Page 1

driveway way OAK BAYNEWS COME ALONG FOR THE RIDE

drivewayBC.ca

PAGE B1

AUTOMOTIVE SECTION

Friday, November 22, 2013

www.vicnews.com

y a d i l ho GIFT GU

Drive to rebuild Clive remains alive

IDE 2013

AS GIFT IDE S FER GREAT OF RS STUFFE STOCKING AY EVENTS HOLID S SAVING SPECIAL

Architects come back with lower density and reduced bicycle parking

Shopping daze

Christopher Sun News staff

A guide to get your gifting done Inside

Light Up

Santa arrives on the Ave along with music, merriment and more. Page A4

The Black Press Christmas fundraiser is underway. Make your donation at Oak Bay Pharmasave, Verico Select Mortgage or 4Cats Art Studio.

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Friggin’ with the riggin’ David Bleakney is elbow deep as he works on the rigging of his keelboat at the Royal Victoria Yacht Club. The 2.4 metre keelboat is widely used by disabled sailors in the Paralympics since the sailor does not move in the boat, and everything is adjustable from the seat.

For Everything You and Your Family Need to Live Well • FREE local prescription delivery • Blister packing service • Postal outlet

PHARMASAVE Pharmasave Oak Bay PHARMASAVE 2200 Oak Bay Avenue

• Full Service Cosmetics • Transit passes • And MUCH MORE!

®

®

(250) 598-3380 oakbaypharmasave.com

Mon - Fri: 8:30am - 8pm. Sat: 9am - 6pm. Sun: 11am - 5pm

All Advent Calendars

A public hearing on the Clive redevelopment is in the works after Oak Bay council voted four to one to move the proposal to the next stage. Two dozen people interested in the project attended Monday’s Committee of the Whole meeting where architect Gregory Damant, of Cascadia Architects, showed his latest revision to the project – the fourth iteration – located at 1510 Clive Dr. The new Clive will now have 17 rental units, down from the proposed 19, and a reduction in bicycle parking to allow increased setbacks. Owner Nicole Roberts said she felt relieved and indicated it’s time for Oak Bay to have a say on the proposal, through a public hearing. “I feel hopeful,” Roberts said after council voted. “The community and council have raised valid concerns and we worked hard to listen and to address them.” Coun. Pam Copley agreed. “A significant amount of preliminary work has been done in terms of community consultation and various revisions of the proposal the applicant has put forward,” Copley said. “Now is the time to engage the broader community in a public hearing.” Since September, the district received 39 letters regarding the Clive redevelopment with 31 opposed. At that time, council received a petition signed by 500 people against the redevelopment, along with more than 60 letters. Coun. John Herbert was the lone dissenter among council. He said the variance required for this updated proposal is still too large and he wants the setback to be further increased, especially for the east side of the proposal. The proposed exterior side setback is 2.8 metres (9.18 feet). Currently, it’s 9.14 metres (30 feet), a difference of 6.34 metres (20.8 feet). Herbert said he doesn’t believe in “spot zoning.” PLeASe See: Council encouraged to enhance village, Page A5

50%F

Danson Multi & Clear

LED 50’s Lights

OF

EARN POINT S & SAVE !

ON SALE

$ Select Christmas Cards

149H9 EAC

Reg. $19.99

EARN POIN TS & SAVE! See stor e for details .


A2 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, November 22, 2013- OAK

BAY NEWS

Langford Furniture Park has been SOLD!

e r to s e m o H e r u it n r u F y le Sandy’s Furniture and Ash

THE

! R E V E R O F LC OSING ever seen ON NOW s ha d an isl e th LE SA UT EO OS CL RE ITU LARGEST FURN

FINAL

! E V A S O T E C N A H C T This is your LAUSP TO 70% OFF MARKDOWADNE!S lstery Fabric and Leather Upho Rooms • Home Office, ly es mi ori Fa • ss s ce om Ac & Ro s ing • Liv oms • Area Rugs • Lamp • Bedrooms • Dining Ro

1 . C E D !! P R A H S M P 5 DOORS CLOSE

HAVE BEEN M

UP TO 70% OFF

Final Markdowns Have Been Made! This Is Your Last Chance To Save! st Closing Forever December1 ! ★

977 Langford Parkway, Victoria 250 391 0033

Rona

Hwy #1

WestShore Mall

Langford Parkway

Jacklin Rd

Nanaimo

Veterans Memorial Parkway Victoria

975 Langford Parkway, Victoria 250 391 6646

www.largest furniture sale.com


www.vicnews.com • A3

OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, November 22, 2013

Oak Bay skater to represent B.C.

A

manda Wright can’t get “Amanda is really enough of the ice. She trains as a figure smart and a great skater six days a week skater, which is why and on the one day she she’s coming along.” has off – the Oak Bay teen doesn’t want to get out of bed in the morning. - Jamie McGrigor Yet, when she has an early skate time, they have about 900,000 Wright’s up and ready to glide. people in the province,” Even at school, the 17-year-old McGrigor said. “B.C. has 4.6 thinks about what she will do when million and can only send she hits the rink again. four. With that focus, it’s no surprise “It’s crazy competitive Wright will represent B.C. in the Skate here.” Canada Challenge on Dec. 4 and 5 Wright’s mother and in Regina. She is the first Vancouver uncle were both figure Island-based figure skaters when they were skater in seven younger, which may have years to make it influenced her passion for through in a singles the sport. Both her parents discipline. If she work full-time so it’s her cracks the top 18 in grandmother who drives Regina, Wright gets her to every practice. an invite to compete “Except on Thursdays at Skate Canada’s because that’s when she junior National curls,” Wright said with a Championships laugh. in Ottawa, next Christopher Sun Besides school and January. Reporting skating, Wright also dances The selfand squeezes in a social life proclaimed which includes a younger perfectionist says she’s surprised by sister who isn’t into figure her success, citing her performance skating but is into team at provincial sectional championships sports – a concept Wright in Richmond earlier this month. can’t understand. “I had a not so good short program. “My big thing with skating I came in eighth,” Wright said. “But it is, I am a perfectionist. And was very close, 1.7 (points) behind it’s just me if I mess up,” third. So I did not have a lot to make Wright said. “On a team, if up for.” someone else messes up, I In the long program, she didn’t fall, don’t think I can handle it. but “stepped out” while landing a If it’s me, fine, I messed up. triple toe. Thinking she would finish But someone else? No.” in fifth, she watched one-by-one as Wright’s skating goal other skaters, who she perceived as is to master all the triple being better than her, hit the rink. jumps. She can currently She ended up placing fourth overall land the triple toe, but she snaring the final spot to represent is working on mastering the B.C. triple loop, flip, and lutz. “I couldn’t believe it,” Wright said. Next year, because of “I almost started crying.” her age, she enters a new Born in Oak Bay, the teen started category where she will skating at age two. By five she was have a shot at international figure skating, but then moved to Kelowna, where she didn’t skate as Sharon Tiffin/News staff competition. The Grade 12 student is much. She moved back to Oak Bay Figure skater Amanda Wright, practicing at the Oak Bay Recreation Centre, will compete at the set to graduate next June with her family when she was 10 Skate Canada Challenge in Regina, Sask. in early December. and her career goal is to be and started feeling a passion for the an orthodontist. told on the rink. old,” McGrigor said. “Five versus 11, sport. She plans to keep skating. Competition is fierce when trying to that’s six years of development and Jamie McGrigor started coaching “It makes me so sad to think that I have represent your province, McGrigor said. making sure everything is perfected. Wright when she was 11. He calls her to quit someday,” Wright said. “I hope Amanda is really smart and a great skater, Each province can only send four skaters dedication and hard work impressive. to go to school and compete next year. I to the Skate Canada Challenge, which which is why she’s coming along.” “Usually when we get kids when they think I’ll be able to do it. he said gives some provinces unfair He added that Wright is the perfect are 11 or 12, they are usually pretty “I know I can.” figure skater to coach. She comes in early, advantage. limited because so much development reporter@vicnews.com “Nova Scotia can send four skaters, but wanting to skate and she does what she’s stuff happens prior to being eight-years-

T heCelebration

n o s a Se Here! is

2 to 200, we can accomodate you! Specials & Christmas menus available.

We’ll do all the work.

and

Kid Friendly! Contact johnmacdonald@vicpubco.ca

2228 oak bay avenue 250.370.9008


A4 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, November 22, 2013 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Here comes Santa You better watch out, you better not cry, you better not pout, I’m telling you why...

Santa Claus is coming to Saanich... December starts with a visit from Santa at the Tillicum Centre, Pearkes Arena and Silver City Victoria on Sunday, December 1st. Free holiday activities start with a movie at Silver City from 10:00 to 11:30 am, followed by a skate with the Junior Braves and concludes with Christmas crafts at Tillicum Centre from 1:30 to 2:30 pm. Please bring a nonperishable food item to the Skate at Pearkes. Celebrate the season at the Saanich Municipal Hall with a festive lights display and activities from 5:00 to 8:30pm. The Deck the Hall – Winter Lights Festival on Saturday, December 7 features Children’s Christmas Concerts, photos with Santa, horse and carriage rides, seasonal entertainment, food and refreshments. Admission is Free. Saanich Commonwealth Place welcomes Santa for a pancake breakfast on Saturday, December 14 from 9:00 - 11:30 am. Enjoy carols and crafts and bring your camera to capture all the fun. Register in person only at Saanich Commonwealth Place to pick your table. Adult admission $10, Children $8.50.

The Chisel Toe in Crazy Horse Brown also available in Rustic Brown

That’s what people say. The only problem with Blundstone boots is that they never seem to wear out. Oh, people try. But after a few years of kicking the bejeez out of them,they’re more comfortable than ever and still going strong. Expensive? Nope, they get cheaper by the day.

S

anta is coming to Oak Bay Village on Sunday, just in time for Light Up at 5 p.m. However, the Christmas festival season kicks off earlier at 2 p.m. with plenty of family-oriented events. The fun continues after the thousands of colourful lights, strung on buildings, lamp posts and trees are lit, with live music and dance entertainment. Grab your scarf, toque, mitts and perhaps some hot chocolate and enjoy the afternoon and evening in the village. Here is a taste of what will be going on:

All day Face painting, giant board games, roving magician, trucks from the Truck Light Convoy, Canada Post collecting letters to Santa, craft booths showing kids how to create a mini-door swag.

The Cobbler 718 View Street 250 386-3741

At Your Service

Deepening into the Heart of Winter with Jenn Rankin

SUNDAY Dec. 1st

Gentle yoga practice with a short meditation & acupuncture treatment. $50

2 - 5 pm

Ajna Yoga Studio 2185 Theatre Lane (behind Starbucks)

www.ajnayoga.ca 250-812-8355 • Your Pure pharmacist does complimentary medication reviews • Free prescription deliveries

YOGA for DEPRESSION Thursday 1:30 - 2:45 pm

First Class Free!

• Seniors receive 10% front store items • Free blister packing (medication management system)

Pure Pharmacy Unit 101 1990 Fort St www.purepharmacyvictoria.com

P: 250 590 8799 F: 250 590 8798

Studio at 2185 Theatre Lane (behind Starbucks)

www.ajnayoga.ca 250-812-8355

Interested in advertising here?

www.saanichrec.ca

LIFE includes YOU! Call 250-475-5407

At YourService

Contact Dianne McKerrell

250.858.9189

10 classes for only $39 Call Brenda 250-598-0830 Henderson, Oak Bay and Monterey Rec. Centres For new customers only. Expires Dec. 31st, 2013 real Results

jazzercise.com

facebook.com/oakbayjazzercise

2 p.m. SportBall’s bouncy castle. Street hockey for ages two to 10 years old. Let’s Play Wheelchairs. An opportunity for kids to discover playing sports from the perspective of a wheelchair athlete. 3 p.m. Musical entertainment begins. BC Fiddle Orchestra and the Joy of Life choir, fiddler Daniel Lapp and the Balken Babes, The Swingin’ Shepherds featuring Danuel Tate, Rick May, Matt Pease, Dave Flellow, Nick LaRiviere. 5 p.m. Light Up countdown by Bill Murphy-Dyson, animated performance of the Twelve Days of Christmas with audience participation, Santa Claus arrives and then poses for pictures at Athlone Travel. After Light Up, a hiphop, winter-themed dance performance by Vibestreet.

Other events: Dec. 5, 10th annual Art on the Avenue Gallery Walk and Ottavio Tasting Evening takes place 6 to 8 pm. Dec. 7, Island Equipment Owners Association Truck Light Convoy. Music, food and entertainment starts at 5 p.m. on the front lawn of Oak Bay Municipal Hall. Food donations will be collected for The Mustard Seed. New this year, Oak Bay Village will stay open on Thursdays and Fridays in December for latenight shopping. For more information go to visitoakbayvillage.ca. reporter@vicnews.com


OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, November 22, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A5



Oak Bay athlete Stanford all-star Get ready to recycle Christopher Sun

Travis Paterson

The kitchen scraps recycling program is part of a Capital Regional District’s mandate to ban all organic waste from going to the landfill by 2015. The ban is expected to divert 30 per cent of all waste currently going into the landfill. More information about the kitchen scraps collection program can be found at oakbay. ca or by calling public works at 250-598-4501. reporter@vicnews.com

News staff

News staff

National team field hockey player Maddie Secco of Oak Bay has been named to the conference and regional allstar teams for her part in the Stanford Cardinals exceptional National Collegiate Athletic Association Div. 1 season. On Tuesday Secco was named to the All-Region Second Team by regional members of the National Field Hockey Coaches Association. Secco is one of four Stanford players to be named to the All-Region First and Second teams. It’s the first All-Region award for Secco, who was named to the 2013 NorPac West All-Conference and NorPac All-Tournament teams last week. One of Stanford’s best stickhandlers, Secco helped run the team’s powerful offence, which outscored opponents 57-19 this season. Secco brings in the award despite having missed three of the team’s 21 games to compete with Team Canada at the Pan American Cup this fall, helping Canada win

New, green curbside kitchen scrap recycling bins and catchers are being rolled into driveways as early as next week, but collection won’t start until January. The district received the bins and catchers earlier than expected, so they will be delivered to people’s homes immediately instead of in December.

Operated by the Non-Profit Glenshiel Housing Society

Affordable Living for Independent Seniors

Karen Ambrose Hickey photo

Oak Bay’s Maddie Secco, playing for the Stanford Cardinals, in an NCCA exhibition game vs Michigan State in September. bronze. Stanford finished the season 16-5 and won its fifth consecutive NorPac West

regular season title and appeared in its eighth straight NorPac Championship final. sports@vicnews.com

Council encouraged to ‘enhance’ village Continued from Page A1

“We change things all the time, but they are not huge changes and it’s not for massive buildings,” Herbert said, before the vote. “I think this would set a precedent.” Mayor Nils Jensen disagreed and said spot zoning has its place in the community, citing examples such as Carlton House and Shannon Oaks. He was originally against the construction of Carlton House, but he thinks people need to view things from a historical perspective. “I had concerns with the Carlton House because of how it could have impacted the neighbours on Chaucer Street,”

Jensen said. “In retrospect, the neighbourhood has learned to accept and appreciate the Carlton House. We need to learn from that experience.” Adrian Blunt lives in one of the units at the current Clive and used to own a heritage home in Oak Bay. He spoke in favour of the redevelopment. “(The proposed new Clive) is an example of what Oak Bay should look like in the future,” Blunt said, adding density needs to be increased within the village. “Enhance the village instead of restraining it.” Former councillor Hazel Braithwaite was one of the 500 people who signed the petition against the redevelopment.

She addressed council, telling them they should respect and represent the view of the majority. “The units have to be livable, I truly agree with that, but you have to address that the building has to be acceptable to the (community) as well,” Braithwaite said. “I am surprised it got to this stage to be honest. You will see residents out in force to discuss this and I look forward to it.” District staff will now proceed to bylaw preparation and draft permits and variances. A public hearing will be scheduled, likely in the new year. Details of the new proposal can be viewed at theclive.ca. reporter@vicnews.com

• All inclusive monthly rates start at $1,100 • 3 home cooked meals daily • Daily housekeeping • 24 hour security • Many social activities

HAVE THE CITY AT YOUR FRONT DOOR

Call 250-383-4164 to arrange a tour

606 Douglas St. • www.theglenshiel.bc.ca

Saanich Walk-In Denture Clinic Walk-In Denture Clinic WHY WAIT?WE WECAN CANHELP HELP NOW! NOW! WHY WAIT? • FREE Adjustments Home & Hospital Visits Happiness is is Happiness beautifulsmile! smile! aa beautiful

ConradDe DePalma Palma Conrad Denturist Denturist (250) (250)595-1665 595-1665

h

3581Shelbourne ShelbourneStreet Street 3581 www.walk-indentureclinic.ca www.walk-indentureclinic.ca COMECOME ON INON FOR IN YOUR FOR

FREE CONSULTATION! FREE CONSULTATION! YOUR

HEY KIDS!

SEND US YOUR

LETTERS TO SANTA By Sunday Midnight Dec. 1st All letters will be entered to win a special prize Your community newspaper will publish a special letter to Santa keepsake edition December 11.

EN

DI

SC

I OR

THUNDERBIRD S

T

S

“Our Family Serving Your Family since 1974”

OU

N

INSURANCE BROKERS LTD.

250-385-9795

FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION

• Scan your picture and enter it online at www.vicnews.com/contests • Please include a hand drawn picture in colour • All letters will be forwarded to Santa Claus at the North Pole via Canada Post • Winner will be contacted December 2nd.

1032 Yates St., Victoria, B.C.

MONDAY - FRIDAY 9:00 AM - 5:30 PM • OPEN SATURDAY 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

www.thunderbirdinsurance.com

Full contest details available at www.vicnews.com/contests


A6 • www.vicnews.com Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Associate Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

Friday, November 22, 2013 - OAK

VIEWPOINT

BAY NEWS

The Victoria News is published every Wednesday and Friday by Black Press Ltd., 818 Broughton S., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4. Phone: 250-381-3484. Fax: 250-386-2624. Web: www.vicnews.com

2009 WINNER

OUR VIEW

Tough decisions needed by Ferries No changes to how B.C. Ferries delivers its services will ever meet with total approval. Critics of the proposal to charge seniors halfprice passenger rates during the week instead of giving them free passage see the decision as gouging a vulnerable segment of society. But half price is still Ferry corporation a generous discount. The perk of free can’t be all things mid-week passage to all people for seniors may have made moral sense, if not business sense, when the corporation was in a better financial position, but not now. B.C. Ferries’ proposal to cut little-used early morning and late-night runs on smaller routes makes sense, as does maintaining service at busier commuter times. Some argue that any cut to service is a blow to the original B.C. Ferries concept of extending the coastal highway system to the growing number of people living on smaller islands. But those residents, many of whom commute to work on Vancouver Island or the mainland, have chosen that lifestyle and it comes with costs. Forcing the majority to pay through everhigher fares to service the minority doesn’t make sense. The idea of putting slot machines on ferries working the Swartz Bay-Tsawwassen run is an insult to passengers maxed out with the number of extra-cost services available on the ships. While revenue from these runs has subsidized the smaller runs for years, enough is enough. It’s time to stop looking for more ways to gouge the already cash-strapped ridership. With the balance sheets bleeding red, B.C. Ferries must make some hard choices. Complicating that scenario is the fact the corporation is quasi-private and serves two masters, the public and government, which is the public in business suits. As such, the need to find workable compromises is heightened. In the end, the main objective is stabilization of fares for all ferry riders. If that takes cutting some low-usage sailings and asking seniors to pay a little more, we’re all for it.

YOUR VIEW

Replace B.C. utilities watchdog A few years ago the B.C. Utilities Commission turned down B.C. Hydro’s request to build the Site C dam on the Peace River in Northern B.C. Since then, Hydro and the B.C. Liberal government have simply bypassed the commission. I used to think that the utilities commission’s mandate was to gather relevant information in order to make knowledgeable decisions and to protect the rights of the public. Minister of Energy and Mines Bill Bennett, in discussions regarding “smart meter” opt outs, recently stated that the BCUC would obey the province and B.C. Hydro and do as they are told. Isn’t it time to institute a non-biased and free-thinking watchdog to protect the public interest? Perhaps one with the unwavering honesty of our previous auditor general? David Waterhouse Saanich

Cedar Hill Park users deserve more The News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Question

of the week

?

The question facing Saanich council is not simply whether they should turn down or approve the tennis clay courts proposal for Cedar Hill Park. The real question is: “What is the best use of this property to provide for the unmet needs of the greatest number of community members,

Should B.C. Ferries put slot machines on vessels servicing the Swartz-Bay-Tsawwassen route? Answer online at www.vicnews.com

while staying within budgetary constraints?” Let me restate that in language everyone understands. As a Saanich taxpayer I want the biggest bang for my buck. I want to ensure that my parks and recreation tax dollars are being well spent to provide services to the community. Exactly who are these community members and what needs are not currently being met? It is families with young children (and grandparents) who have no playground area in Cedar Hill Park. Beacon Hill has two new, beautiful playground areas. Cedar Hill Park has nothing; no outdoor facilities for families and young children. Currently there are no outdoor facilities for seniors with mobility issues or persons with disabilities. Cedar Hill Park has wonderful walking trails, but they are not designed for strollers, young children or people with mobility issues. I would like to see an attractive new playground alongside groomed walking trails for families, seniors and people with disabilities. This could include a reclaimed wetland “garden” featuring indigenous species along parts of the trails. This proposal provides the greatest “substantial benefit” for the largest number of community members, while actually costing

Last Week

we asked you:

us taxpayers substantially less compared to the ongoing tax commitment for the clay courts proposal. Andy Ruszel Saanich

Labour-saving machines bound to create noise Re: Noisy leaf blowers residents’ bane (Letters, Nov. 15) Leaf blowers. lawnmowers, pressure washers, table saws and other noisy machines are all tools used to effectively reduce labourintensive jobs. No one likes the noise, which seems to be an unavoidable result of using these tools. We all put up with the noise for the same reason we put up with taxes. It’s necessary. The advocate of banning leaf blowers is welcome to rake my lawn, cut my grass with a push mower and hand-brush the moss off my driveway. I’ll understand if he turns down my offer, as he’s likely too busy raking his leaves, push mowing his lawn and hand-brushing the moss off his driveway. You do these things, don’t you? John Phillips Oak Bay ••• Let your voice be heard. Send your thoughts to editor@vicnews.com

Does Greater Victoria have a problem with jaywalking? 115 responded YES 57% NO 31% MAYBE 12%


www.vicnews.com • A7

OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, November 22, 2013

Year of the baby at VGH Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

Tara Douglas photo

Guide dog in training, Noelle, enjoyed Vancouver’s beaches as she spent a holiday away from her Oak Bay home during training.

Sharing our journey with Noelle

A

s part of Noelle’s service dog training, we decided it was time for her first vacation to Vancouver living with another volunteer. BC Guide Dog Services encourages “doggy sleepovers” so Noelle learns to listen to new people. This experience helps prepare her for the day when she moves into her “forever home” with a blind person or child with autism. It was very sad for me to watch her looking out the car window as we waved goodbye. But we knew it was important for Noelle to be exposed to the big city, its traffic, its noises, and its famous Granville Island Market. By all accounts, she had a wonderful time and never missed us enough to lose her appetite. Noelle came back to us visibly matured, with more self-confidence.

She got a glowing report card from her summer host although we are still working on some skills. For one thing, she loves riding in the car so much that she is reluctant to get out. Another issue is that she scavenges for food and sticks during her walks. Instead, Noelle needs to focus on keeping her partner safe. Guide dogs are taught by using positive reinforcement rather than punitive methods so I definitely have a challenge ahead of me. As Noelle might play a significant role in society she needs to be well trained. If any readers have suggestions regarding her penchant for scavenging for food on her walks, I would love to hear them. - Tara Douglas is fostering and training Noelle for B.C. Guide Dog Services

The Auxiliary of the Victoria General Hospital is pushing poinsettias 10 times as fast as last year in its Poinsettias 4 Patients campaign to raise funds for the Neonatal Intensive Care. Already this year the auxiliary has purchased two other pieces of equipment for the Neonatal Intensive Care and Pediatric units of Victoria General Hospital: an MRI compatible pediatric monitor at $115,925 and a portable cardiac ultrasound for $90,899. “We thought why not keep the theme of the babies,” said Carolyn Haines, auxiliary fundraising director. “It is the year of the babies.” Last year the campaign raised more than $400. This year during discussion in June, they decided to aim for $7,400 the cost of a new blanket warmer for babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The auxiliary garnered some help from Victoria Hospital’s Foundation to boost the campaign reach. “They’ve kindly helped us do the posters and brochures using their communications department because it’s on a larger scale,” Haines said. “Last year we didn’t

have specific equipment we were targeting. This year we are.” They’ve targeted large orders from banks, retirement homes, Government House and even a Victoria law office. “It’s a community effort, we depend on everybody. Every plant sale counts,” she said. Nov. 27 is the first pickup, but those who want to see the product can stop by and check out a table in the lobby at VGH. “We’re going to have round two delivery. We’ve extended our deadlines,” Haines said. “We’re keeping the doors open for people that wanted to still order … Once people see the plants they’ll be in awe, because they really are stunning.” The last chance to order poinsettias will be at the annual Christmas Chaos sale on Tuesday, Dec. 3, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The sale will be held in the VGH Lecture Hall, room S263 (off the main lobby). Members of the public can visit the gift shop at Victoria General Hospital before Dec. 3 to order poinsettias, go online to www.vgha.ca or email info@vgha.ca to place an order. Plant pick-up will be Dec. 11 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the VGH main entrance. editor@goldstreamgazette.com

INGLEDEW S FALL

Tennis Tournament MERRYTHON FUN RUN Hosted by the Rotary Club of Oak Bay

SUNDAY, DEC. 1, 2013 at The HENDERSON RECREATION CENTRE 2291 Cedar Hill Cross Road, Victoria 9.45 AM Warm-up with Jazzercise in the gymnasium. 10.00 AM Start of 8 km run and 4 km walk 11.15 AM Children’s 1 km walk Registration at Henderson and Oak Bay Recreation Centre (250 370 7200) and at Frontrunners, 1200 Vancouver Street, Island Runner, 1576 Fairfield Road Peninsula Runners, 3659 Shelbourne Street

January 1-12, 2014 EVENTS FOR ALL LEVELS AND AGES

Held at Recreation Oak Bay’s 4 Court Bubble Oak Bay Recreation Centre 250-595-7946

Entry Deadline Saturday, December 21 Registration online only at: www.tennisbc.org Our THANKS to the following “Classic” sponsors...

Cost $25 for adults (13 and up). $5 for kids (12 and under)

EVERY BOOT

ON SALE Experience a delightful state of Bootopia by saving on some of the most stylish boots in the city – including Stuart Weitzman, Cole Haan and Amalfi.

Runners of Compassion will be collecting non-perishable food items plus warm clothing and blankets. Free babysitting from 9.30 AM to 11.30 AM All funds raised will support the Rotary Club of Oak Bay’s Community Projects

centre court racquets

1543 Pandora Ave

250-598-7175 www.centrecourtracquets.ca

2060 Oak Bay Avenue

Hillside Centre, Victoria • 250 595 7463


A8 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, November 22, 2013 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Oak Bay Family

Parenting in the age of iPads ■ TRAVIS PATERSON, NEWS STAFF

Get off the phone at dinner, dad. No texting during story time, mom. There was a time when the art of parenting was passed down generationally. Many of the traditional skills still apply, but parents today are also jumping into the completely new, and still unknown, world of smartphones and tablets in addition to computers and televisions. In some cases, teenagers are getting smartphones before their parents realize what the device is capable of. The challenge in 2013 isn’t keeping new technology from our children. It’s teaching adults to see technology as a way to connect with people and as a learning tool, and not something passive like TV that can isolate us, says Prof. Valerie Irvine, co-director of the Technology Integration and Evaluation Research lab at the University of Victoria. For some parents it means looking in the mirror at their own usage of smartphones and iPads. “Who is mentoring and guiding our kids’ (use of technology) if parents don’t have network literacy or know how to monitor it?,” Irvine asked.

Parental monitoring of phones and other device usage is a start, but parents also need to engage their children’s in the use of technology. Irvine suggests starting by the time they’re in kindergarten. “Cutting out technology is not where the world is at right now,” she says. “We need to encourage and teach them to make choices. The medium is a big role in their life. “There’s a criticism and worry about mobile phones but really, the mobile device allows connection between people. FaceTime, Skype and such programs connect us with others. In divorced households they’re great for children to connect, as well as with grandparents, and even for parents to connect with their parents for mentoring.” Though television tends to fixate its viewers, whereas smart devices demand at least some level of interaction, it’s generally accepted that all screen time be lumped together with a daily maximum. The Canadian Paediatric Society suggests no screen time for children younger than two, less than an hour for children two to four, and less than two hours of recreational screen time per day for ages five to 17.

Irvine stands behind it as a form of digital hygiene. Gradual development of appropriate use and informed decision-making through small steps is important. Making little judgment mistakes and having teachable moments when risks are small can help to develop the self-discipline needed by the time children reach the middle years. “Family values aren’t new, they just need to be updated to handle these mediums,” says Allison Rees, whose Living In Families Effectively (LIFE) seminars have guided hundreds of Greater Victoria parents through the challenges of child rearing. “Certainly we need screen-free zones, such as the kitchen, the kitchen table, the car, etc., to foster conversation.” Rees’ longtime colleague Alison Miller refers to the concept of social viruses. One such social virus is the process of letting a child who normally has restricted screen time visit a household with unlimited or unmonitored screen time. And that’s OK too, Rees says, as long as parent and child discuss the experience and can grow from it. Perhaps the child will get upset with their parents’ rules, which is an important part

the

of development. “There’s stories of teenagers who reach university and have no barometer for technology usage and are unable to stop themselves,” Rees says. “They’ll have to make their own decisions eventually. Be up front in conversation as much as possible about the amount of (television, Internet or device usage) while away from the (parents).” A small child doesn’t have a need for confidentiality, Rees reminds us. The more early dialogue the better. In fact, Irvine suggests to get the child their own smart device, such as an iPod (which does most of what an iPhone does but without the phone), but not until they’re school age and with limited use. “The iPod has all sorts of learning apps that can

This family’s life: Q&A Jessie Moore’s family includes her husband, Will, their sons – four-year-old Oliver and 18-month-old Jack – and their dog, Porter. Will is a high school teacher in the Saanich school district and Jesse teaches Grade 2/3 part-time in the Sooke district. She loves spending time with her family.

With consistent, dependable …financial advice… you can get there.

Q A

Jesse Moore and her husband Will Moore with their children, eighteen-month-old Jack, dog seven-year-old Porter and four-year-old Oliver in their home in Oak Bay. SHARON TIFFIN/NEWS STAFF

A

ISSUE

be downloaded and done together,” Irvine says. “Talk about the app, teach them how to assess apps and computer websites before they download or click on them.” Parental passwords can be set on the iPod, as well as other controls to limit what grade school kids can access. “Eventually, once they reach middle school,” Rees says, “they’re going to be able to access anything on the web that we can and they need to be prepared for that.” ● sports@vicnews.com

P

R

O

O

Thank you for supporting the WestShore Go2Guide. Please rev Our family loves to read and we are currently

PDF proof to by ensure enjoying Pete the Catthis books and stories Oliver Jeffers. and layout are correct.

Q A Q Dale Collins A Certified Financial Planner

How do you find time for “you,” in addition to your role as “mom”?

BIG

Alec Couros photo via Flickr, used under a CC-BYSA 2.0 license.

that the c

What is your family’s NOTE: favourite to share PDF proof fo This activity is a low-resolution together? final check only. As such, the colour and c may represent how the ad will appear Our favourite things to donot include walking through Uplands Park and spending time Island. print; ads willon be Pender crisper when printed.

The part of your day you most look forward to? Some of my own interests include reading and photography. I am part of a book club (we are My son attends the Oak Bay parent-owned currently reading ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ by John Green) preschool and our family loves being a part of this group of families. I love that I can be part of the preschool and also a camera club that friends and I with a shared thespend appropriate class with my son on my dutyPlease days andXalso time interest in photography set up.Elder I am continuing to work Planning Counselor with the wonderful friends I have made with the other instructions: on finding a balance between being a mom, a teacher, parents in the school. We are able to connect every and also finding time just for me. day after school as our kids play with OK each o Proof asother. is This connection with friends is part of my day that I most look What are you reading right now? What do you o Proof OK with changes indicated forward to. ● read with your sons? Dale Collins CFP EPC

Q

Office: 250-818-2616 Fax: 250-590-5721

o Revised Proof required

Notes: ______________________

___________________________ Need Help ___________________________ Understanding Your www.prosperity-planning.com ___________________________ Investments? ___________________________

Email: dale@prosperity-planning.com

Megan Herlaar CFP EPC

___________________________

Office: 250-589-2250 Fax: 778-265-0031 megan@ prosperity-planning.com www.prosperity-planning.com

___________________________

___________________________

___________________________

Authorized by: ________________


OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, November 22, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A9



Oak Bay Family

Fright Night

So you think you can sew… a slug?

Now that Halloween is done and gone, I can hear the collective sigh from parents who like me, can’t sew, yet are forced each year to produce The Remarkable Costume. For these parents, gone are the ■ SUSAN LUNDY good ole days when their children FEATURE WRITER were younger, had less discerning tastes and wore anything for Halloween. Witch? Easy, wear black and a hat. Snow Queen? Fine, white and icy-looking glitter. I used to own a string of animal teeth, and for three years I suggested at least one child dress as a tooth fairy. I even said things like, “A tooth fairy, now that would be a ridiculous costume. I’d never have gone as a tooth fairy.” But because I had a simple costume in mind, even reverse psychology didn’t work. The year my daughter, Danica, was eight we started musing about costumes way back in September. “Why don’t you be a slug?” I joked and then clapped a hand over my mouth as her eyes lit up and a determined look fell upon her face. Okay. A slug. Other mothers whip up costumes like this — why can’t I? We found a pea-green sheet and bought a metre of Velcro. I draped one of the sheet’s fitted corners over Danica’s head, took a deep breath, forbid her from breathing and started cutting. “Open your eyes while you cut!” she hissed. “If you’re talking, you’re breathing,” I snapped. The shape took form; it was time to sew. I sewed and sewed and then wrapped the creation around her body. She looked like a nun in a green habit. So we turned the sheet around, made the front the back and cut out eyeholes. She looked like a sickly green ghost and I was getting cranky. “Why don’t you be the tooth fairy or something,” I suggested. “We could sew toothbrushes onto a dress and give you dental floss hair.” Then I thought about

the horror of creating that costume and cursed this problem I have of opening my mouth without thinking. “I want to be a slug.” So I sewed some more. Halloween is at least dark. The real problem lay in the school costume parade. Parents (dozens of expert sewers) would be there and my little slug looked like a child wearing a green sheet. “You know, I could have chicken pox at Halloween,” my daughter reminded me as I sucked the blood from a pinprick on my finger. “Don’t think that hasn’t crossed my mind,” I said darkly. Her sister erupted in itchy red spots precisely two weeks before costumed students were scheduled to traipse through school hallways, and Danica was likely next. When Dad came home Danica modeled the costume in progress. By this time I’d added goggles to the eyeholes, cut out arm holes (necessary for trick or treating) and cut and sewed a Velcro opening on the top for antennae — which had yet to be created. “Try something around her neck,” he suggested. She looked like E.T. “Let’s drape this extra bit of sheet around her shoulders for slime.” She looked like a soldier armed against gas warfare in the desert. The next day I found martian antennae, which gave the costume a definite alien look. I considered hanging an “I am a slug” sign on her back. Two days prior to the costume parade, Danica woke up with chicken pox. Thankfully, she was out of the contagious zone for Halloween night. So after 10 hours of costume sewing there was at least two hours of costume wearing. “Maybe next year I’ll be the tooth fairy,” Danica said. “Actually,” her face lit up, “I think I’ll be a snail!” ●

Making a difference in your community Briar Rose Redchurch Age 15 Briar Rose is a grade 10 student at Oak Bay high school and an active member of her school in the community leadership program and choir. She was also a big supporter of the school’s Cops for Cancer fundraising effort, which included head shaves, a bottle drive, benefit concert and car wash.

Adam Walton Age 17 Adam Walton is an academic leader and peer tutor at Oak Bay high school. Adam is well connected with his peers, plays in a rock band and is committed to the school’s rowing team. Adam also puts his talents towards the Best Buddies Club (special needs inclusion club) and as a coleader has really grown this group to be a dynamic program. He also sits on the United Way Youth Council, honing his skills and expanding his experience as a future community leader.

If you know someone who is making a difference in your community, please email your comments to editor@vicnews.com.

Bordeaux, Vineyards & Châteaux

Europe’s “Queen” of the Great Rivers

“Wine Lover” Fully Inclusive 8 Days

“Wine Lover” Fully Inclusive & Days

France River Cruise

Enchanting Danube

26 OCT - 02 NOV, 2014 from only US $3349 + Port Taxes

13 JUN, 2014 from only US $5325 + Port Taxes

An Incredible Adventure Awaits

China & the Yangtze Fully Inclusive 10 Days

25 SEPT - 05 OCT, 2014 from only US $4199 + Port Taxes

Early Booking Bonus up to $550 per person if booked by 01 DEC 2013. 2187 Oak Bay Avenue • 250 598 5252 • www.athlonetravel.com • Out of town 1 888 987 2351

ne o l l h At rave T

BC Reg. 3636


A10 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, November 22, 2013 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Navigate Your Cruise Options with Marlin Travel JOIN US

THURSDAY, NOV 28 @ 7PM FOR PROFESSIONAL ADVICE & INSIDER TIPS from MARLIN CRUISE SPECIALISTS with guest speaker, Peter Nowicki of Crystal Cruises

RSVP 250-595-1181 *Exclusive offers, Refreshments and Door prizes*

2564 Sinclair Road • Cadboro Bay • 250-595-1181

Like the Oak Bay News on Facebook

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Sweet Sunday Oak Bay High school students Mia Kennedy, front, Ellsa Stauft, Emma Fulton, Cetareh Mohsenzadeh-Green, Yuri Sekita and Sunny Lin sell baking by donation to raise money for the Phillipine relief fund last weekend. The students raised $2,100 in just two days.

COMMUNITY NEWS

EARN UNTIL DEC. 2!

IN BRIEF

Birding in Uplands Park

4x

Join Birder Geoffrey Newell of the Friends of Uplands Park in a bird walk from Cattle Point through Uplands Park at 9 a.m. on Nov. 24. Meet at Cattle Point by the first boat launch. Bring binoculars, bird books or checklists or simply show up to enjoy the outing, rain or shine. Call Margaret Lidkea   at 250-595-8084 for more information.

Superbucks™ rewards

on your filled prescription* on the portion not covered by PharmaCare Superbucks rewards are redeemable towards the purchase of most items in our stores. No waiting, no collecting. Ask our pharmacist for details! ™

Visit our pharmacy

835 Langford Pkwy., Victoria (250) 391-3135

846 Viewfield Rd., Victoria (250) 381-8266

This offer is available at our pharmacies in British Columbia only. Offer expires December 2, 2013 *4x Superbucks™ rewards are calculated as 4% of the portion of the prescription that is not paid for or reimbursed by the province of B.C. under PharmaCare, with a maximum value of $99.99 per coupon. Superbucks™ rewards are provided by host supermarket to redeem for merchandise in-store excluding prescriptions, tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and any other products which are provincially regulated. Redemption is also excluded at all third party operations (post office, drycleaners, gas bar, etc.). Superbucks™ rewards are issued only for individual customer in-store prescription purchases (excludes healthcare and other facilities). ®/TM Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. All rights reserved. © 2013.

Victoria blings in the season

BOOT SALE! Everything

MUST GO! THE

COBBLER 718 VIEW STREET • VICTORIA • 250-386-3741

The global CEO of Christmas appears Nov. 23 in the annual Island Farms Santa’s Light Parade. The parade kicks off at 5:45 p.m. near Belleville and Government streets and rolls through Victoria ending at Store Street near Capital Iron.

Inventor wins award

Victoria’s Dr. Henry Chen was honoured by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for his work developing X-ray and gamma-ray detectors over the past 20 years. The technology is widely used by airport security worldwide and by NASA.


For Robert Moyes’ film reviews and movie listings go

ONLINE mondaymag.com

monday weekend

VICTORIA’S ULTIMATE GET OUT GUIDE

Bringing home

mon daym ag.co m

www.vicnews.com • A11



DISSONANT HISTORIES

KYLE WELLS

news@goldstreamgazette.com

O

livier Clements is back home and he’s pretty excited about it. The Victoria-bred trumpet and flugelhorn player says he has been incredibly busy touring with stars of the local indie music scene, such as Aidan Knight and Justin Rutledge. “We had shows everywhere between Victoria and Winnipeg,” Knight said from on the road in Abbotsford at about 10:30 a.m. “The whole band is still asleep but I was able to sneak out to take this phone call.” With upcoming runs with the Victoria Jazz Orchestra and the Victoria Operatic Society for its run of Annie, Clements will now have a chance to hang up his hat, albeit with a busy local schedule. With all that’s going on in his career, however, perhaps the most exciting is developments with his fusion passion project Olivier Clements and Dissonant Histories, which has a rare live show and a first album release in the near

future. The band will be taking to the stage at Hermann’s Jazz Club on Tuesday, Nov. 26. The event will mark only the third time the band has played for the public. A full schedule for Clements and the challenges of co-ordinating seven other busy musicians has put the project on the back burner for the most part. But that’s about to change. As an eight-piece band with lots of brass and a three-piece rhythm section, the group plays an experimental yet accessible brand of music which comes from the seemingly mismatched musical directions of its leader. Clements writes original material for the group, taking influences from a variety of sources and writing a brand of music that’s hard to pin down. “I’ve got all these weird influences that are all over the place, and I’m trying to make music that’s not awful,” Clements laughed. “It’s like indie-folk aesthetic with hip-hop grooves.” While raised and trained as a jazz musician, Clements has also toured extensively with indie pop and folk

groups, and also holds a blooming love of somewhat offbeat hip-hop, such as MF Doom, and classical music, such as Phillip Glass. “(It’s) trying to figure out where I stand in all this,” Clements said. “I’m not trying to blend all these styles together, I’m more trying to reconcile them.” A growing dissatisfaction with the direction of modern jazz music also spurred the creative change of pace. “I was getting really tired of this idea where the band plays a 30-second melody and then everybody takes a 20-minute solo,” Clements said. “There was a conscious movement on my part to try to make this about a band … make it more about eight people working together to make these songs.” Clements has also recorded an album of the Dissonant Histories material with other musicians in Toronto, which will be released in February 2014 simply titled Olivier Clements and Dissonant Histories. With the album coming out, Clements hopes to start touring with the band and playing a lot more live gigs. The show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $18, $14 for students and are available at Ditch Records and olivierclements.com.

approved

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Olivier Clements is one busy musician these days, both in and out of Victoria. He will be playing with his hip-hop/indie rock/ classical/jazz band Olivier Clements and Dissonant Histories at Hermann’s Jazz Club on Nov. 26.

SPECIAL BUY A QUAKER STATE MOTOR OIL CHANGE AND

CANADA’S

AUTO SERVICE

ENTER FOR A CHANCE TO WIN A 2013 CHRYSLER 200S

STORE

GORDON HEAD 3993 Cedar Hill Road 250.721.1125

LANGFORD West Shore Town Centre 250.474.2291

ROYAL OAK 801 Royal Oak Drive 250.727.6561

VICTORIA 2959 Douglas Street 250.361.3152

VIEW ROYAL 1519 Admirals Road 250.381.5055

e

FLYER

Get the latest on our special offers

Sign up now

www.canadiantire.ca

Prices in effect from Friday, November 22, 2013 to Thursday, November 28, 2013

No purchace necessary. For full rules, full prizing details and how to enter, visit canadian tire.ca/winacar. Closes 11:59:59 P.M. (ET) on December 31, 2013. 3 prizes available to be won. Grand Prize consists of a 2013 Chrysler 200 S - ARV $25,895 (CDN), Second Prize consists of $5,000 (CDN) in Canadian Tire gift cards and Third prize consists of $1,000 (CDN) in Canadian Tire gift cards. The Draw will take place on January 6, 2014 in Oakville, ON. Odds of being selected depend on the total number od eligible entries recieved. Must be a legal resident of Canada and the age of majority. Correct answer to mathematical skill testing question required. CE8074-01 BEST AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE & BEST TIRE STORE

Industry-licensed technicians • Modern Equipment • Coast to Coast Warranty • Premium products you know & the Brands you can trust!

Voted

Best City

of the

1

VICTORIA NE WS

YEAR

Sign up & Save

Offer Valid on Quaker State motor oil change purchases at participating Canadian Tire Retail Stores from October 28, 2013 through December 31,2013 Visit www.canadiantire.ca/winacar for details

201 2

IL

OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, November 22, 2013

18th


A12 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, November 22, 2013 - OAK

Goin’ for Mo

tRaviS PatERSoN

sports@vicnews.com

DaviD Bukach Photo

Boxers are Breif Boylesque performs its annual Less is Mo fundraiser show for Movember at the Victoria Event Centre on Saturday, Nov. 23.

it’s been just over a year since the men of the Boxers are Brief Boylesque troupe unleashed themselves on victoria with their debut in Rosie Bitts’ Fresh From the Sexy Factory show. it sold out, as did their inaugural Less is Mo fundraiser for Movember last year, and every Boxers are Brief show since. they are humongous (in terms of popularity) and are once again ready for, well, some more mo, with the second annual Less is Mo, Saturday night at the victoria Event centre. “i don’t know exactly what it is about it that makes it successful except that we have so much fun with it. i think it’s just the amount of fun we’re having on stage,” says Johnny Bottomsworth, who started the local boy meets burlesque movement. in Movember spirit, Bottomsworth is flaunting a hairy upper lip but not all members will be carrying face furniture. Part proceeds will go to Movember (last year’s event donated $2,000) to benefit the research and awareness around men’s health areas of

BAY NEWS

prostrate and testicular cancers, and mental health. “We really believe in male self-acceptance and equality,” Bottomsworth said. “Gay, straight, whatever, we’re just a very relaxed bunch of dudes, acting and goofing, and the audience can see that.” Since it started the troupe has grown in size, swelling from six members to the current rotation of 10 to 20. there are 10 performers on the bill for Saturday, including founding members BadMan throbbins and clam chowda. Shows sell out and Bottomsworth estimates the number of women in the audience is only about 65 per cent. of course, that says nothing about the sexual orientation of the audience, which is as mixed as the cast itself. But it isn’t always that way. “one guy slammed his beer bottle down and left,” says Bottomsworth of one of their less positive reviews. “But i just read a study that said the more homophobic you are, the closer you are to being homosexual. We’re totally secure with ourselves. Rehearsal has become a positive place for us where we can be ourselves. the only rule is if you want to be on the team you have to come to rehearsal.” Doors at 7, show at 7:30 p.m., Saturday (Nov. 23) at the victoria Event centre, 1415 Broad. tickets are $20, available at Lyle’s Records or online at boxersarebrief.ca.

“I recommend Vitamin C and Lysine for Heart Health” W. Gifford-Jones, MD Fourteen years ago following my own coronary attack I decided to follow the research of Dr. Linus Pauling, Professor Williams Stehbens and Dr. Sydney Bush and take high doses of vitamin C plus lysine. I am turning 90 soon and I am glad I did! Dr. Linus Pauling, two-time Nobel Prize winner, was ignored for reporting that large amounts of vitamin C and lysine are needed to prevent coronary attacks. Twenty-five years ago Pauling reported that animals make vitamin C but humans do not and must supplement this important vitamin. Lysine must also be supplemented. Vitamin C is required to manufacture healthy collagen, the glue that holds coronary cells together, just like mortar is needed for bricks. Lysine, like steel rods in cement, makes collagen stronger. Pauling claimed it takes a mere 10 milligrams of vitamin C to prevent scurvy, but several thousand to prevent heart attack. Dr. William Stehbens, Professor of Anatomy at Auckland University in New Zealand emphasized that coronary arteries are under more pressure than any other arteries in the body. After all, they’re situated in the heart’s muscle, not in the big toe. Moreover they’re under constant pressure while the heart beats 100,000 times every 24 hours, or 37 million times a year, and 2.2 billion times if you live to 70 years of age. Without sufficient vitamin C and lysine this constant pounding causes minute cracks in collagen, resulting in blood clots and possible death, or a weakened artery can break, causing a stroke. Dr. Sydney Bush, an English researcher, has now proven that vitamin C and lysine can reverse atherosclerosis. Bush took retinal photographs, then started his patients on high doses of vitamin C and lysine. One year later new pictures showed atherosclerosis had regressed in retinal arteries.

Mauve Friday is Coming. Black Friday will never be the same.

$2 OFF

ONLY at local Health Food Stores and Select Natural Pharmacies

ANY SIZE OR FLAVOUR PNO.CA

find us on

MANUFACTURER COUPON - TO THE RETAILER: For redemption, mail to: Preferred Nutrition, 153 Perth Street, Acton, ON, L7J 1C9. Limit one coupon per purchase. Offer valid only in Canada. Expiry: Dec 31, 2013 - Coupon code: 08-887

LOOK FOR MORE GREAT IN-STORE SAVINGS!

CUSTOMER SIGNATURE REQUIRED FOR VALIDATION

Black Friday will never be the same.

COUPON

Mauve Friday is Coming.

Now you can take the right combination of vitamin C and lysine in a powder form I developed called Medi-C Plus™. The dosage for Medi-C Plus is NEW BOOK one flat scoop with breakfast and the evening meal, mixed in NOW water or juice. AVAILABLE


OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, November 22, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A13



Merry Maids Victoria earns fifth top-20 award Scott and Susan Tanner, owner of the Merry Maids franchise serving Greater Victoria, including the West Shore and Saanich Peninsula, accepted their fifth straight Dallen Peterson Award of Distinction recently in Nashville, Tenn. as a top-20 operation among more than 500 Merry Maids franchises in North America. The award recognizes those offices that best exemplify high quality in business operations, customer and employee satisfaction. The Tanners Don Descoteau have operated Merry Maids Biz Beat in the region since 1991 and count among their management team son Matt, Karen McClean and Colleen Knudskov.

Fortis makeover contest down to final three Three B.C. homeowners have a chance to win $10,000 towards a room makeover with natural gas after being chosen as a finalist in the RenoMe! with FortisBC contest. More than 150 entries were received from all over the province, but the final three were narrowed down to Gayle Curtis of Maple Ridge for her kitchen, Melissa Tolsma of Nanaimo for her outdoor space and Wendy Frose of Chilliwack for her great room. The finalists have received renderings of their redesigned space from participating designers and Black Press online readers are asked to vote on the most deserving project. The winner room receives $10,000 towards their renovation, while the second- and third-place finalists receive $2,000 each. Readers can also win $500 toward a

natural gas appliance just by voting. Visit vicnews.com/contests to vote and bit. ly/18HJy9m for an expanded story.

Downtown bistro switches format Opened as the Black Hat by Bistro 28 in 2011, the rebranded north FORTYEIGHT at 1005 Langley St. is chef-owner Sam Chalmers’ bid to shake things up again in the competitive restaurant market in downtown Victoria. A new menu features diner-style items given refined flavour and prepared with flair. Visit northfortyeight.com.

Cascadia staffer takes on dual role

Bryan Paler, manager of Cascadia Liquor Store in Quadra Village, doesn’t just know a lot about beers and wines, he’s got the papers to prove it. Already a certified sommelier with expertise and all-around understanding of the wine industry, Paler recently passed a similarly challenging certification to become a beer sommelier, or “cicerone.” He becomes one of just four cicerones in Greater Victoria and 25 in Canada, but is said to be the first in this country to hold both certificates.

Holiday tour brings foodies to Fort Street

It may be known for its antique stores, but Fort Street is fast becoming a haven for fans of good food. Culinary tour company Off the Eaten Track is running tours of Fort Street food purveyors Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:30 to 4 p.m. through Dec. 19. Sampling stops happen at five different locations: The Little Cheese Shop, Choux Choux Charcuterie, Chorizo & Co., Hook Fine Foods and Crust Bakery. On Dec. 10, all tour proceeds will be donated the Mustard Seed food bank. Visit offtheeatentracktours.ca/victoria.

Don’t snooze on your contributions.

St. Mary’s Anglican Church 1701 Elgin Road

250-598-2212

stmarysoakbay.bc.anglican.ca

Sunday, November 24th, 2013 The Reign of Christ

8:30 am Holy Eucharist (BCP) 10:00 am Holy Eucharist (BAS) with activities for children

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

12:10 pm Advent Noon Hour Concert – St. Mary’s Children’s Choir 7:15pm Compline & Conversation

Saturday, November 30th, 2013 9:30 – 12 pm Preparing for Advent – Drop-In Meditation, crafts & more . . .

Bunion?Hammer Toe? We can help. Services offered are covered by most Extended Healthcare Packages. DVA Clients Welcome!

Get our Better-than-cash™ GIC at 1.45 % * and avoid RRSP crunch time.

Call us to learn how you can be pain free

Dr Glen Cornwell •Podiatric Medicine #204-1711 Cook St. 250.386.9353

50% OFF HUNTER DOUGLAS

BLINDS & SHADES

It’s almost RRSP season. You know what that means – waiting until the eleventh hour to get your contributions in and getting really stressed out. But what if you tried something different this year? We think our Better-than-cash™ GIC at 1.45% might just be crazy enough to tempt you to come in before the rush. It’s RRSP-eligible and redeemable starting March 1, 2014 with full interest accrued1. Plus, you can start investing with just $500. Crazy, right? So head over to Coast and get your RRSP business – and stress – out of the way early this year. To learn more about GICs or other RRSP options, just call us at 1.888.517.7000, visit one of our branches or www.coastcapitalsavings.com

Choose from TruGrain EverWood blinds and Designer Roller Cassette shades. CALL TODAY:

To arrange your complimentary in-home consultation

250-480-4972

November 1 to December 21 - Off our regular price

*Rate as at November 1, 2013 and subject to change. 1. Interest is not paid if redeemed prior to March 1, 2014.


A14 • www.vicnews.com

You improved lung cancer detection and diagnosis.

Friday, November 22, 2013 - OAK

Appliances

SPORTS

Pacific pride Langley Utd.’s Will Folstad, right, races for the ball against Saanich Fusion’s Leo Falzon during the Pacific Cup final at Tyndall Park on Saturday. Langley won 4-2. Gordie Elliot Jr. and Mike Moon scored for the Fusion. The annual crossover tournament is between clubs from the Vancouver Island Soccer and Fraser Valley Soccer Leagues.

Cancer breakthroughs need you. When BC Cancer Agency researchers got the first-in-Canada 3D mapping technology for diagnosing lung tumours, they didn’t do it alone. With your support of the BC Cancer Foundation, you become a partner with BC’s leading cancer researchers. As the fundraising partner of the BC Cancer Agency, the BC Cancer Foundation funds more cancer research in BC than any other charitable organization.

Help BC’s cancer researchers make their next breakthrough. Become a Partner in Discovery.

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Junior Rams tops on the Island Travis Paterson News staff

1.888.906.2873 bccancerfoundation.com

21 100 FOR

BC’S EYEWEAR HEADQUARTERS

OR

OFF

$

GE PACKA$129 DEALINSCLUDESfl: ex frame uper ses, n tic or S Sunop gle Vision le ating, Sin ective Co , n fl Anti-re UV Protectio h! 100% aning Clot and Cle

COMPLETE PPAIR

FREE VISION EXAMS BOOK YOURS TO

DAY!

FREE FR R EYEGLASS CLEANER FOR LIFE With complete eyewear purchase. Ask for details.

DIRECT INSURANCE BILLING

BAY NEWS

We will w beat any competitor’s written quote

WE NOW DIRECT BILL TO VARIOUS INSURANCE COMPANIES (ASK FOR DETAILS)

MAYFAIR SHOPPING CENTRE

250.381.2266

w w w. v i s i o n s o p t i c a l . c o m

The Mount Douglas Rams junior girls are competing in the provincial volleyball championships today and tomorrow at South Delta and Sequam secondary schools. The Rams are the only South Island team there after winning the Island championships at Dover Bay second-

ary in Nanaimo on Saturday. Coach Brian McKinnon said his team of strictly Grade 9 players will be hard pressed to follow-up their Island heroics against the competitive teams at provincials. “Some of elite teams will have Grade 10 players who are also on elite club teams.” The Rams defeated the top-ranked Island

SPORTS NEWS IN BRIEF Junior B Cougars visit Braves

The Victoria Cougars and Saanich Braves play their second game in back-to-back nights at Pearkes arena tonight. Face off is 6:30 p.m. The Cougars are coming off a 5-0 win over the Oceanside Generals while the Braves lost 5-3 to the Kerry Park Islanders on Saturday. The

team Mark Isfeld in the Island final. Isfeld won the first set 26-24, the only set the Rams lost in the tourney. The Rams won the second set 25-17 and came back from an 11-6 deficit in the third set with a a 10-to-3 run to win 16-14. “(The Rams) had a lot of fight. They’re all Grade 9s so they hope they can do this at Islands again next year.

At provincials, they’re going to get as much experience as they can for next year,” McKinnon said. Rams left-side hitter Jessica Lane was named tournament MVP. Rams’ Sabrina Lam was a first team all-star with sixth-place Claremont Spartans star Taylor Columbine. Belmont finished eighth. sports@vicnews.com

Braves hosted Pink in the Rink on Friday, a 2-1 loss to the Westshore Wolves.

Victoria Royals trade for big Swede

Swedish forward Axel Blomqvist will make his home debut for the Victoria Royals in the Western Hockey League tonight against the Kamloops Blazers. The Royals traded fourth round and eighth round picks to the Lethbridge Hurricanes for Blomqvist, who has eight goals in 19 games this year. Puck drop tonight and Saturday is 7:05 p.m. at Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre.


OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, November 22, 2013



www.vicnews.com • A15

LOCAL DIN I NG JAMES Drop by the JBI Pub and BAY INN Restaurant and enjoy a

WING’S

THE

RESTAURANT

Take Out or Eat In Menu Daily Lunch & Dinner Buffet

An Invitation Breakfast, Lunch, or From an Old Friend Dinner Entrée

Combination Dinners for 1 to 8 Seafood and Deluxe Dishes Licenced Premises Open 11 a.m.- 10 p.m. daily Free Home Delivery with min. $20 order

Present this coupon when you buy dinner or lunch and get a second of equal of lesser falue FOR ONLY $2.00. This coupon may only be used with a minimum of two beverages (need not be alcholic). Present coupon at time of ordering. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Maximum 3 coupons per group or table. Not valid at JBI Pub on Sundays between 3:30-8:00pm. EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30, 2013

P

90 Gorge Rd. West

250-385-5564

250.384.7151 270 Government Street

urple Garden

Chinese Restaurant

* All You Can Eat Buffet! * Party Room! Take Our Menu on www.purplegarden.ca

Belmont Bulldog Kiana Pomponio, No. 9, sets the ball during the Island Championships at Belmont secondary school, in a set the Bulldogs won over Cowichan secondary. 25-15.

#138-1551 Cedar Hill X Rd (Behind McDonald’s on Shelbourne St.)

250-477-8866 250-477-8820

PICK UP YOUR COPY Available at 275 locations across Greater Victoria including:

News staff

The Belmont Bulldogs and Oak Bay Bays are headed to North Vancouver this weekend to compete in a six-team wild card tournament for the final two berths at the AAAA Senior Girls Volleyball Championships in Penticton, Nov. 28 to 30. The two teams earned the entry after the host Bulldogs finished second at the Senior Girls

AAAA Island Volleyball Championship and the Bays finished third. The Bulldogs lost in the final to the Vanier Towhees, Island winners for the third consecutive year. Vanier won in straight sets, 25-21, 25-23, 25-20 and qualiied for provincials. “Vanier is ranked No. 8 in the province (tops on the Island) and proved to have a little more firepower than Belmont,” said Bulldogs coach Mike Toakley. “The Bulldogs (actually) lead Vanier at some point in all three games but were unable to push through for a win.”

The Bays defeated Claremont for third in a tight finish as Oak Bay won the final set tie-breaker 17-15. The wild-card tournament is Saturday, Nov. 23, at North Vancouver’s Handsworth secondary. Vanier’s Megan Ireland was named the AAAA Island tournament MVP. The tournament all-stars were dominated by the top four teams: Carly Guenter (Vanier), Kiana Pomponio (Belmont), Tamara Bonsdorf (Belmont), Asia Rattigan (Oak Bay), Haley Cabral (Claremont), Alena Holyk (Dover Bay). sports@vicnews.com

Reynolds’ run lost in the mix Travis Paterson

Provincials in Nov. 27 to 30 in Kelowna, the Roadrunners were warmed up and confident going The Reynolds Roadrunners into the semifinal versus the Bulldogs. Reynare in the midst olds took the first of one of its best two sets 25-21 senior boys voland 25-20, but leyball seasons but dropped the next it’s going under three 22-25, 23-25 the radar with the and 12-15. Island champion “We were playOak Bay Barbers ing really strong looking to win a (against Belmont), third straight B.C. maybe aftertitle. Add to that the wards we were a Belmont Bulldogs’ bit surprised we tremendous year, in did that well,” which they’ve chalReynolds player lenged and beat the Alexis Duval Alexis Duval said. Barbers, and the Roadrunners are quietly the “Before the game we probably didn’t the think we’d come that third best team on the Island. Third is how they finished close, so it’s disappointing.” Later that night the Roadrunat the AAA Island Senior Boys Championships at Oak Bay on ners bounced back and defeated Saturday (Nov. 16). But it was Dover Bay in four sets, including nearly a trip to the Island final, a hair-raising third set, 32-30, to as the Roadrunners fell just finish third at Islands. Most important is the Roadshy of a colossal upset in the semifinal. Having already beat runners spot at provincials, the Claremont Spartans in the Duval said. “We were happy to win Saturday morning quarterfinal, and thereby clinched a spot at (against Claremont). It’s great the AAA Senior Boys Volleyball to finally go to provincials. Last

News staff

year we were close, fourth at Islands.” The 6-foot-3 power hitter was named to the AAA Island second all-star team. Duval is a net threat for Reynolds and has been part of the Roadrunner’s biggest season in the recent era, though he’s even more promising as a provincial level badminton player. “Volleyball’s really fun right now so I don’t mind that it’s taking a lot of time out training for badminton. The lead up from all the practices we’ve had, (Islands) was time to play our best volleyball. If we can play our best volleyball at provincials we’ll be happy with that,” Duval said. Reynolds has shown flashes of brilliance this season, the biggest coming back in September when they won the University of B.C. Invitational, topping a field of 40 teams. The team is led by Duval up front and a core of strong Grade 11s around the talented setter, David Lee. Duval predicts this team should be just as good, if not better, next year. sports@vicnews.com

mag day

Campus Honda 506 Finlayson St Canoe Brew Pub 450 Swift St Pluto’s 1150 Cook St OT Fitwear 1006 Broad St Aveda 1402 Douglas St American Apparel 566 Johnson St Gorge Rowing & Paddling Centre 105-2940 Jutland Rd Market on Yates 903 Yates St Birdcage Confectionary 501 Government St Niagara Grocer 579 Niagara St Central Library 700 Broughton St Black Press 818 Broughton St Floyd’s Diner 866 Yates St Moka House 345 Cook St Activebody Nutrition 658 View St Hemp & Co 1102 Government St Le Spa Sereine 1141 Government St Lifestyle Markets 2950 Douglas St Strathcona 919 Douglas St Soprano’s 730 Caledonia Ave Cobbler 718 View St Capital Iron 1900 Store St Hudson Market 770 Fisgard St The Reef 533 Yates St Art World 860 Yates St Simple Remedies 1010 Cook Street Legends Comic Book 633 Johnson St Pescatores 614 Humboldt St

.c o m

VICTORIA mon

Bulldogs seek wild card entry Travis Paterson

Closed on Tuesday for Lunch

No MSG - $10.95 Lunch and $14.50 Dinner

Charla Huber/News staff

Second chance at AAAA B.C. berths

10% OFF PICK-UP and FREE DELIVERY

DEC EMB ER 2 0 1 3

MEET THE MASTER

CAPE BRETON CH ICK RULES THE ROOS T

SIMON WHITFIELD

WH AT’ S NEX T FO R RET IRE D OLY MP IAN

DECK THE HALLS

SO AK UP THE SPI RIT OF THE SEA SO N

&

V I C T O R I A’ S U LT I M AT E G E T OUT GUIDE

A D A M S AWAT SKY | JO-ANN ROBERTS | MI KE DELAMONT | E M M A YA R D LEY | DON GEN O VA | R O B E R T MOYES

OAK BAY

WEST SHORE

Oak Bay Rec 2291 Cedar Hill X Rd Cafe Misto 2885 Foul Bay Road Delicados 1911 Oak Bay Ave Demitasse Estevan Village Oak Bay Library 1442 Monterey Rd

Langford Lanes 1097 Langford Parkway London Drugs 1907 Sooke Rd Loghouse Pub 2323 Millstream Rd Goldstream Gazette 777 Goldstream Ave Juan de Fuca Rec Centre 1759 Island Hwy Market on Millstream 2401 Millstream Ave Steve Drane 2940 Ed Nixon Terrace

SAANICH

Red Barn Markets

751 Vanalman Ave 5500 West Saanich Rd

Matticks Farm

5325 Cordova Bay Rd Cedar Hill Rec Centre 3220 Cedar Hill Rd Health Essentials 300 Gorge Rd W

Royal Bank

306 Burnside Rd W Maude Hunters Pub 3810 Shelbourne St Eccotique Uptown ZennKai Salon Uptown

SAANICH PENINSULA The Old Attic 7925 East Saanich Rd Mary Winspear Centre 2243 Beacon Ave

ONLINE

mondaymag.com


A16 •www.oakbaynews.com www.vicnews.com

Nov 22, OakBAY Bay NEWS News Friday, Fri, November 22, 2013, 2013 - OAK

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.388.3535

$2997 plus tax

fax 250.388-0202 email classified@oakbaynews.com

SELL YOUR STUFF! Private Party Merchandise Ad 1" PHOTO + 5 LINES

BONUS! We will upload your ad to

Choose any: Black Press Community Newspapers!

3

(99¢ extra lines) Runs till it sells, up to 8 weeks! Add any other Greater Victoria paper for only $9.99 each +tax

FREE!

Ask us for more info.

SOOKENEWS

MIRROR

/AKĂĽ"AYĂĽ .EWSĂĽ $EADLINES

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS IN MEMORIAM

7EDNESDAYĂĽ%DITIONĂĽ 8PSE"ET-ONDAYxxAM %JTQMBZ"ET&RIDAYxxAM &RIDAYĂĽ%DITION 8PSE"ET7EDNESDAYxxPM %JTQMBZ"ETx4UESDAYxxAM -!*/2ĂĽ#!4%'/2)%3ĂĽ).ĂĽ /2$%2ĂĽ/&ĂĽ!00%!2!.#% &!-),9x!../5.#%-%.43 #/--5.)49x!../5.#%-%.43 42!6%,x #(),$2%.x%-0,/9-%.4 0%23/.!,x3%26)#%3 "53).%33x3%26)#%3x 0%43xx,)6%34/#+ -%2#(!.$)3%x&/2x3!,% 2%!,x%34!4% 2%.4!,3 !54/-/4)6% -!2).%

!'2%%-%.4

)Tx ISx AGREEDx BYx ANYx $ISPLAYx ORx #LASSIÙEDx !DVERTISERx REQUESTINGx SPACEx THATx THEx LIABILITYx OFx THEx PAPERx INx THEx EVENTx OFx FAILUREx TOx PUBLISHx ANx ADVERTISEMENTx SHALLx BExLIMITEDxTOxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxBYx THEx ADVERTISERx FORx THATx PORTIONx OFx THEx ADVERTISINGx OCCUPIEDx BYx THEx INCORRECTxITEMxONLYxANDxTHATxTHEREx SHALLx BEx NOx LIABILITYx INx ANYx EVENTx BEYONDxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxFORxSUCHx ADVERTISEMENTx 4HEx PUBLISHERx SHALLx NOTx BEx LIABLEx FORx SLIGHTx CHANGESx ORx TYPOGRAPHICALx ERRORSx THATxDOxNOTxLESSENxTHExVALUExOFxANx ADVERTISEMENT BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx CANNOTx BEx RESPONSIBLEx FORx ERRORSx AFTERx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx OFx PUBLICATIONx OFx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx.OTICExOFxERRORSxONx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx SHOULDx IMMEDIATELYx BEx CALLEDx TOx THEx ATTENTIONx OFx THEx #LASSIÙEDx $EPARTMENTx TOx BEx CORRECTEDx FORx THEx FOLLOWINGx EDITIONBCCLASSIÙEDCOMxRESERVESx THExRIGHTxTOxREVISE xEDIT xCLASSIFYxORx REJECTx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx TOx RETAINx ANYx ANSWERSx DIRECTEDx TOx THEx BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx "OXx 2EPLYx 3ERVICEx ANDx TOx REPAYx THEx CUSTOMERxFORxTHExSUMxPAIDxFORxTHEx ADVERTISEMENTxANDxBOXxRENTAL

$)3#2)-).!4/29 ,%')3,!4)/.

!DVERTISERSx AREx REMINDEDx THATx 0ROVINCIALx LEGISLATIONx FORBIDSx THEx PUBLICATIONxOFxANYxADVERTISEMENTx WHICHx DISCRIMINATESx AGAINSTx ANYx PERSONxBECAUSExOFxRACE xRELIGION x SEX x COLOUR x NATIONALITY x ANCESTRYx ORxPLACExOFxORIGIN xORxAGE xUNLESSx THEx CONDITIONx ISx JUSTIÙEDx BYx Ax BONAx ÙDEx REQUIREMENTx FORx THEx WORKxINVOLVED

#/092)'(4

#OPYRIGHTx ANDORx PROPERTIESx SUBSISTx INx ALLx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx INx ALLx OTHERx MATERIALx APPEARINGx INx THISx EDITIONx OFx BCCLASSIÙED COMx 0ERMISSIONx TOx REPRODUCEx WHOLLYxORxINxPARTxANDxINxANYxFORMx WHATSOEVER x PARTICULARLYx BYx Ax PHOTOGRAPHICx ORx OFFSETx PROCESSx INxAxPUBLICATIONxMUSTxBExOBTAINEDx INxWRITINGxFROMxTHExxPUBLISHERx!NYx UNAUTHORIZEDxREPRODUCTIONxWILLxBEx SUBJECTxTOxRECOURSExINxLAW

!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

It’s been 21 years since that cold November day when I kissed your forehead and hugged you for the last time. On every one of the 7,670 days since, I have felt your eyes watching over me, your arms protecting me, your spirit guiding me and your love in my heart. I am a better husband, stepfather and family man because of the example set by you and Dad. I miss your hugs. Always and forever your devoted son, Dan.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS CRAFT FAIRS

CHRISTMAS

Vintage Retro & Collectible Show & Sale

TRADES, TECHNICAL

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

APARTMENT/CONDOS

HEAVY EQUIPMENT Technicians required for work in Fort McMurray. If you are interested in a balanced schedule, competitive wages and benefits please send your resume to: hr@gladiatorequipment.com or fax to 1-780-986-7051.

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

NANAIMO WATERFRONT 2nd floor condo. 1500 sq.ft. LR/DR/2bdrms with view, den, gas FP, secure bldg. 2 underground parking spaces. Maintenance fee includes hot water/gas/landscaping. 1 pet OK. $339,900 (250)753-9123

VOLUNTEERS

HELP WANTED

TRAVEL GETAWAYS ROMANTIC GET AWAY Campbell River oceanfront private cottage, gas F/P, deck hot tub, modern kitchen, laundry, cable TV, bbq. Bird & storm watching. www.seasidecottage.com 1-866-663-1800.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. NO Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. SignUp Online! iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853

Sunday, Nov. 24th, 9:30am - 4:00pm, $3 ‘Early Birds’ @ 8:30am, $20 Mary Winspear Centre, Sidney. Meet over 85 retro & collectible enthusiasts at this 120 table sale. Free parking; children free with adult.

OIL & GAS INDUSTRY GUARANTEED Job Placement

http://josiejones. shawwebspace.ca

• Labourers • Tradesmen • Class 1 Drivers

Contact Josie at 250-744-1807 or josiejones@shaw.ca

HELP WANTED GENERAL LABOURERS

CANADIAN DIABETES Association seeks a volunteer engagement person to assist staff with recruiting and training volunteers. Ambassadors to the business community also sought to increase support for the organization. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-3862269. THE DIDI Society seeks UVic students with interest in fair trade and social justice for campus committee to promote handicrafts by women in Guatemala and India. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269. THE WEST Coast Men’s Support Society based in Duncan seeks a Victoria representative for its programs which include support of fathers, communication skills, one-to-one counseling. Requires organizing and computer skills. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-3862269.

PERSONAL SERVICES MIND BODY & SPIRIT Kripalu full body massage. Release your stress now. Over 13 years experience. Gift Certificates. Women only. Holiday special. Professional. 250-514 -6223, www.andreakober.com

FINANCIAL SERVICES

UKRAINIAN FOOD SALES

Frozen Perogies, Cabbage Rolls, Borscht and Kobassa. Saturdays Nov 23 & 30, Dec 7, 14 & 21. 9 am-1 pm ORTHODOX CHURCH OF SAINT GEORGE 1100 Colville Road

INFORMATION DID YOU KNOW? BBB provides complaint resolution services for all businesses and their customers. Look for the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory E-edition on your Black Press Community Newspaper website at www.blackpress.ca. You can also go to http://vi.bbb.org/directory/ and click on the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory

PERSONALS REAL PEOPLE, Real Chat, Real Discreet Try FREE! 18+. Call 250-220-1300. Or visit online at: www.livelinks. com

YOUR COMMUNITY, YOUR CLASSIFIEDS Call 250.388.3535

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Home Movies to DVD. Also, Portraiture, Baby, Family + Maternity. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE FRIENDLY FRANK FULL AQUARIUM set with stand, 12x16x24�, filter, heater etc. $75. (250)472-2474.

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper?

PERSONALIZED & QUALITY Home Care Services available by Jan. 35yrs experience in Senior care. Call for my list of services. (250)532-3840.

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

4OPĂ–EMPLOYERS Ă–./7Ă–()2).'

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

BUYING OR SELLING? Call 250.388.3535

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

Call 24Hr. Free Recorded Message 1-888-213-2854

HOME CARE/SUPPORT COMING EVENTS

REAL ESTATE

LOST AND FOUND

LOST: LAPTOP IMac Pro 13� brushed alum. in black zipped case, near Jubilee areas. Reward. Call (250)480-9091.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

FOUND DORO Cell phone at Haro & Arbutus St. Call to identify (250)595-7720. LOST: CAT, Tanner Ridge. Female “Lucy�, black with white chest, paws and stripe on face. (250)652-2122.

In Loving Memory of Lorna Salmon (nee Dallin) Mar 15, 1948-Nov 21, 1992

PERSONAL SERVICES

4/0Ă–,/#!,Ă–*/"3 XXXMPDBMXPSLDB

CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

HELP WANTED

CREATIVE SERVICES

The award-winning North Island Gazette is seeking a graphic designer to join our community newspapers’ production department. This is a full time position for an experienced ad designer. The successful applicant should be familiar with Mac OSX and Adobe InDesign Software and ideally have experience designing ads and page layout. You must be a team player and able to work in a fast-paced, deadline driven open office environment. Black Press community news media is an independent and international media group with more than 190 community, daily and urban publications, 14 press facilities and over 160 websites in BC, Alberta, Washington, Hawaii and Ohio. Please submit your resume and cover letter in confidence to: Sandy Grenier Box 458 Port Hardy, BC V0N 2P0 Email: publisher@northislandgazette.com

./24( )3,!.$

'!:%44%

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT 110 -

Join a profession that supports and cares for our community. Medical and dental office clerks and transcriptionists are always in high demand. In addition to basic administrative and bookkeeping skills, you will also learn standard medical terminology. Career Opportunities: Medical Office Assistant O Dental Office Assistant Medical Transcriptionist MSP Billing Clerk O Ward Secretary Pharmaceutical Firms O Medical Supply Firms Medical Clerical in Research & Care Agencies

CALL VICTORIA: 250.384.8121 OR VISIT SPROTTSHAW.COM


OAK BAY News NEWS Fri, - Friday, Oak Bay NovNovember 22, 201322, 2013

www.vicnews.com A17 www.oakbaynews.com •A17



REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

FOR SALE BY OWNER

APARTMENT/CONDO

RECREATION

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

AUTO SERVICES

CARS

SIDNEY- DOWNTOWN. 1400 sq ft, $1800. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 6 appls, 1 secure prking. NS/NP. Avail Now. (250)655-4184.

RV RESORT ON THE LAKE

$$$ TOP CA$H PAID $$$. For ALL unwanted Vehicles, any condition. Call (250)885-1427.

$50 to $1000

SAANICH WEST- 1246 Hastings St, 3 bdrm Rancher, 2 garage, dining/living/family rooms, 2 bath (ensuite), F/P, appls incld, new roof. Walking distance to Interurban campus. Reduced price, $460,000. Call 250-477-4600.

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT Bright lg Bach 1,2,3 br. Units Fully reno 5 min drive to DT Victoria Full time on site manager

Move in today 250-588-9799

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO

admin@resortonthelake.com

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

ROOMS FOR RENT

SIDNEY- 3 bdrm sxs duplex, 1.5 bath, NS/NP. $1375+ utils. Available now (250)656-4003.

CRYSTAL POOL: 1 bdrm, full kitchen, shared bathroom, $565. NS/NP, non-drinker. Call (250)477-0686.

HOMES FOR RENT SPACIOUS 742 sq.ft CONDO in the Wave, 705-845 Yates St. Great investment close to all amenities downtown Victoria. (250)380-6934.

Spots available at Great Rates. Daily, weekly, monthly. Pool, Hot tub, exercise room, laundry, putting green, hiking, fishing, Pickle Ball Court. Free coffee in one of the best clubhouses on the island. Nanaimo area. www.resortonthelake.com 250-754-1975 or

4-BDRM HOUSE, near Commonwealth Pool. N/S, N/P. $1900 + utils. (250)920-6282 or (250)361-1569. SAXE POINT- 3 bdrm, 2 bath, brand new executive home w/ocean view & high end finishes. $2350 inclusive. Pets considered. (250)686-1513.

NORTH NANAIMO: Attention Students/Working Professionals: fully furnished room, nice, quiet area. Own bathroom, cable, FREE WiFi, shared kitchen and laundry. N/S, N/P, no partiers. $550/mo. Avail. immediately. 250-756-9746

SUITES, LOWER GOLDSTREAM- 2bdrm, 2bath 5appls, condo patio, pet, F/P, UG parking. $1150/mo. Avail Dec 1. Call 250-478-5334. ravenhillhomestead@shaw.ca

CARS 1966 CHEVY Pick up, 1/2 ton short box, burgundy. 3 in the tree, 6 cylinder. Good condition, runs great, comes with second set of winter tires and rims. Second owner for last 45 years, in Victoria. $6,000 obo. Call: 250-479-0441 or email: havoc@telus.net

AUTO FINANCING

LANGFORD (Mill Hill)- large, bright, quiet 1 bdrm, on bus route, parking NS/NP. Refs. $950 inclusive. (250)478-5261

SEASONAL ACCOMMODATION

MARIGOLDcozy 1 bdrm, woodstove. shared W/D, quiet. NS/NP. $850. 250-727-6217.

WANTED 1 or 2 bdrm to rent for 1 month to 6 weeks on or near waterfront in Oak Bay during May, June or July. Call Heather (250)920-9043 or email: heather ferguson01@gmail.com

WATERFRONT. NORTH Saanich. Above grnd, large 2bdrm, 2 bath. $1800./mo + 1/2 utils. Possibly sm boat moorage +. NP/NS. (250)656-5999.

Scrap Junk Broken Down Cars Trucks Vans

FREE TOW AWAY

250-686-3933 VEHICLES WANTED

1990 CHEVROLET Cavalier Z 24, 3.1 Litre. Only 70,000 km on rebuilt motor. Newer Luc High Performance clutch, 5sp trans, near new Hankook tires. Red, sun roof, mint interior, power doors/windows (new motors and regulators). Pioneer stereo w/iPod adapter, sub woofer, Pioneer 6x9 3 way speakers. Same owner since 1990, have all receipts. $3000. Chris, 250-595-0370 lv mess.

2008 OR newer automatic, low mileage Cooper or Cooper Clubman wanted. Private buyer will take over payments or buy outright. 250-474-3667, leave message.

Your Community

Classifieds can rev you up!

SELL IT FAST WITH CLASSIFIEDS!

TOWNHOUSES

SERVICE DIRECTORY

SAANICH: 55+ furnished 2 bdrm, balcony faces Swan Creek, 5 appls, in-suite W/D. $1200. utils incld 250-479-5437

TILLICUM- 2 bdrm, 1 bath. F/S. N/S. Avail Dec 1. $1000. (250)479-4779.

BUYING - RENTING- SELLING 250.388.3535

SIDNEY 3-BDRM, 2.5 bath. 5 appl’s, gas F/P, garage, sunroom. NS/NP. $1600. + utils. Avail Nov. 15. (250)656-7456.

CLASSIFIEDS WORK HARD! Call 250.388.3535

Call us today • 388-3535 •

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

FENCING

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

PAINTING

PLASTERING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

J&L Gardening yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. Call John or Louise (250)891-8677.

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

250-216-9476 ACCEPTING new contracts; landscape and carpentry. BBB/Insured. Res /Comm. www.ftguland.com

BIG BEAR Painting. Interior & Exterior. Quality work. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

COMPLETE HOME Repairs. Suites, Renos, Carpentry, Drywall, Painting. Licensed and insured. Darren 250-217-8131.

SAFEWAY PAINTING

PRESSURE WASHING

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601

CARPENTRY JEREMIAH’S CARPENTRY Specializing in small indoor and outdoor jobs and repairs. 20 yrs exp. Licensed, insured, registered. (250)857-1269.

CLEANING SERVICES HOUSEKEEPER EXPERIENCED, reliable. References. 250-920-6516, 250-881-7444.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

250-361-6193 Quality Electric Reno’s, res & comm. No job too small. Lic# 22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

10% OFF! Fall Cleanups, Raking, Pruning, Hauling, Mowing. (250)479-6495. (250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK Fall clean-up, hedge & tree pruning, weed & moss repair on lawns, blackberry/ ivy removal, gutter repair/cleaning.

250-479-7950 FREE ESTIMATES • Lawn Maintenance • Landscaping • Hedge Trimming • Tree Pruning • Yard Cleanups • Gardening/Weeding • Aeration, Odd Jobs NO SURPRISES NO MESS www.hollandave.ca DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141 PREPARE YOUR Lawn & garden for fall & winter. Glenwood Gardenworks. 250-474-4373.

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB

JACK NASH, serving Victoria since 1980. We do it all! Free estimates WCB. 250-881-3886

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

GARDENING

ELECTRICAL (250)217-3090.ELECTRICIAN 30 yrs exp. New homes and Renos. Knob & tube replacement. Service calls. Senior’s Disc. Free est. Lic.#3003.

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Moving- 2 men, 5 ton, $90/hr.

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave- window, gutter cleaning, roof-de-moss, gutter guards, power washing. Free est.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

JUNK BOX- We Do All The Loading

HANDYPERSONS

JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK.

BIG BEAR Handyman. Painting, household repairs. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774 SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. BBB accredited. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

PAINTING A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

Commercial/Residential Interior/Exterior

250-652-2255 250-882-2254

Written Guarantee Call for details Budget Compliance

15% SENIORS DISCOUNT

PLUMBING EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

DREAMING OF A New Career?

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

TREE SERVICES BUDDY’S TREE SERVICESTrimming, pruning, chipping, removals, hedges, lawn care, Insured. Keith, (250)474-3697.

MOVING & STORAGE

ABBA EXTERIORS Gutter cleaning & repairs. Seniors discounts. WCB, Insured. Free estimates. (778)433-9275.

HANDYMAN- Light maintenance. Leaky taps, caulking, stain fabric/floor removal, electrical outlets & switch. Call (250)818-2709.

Peacock Painting

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

UPHOLSTERY UPHOLSTERER work. Your fabric 250-480-7937.

or

NEEDS mine.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

NEED REPAIRS?

Use our community classifieds Service Directory to find an expert in your community


A18 • www.vicnews.com OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY

Real Estate Victoria

Select your home. Select your mortgage.

Friday,November November 22,21, 2013 - OAK BAY NEWS week beginning 2013 Page 17

OPENHOUSES Published Every Thursday

Oak Bay 250-370-7601 Victoria 250-483-1360 Westshore 250-391-2933 Sidney 250-655-0632 Chatterton Way 250-479-0688 www.vericoselect.com

Find more details on the Open Houses below in the Nov. 21 - Nov. 27 edition of Real Estate Victoria 4-3981 Saanich, $329,900

Sunday 2-4 Century 21 Queenswood Realty Brian Meredith-Jones, 250 477-1100

1752 Armstrong, $774,900

302-1121 Oscar, $259,000 Saturday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Roland Stillings, 250-744-3301

pg. 8

Saturday 1-3 RE/MAX Camosun Mark Lawless, 250-744-3301

Sunday 2-4 Newport Realty Matt Eide, 250 704-9949

pg. 8

Sunday 2-4 Brown Brothers Real Estate Robert Young 250 385-6900

pg. 9

pg. 3

Saturday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Doug Poruchny, 250-474-4800

Saturday 1-3 Pemberton Holmes Jim Fields, 250-384-8124 pg. 2

Saturday 2-4 Fair Realty Danny Parmar 250 213-1717

Saturday 2-4 Newport Realty John West 250 385-2033

Saturday 1-3 JONESco Real Estate Inc. Marilyn Ball, 250-655-7653

Saturday & Sunday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Scott Munro, 250 477-5353

pg. 7

1504A Glentana Rd, $349,900 Saturday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Doug Poruchny, 250-474-4800

403-2527 Quadra, $264,900 Saturday 2:30-4 One Percent Realty Guy Effler, 250-812-4910

pg. 19

106-55 Songhees, $549,800 Saturday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Dale Sheppard, 250-478-9600

pg. 9

Saturday 11:30-1 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Jackie Adkins, 250-477-5353

pg. 9

Sunday 2-4 RE/MAX Camosun Doreen Halstenson, 250-744-3301

403-1436 Harrison, $269,900 Saturday 2-4 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Deidra Junghans, 250-474-6003

pg. 8

510-165 Kimta, $389,999 Saturday 1-2:30 Fair Realty Ltd. Sean Thomas, 250 896-5478

pg. 8

11-532 Fisgard, $424,900 Saturday 2-4 Newport Realty Blair Watling, 250-385-2033

pg. 7

203-1110 Oscar, $329,900 Sunday 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Susan Carley, 250-477-7291

pg. 18

7-1115 Craigflower, $479,900 Sunday 1-3 Pemberton Holmes Jim Fields, 250-384-8124

pg. 10

pg. 10

1028 Tillicum, $424,900

pg. 20

5-915 Glen Vale, $669,888

Saturday & Sunday 1-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty James Liu, 250 477-5353

pg. 10

Saturday 1-2 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Mark McDougall, 250-588-8588

pg. 9

Saturday 11-1 Pemberton Holmes Rick Couvelier, 250-477-0921

199 Olive, $839,900

3225 Service

Saturday 2:30-4:30 Pemberton Holmes Shawn Adye, 250-384-8124

pg. 8

302-327 Maitland, $275,000

Sunday 1-3 RE/MAX Camosun Mark Lawless, 250-744-3301

pg. 8

405-630 Seaforth, $359,900

Saturday 2:30 - 4 Re/Max Camosun Kevin Koetke, 250 478-9600

pg. 10

pg. 3

pg. 20

4-1231 McKenzie, $529,000

Saturday 12-2 Pemberton Holmes Jeff Shorter, 250-744-9903

pg. 20

pg. 8

pg. 8

733A Humboldt (200 Douglas)

Saturday 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Frank Chan, 250-477-7291

4675 McMorran, $699,000 pg. 1

pg. 11

Saturday 1-2 Boorman’s Rod Hay, 250-595-1535

Sunday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Doug Poruchny, 250-474-4800

Sunday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Rosemarie Colterman, 250 592-4422

Saturday 2-4 Pemberton Holmes Corie Meyer, 250-384-8124

Saturday & Sunday 1-4 Sutton Group West Coast James Gardiner (250) 507-4333

pg. 10

pg. 14

pg. 14

13-10471 Resthaven, $344,900 pg. 11

pg. 5

Sunday 1-3 Holmes Realty Kimberly Legeard, 250 656-0911

pg. 14

Saturday 2-4 Macdonald Realty Jane Logan, 250-920-6868

pg. 3

1188 Parkdale Creek Gdns, $419,900 Sunday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Neil Docherty, 250-478-9600

pg. 14

Thursday thru Monday 1-4 Re/Max Camosun Brad Gregory, 250 744-3301

pg. 6254774

Sunday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Marsha Crawford, 250-889-8200

pg. 14

Sunday 12-2 Pemberton Holmes Greg Long, 250-384-8124

pg. 6

3467 Happy Valley Rd.

Saturday & Sunday 12-4 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Mike Hartshorne, 250-889-4445 Saturday 12:30-2 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Brad Forrest, 250-508-1973

106-611 Brookside, $218,900 pg. 6

46-7583 Central Saanich, $122,900

Saturday 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Mike Hartshorne, 250-590-3921

Saturday 12:30-2 SmartMove Real Estate Gary Brown, 250-380-6683

3126 Lynnlark Pl, $387,900 pg. 12

302-9155 Lochside, $1,198,800 Sunday 2-4 Newport Realty Blair Watling, 250-385-2033

pg. 5

406-611 Brookside, $189,000

10500 McDonald Park, $585,000

Sunday 1-3 Holmes Realty Michele Holmes, 250-656-0911

Saturday & Sunday 1-4 Pemberton Holmes Greg Long, 250-384-8124

30-3650 Citadel Pl, $559,000 pg. 12

Sunday 2-4 JONESco Real Estate Inc. Ian Heath, 250-655-7653

Saturday & Sunday 1-3 Pemberton Holmes Nicole Burgess, 250 384-8124

593 Latoria Rd, $294,000

2655 Sooke Rd, $219,900+

1469 Honeysuckle Pl, $689,900 pg. 5

pg. 15

Saturday 12-2 Pemberton Holmes Greg Long, 250-384-8124

pg. 6

304-2732 Matson Rd, $229,900 pg. 12

Wednesday-Sunday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Neil Docherty, 250-478-9600

pg. 5

103-383 Wale Rd, $207,900 Saturday 1-3 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Kevin Seibel, 250-580-4878

102-2360 James White, $227,000 pg. 6

Sunday 12:30-2:30 Pemberton Holmes Andrew Mara, 250-384-8124

pg. 7

9820 Seaport, $499,500+ pg. 8

Saturday & Sunday 2-4 Holmes Realty Ltd Lorne Klipper 250 656-0911

pg. 12

8880 Park Pacific Terr, $1,248,000 pg. 1

11-1063 Valewood, $599,900 Sunday 12-2 Pemberton Holmes Corie Meyer, 250-384-8124

pg. 5

pg. 5

4009 Cedar Hill Rd, $529,900 pg. 13

Sunday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Lynne Sager, 250 744-3301

pg. 11

Sunday 2-4 Sutton Group West Coast Realty Shelly Reed, 250-213-7444 Saturday 2-4 Pemberton Holmes Corie Meyer, 250-818-3216

pg. 12

4-9925 Third St, $709,000 Sunday 1-3 Holmes Realty Magdalin Heron 250 656-0911

Saturday 2:30-4 SmartMove Real Estate Gary Brown, 250-380-6683

2588 Legacy Ridge, $464,900

Saturday, Sunday & Monday 1-3 Re/Max Camosun Craig Walters, 250-655-0608

Saturday 1-3 Royal Lepage Coast Capital Sladja Stojkovic 250 477-5353

Saturday 2:30-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Brad Forrest, 250-508-1973

Sunday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Don Bellamy, 250-744-3301

pg. 12

11120 Alder, $1,080,000

3795 Burnside Pl, $549,900

211-1490 Garnet

22-899 Royal Oak, $569,000

Saturday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Sharen Warde, 250-592-4422

pg. 11

534 Heatherdale, $639,900

Saturday 1-3 DFH Real Estate Freda Wiggs, 250 477-7291

Sunday 1-3 Holmes Realty Steven Klipper, 250-656-0911

891 Wild Ridge Way, $399,900

3343 Wishart, $665,900

7161 West Saanich Rd, $239,900

329-40 Gorge Rd W, $309,000 pg. 2

202-1680 Poplar, $219,000

220-1680 Poplar Ave, $142,900

Saturday 12:30 - 2 Re/Max Camosun Kevin Koetke, 250 478-9600

Sunday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Ross Shortreed, 250-858-3585

111-1505 Church Ave, $219,000

3760 Doncaster, $545,000

Saturday 12-2 Pemberton Holmes Andrew Mara, 250-384-8124

pg. 11

1020 Burnside Rd W

1575 Jasper, $620,000 pg. 13

pg. 11

11058 Larkspur, $487,000

306-494 Marsett Pl, $329,000

101-1196 Clovelly, $389,000 pg. 3

Sunday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Sharen Warde, 250-592-4422

102-651 Jolly Pl, $199,000

982 Mckenzie Ave, $299,900 pg. 18

Saturday 2-4 Brown Brothers Real Estate Robert Young 250 385-6900

Saturday & Sunday 1-3 Re/Max Alliance Karen Love, 250-386-8875

Saturday & Sunday 1-3 Re/Max Camosun Craig Walters, 250-655-0608

Sunday 1-3 Holmes Realty Irene Dunic, 250 656-0911

79 Hampton, $529,000

4007 Birring Pl, $799,999 pg. 18

Sunday 2-4 One Percent Realty VI Ray Kong, 250-590-7011

pg. 10

102-4394 West Saanich Rd, $399,000

1759 Barrie Rd

pg. 19

pg. 14

101-2329 Bradford Ave, $479,500

591 Melba, $499,500

Midtown Park

Saturday & Sunday 12-4 RE/MAX Alliance Ron Neal, 250-386-8181

Saturday & Sunday 1-2 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Bill Knowles, 250-656-0131

102-2286 Henry, $259,000

4343 Tyndall, $588,800

4 Stoneridge, $474,900 Saturday 3-5 Pemberton Holmes Jeff Shorter, 250-744-9903

pg. 9

pg. 9

4022 Palmetto

29 Brigadoon Pl, $824,000 606 Speed Ave, $215,000

302-2250 James White, $268,900

3994 Century, $504,900

Saturday & Sunday 1-4 Re/Max Camosun Dan Juricic, 250-514-8261

5502 Alderley Rd, $449,900

Saturday 3-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Mark McDougall, 250-588-8588

Saturday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Cheryl Bejcar, 250-592-4422

1-3211 Shelley St, $359,900

629 Toronto, $499,000

Saturday, Sunday & Monday 1-4 Macdonald Realty Helene Roy, 250 883-2715

pg. 7

2604 Shieling Pl, $739,900

624 St Patrick, $848,888

5-800 St Charles

4000 Cedar Hill, $579,000

Saturday 1-3 Re/Max Camosun Craig Walters, 250-655-0608

pg. 7

620 Southwood, $748,000

Saturday 3-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Mark McDougall, 250-588-8588

pg. 2

5577 Medberry, $699,000

3223 Woodridge, $725,000 Saturday 1-3 Royal LePage Coast Capital Sharen Warde, 250-592-4422

pg. 14

Saturday 2-4 Century 21 Queenswood Realty Ruth Stark, 250-477-1100

pg. 16

pg. 14

46-2600 Ferguson, $299,900 Sunday 2-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Sharen Warde, 250-592-4422

pg. 5

3008 Dornier Rd. pg. 14

Daily 12-4 DFH Real Estate Ltd. Mike Hartshorne, 250-889-4445

2883 Cudlip Rd, $368,900 Saturday & Sunday 1-3 Re/Max Camosun Dana Hahn, 250-744-3301

HEY KIDS! SEND US YOUR

By Sunday Midnight Dec. 1st All letters will be entered to win a special prize Full contest details available at www.vicnews.com/contests

pg. 16


www.vicnews.com • A19

OAK BAY NEWS - Friday, November 22, 2013

Leather

SOFA

SALE scandesigns.com

Model # A768

Model # 30016

1998

Model # 5793 Sofa and Loveseat VICTORIA 661 McCallum Rd 250.475.2233

NANAIMO 1711 Bowen Rd 250.753.6361

37

CELEBRATING

COQUITLAM 1400 United Blvd

604.524.3444

YEARS

1398

Model # 30248 Sofa and Loveseat

1798

Model # 1263

RICHMOND 12551 Bridgeport Rd 604.273.2971

LANGLEY 20429 Langley By-Pass 604.530.8248

3198

1798 KELOWNA 1850 Springfield Rd 250.860.7603

Solid Acacia Wood Dining Table with two extensions $998

Solid Acacia Buffet $998 Dining Chair $298

VICTORIA 661 McCallum Rd NANAIMO 1711 Bowen Rd COQUITLAM 1400 United Blvd LANGLEY 20429 Langley By-Pass

250.474.3433 250.753.8900 604.524.3443 604.530.9458

Museandmerchant.com


A20 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, November 22, 2013 - OAK

Halftime Specials! Pay it forward Great food bank items

Sun-Rype

Pure Apple Juice 1L Single, 4 For $5

Fort Hardy

Pork Back Ribs with Barbecue Sauce On Sale Fully-Cooked Previously Frozen 568g Regular Retail: $9.99 Each

*SA ME ITE M OF EQ LES SER VA LUEUA L OR .

On Sale

Family Size Pizza

1299 Case of 12

Pepperoni, Hawaiian or Deluxe 12” x 16”

On Sale

Compliments

9

9Each9

Light Tuna Chunk or Flaked 170g

Single, $1.09 Each

On Sale Case of 6

Hunt’s

Tomato Sauce Assorted 398ml

Single, 99¢ Each

1099 Case of 12

Where this symbol appears, deposit & enviro levies are applicable.

7 Layer Dip

On Sale

On Sale

Large, 550g

Grown in Mexico

99

On Sale

Large Avocados

743009

2 $3 for

Each

50

When you buy 2

Coke, Pepsi,

THRIFTY

Tortilla Chips

Selected Flavours, Dasani or Aquafina 12 Pack or Glaceau Vitamin Water 4 Pack Selected

Selected 400g

On Sale

2 5 $

for

Specials in Effect until

On Sale

100

When you buy 2

3 999

November 26th, 2013 ONLY

for

5

75

BAY NEWS

Oak Bay News, November 22, 2013  

November 22, 2013 edition of the Oak Bay News

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you