re into “We had a bit of misfortune December now and, believe it or there (in the seventh), but that’s not, as a team we’ve only played just the way curling goes sometwo games because of work com- times.” mitments and I was on vacation The Smallwood rink, which for two weeks. won $1,300 in the weekend spiel, “This was a good tune-up for lost their skip Bob Smallwood to us. I felt really good about it. What a business trip to Arizona shortly I was looking for was consistency before the final. in the team and we found it.” So the remaining members Team Hilderman, which brought in Ladene Shaw for the includes third Doug Gee, second last game, taking over third as Doug Hamilton and lead Dale Odian moved to skip. Also on Enzenauer, captured the coinage board was second Jody Smallwood with an 8-7 win over Team Small- and lead Tamar Vandenberghe. wood in the final. Hilderman Odian, who is from Atlin, and jumped out to a two-point lead Bob curled together at the junior nationals and the Brier two decafter scoring four in the seventh end. Smallwood scored one in the ades ago. Both finalist teams contained final end, needing two to push the News Reporter

T

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Team Smallwood skip Scott Odian, centre, watches his shot during the final.

a player who helped make Yukon curling history recently. Hamilton curled on Team Paskawski and Shaw on Team Baldwin as both Whitehorse teams became the first from the territory to reach the semifinal

of the Dominion Curling Club Championships last month. The Smallwoods and Vandenberghe competed with Adam Pleasant at the 2014 Canadian Mixed Curling Championship in Ottawa last month. The Yukon

rink opened the double-elimination pre-qualifier with a 6-4 win over Nunavut, but losses to Newfoundland and N.W.T. eliminated the rink from the championships. The Willingham team of skip Walter Wallingham, lead Ed Kormendy, second Wayne Braga and third Nelson Lepine, placed third on Sunday and grabbed $700. B Pool winners, Team Mikkelsen with skip Ray Mikkelsen, third Dustin Mikkelsen, second Scott Williamson and lead Darrin Fredrickson, also pocketed $700. George Hilderman will attempt to qualify for his fifth Canadian championships with the Yukon Senior Curling Championships at the end of February at the Whitehorse Curling Club. “It was a very well run tournament,” said Hilderman of the cashspiel. “We have a new sponsor with Polar Eyes (Optometry with owner) David Rach – hats off to him because we have to keep these bonspiels going. We need this experience if we’re going to be more competitive in playdowns.” Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


69

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Whitehorse runner takes fourth at cross-country nationals little bit better than that,” said Roots. “The race overall, I didn’t feel like it was one of my better ones. I still beat quite a few people, so that was good.” Saturday was Roots’ first time competing at the cross-country nationals. The 20-year-old completed the 10-kilometre course in 35:44.41. “The times were terrible. No one liked the times,” said Roots. “Even the winner’s time was considerably slower than any other 10-kilometre. “Some might call that great conditions for cross-country, I didn’t like it too much. It was pouring rain all day and since we were the last race of the day, the track was really, really muddy.” Whitehorse’s Kieran Halliday had a rough race in junior men. Halliday withdrew from the race after the first of four laps in the eight-kilometre race. “After a lap, I really wasn’t feeling too good,” said Halliday. “I wasn’t tired, per se, my stomach was just having a really bad day. I felt like I was going to puke, was cramping up, I couldn’t breathe. “I just couldn’t imagine doing three more laps after that, so I just had to call it quits.” The 17-year-old ran to 19th out of 242 runners in the senior boys division at the B.C. High School Cross Country Championships at the start of November. “This was my first nationals, so I’m a little disappointed, but I’m going to train really hard this winter and try to come back,” said Halliday. Roots, who competes for Prairie Inn Harriers Running Club in

Victoria, placed 16th at the British Columbia Cross Country Championships in the open division (men 20-34) at the end of October. He also finished 12th overall and was third for men 20-24 in the halfdistance of the Victoria Marathon in the middle of October. Roots and Halliday were on Yukon’s athletics team at the Canada Summer Games this past August in Sherbrooke, Que. And both marked firsts for the territory’s team. Roots became the first Yukoner to make a final at the Canada Games. He made the A final in the 1,500-metre race, setting a personal best time of 3:59.95 to place 11th overall out of 22 runners. In Sherbrooke, Halliday became the first from the territory to compete in the 3,000-metre steeplechase in athletics, placing 12th out of 16 runners with a time of 10:02.02. Halliday, who was Yukon’s flagbearer during the Games, was one of just two athletes on the team to compete in two different sports at the Games, in tennis in week one and athletics in week two. Carson also had a productive season. She took 60th in the senior women’s race at the IAAF World Cross Country Championships last March in Poland. She placed fourth in the 5,000-metre at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Muncton, N.B., in June. She was also the top female – and second overall – in the half distance of the Yukon River trail Marathon in August. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com

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Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Whitehorse’s Lindsay Carson during a race in August. Carson placed fourth at the Canadian Cross Country Championships on Saturday in Vancouver.

Tom Patrick News Reporter

R

ain, mud and chilly temperatures made for tough races at the Canadian National Cross Country Championships on Saturday. Just ask the three Whitehorse runners who battled the elements in the nationals at Jericho Beach in Vancouver, B.C. “It wasn’t a type of race you ran for times, let’s just say that,” said Whitehorse’s Lindsay Carson. “It was a really muddy course, rainy, cold.” Carson’s time might not be fast for a seven-kilometre course, but it

sure was compared to the rest of the field. The 24-year-old took fourth place in the senior women’s division, completing the race in 25:05.99, just 18 seconds behind the bronze finisher. “It went really well, I definitely surpassed a lot of my expectations going into the race,” said Carson, who moved to Whitehorse from Ontario during the summer. “This my first season training in the Yukon. I’m not going to lie, it’s been pretty tough, especially with the late cross-country season. Most Yukon athletes pack it up and go snow-

shoeing come October, but I still had to train hard in November. “It was a big confidence builder, showing I still got it.” Carson has competed at several other cross-country nationals, but Saturday was just her second time in the senior women division. Her best placement was second place in junior women at the 2008 nationals in Guelph, Ont. Carson took 10th place last year in senior women. Whitehorse’s Logan Roots ran to 46th in the senior men’s division on Saturday. “I was hoping to do maybe a

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70

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Friday, December 6, 2013

Troy Henry skates to fifth at international competition Tom Patrick News Reporter

S

peedskating outdoors can be a drag. Literally. Without the controlled conditions of indoors, the ice can be too soft or too hard, and dust and other particles trapped in the ice can cause friction. It can be a slog. Whitehorse speedskater Troy Henry went from placing fifth at an international event indoors, to struggling to crack the top-25 outdoors over the last two weekends. “The season has gone really well so far, aside from the results I got in Quebec,” said Henry. “I am disappointed with the results I got in Quebec, but I’m not dismayed over it. They are not bad for outdoor results for me, but they’re not where they should be. “I have to learn how to skate outdoors better … I’m doing really well at indoor right now and I’m happy with Stephen Maunder photo that.” Whitehorse’s Troy Henry competes at the CanAm International at the Calgary Oval on Nov. 22. Henry placed fifth in the The 24-year-old long-track 5,000-metre against an international field of skaters. skater took in a fifth-place

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at 37.28. He set season best times in all three events. It was a different story at the Canada Cup 1 outdoors in Quebec City over the weekend. “I didn’t have a very good competition in Quebec, but I did have a really good one here (in Calgary) the weekend before,” said Henry. Henry claimed 23rd in the 5,000-metre (7:51.31) and 26th in the 1,000-metre with a season-best time of 1:19.58. He also skated to 28th in the 500-metre (39.86), 33rd

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finish at the 2013 CanAm International indoors at the Calgary Oval the weekend before last. Henry placed fifth in the 5,000-metre with a seasonbest time of 6:42.72. He was the third Canadian in the field of 35 skaters in the race, just ahead of a skater from Belgium in sixth and a Polish skater in seventh. Henry also raced to 17th in a field of 103 skaters in the 1,500-metre with a time of 1:51.69 and 23rd out of 118 skaters in the 500-metre

in the 1,500-metre (2:07.86) and 41st in the 500-metre (41.17). “Quebec is outdoor ice, which is quite a bit different than indoor ice,” said Henry. “I’m used to skating on indoor ice because I started with short-track, which is only indoor, and I moved to the (Calgary) Oval, which is indoor as well. “I never skated that much on outdoor ice. It requires a bit of a different technique. The whole approach is different, which I’m not really used to yet. I don’t have it figured out yet and it was really affecting my results.” Skating on outdoor ice requires a more frequent pumping of the legs to overcome the ice’s drag, said Henry. “The technique is different because you have to have a faster turnover,” said Henry. “You don’t glide along in outdoor, you have to keep moving the whole time. The ice doesn’t glide as well.” In his first meet of the season, Henry placed seventh out of 13 skaters, with a time of 14:11.59, in the 10,000-metre at the World Cup Long Track Trials at Calgary’s Olympic Oval in October. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


Friday, December 6, 2013

71

Yukon News

Koltun rink grabs wins in Lloydminster

Jeff Peters/Meridian Booster

Whitehorse’s Sarah Koltun competes at the Boundary Ford Curling Classic Lloydminster, Alta., last weekend. Team Koltun came away with two wins.

Tom Patrick

head to the Scotties – the weeks ago. Canadian women’s chamThey won 7-6 over Team pionships – in Montreal. Nichol and 7-5 over Team hitehorse’s Team KolThe weekend after the Kaufman in Lloydminster. tun grabbed two more Their losses came against women’s championships, wins on the World Curling Koltun will also compete in Saskatchewan’s Team HolTour over the weekend as the land and Alberta’s Martineau the territory’s junior chamrink turns its attention to a pionships with a slightly and Rogers. run at the Scotties Tournadifferent team that includes Team Koltun – includment of Hearts. Sinclair as third, Wallingham ing third Chelsea Duncan, The Koltun crew beat remaining as second, and second Patty Wallingham two Alberta teams before Jenna Duncan – Chelsea’s and lead Andrea Sinclair – getting eliminated in the little sister – as lead. is now gearing up for the triple-knockout format at the If successful, it will be KolYukon Women’s Curling Boundary Ford Curling Clastun’s eighth consecutive trip Championships in a little sic in Lloydminster, Alta., on to the junior nationals. over a week. Sunday. Last season Team Koltun The top two teams will “It went pretty well, we placed fourth in the women’s then travel to Yellowknife to were playing pretty strong,” division of the 2012 Cancompete against N.W.T.’s top said skip Sarah Koltun. “The adian Junior Curling Chamtwo teams for a playdown, first two games that we lost pionship in February. the winner of which will came down to the last rock. We were in good positions but the other skips made their shots. Sometimes you Yukon/Stikine just can’t do anything about Regional that. “But we played well and Science Fair we’re pretty proud of how we Saturday december 7, 2013 did and it’s a boost of confiYukon College Cafeteria dence going into our upcoming playdowns.” The Boundary Ford spiel Public Viewing: marked Team Koltun’s fourth 12 Noon – 1:45 pm World Curling Tour event of the season. They were held to Awards Ceremony: 2:00 pm one win in their first two, but Come support our Yukon students then won three straight to reach the quarterfinal of the Spruce Grove Cashspiel two News Reporter

W

The accomplishment helped the rink get named team of the year at the annual Sport Yukon Awards Night last week. “We think it’s a pretty big deal because we are very proud of where we’re from and the place we represent,”

said Koltun. “We always go out to all these tournaments and try to do our best and show people the Yukon can compete, so to be recognized for that is very exciting. We’re all very grateful.” Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com

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72

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Arrival of HBO’s 24/7 cameras turns up spotlight on struggling Leafs Stephen Whyno

Carlyle and his coaching staff have tried to do is lighten the mood in recent weeks. TORONTO “What we’ve tried to do is hen 24/7: Road to the remain as positive as we posWinter Classic debuts sibly can,” Carlyle said. “There’s later this month, viewers might enough pressure being applied find out what caused Phil Keswhen you don’t have success in sel to abruptly leave a practice the NHL from outside sources.” because HBO cameras followed Beyond the regular media him to the locker-room. attention, HBO represents What no one will see is what another outside source of presToronto Maple Leafs goaltender sure. James Reimer and Carlyle were “It’s something that you’ve talking about on the ice, only got to be used to,” Phaneuf said. because coach Randy Carlyle “And you’ve got to be able to turned off his microphone. And work with because they’re not no one will hear what Mark going anywhere and they’re in Fraser would’ve yelled at James our room for the next month.” van Riemsdyk during a drill Over the next month, viewers because the defenceman bit will catch a glimpse of playhis tongue instead of making a ers’ lives away from the rink, joke. too. Kadri’s looking forward to This is the new reality for the seeing what the show features struggling Leafs as HBO’s 24/7 about Kessel. cameras began filming them at “Phil, he likes to kind of keep practice Wednesday. Mired in a to himself a little bit, but I know five-game losing streak, they’ll the HBO cameras are going to try to turn things around with kind of want to get on him a the spotlight brighter than ever. little bit and have him in the “Guys are just going to kind show. And he’s a big part of this of be themselves, but maybe in team, so why not?” Kadri said. the back of their minds they’ll “I think he should embrace it a want to provide a little bit more little bit.” entertainment, too, and that Fraser wondered if Kessel might calm us down or just might remain subdued with the make us a little more at ease,” cameras on him, but hopes the Fraser said. “It’s definitely not a shy superstar opens up a bit. As panic situation for us right now. for the rest of the Leafs, Fraser But we definitely want to be in thinks reporters already have a comfortable environment to a good idea of personalities in get back to the hockey we want the locker-room, however he to play.” allowed for the possibility that From injuries to a lack of HBO will get to see different discipline and a rough stretch aspects of players. on the penalty kill, the Leafs are “Some guys will defindealing with a bevy of problems. Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press itely enjoy maybe more of a They’re also in the midst of a Toronto Maple Leafs winger Phil Kessel, right, celebrates his career 200th goal on Tuesday. A social aspect of this career than brutal segment of the schedule new HBO television show will follow the team through their ups and downs. others,” he said. “So you might that continues Thursday when find out who goes out and does “There are certain things that interesting cool things and who “They’re around and they’re goes into playing in the Winter the Dallas Stars visit Air Canada we do believe have to remain in just sits on the couch and plays Classic next month against the in most meetings, so you’re Centre. house,” Carlyle said. “But this Detroit Red Wings. The documentation of a team going to see a lot of stuff that video games.” is a little different experience. The veteran NHL coach would never get outside of this in a tailspin is probably isn’t Phaneuf hopes his ping-pong When you have people inside room because of the access they hasn’t instructed players on what former general manager rivalry with Kessel makes an your room living with you it’s have,” Phaneuf said. “When they what to say and not say with Brian Burke wanted when he appearance on the show, but obviously different. It’s going to beyond that he doesn’t know say 24/7 access, that’s what they the cameras rolling. Just like signed on for the Leafs to take be challenging through the next what will make it on air. when dealing with members of got.” part in the all-access program. Carlyle has made little secret the media, he wants them to be month, that’s for sure.” And even though captain Dion “I can’t tell you what you’re Players pointed to watching Phaneuf praised the production of the fact that he’s not a big fan fair and honest when possible going to see because it’s a daytheir language as the biggest of letting cameras have such un- but also recognizes that secrets staff for staying out of the way to-day basis that they cover challenge. But previous incarna- everything from when you’re are harder to keep with more in the infancy of this project, he fettered access to his team. But tions of the show, including the at the rink to when you’re at he understands it’s part of what invasive access. knows there’s nowhere to hide. Emmy Award-winning first ver- home, and you’re going to see sion with the Pittsburgh Pena lot of stuff that you wouldn’t guins and Washington Capitals, see on a normal basis,” Phaneuf said. Complete equipment featured plenty of cursing. would like to invite you to our That’s just bleeping hockey Whatever makes it on to the sometimes. But Leafs centre show, which debuts Dec. 14 on Nazem Kadri will be conscious HBO in the United States and of what he says. then Dec. 15 on Rogers Sports“Obviously you’ve got to net in Canada, Phaneuf said on Friday, December 13th, 2013 watch it a little bit,” he said. “Be he respects the process. He has yourself, just really watch your watched 24/7 in the past and between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m language and just do what you appreciates the end result. at 117 Industrial Road at the TKC office. always do.” “I think that they do a really What the Leafs have been good job of showing the fans Please join us. Skate Sharpening doing of late is losing. They last what happens behind doors,” he you can trust Snacks and refreshments will be provided. won Nov. 23 against the Capsaid. “You can see that they get 305 Main St. the little things that a fan would itals and have struggled to put EvEryonE wElcomE! 668-6848 together a 60-minute perform- never see, and I think that’s /SportslifeYukon great for our fan base to see it.” ance since. The Canadian Press

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Friday, December 6, 2013

COMICS DILBERT

BOUND AND GAGGED

ADAM

73

Yukon News

RUBES速

by Leigh Rubin


74

Yukon News

PUZZLE PAGE

Friday, December 6, 2013

Kakuro

By The Mepham Group

Level: Moderate

Sudoku Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test! Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in blod borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

FRIDAY CROSSWORD PUZZLE

To solve Kakuro, you must enter a number between 1 and 9 in the empty squares. The clues are the numbers in the white circles that give the sum of the solution numbers: above the line are across clues and below the line are down clues and below the line are down clues. Thus, a clue of 3 will produce a solution of 2 and 1 and a 5 will produce 4 and 1, or 2 and 3, but of course, which squares they go in will depend on the solution of a clue in the other direction. No difit can be repeated in a solution, so a 4 can only produce 1 and 3, never 2 and 2. © 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

Puzzle A

Puzzle B CLUES ACROSS 1. Disrupt the arrangement of 7. Don’t know when yet 10. Dawn 12. Terrestrial frog 13. Water crops 14. Sucking onion louse 15. Struck a heavy blow 16. Rock guitarist Clapton 17. Fed 18. Big man on campus 19. Tough Asiatic grass

21. To copy the behavior of another 22. M_____: soaked meat 27. Dover is the capital 28. Outdoor cooker 33. Farm state 34. More bleak and dismal 36. Large northern deer 37. “L’Eggo My ____” 38. Thais (alt. sp.) 39. No (Scottish)

40. Civil wrong 41. Be suitable for 44. Spider-Man actor Maguire 45. Put up with something 48. A plank for sliding objects 49. Coated a metal with an oxide 50. A companionship animal 51. Archaic “to commit”

14. Poster paints 17. Physician’s organization 18. Boy Scout merit award 20. Same name son (alt. abbr.) 23. The quality of being capable 24. Outdoor furniture woods 25. Emotional intelligence 26. An explosion fails to occur 29. Trauma center 30. Anger 31. Brown coal 32. Sent as an official emissary 35. Egg mass of a lobster

36. Dog-_____: shabby 38. A Hebrew captive in Nineveh 40. Take a puff 41. Binge Eating Disorder Assoc. 42. Pitcher Bedard 43. Disconcert 44. Tea spoonful (abbr.) 45. The bill in a restaurant 46. Being a single unit 47. Grounds of a film studio

CLUES DOWN 1. Novice or beginner 2. Notice of someone’s death 3. An instinctive motive 4. A very large body of water 5. Broad flat back muscle 6. Supplement with difficulty 7. Shaped like a torus 8. Spoken in the Dali region of Yunnan 9. Automatic data processing 10. Move deeply 11. Yerevan is the capital 12. Severe spasm of pain

Puzzle C

LOOK ON PAGE 87, FOR THE ANSWERS


Friday, December 6, 2013

Yukon News

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Friday, December 6, 2013

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www.yukon-news.com • 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2E4 • Phone: (867) 667-6285 • Fax: (867) 668-3755 For Rent ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com WEEKEND GET AWAY Rustic Cabin-45 minutes from town Hiking Trails in the summer Skiing in the winter Includes sauna. Reasonable rates. Rent out by the week or for a weekend. 867-821-4443 ARE YOU New to Whitehorse? Pick up a free Welcome to Whitehorse package at The Smith House, 3128-3rd Ave. Information on transit, recreation programs, waste collection & diversion. 668-8629 $575, $775, $900, ROOMS. BACHELORS. 1-BDRMS. Clean, bright, furnished, all utilities incl, laundry facilities. Close to college & downtown. Bus stop, security doors. Live-in manager. 667-4576 or Email: barracksapt@hotmail.com SKYLINE APTS: 2-bdrm apartments, Riverdale. Parking & laundry facilities. 667-6958

HOBAH APARTMENTS: Clean, spacious, walking distance downtown, security entrance, laundry room, plug-ins, rent includes heat & hot water, no pets. References required. 668-2005 1-BDRM APT in Copper Ridge, full bath, big L/R, shared laundry, avail Jan 1, $1,100/mon + util. 456-7099 1-BDRM WALK-OUT bsmt suite in Porter Creek, w/private bath, kitchen, & laundry, n/s, avai Dec 1-April 30, $900/mon. 335-1230 ROOM FOR rent in shared Hillcrest home, utils & wifi incl, N/S, N/D, dd reqʼd. $625/mon. 334-5032 2 EASY going professionals looking for 3rd roommate in Mountain View townhouse, Clean and spacious. $540/mon + 1/3 utils Available Jan 1. 335-6462 RIVERDALE: FURNISHED room, N/S, N/P, no drinking, clean, quiet home, serious inquiries only, $600/mon. 667-2452 3-BDRM DUPLEX, CR, garage, greenbelt, fenced yard, lg patio, avail Dec 16, refs&dd req. $1,750/mon + utils. 334-1907 1-BDRM NEW apt in Riverdale, avail immed, N/S, N/P, no parties, includes heat, hot water, lights, responsible tenant, $1,200/mon. 668-5558 Available Now Newly renovated OFFICE SPACE & RETAIL SPACE Close to Library & City Hall A short walk to Main Street Phone 633-6396 RENDEZVOUS PLAZA on Lewes Blvd, Riverdale Lots of parking 1,100 sq ft (previously flower shop, studio) 7,000 sq ft (previously Frazerʼs) Call 667-7370

Beautifully finished office space is available in the Taku Building at 309 Main Street. This historic building is the first L.E.E.D. certified green building in Yukon. It features state of the art heat and ventilation, LAN rooms, elevator, bike storage, shower, accessibility and more.

Call 867-333-0144 FOR LEASE

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for rent Approx. 1650 sq ft

of high-end office space available immediately. Independent HVAC system, elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, move-in ready.

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For more details call: 403-861-4748

WEEKEND GETAWAY Great, cozy cabin for your next getaway Soak in the wonderful scenery and lose yourself in serenity Completely furnished and equipped Located 40 minutes from Whitehorse Beautiful trails at your door for hiking, skiing, bicycling Good lake for fishing Accommodates 2-6 people Call for rate, 633-2156 RENT ONE of our cozy cabins with sauna for a weekend getaway Relax and enjoy the winter wonderland on the S. Canol Road 332- 3824 or info@breathofwilderness.com. BACHELOR APT downtown, fully furnished, $900/mon, utils incl. 668-5558 ROOM FOR rent, N/S, N/P, avail. Dec. 1. $750/mon. all incl. 393-2275 FURNISHED BEDROOM, lg. farmhouse on Hot Springs Road, Mile 5 Rivendell Road, no pets allowed, must like dogs, refs&dd reqʼd, responsible tenant, $700/mon all incl. 633-2119 AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 3-bdrm 2-bath home in Crestview with attached garage On greenbelt Next to park and rink No Smoking, no pets $1,700/mon Including electricity & utilities Call 334-9773 3-BDRM TRAILER in Lobird, no dogs, avail immed. $1,200/mon + elec. 334-7872 Downtown Vacation Suites 2 & 3 bedroom executive class furnished suites with well equipped kitchens, Cable TV, internet & utilities included Perfect for relocation, corporate, and for short or extended stay in mind Offering a less expensive alternative to hotel rooms A home away from home 667-2255 or www.midnightsunvr.com

Horwood’s Mall Main Street at First Avenue Office Spaces Available

2 - Second Floor units available. 250 & 350 sq. ft

Please call Kevin at 334-6575 for more information.

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for rent

Office Space fOr LeaSe

Approx. 900 sq ft

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CABIN, 2 bdrm. incl. elec., phone, Internet, no water, super insulated, easy to heat, N/S, N/P. Refs. & dd required. $800/mon. 660-5545

of high-end office space with fantastic views available immediately. Elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, large windows, lots of natural light.

Please call Kevin at 334-6575 for more information.

Above Starbuck’s on Main St. Nice clean, professional building, good natural light. 544 sq.ft. (can be leased as one office or can be split into two smaller spaces). Competitive lease rates offered.

Sandor@yukon.net or C: 333.9966

2-BDRM LEGAL bsmt suite, Copper Ridge, avail Dec. 1, reasonably priced, 336-1406, for info. 668-6446. BACHELOR APT 15 mins fr downtown, private entrance, on bus route, N/S, N/P, dd&refs req, avail Jan 1, $950/mon incl cable, 333-0497 MARSH LAKE 3-bdrm 2-bath house (1,000 sq ft) w/d, N/S, avail immed, $1,000/mon + elec & dd. (250) 864-4499 2-BDRM BASEMENT suite, Wolf Creek, 5 appliance, large fenced yard, N/S, no parties, one dog ok, refs&dd reqʼd, $950/mon + utilities. 393-3728 HOUSEMATE WANTED, furnished room in Riverdale by bus stop, seeking responsible tenant, ref req'd, 2 cats, med friendly dog, $550/mon, $400 dd, avail immed. 456-7490 LOOKING FOR mature quiet  female.  $550  all in, very near downtown, avail Dec. 1. Leave voicemail 336-0465 FURNISHED BDRM. in Copper Ridge home, N/S, N/P, refs reqʼd, $575/mon. 336-1406 3-BDRM 2.5-BATH townhouse, CR, garage, fenced/landscaped, N/S, pets may be considered, avail Jan. 1, $1,750/mon + utils + 1 mo. dd. 334-3012 or 335-8910 FULLY FURNISHED 2-bdrm suite available for weekly/monthly terms, sep ent, laundry, fully equipped kitchen, basic cable, wifi, fireplace and utilities incl, NS, NP.  $700/wk 334-1249. BACHELOR APT 15 mins from downtown, clean, private entry, parking, N/S, N/P, dd&refs reqʼd, $950 incl. 333-0497 NEW TOWNHOUSE in Ingram, room, N/P, N/S, $750/mon, utils incl. 668-2848 SMALL FURNISHED cabin, elec, propane cook stove, wood stove, internet, firewood, no running water, $500/mon. 660-5020 LARGE FURNISHED room in spacious, shared trailer in Crestview, near bus, w/d, cable & internet all included, $750/mon + $375 dd. 335-5310

2-BDRM LEGAL basement suite in C/R, sep ent & driveway, fridge, stove, w/d, discount for 1-yr lease, avail Jan. 1, $1,250/mon + utils. 668-6446 or 336-1406 2-BDRM CABIN with addition, recently renoʼd, on Spirit Lake, wood heat and propane monitor. 45 min from Whitehorse. $875/mon + utils. 667-7268 eves 2-BDRM TRAILER, fully renoʼd, wood/oil heat, fridge, stove, w/d, avail Dec. 1, refs&dd reqʼd, $1,500/mon + utils, we pay the pad rent. 668-4070 1-BDRM BASEMENT suite in C/R, nice & clean, private entrance, N/P, N/S, $900/mon. 332-8801 1-BDRM FULLY furnished apt in d/t, incl heat, lights, hot water, basic cable, N/P, no parties, responsible tenant, avail immed, $950/mon. 668-5558 BACHELOR APT 15 mins fr downtown, private ent, cable incl, on bus route, N/S, N/P, dd&refs reqʼd, avail Jan. 1, $950/mon. 333 0497 SMALL BACHELOR apt, fully furnished d/t area, incl heat, lights, basic cvable, N/P, no parties, resonsible tenant, avail immed, $800/mon. 668-5558 2-BDRM + den, attached garage, upper level of triplex in PC, bright, energy efficient, near bus stop, N/S, no parties,  one cat ok, $1,350/mon + utils.  333 0866 3-BDRM HOUSE in Ibex Valley, wood stove, elect heat, shower, w/d, phone/internet., refs reqd, avail Jan. 1. $1,200/mon. 668-1045 OFFICE SPACE, 454 sq ft, heat/elec included, reception & 2 sep rooms, 2nd flr corner of 4th & Wood, lease required, $965.95/mon includes GST. 333-0085 2-BDRM CONDO-STYLE apt, Hillcrest, clean, 5 appliances, elec heat (not included) carport, N/S, no dogs, responsible tenants, $1,150/mon + dd. 333-0085 OFFICE SPACE, 257 sq ft, heat/elec included, 2nd flr, corner of 4th & Wood, lease required, $530/mon includes GST. 333-0085

FURNISHED ROOM in spacious shared trailer in Crestview, near bus, w/d, cable, internet all included. $500/mon + $250 dd. 335-5310

2-BDRM HOUSE in PC near Jack Hulland w/basement, w/d, heat and utilities incl, bright, clean, quiet area, N/S, no partying, pets okay, avail immed. 336-0112

LEGAL 2-BDRM basement suite avail Dec 1st, Mt. Sima subdivision, $1,200/mon including utils. 336-0455

CHARMING CABIN on Takhini river w/private sauna,/electricity/phone/internet, no running water. Both wood & toyo stove. Refs reqʼd, avail Jan. 1, $650/mon. 668-1045

700 SQ ft cabin located in Wolf Creek, fully supported with all the amenities. Asking $750/mon + dd.  334-9230 700 SQ ft fully supported cabin 15 min from downtown, c/w septic field, water holding tank, has all amenities, $750/mon + dd. 335-8089 FURNISHED ROOM w/double bed, bedding,  TV, cable, internet, phone, parking available, on bus route, laundry facilities, avail immed, $700. 667-7733

1-BDRM SEMI-FURNISHED walk-out apt on greenbelt/bus route in PC, bright&clean, w/d, sep. ent, incl heat, N/S, N/P, no parties, dd&refs reqʼd. $800/mon. 336-4416 2-BDRM CONDO-STYLE apt, Hillcrest, newly renoʼd, clean, 5 appliances, elec heat (not included), carport, N/S, no dogs, responsible tenants, $1,450/mon + dd. 333-0085

LARGE 2-ROOM suite, w/d, utils, wifi, HDTV included, 15 mins from Main St, $975/mon + $200 dd. 335-3619 or 780-915-2940

2-BDRM UPPER floor furnished unit shared duplex in CR, lg bdrm, small bdrm/office, open kitchen, dining, living, private bath, shared laundry, $1,100/mon all incl, avail immed to July 1, 393-2700

FULLY FURNISHED room for rent close to bus and grocery store, incls all utilities, cable, wi-fi. N/S, N/P. Available until April 30th. $525/mon. 456-7855

2-BDRM HOUSE d/t, laundry, parking incl, sm fenced backyard, N/S, no parties, pets considered, $1,200/mon+utils. Contact whse@hotmail.com.

CARCROSS CUT Off, full plumbing, Oil heat/ elec, L/R, bedroom, dining area, bathroom, elec. stove/fridge, great location, N/S, 10-12 min from downtown, 667-6970

3-BDRM HOUSE, Takhini, 2,000 sq ft w. garage, N/S, N/P, avail Jan. 1, $1,700/mon. 334-6510

FULLY FURNISHED room including double bed in d/t house, $550/mon + utils. 335-5175

WANTED: FEMALE roommate in d/t house, N/S, N/P, refs & dd reqʼd, $600/mon includes elec & laundry. 668-5185 or 667-7840

NORTHLAND, COZY, clean, furnished, own bathroom but no shower, sheltered parking, near bus, N/S, N/P, Claire 456-7833

3-BDRM UPPER level of house, Ingram, avail Jan. 1, heat, hydro & laundr incl, first/last month rent, $1,750/mon. 334-4755


77

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013 RIVERDALE TOWNHOUSE January 1. 3-bdrm, 1.5 bath, finished basement, carport and large common yard, N/S, pets considererd, $1,450/mon + utils. 334-5585

4-BDRM, 2-BATH bi-level house in Riverdale. 1800sqft, N/P, no parties, ref reqʼd, avail immed, $1,700/mon + utils. 335-5976

2-BDRM HOUSE in Riverdale, partially furnished, N/P, N/S, laundry facilities, avail Dec 15, $1,100/mon. 867-634-3887

2-BDRM BSMT suite, Granger, clean & bright, new renos, private ent, laundry room, N/S, N/P, avail immed, $1,100/mon + utils & dd. 667-4463

2-BDRM APT in D/T, N/S, N/P, dd&refs reqʼd, avail immed, $1,100/mon + elec, 334-9087 2-BDRM BASEMENT suite, Riverdale, avail immed, $1,200/mon includes everything, $500 dd required. Call Pink, 334-6283 LG 3-BDRM suite in PC, avail Jan 1st, new reno, satellite TV, dishwasher, shed, garden, $1,600/mon all incl, text or leave msg 336-0306 2-BDRM APT Riverdale, N/S, no dogs, daycare in building, avail Jan. 1, $950/mon + dd all included. 633-3940 after 3pm FULLY FURNISHED home for January, February & March, 2014. 668-4835 1-BDRM APT downtown, N/P, N/S, avail immed, $950/mon all incl. 633-3940 after 3pm

1 OR 2 bdrms in family home, private bath, shared kitchen/laundry, N/S, N/P, refs reqʼd. 667-6579 STUDIO/OFFICE SPACE available on Copper Road. Two spaces available or able to combine for one large space. First unit, 780 sq. ft. Second unit, 1,080 sq. ft. Full lunchroom and utilities included. Contact Brenda or Michelle at 667-2614 or email totalfire@northwestel.net 3-BDRM 1.5 bath condo, Riverdale, newly renoʼd kitchen/bath/LR, small fenced yard, shed, lots of parking, dog friendly, avail Jan 1 or sooner, N/S, L/T, refs reqʼd. $1,450/mon. 334-1614

ROOMMATE WANTED in shared home in Porter Creek, one unfurnished room for $600/mon, one furnished room for $700/mon, 335-3973 or 334-2832

Wanted to Rent HOUSESITTER AVAILABLE Mature, responsible person Call Suat at 668-6871

Property Guys.com™

SIGN # 703114

$465,000 16 Redwood St, Whitehorse

hoUSe hUnterS

riverdale greenbelt home

3-bedroom, 1-bathroom house on greenbelt in Riverdale. Many upgrades inside. Nice yard, including large garden, greenhouse and new decks. AskiNg

349,000.00

$

LONG-TERM HOUSESITTER available for winter months, gd w/pets & plants. No criminal record, 30 yr. Yukon resident. 335-0009 WANTED: 2-BDRM apartment/small house near Porter Creek or Takhini Hot Springs Rd, need running water and wood heat. Plan to stay several years with German family. waldlaeufer_c@web.de WANTED: RESPONSIBLE housesitter for December 10-24 near Golden Horn school, car available. 667-2307

JUST LISTED: 4 BDrm COWLEY CrEEK

$529,000 45 Dolly Varden Drive, Whitehorse

hOUSe hUNTerS

just listed: 5 bdrm including suite!

SIGN # 143606

$269,000 4031 4 Ave Unit B Whitehorse

867-668-4539

Open concept living, dining, kitchen and laundry. Large family or ‘whatever room’, 3 bedrooms, 1 and a half baths. Blaze King wood stove and electric baseboard. New enclosed porches front and back. New roof, attic and upgraded windows. Drilled well plus septic. 2.5 acres with rental cottage, small stable and corral. Priced to sell at

230,000

$

1-250-651-7861

Mobile & Modular Homes Serving Yukon, NWT & Alaska

867.334.1111 vivianetessier@remax.net

WATSON LAKE split level home, 2 acres, private well, 3-bdrm, 2-bath, custom kitchen, heated workshop, garage and outbuildings, patio, $199,000 (appraised at $250,0000), 867-536-7757

It’s good for you.

667-2514 ®

RE/MAX Action REAlty • WhitEhoRsE yukon Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

Help Wanted YUKON MAN Barbershop requires one barber/hair stylist. For more info please call 336-0950. RAYMOND BROS TRUCKING LTD is accepting resumes for experienced Class 1 drivers for seasonal camp work in fort Nelson. Drivers must have references & experience with End Dump, Winch Truck & Low-Bedding Equipment. H2S, 1st aid & GODI required Email: sraymond@northwestel.net

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

SIGN # 703109

RARE! GRD FlooR, 1 BDRm At thE RivER’s EDGE

2212 Birch Drive

A Professional at Your Side

Employment Opportunity

867-336-4723

Beautiful 2,000 square foot Pine Creek suB-division, atlin

®

action realty realtor®

MAYO, SPLIT level, 3-bdrm, 2 bath, lower, 1 bdrm, 1 bath, office, family rm & laundry area, upper, 2 bdrms, 1 bath, w/walk-in linen closet, kitchen w/pantry. $100,000 obo, babeross@msn.com

Property Guys.com™

Call 867-393-3795 to view.

Property Guys.com™

NEW 28ʼX34ʼ 2-storey unfinished house in Atlin, drilled well, power & septic field, on 2-acres w new 18ʼx28ʼ cabin, trailer & shop, nice location. $214,000. 250-651-7868

Advertising

867-633-4520

E HOUS PM OPENer 7th • 1:00 to 3:00 b em ec Saturday, D

HAINES JUNCTION 2-storey house. Contemporary design, open concept on cul-de-sac, 10+ acres, Fire-smarted around house, lots of trees left, view of St. Elias Mtns, 1350 sq. ft. Rod 634-2240 CABIN FOR sale, new, 10ʼx14ʼ, wired, insulated, c/w propane stove, fridge, heater. Can be moved. $15,000. 660-5545

House Hunters JUST LISTED: PorTEr CrEEk 3 BEDroom

Real Estate

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Expression of Interest - Casual Hire Curriculum Developer Skills for Employment - Childcare School of Academic & Skill Development January 20, 2014 to March 31, 2014 Hourly Rate: $32.30 to $36.33 Competition No.: 13.152 Initial Review Date: December 10, 2013

Property Guys.com™

SIGN # 143608

$479,500 9 Topaz Crescent Whitehorse

867-667-6828

HOUSE HUNTERS

Yukon College is looking for qualified person(s), for developing and organizing Adult Basic Education (ABE) curriculum at Yukon College. Reporting to the Director of Academic and Skill Development, this position is responsible for developing curriculum for a Childcare, Skills for Employment program. The incumbent will be responsible for creating, planning and organizing new curricula; selecting appropriate instructional materials for inclusion in the curricula; meeting regularly with the course advisory committee and other content experts; and submitting completed curricula. The ideal candidate will have a post-secondary degree preferably at the graduate level with experience in adult educational programming and curriculum development. Additional experience in Early Childhood Education would be considered an asset.

BRaNd NEw – BUy NOw!

667-7681 or cell 334-4994 23 Lorne Rd. in McCrae

clivemdrummond@gmail.com

NO Pad FEES UNTil FEB 2014! 2-bedroom upscale mobile home. $ Reduced to FOR QUick SalE

124,000

Call 334-6094 for more information.

For additional information please contact: Erica Bourdon, Instructor/Coordinator, School of Academic and Skill Development Email: ebourdon@yukoncollege.yk.ca Phone: (867) 456-8641 Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Trying to find a great local deal? You can find all the display ads in this newspaper online at our website:

www.yukon-news.com Just click on the MarkeTplace Tab and all the ads will be sorted and categorized for easy viewing. Hassle free shopping, so you can find what you need fast!


78

Yukon News

Icy Waters Ltd.

Friday, December 6, 2013

À LA RECHERCHE D’UN EMPLOI?

has a vacancy for an:

AnimAl cAre worker (except farm) Aquarist for Arctic chArr fAcility (Noc 6563) Pay rate $16/hour, 40 hours per week.

RAYMOND BROS TRUCKING LTD Accepting resumes for WATER TRUCK OPERATORS Fort Nelson oil patch $27-$30/hr + overtime Seasonal camp work Class 1 or 3 First Aid, H2S & GODI required sraymond@northwestel.net Gold Village Chinese Restaurant Looking for experienced full-time kitchen helper and server Apply with resume to 401 Craig Street, Dawson City, YT Y0B 1G0 867-993-2368

to assist Management in maintaining and improving husbandry practices in all aspects of the aquaculture facility; participate in vaccination and brood stock programs; undertake research including recirculation technology. the applicant should have at least 12 months experience of fish health, breeding and genetics issues. An understanding of hAccP both for internal and export use, is required. high School, and college vocational qualifications in fish or animal health are required.

Des professionnels engagés

TAGS

Conseils en développement de carrière

Please email resume to Jlucas@icywaters.com ;

Création, amélioration et traduction de CV

cloSiNg dAte for APPlicAtioNS iS deceMber 31St 2013.

Simulation d’entrevue

food & gas 24 hrs/7 Requires

Des services personnalisés et des ressources utiles.

Éducation

Direction de l’enseignement postsecondaire

CENTRE DE LA FRANCOPHONIE

Capstone Mining Corporation is a Canadian mining company with three producing copper mines, Pinto Valley in the US, Cozamin in Mexico and Minto in Canada. In addition, Capstone has two development projects, Santo Domingo in Chile and Kutcho in Canada, as well as exploration properties in Canada, Chile and Mexico. As a Capstone Mining Corporation employee you will become part of a supportive, performance-driven and dynamic environment. You will be given the opportunity to expand your knowledge and skill set working alongside dedicated employees from a variety of backgrounds and cultures. We place the highest priority on employee safety, protecting the environment and enhancing the development of the communities where we operate. By joining the Capstone team, you will become part of an inclusive and loyal team where you will be supported in your career growth through training, diverse opportunities and professional development.

Mine Captain

This position reports to the Operations Superintendent and is directly responsible for the safe extraction of the mineral resource, associated waste development, including ancillary developments, and associated project work within the underground mine. This is achieved through direct supervision of Underground Shift Supervisors, Surface Operations Supervisors and working in conjunction with the Mine Maintenance General Supervisor and Mine Technical Services personnel.

Electrical Supervisor

This position reports to the Maintenance Supervisor and is responsible for overseeing the site/mill electrical needs and the instrumentation monitoring program, in compliance with federal and Yukon Electrical Codes and related regulatory/safety requirements. The incumbent plans and executes small and major jobs/projects, and directly supervises trades and apprentices.

Mine DTH Driller and Sampler

The Mine DTH Driller and Sampler is responsible for carrying out drilling and sampling activities according to mine planning engineering, environment and geology. Incumbents typically have two to five years of experience with a DTH drill.

302, rue Strickland, Whitehorse (Yukon) 867.668.2663 poste 223 www.sofa-yukon.ca

Employment Opportunity Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Camp Leaders (2 positions) Casual Hire Science Adventures

Ayamdigut (Whitehorse) Campus Hourly Rate: $25.00 (Bi-weekly Saturday mornings plus flexible weekly hours) From: January 6, 2014 to July 15, 2014 Competition #:13.157 Initial Review Date: December 16, 2013 The Camp Leaders provide leadership for the All-Girls Science Club, taking responsibility for the successful operation of the program and the positive learning experience of twenty Grades 5-7 girls. Duties include: • • • • •

Preparing and delivering eight “Science of Health” sessions Engaging science mentors from the community Communicating proactively with students, parents, mentors and youth leaders Promoting the All-Girls Science Club to schools and public Writing a professional final report

Closing Date: Open until suitable candidate found.

Qualifications:

To Apply: Send your cover letter, stating salary expectations, and resume by e-mail to humanresources@mintomine.com. Please include your Name and Title Position in the subject line of your e-mail response.

• • •

To learn about employment opportunities at the Minto Mine in Yukon and Whitehorse, please vist our website at www.capstonemining.com.

900CM-001 Yukon News

A post-secondary science degree Project coordination skills Experience teaching children

Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Gas Service Attendant $11/hr

Open 24/7. This position requires you to work shiftwork. NOC: 6621 Mail or Drop off Resume to:

Tags Food & Gas

4221-4th Ave. Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 1K2 5 VAcAnT pOsiTiOns Opening date: Dec. 1st, 2013 Closing date: Dec. 31st, 2013

TAGS food & gas 24 hrs/7 Requires

Food Counter Attendant $12/hr

Open 24/7. This position requires you to work shiftwork. NOC: 6641 Mail or Drop off Resume to:

Tags Food & Gas

4221-4th Ave. Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 1K2 5 VAcAnT pOsiTiOns Opening date: Dec. 1st, 2013 Closing date: Dec. 31st, 2013 Laborer/Small Engine Mechanic required. Primary responsibilities include loading/unloading construction equipment and cleaning/preparing equipment for rentals.   See full job description at MACPHERSON RENTALS 117 Copper Road, Whitehorse, or on our website at www.MacPhersonRentals.com. Please drop off resume in person. GREEN GARDEN RESTAURANT is seeking an experienced, hard-working, reliable full-time food and beverage server, $12 per hour. Apply with resume to 1612 Centennial Street between 2:00pm and 4:00 pm.


79

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013 Miscellaneous for Sale BETTER BID NORTH AUCTIONS Foreclosure, bankruptcy De-junking, down-sizing Estate sales. Specializing in estate clean-up & buy-outs. The best way to deal with your concerns. Free, no obligation consultation. 333-0717 We will pay CASH for anything of value Tools, electronics, gold & jewelry, cameras, furniture, antiques, artwork, chainsaws, camping & outdoor gear, hunting & fishing supplies, vehicles & ATVs. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS FURNACE BURNER, fully reconditioned, new motor, transformer & pump, $200. 633-3053 ELITE TRAVELLER scooter, 3-wheel, excellent for mobility problems, like new, open to offers. Richard, 667-7057. POWER “G” generator, 1,000 watts, never used, asking $175. 668-5833 DELTA 12” variable speed wood turning lathe model 46-700C, many accessories, asking $550. 668-5833 WOMENS "YUKON Parka" size 10, wine colored inner duffle and shell /w fur trim exc cond, $100.  634-2631

Village of Haines Junction

Is now accepting resumes for the position of:

Veterinary Customer Service Representative Our veterinary team is seeking full time employment of a Veterinary Customer Service Representative effective immediately. We are looking for a strong team player who is enthusiastic, professional, has excellent people and communication skills and has interest and experience with animals. The successful candidate must have good telephone skills and be able to work in a busy environment. Prior reception experience and familiarity with Microsoft Word™, Excel™ and Avimark™ Veterinary Software will be considered an asset. There will be some stocking of pet food which will involve lifting up to 20 Kgs. Resumes will be accepted until December 20, 2013. Please submit resumes to 107 Copper Road or e-mail resumes

STARTECH 7 Port USB 3.0/2.0 Hub with Charging Port ST7320USBC, $35, 667-6472

to clinic@alpinevet.ca

CANON EF 24mm Lens, f/1.4L, Series II, superb for weddings, low-light photography, original packaging, excellent condition, $950, 667-6472 2-LEVEL CAGE for small animals (rabbits, chinchillas, etc), made of solid pine with arborite floors. Has 2 front opening doors with wire mesh, $60 Matt 667-4394 CANON EOS-1DS Mark III DSLR Camera, 21.1 Megapixel, full frame CMOS Sensor, 5 fps, live view, weather resistant, takes both CF and SD cards, good cond, $850, 667-6472 CANON 5D Mark II DSLR Camera, 21.1 Megapixel, full frame sensor, 1080p movie mode, broad ISO, live view, 3.9 fps, weather resistant, original box/manuals, exc cond, $1,250. 667-6472 REILO M3 burner, $250, 667-6752 or 332-8706 TIGER LOOP for oil furnace or boiler, $100. 667-6752 or 332-8796. DAYTON EXHAUST fan w. back draft damper, 1,500 CFM, $200. 667-6752 or 332-8706 30 GAL John Woods oil-fired hot water tank, $600, 667-6752 or 332-8706. HONDA EU3000IS generator, used as a backup, has low hours, good cond, c/w original manuals, $1,750. 667-6472 8X8 TIMBERS 16ft long for sale $60 a piece 336-3383 byrongagne@gmail.com WEDDING RING set, 2.5 carat diamond total, 14K gold on both, valued at $18,000, replacement $31,000.00, asking $8,000 obo, rare & registered, serious inquires only. 335-2092 WOMENʼS DOWN coats, MEC xs, $85, Land End, med, $125. 311B Hanson St. after 5:00 pm. YOUTH WINTER jackets, MEC sz 12, $40, Patagonia XL, $40, Loki sz 10, $30. 311B Hanson St. eves. NEW DOUBLE XL black wool jacket, tan colored leather sleeves, $100. 334-1846 AS SEEN on TV, new Tria Beauty Skin Rejuvenating Laser Kit with cleanser, value $170, asking $65. 333-9305 8” GAS ice auger, runs great, $100.00. 335-2103 FRAMED MIRROR, 4ʼ3” x 3ʼ4” wide, $150 obo. 334-3822 HONDA PRESSURE power washer, 2600 psi, 160cc, gas powered, 4-stroke, 2.3 gpm, new in box, $180 obo. 335-4407 USED 9ʼ Myers snowplow, fair cond, c/w frame but no rack, pump or lights, $1,500. 633-4666 ONE BATTERY charger on wheels. 668-6931 or 332-9355. HUSQVARNA MODEL 455 (55cc) Rancher Chainsaw with 18" bar, hard case, new cond, barely used, $300 obo. 335-2103 TWO GOOSE down jackets, 1 green (L) Canada Goose and 1 Blue (XL) Woods, both in new cond, reasonable offers accepted, 335-2103 KENMORE VACUUM cleaner, $20.00, high quality exercise ball $10.00, 668-5882 MEN'S MED Bench Hoodie, brown wool, great shape, $50.00 obo. 633-6484

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY MUNICIPALITY OF HAINES JUNCTION

CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER The Village of Haines Junction invites applications for the position of Chief Administrative Officer. Haines Junction is home to approximately 850 residents and has extensive year round services and amenities. Located at the junction of the Alaska Highway and the Haines Road, Haines Junction lies on the edge of a vast and spectacular wilderness and is a community that offers a high quality of living and unparalleled recreational opportunities for the outdoor enthusiast. Reporting to Mayor and Council, the successful applicant will be responsible for the overall administrative functions of all municipal departments, as per the Yukon Municipal Act and the bylaws and policies of the Village. The ideal candidate should have a minimum of five years’ experience in municipal senior management and should have the following: 1) Proven track record in municipal operations 2) Excellent communications and interpersonal skills 3) Growth and infrastructure renewal experience 4) Grant development and budget preparation 5) Certificate in local government or relevant post-secondary education The salary range for this position is $81,510 to $103,740 per annum and an attractive benefit package is included. The closing date for this competition is January 3, 2014 at 5:00 p.m.

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

If you wish to be considered for this position, please send a covering letter and a resume to:

Mayor Mike Crawshay

Village of Haines Junction Box 5339, Haines Junction, Yukon Y0B 1L0 You may also fax your application to (867) 634-2008, or email to vhj@yknet.ca The Village of Haines Junction thanks everyone for their interest, however only those selected for an interview will be contacted. The Village of Haines Junction does not offer compensation for relocation expenses.

Budget Officer

Finance and Administrative Services Ayamdigut (Whitehorse) Campus Permanent Position Based on 75.0 hours bi-weekly Salary: $67,131 to $83,919 per annum Initial Review Date: December 18, 2013 Competition No.: HR 13.155 This position is excluded from the Bargaining Unit. This position is responsible for the review, costing, tracking and monitoring of third party projects as they evolve from ideas to finalized funding contracts, and through to completion. It reviews and facilitates related financial reporting to third party funders. It is also responsible for ensuring accurate and timely posting of certain periodic entries such as annual accruals and deferrals and for creating supporting schedules for consolidation reporting. Monthly financial responsibilities include monitoring and recording VISA expenses, recording institutional administrative overhead allocations, bookkeeping and financial reporting for related party (HillTop Bistro) using QuickBooks, and coordination of special projects within the unit. We are looking for an individual who has completed a diploma/degree in accounting or has completed their third year towards an accounting designation (CMA, CA or CGA). Extensive work experience preparing, and overseeing budgets, forecasting and preparing financial reports and the analysis of financial results is required. An equivalent combination of education and experience may also be considered. The ideal candidate will have excellent customer service, communication and presentation skills as well as strong technical knowledge. Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Administrative Assistant Whitehorse Office Full Time 37.5 hrs/week (Permanent Full-time) $22.03-$25.30/hour

Many Rivers seeks a mature, organized, and experienced individual to provide general office duties, word processing, invoicing, and with periodic reception responsibilities. Qualifications: Preference will be given to candidates with a minimum of 3 years experience in an office environment; Knowledge of office procedures and equipment; Excellent word processing skills including Power Point, Publisher and Excel; Attention to detail; Excellent interpersonal and communications skills; Ability to maintain strict confidentiality; Valid driver’s license. If you are looking for meaningful work in a human service organization, please respond with a resume and cover letter by email, fax or mail to: Brent Ramsay, Executive Director Many Rivers Counselling & Support Services 4071 - 4th Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 1H3 Ph: 667-2970 • Fax: 633-3557 E-mail: info@manyrivers.yk.ca Closing date: December 9, 2013 at 4:00 pm For further info please visit our website at www.manyrivers.yk.ca We thank all applicants in advance for their interest however, only those invited for an interview will be contacted. Many Rivers is covered by a Collective Agreement.


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Yukon News

E M P L OY M E N T O P P O RT U N I T Y

EM OYMMEENNTT OOPPPPO ORT RTU UN N II T EM PP LL OY TY Y DIRECTOR - EDUCATION AND DIRECTOR- -EDUCATION EDUCATION AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE DIRECTOR AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE SOCIAL ASSISTANCE

Position Type: Full-time, Permanent Department: Education Closing: Dec. 20, 2013 Position Type: Full-time, Permanent Position Type:9Education Full-time, Permanent Salary: Level - $90,352 to $117,458 Department: Closing: Dec. 20, 2013 Department: Closing: Dec. 20, 2013 Salary: LevelEducation 9 - $90,352 to $117,458 Salary: Level - $90,352 to $117,458 For complete details, visit9www.kwanlindun.com/employment For complete details, visit www.kwanlindun.com/employment

For complete details, visit www.kwanlindun.com/employment

Friday, December 6, 2013

PAIR OF beaver mitts, moose hide outers and sheep wool inners, new cond, $250. 335-2103

FULL LENGTH mink coat, great X-mas gift, size 12-14, new cond, 633-6870

MILWAUKEE PAM-DRIVE floor screw systems, like new, $250. 633-4375

AUSTRALIAN OUTBACK Oilskin Drover, extra long length, leg straps, deep fantail gusset, removable cape, 11 oz wax cotton, brown, large, like new, $150, 668 5511

DUAL HALOGEN construction stand lamp, needs bulbs. $20, Mastercraft 13" scroll saw single speed, $20, Mastercraft router table $20, 634-5151

MEN'S LARGE BENCH jacket, grey excellent shape $50.00, 633-6484

CANADA GOOSE down parka w/fur ruff, model Resolute, top of the line extreme parka, blue, mens XL, like new, $600. 668-5511

PAINTBALL GUN, Spyder aggressor GT, semi auto, full aluminum construction, cw 12oz pure energy C02, $50. 335-8925

MEN'S LARGE Bench hoodie, excellent shape black with blue accent $60.00, 633-6484

VARIOUS ITEMS for sale (new), great for Xmas presents (still in boxes), priced cheap to sell, 667-6587 lv. msg.

MEN'S MEDIUM Mexx jacket $40.00 black, 633-6484

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS (new) from Partylite, Plantation and Murdochs (still in boxes) priced cheap to sell. 667-6587 lv msg

MEN'S BLACK Volcom hoodie medium, $50.00, 633-6484 MEN'S LARGE Jack & Jones jacket white, great condition $50.00, 633-6484

LADIES SIZE 10 black Hush Puppies with heel, like new $30.00, 633-6484

Business is looking for people to join ou g n i w r t ea m o Gr . O ur

MicMac

WE ARE LOOKING FOR

2 Parts/Service Advisors and a Product Advisor for our growing dealership. We offer competitive wages and a benefit package. Applicants should see Brad Barker for the Parts/Service position and Derek Kindervater for the Product Advisor. @ 6111-6th Avenue, Downtown, Whitehorse. No phone calls please. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

CANNING JARS, vintage, glass lid c. 1940-1950s, Gem, Carona, Jewel, all sizes $10 each or $100/dozen. 332-0025 lv msg. BLUE MOUNTAIN Pottery, vintage, out of production in 80s, various pieces, $10 each or $100/dozen, 332-0025 lv msg SLOW COOKER, Bravetti, stainless steel, as new, mini slow cooker $15, 332-0025 lv msg PLANT POTS, ceramic, small to medium sizes, various designs, $5 each or 3/$10. 332-0025 lv msg

LADIES CLOTHING (new), great for Xmas parties and evening gown/dresses (never worn) for New Years. 667-6587 lv msg LADIES WINTER boots and shoes (new) from ShoesRUs (never worn), size 9 & 10, priced cheap to sell, 667-6587 lv msg MEADE 8" Schmidt Cassigrain Telescope. Too many accessories to list. $1,000 obo. 335-7154 LARGE WESTSTEEL Tidy Tank, asking $500. 335-7154 NEEDLEPOINT PICTURE of 18th century English pub scene with light and guild frame, 39" x 33", $100. 668-5972

CHINA, ROYAL Albert, Happy Anniversary, Wedding Anniversary, 25th, and 50th, various pieces starting at $15, 332-0025 lv msg

MASTERCRAFT (CDN Tire) table saw, barely used, $65. 667-2607

NIKKEN WATER filtration system, countertop, gravity-fed, over $200 new - asking $50obo. 336-2226

US MILITARY Gore-tex 2-pc rain suit, universal camo, worn twice, $500 new, asking $200. 667-2607

DIDDYBEATS IN ear high performance headphones, like new condition, colour pink. $75.00, 633-6484

SMALL STEEL wood stove, 13” w, 22” h, 21” l, on legs, good for wall-tent, sauna, $50. 667-2607

Kluane Corporation

is looking for a

General Manager

to oversee projects and job sites in Burwash Landing, Yukon starting January 1st, 2014. Must be able to travel to Whitehorse and possibly other Yukon communities. Please send cover letter and resume by email to gclark@kluanecorp.ca by December 15th, 2013.

MASTERCRAFT 4X36" stationary belt sander, needs drive belt, $20, Coleman Powermate 15 Gal compressor=30 feet of hose, runs well, $100.002 adjustable roller stands, $20, 2 adjustable roller stands, $20. 634-5151 9 CUBIC foot propane fridge/freezer with regulator, $600, 634-5151 YAMAHA EF 3800 Generator (head shaved a few years ago, not used since) $300, Craftsman 10" table saw. $50.00, King Canada 10" sliding compound mitre saw C/W 10" Freud blade, 634-5151 CHILDRENʼS TLINGIT fur hat, new, handmade Beaver fur, $300. 393-3358

Electrical Appliances KENMORE DRYER, front loader, works great, $300. Also nw pump out of Kenmore washer, $40. 332-7797 SEARS BEST refrigerator, $200. 633-2580 eves MOFFAT RANGE top  electric "drop in" 4-burner, SS/ 110 volt, older but in good shape, $50, 867-634-2631 30” HOT Point refrigerator, ceramic top range & over range microwave, $600 as package. 667-7072 GE DISHWASHER, good condition, white, asking $85. 335-1399 DRYER, 2 years old, excellent working condition, $250. 335-7830 INGLIS DRYER, extra large capacity, works fine, $125. 667-7152 AERUS ELECTROLUX ceramic, infrared heaters, 6-mon old, work great, 1/2 of original retail value, $200 for one/$250 for the other which purifies the air as it runs. 336-2226 LAUNDRY PAIR, regular, top loading washer/matching propane dryer, both work fine, Kenmore brand. $65 each or $100 for both.  393-2929

TVs & Stereos Paying cash for good quality modern electronics. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS

Advertising Sales Representative The Yukon News, a twice-weekly award-winning newspaper has an outstanding opportunity for a full-time sales person. The successful candidate will have sales experience – preferably in the advertising or retail industry. The ability to build relationships with clients and offer superior customer service is a must. The winning candidate will be a team player and will also be called upon to grow the account list with an aggressive cold calling mandate. The ability to work in an extremely fast paced environment with a positive attitude is a must. We offer a great working environment with a competitive base salary coupled with a strong benefit package. Black Press has more than 170 community newspapers across Canada and the United States and for the proven candidate the opportunities are endless.

Friday. December 20th Greg LeBlanc

Please submit your resume with a cover letter to Mike Thomas Publisher, Yukon News, 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, Y.T. Y1A 2E4 or email to mthomas@yukon-news.com No phone calls please.

55" PHILLIPS Projection TV in great condition, $75.00 obo. 336-2996

Computers & Accessories PANASONIC KX-FP250 Plain Paper Fax and Copier. Includes a spare roll of ink film (KX-FA136A). Asking $50, 667-6472 HP LASERJET 6P C3980A Plain Paper B+W Laserjet Printer w nearly full cartridge, quality results, $50, 667-6472 CANON CANOSCAN 5600F Scanner, exc cond, rarely used, c/w setup guide and installation software. Asking $50, 667-6472

Musical Instruments We will buy your musical instrument or lend you money against it. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS PIANO TUNING & REPAIR by certified piano technician Call Barry Kitchen @ 633-5191 email:bfkitchen@hotmail.com ANTIQUE 1960'S Gerhard Heintzman upright piano for sale. $2,000. 334-3053 3/4 SIZE violin with bow, hard case and chin rest, asking $250, call 334-9230 to view YAMAHA ACOUSTIC Guitar, Model F 325, steel strings, like new, c/w carrying case, guitar tuner and instructional DVD Learning the Guitar, $150. 668-5511 EPIPHONE TRIGGERMAN guitar amplifier, 100H, DSP, exc cond, retro look, 4-12” speakers in cabinet, $550. 668-3254

www.blackpress.ca

www.yukonnews.com

FULL SIZE violin w/case, shoulder rest, other accessories, recently returned from a check over with a luthier,, appraised at $7,000,asking $1,800 firm for everything. 336-2226


Fire-killed Spruce Firewood Very dry, clean burning $250/cord 16”x3-cord load Larger loads available $190/cord if you cut & haul from my yard in town 333-5174

Firewood CRL FIREWOOD/WHITEʼS WOOD Standing dry from Haines Junction. Cut to any length • $250/cord 335-1934 Serving Whitehorse since 2007

FIREWOOD Clean, beetle-kill, dry Ready for pick-up, $210/cord or Local delivery, $250/cord 1/2 cords also available for pick-up only Career Industries @668-4360

Come on Whitehorse, get off your stumps and start heating your homes with Yukon-made fuel! FIREWOOD FOR SALE 20-cord orders Big or small tree length Logging truck loads $150/cord Delivered to Whitehorse Call Clayton: 335-0894

MELDON FIREWOOD Prompt, professional delivery Licenced, certified and registered Haines Junction standing dead wood $250 - 22”, 18”, 16” $220 - 4ʼ $200 - 8ʼ Jordon 335-0725

HURLBURT ENTERPRISES $250 per cord We have wood. You-cut, You-haul available. Discount for larger quantities. Stockpiled in Whitehorse for PROMPT Delivery Visa, M/C, Cheque, Cash Dev Hurlburt 335-5192 • 335-5193

TEN TON Firewood Services $160 - cord for 10-cord load - 30ʼ lengths $250 - cord - bucked up, discounts on multiple-cord orders Call or text David 867-332-8327 FIREWOOD FOR SALE Cut to length, $260/cord Same day delivery Call 334-4911

EVF FUELWOOD ENT Year Round Delivery • Dry accurate cords • Clean shavings available • VISA/M.C. accepted Member of Yukon Wood Producers Association Costs will rise. ORDER NOW 456-7432

Dry Pine Firewood $240/cord 456-7112 FIREWOOD Split dry spruce 16” or 18”, $250 per cord Marsh Lake area Rolland at 332-4671 or 660-4671

DIMOK TIMBER 6-cord or 22-cord loads of firewood logs. You cut in the bush - $105 /cord Call 634-2311 or email dimoktimber@gmail.com

PINE FUELWOOD seasoned two years, bucked to length, split and delivered, $250. 393-2728 DUKEʼS FIREWOOD Standing Dry Beetle Killed Spruce Wood Prices: 6 cord load $240/cord $260 for multiples of 2 cords Cut your own at $95/cord 20 cord truckload logs $155/cord 8 cord loads of 20ft dry logs $180 per cord Cash and Debit Accepted 334-8122

DONʼS FIREWOOD 20 Cord Always stock piled for quick deliveries to -40° C. Social Services & Kwanlin Dun 393-4397 1ST QUALITY heating wood Season-dried over 3-yrs. to be picked up on Levich Drive in Mt. Sima industrial subdivision. Complete info at 335-0100.

Guns & Bows

DRY PINE, 18”, $250/cord, prices may vary upon length. Call Stu at 633-5041 BIG BEAR WOODWORKS Firewood & Delivery Clean beetle-kill wood Accurate honest cord Will deliver anywhere $250 per cord Available Now Call 867-689-9017 CGFJ WOODCUTTING SERVICE $250 - 16” lengths $220 - 4ʼ lengths Prompt, friendly service Dry timber, money-back guarantee 336-2013

81

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Case cutlery, high quality hand-crafted pocket and hunting knives available at G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS BRAZILIAN MAUSER in 8mm Mauser, hand made hardwood stock, bedded and floated, recent refinish of whole rifle, $300 firm, PAL req'd, 667-2276 LEE ENFIELD #1 Mk 3, 303 British, 10 rd mag, sporterized wood, good bore, military sights, steel scope rings, with 3-9x40mm scope mounted. PAL req'd, $350 firm. 667-2276

MARLIN X57VH .308 heavy barrel 4-12X Bushnell scope, like new, $550. Weatherby Vanguard 257 Wby 3-9X scope, 3.5 boxes factory ammo, like new, $750, must have PAL. 334-8604, lv msg.

1990 CHEVROLET Lumina, 120,000kms, auto, good 4 seasons tires, good shape, $1,000 gicheror@tiscali.it, 660-5253

MOSSBERG PLINKSTER 22 lr semi-auto, like new, 2 clips, $200, Mossberg 835 multi-mag 12 gauge, takes 2 3/4”, 2”+3.5” shells, 28” VR barrel, $350, must have PAL, 334-8604 lv msg.

FORD 2001 Crown Victoria, $2,750 O.B.O, ex cop car, winter tires ready, auto trans, electric windows, good cond., very reliable car. 332-7781

NON RESTRICTED firearms safety course, presented by Whitehorse Rifle & Pistol Club, Dec 7 & 8. For more info call 667 6728 or 334 1688 LEE ENFIELD No4 Mk1, 303 British, 10 rd mag, sporterized, good condition, picatinny style rail instead of rear sight, sling, $300 firm, PAL req'd, 667 2276 ONE SPOTTING scope, 80 mm, Celestron Ultima 80 ed. 668-6931 or 332-9355 WANTED: OLD bolt action sheep hunting rifle for taxidermy project. Prefer blued barrel, wood stock, non-functioning or shot out rifle preferred, 336-4811 RUGER MINI 14 Ranch Model in 223, stainless and synthetic, excellent, $800. 335-7154 REMINGTON 870 12, tactical with peep sights. Mint unfired. $550 obo. 335-7154 WINCHESTER M O D E L 70 extreme weather, 30-06. stainless, composite stock. approx 100 rounds, VG condition c/w Talley scope mounts, PAL required, $800. 335-8925

Wanted WANTED: URGENTLY need compact car or beater truck to go to work on Annie Lake Rd. Help is very much appreciated. Will barter for vehicle repairs. 821-4772 or 334-2221. WANTED, WOOD Stove small to mid size, nothing fancy, but solid and in good working condition, will pay fair price. 668-5511

FORD ESCAPE XLT 2002, 74.000km, not driven from 2007 to 2011, dark blue, great shape, $8,400. 335-1093 2012 NISSAN XTerra Pro-4X, 16,000km, paid almost $41k last year with extras, c/w Bluetooth, satellite radio, hatch tent, trailer brakes & hitch, $29,900. 336-0375 2007 PONTIAC G6 4-door, grey, 6-cyl, auto, well maintained, 134,000kms, $8,700 obo. 332-0025 lv msg 2007 TOYOTA Highlander SUV, white, AWD, command start, extra set winter tires, tow package, approx 128,000kms, $15,500. 332-4143 2006 CHEVROLET HHR, 148,000kms, good cond, clean/smoke free, $7,500. 336-2036 2005 NISSAN Sentra, 1.6L, blows cold air when comes to stop, $2,000. 633-8532 2005 PONTIAC Grand Am, 150,000 km in good running condition, $4,500. 334-9239 2005 PONTIAC Sunfire, great car & good on gas, low kms, fully loaded, new windshield and tires, rear spoiler, $4,800. 332-6022 2003 FORD Explorer Sport XLT. 2-dr V6 auto, 4-wd, 168,000 km, nice shape, good for winter driving, $5,200 obo. 332-4858 2001 PONTIAC Montana, long version, fairly well maintained, 250,000kms, $2,000 firm, 336-2036

WANTED: BLACKBERRY world edition cell phone, they were the first to come out, I need the parts, call 332-7737

2001 TOYOTA Echo, 2-dr auto, 170,000km, exc condit, c/w mechanical inspection, easy to maintain, good gas mileage, $3,500 obo. 332-7213

WANTED: FREE or cheap wedding dress that I can make new again for my wedding. If you have one you want to get rid of call or text 334-4215

1999 SUBARU Forester 217K, awd, auto, p/w, p/l, remote start, decent summer tires & excellent winter tires on rims, struts s/b replaced soon, $3,300 obo. 668-5876

WANTED: LOOKING for a Clare oil furnace sidewall vent cap. 633-4326 WANTED: SMALL or medium-sized wooden book shelf. Please call 667-7684. WANTED: BROOMBALL players for 2013/14 season, no experience needed, fun, gets you off the couch, makes winter go fast, meet new friends. Check our website yukonbroomball, or 335-0534 WANTED: RSF wood stove. 334-6868

Cars 2003 SUBARU Legacy GT sedan AWD, 185,000kms, exc winter car, new tires, windshield, battery, brakes. sunroof, heated front seats/windshield, auto starter. $6,700 393-2504 2010 MUSTANG GT convertible, 5L, 5-spd loaded, immaculate, 42,000kms. 336-0505 or 667-6579

Fast, Hassle-Free

cHeque casHing no Holds... instant casH!

Open 7 Days A Week Whitehorse Money Mart 2190 second avenue 867-668-6930

1993 CIVIC DX Hatchback, standard, clean, winter/summer rubber, 1989 Acura engine, minor rust, runs, needs battery, $1,900 or cash + trade. 335-5945 call/txt

1999 TOYOTA Corolla, 277,000kms, timing chain, standard, new tran Jul/13, Yukon windshield, runs perfect, $2,000. 335-3327

1999 VOLKSWAGON Golf, 240,000kms, great on gas, a/c, p/l, CD player, black interior, dk green exterior, $1,800. 667-4770

the yukon’s best pre-owned vehicles! ✔ I50 point comprehensive vehicle inspection ✔ 3 month or 5000 km limited powertrain warranty ✔ 10 day or 1000 km Vehicle Exchange Privilege ✔ Car Proof verified report ✔ Complimentary Roadside Assistance ✔ Nitrogen inflated tires ✔ Full tank of fuel ✔ First two oil changes FREE

piece of dependable...

mind

Nervous about your credit? No problem! call us!

whitehorsemotors.com

Trucks

We Sell Trucks! 1-866-269-2783 • 9039 Quartz Rd. • Fraserway.com

2006 GRAND Caravan, lots of kms but in good shape, $2,500. 633-4666

Happy 50th Anniversary

Bill & Adeline Webber

December 7, 2013 With Love From Your Family, Cindy & Dave Wendy, Dan, Stéphane & Marissa and Will

Congratulations to

Shawn Sederberg on the completion of his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering. Shawn successfully defended his thesis on November 27, 2013 at the University of Alberta, and will be continuing his research in Munich, Germany. Well done, Dr. Sederberg! With love, your family


82

Yukon News

Pet Report 633-6019 WED, DEc 4

2013

2011 CHEVY Silverado one ton diesel, remote start, crew cab, long box, paid $59,000, asking $39,000. 456-7157

2003 CHEV Silverado, needs starter & sensor, crew cab, long box, runs great, $2,500 obo. 336-3922

1992 GMC 2500 ext cab 4/4, new motor, exhaust system & transfer case, very powerful, $5,500 obo. 334-5032

2009 NISSAN Frontier, red, king cab w/canopy, 81,000km, c/w all season tires, like new, $12,000 obo. 335-6904

2003 FORD Explorer Sport Trac XLT, 4x4, V6, 4-door, heated leather seats, remote start, sunroof, c/w 4 winter tires, pickup box cover & extension rack. $7,500. 667-6951 eves

1990 TOYOTA 3L V6 RWD, some rust and is a bit loud, runs great, never let me down, $2,500 obo. 334-8287

Hours of operation for tHe sHelter: Tues - Fri: 12:00pm-7:00pm • Sat 10:00am-6:00pm CloSed Sundays & Mondays

2008 F250 with 7' flatdeck, 5.4L V8 4wd, recent full service, winter pack installed, new wheels and tires, 70,000km. $12,500 obo. 334-3049

Help control the pet overpopulation problem

2008 FORD F450 Dually crew 4x4 , King Ranch Edition. Matching company, inverter, driving lights, loaded, 125,000kms, great shape, new tires, good price. 660-5932

have your pets spayed or neutered. For iNFormatioN call

633-6019

lost/found

lost • Near the S.S. Klondike. medium. • mendenhall Subdivision, large Shepherd/ Elkhound X. Wearing a Greenland/Siberian Husky, brown chain style collar with tags that say and white, wearing red collar, shy “Honey”. if found please contact but friendly, answers to Browny Dan Kemble @ 335-8871. (2/12/13) contact cindy @ 456-7596. • (29/11/13) found • Porter creek red wood, Shepherd x • Hillcrest area, male Husky white and tan, wearing a large Harley Davidson lab, f/s, black and brown answers collar, contact christina @604-990to Kahlua contact caitten @ 9944. (20/11/13) 334-4343. ( 29/11/13) RunninG At lARGE... if you have lost a pet, remember to check with city Bylaw: 668-8382

AVAilABlE foR Adoption in fostER HoMEs

doGs • None at this time.

CAts • 1.5yr old, DSH, grey and white, neutered male (Sappy)

At tHE sHEltER

2008 GMC Sierra 3500 ext cab long box 4x4, 6.0l, new rims and tires, 200k, c/w canopy, camper bars, $15,500 obo. 334-4923 2007 C H E V R O L E T Uplander Van 101,000kms, Silver FWD, $4,500, serious Inquiries only 668-4787 2007 TOYOTA Sienna limited awd 7-passenger minivan, 74,000 kms, power sliding doors/rear hatch, sunroof, loaded, new winter tires on rims. 333-9020 2005 CHEV Silverado 2500 4x4, crew cab, long box, auto 6.0, 130,000kms, p/w & door locks, remote start, tilt, box liner, hitch, bumper, new ball joints/shocks/cv axles. $11,500. 633-3659 2005 DODGE 1/2 ton Ram 4x4, quad cab, long box, V/8, auto, P/S, P/B, A/C, cruise, radio/CD, $6,600. 667-7777 2005 DODGE 1500 quad cab, long box, 5.7 Hemi, electr. break controller, rear air shocks, 130,000kms, $8,500 obo, 633-5246 2005 F250 4x4 ext cab, FX-4 off road pkg, new windshield, clean, solid truck. $10,900 obo. 660-5166 2005 F350 diesel Lariat, 4wd, long box, fully loaded, all engine updates, exec condit, $19,500. 667-4463 or 334-9436 2004 CHEV Cube Van, 16ʼ box roll up door, 3500 1 Ton, 5.7L engine, solid wood floor perfect shape, 120,000kms, exc cond, $15,900. 333-9990 2003 CHEV Silverado 2500HD, diesel, quad cab, fully loaded, heated leather seats, exc cond, $14,900 obo. 332-8801

doGs

• 11 week old, female, Husky/ Bear dog X, black (chris) • 5 yr old female, lab/Pit Bull X, black (Gaia) • 13 week old, male, Husky/ Bear dog X, blonde (Justin) • 3yr old, neutered male, akita, grey and white (a.J.) • 11 week old, male, Husky Bear dog X, black and tan (lance) • 1 yr old female, Husky, grey and white, (chinook) • 11 weeks old, male, GSDX, black and tan (Boo) • 7 yr old, neutered male, GSDX, black and tan (Nitro) • 6 months old, male, collie X, black ( Elf) • 11 week old, male, Bear dog X, black • 8 yr old, neutered male, Husky GSDX, and brown (Ernie) black and grey and white ( Ed) • 11 week old, male, Husky X, white and CAts brown (chance) • 8 yr old, DSH, female spayed, calico • (mao) spECiAl • Homes needed for retired sled dogs. they would make excellent pets. Please contact 668-3647 or kennelmanager@muktuk.com

Pet Photos with Santa 2013

2002 CHEV 1500 Silverado 1/2 ton 4x4, ext. cab, v/8, auto, P/S, P/B, cruise, short box a/c, radio/CD, new Wrangler grips, $6,300. 667-7777 2002 F250 Lariat 4x4 ext cab long box new factory trans, 143,000 miles, $8,500 668-5882

1979 CHEV 2500 350, engine/tires/drive train good cond, cab damage so eed to change or use as parts truck. $800$ obo. 332-7737

2000 JEEP Cherokee Sport, 4wd, automatic, 4L, V6. Class 3 hitch, alloy and steel wheels, Thule roof rack. 230,000km. $4,500 obo. 667-7884 1999 CHEVY Z71 4x4, auto, ext cab. $2,000 obo. 336-4008 1999 DODGE Dakota Sport, 2wd, $1,700. 334-7658 1999 GMC Sierra 1/2 ton 4x4, ext. cab, V8 auto, c/w cruise, tilt, a/c, great shape, well maintained, comes with xtra tires, $4,800. 633-3860 or 334-3860.

Gerry, from Gerry’s computer magic will be working her magic to capture your pet’s special visit with Santa. Your $25 donation will get you a beautiful 5x7 print. call 633-6019 to book your sitting. Walk-ins welcome! All proceeds go to

mae Bachur animal Shelter.

Pets will be posted on the Pet report for two weeks. Please let us know after that time if you need them re-posted.

You can also check out our award winning website at:

www.Humanesocietyyukon.ca

Auto Parts & Accessories

1998 DODGE 1/2 ton 4x4 ext. cab v/8 auto, P/B, P/S, cruise, a/c, radio/tape, new rubber, $3,600. 667-7777

Hi-Rise & Cab Hi - several in stock View at centennialmotors.com 393-8100

1998 DODGE Dakota w/command start, 8,000 lb. Warn winch, v8, new motor drive train, $4,500. 668-6809

GERMAN SPARK plug wires for 1992 VW Passat, like new. $60. 334-1846

1997 FORD F150 4x4 5-spd, SC, SB transfer case blown, $1,000. 335-4407

snowmobiles: 2001 Polaris 120cc Youth Snowmobile ......................................$1,699 2007 Yamaha Apex Gt 121" .........................................................$5,999 2008 Yamaha Phazer Mtx 144" Timbersled Suspension ..........$6,499 2009 Yamaha Nytro Rtx Se 121" Sno X Edition 1275km ...........$7,999 2010 Yamaha Nytro Xtx 144" .......................................................$6,999 2010 Yamaha Nytro Mtx 162" 180hp Turbo 1800km ..................$8,999 sold 2011 Yamaha Bravo 250cc 600km .............................................$5,999 2012 Yamaha Nytro Xtx 144" Speed Racer Edition ...................$9,999 2012 Yamaha Nytro Mtx 162" 270hp Turbo ..............................$15,999

YAMAHA

(867) 668-2101 or 1-800-661-0430

6 750X15 bias ply directional lug snow tires w/tubes, good for plowing snow, $40 ea. 667-6752 or 332-8706 NEW DODGE floor mats, black in color, 2 single front, 1 full length for back, out of 2010 Ram 1500, asking $100 obo. 456-4422 4 MAG wheel for Toyota Tundra 2007 and up, $100. Martin 334-4787 or 393-3754 2004 GMC 1500 parts (112,000kms), 2wd trans, $500, 4.8L motor $500, rims and tires $500 and much more, info 334 6776

Pets 4 SHIH-TZU puppies, 9 weeks, $300. 250-651-8250 after 6pm. LOST: LARGE, shy, red/brown male husky (resembles a malamute) Mendenhall Sub since November 14th, red collar. Browny is sadly missed, please call or email with any info, cbakerhawk@gmail.com, 456-7596 The Yukon Kennel Club has NEW COURSES for 2014!  FCI/MEOE Certified Training Director - Niomi Smith  Puppy Kindergarten Jan 7 – Feb 25  Novice Obedience Jan 4 – March 29 Agility Fundamentals Jan 7 – Feb 15 Foundation to Nosework Mar 4 - 29 Please contact Wendi @ 633-4952 www.Facebook.com/YukonKennelClub 2 BORDER Collie/Lab cross puppies free to a good home ASAP, 6-month old females, for more info, 334-0911 after 6pm BEWE SPRINT sled (dog sled), new cond, $1,200. 335-2103 FEMALE BLACK/WHITE half Pom-half terrier lap dog free to good home, loving and loyal, we are never home, spayed and up to date on shots. 335-6343

rniE

Hi! Helloooo! Howdy! I’m the young and ambitious Ernie! When I’m bored, I like to chase my tail, but around here I don’t get bored very often! There are always people coming in and saying ‘Hi’! Maybe you should come down too, maybe even take me home?!

MAZDA B2300 2.3L 4-cyl RWD, runs great, new timing chain and set, regular maintenance, c/w studded winter tires & canopy, $4,500 obo. 334-8287

TRUCK CANOPIES - in stock * new Dodge long/short box * new GM long/short box * new Ford long/short box

2009 Yamaha Big Bear 250 ..........................................................$3,499 2009 Yamaha Wolverine 450 .......................................................$4,999 2011 Yamaha Bruin 350 winch/plow included ...........................$5,499 sold 2012 Polaris Sportsman 550 EFI 200km .....................................$6,499

E

FORD F-250 4X4 Supercab, 5.4 L gas engine w/auto trans, 147,000 kms, 8' box w/liner, fibeglass cap w/rack, tow package, summer/winter tires on rims, new windshield, ext warranty, $15,500. 335-0277

1999 GMC Sierra single cab long box 5.3L, 199,000kms, first year of new body style, runs good, $3,300 or $3,800 with set of spare GMC rims with rubber. 334-6776

Pet of the Week!

at the mae Bachur animal Shelter

1988 TOYOTA 4x4 V6 Xtra Cab, working condition, new battery, $2,500 obo. 668-5866

2001 TOYOTA Tundra 4x4, good work truck, runs good, new parts, 380,000kms, $4,000. 336-3922

Inventory

YUKON

1989 BRONCO 4x4, motor issues, body good shape, lift kit, good tires, great project truck, $800 firm. 633-3571

1987 TOYOTA 4Runner, 4 x 4, 5 spd, trailer hitch, roof racks, bush bumper, 250,000 kms, A/C, two sets of great tires on rims. $3,450 obo. 633-4322

Gently Used

Atv’s:

1990 TOYOTA Hiace, 4wd, 4-cyl diesel, auto, excellent fuel consumption, seats 8, middle seats swivel, 128,000 kms. 333-9020

2001 C H E V R O L E T Van, seats 7, 160,000kms, run well but no heat, c/w four winter tires and command start, $1,500. 393-8139

1 KM south of Robert Service Way, Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, Y.T.

december 7 and 8 11:00 AM to 4:00 pM

if your lost animal has been inadvertently left off the pet report or for more info on any of these animals, call 633-6019 or stop by 126 tlingit street.

Friday, December 6, 2013

WANTED: KITTEN, orange in color preferred, will pay up to $50 for the right one. 668-2437 FUNDOGS DOG TRAINING January 2014 Classes Positive, gentle, force-free Puppy Kindergarten Jan14 Small Dog Play Jan20 Growly Dog Class Jan14 K9 NoseWork® I + II Jan16 Good Manners I + II Jan20 667-6668  FunDogsTraining.com

633-6019

126 Tlingit Street

www.humanesocietyyukon.ca

REMINGTON X-LARGE dog kennel, new condition, $65. 667-2607 FRENCH BULLDOG puppies, $2,500. For more info/to view call 633-4952. 11-MON OLD Lab X, white female, protective, energetic, loves to run, has been indoor dog, imagesyukon@hotmail.com, 456-4137


Motorcycles & Snowmobiles TAITʼS CUSTOM TRAILER SALES 2-3-4- place snowmobile & ATV trailers Drive on Drive off 3500 lb axles by Trailtech - SWS & Featherlight CALL ANYTIME: 334-2194 www/taittrailers.com PLOW KIT for Polaris Ranger, hydraulic, like new, $850. 633-4375 RONʼS SMALL ENGINE SERVICES Repairs to Snowmobiles, Chainsaws, Lawnmowers, ATVʼs, Small industrial equipment. Light welding repairs available 867-332-2333 lv msg 2010 TUNDRA 550F, good condit, heavy duty bumper, tow hitch, large windscreen, manual, cover. Stored indoors. 136 track, runs great. $5,500. 393-7759 day, 6674172 eve

TAITʼS TRAILERS www.taittrailers.com taits@northwestel.net Quality new and used Horse * Cargo * Equipment trailers For sale or rent Call Anytime 334-2194 Southern prices delivered to the Yukon 5X10 UTILITY trailer with raised sidewalls, 3,500lb axle, $1,000. 335-2103 2009 T@B trailer, fridge, stovetop, sink, dining table which folds down to large bed, CD player, large tent which attaches, $12,000. 335-0607 or 334-5190 TRAILER 5ʼX10ʼ, HD construction, 3 new tires, stake pockets allow more width, 5km on trailer toys/wood, $700, imagesyukon@hotmail.com, 456-4137 after 4pm TRAILER FOR ATV 4ʼw x 5ʼ3”l, haul out/pull behind, stake pockets for more width, light for use as big wheel barrow, $600, obo, imagesyukon@hotmail.com or 456-4137

SINGLE TOY carrier for sleds or quads, fits 6ʼ or 8ʼ box, easy load all aluminum, $1,200 new, asking $600 obo. 668-6809

Coming Events

2008 YAMAHA Nytro 1000cc, new 21/2“ track, mountain under carriage, after market pipes, computer chipped, pushing 155 hrp. 3,000 km, all work done by Yukon Yamaha, all original parts. 333-0777

ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com

SNOWMOBILE SKIMMER, all metal, 6" long, tie down. $145 obo. 633-4322 2004 MXZ rev rebuilt 800 cc motor, c/w carbs & extra parts, $1,500 obo. 336-3922 2004 SKIDOO Skandic 600, liquid cooled sled, near new, asking $4,000. 335-2103 2011 POLARIS Pro-Rush 800, low kms, exc shape, still under warranty. 333-0656 2010 SKI-DOO GTX sport 550 with 850 kms on it, 2 up, runs very well. $6,500. 332-1200 2001 YAMAHA Raptor 660 4-stroke, engine blown, lots of aftermarket parts, good for parts/fixer upper, consider trades on older 340-440 sled, $900 obo. 633-3571 or 335-4407 1998 YAMAHA Warrior 350, 4-stroke, 5-spd w/reverse, runs & drives, needs TLC, c/w parts quad, consider trades on older 340-440 sled, $500 obo. 633-3571 or 335-4407. 2004 MOUNTAIN Cat 800 snowmobile, 1,000 miles, exc cond, $3,700, 333-0192 2005 POLARIS 900 RMK 151 in good working order, $4,000. 336-4947 2008 SKIDOO Summit X 154 track c/w Skidoo cover, tank & belt, exc cond, $6,900 obo. 332-8801 2012 KX-450 motocross bike, approx 50 hrs, exc cond, paid $9,500, asking $5,500. 393-3496

Marine PROFESSIONAL BOAT REPAIR Fiberglass Supplies Marine Accessories FAR NORTH FIBERGLASS 49D MacDonald Rd Whitehorse, Yukon 393-2467

Heavy Equipment 2003 Dodge Single Cab 4x4 service box, $7,900 2003 Dodge Crew Cab 4x4 service box, $9,800 2003 Chev Super Cab 4x4 service box, $6,900 Ex-Yukon Electrical trucks 333-0717 HOBART 225 AMP, Kohler gas powered, arc welder/genset sitting on a rubber wheeled steel wagon, exc cond, $2,500 obo. 633-6502

Campers & Trailers 8 FT sled deck for pickup truck. 14 inch telescopic sides. $800. 333-0777

ATLIN - GLACIER VIEW CABINS “your quiet get away” Cozy self contained log cabins canoes, kayaks for rent Fax/Phone 250-651-7691 e-mail sidkatours@ atlin.net www.glacierviewcabins.ca CAROLING CHORISTERS, singers from the Whitehorse Community Choir will come to YOUR Christmas party and sing carols for 20 minutes. Nov 29, Dec 13, 14 & 20. Fundraiser. 633-4786 THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone with Dementia. Info call Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713 HOSPICE YUKON: Free, confidential services offering compassionate support to those facing advanced illness, death and bereavement. Visit our lending library, 409 Jarvis, M-F, 11:30-3:00. 667-7429, www.hospiceyukon.net COFFEE HOUSE! Sat. Dec. 7, featuring Darcy Lindberg, Alana Martinson the Open Stage! Help set up 6PM, 7PM Open stage sign-up, 730pm show! $5 United Church Bsmt, 6th+Main, 633-4255 FREE NINE-WEEK study of key Old Testament topics Wednesday nights 7:00pm starting Nov. 13 at Whitehorse Church of the Nazarene, 633-4903, details at http://www.whitehorsenazarene.org/old-testament.html HUMAN RIGHTS Day is December 10.  Join the Amnesty International Action Circle to write letters to protect and promote human rights worldwide. Whitehorse United Church (upstairs)7:00pm-9:00pm.   www.amnesty.ca THE LITTLEST Art & Craft Fair, 15 years of handmade and local gifts. Saturday, December 7th ,10am – 5pm. 56 Carpiquet Road, Takhini North FOOD BANK Society of Whitehorse annual general meeting, Wednesday December 11th at 6:00pm, 306 Alexander Street, Whitehorse. For info call 393-2265 A GOSPEL Christmas, an evening of Christmas music presented by Whitehorse Community Choir, 8:00 pm, Dec 6th & 7th, Yukon Arts Centre, tickets at Yukon Arts Centre and Arts Underground HOSPICE LIGHTS of Life Opening Ceremony Thurs Dec 12, noon, Elijah Smith Bldg. Remember the life of a loved one, Dec 12-20. More info 667-7429 YUKON PUBLIC Legal Education Association annual general meeting, December 18 @ 5:15pm, Java Connection boardroom

Attention miners

Murdoch’s Gem Shop is now accepting mining gold for melt. Convenient Main Street Whitehorse drop-off location. Fast settlement - within 24 hours after receipt of goods by the refiner. Payment by direct deposit or cheque. Any lot size - small or large. CAll Troy AT

83

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

867-667-7403 for details.

INTRO TO Quaker Practice, silent worship, corporate discernment, peace and social justice work, 6 experiential learning sessions, first Sundays 1:00–3:30pm December 1. Sue 334-6629 yukonsuestarr@gmail.com

Your Community Connection

THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone with Dementia. Info call Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713 CLIMB YUKON AGM, December 9, 6:00pm at F.H. Collins Climbing Wall. LATIN DANCE Classes, new 8-week sessions start January 10, 2014, Beginner, Salsa and Merengue or Intermediate, Salsa. salsayukon@gmail.com or 336-0255 to register HUMAN RIGHTS Day, December 10. Join the Amnesty International Action Circle, write letters to protect and promote human rights worldwide. Whitehorse United Church (upstairs) 7:00pm-9:00pm. www.amnesty.ca MOVEMBER IS ending. Shave and come down to register for our New Growth Beard Contest! $10 entry fee, win prizes. Contact: admin@yukonrendezvous.comor by phone @ 667-2148

WHERE DO I GET THE NEWS? The Yukon News is available at these wonderful stores in Whitehorse:

HILLCREST

PORTER CREEK

RIVERDALE:

Airport Chalet Airport Snacks & Gifts

Coyote Video Goody’s Gas Green Garden Restaurant Heather’s Haven Super A Porter Creek Trails North

38 Famous Video Super A Riverdale Tempo Gas Bar

GRANGER Bernie’s Race-Trac Gas Bigway Foods

DOWNTOWN: The Deli Extra Foods Fourth Avenue Petro Gold Rush Inn Cashplan Klondike Inn Mac’s Fireweed Books Ricky’s Restaurant Riverside Grocery Riverview Hotel Shoppers on Main Shoppers Qwanlin Mall Superstore Superstore Gas Bar Tags Well-Read Books Westmark Whitehorse Yukon Inn Yukon News Yukon Tire Edgewater Hotel

THE YuKoN NEWS IS AlSo AVAIlABlE AT No CHARGE IN All YuKoN CoMMuNITIES AND ATlIN, B.C.

MONDAY • WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

“YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION” WEDNESDAY * FRIDAY

AND …

Kopper King Hi-Country RV Park McCrae Petro Takhini Gas Yukon College Bookstore


84

Yukon News

Clayton Robert

Wilson

October 12, 1960 - November 4, 2013

Clayton passed away at Ogilvie Camp, Dempster Highway, at the age of 53.

He is survived by wife, Chere; children Melissa (Jake), Michael (Melissa) and Jason; mother Gail Wilson; sister Cheryl Wilson (John) and brother Bradley Wilson (Tammy); three grandchildren, numerous aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Predeceased by first wife, Staria, and father, Bill.

Services for Clayton Wilson will be held December 7 at 2:00 p.m., St. Paul’s Anglican Church, Dawson City; Reverend Laurie Munro officiating. Reception to follow at the Downtown Hotel Conference Room.

WHITEHORSE PHOTOGRAHPY club is hosting a 3-day workshop led by renowned Yellowknife photographer , Dave Brosha, Dec 6-8. Info at: whitehorsephotoclub.ca HOLISTIC HEALTH Practitioners Reconnection Open House, December 18, 5:30-7:30pm at RahRah Gallery on 6th Ave. Refreshments provided.  To RSVP or more info call Tegan, 668-5180 or email ywhn99@yahoo.ca VANIER CATHOLIC Secondary School Annual Pancake Breakfast, Tuesday, December 10 7:00am to 10:00am, $5/plate, $20/family. Come and enjoy breakfast with your family. Proceeds to Share the Spirit fundraiser CHRISTMAS CRAFT Fair at the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre. Come enjoy First Nations crafts and contemporary art on Saturday December 7th from 9:00am-4:00pm. For more info call 456-5322 WHITEHORSE G E N E R A L Hospital Women's Auxiliary monthly meeting & Christmas Party: Mon. Dec. 9th, 7:30 p.m. at WGH. Guests are welcome!  Info: Barb @667-2087 RIVERDALE BAPTIST Church, celebrate Advent and Christmas, Dec. 8th: Children's program @ 10:30 a.m., Dec. 15th: Choir presentation @ 10:30 a.m., Dec. 24th Christmas Eve services @ 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. HORAIRE PISTE Chilkoot/Log Cabin: Multi-usage tous les jours sauf du 6 au 8 et du 27 au 29 décembre : activités non motorisées. 867-667-3910 YRTA (YUKON Retired Teachers) Breakfast Tues. Dec. 10th, 9:30 a.m. at Ricky's. Info: 667-2644 YRTA (YUKON Retired Teachers) Christmas Luncheon, Thurs. Dec. 12th, 11:30 a.m. at Westmark Whitehorse. Info: Jean @ 668-3483

Alexander (Alex) Tooshie McBride was born in Calgary, AB on May 18, 1943. Alex suddenly passed away on November 27, 2013 at the age of 70 at the Whitehorse General Hospital. Over the years, Alex answered to many different versions of his name; Dad, Grandpa Al, Al, Alex, Uncle Al and around Whitehorse and in the bars was commonly referred to as “Honest Al”. Alex graduated from Vernon Senior High School. After high school he applied to the R.C.M.P. at age 18, enlisted at age 19, and was in the force for 12 years. Following his R.C.M.P. career, he became a truck driver for different companies over the next 39 years throughout BC, Yukon and Northwest Territories; White Pass, Yukon Alaska Transport and North of 60 and up to very present Lynden Transport Ltd, hauling ore, freight or fuel on the Klondike Highway. As well he hauled logs for O’Hashi Bros. and he hauled lumber and wood chips for R.V. Schmidt Bros. both companies out of Lumby, BC.

“Yet it isn’t the gold that I’m wanting So much as just finding the gold. It’s the great, big, broad land ‘way up yonder, It’s the forests where silence has lease; It’s the beauty that thrills me with wonder, It’s the stillness that fills me with peace.” Al was a free-spirit taking interest in adventures, hiking, gold mining, fishing, hunting, horseback riding, watching the SK Roughriders and following NHL Hockey (especially Don Cherry and Ron MacLean) .... and he also enjoyed an occasional trip to the bar! Al was a hobby gold miner and took a keen interest in the daily stock market.

As a Dad and a brother, Al was always excited to entertain family members that joined him up north and depending on the time of year he was sure to include Rendezvous, Yukon Quest, Burwash Landing, Dawson Creek, and Haines Junction to name a few.

He had an exceptionally strong physique amidst his short stature. There were very few that would beat him in an arm wrestle, even at his tender age of 70! Al enjoyed the simple things in life with all his heart, always living life to the fullest! Al was predeceased by: his mother Joan McBride Aug. 25, 1950 in Vernon B.C. and his father Alexander McBride Dec. 18, 1992, in Sydney, Nova Scotia, Christina Wallace (niece) in 1966, Scott Wallace (nephew) in 2011, his foster parents Lill and Will Dawe, and later Dorothea Dawe. Alex leaves to mourn his passing and celebrate his life; his son Toosh (Johnna) McBride of Yorkton, SK and their two children (Karissa and TJ), his daughter Terri McBride of Saskatoon, SK and his youngest son Robbi McBride of Prince George, BC and his four children (Tyler, Jayden, Kade and Ethan). He also leaves to mourn his older sister Sally (Ken) Isinger, of Burnaby, B.C. and their four children, Rick, Randy, Cindy, Coreene, and their families, as well as Alex’s younger sister Jo-Ann (Joe) Wallace of Lumby, B.C. and their three children, Cam, Carey-Ann, and Geneva all of Lumby, B.C. and their children. He is survived by his foster brothers Herb Crowe of Kelowna, BC and Gordon Crowe of Orcas Island, Washington, U.S.A.

As a young boy, Al was introduced to Robert Service’s poetry and was intrigued by the north-country. Just as Robert Service’s, ‘The Spell of the Yukon’ states and Al believed;

MUSIC FOR a Winter's Eve Dec 16 & 17, 7:00 pm, Yukon Arts Centre. Tickets $7. allcityband.com TAKHINI ELEMENTARY School Council regular council meeting December 10 at 7:00 PM in the school library. Everyone is welcome CHILKOOT TRAIL/LOG Cabin: Non-Motorized Weekends: Dec 6-8 & 27-29. Other weekends & weekdays: Multi-Use. For info: 867-667-3910

Services - INSULATION Upgrade your insulation & reduce your heating bills Energy North Construction Inc. (1994) for all your insulation & coating needs Cellulose & polyurethane spray foam Free estimate: 667-7414 BACKHAULS, WHITEHORSE to Alberta. Vehicles, Furniture, Personal effects etc. Daily departures, safe secure dependable transportation at affordable rates. Please call Pacific Northwest Freight Systems @ 667-2050

MC RENOVATION Construction & Renovations Laminated floor, siding, decks, tiles Kitchen, Bathroom, Doors, Windows Framing, Board, Drywall, Painting Drop Ceiling, Fences No job too small Free estimates Michael 336-0468 yt.mcr@hotmail.com THOMAS FINE CARPENTRY • construction • renovation • finishing • cabinets • tiling • flooring • repairs • specialty woodwork • custom kitchens 867-633-3878 or cell 867-332-5531 thomasfinecarpentry@northwestel.net ANGYʼS MASSAGE Mobile Service. Therapeutic Massage & Reflexology. Angelica Ramirez Licensed Massage Therapist. 867-335-3592 or 867-668-7724 angysmassage@hotmail.com 200-26 Azure Rd Whitehorse YT, Y1A 6E1

SHARPENING SERVICES. For all your sharpening needs - quality sharpening, fair price & good service. At corner of 6th & Strickland. 667-2988 LOG CABINS & LOG HOMES Quality custom craftsmanship Using only standing dead local timber For free estimate & consultation contact: Eldorado Log Builders Inc. phone: 867.393.2452 website: www.ykloghomes.com

NORTHRIDGE BOBCAT SERVICES • Snow Plowing • Site Prep & Backfills • Driveways • Post Hole Augering • Light Land Clearing • General Bobcat Work Fast, Friendly Service 867-335-1106 BUSY BEAVERS Painting, Pruning Hauling, Snow Shovelling and General Labour Call Francois & Katherine 456-4755

13 Denver roaD in McCrae • 668-6639

Custom-cut Stone Products

HEADSTONES • KITCHENS • BUILDING STONE • AND MORE...

sid@sidrock.com

Mouchet

Father Jean-Marie 1917-2013

A vigil, celebration and prayers for

Father Jean-Marie Mouchet will be held on Monday, December 9, 2013 at 7:30 pm at Sacred Heart Cathedral, Steele Street and 4th Avenue.

As a grandfather and uncle, he was always interested in the kids’ activities and looked for phone updates as to how they were all doing. Although his trips to Saskatchewan were few, the grandkids have very fond memories of these visits with Grandpa Al. Al had the ability to light up a room with his contagious laughter! He could bring a smile to anyone’s face with the twinkle in his eye, and a firm arm around their shoulder. Al worked hard, and he played hard!

Friday, December 6, 2013

Funeral service will be on Tuesday, December 10 at 1:30 pm at Sacred Heart Cathedral. In accordance with Al’s wishes, a private family cremation committal will take place at Mt. Hoge overlooking the Donjek River at a later date.

A gathering and reception at Mount McIntyre Centre will follow the service. All are welcome to attend.


S.V.P. CARPENTRY Journey Woman Carpenter Interior/Exterior Finishing/Framing Small & Medium Jobs “Make it work and look good.” Call Susana (867) 335-5957 susanavalerap@live.com IBEX BOBCAT SERVICES “Country Residential Snow Plowing” •Post hole augering •Light landscaping •Preps & Backfills Honest & Prompt Service Amy Iles Call 667-4981 or 334-6369 TCM MAID SERVICE Reliable, Thorough & Professional Reasonable Rates References available 335-4421or 393-3868 LOG CABINS: Professional Scribe Fit log buildings at affordable rates. Contact: PF Watson, Box 40187, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 6M9 668-3632 PASCAL PAINTING CONTRACTOR PASCAL AND REGINE Residential - Commercial Ceilings, Walls Textures, Floors Spray work Excellent quality workmanship Free estimates pascalreginepainting@northwestel.net 633-6368 KLASSIC HANDYMAN SERVICES “HOME RENOVATION SPECIALIST”

Cromarty General Contracting Licenced boiler mechanic (repairs & services) Home & office renovations Bookkeeping services Residential cleaning For boiler & renovation services call 334-2701 For bookkeeping & cleaning services call 335-2702

SNOW CLEARING/REMOVAL Sidewalks, Driveways, Parking lots, Compounds Private and Commercial Properties Fast and reliable service Aurora Toolcat Services 867-334-8447

SNOW CLEARING Sidewalks, Driveways, Commercial, Residential Call Francis at Speedy Sparkle 668-6481 or cell 334-8480

LOST: GRAY purse with Philippine passport, greatly appreciated if found and drop it off at RCMP or call 336-3519 or 668-2035. Reward offered.

Business Opportunities

Looking for New Business / Clients? Advertise in The Yukon News Classifieds!

Take Advantage of our 6 month Deal... Advertise for 5 Months and

Acorn Building Construction *Bathrooms *Kitchens *Renovations Call Roland at 633-5324 or 334-1198

Get 1 MONTH OF FREE ADVERTISING

CONDO MANAGEMENT SERVICES Including reserve studies. North of 56 Property Management. 332-7444

T: 667-6285 • F: 668-3755 E: wordads@yukon-news.com

CATHWAY WATER RESOURCES We buy used hot tubs and take trade ins! come visit us today at 101B Copper Rd., Whitehorse or call 668-7208 Tired of the snow in your driveway? Let Redʼs Helping Hands shovel it for you each time it snows Reasonable rates 668-2866 (h) - 333-9958 (c)

Book Your Ad Today!

Sports Equipment OSPREY LUNA 60L hiking pack, women's size SM, lightweight, minimalist pack, hardly used, too small for owner. $275 new, asking $100, 336-2226 AVALANCHE BEACON Tracker DTS, excellent condition, easy to use, 2 avail, $130 ea. 821-6011

CUSTOM To make your ideas a reality.

Ironwork railings, gates and much more

www.ironworkyukon.com call mike morrow at 335-1888

BOBCAT AND BACKHOE SERVICES in Whitehorse, Marsh Lake, Tagish area Call Andreas 660-4813

ELECTRICIAN FOR all your jobs Large or small Licensed Electrician Call MACK N MACK ELECTRIC for a competitive quote! 867-332-7879

FOUND: SET of car keys with tab that says “Moosejaw Ford”. 667-7138

Employer wanted! Plumbing and heating technician (Journeyman Plumber/Gasfitter B, Red Seal) is looking for full-time employment in Whitehorse, available immediately. Call or text Frank at 403-827-5643

CITYLIGHT RENOS Flooring, tiling, custom closets Painting & trim, kitchens & bathrooms Fences & gates Landscaping & gardening Quality work at reasonable rates Free estimates Sean 867-332-1659 citylightrenos@gmail.com

SUBARU GURU Fix•Buy•Sell Used Subarus 30 year Journeyman Mechanic Towing available Mario 333-4585

LOST- RED wool hat with 4 chin straps on Main Street Nov. 19 or 20, sentimental value. 667-4330

WANTED: PLUMBING JOBS! Journeyman plumber can help you with your plumbing and heating projects. Contact Frank by phone or text at 403-827-5643 or email frank.herbrig@gmx.net

“SPECIALIZING IN BATHROOMS” Start to Finish • FLOORING • TILE • CARPENTRY • PAINTING • FENCING • DECKS “ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!! DON: 334-2699 don.brook@hotmail.com

TITAN DRYWALL Taping & Textured Ceilings 27 years experience Residential or Commercial No job too small Call Dave 336-3865

Lost & Found

n n

LOW COST MINI STORAGE

Now 2 locations: Porter Creek & Kulan. Onsite & offsite steel containers available for rent or sale.

Phone 633-2594 Fax 633-3915

OFFICE LOCATED BESIDE KLONDIKE WELDING, 15 MacDONALD RD., PORTER CREEK, info@lowcostministorage.ca

AL-ANON MEETINGS

DRUG PROBLEM?

CUTTING EDGE BOBCAT SERVICES •Experienced operator •Insured & WCB certified •Snow removal •Site preparation •Landscaping •Backfills •Asphalt prep work •Clean up & haul away More Info & Free Estimates 333-9560

85

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Narcotics

Anonymous

MEETINGS:

Wednesdays 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. <BYTE> Fridays 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm 4071 - 4th Ave. <Many Rivers>

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS in Whitehorse

MONDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 8:00 pm New Beginnings Group (OM,NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. TUESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 7:00 pm Juste Pour Aujourd’hui 4141B - 4th Avenue. 8:00 pm Ugly Duckling Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. WEDNESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St.. 8:00 pm Porter Crk Step Meeting (CM) Our Lady of Victory, 1607 Birch St. 8:00 pm No Puffin (CM,NS) Big Book Study Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. THURSDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Grapevine Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 6:00 pm Young People’s Meeting BYTE Office, 2-407 Ogilvie Street 7:30 pm Polar Group (OM) Seventh Day Adventist Church 1609 Birch Street (Porter Creek) FRIDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Big Book Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 1:30 pm #4 Hospital Rd. (Resource Room) 9:00 pm Whitehorse Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. SATURDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 2:30 pm Women’s Meeting (OM) Whitehorse General Hospital (room across from Emergency) 7:00 pm Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS) SUNDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 7:00 pm Marble Group Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS)

NS - No Smoking OM - open mixed, includes anyone CM - closed mixed, includes anyone with a desire to stop drinking

www.aa.org

bcyukonaa.org

AA 867-668-5878 24 HRS A DAY

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Yukon Communities & Atlin, B.C.

Beaver Creek Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Carcross Y.T. Wednesday - 7:30 p.m. Library Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Carmacks Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Dawson City Y.T.

Thursday - 8:00 p.m. New Beginners Group Richard Martin Chapel Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Saturday 7:00 p.m. Community Support Centre 1233 2nd Ave.

Destruction Bay Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Faro Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Haines Junction Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Mayo Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Old Crow Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Pelly Crossing Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Ross River Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Tagish Y.T. Monday 7:30pm Lightwalkers Group Bishop’s Cabin, end of road along California Beach Telegraph Creek B.C. Tuesday - 8:00 p.m. Soaring Eagles Sewing Centre

Teslin Y.T. Wednesday - 7:00pm Wellness Centre #4 McLeary Friday - 1:30p.m. Health Centre Watson Lake Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

contact 667-7142

Has your life been affected by someone’s drinking ???

WEDNESDAY 12:00 noon Hellaby Hall, 4th & Elliott

FRIDAY

7:00 pm Lutheran Church Basement Beginners Mtg ( 4th & Strickland ) 8:00 pm Lutheran Church Basment Regular Mtg ( 4th & Strickland )

60 Below Snow Management Commercial & Residential

Snow Removal (867) 336-3570

Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Rooftops and Sanding


86

Yukon News

Notification of Harvesting Licence Applications Pursuant to Section 18 of the Forest Resources Act, Forest Management Branch notifies the public of applications made for commercial timber harvesting. Current applications for harvesting licences are available for comment for a minimum of 30 days at www.forestry.gov.yk.ca or through the Compliance Monitoring & Inspections Office in your community. Commercial timber harvesting occurs in accordance with an approved Timber Harvest Plan that has undergone public review. These plans are available online. For more information, e-mail forestry@gov.yk.ca or phone 1-800-661-0408, ext. 3999.

CERTIFIED TECH SHOP

Heat moulded skates Skate sharpening Downhill, X-ski and Snowboard repairs and maintenance Bike maintenance and repairs Fast, thorough service

The Hougen Centre, Whitehorse, Yukon

in the Hougen Centre, 305 Main St. 668-6848

SIX WEIGHT plates, 10 lbs each. Buy all 6 for $50. 667-6472 WANTED: SOLOFLEX gym set, must be in good condition & complete. Virginia, 633-3388 TUBBS SOJOURN 25 snowshoes. Good condition. $75 obo. 633-4322 XC SKIS, 167/190/195, $25 pr. XC boots, menʼs 7/10/46, $25. XC poles 140/150, $15 pr. 311B Hanson St. eves. MENʼS BAUER skates Supreme Pro, sz 10 1/2, asking $45. 456-2051 BOWFLEX EXTREME, approx 10 yrs old, needs new rods (extra $230), first $150 takes it. 393-3638

Friday, December 6, 2013 4-BIKE HITCH bike pack, used, great shape, soft ride element 4, swings back to open trunk doorm $100. 335 1093 15M OZONE Manta snow kite, $700, 12m Ozone Manta snow kite $600, both good cond. 336-0556 SCOTT BIKE Classic Transport Bag, black , mint condition. 335-1093 E-Z CURL bar + 60 lb, 2 dumbbells 20 lb, 2 dumbbells 25 lbs, $75. 393-3754 or 334-4787 4 PAIRS of skis with harness, Rossignol Berma Shorts Volkl-Salomon head, $300. 332-6565

Livestock QUALITY YUKON MEAT Dev & Louise Hurlburt Grain-finished Hereford beef Domestic wild boar Order now for full delivery Payment plan available Samples on request 668-7218 335-5192 HORSE HAVEN HAY RANCH Dev & Louise Hurlburt Irrigated Timothy/Brome mix Small square & round bales Discounts for field pick up or delivery Straw bales also for sale 335-5192 • 668-7218 WINTER HORSE boarding/pasturing available close to Whitehorse. Excellent feed with economical prices.  Phone 334-4589 TIMOTHY/BROME MIX round bales for sale.  Irrigated quality hay, netting wrapped Delivery available Phone 334-4589

If you purchased LCD panels and/or televisions, computer monitors or laptop computers containing LCD panels, your legal rights could be affected by class action settlements. Background Class action lawsuits have been initiated in Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec alleging that, between January 1998 and December 2006, the defendants conspired to fix prices for LCD (liquid crystal display) panels and televisions, computer monitors and laptop computers containing LCD panels (“LCD products”). On May 26, 2011, the Ontario action was certified in respect of a national class on behalf of certain purchasers of LCD panels and LCD products. The defendants were granted leave to appeal certification and the appeal is pending. The plaintiff has brought a motion to amend the class definition to include all purchasers of LCD panels and LCD products during the relevant period and that motion is also pending. You are encouraged to read the long-form notice, available online at www.classaction.ca. Proposed Settlements Additional settlements have been reached with Japan Display Inc. (successor to Hitachi Displays, Ltd.) (“JDI”) on its behalf and on behalf of Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi Canada, Ltd., Hitachi America Ltd., Hitachi Electronics Devices (USA) Inc., and Innolux Corporation (successor to Chi Mei Optoelectronics Corporation) (“Innolux”). Pursuant to the settlements, JDI has agreed to pay CDN$3,150,000, and Innolux has agreed to pay CDN$10,000,000 for the benefit of settlement class members, in exchange for a full release of claims against them and their related entities relating to the pricing of LCD panels of all sizes and products containing such LCD panels. JDI and Innolux have agreed to provide cooperation to the plaintiffs in pursuing the class actions against the remaining Defendants. The settlements represent a resolution of disputed claims. JDI and Innolux do not admit any wrongdoing or liability. The class actions have been certified against JDI and Innolux for settlement purposes. Motions to approve the settlements will be heard by the Ontario Court in the City of London on January 10, 2014 at 9:00 a.m., the British Columbia Court in the City of Vancouver on January 24, 2014 at 9:00 a.m., and the Quebec Court in the City of Quebec on February 20, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. At these hearings, the Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec Courts will determine whether the settlements are fair, reasonable, and in the best interests of settlement class members. Settlement class members are entitled to file written submissions and/or appear and make submissions at the settlement approval hearings. Settlement class members who wish to exercise either of these rights must submit written submissions postmarked no later than December 31, 2013. Instructions regarding the process for making submissions are available online at www.classaction.ca. Proposed Distribution of the Settlement Funds Including prior settlements, the settlements achieved to date in the litigation total $37,623,000. At the approval hearing, the courts will be asked to approve a protocol for distribution of the settlement funds for all settlements, plus accrued interest, less court-approved legal fees, disbursements, administration expenses, and applicable taxes. A copy of the proposed distribution protocol is available at www.classaction.ca or from Class Counsel. After the approval hearings, a further notice will be distributed by mail or email and posted online at www.classaction.ca regarding the process and deadline for filing a claim. To ensure that you receive this notice, please register online at www.classaction.ca, email lcdclassaction@siskinds.com or call 1-800-461-6166 ext. 2446. Class Counsel & Legal Fees The law firms of Siskinds LLP, Camp Fiorante Matthews Mogerman and Siskinds Desmeules s.e.n.c.r.l. are class counsel. Their full contact information is available online at www.classaction.ca. Class Counsel legal fees and disbursements must be approved by the courts. Class Counsel will collectively be requesting that legal fees of up to 25% of the settlement funds, plus disbursements and applicable taxes be approved by the Courts and paid out of the JDI and Innolux settlement funds. Questions? Visit www.classaction.ca, call 1-800-461-6166 ext. 2446 or email lcdclassaction@siskinds.com

want to get involved with

the Humane Society? Become a volunteer and join the Board, walk dogs or help with a fundraiser; it all helps!

Call 633-6019 today to find out how you can become involved!

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS SPECIFIED PROCEDURES REPORT MOUNT SIMA The City is inviting proposals from interested individuals or firms for the development of a Specified Procedures Report - Mount Sima. Respondents should submit bids in writing, enclosed in an sealed envelope clearly marked "RFP 2013-00384/2 Specified Procedures Report - Mount Sima" addressed to

Manager, Financial Services City of Whitehorse 2121 Second Avenue Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 1C2 Proposals will be accepted before 4:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time Monday, December 16, 2013. Proposal documents may be picked up from the office of the Manager of Financial Services, City Hall, 2121 Second Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon, after 12:00 noon Pacific Standard Time on Monday, December 2, 2013.

Proposals will be "EVALUATED IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE CITY OF WHITEHORSE." Proposals submitted by facsimile will not be accepted or considered. All inquiries may be directed to the Director of Corporate Services at 867-334-2122 between the hours of 8:30 am and 3:00 pm Monday to Friday.

www.whitehorse.ca

YUKON PORK MEAT Cut & Wrapped Government inspected 25lb. boxes or individual order YUKON VALLEY FARM 335-4431 LOCAL FREE Range pork, no hormones, no antibiotics. Professionally cut and wrapped. 20lbs or more, $6/lb.

PubLIC TENDER PAN-TERRITORIAL HEALTHY EATING PROJECT FINAL REPORT

Project Description: The Proponent will provide the Government of Yukon Department of Health and Social Services with a final report of the activities of the pan-territorial healthy eating project. The report will collect and compile the lessons learned from the Departments of Health and Social Services in the Governments of the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon through this pan-territorial project. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is December 11, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Before November 14, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. On or after November 18, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101, 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Sidney Maddison at 867-667-5694. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Health and Social Services

GRASS-FED BEEF No hormones/antibiotics $4.50/lb hanging weight Sold by quarter, half or whole YUKON VALLEY FARM 335-4431 HAY FOR SALE Good variety of excellent quality hay 1st cut alfalfa/timothy mix (65/35%) 60-65 lb, $14.50 2nd cut alfalfa/timothy mix (90/10%) $15 Brome/timothy/orchard grass mix $14.50 Plus we have our own brome hay, $12 for 50-55 lb Oat straw bales $7 Nielsen Farms - Maureen at 333-0615 or email: yukonfarm@gmail.com

Baby & Child Items CHILDRENʼS CLOTHING in excellent condition, given freely the first & third Saturday monthly at the Church of the Nazarene, 2111 Centennial. 633-4903 KEEN NEWPORT H2 sandals, pink, kids size 12. Worn one season. Asking $20, 667-6472 WILL SEW doll clothes for your doll. phone 660-5922

Childcare CHEEKY MONKEYʼS DAYCARE Leisure on Lewes Complex A fun, educational program for your children. All food provided. Accepting enrollment in all age groups 6 months to 12 years. 334-4665

Furniture BEDFRAME ONLY, $100. 393-2275 OVAL KITCHEN table, 60 x 36, with four spindle chairs, $60. 668-5972 SMALL DESK, 3 side drawers, 30" x 16", walnut veneer, $20, office chair, blue fabric, $15, 5-shelf bookcase, 24" x 10" x 66h, walnut veneer, $20. 668-5972 SMALL DESK for sale, 2 drawers, w: 45" d:23.5" h:26.5", good condition, $20, pick up downtown. 335-1093 FREE - old a loveseat to give away, missing back cushions, Naali 336-2226 SELLING TERRACOTTA look dresser/cabinet, good cond, very heavy, pick up downtown, $30, 335-1093 TV STAND with swivel top, shelf and cupboard below, walnut veneer, 29 x 16 x 21h, $30, small wicker chair with cushion, 25 x 30h $25. 668-5972

PUbLiC TENDER AVALANCHE CONTROL YUKON 2013

Project Description: Transportation Maintenance Branch is requesting Avalanche Control and associated training along the South Klondike Highway between kilometres 24.1 and 85 Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is December 5, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Mickey Parkin at (867) 667-5456. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Highways and Public Works


CURIO DISPLAY cabinet with 3 open shelves and built in clock, walnut veneer, 14 x 9 x 60h, $30. 668-5972 DESK, HAS drawers, shelf and file cabinet, good condition, some wear in mouse area, $50. 335-1093 SOLID WOOD table with 4 chairs, extendable, great cond, $250, 393-3754 or 334-4787.

Personals ARE YOU MÉTIS? Are you registered? Would you like to be involved? There is a Yukon Metis Nation that needs your support Contact 668-6845 DRUG PROBLEM? Narcotics Anonymous meetings Wed. 7pm-8pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. BYTE Office FRI. 7pm-8:30pm 4071 - 4th Ave Many Rivers Office CITIZENS ON PATROL. Do you have concerns in your neighborhood & community? Be part of the solution! Volunteer valuable time to the C.O.P.S. program. With your eyes & ears we can help stomp out crime. Info: RCMP 867-667-5555 WHITEHORSE CURLING Club November $100 winner Annie Cable, $50 winners Jo & Dennis Hodgins, Ric Hudson, Bruce Cairns, Tracey Rumbolt, $25 winners William Slykhuis, Lennea Whitty, Sue Lancaster, Bruce Rittel, Kane Dawe, Carl Michaels, Natasha Lenko, Andrew & Mira Berdhal, Wayne Tuck, Clarence Jack, Reta Albers, Jacqueline Dillon, Elijah Stick, Pauline Livingstone, Nathan Jardine, Fran Morris, Marc Petitclere, Marc Martel, Gustav Steiner, Cathy Breaden, John Kimer, Katie Sweetman, Jenna Duncan, Pat Paslawski, Janice Lafferty.

Announcements

PUBLIc TENDER

REqUEST FOR PROPOSAl

VENTILATION UPGRADE YUKON TRANSPORTATION MUSEUM - BLDG.#1448 WHITEHORSE, YUKON

WOOD PROCESSING AT VARIOUS SITES Project Description: For the processing of wood materials at various solid waste sites throughout the Yukon Territory on an as-required basis. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is December 19, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Darrin Fredrickson at (867) 667-5195. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 7, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Rob Kelly at (867) 667-8980. Site Visit December 18, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Government Community Services

Whitehorse Duplicate

Bridge Club

Highways and Public Works

November 19, 2013

1. Mark Davey Chris Bookless 2. Harvey Brooks Andrzej Jablonski 3. Noreen McGowan - Lorraine Hoyt

Garage Sales #2 MACDONALD Rd., MacDonald Storage, Sat & Sun, Dec 7 & 8, noon - 3:00 pm,. By donation, proceeds to needy families. Joe at 334-1004. 61 FINCH Cres (Logan) Sat. Dec. 7, 1:00pm-4:00pm, new Xmas decorations & gifts (still in boxes) from Plantation, Murdochʼs Gem Shop, ladies clothing, gowns, dresses (never worn), sz 14&16

Trying to find a great local deal? You can find all the display ads in this newspaper online at our website:

www.yukon-news.com Just click on the MarkeTplace Tab and all the ads will be sorted and categorized for easy viewing. Hassle free shopping, so you can find what you need fast!

87

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Puzzle Page Answer Guide

Sudoku:

REqUEST FOR PROPOSAL

Health and Social Services

sponsored by Whitehorse Baptist Church, Friday, December 6, 7:30 pm at Mt. McIntyre Rec Centre. For info call 667-4889 or visit whbc.ca

THE LITTLEST Art & Craft Fair,

15 years of handmade and local gifts. Saturday, December 7th, 10am–5pm, 56 Carpiquet Road, Takhini North

TRAVEL BACK in time to Bethlehem for ‘One Starry Night’. Enjoy this fun interactive family event! Drop in 6-9 pm at Elijah Smith Elementary on Dec. 7th. Admission: FREE

PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW

Saturday, December 7, 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Hellaby Hall (4th & Elliott) Metal, canvas, framed and matted Prints, posters, calendars & cards

COOKIES!

SATURDAY, Dec. 7, 10am-2pm, small $6, large, $15, pies too. Whitehorse United Church, 6th & Main, 667-2989.

COUNTRY CHRISTMAS Craft Fair

STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT FOR ALCOHOL AND DRUG SERVICES

Project Description: Required to conduct an evidence-based literature review for the development of evidence-based standards, write the standards, and develop accompanying evidence-based support documents for the standards. Completion of this work is to provide support for standards implementation at the Detoxification and Treatment Services at Alcohol and Drug Services. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is January 2, 2014. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101 - 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Jocyline Gauthier at (867) 6675780. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

LADIES CHRISTMAS TEA

December 8th at Lorne Mountain Community Center, reserve a table now. 667-7083 Kakuro:

12 DAYS of Christmas Market

Tuesday Dec. 11 to Dec. 22, presented by the Fireweed Community Market Society at The Old Fire Hall. Opening day Noon-9pm, Sat-Wed 10am-7pm, Thur-Fri 10am-9pm

ARTFUL THINGS Christmas Market

Crossword:

Saturday, Dec. 14th at the Westmark Hotel, 201 Wood Street, 10am-4pm, featuring 12 local bakers, artists and craftspeople. Everyone is welcome!

YUKON BIRD ORNAMENT SERIES by Rosemary Piper for collecting or gifting. Available at 120 Industrial Rd Yukon Artists @ Work Gallery 11am-5pm daily 668-5776

YUKON ARTISTS at Work Christmas Craft Sale daily 11am-5pm, 120 Industrial Word Scramble A: Cavity B: Novel C: Wooden

Road, Whitehorse


88

Yukon News

Friday, December 6, 2013

Where can you get a dependable work truck in Whitehorse? The Place for REALLY Tough Trucks

Supply is limited.

This YEAR

Outland Firebowl

with LID (#73842 and #83155) (regular $192.90 combined)

$

169.95

- CSA approved outdoor gas fireplace - Made from galvanized steel - Safe to use during most campfire bans - Lightweight and easy to carry

FRASERWAY.com

put SOMETHING from Fraserway under the tree(s)

Gift Certificate Stocking Stuffers available in any amount.

- Burns clean and smokeless - All weather use - 58,000 BTU - One year manufacturer's warranty

9039 Quartz Road (across the road from Kal-Tire)

The Place for REALLY Tough Stuff

Mon Mon -- Fri Fri 8:30 8:30 -- 5:00 5:00 // Closed Closed Saturday Saturday && Sunday Sunday

Toll Free: 1-866-269-2783

Yukon News, December 06, 2013  

December 06, 2013 edition of the Yukon News

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