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A change made by the manufacturer of specialized fire fighting equipment will cost the district nearly $200,000.

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Wednesday, November 27, 2013

SPCA wants deer cull off the table Animal activists urge Oak Bay to reconsider deadly decision Christopher Sun News staff

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Festive fiddler Max Hollmann, 3, on plays along while Daniel Lapp performs on stage at the Oak Bay Light up Sunday evening.

Thief takes warm opportunity C

old weather left an opportunity for crime last week. A resident of Foul Bay Road left his minivan unlocked and running to warm it up at 7:30 in the morning on Nov. 24 and when he next looked out of his house, the van was gone. As the owner was reporting his

van stolen, Saanich police received a report of a single vehicle crash on Cedar Hill Cross Road. Sure enough, said police, the stolen van from Oak Bay was involved in the Saanich crash. Witnesses provided a good description of the man who had

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been driving the van and had fled the scene. Around 8 a.m. a member of the Oak Bay police located a man matching the description on Shelbourne Street. The 21-year-old was arrested for the theft of the vehicle. He was later released with a court date next month.

The BCSPCA and others are demanding Oak Bay council reverse its decision to allow a deer cull in the district, saying the lethal approach will not end the problem. Two weeks ago, Oak Bay council voted five to one to sign onto the Capital Regional District’s deer management pilot project, which recommends the culling of up to 25 deer, with the meat, antlers and hooves going to the Songhees First Nations. Coun. Cairine Green was the lone dissenter and Coun. Tara Ney was absent for the vote. BCSPCA manager of wildlife services Sara Dubois said Oak Bay’s approval for a cull is “misguided” and a “knee-jerk reaction.” “We’ve heard from a lot of our supporters who are really upset Cairine Green with this deer cull,” Dubois said. “Take the cull off the table and have a conversation with deer management experts.” BCSPCA CEO Craig Daniell wrote a letter to council in late June, expressing his organization’s opposition to a deer cull in Oak Bay. The letter asked for community consultation on the issue and enforcement of local bylaws as locals are feeding deer, encouraging the animals to stick around and multiply. Dubois said deer control is under provincial jurisdiction and the province should be dealing with the issue directly. She cited a cull in the interior, where of the 25 deer killed, 11 were the wrong species. “Responding to wildlife is not something municipalities have experience in or have the support and resources to do,” Dubois said. “It’s an indiscriminate cull. … They have no sense of the deer population.” The Association for the Protection of Fur Bearing Animals is also against the cull and has launched a letter writing campaign on its website, directing the public to voice their opposition to Oak Bay council. Please see: Public safety put before lives, Page A2

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A2 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 27, 2013- OAK

BAY NEWS

come & see who is new at Oak Bay Fire Fighters Jon Popham, left, and Kyle Beaumont do rooftop drills from the aerial ladder outside the firehall. The SCBA equipment the firefighters are wearing will soon be discontinued by the manufacturer.

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Fire dept needs $195,000 for replacement Christopher Sun News staff

The self contained breathing apparatuses (SCBA) the Oak Bay fire department currently uses are being discontinued and replacing them will cost an estimated $195,000. Fire chief Dave Cockle broke the news to council at the committee of the whole meeting on Monday. He received a letter last month from manufacturer, Mine Safety Association (MSA), saying they will stop producing the MSA 3000 series, which Oak Bay

uses. Other fire departments affected include Langford and CFB Esquimalt. SCBA equipment allows firefighters to breath in smoky conditions, making it mandatory firefighting equipment. “Our department has used (the MSA 3000 equipment) since 1983 and in 2014 they will become obsolete,” Cockle said. “This means it will be difficult to get parts.” Cockle said replacing the entire SCBA equipment is an opportunity for the fire department to have the same equipment other departments in the Mutual Aid Agreement are using. Saanich, Victoria and Esquimalt are in the agreement and they use a brand made by Scott Safety.

Cockle expects the tender price to be lower than his estimate. Council directed staff to prepare the 2014 fire department budget to include replacing the SCBA equipment and to allocate up to $45,000 from the 2013 reserve to partially fund the purchase. The rest will be funded through a lease purchase plan through the Municipal Finance Authority. Coun. Kevin Murdoch said the district should look at replacing the equipment immediately as there is some value in the current equipment, which can be sold. “If we delay, it will cost more,” Murdoch said. The purchase is subject to budget approval next spring. reporter@vicnews.com

Oak Bay Ave becomes United Way Oak Bay Avenue is being renamed “United Way” for two hours today (Nov. 27) as Monterey Middle school and Oak Bay High students encourage patrons and citizens to show their support for the charity. In the area between Wilmot and Monterey avenues from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. students will be manning information booths along the street to bring awareness to United Way’s All That Kids Can Be impact area – providing opportunities to children and youth in the community to help them grow, learn and build a bright future. Mayor Nils Jensen and Oak Bay councillors will join the activities by becoming agents of change

for United Way and serving tea to residents. Together with United Way staff and students, Jensen will also walk the United Way road while thanking local businesses for running United Way workplace campaigns. As the largest non-government funder in the region, United Way has invested more than $140 million to build a strong community since 1937. Last year more than 20,000 children and youth used more than 50 United Way funded programs related to school readiness, school achievement and a successful transition to adulthood and the workforce. editor@oakbaynews.com

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Public safety put before lives to vaccinate animals with the drug. Local biologist Rick Page is also xecutive a proponent for director Lesley SpayVac. He said Fox said culls the culling of deer do not work. requires trapping “You kill 25 the animal and then in Oak Bay and 25 from stunning it in the Saanich will just walk head with a bolt in,” Fox said. “This is a gun, which does total waste of taxpayer not instantly kill the money. Redirect the animal. money being spent on “After they get the cull to help those knocked out with specific homeowners a bolt gun, their who are complaining.” throats are slit,” Page Fox said the province said. “They are killed is to blame for deer by bleeding out. … overpopulation, The deer will be put as it allowed the on a plastic sled to indiscriminate killing of bleed out on instead wolves, creating the deer of the ground.” imbalance. She said this Page also said cull will stain Oak Bay’s female deer have reputation. proven to be “It sends a bad territorial in urban message to the surroundings, which community, that animals makes SpayVac a are disposable,” Fox better option. said. “Part of being a “They essentially Canadian, and being on Devon MacKenzie/News staff the island, is being able Biologist and president of SpayVac for Wildlife Inc. and TerraMar Environmental keep the other does out,” Page said. to share (your space) Research Mark Fraker prepares a syringe of medication. “It’s the bucks that with a variety of species travel.” and deer is one of them, can prevent pregnancy for up to six years. Mayor Nils Jensen said Oak Bay and the like it or not. The life expectancy of deer is typically Capital Regional District have worked on “This is nature, we are part of it and we seven to eight years. a deer management plan for two years. He live with it.” The drug costs $200 per dose and The association’s mandate is to protect approval must be granted by Health Canada has personally met with various groups and individuals over the years to find a fur bearing animals such as fox and mink, and the province’s wildlife veterinarian. however the increasing number of deer While the approval process is cumbersome, non-lethal solution to dealing with the deer problem and all alternatives have been culls in the province is concerning its Fraker said it’s not impossible. explored, which is why council finally made members. “I have experience with the paperwork, the decision to allow a cull. “We are really scared this is going to be a it’s not bad,” Fraker said, explaining it “It’s not a decision we have pattern,” Fox said. “What’s next? Coyotes, would take six months to get “It sends a taken lightly,” Jensen said. “We raccoons and maybe the year after that all necessary permits in place had countless meetings on Canada geese?” or sooner if an emergency bad message to have this issue.” Fox was in talks with a number of groups application is made. “Any vet, Jensen said SpayVac was and people about spaying deer with a under the veterinarian act in the the community, vaccine called SpayVac. Her organization province, has the authority to that animals are something he was very interested in, but it’s an was exploring the idea of donating $50,000 sign a one page piece of paper to disposable.” experimental drug that would toward spaying, if it meant no cull. However, get the drug for emergency use - Lesley Fox be used in conjunction with she said there are other avenues that and the federal government will a research proposal that residents can take to remove deer from release it.” needs funding, something that has not their property. The Association for Fur The drug is considered experimental as it materialized. Bearing Animals, BCSPCA, DeerSafe and has not been widely used. However, Fraker “I don’t think there is enough science Friends of Animals have put together a has used it in the United States and locally, behind SpayVac,” Jensen said, adding that booklet that will be distributed in Oak Bay at CFB Esquimalt and Maple Ridge, with council’s biggest concern is public safety, to teach people how to live with deer. positive results. which needs to be addressed now. “(In Maple Ridge) there were 10 females “I heard a story about a child who came and they had 12 (fawns). Five years down Is spaying the answer? very close to being trampled on by deer. I the road after they were treated, there have heard of dogs almost getting trampled was only one born instead of 60,” Fraker Mark Fraker is a biologist and president on. Recently I heard of a cyclist who was said. “These are typical results. That was a of SpayVac for Wildlife Inc. and TerraMar struck by a deer and knocked off his bike,” 50-times reduction in fawns being born.” Environmental Research, based in Sidney. Jensen said. “Our (council’s) responsibility The best time to vaccinate deer in Oak He said SpayVac was originally developed at is to deal with those issues in a fair and Bay would be in the late summer and early Dalhousie University for the Department of reasonable manner and that’s what we are fall, when there is shortage of food, likely Fisheries and Ocean to spay seal. doing.” when the cull would take place as well. Fraker modified the drug, which is Jensen also said a deer cull is just one of Fraker does not earn royalties from derived from pig protein, so it can be used many things that will be used to manage the SpayVac sales as it’s owned by a on deer, wild horses and elephants. The deer population. pharmaceutical company. He earns his drug is a vaccine injected into the animal reporter@vicnews.com income as a consultant and on contracts and preliminary tests have shown that it Continued from Page A1

E

www.vicnews.com • A3

Deer cull opponents target mayor’s home Christopher Sun News staff

A rally against the deer cull in Oak Bay on Saturday ended in Mayor Nils Jensen’s front yard. However, he wasn’t home. The rally, organized by DeerSafe Victoria, was meant to draw attention and opposition to the district’s decision to allow the culling of up to 25 deer as part of a deer management pilot project being managed by the Capital Regional District. However, Jensen said there is a time and place for dialogue and his home is not one them. “They have been provided with an appropriate public forum for them to express their concerns,” Jensen said. “I have met with them numerously as a group and individually. It’s not appropriate to come to my home and disturb my neighbours.” The mayor said he understands the deer cull is a sensitive issue and as an elected public official, he accepts that he will be confronted by residents on how he votes and runs the district. But a line was crossed on Saturday that should not be repeated, he said. “My neighbours and family did not sign up for that,” Jensen said. “One of the protesters had to be shooed off my neighbour’s property.” The original itinerary for the DeerSafe rally, according to a press release, was for protesters to meet at noon on the grass of the “Welcome to Oak Bay” sign. The group then planned to walk along Oak Bay Avenue to municipal hall. The release also stated Oak Bay residents have come forward to offer their property for the clover traps to be used to capture deer, something Jensen has heard but can’t confirm. “Throughout the CRD, private property owners have volunteered their property for the deer cull,” Jensen said, adding this has been happening over the past two years. “I have not been told where, just in general that the CRD has properties where they may be able to conduct the capture.” reporter@vicnews.com


A4 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - OAK

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Murray Rankin functions at a pace most people would find exhausting, but he likes it that way. For the past year, the Victoria MP has clocked near-weekly flights between Ottawa and his constituency for everything from early morning committee meetings to Question Period to party fundraisers. “I’ve learned to live with permanent jet lag,” he said between a packed-house pension forum with NDP leader Tom Mulcair in Cook Street Village and a stop at the Youth Addressing Local Poverty conference at St. Michaels University school last Friday.

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seen his legal expertise and encyclopedic knowledge help him rise quickly in the NDP caucus. He’s opposition critic for national revenue and pensions, a member of the federal finance committee and an architect of the NDP’s targeted querying that has breathed new life into Question Period. “One of the great keys to success is preparation,” he said. “If finance committee meets at 9 a.m. in Ottawa, I get up at the equivalent of 4 a.m. (PST). But you have to be sharp and prepare.” Locally, Rankin has been surprised by the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder suffered by many military officers as he continues work done by former Victoria MP Denise Savoie to improve federal veteran

assistance. “The whole issue is something i didn’t know much about before taking this job. The government is fighting people who are hoping to get pension benefits, giving them lump sum payments rather than ongoing benefits,” he said. Over the next few months, Rankin will join Mulcair for a cross-country pensions tour to tout plans to overhaul the Canada Pension Plan, a “core plank” of the NDP’s 2015 election campaign. “This isn’t the Canada I grew up in,” he said. “We’re leaving a massive economic, environmental and social debt on the backs of the next generation. We’re going to change that.” While Rankin wouldn’t confirm whether the B.C. NDP have approached him as a leadership candidate (he was considered a prime candidate in 2003 before Carole James assumed the role), he has no plans to leave federal office in the foreseeable future. “I was just elected a year ago. I’m not going anywhere,” he said. “I’m thrilled with how well we’re doing and proud to be a part of such a dynamic caucus.” dpalmer@vicnews.com

What do you think? Give us your comments by email: editor@ oakbaynews.com. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification.

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 27, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A5



Resident asks for blasting ban Christopher Sun News staff

An Oak Bay homeowner wants blasting banned in residential areas after his home sustained damage last year. Peter Ehlers told Oak Bay council how extensive blasting across his back lane at 1221 and 1231 Victoria Ave. last year caused cracks in the wall and damage to doors in his almost century-old home, and that the blasting company refused compensation. “I would like you to essentially ban explosives in

residential neighbourhoods,” Ehlers told council. “My experience has been absolutely horrendous. The only option someone like me has, is to spend a significant amount of money (to upgrade my home) but for what? I didn’t create this problem.” Ehlers’s experience was triggered again when he heard about his neighbour’s plans to blow up bedrock to build a new house, located north of his. John Young owns two, sideby-side properties on Roslyn Road. He plans to construct a new, two storey single-family

A lone oak

A few people at the meeting also raised concerns regarding the need to remove a Garry Oak tree on the property. The tree is considered to be in poor shape. The property however, has a number of other trees that will be protected, the owner said. “I might be said to be a poor candidate to be kept, but I would like to be kept,” said David Godfrey, comparing himself to the tree that’s in poor shape. “I have seen architecture featuring trees. Architecture built around and showcasing the trees.” John Armitage spoke in favour of the development, but against the tree removal. “They need each other for support,” Armitage said, regarding the poor and healthy trees. “I support, in principle, this process but not at the expense of the tree. The tree didn’t ask for this.” At least one council member sided with Young when it comes to the tree. “One tree? I don’t really have an issue with that,” said Coun. Kevin Murdoch.

home with a basement. “I am very concerned with blasting, I own (a home) next door, “ Young said. “The blasting will be on a smaller scale than what we experienced a year-and-a-half ago.” David Godfrey, who lives on King Road, mentioned an alternative called expanding grout. “I understand that you drill holes into the bedrock and put this cement type substance in and in 24 hours it expands and your hear this popping noise.” Building and planning director Roy Thomassen said expanding grout isn’t the solution to get rid of bedrock on all properties. He said low impact blasting with more holes drilled and fewer charges is another alternative, however, it is time consuming and expensive. “I don’t know if it’s reasonable to have no blasting at all,” Thomassen said. “The Oak Bay Hotel wouldn’t have happened if they weren’t allowed to blast three storeys. Expanding grout on a three storey building would be a little difficult.” Council directed Thomassen to look at alternatives before it decides on Young’s development proposal. reporter@vicnews.com

HomeFinder launches in Friday's paper

The Greater Victoria real estate market can be tricky to navigate for home buyers and sellers alike. With this Friday's editions (Nov. 29), Black Press unveils HomeFinder, a must-read for insights into the process of buying and

selling homes in the Capital Region. We'll have stories featuring local people and go beyond the facts and figures and provide interesting points of view. HomeFinder, Find a Place to Call Home. For more information on how to get involved, contact Oliver Sommer at 250-480-3274.

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A letter to Santa could win a prize Kids! Send us your letter to Santa and we’ll publish it in a special letter to Santa keepsake edition and enter you to win a special prize, before we send it to the North Pole. To participate, write your letter and decorate it with hand

drawn pictures and make sure to colour it. Colour will catch Santa’s attention and will standout when in the newspaper. Once you’re done, go online and visit vicnews.com/contests and upload your picture letter by Dec. 1. Ask a grown up to

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Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - OAK

Each time Karen Hauser’s cancer returns, she readies herself for the hair loss, cracked skin and emotional turmoil that inevitably follows. “You feel like you’re losing your womanhood somehow,” said Hauser, who was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 1988. “There are so many times with cancer when it’s all encompassing, it takes your whole personality away.” While she was accustomed to sterile medical procedures, the stigma of undressing in front of other people led to isolation and a loss of self-confidence. “It’s hard to know how to present yourself when you’ve lost your hair from radiation,” she said. It wasn’t until a friend told Hauser about oncology esthetics, spas that cater to cancer patients, that she booked a massage for the first time in 25 years. “Initially, I thought thank goodness you don’t have to explain yourself when you get to the spa,” she said. “You’re surrounded by people who know what’s going on. If your towel falls open or you want a head massage, it’s not a big deal.” As more than 186,000 Canadians are diagnosed with cancer every year, cancerrelated beauty and self-care industries are growing rapidly. The Spa Magnolia has been offering oncology esthetics to mostly women since May, and the business is already seeing about 20 clients per month, said owner Paula Veenema. “Massage and facial is what we book most frequently, simply because touch just feels so good after undergoing cancer therapy,” she said. “A lot of what we see is severely dehydrated, very sensitive skin.” Certification involves training in the effects of chemotherapy

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Oncology esthetician Drew Flanagan demonstrates a spa technique on fellow worker Amanda Grey at Spa Magnolia on Courtney Street. and radiation on the body, massage techniques and sensitivity training. There are around 10 certified oncology estheticians in B.C. including the Sapphire Day Spa and AVEDA Institute in Victoria. The practice isn’t openly endorsed by the Canadian Cancer Society, but self-care activities like massage are an “extremely important of the cancer journey,” said Dr. Sandra Kruecki, director of Information and Support with the Canadian Cancer Society. “We welcome services that provide respite, relaxation and self-care to cancer patients and their families,” Kruecki said. The American Cancer Society is also beginning to promote self-care with its new Look Good, Feel Better campaign, an online guide that provides beauty, skin and nail care tips for men, women and teens. The program aims to improve

The Corporation of the District of Oak Bay

SNOW CLEARING REGULATIONS Oak Bay residents are advised that in the event of a snowfall, the provisions of Oak Bay’s Streets and Traffic Bylaw require the owners, occupiers or lessees of lands or premises abutting any sidewalk in the Municipality, to keep the sidewalks free of snow or ice. You are encouraged to use alternatives to salt (such as sand, high nitrate fertilizers or calcium chloride) which do not corrode concrete. Thank you for your cooperation. Loranne Hilton Municipal Clerk

self-esteem and quality of life during cancer treatment. Veenema intentionally keeps treatment costs for cancer patients about 20 per cent lower than normal spa treatments, and said she’d like to see the service more readily available to the 838,000 Canadians with cancer. “We’d love to talk to anyone going through treatment and work something out,” Veenema said. “We’d hate to think this is out of reach for someone who needs it.” Hauser plans to book another massage soon to get her mind off a pending reconstructive surgery. “There are so many younger women now that cancer is affecting,” she said. “Being at the spa, you completely forget everything except being a princess for an hour or two. It really should be mandatory.” dpalmer@vicnews.com

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www.vicnews.com • A7



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United Way leader among the honourees at National Philanthropy Day gala Don Descoteau News staff

Rebecca Grant can still remember her first employer's advice on how to connect with her community: get involved with the chamber of commerce and donate to the United Way. That was 40 years ago and Grant, now an associate professor of information technologies at the University of Victoria's Gustavson School of Business, maintains both connections today. Anyone involved at the campaign level with United Way of Greater Victoria likely knows at least a little of Grant's legacy with the organization. Since 2002 she has served in various capacities, acting as Capital Region campaign chair in 2008 and as a campaign cabinet member since. Talking about her motivation to volunteer for United Way and other local charitable and business organizations, she said anyone can be self-focused if they choose. “But we’re all part of a community and as an indiRebecca Grant vidual, your quality of life is only as good as the community around you,” she said. Grant was among honourees at the Fairmont Empress Hotel recently at a National Philanthropy Day celebration, earning the outstanding fundraiser award. She recalled with a chuckle being invited to lunch in 2002 to talk about how UVic might expand its United Way campaign. “One of the things I quickly realized is there really is no such thing as a free lunch. The next thing I knew I was the workplace leadership chair for UVic.” Among the other winners on the night, local businessman and former Second World War POW Rudi Hoenson was honoured with the Generosity of Spirit award for his significant personal donations of money, time and leadership over the years to various causes, mostly health care-related. The Independent Order of Odd Fellows received the Outstanding Philanthropic Service Club Award for supporting those in need, with a focus on children, seniors and a multitude of health-based charities. The Mustard Seed food bank and B.C. Cancer Agency are two frequent beneficiaries of Odd Fellows’ efforts. The Reynolds secondary Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock fundraising team collected the Youth in Philanthropy award for its ongoing work to collect money for pediatric cancer initiatives. For 2013, the Reynolds campaign recently surpassed the $100,000 mark, bringing the nine-year total for the school to more than $470,000. Taking this year’s Corporate Citizenship Award was Coastal Community Credit Union. ddescoteau@vicnews.com

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A8 • www.vicnews.com

OAK BAYNEWS

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - OAK

EDITORIAL

BAY NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Laura Lavin Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The OAK BAY NEWS is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-480-3239 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Cull protesters crossed the line While no vandalism was reported from a weekend deer cull protest in Oak Bay, the fact the group changed course and chose to protest at Mayor Nils Jensen’s home reminded us of two other instances of people taking their fight to political leaders’ homes. Three years ago, vandals invaded Victoria Mayor Dean Fortin’s yard and spray painted his home and car, in retaliation for the city’s crackdown on camping on Harris Green along Pandora Avenue. More recently, demonstrators opposing the province’s liquid natural gas plans set up a mock three-metre fracking rig on Premier Christy Clark’s front lawn in Vancouver. Jensen wasn’t home when the marching protesters gathered at his residence, but what if he had been? Would be have been accosted at his front door? In a community the size of Oak Bay, it’s not unusual for people to know where the mayor lives. In some areas, people know their mayor well enough to visit them at home with questions, suggestions or criticisms. In general, however, most mayors serve as such when presiding over council or representing their municipality in an official or semi-official capacity. They, like any publicly elected official, have an expectation that their privacy will be respected in the relatively few hours they spend at home with their families. People who choose to voice strong opposition on issues they are passionate about must be free to do so. But making issues personal and seemingly ignoring the fact regulatory and other decisions are made by groups of people, not individuals, crosses the line of appropriateness for public protest. In 2011, residents upset with a development in Oak Bay made a show of confronting then mayor Christopher Causton at the municipal hall. Causton promised a town hall meeting and delivered on his promise to further air out residents’ grievances. That scenario illustrated that when protesters make a point in the right forum, they can be more clearly heard. Not doing so reduces their credibility and only works to cheapen their message. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@oakbaynews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The OAK BAY NEWS is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009

Carbon neutral scheme is sinking such nefarious activities as heating Two days after Energy Minister their schools. But now the money Bill Bennett announced the demise goes into a “Carbon Neutral Capital of the Pacific Carbon Trust, Program,” and districts the public accounts have to apply to get their committee convened at money back for emissionthe legislature to pound reducing projects. a few more nails into This is going so well, its carbon-sequestering according to Bennett, that coffin. post-secondary institutions Assistant Auditor and health authorities will General Morris Sydor be converted to a similar was there to defend his program in the years report from last March ahead. that concluded the B.C. How is that school government was not Tom Fletcher program going? Here are “carbon neutral” in 2010, B.C. Views some examples. because the trust paid The Coast Mountains $6 million for hastily School District around Terrace paid arranged offset projects that were $66,452 for carbon offsets last year. not valid. It got back most of its three years An Encana Corp. gas flaring of offset payments as a grant to reduction project at Fort Nelson complete a boiler upgrade for its and a forest preserve in the Kitimat high school. Kootenays would have proceeded Abbotsford and Nanaimo school without assistance from $25 a tonne districts each have to pay about carbon fee imposed on hospitals, $100,000 a year. They got money universities, colleges and until last back for school boiler upgrades as year, school districts. In fact they well, although local school officials did proceed without this subsidy. say that would not likely have been The government continues to deny the top priority for spending, if it this, but not many people outside the international carbon offset sales hadn’t been for the program that forces districts to spend grants racket believe them. immediately on emission reduction. The Pacific Carbon Trust’s Surrey school district paid functions will continue, Bennett out $585,000 last year, and also said. Instead of a board of directors upgraded boilers. and 18 staff, five people headed Vancouver’s pitch this year was by an assistant deputy minister for three electric cars. will evaluate projects and bestow Leaving aside the distortion of millions taken from college, spending priorities caused by this university and health authority restrictive tax-and-spend scheme, budgets each year. what happens when they run out B.C.’s school districts are still of boilers to upgrade? And has paying $5 million a year to offset

it occurred to the government’s “carbon neutral” braintrust that those new boilers are still burning natural gas? This program is about to be foisted onto universities and hospitals. Does anyone actually believe that heating hospitals and college classrooms is a key driver of global warming? Presumably our carbon czars know that 40 per cent of B.C.’s human-generated greenhouse gas emissions are from transportation, and a few electric cars for school district staff aren’t going to change that. At this rate, it won’t take long for colleges and hospitals to modernize all their boilers and upgrade their insulation. In hindsight, this “carbon neutral government” scheme is perhaps the worst single idea implemented in 12 years of B.C. Liberal government. Gordon Campbell’s grand vision of a province where government sets the green standard and the private sector economy follows has simply not worked. The NDP presented a motion in April 2012 to relieve hospitals, colleges and universities of their carbon offset obligation. The idea was supported by a B.C. Liberal backbencher, who argued that B.C. should also scrap the carbon tax and quit pretending it can change the climate. His name? Bill Bennett. Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalNews.com Twitter:@tomfletcherbc E-mail: tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Does anyone believe heating hospitals, colleges is driving global warming?’


OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 27, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A9



LETTERS Out of town visitors dismayed Council has brutal view by Oak Bay deer cull plan We recently returned from a very enjoyable vacation on Vancouver Island spending time in Victoria and the wonderful community of Oak Bay, visiting the marina and the beaches as well as shopping on Oak Bay Avenue. As we hope to return, we try to keep abreast of the area news by reading the Oak Bay News online. It was a shock to us when we read that the district of

Oak Bay is planning to kill deer in the area. We saw deer and found them beautiful and after reading that story, all of our love for your wonderful community changed instantly. How can such a pleasant town think that by killing innocent animals it will not go unnoticed? Furthermore research showed us that the so-called humane euthanization is not at all what is proposed.

It is horrible and I feel for the deer as well as what I presume to be the majority of residents who enjoyed them as we did. This was our second trip to Vancouver Island but now we are really wondering if we will come again to what is called Beautiful British Columbia. We have written to the mayor but as yet we have had no reply. Marie and Arnold Hemet Montreal, Que.

Mayor should set an example I, like many others in the community, am terribly saddened by Oak Bay council’s decision to kill some deer in Oak Bay. I have heard the reasons (car accidents, injuries and of course, the biggest is gardens) but do you think it is right to just kill these innocent animals for those reasons? It seems that in today’s changing world people in authority feel that the easiest solution is a cull. Be they

rabbits, deer or beavers. Soon there will be no wildlife left anywhere. Out of curiosity when was the last time you saw a frog, a butterfly or a dragonfly? When I was a child growing up here, my parents would take me to Bowker Creek and Willows Beach and we saw plenty. Pesticides and culls seem to be the answer, the easy answer. The mayor is a leader of

this community and not a follower.  If he starts the cull he will be just a follower. Instead, he should become a leader. Show the province and the country and even the world that we can live in harmony with wildlife. Set an example. Set a legacy. I truly hope you reconsider. The people of Oak Bay are waiting, as is the world. Janet McLaren Oak Bay

Cull is inhumane It is obvious that our mayor does not understand the difference between humane and brutal. He states the deer will be culled humanely but it will be just the opposite. These animals will be killed in a most brutal and horrific way. I refer readers to the DeerSafe Victoria web site for a description of this “humane” slaughter. Warning, the content is very disturbing. Many animal groups, political leaders and the SPCA oppose this means and no animal nor human deserves to die in this manner. William Jesse Oak Bay

Seek solutions While I do not deny that there may be safety problems for both deer and residents of Oak Bay, I must agree with several recent letter writers who pointed out that 25 fewer deer will make very little difference. I also feel strongly that every citizen of Oak Bay should educate themselves on the clover net and bolt method of culling, which I believe has been approved by council. This method of killing the deer is inhumane and horrible to think about. Personally I must believe there are other solutions, and I plan to do my own research and inform council of other options available to them. If readers have similar concerns, I urge them to contact council as soon as possible. Pamela Slyth Oak Bay

“Animals touch our lives in many ways. We have a choice to harm, hurt and encounter them with disregard, or we can honour their existence by protecting and appreciating them….We share the earth with every creature, be it a snake, butterfly, vulture or kitten. After all, it is their world too.” This quote is from Michael Kaufman, former director of education, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Elected members of the municipality of Oak Bay have chosen to harm, hurt and encounter deer with disregard. Every one of these elected officials, who voted to kill deer for doing what comes naturally to their species, ie. trying to survive, should be charged with cruelty to animals and should be punished accordingly. What an unevolved and brutal point of view. Lia Fraser Victoria

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. Send your letters to: Mail: Letters to the Editor, Oak Bay News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 Email: editor@oakbaynews.com

www.vicnews.com A fresh face means a fresh opinion

Jack Lowther photo

Deer are causing controversy in Oak Bay.

Taxpayers deserve better Oak Bay taxpayers do not deserve the presence of garden-ravaging deer on their properties.  Nor do they deserve the presence of an incompetent, ineffectual council. Deer are here. With deer here, can cougars be far behind? The only way to get rid of responsibilities is to discharge them. Jack Lowther Oak Bay

Please join us in welcoming Michael Bacon, Financial Planner, Investment & Retirement Planning to the Oak Bay Branch. Michael has an in-depth understanding of the markets and can put a customized financial plan in place to help you meet your financial goals. To receive a fresh opinion on your financial future, call Michael today. Michael Bacon Financial Planner, Investment & Retirement Planning Tel. : 250-405-2003 michael.bacon@bmo.com

Financial Planners, Investment & Retirement Planning are representatives of BMO Investments Inc., a financial services firm and a separate legal entity from Bank of Montreal. ® Registered trade-marks of Bank of Montreal, used under licence.


ONLINE mondaymag.com

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Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - OAK

victoria’s ultimate get out guide

Vaudeville enters the

Canary Club

NATALIE NORTH

arts@mondaymag.com

W

ine bottles and chairs have been hurtled at the stage. The director was once pummelled with firm tomatoes. And then there are those nights when someone in the audience thinks they’re the stars of the show and continually yell out at the performers. An Atomic Vaudeville cabaret is definitely not a night at the Belfry, but the company has proven prowess with that, too. “There’s certainly no fourth wall,” said Atomic Vaudeville’s artistic producer Britt Small of their seasonal cabarets at the Victoria Event Centre. “The audience is the last piece of the performance. The audience is complicit in the performance, and the audience can not only turn on you in a second, but they can take over.” For 10 years Small, along with AV cofounder and director Jacob Richmond – who survived the ill-conceived tomato assault during his never-ending rendition of the Star Spangled Banner – have been redefining a night of theatre for Victoria audiences. Their shows have taught twisted after school special-style lessons, hosted by the likes of Ronald McDonald, Death, Sid Vicious and Osama Bin Laden and have featured the

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work of some 300 artists was interesting to us.” from the theatre, sketch To get audiences acquainted with the and improv communities. project – and to generate some funds Small and Richmond’s initial for development with a playwright, hope for the company? To Atomic Vaudeville is hosting a roaring create work for themselves ‘20s-themed speakeasy Nov. 28, from 7 in Victoria. Like any new to 11pm. The evening features perforundertaking, its longevity mances by Schaefer, along with a line up wasn’t expected. of company regulars. Dubbed the Canary “When the shows started Club Speakeasy, Rifflandia Headquarters to take off and the audience (1501 Douglas) will go Gatsby-era glam started to dig the show, for an evening of cocktails, catering, and a that’s what made us keep chance to win uniquely Atomic Vaudeville doing it, because all of a prizes, such as dinner with Small and sudden it didn’t feel like it Richmond or singing telegrams from Hank was our show anymore, it and Lily. was our community’s show Tickets, $50, are available at ticketrockSUPPLIED PHOTO and we had a responsibility et.org and include a year-long memberPaul Shortt, left, and Chris Gabel perform in Atomic Vaudeville’s to keep doing it,” Small said. Halloween cabaret. ship to the Atomic Vaudeville Society. “In our community, which “The show has taught me a lot about is relatively small, it feels theatre,” Small said. “It’s been interesting similar path to Ride the Cyclone, an awardlike a great gathering place. People from all training ground for our company and thinkwinning musical which toured the country different companies come and work with ing about what theatre is. A lot of people earlier this year. each other. Sometimes people meet at our said it’s not real theatre. What do you “The idea that’s explored is that of the shows and decide they want to do a project mean? It’s the most real theatre in a way. lonely crowd,” Small said. “A waiting room together. It’s kind of a great lab, where crebeing a place with people in transition, wait- It’s completely live and completely engages ative energies meet and spin off into other its audience. ... For me now, when someing to be somewhere else. It can be a place things.” thing unexpected happens on stage, it’s a where there are a lot of people, but those Their latest undertaking, an original gift because then you can riff off of it and people are rarely a community. Especially production inspired by the music of singerthe audience loves it because they know being on the Island, it does have such a songwriter Anne Schaefer and her latest community feel because of the size and rela- it’s happening in the moment and it’s very release, The Waiting Room, is following a spontaneous.” tive isolation – the idea of the lonely crowd

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www.vicnews.com • A11

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 27, 2013

MONDAY’S TOP PICKS

VOTE

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that. Until Dec. 8. Tickets, $25 - $40 at 250-385-6815 or tickets.belfry.bc.ca.

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sTage WeD. Nov. 27

EvEnts Thurs. Nov. 28 The canary club speakeasyAtomic Vaudeville is at it again, fundraising to support the development of their next original production, inspired by the music of Victoria singer-songwriter Anne Schaefer. Hosted by Monday’s own Mike Delamont, with Anne Schaefer, Brooke Maxwell, Kelly Hudson and more. Tickets, $50, at ticketrocket. org. From 7 to 11pm at Rifflandia Headquarters, 1501 Douglas.

Fri. Nov. 29 Fashion in acTion - The Out of Hand artisan fair is celebrating their 25th anniversary with Fashion in Action, a show featuring fashions available at the fair. Christmas classics will be on the turntable while ballerinas from Ballet Victoria parade down the runway. Proceeds to benefit Ballet Victoria. At 7pm, Crystal Garden. $8/25.

suN. Dec. 1 Merry and brighT- Intrepid Theatre’s annual fundraiser includes a live and silent auction, tastings and cocktail catering from Zambri’s. Raise a glass with the casts of Pick of the Fringe winners Grim and An Improvised Quentin Tarantino and bid on one of a kind experiences. Cash raised supports festivals, venues and programming. Tickets, $40, at

Thurs. Nov. 28

grease - Victoria High school student musical theatre jumps aboard the grease lightning for four nights. Runs 7:30pm nightly, with a 2pm Saturday matinee. Until Nov. 30 Tickets, $10/8 at the door (1260 Grant). heroes - Three First World War Heroes are under siege as overbearing nuns and relentless repetition of days have them plotting one more escape. The character study of camaraderie and hope runs nightly at 8pm, except for Sundays and Mondays at Langham Court Theatre until Nov. 30. Tickets, $16-21, at langhamtheatre.ca.

2 For Tea - The sold out 2013 Victoria Fringe hit returns as James and Jamesy lure audiences into their delightfully bizarre world of innocence and endearing chemistry. Tickets, $20 at the door or 250-5906291. Until Nov. 30 at the Metro (1411 Quadra).

The collecTed Works oF billy The kid-The most notorious and mythical ghost from the American Midwest frontier is brought to life through the words of Michael Ondaatje at Theatre Inconnu (1923 Fernwood). Until Dec. 14. Tickets, $14/9 at ticketrocket.org. a Tender Thing - Imagine a remix of the greatest love story ever told: a Romeo and Juliet where the young lovers grow old together. Ben Power’s adaptation of William Shakespeare’s masterpiece does just

Fri. Nov. 29 JiM byrnes - Blues musician/actor, Jim Byrnes stops by The Charlie White Theatre (2243 Beacon) in Sidney. 7:30pm. Tickets, $37.50, 250-656-0275. marywinspear.ca.

Fri. Nov. 29

ActivE

eddie izzard - See the guy John Cleese calls the funniest man in England on his world tour, Force Majeure. Until Nov. 30 at the Royal theatre. Tickets, $71.25. rmts.bc.ca.

suN. Dec. 1

music

True WesT - Sam Shepard’s searing black comedy about sibling rivalry kicks off Blue Bridge Repertory Theatre’s season in its new home at the Roxy Theatre (2657 Quadra). Until Dec. 8. Tickets, $26.25-42. 250-3854462. bluebridgetheatre.ca.

mess of foot percussion, and a very greasy Telecaster comes to Lucky Bar, 517 Yates at 8pm. Tickets, $15 advance, ticketweb.ca.

Thurs. Nov. 28 kelby Macnayr QuinTeT cd release - Join MacNayr for two incendiary nights of jazz featuring Phil Dwyer, Daniel Lapp, Miles Black and Tom Wakeling Nov. 28 and 29 at Hermann’s Jazz Club (753 View). Tickets, $18/20, 8pm. The sTanFields - The Stanfields hit the Strathcona Hotel’s games room for a Movember “fun-rasier,” a by-donation acoustic performance with The Town Heroes at 9pm. Check the guys out the following evening for a full electric show at 7pm at club 9ONE9. Tickets, $18 advance at the Strath (919 Douglas). The harpoonisT and The axe Murderer - A sweaty fling between a sack full of harmonicas, a

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Words WeD. Nov. 27 sTuarT Mclean - Canada’s ultimate storyteller and creator of The Vinyl Cafe, rolls into town for two annual Christmas shows at the Royal Theatre. This year he brings the Juno-Award-winning harmonies of The Good Lovelies. Until Nov. 28. rmts.bc.ca

Thurs. Nov. 28 Jane and The Whales - Caitlin Press presents the launch of Andrea Routley’s collection of short stories, Jane and the Whales, with live music from Auto Jansz and Jonny Miller.

From 7:30 to 9pm at Gorge-ous Coffee, 103-300 Gorge. sTories by The glass - Ian Case, David Radford and Dave Morris offer an intimate evening of drinks and stories onstage in a completely off-thecuff one-time-only show, a fundraiser for the fourth annual Victoria Spoken Word Festival. At 7;30pm, Intrepid Theatre Club, 1609 Blanshard. Tickets, $25, ticketrocket.org.

GAllEriEs sandra Meigs: The baseMenT panoraMas- The Victoria artist went underground to study the invisible foundations of buildings: basements and crawl spaces. She found the overlooked, catch-all spaces surprisingly intimate and exploits that quality in her large-scale work. Until Dec. 14 at Open Space (510 Fort). Wish lisT: polychroMe Fine arT’s 2013 WinTer group exhibiTion - Polychrome offers a panoply of artistic delights: paintings, photography, sculpture, and drawing by an epic list of local artists. Until Dec. 24 at Polychrome Fine Art (977-A Fort Street).

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A12 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - OAK

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 27, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A13



Watch for pop-up shops to flourish this Christmas season Mobile game company Now through Dec. 8, special The idea of pop-up retail shops Christmas trees will be displayed is not new. The concept of setting moving beyond tiny containing ornaments with up short-term spaces to expose seniors’ names and gift requests. new customers to one’s products Gaming industry entrepreneurs Pick a name, purchase the gift or reduce stock has seen success Alex Mendelev, Chris Hoefgen and return it unwrapped to the in local shopping malls, and on and Jamie Toghill are hoping store. Trees are at Walmart at a larger scale in cities like New a major influx of local cash will Uptown and West Shore Town York and Los help turn their startup TinyMob Vintage After Angeles. Games into a growing concern in Death proprietors Centre, Forbes Pharmacy on Goldstream Avenue, Progressive Abbey the free-to-play strategy games Abbey Riddell, Chiropractic at 207-1595 Riddell and market for mobile devices. left, and Arunima McKenzie Ave. and Home Arunima Adrian Pereira, Don Wharton, McNeish stand Instead, 222-1595 McKenzie Ave. McNeish, a Elton Pereira and Myron Pereira in front of a Fan pair of young of local tech firm Pareto Logic Tan Alley gate women were among the investors who marking the Names in the news who have provided the trio with more $2 address of their in biz and community developed a million in seed funding for the pop-up vintage following for new venture, which expects clothing store. The Peter B. Gustavson School their vintage to release its first game next The women took of Business at the University of Don Descoteau clothing spring. TinyMob’s founders, a short-term Victoria has a new executiveBiz Beat ideas at local each a veteran of the industry, lease to test the in-residence, international vintage fairs announced their company is now retail waters. entrepreneur and corporate and other shows, are testing the hiring. See tinymobgames.com. executive Blair Hagkull. He Don Descoteau/ News staff pop-up waters downtown for the is also on the school’s’ newly month of December with Vintage established international advisory Fort Street merchants After Death. board. Stores can help send a stuffed Care is spearheading a program “It’s become more popular, with celebrating early Send your business news to bear to a good home, through the to provide Christmas gifts for the economy leaving storefronts ddescoteau@vicnews.com annual Share-a-Bear campaign. isolated and low-income seniors. Retailers along lower Fort more (available),” says Riddell, Buy twin teddies for $11 at Street in Victoria are banding who also operates Bikram Yoga any local store and leave together for an old fashioned BC Grown Saanich. The pair will work in the Christmas evening. Festive Fort one behind to be sent to a tiny former jewelry store on the happens tomorrow (Nov. 28) from community charity helping Pandora Avenue edge of Fan Tan families in need. The 5 to 8 p.m. and features candle-lit Alley. “Landlords have become campaign is going on at all streets, carolers, featured in-store more open to accept short-term 195 stores in B.C. until just specials and chances to “Win the leases,” Riddell says. before Christmas. Window” at 795 Fort St. Vintage A.D. will stock men’s   pricing in effect Nov 27 - Dec 4 while quantities last and women’s vintage clothing, Teddy bear sales Isolated seniors /lb locally owned & operated vintage knick-knacks and at B.C. Liquor Stores given some cheer Certified Organic Locally Grown figurines. today’s produce co “I’m excited about creating an Customers at B.C. Liquor Home Instead Senior Large Bananas unt atmosphere where Cauliflower people can chill and play dress-up,” /lb McNeish says. She likes the idea of having BC Grown Locally Grown Locally Grown fun with fashion and Braeburn Apples Kiwi Leeks bringing art back into the way people dress. Ken Kelly, executive /lb /lb /lb director of the California Grown First of the Season Downtown Victoria California Grown /lb California Cantaloupe Business Association, Raspb erries Navel Oranges says one of the keys 170 g to a successful pop-up business is opening up /lb where there is a heavy traffic flow. 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A14 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - OAK

Donate your spare change All proceeds going to The Salvation Army Stan Hagen Center for Families Our newspapers collect change, convert it to dollars and donate funds to this year’s chosen children’s charity.

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Donate Here: • Black Press 818 Broughton St. • Frontrunners 1200 Vancouver St. • Frontrunners 123-755 Goldstream Ave. • Quality Cobbler 140-2945 Jacklin Rd. • Corona Foods 2155 Sooke Rd. • Dodds Furniture 715 Finlayson St. • Heirloom Linens 777 Royal Oak Dr. • Red Barn Market 751 Vanalman Ave. • Red Barn Market 5550 West Saanich Rd. • Red Barn Market 5325 Cordova Bay Rd. • Peppers Foods 3829 Cadboro Bay Rd. • Oak Bay Pharmasave 2200 Oak Bay Ave. • Salon Modello 2590 Cadboro Bay Rd. • Slater’s Meats 2577 Cadboro Bay Rd. • Verico Select Mortgage 105-1497 Admirals Rd. • Verico Select Mortgage Westshore 3212 Jacklin Rd. • Verico Select Mortgage 1925 Oak Bay Ave. • Verico Select Mortgage 110-4460 Chatterton Way • Brick Langford 500-2945 Jacklin Rd. • Capital Iron 1900 Store St. • 4 Cats Art Studio 2279 Bowker Ave. • Western Foods 772 Goldstream Ave. • Standard Furniture 758 Cloverdale Ave. • Goldstream Food Market 976 Goldstream Ave.

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Gingerbread showcase Yolanda Meijer, executive director, Habitat for Humanity Victoria, looks over one of the 23 entries in the fifth annual National Gingerbread Showcase at the Inn at Laurel Point. The event opened to the public on Nov. 23 and runs until Jan. 5. All funds raised at the event go to support Habitat for Humanity Victoria. Don Denton/News staff

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 27, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A15



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Lions hunt elusive prize Lions look to improve on silver medals at provincials Travis Paterson News staff

T

he Lambrick Park Lions AA senior girls volleyball team could prove be the best high school team in the province at any level, though they’d settle for a AA championship. This week the Lions are at the AA provincials in Surrey, co-hosted by Pacific Academy and Surrey Christian, Nov. 27 to 30. The Lions won the recent double-A Islands beating Cedar (ranked No. 4 in B.C.) in the final, 25-19, 25-11 and 25-21. “Cedar was close, they’re a good team but we played well, we had a good day and didn’t give them many options,” said Lions coach Chris Koutougos. Cedar was, in fact, one of just three teams to beat Lambrick earlier this year. Lambrick’s other losses were against Timberline in the first game of the season and to Neelin from Manitoba in the final of the UBC tournament in September. The Lions rode the season as B.C.’s top-ranked AA team. Along the way they’ve defeated No. 1-ranked AAA and AAAA teams and won the

Vic Lindal Cup crossover city championship for AA, AAA and AAAA teams. But there is no crossover tournament beyond the city championship. The Lions are stacked with a mix of volleyball specialists and elite athletes who’ve crossed over from baseball. There is leadership from graduating captain Emilie Wong, who’s been with the senior team since she was in Grade 9 and was part of its silver medal wins at provincials in 2010 and 2011. There is height, particularly on the left side with 6-foot-tall powerhitting sisters Thana Fayad, in Grade 10, and Shimen Fayad, a Grade 12 student with a scholarship waiting at Wichita State. (Both are provincial team players.) And there are all-around athletes, with Emma Entzminger at libero (she of the national baseball team and who is also one of B.C.’s most dangerous high school strikers when she laces up for the Lions senior girls soccer team) and Jasmine Strandlund, a Grade 11 who is no doubt collegebound for baseball in 2015. “It’s a highly focused and committed team looking to finish the season strong, a lot of crossover athletes who excel on the court,” Koutougos said. In particular, it has depth, with a bench full of club volleyball players who would start on most school teams.

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What exactly is astigmatism? Submitted

Lambrick Park Lions libero Emma Entzminger, left, watches as Emilie Wong bumps the ball to the setter during a game at PISE earlier this year. Entzminger has won provincial silver with the Lions volleyball team in 2011, bronze with the Lions soccer team in 2012 and silver with the basketball team in 2011 and has yet to win gold. And it has a chemistry about it, well-earned from hard work and from making the team an inclusive environment. It’s the culmination of about eight years of building a program, Koutougos said. “It’s funny because we might not have a team like this again, it’s a rare group of athletes, that’s for sure. And yet it will be a real challenge to win this

week, it takes a lot of luck and things have to go your way.” The Lions have come close. Captain Wong was with the team as a Grade 9 player in 2010 when it finished second in B.C. and was second again in 2011. Last year they fell to the bottom eight at provincials despite winning the Island championship. sports@vicnews.com

Skaters headed to Regina

Cedar Bridgewood and Ravie Ponn of Saanich Skating qualified.

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A host of local skaters have qualified to compete at the upcoming Skate Canada Challenge skating competition in Regina, Dec. 6 to 8. Two of the skaters are from the Saanich Skating Club, dance couple Ravie Ponn and Cedar Bridgewood, while six more train with the Racquet Club of Victoria Figure Skating Club. Racquet Club’s Tessa Jones and Matthew den Boer qualified for the pre-novice pairs by winning both the short and long programs with personal best scores at the BC/YT Challenge last weekend. Racquet Club’s Karlissa Lem has

partnered with Le Vu of the Juan de Fuca Skating Club in pre-novice ice dance and won the pattern dance and free dance events at the BC/YT. Part time Racquet Club skaters Sarah Kedves of Chemainus and Lucas Pallard of Nanaimo came second in the pre-novice pairs event to qualify Regina. “This is a strong group of skaters who work hard and are dedicated to achieving their goals,” said Matt Willis, Racquet Club coach and director of junior development. “I’m proud to take them to Regina.” sports@vicnews.com

The question is asked every day and astigmatism is, without doubt, one of the most misunderstood refractive disorders. Optometrists agree that astigmatism has various causes. While some theories claim it is hereditary, others state it is developmental. Both opinions are almost certainly correct. The most common form of astigmatism is due to the clear front part of the eye, the cornea, not being round. This “out of round” of the cornea causes distortion of the focussed light, which in turn causes blurred vision at all distances. An uncorrected astigmatic eye is constantly trying to improve its focus. This is tiring and can cause headaches especially during precise visual work. Most patients are surprised to learn that the majority of people have at least a small amount of astigmatism. The amount of astigmatism will determine the severity of the visual complaints. Most people can go for years without realizing that they have a problem. If one has never seen clearly, it is difficult to comprehend what clear vision truly is. Fortunately both spectacles and contact lenses can correct astigmatism, and recently, refractive surgeons have added astigmatism corrections with lasers to their services. When astigmatism is first corrected a period of adaptation and adjustment is to be expected. Objects may look distorted or slanted but clear. After a few days the strange symptoms will subside. It took the brain years to get used to the “old vision” so it will take a while for the “new vision” to settle. It is very important to correct significant astigmatism in children. They may not complain, but uncorrected astigmatism can often cause poor performance at school. Don’t forget; first eye exam by age three. A regular eye examination with the optometrist is the best way to monitor astigmatism in patients of all ages.

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A16 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - OAK

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Information Sessions will take place: Sidney Wednesday, November 27, 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm Mary Winspear Centre 2243 Beacon Ave

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Jon Howe Victoria Royals

Royals roar over Blazers Royals win streak at four games Travis Paterson News staff

Patrik Polivka is not letting his current opportunity get away. He earned a 26-save shutout in the Royals’ 5-0 win on Saturday and will likely get the start against the Tri City Americans in Kennewick on Friday night. The Victoria Royals goalie has been in net for four straight wins though he won’t take the credit, at least not all of it. “The compete level for the team has changed. They’re doing a better job in the games, they’re blocking shots, great job in the defensive zone. It’s team defence, it’s not just me,” Polivka said.

Vikes women, men cruising

The UVic Vikes men’s basketball team is ranked No. 3 in the CIS with a record of 8-0 after a 77-66 victory over the previously undefeated Winnipeg Wesmen on Saturday (Nov. 23) and 62-51 over the Manitoba Bisons on Friday at McKin-

The 19-year-old Czech import earned the majority of the starts last year and this year but when he was pulled on Nov. 6 in a 5-0 loss to the Edmonton Oil Kings, Coleman Vollrath started the next four. The Royals won three of those four and Polivka finally got back in the net against Kamloops on Tuesday (Nov. 19). The Royals won 2-1 and Polivka was named the first star for stopping 42 shots. He’s now been the first star in the past four games as the Royals (17-10-0-1) have jumped to fifth place in the Western Conference standings, four points up on the Americans. “It’s tough to take (Polvika) out of the net when he’s going like this,” said Royals head coach Dave Lowry on Monday. “The whole thing now is it doesn’t

non Gym. The Vikes women also won both games, 59-43 over the Bisons and 66-51 over the Wesman. Both Vikes visit the Trinity Western Spartans this weekend.

Jr. Rams drop out of provincials The Mount Douglas Rams junior girls volleyball and junior boys

matter for us who’s in the net ... our group is confident in each one of those guys.” While the goaltending battle is one of the easiest areas to credit during the recent winning streak there is also the matter of the Royals’ offensive explosion, popping 11 goals on the Blazers in two games this weekend. And there’s more, as 16-year-old Tyler Soy scored the first goal of the game on Tuesday and Wednesday against the Blazers and Rockets, then scored two more against the Blazers on Saturday. Meanwhile, the defence has made up for the loss of 17-year-old Joe Hicketts, who was averaging at least 30 minutes per game when he went down injured as well as 20-yearold Jordan Fransoo, who won’t be back for another four weeks. sports@vicnews.com

football teams suffered similar fates as they were knocked out of their respective provincial tournaments. The Rams volleyball team had trouble motivating themselves after winning the Island championships and went 2-2 in the round robin at provincials. They finished 11th among 24 teams. “They found their

passion and won two matches (but) lost a very close (round robin) game on Saturday,” coach Brian McKinnon said. The junior football squad, which was undefeated going into Thursday’s tilt against the Terry Fox Ravens, fell 21-16.


Oak Nov 27, 2013 27, 2013 OAK Bay BAYNews NEWS Wed, - Wednesday, November

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DID YOU KNOW? BBB Accredited Businesses contractually agree to operate by the BBB’s 8 Standards of Trust. Look for the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory Eedition on your Black Press Community Newspaper website at www.blackpress.ca. You can also go to http://vi.bbb.org/directory/ and click on the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory

THE LEMARE GROUP is accepting resumes for the following positions: •Heavy Duty Mechanics •Boom man •Chasers •Hooktenders •Grapple Yarder Operators •Off Highway Logging Truck Drivers •Hydraulic Log Loader Operators •Processor Operators •Hand Buckers •Coastal Certified Hand Fallers Fulltime camp with union rate/benefits. Please send resumes by fax to 250-956-4888 or email to office@lemare.ca.

VICTORIA FILM Festival 2014 which takes place Feb. 7-16 requires volunteers in many positions including box office, special events, decorating help. Some positions require time before the festival. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-3862269.

PERSONALS FUN, FLIRTY, Local Women! Try FREE! 18+. Call 250-2201300. Or visit online at: www.livelinks.com

LOST AND FOUND LOST: CAT, Tanner Ridge. Female “Lucy�, black with white chest, paws and stripe on face. (250)652-2122. LOST: PANDORA charm bracelet, very sentimental (present from deceased husband). Reward ($200), if found please call (250)592-5911.

TRAVEL TIMESHARE CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No risk program. Stop mortgage and maintenance Payments today. 100% money back guarantee. Free consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES GET FREE vending machines can earn $100,000.00 + per year. All cash-retire in just 3 years. Protected territories. Full details call now 1-866668-6629. www.tcvend.com MAKE A FORTUNE with $3000, we know how! Free info pack. Call (250)590-9634.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

ARE YOU 55 PLUS? Worklink is offering a funded 12 week job re-entry program for nonEI eligible applicants.

Call 250-381-1194 HELP WANTED GENERAL LABOURERS

OIL & GAS INDUSTRY GUARANTEED Job Placement

• Labourers • Tradesmen • Class 1 Drivers

Call 24Hr. Free Recorded Message 1-888-213-2854

4/0Ă–,/#!,Ă–*/"3

HOME CARE/SUPPORT PERSONALIZED & QUALITY Home Care Services available by Jan. 35yrs experience in Senior care. Call for my list of services. (250)532-3840.

TRADES, TECHNICAL AUTOBODY TECH, 3 years minimum experience required in Campbell River. Travel assistance available for out of town employees. Benefits, hourly. Call 250-287-8258. HEAVY EQUIPMENT Technicians required for work in Fort McMurray. If you are interested in a balanced schedule, competitive wages and benefits please send your resume to: hr@gladiatorequipment.com or fax to 1-780-986-7051.

VOLUNTEERS THE ALZHEIMER Society of BC is looking for a media/public relations person with communication and organizational skills to develop contacts and promote their work. Other positions available. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269. VICTORIA DISABILITY Resource Centre is recruiting Volunteer Employment Mentors to help clients with disabilities gain information and self-confidence in a field of employment interest. Requires 4 to 6 hours per month for 6 months. Other positions available. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

FINANCIAL SERVICES

FRIENDLY FRANK

FUEL/FIREWOOD

LIGHT OAK office desk, filing dr, $50.Gott garbage can, on wheels, $15. (250)656-7786.

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

PERSONAL SERVICES

Part Time Paginator

MIND BODY & SPIRIT Kripalu full body massage. Release your stress now. Over 13 years experience. Gift Certificates. Women only. Holiday special. Professional. 250-514 -6223, www.andreakober.com

The Trager Approach

is an Innovative, Gentle and Therapeutic Bodywork that Reduces Pain & Tension and supports Balance and Presence in a Relaxed Body. Rae Bilash CertiďŹ ed Trager Practitioner call for appointment 250-380-8733 www.raebilash.ca

HEALTH PRODUCTS RESTLESS LEG Syndrome & leg cramps? Fast relief In one hour. Sleep at night. Proven for over 32 years. www.allcalm.com Mon-Fri 8-4 EST 1-800-765-8660.

Black Press Community Newspapers requires a Part Time Paginator in our Victoria ofďŹ ce. DROWNING IN debt? Cut debts more than 60% & debt free in half the time! Avoid bankruptcy! Free Consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1-877-556-3500 BBB Rated A+

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

MEDICAL HEALTH

PSYCHICS

VIAGRA 100mg or CIALIS 20mg. Generic. 40 tabs + 10 Free all for $99 including Free Shipping. Discreet, Fast Shipping. 1-888-836-0780 or metromeds.net

PSYCHIC MIRACLES by Luna.com. Call and get a free reading by phone. Love money job family, restores broken relationships, solves all problems permanently. 1-866-2295072

RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Home Movies to DVD. Also, Portraiture, Baby, Family + Maternity. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

FINANCIAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

,OOKINGĂ–FORĂ–AĂ–.%7Ă–JOB XXXMPDBMXPSLDB

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

FRIENDLY FRANK 9 READER’S Digest hard cover piano books, $10/each. (250)642-6949. FOOT MASSAGER, Dr. Scholl, new $35. Massage heat pad $50. 250-721-9271. FULL AQUARIUM set with stand, 12x16x24�, filter, heater etc. $75. (250)472-2474.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

This is an entry-level position and while this is not a design position, some ad building will be required. The successful candidate will have a good knowledge of InDesign, as well as a basic knowledge of PhotoShop and Adobe Acrobat. Other skills required include a good working knowledge of either Mac or PC platform and a willingness to learn the other, the ability to be focused and to work in a fast-paced, deadline driven environment and to think independently and be a good problem solver. Additionally, the ability to learn several industry speciďŹ c software packages is a must. Candidates must be willing to work day shifts Monday to Wednesday, totaling approximately 20 hours a week. Black Press is Canada’s largest independent newspaper group with over 150 community, daily and urban papers located in BC, Alberta, Washington State, Hawaii and Ohio. To apply, please send your resume to: Loralee Smyth, Operations Manager 818 Broughton Street, Victoria BC V8W 1E4 Or email: lsmyth@blackpress.ca with Paginator in the subject line. Deadline for applications is December 6, 2013. Only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. www.blackpress.ca

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKER/ SOCIAL SERVICES As a Community Support Worker, you will be able to provide rehabilitation, support, and other forms of assistance to children, youth, and families while supporting social workers and health care professionals. Train in this rewarding career. Career Opportunities:

Child and Youth Care Worker O Women’s Shelter Worker Family Place Worker O Settlement/Newcomers Service Worker Teen Pregnancy and Parenting Support Worker

110 -

CALL VICTORIA: 250.384.8121 OR VISIT SPROTTSHAW.COM


www.vicnews.com A18 •www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, November 27, 2013, 2013 - OAK Wed, Nov 27, OakBAY Bay NEWS News

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

FURNITURE

FOR SALE BY OWNER

TWIN MATTRESS, Firm. Sears Kingsdowne Joplin. only used 3 wks with topper, so in pristine cond. Selling because at 11” thick is too high for new daybed. Sells in store for $800. See www.sears.ca for range from $449 - $800. + tax. Selling for $425. (250)380-8733. (pic is full size).

SAANICH WEST- 1246 Hastings St, 3 bdrm Rancher, 2 garage, dining/living/family rooms, 2 bath (ensuite), F/P, appls incld, new roof. Walking distance to Interurban campus. Reduced price, $460,000. Call 250-477-4600.

STEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or visit us online at: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca STEEL BUILDING. “The big year end clear out!” 20x22 $4,259. 25x24 $4,684. 30x34 $6,895. 35x36 $9,190. 40x48 $12,526. 47x70 $17,200. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

REAL ESTATE

NANAIMO WATERFRONT 2nd floor condo. 1500 sq.ft. LR/DR/2bdrms with view, den, gas FP, secure bldg. 2 underground parking spaces. Maintenance fee includes hot water/gas/landscaping. 1 pet OK. $339,900 (250)753-9123

BUYING - RENTING- SELLING

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

AUTO FINANCING

CARS

SEASONAL ACCOMMODATION

SUITES, LOWER

WANTED 1 or 2 bdrm to rent for 1 month to 6 weeks on or near waterfront in Oak Bay during May, June or July. Call Heather (250)920-9043 or email: heather ferguson01@gmail.com

ROYAL OAK- grd level 2 bdrm, newly reno’d, close to all amens, NS/NP. $950 heat & H/W incld. 250-704-6613.

TILLICUM- 2 bdrm, 1 bath. F/S. N/S. Avail Dec 1. $1000. (250)479-4779.

RECREATION

Spots available at Great Rates. Daily, weekly, monthly. Pool, Hot tub, exercise room, laundry, putting green, hiking, fishing, Pickle Ball Court. Free coffee in one of the best clubhouses on the island. Nanaimo area. www.resortonthelake.com 250-754-1975 or admin@resortonthelake.com

RENTALS

ROOMS FOR RENT

APARTMENT/CONDO

CRYSTAL POOL: 1 bdrm, full kitchen, shared bathroom, $565. NS/NP, non-drinker. Call (250)477-0686.

SAANICH: 55+ furnished 2 bdrm, balcony faces Swan Creek, 5 appls, in-suite W/D. $1200. utils incld 250-479-5437

RENTALS

HOMES FOR RENT

SHARED ACCOMMODATION NORTH NANAIMO: Attention Students/Working Professionals: fully furnished room, nice, quiet area. Own bathroom, cable, FREE WiFi, shared kitchen and laundry. N/S, N/P, no partiers. $550/mo. Avail. immediately. 250-756-9746

STORAGE

WATERFRONT. NORTH Saanich. Above grnd, large 2bdrm, 2 bath. $1800./mo + 1/2 utils. Possibly sm boat moorage +. NP/NS. (250)656-5999.

TOWNHOUSES SIDNEY 3-BDRM, 2.5 bath. 5 appl’s, gas F/P, garage, sunroom. NS/NP. $1600. + utils. Avail Nov. 15. (250)656-7456.

TRANSPORTATION ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

WANT TO rent detached garage for classic car in Oak Bay only. Call (250)598-1845.

AUTO SERVICES

LANGFORD (Mill Hill)- large, bright, quiet 1 bdrm, on bus route, parking NS/NP. Refs. $950 inclusive. (250)478-5261 MARIGOLDcozy 1 bdrm, woodstove. shared W/D, quiet. NS/NP. $850. 250-727-6217.

1966 CHEVY Pick up, 1/2 ton short box, burgundy. 3 in the tree, 6 cylinder. Good condition, runs great, comes with second set of winter tires and rims. Second owner for last 45 years, in Victoria. $6,000 obo. Call: 250-479-0441 or email: havoc@telus.net

$50 to $1000 Scrap Junk Broken Down Cars Trucks Vans

250-686-3933

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

SEND US YOUR

SIDNEY- 3 bdrm sxs duplex, 1.5 bath, NS/NP. $1375+ utils. Available now (250)656-4003.

HOMES FOR RENT

with a classified ad

FREE TOW AWAY

HEY KIDS!

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

SELL YOUR CAR... FAST!

CARS

SIDNEY- DOWNTOWN. 1400 sq ft, $1800. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 6 appls, 1 secure prking. NS/NP. Avail Now. (250)655-4184.

Bright lg Bach 1,2,3 br. Units Fully reno 5 min drive to DT Victoria Full time on site manager

1990 CHEVROLET Cavalier Z 24, 3.1 Litre. Only 70,000 km on rebuilt motor. Newer Luc High Performance clutch, 5sp trans, near new Hankook tires. Red, sun roof, mint interior, power doors/windows (new motors and regulators). Pioneer stereo w/iPod adapter, sub woofer, Pioneer 6x9 3 way speakers. Same owner since 1990, have all receipts. $3000. Chris, 250-595-0370 lv mess.

$$$ TOP CA$H PAID $$$. For ALL unwanted Vehicles, any condition. Call (250)885-1427.

SUITES, LOWER

250.388.3535

fil here please

Move in today 250-588-9799

APARTMENT/CONDOS

250.388.3535

SPACIOUS 742 sq.ft CONDO in the Wave, 705-845 Yates St. Great investment close to all amenities downtown Victoria. (250)380-6934.

RENTALS

SAXE POINT- 3 bdrm, 2 bath, brand new executive home w/ocean view & high end finishes. $2350 inclusive. Pets considered. (250)686-1513.

RV RESORT ON THE LAKE

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

RENTALS

By Sunday Midnight Dec. 1st All letters will be entered to win a special prize

SERVICE DIRECTORY 4-BDRM HOUSE, near Commonwealth Pool. N/S, N/P. $1900 + utils. (250)920-6282 or (250)361-1569.

Full contest details available at www.vicnews.com/contests

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

FENCING

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

PRESSURE WASHING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

PREPARE YOUR Lawn & garden for fall & winter. Glenwood Gardenworks. 250-474-4373.

SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601

CARPENTRY JEREMIAH’S CARPENTRY Specializing in small indoor and outdoor jobs and repairs. 20 yrs exp. Licensed, insured, registered. (250)857-1269.

ELECTRICAL (250)217-3090.ELECTRICIAN 30 yrs exp. New homes and Renos. Knob & tube replacement. Service calls. Senior’s Disc. Free est. Lic.#3003. 250-361-6193 Quality Electric Reno’s, res & comm. No job too small. Lic# 22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

GARDENING (250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK Fall clean-up, hedge & tree pruning, weed & moss repair on lawns, blackberry/ ivy removal, gutter repair/cleaning.

250-479-7950 FREE ESTIMATES • Lawn Maintenance • Landscaping • Hedge Trimming • Tree Pruning • Yard Cleanups • Gardening/Weeding • Aeration, Odd Jobs NO SURPRISES NO MESS www.hollandave.ca

250-216-9476 ACCEPTING new contracts; landscape and carpentry. BBB/Insured. Res /Comm. www.ftguland.com

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS ABBA EXTERIORS Gutter cleaning & repairs. Seniors discounts. WCB, Insured. Free estimates. (778)433-9275.

COMPLETE HOME Repairs. Suites, Renos, Carpentry, Drywall, Painting. Licensed and insured. Darren 250-217-8131.

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave- window, gutter cleaning, roof-de-moss, gutter guards, power washing. Free est.

JACK NASH, serving Victoria since 1980. We do it all! Free estimates WCB. 250-881-3886

HANDYPERSONS

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

BIG BEAR Handyman. Painting, household repairs. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071.

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

HANDYMAN- Light maintenance. Leaky taps, caulking, stain fabric/floor removal, electrical outlets & switch. Call (250)818-2709.

JUNK BOX- We Do All The Loading

HAULING AND SALVAGE

JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK.

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. BBB accredited. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

PAINTING A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. BIG BEAR Painting. Interior & Exterior. Quality work. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071 OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

PLUMBING

MOVING & STORAGE

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Moving- 2 men, 5 ton, $90/hr.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

TELEPHONE SERVICES DISCONNECTED PHONE? National Teleconnect Home Phone Service. No One Refused! Low Monthly Rate! Calling Features and Unlimited Long Distance Available. Call National Teleconnect Today! 1-866-443-4408. www.nationalteleconnect.com.

TREE SERVICES BUDDY’S TREE SERVICESTrimming, pruning, chipping, removals, hedges, lawn care, Insured. Keith, (250)474-3697.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS 250.388.3535


OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 27, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A19



VIASPORT CELEBRATES SPORTS DAY IN CANADA: NOVEMBER 30, 2013

Try a new sport for Sports Day in Canada! In the week leading up to RBC Sports Day in Canada on November 30, communities across British Columbia are hosting a variety of events for citizens to learn about and participate in a new sport. In honour of Sports Day, ViaSport wants to inspire B.C. to explore more than 60 provincial sport organizations and hundreds of clubs that deliver sport for all ages and abilities in our communities, all year round! No matter your age, skill level or where you call home, sport is your connection to friends, fun, learning and a general sense of wellness in your everyday life. There are opportunities for everyone through sport, whether you’re a beginner, advanced or adaptive athlete, a child or senior, or perhaps someone who isn’t sure where to begin. ViaSport is your easy connection to the resources you need to get started.

sportsday.cbc.ca

Play ViaSport The power of sport can invigorate communities like no other event or activity can, and ViaSport is passionately committed to the ongoing development of sport and opportunities for physical activity in every community across British Columbia. In time for Sports Day in Canada, ViaSport is launching the Play ViaSport online resource, your one-stop connection to trying out the diverse menu of sport available in British Columbia. Play ViaSport is your link to over 60 provincial sport organizations and their affiliated clubs who work together to deliver regular sport programming in communities throughout our province. What are you waiting for? Now’s your chance to Play ViaSport!

Enter to

WIN

$500 gift card! from

Go to ViaSport.ca and PRESS PLAY for more information! Your better starts here

Go to vicnews.com and click on contests… Enter to WIN one of 5 Sport Chek $500 gift cards!

RENO MEN ■

Bathrooms Flooring Tiling Fences Decks Kitchens Additions FREE Estimates ■

Garry 250-885-9487

www.reno-men.ca • Call anytime. We stand behind our work!

Start With Trust

Transcendental Meditation

®

Why Learn TM?

• TM brings balance to busy lives • Relieves anxiety and stress • Refreshes mind, body and emotions • Is easy to learn, simple to practice

250.383.9822 ~ www.meditationvictoria.org


A20 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - OAK

Est. 1962

C

ood F d o o G of rs er 50 Yea elebrating Ov

Like Us On Facebook Peppers Foods

Follow Us On Twitter @PeppersFoods

FREE Wi-Fi

BAY NEWS

JOIN US!

Sunday, December 8, 6:30-8:30 pm Cadboro Bay Village’s Annual

Caroling in the

Village

Live Music • Turkey Draw •9th, Egg2012 Nog • Candy Canes December • Hot Chocolate • Gift Baskets Raffle

6:30 - 8:30pm

ENTER OUR IN-STORE DRAW FOR A $100 PEPPER’S GIFT CARD! TWO WINNERS EVERY MONTH! Prices in effect Nov. 26 - Dec. 2, 2013

Sponsored by Island Farms

FULL SERVICE DELI Join the merchants of Cadboro Bay Village

PRODUCE

Green Onions

Kiwi Fruits

1

146

MEAT

Chicken Thighs Chicken Breast

L LOCA

per 100 g

DED NO AD NES! O M FRESH R HO

Chicken Drumsticks

276

OUR MADE INR SHOP E H C T BU

CRACKER BARREL

EXTRA LEAN

426

per lb 8.29 kg

ay Same Dry 250-477-6513 Delive

Orange Juice

220-240 g

per lb 9.39 kg

276

+ dep. 1.75 L

ROGERS

Fine Granulated or Berry Sugar

196

250 g

CLUBHOUSE

GOLDEN BOY

25%

296

QUAKER

DAN-D-PACK

1 kg

Extracts Raisins All Var.

OFF 43-125 ml Asst.

Asst.

LOCAL

2

Asst.

Salted & 216-425 g Unsalted

ISLAND FARMS

476

6

With Blue Cheese, Apples, Walnuts and White Balsamic Vinaigrette

Asst. Flav.

196

Chicken Caesar Wrap

586

per 100 g

496

8

96

800 g

Fire Logs

500

2/

Icing Sugar

150 g

FREYBE

Asst. Asst. Flav. Flav.

4 lb

96 375 ml

326

200 g

5

1 kg

2/

00

NATURAL & ORGANIC PACIFIC

Organic Soups & Bisques

2

Asst. 472-480 ml

HEARTHFIRE

CASE: 1.65 L $15.00

each

ROGERS

NEW!

Pure Maple Syrup

570 g

Kale Salad

750 g

Roasted Cashews

Instant Oatmeal

76

MADERE PEPPER’S OWN IN-STO

CRUNCHY

GROCERIES

246

UNCLE LUKE’S

Artisan Breads 3 Var.

276

Asst.

Classic Ice cream

WESTONS

Vancouver Island Wholegrain Bread 675 g

446

NEW

per 100 g

Boursin Paté

TREE RIPE

Cheese Slices

per lb 6.08 kg

Ground Beef

PORTOFINO

Mon-Fri Excluding Holidays

1

Premium Cocoa

BAKERY

376

each

120-129 g Asst.

60

per lb 6.96 kg

DED NO AD NES! FRESH O M R HO

376

per lb 4.10kg

FRYS

3

Previously Frozen Skin On

Bone-In

Pomegranates

1

396

Asst. All Var.

473 ml

DED NO AD NES! O M FRESH R HO

CALIFORNIA GROWN

86

2

76

Brought to you by the Cadboro Bay Residents Association and the Cadboro Bay Business Association. All proceeds to the Open Door and the CSPA Players.

Asian Cut Broccoli Crowns

Babybel Cheese

Halibut Fillets

316

CALIFORNIA GROWN

MINI

Light Cream

Tomato Turkey

4/ 00

DAIRY

ISLAND FARMS

O’come all ye faithful and enjoy some: Holiday Hot Chocolate, Freshly Roasted Chestnuts, Coffee, Hot Dogs, Shopping Specials, Merchant Gift Hampers, Decorated Shops, the Village Light Up and of course The Annual Pepper’s Holiday Turkey Draw.

1

1

86

and sing-a-long with Louise Rose, the Open Door Choir and the Canadian School of the Performing Arts Players.

CUDDY

Lemons Sundried

3/ 00

3/ 00 LOCAL

MEXICAN GROWN

CALIFORNIA GROWN

CHILEAN GROWN

26

OFF

SILLY COW

FILIPPO BERIO

All Natural Organic Extra Virgin Hot Chocolate Mix Olive Oil Asst.

496

480 g

250-477-6513 • 3829 Cadboro Bay Rd. www.peppers-foods.com

We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some restrictions may apply on certain promotions.

1096

500 ml

Hours Mon-Fri: 8 am–9 pm Sat: 8 am–7:30 pm Sun: 8 am–7:30 pm


Oak Bay News, November 27, 2013