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Page 17 Your Community Connection

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Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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he Frostbite Music Festival won’t be happening this winter because the society that runs the festival is mired in debt and missed the deadlines for two key funding grants. The decision to postpone the three-day festival was made by a unanimous vote last night at a special board meeting in the Frostbite house at Shipyards Park. “We have a huge capacity issue. We still have a $24,000 debt. We need more than a five-person board,” said board member Renee-Claude Carrier. The board is now asking the public to come forward as volunteers to help the society get back on its feet. “We also need people on the sidelines that help us by taking events on and help us get to a place where we can pay off our debt,” Carrier said. The problems arose after the society missed the deadline for the territory’s Arts Operating Fund, which usually provides core funding of $32,000. That money pays the salary of a producer to put the festival together. The deadline is Feb. 15, right in the middle of Frostbite’s annual three-day music festival. “It’s really challenging for the festival to put on a festival, do the application for the grant and do everything the same weekend. It was decided last year that we would no longer apply because of the

timing,” Carrier said. The society also lost money on last year’s festival, but Carrier couldn’t say how much because the board’s finances for last year aren’t finished yet. That in turn led the society to also miss a Sept. 15 deadline for a national arts project grant worth $20,000. There is one more chance to apply for that grant, with a deadline of Dec. 15, but that’s so close to the festival that the board can’t risk the uncertainty, so the standard three-day festival is on the rocks. Instead, the society will try to continue running concerts and other special one-off events through the winter to maintain its community presence and try to raise money to pay down its debt. The society is also still dealing with the loss of Andrea Burgoyne, who was the festival’s producer until she left to work for the Winnipeg Music Festival last August. She often handled most of the grant writing, said artistic director Eric Epstein, and the society needs to find someone to fill that role. “I think that in order to move ahead, the society really needs to take the issue of management and professionalism very strongly,” Epstein said. “It needs to face up to its own management deficits. It’s not just a matter of getting people together to do more stuff. We need to get knowledgeable people together to deal with the real management issues and find a way

to move forward in a professional manner,” he said. Steve Reed, the new executive director of Music Yukon, said he’s worried about the impact that the loss of the festival could have on the local music scene. “Losing Frostbite would be a massive blow to local artists. This festival gives more stage time to local talent than just about any festival in Canada,” Reed said. Yukoners love Frostbite, said Reed, and he hopes the public will step forward to help. So does Carrier. “We need people to help organize fundraisers and come up with ideas of how to raise some quick money. People who can come volunteer would be huge. We need people to join the board or to join committees who are good at writing grants, who are good doing financial work. Instead of paying a bookkeeper, if someone wanted to donate bookkeeping skills, that would help, or someone who is good at strategic planning,” Carrier said. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

Correction Last week we reported that Castle Rock Enterprises is suing the City of Whitehorse over what it says was an unfairly-awarded paving contract. Castle Rock is suing for the lost profits, legal costs and interest – not the cost of the contract, as we reported. The News regrets any confusion this error may have caused.


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

3

Yukon News

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Lise Farynowski smiles after getting her flu shot from community health nurse Brenda Dedon at the Whitehorse Health Clinic on Tuesday. A limited number of Flu Mist nasal spray immunizations are available this year for children and youth, at Whitehorse flu clinic locations only.

Government flip flops on exploration project Ashley Joannou

tory said environmental risks could be mitigated. The Chisana herd has consisted he Yukon government has of about 700 animals since 2005. The changed its mind about a minherd is in Yukon and Alaska on the ing exploration project south of Klutlan Plateau and near the headBeaver Creek. waters of the White River. Despite originally approving White River First Nation took the the plan by Tarsis Resources Ltd., government to court. officials now say exploration cannot In a July 5 ruling this year, Justice go forward. Ron Veale ruled the government did Meanwhile the White River First not properly consult with the First Nation is calling for a ban of all stak- Nation. He ordered the government ing in the First Nation’s traditional to consult further before deciding to territory. issue the licence or not. The hotly contested project pitted The consultation took place Sept. the government against the First Na23, according to government docution and led to a battle in the Yukon ments. Supreme Court. In a new decision document Tarsis had applied for a five-year released Friday, the government now Class 3 exploration permit. The says it will not approve the plan. work would have required, among This time, the territory says the other things, heavy machinery, new environmental impact of the explotrails, line cutting and trenching. Last year, the Yukon Environmen- ration could not be mitigated. “The evaluation report concluded tal and Socio-economic Assessment that significant adverse environmenBoard recommended the project tal and socio-economic effects that not be allowed to proceed because could not be mitigated in relation it would have significant adverse to wildlife and wildlife habitat and effects on wildlife, specifically the First Nation traditional land use and Chisana caribou herd. The First Nation also opposed the culture could occur if the project proceeded,” the decision document application. states. At first the government chose to “In the consultation meeting held go against the assessment board’s on September 23, representatives of recommendation and allow the White River discussed openly and project to move forward. In its original decision, the terrifrankly with the (government) the News Reporter

T

importance of the Chisana caribou to their culture. They also spoke in detail about the importance of the land where the project is proposed to occur and noted that displacement from this area – distinct from other areas in their asserted traditional territory – would have adverse impacts on their culture.” In an interview this morning, Robert Holmes, Yukon’s director of mineral resources for the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, said a lot of new information regarding the caribou came out in the year and a half between the two decisions. “The project is kind of remarkable for the information about caribou that came out after the seeking views and information period closed,” he said. When the government first considered its position, biologists thought the caribou herd could be managed through regulations, said Holmes. “We were finding enough information about caribou that you could, through spatial changes and timing windows, deal with the concerns.” Since that time, he said, new data has come in including more complete collaring data and new reports that weren’t available the first time. During the time between deci-

sions, a different project, this time by Teck Resources, was approved for land just to the southeast of the Tarsis project. The cumulative effects of the two projects were also considered in denying Tarsis’s plans this time, Holmes said. In a statement from the White River First Nation, Deputy Chief Dwayne Broeren criticized the government’s handling of the situation. “It is a shame that YG wasted all this time and money fighting for a company that disregarded WRFN interests blatantly. However, we are pleased that ultimately they listened to WRFN. WRFN seeks a new relationship with Canada and YG that reflects our unique status of unextinguished aboriginal rights and title to our traditional territory.” Questions to the government about how much money was spent on the legal wrangling were not answered in time for the News’ deadline. The First Nation calls for the banning of all staking in WRFN traditional territory “while consultation and accommodation issues are being resolved with government.” “The WRFN have informed YG and Canada that they are reasserting the traditional territory maps provided to government before the UFA Land Claim process began with

WRFN, and long before mineral discoveries were made on their lands,” the statement reads. “WRFN took this step after conducting extensive traditional land use and historical land usage studies of their people’s history.” White River points to this case, and also a recent win by the Ross River First Nation, as a sign that things are changing. “The WRFN win in court over YG and Tarsis, as well as RRDC killing ‘free entry’ in court, show that the old ways of doing business in YT for mining are over. WRFN is not interested in a UFA-based land claim but we are willing to negotiate a new relationship with government that reflects the modern reality and our unextinguished title,” WRFN Land Co-ordinator Janet VanderMeer said in the statement. “WRFN is re-asserting our land claim to our entire traditional territory and we have the evidence to support this. We hope the premier respects what was learned from the Tarsis fiasco and will join WRFN in now establishing a more productive process to resolve our issues that abandons their confrontational previous approaches.” Marc Blythe, president and CEO of Tarsis, said his company was still reviewing the government’s decision. Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com


4

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Yukon, Alaska to study cross-border power link Jesse Winter News Reporter

T

he Yukon and Alaskan governments are putting up $150,000 each to study a possible electrical grid link between Skagway and Whitehorse. The money comes from an agreement signed on Friday in Skagway by Energy Minister Scott Kent, Economic Develop-

ment Minister Currie Dixon and Alaska’s commissioner of economic development, Susan Bell. “We’re going to conduct a few different studies,” said Dixon. “One is a high-level investigation into the feasibility of an electrical grid extension from Whitehorse down into Skagway. “Basically, we’re looking at if that grid extension were to come

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a feasibility study on the hydro project itself, nearly dashing Skagway’s hopes of seeing West Creek come to fruition anytime soon. This new feasibility study could help show that West Creek is not only possible, but is mutually beneficial to both Alaska and the Yukon, said Dixon. “It theoretically could provide cruise ships with power in the summer when they need it in the ports there, and provide us with the power when we need it in the winter,” Dixon said. Along with looking at a possible power grid link to Southwestern Alaska, the two countries will also look at sharing a fibre-optic link as well. In August the Yukon government announced another feasibility study to look at providing a fibre-optic link through Carcross to Skagway and then

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Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

jointly by Environment Yukon and Environment Canada. One of the new stations is near the mouth of Dalglish Creek in the Peel A truck driver is being credited Mounties from Beaver Creek, River basin. with helping RCMP catch an Ameri- Haines Junction and Whitehorse The other two are both upstream can man who drove through the were all called in to help with the from Old Crow in the Porcupine border in Beaver Creek. search. River basin. One of those is on the At around 3 a.m. on Thursday, Drivers in the area were also given Eagle River at the Dempster Highway, Oct. 10, Canada Border Security and the other is near the mouth of a description of the vehicle. Agency officers refused to allow a McParlon Creek. While RCMP members were 40-year-old Utah man into Canada “The health of our water systems investigating a single motor vehicle because of his lengthy criminal has always been a top priority in collision unrelated to the borderrecord, police say. North Yukon and it’s great to see running incident, “a helpful truck They told him he could turn driver advised them that he had spot- our government acting to ensure we around and return to the U.S. maintain the water quality through ted the suspect vehicle now driving “He at first accepted this option northbound towards the Duke River baseline data collection,” said Darius and started to head back towards the Bridge on the Alaska Highway,” police Elias, MLA for Vuntut Gwitchin, in U.S. border but then made a U-turn a press release. “The more surface say. and drove down the opposite side of Officers were able to arrest a man water knowledge we have, the better the road around the border guard management decisions we can make. within minutes. building and headed southbound on I believe this decision reflects the valHis name was not released. He has the Alaska Highway through the town ues that Yukoners hold because water been turned over to border security of Beaver Creek,” the RCMP said in a is essential to all aspects of our lives.” officials and is now facing charges The cost for installing and operatstatement. and fines under the Immigration and ing the new water stations is $147,700 Refugee Protection Act. for this fiscal year. An additional (Ashley Joannou) Wed, Oct 16 & $119,000 has been set aside for next Thurs, Oct 17 year’s operations. New water monitoring Northern Cross contributed Whitehorse Yukon Cinema Whi8thorse tools for North Yukon helicopter time and other services 304 Wood Street Ph: 668-6644 because it is already doing exploration work in the area, and will benefit The Yukon government has installed three new water monitoring from the collected data. All of Yukon’s water data can be stations in the North Yukon. accessed at yukonwater.ca. Data from The instruments collect informa(G) Nightly in 3D at 7:00 & 9:20 PM the new stations will be available later tion like river level and flow rate. this year. There are 64 water monitoring stations across the Yukon, operated (Jacqueline Ronson)

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into existence, what potential projects could be added to it? West Creek is definitely one of them,” he said. Skagway has asked the Alaskan government to help build the West Creek hydro project for the past six years. Its extra power would help run the cruise ships that dock at its port. Right now, the cruise ships depend on their diesel engines, leaving a haze of exhaust hanging in the area. A year ago the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency mandated that ships switch to a more environmentally friendly, low-sulphur fuel while docked in port. But it’s still far from clean. If the borough can provide a power hook-up for the ships, they can turn their engines off altogether while in port. In March, the state said no to

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Yukon News

Whistle Bend complications continue Jesse Winter News Reporter

I

t cost the territory $100,000 to keep the pipes in the nearly empty Whistle Bend subdivision from freezing last winter. Usually, the city pays for sewer and water services in Whitehorse, but because the territory still owns the land, the city isn’t responsible for paying the costs, said acting city manager Mike Gau. In most areas of the city, residents’ regular water usage creates enough draw through the system to keep the pipes from freezing. But there aren’t enough people in Whistle Bend to keep the water running. “The heating is allowing water to flow through the system, also called bleeding, which keeps both the water and sewer pipes from freezing,” Gau said in an email. “The development agreement requires the Yukon government to pay for bleeding until consumption for residents is enough to keep the pipes from freezing,” Gau said. When the territory put up for sale the second phase of Whistle Bend earlier this fall, no one bid on the lots and that site is still entirely empty. Gau said the city and the territory are still deciding what to do with the pipes in that part of the development for the winter. At this point, the city won’t be responsible for the bearing those costs until at least December. The transfer of Whistle Bend’s phase two lots from the territorial government to the city is delayed

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Empty lots in Whitehorse’s Whistle Bend subdivision. Transfer of phase two of the development from the Yukon government to the city is delayed while inspections are completed.

because of outstanding inspections reports on the paving work, according to the City of Whitehorse. Gau said the majority of the inspections are finished, except for underground workings, which were not ready to be inspected. At this point, he didn’t know of any

Canadian Review of the 2002 Yukon River Salmon Agreement 10 Years Post-Implementation In 2002, Canada and the United States formally implemented the Yukon River Salmon Agreement under the umbrella of the Pacific Salmon Treaty. The Agreement was negotiated to guide the management and harvest sharing of Canadian-origin Chinook and chum salmon stocks inhabiting the Yukon River. Canadian users, stakeholders and governments with an interest in the management of Yukon River salmon are invited to attend an engagement session to discuss the performance of the Yukon River Salmon Agreement. Date: Time: Location:

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deficiencies or warranty issues. The reports should be completed soon, he said. “If everything passes inspections and any deficiencies are addressed through warranty, we may have ownership by December,” Gau said. If there are any minor repairs

needed, they will be completed in the spring and shouldn’t delay the transfer, Gau said. The Department of Community Services, which currently owns the land and is responsible for the construction contracts, was unable to comment by press time. Ted Danyluk, the vice-presi-

dent of Castle Rock Enterprises, which was contracted for the paving and surface work in phase two, said he is still waiting for a list of deficiencies from the territory, but that he’s been assured any required fixes will be minor. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com


6

Yukon News

Opinion

EDITORIAL

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

INSIGHT

LETTERS

COMMENTARY

Yukon’s capital costs are out of control Charles McLean

T

he Sept. 13 edition of the News described Jesse Winter’s difficulties in trying to determine, over a six-month period, how well the Government of Yukon spends money on capital projects. From what I know about building construction projects, the short answer is poorly. This has held true for all political stripes, so the parties shouldn’t be pointing fingers at each other. This is largely why I haven’t bid directly on Yukon government design contracts for about six years – few people in government care about cost effectiveness, running a project well, or getting a good result. They routinely exceed the original budget by significant amounts. I just couldn’t take the absence of care on the part of the government anymore. Essentially, the territory fails to give direction, watch over the project and say no when it should. The fact that the government wouldn’t provide simple, detailed and definitive numbers kind of speaks for itself, doesn’t it? Instead, you got the runaround. You wrote that they told you part of the difficulty in providing answers was the government “often doesn’t know what it will have to spend.” Oh, please. Every project that comes out for design has a construction budget associated with it. Before you go shopping, you should know if you’re looking at Chevs and Fords, or Mercedes. I’d guess that there may be some deliberate obfuscation going on, so the situation doesn’t look as bad as it is. Your article

stated that the territory claims 75 per cent of building projects were within budget. Maybe that’s the escalated, “we didn’t want to spend that much,” budget. Let’s give an example. You were given a contract value for the Tantalus School of $11.1 million and a completion cost of $11.5 million. That sounds pretty good, unless you know that the original budget in the design request for proposal was $7 million. A whopping 65 per cent overrun paints a different picture, doesn’t it? I don’t have figures handy for all the projects you list, but surely somebody in government should realize that curving glass walls, curved hardwood radiator covers, unique roof shapes and other features all add up. The territory’s initial design budgets have often been reasonable – it’s the lack of management at later stages where it goes awry. There can be some valid reasons for cost escalation, but if the scope of the project is accurately defined, the site investigated, all those good things done … well, you should end up close to where you started. Let me give you an inside look at how costs grow. First, a reasonable budget is established for construction. Then design starts, nobody pays sufficient attention to good value, and the cost swells. Rather than make a course correction, the budget grows. By tender, the budget may have been revised a couple times and is now “the new black.” The tender comes in over budget for a variety of reasons that I’m not going to discuss here, and the accepted bid becomes “the new black 2.0.” By the end of construction, the Publisher

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cost has continued to grow, and the final number often becomes “the new black 3.0,” and is the budget of record. Then you can say that you were within budget. I sure wish my personal budgeting could work like this. Of course, it’s not my money that’s being wasted … oh, wait, it is. We’re a rich little place, a lot of people work for government, and nobody cares enough. If they did, the politicians would have to crack down on the bureaucrats who are largely responsible for this situation. Instead, the politicians don’t know enough about how this works to control costs, and they believe what briefing notes tell them. In fact, many bureaucrats shouldn’t be called project managers, but briefing note writers, as they mostly process a project, not manage it. There’s some fallout from this mess. First Nations, in learning how to manage projects, look to the Yukon government for an example. Some First Nations assume that a project is supposed to come in about 30 per cent over budget. That’s a bit sad, and it’s unReporters

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necessary. That’s a generalization, of course. We recently finished the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations’ Da Ku Cultural Centre. The initial design budget about five years ago was $12 million. It tendered under budget, and even after adding 20 feet to the assembly hall during construction and some other changes, finished at $12.7 million. That’s how it’s supposed to be done, and I’m pleased that our team of designers and the First Nation personnel were able to accomplish this. Everybody was paying attention. What is the Yukon government doing to make it all better? It’s adding more layers of management, rather than fix what they have. The new trend

is for the territorial manager to manage a private sector manager, who then is supposed to manage the job. Confusing? Yes. Effective? Doubtful. Costs more? Sure. Design/build is another way of passing the work and responsibility to somebody else. Maybe we should start thinking about what could be bought with this wasted money. Lots of hospital equipment might be a start. Or how about giving us the equivalent of the Alaska oil cheque, and pass out a couple thousand bucks to everybody every year? That’s a lot more democratic than allowing a lucky few to tap into the waste stream. Charles McLaren is an architect who lives in Whitehorse.

Quote of the Day “People who can come volunteer would be huge. We need people to join the board or to join committees who are good at writing grants, who are good doing financial work.” Renee-Claude Carrier, Frostbite Music Society board member, while announcing that the festival won’t run this year. Page 2

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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

INSIGHT Are you working a 15-hour week? by Keith Halliday

YUKONOMIST I

t is a safe bet that most of your ancestors spent most of their daylight hours working to find enough food and shelter to get by. Some of your forebears might have been idle and overfed priests or potentates of some long-forgotten kingdom. Others might perhaps have stumbled into some uninhabited temperate ecosystem rich in food that didn’t run away or fight back. But most of your ancestors, most of the time, struggled to keep body and soul together. Consider, however, the amazing productivity of the modern farm and factory. Just a few per cent of the population produce our food, and just a few per cent more could run the machines that would produce

more clothes and tools than our ancestors would know what to do with. With food and basic needs taken care of, the rest of us are in “services.” We are newspaper columnists, lawyers, barbers, car detailers, yoga instructors, real estate agents, consultants, marketing experts, video game testers, policy analysts and so on. Famous British economist John Maynard Keynes predicted in 1930 that by now everyone would be working a 15-hour week. A few people are working this little by choice, but not many. And there has been an increase in leisure time for many people in recent decades. When I was a kid, we considered it normal that my father would work five days a week plus half of Saturday. This is less common now. Most advanced countries also have more holidays than they used to. But most people still work 40hour weeks. Some statistics even show that in the United States the average weekly hours worked has gone up in the last 30 years.

Part of this is a choice people make to have more toys and bigger houses. It takes money to produce those extra snowmobiles, big-screen televisions and extra rooms that you seldom use. But a professor from the London School of Economics has a more insidious theory. David Graeber has recently written an article entitled “On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs.” He claims that “huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed.” It is one thing to think that someone else’s job is a worthless waste of time. But Graeber is right to point out that more than a few people think this about significant chunks of their own jobs. It brings back a few painful memories from my work experience, both in government and the private sector. When I worked at the Department of Foreign Affairs in the 1990s, some diplomats were talking

about striking or working to rule (to protest how much lower our salaries were than government economists or sociologists, in case you were wondering). A friend of mine was against the idea, saying that he was worried that the powers-that-be would find out how little they noticed we weren’t working any more. A corporate efficiency expert once told me about a major corporation that laid off 10 per cent of the white-collar staff at headquarters. No one in the field, and definitely no customers, even noticed. Yet the people who were laid off all had busy calendars and often worked overtime. What does this say about the value of the work they did before they were laid off? Of course, some people enjoy the idea of having tricked “the man” into paying them 40 hours of money for much less work. They still have to go into work, however. It can’t be good for the soul in the long run to think so little of the work one does. Assuming you don’t aspire to having a bullshit job, there are a few questions you can ask

yourself. First, did you make something beautiful that made other people happy? Musicians and artists often get paid much less than corporate bullshit jobs, but I suspect many of them find their work deeply satisfying. Second, if you are not fortunate enough to delight others with your talents, did someone else at least find your work worth paying for? A pizza delivery guy or a professional dog walker does an honest service that the customer is willing to exchange cash for. That’s more rewarding than being paid big bucks to reformat the PowerPoint presentations at corporate headquarters. I don’t know whether Keynes was right that we could get by on 15 hour weeks. But I think I’ll use his theory to justify taking an extra week of vacation next year. Keith Halliday is a Yukon economist and author of the MacBride Museum’s Aurore of the Yukon series of historical children’s adventure novels. You can follow him on Twitter @hallidaykeith

The Yukon could be a model for consultation Ken Coates and Amanda Graham anada has discovered the art and mystery of consultation. The processes – familiar to all Yukoners – of land claims negotiations, government planning (remember Yukon 2000?), duty to consult and accommodate, and the imperatives of 21st-century politics have had a profound effect on governance and political life. Add to this the speed of the Internet and the power of social media and we find ourselves in an age of mobilized public opinion and engaged citizens. Yukoners and other northern Canadians are at the forefront of the broader global transition to consultation-based democracy. The process of land claims negotiations, which started largely behind closed doors, was pulled by First Nations and territorial politicians into full public view. The Yukon 2000 process expanded the range of consultations to include visioning the future and planning for economic growth and sustainability. The Umbrella Final Agreement codified extensive consultation commitments before the rest of the country

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became accustomed to greater citizen engagement with political and governance systems. The territorial and, indeed, the national political processes have not yet fully internalized the culture of citizen consultation. The electoral process appropriately leaves elected officials in a final decision-making position, with authority over the civil servants charged with implementing those political decisions. Many groups, however, see consultation as providing an effective veto over government action. If there is sufficient opposition, the argument goes, the government must back down from their plans. This is neither legally or constitutionally sound – elected governments have the right to operate within their constitutional limits. The culture and power of consultation remains a work in progress. Initially intended as a means of getting feedback on government proposals, community consultations are increasingly taking on overtones of an alternative political process, a type of binding referendum. When a major initiative, from a new govern-

ment program to a resource development, generates strong and consistent criticism, governments routinely find themselves facing what is effectively an additional opposition force, often with considerable moral authority and substantial public support. The Yukon has one of the most elaborate political cultures in Canada, combining standard political structures and processes with constitutionally protected procedures for First Nations engagement and an emerging system of broader consultations. The territory is a numerically small political community with broad familiarity with issues, proponents and critics. Yukoners care about what happens around them and have strong motivations to engage with government issues. In the years to come, the Yukon will probably emerge as a national, if not global, model for the politics of formal consultation and community engagement. More and more, politicians, civil servants and the public at large are being asked to come to terms with the realities and possibilities of consultation. In the territorial arena,

all actors face new challenges to incorporating open, fair and appropriate consultation processes. Consequently, there is a growing need for deeper understanding of the strengths of informal and formal consultation and for the prospects of including community engagement – in limited and legitimate ways – in political decision making. What is underway, in the Yukon as well as more broadly, represents a profound transformation of the political process. The intersection of elected governance, partisanship, aboriginal rights and the ease of mobilizing public engagement will take years to shake out. The process of getting there will be challenging, occasionally messy and controversial. In the end, with the Yukon at the lead, we are in the process of redefining politics, governance and the very role of the citizen in public affairs. The Northern Review, a Yukon College-based scholarly journal, takes note of this important political transformation. Earlier this year, we received a manuscript submission from researchers at the University of Saskatchewan

that examines consultation and decision-making process – “Fixing Land Use Planning in the Yukon Before It Really Breaks: A Case Study of the Peel Watershed.” Following the recommendations of peer reviewers, we accepted the article for publication in our Fall 2013 issue, expected December 2013. We have now published it open access as an advance online article: www.yukoncollege. yk.ca/review. Please feel free to download the article and engage with the authors. The Northern Review hopes that, as a result, the discussion will further the conversation here in the territory on the rapidly emerging political culture of consultation and engagement. It is time for everyone to get ready for the future. Ken Coates is an editor of The Northern Review and the research chair in regional innovation of the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Saskatchewan. Amanda Graham is also an editor of the Northern Review and instructs for the University of the Arctic and the school of liberal arts at Yukon College.


8

Yukon News

LETTERS

Defending Little Dreamers This letter is in response to an article that was written recently regarding the Little Dreamers daycare. We wanted to defend the daycare, and its owner and teachers, as we think they have been misrepresented in that article. Our little boy started going to the daycare when he was 12 months old, in 2009. We looked at day homes and daycares and even called one of our friends who works at childcare services researching to find the best place. Like all parents of babies who have to go back to work, we can tell you that this is no small task. We are parents, like most, who want the best for our kids, and we wanted our boy to be happy and loved wherever he went, especially since it was so

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

hard to leave him and go back to work. The first time we walked into Little Dreamers, we were delighted to see that the space was bright and happy and full of happy babies and kids. It was a warm and welcoming place, and Lori and all the teachers were so friendly. We felt great about the place. Over the years at Little Dreamers, we have built a great, open relationship with Lori as well as all the teachers. You can tell that they all love what they do and have a real commitment to caring for kids. Our boy is what you would call very busy, and we have had some hurdles to

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jump with him, both at home and at daycare. Without all the help and advice that Little Dreamers has provided, we would have been completely lost. We know that kids get hurt, whether they are in our care or the care of others. That’s just life with kids. No one goes through this world without a few scrapes and bumps, and our boy has had his fair share, both at home and at daycare! We have never had a time when our boy has come home with a scrape or bruise or whatever that we weren’t made aware of. We have signed accident reports even for the smallest of ouches. We have gotten phone calls for fevers and stomach aches and coughs and knowing that someone is paying attention and knows when our little guy is not feeling well, or just not up to par on a certain day, makes us feel so great. We know they all love our boy and we leave him, everyday, knowing he is safe and taken care of. So please, Yukon News, don’t slander our daycare! You’ve obviously been fed some lies and jumped for the dramatic story, which disappoints us greatly, having been supporters of your paper. Next time you write a story, use the tools of journalism, like research, follow up and, most importantly, getting both sides of the story. Stop behaving like a tabloid and remember that you are a newspaper.

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The drug trap

Editor’s note: The Yukon News made repeated efforts to contact the daycare owner prior to publication. She has so far declined to comment.

It’s good to see the Yukon government is trying to get drugaddicted jail inmates off their methadone. Keeping anyone dependent on that stuff is a hopelessly inadequate answer. Mr. Karp, It’s probably just as bad as betime to tell the truth ing on heroin anyway! No, I’m not an expert on In the October 9th edition either of those drugs. Thank of the Yukon News, “Federal God I’ve never had to get job program draws ire” it was involved. But I have had some reported that, “Rick Karp, experience of having issues president of the Yukon Cham- with doctors over drugs they ber of Commerce, says no prescribed, or dare I say, inconsultation occurred that he flicted on me. was aware of ” in response to Quite a few years ago, I may my comment that our govern- have needed some medicament had consulted with the tion to get me through a short business community to create problem. But it turned into a an effective Canada Job Grant long-term difficulty because Program. of a quack who insisted on You were quoted as saying, keeping me medicated on an “If there was consultations, it on-going basis. wasn’t with anyone here as far I couldn’t accept the as I know. I would like to meet situation because the doctor a person who was consulted.” couldn’t accept the idea that Well, Mr. Karp, let me intro- I’d never be OK until I’d be off duce you to … Mr. Karp. the medication and not need it In fact, you were in attendanymore. ance and participated in the I had fallen under the May 14th Canada Job Grant influence of a bad doctor who Consultations held at the didn’t have my best interests at Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre. heart. He was abusing me and I am deeply concerned and abusing the system. perplexed by the fact that you Things got worse and I got fail to recall these important stuck in a hospital drugged federal consultations, your all the more! I wondered if I’d own attendance and participa- ever get free from them. But I tion. did. Yukon citizens deserve It’s been many years since the truth, and our business I’ve been in such an unacceptcommunity deserves sound able situation. But I’d never representation. I’m certain the have survived without breakother members of our business ing all contact with anyone and academic communities as involved in this abuse. well as the territorial governDrugs are not the answer! ment representatives recall the input they provided. Remem- Stewart Jamieson Whitehorse bering your own input at a

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Letters to the editor The Yukon News welcomes letters from its readers. Letters should be no longer than 500 words and must be signed with your full name and place of residence. A daytime phone number is also required for verification purposes only. We reserve the right to edit letters for clarity, length, accuracy and legality. You can send submissions to editor@yukon-news.com. They can be faxed to 867-668-3755 or mailed to 211 Wood St., Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2E4.

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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

UN official calls for inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women The Canadian Press OTTAWA he federal government should set up a national inquiry into the “disturbing phenomenon” of missing and murdered aboriginal women, a senior UN rights official said Tuesday. James Anaya, the UN special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, has spent the last nine days touring the country, talking to aboriginals and both federal and provincial government officials. And while governments across Canada have pledged a number of steps to deal with the problem of missing aboriginal women, it’s not enough, Anaya told a news conference in Ottawa as he wrapped up his visit. “I have heard from aboriginal peoples a widespread lack of confidence in the effectiveness of those measures,” Anaya said. “I concur that a comprehensive and nationwide inquiry into the issue could help ensure a co-ordin-

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ated response and the opportunity for the loved ones of victims to be heard and would demonstrate a responsiveness to the concerns raised by the families and communities affected by this epidemic.” There has been strong pressure from aboriginal groups and some provinces for an inquiry into the disappearances, which some say run into the hundreds. The Native Women’s Association of Canada estimates there have been more than 600 such cases in the last 20 years. The federal government, however, has so far refused to entertain the idea of an inquiry. Anaya, a professor of human rights law at the University of Arizona, also has a Canadian connection, having done several stints as a visiting professor in the law faculty of the University of Toronto. He acknowledged that Canada has made significant progress on aboriginal issues since his predecessor delivered a tough report in 2004. But many challenges remain, he said.

CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

United Nations special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, James Anaya, holds a press conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa.

“Canada faces a crisis when it comes to the situation of indigenous peoples of the country,” Anaya said.

The economic gap between aboriginals and non-aboriginals hasn’t narrowed, treaty and land claims remain unresolved and “there appear to be high levels of distrust among aboriginal peoples towards government at both the federal and provincial levels.” Liberal aboriginal affairs critic Carolyn Bennett pounced on Anaya’s report as evidence of a hard-hearted Conservative attitude towards Canada’s First Nations. “The Conservatives’ adversarial approach to aboriginal peoples on a host of issues has created conflict and distrust, rather than reconciliation and better lives,” Bennett said. “As Mr. Anaya noted today, Canada needs to change direction urgently towards a new, collaborative partnership with aboriginal peoples to achieve progress and shared prosperity.” Anaya also noted that aboriginal education in Canada could be improved quickly if money given to native authorities for schooling was equal, on a per-student basis, to

spending in the provincial system. But he warned the federal government against going ahead with its proposed First Nations education bill. He said he heard “a remarkably consistent and profound distrust” about the measure and urged the government to take its time and redraft the legislation in consultation with aboriginals. Anaya also said housing remains a dismal problem. “I urge the government to treat the housing situation on First Nations reserves and Inuit communities with the urgency it deserves,” he said. “It simply cannot be acceptable that these conditions persist in the midst of a country with such great wealth.” Anaya also said the residentialschools era continues to cast “a shadow of despair” over aboriginal communities and he urged the government to extend the mandate of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to as long as it needs to do its work.

Senate abolition gains momentum inside Conservative caucus Jennifer Ditchburn

uncomfortable speaking publicly about the matter – say the Senate should simply be done away with, OTTAWA rather than wait for reforms that hile the NDP bangs the drum could take years to achieve, if at all. for Senate abolition in the “Personally, I think the country Commons, Prime Minister Stephen could be well governed without it,” Harper is likely to hear the same said one Conservative MP. beat coming from inside his own Added another MP: “I’m ready Conservative caucus. to campaign on abolition.” Government MPs got an earful Some even pointed to the politfrom constituents over the spring ical toll that the concept of Senate and summer about the ongoing reform is taking on Harper himself. Senate expenses scandal, which “The Senate is a longer-term has already prompted the ouster of problem where without action, the three high-profile Tory senators and prime minister is perceived as the Harper’s chief of staff. An RCMP person who is responsible for the investigation and auditor general’s Senate and the status quo,” said one review will keep the story alive Tory MP. indefinitely. “That’s not a position he wants Many members were riled up to be in.” after a Conservative private memAny movement on the Senate ber’s bill on union accountability will have to wait until the Supreme was gutted with the help of some Court of Canada answers a series of their own caucus mates in the of questions the government posed upper chamber. earlier this year – including how to As a result, patience is running thin. A number MPs who spoke to The new Yukon home of The Canadian Press – some on the record, others preferring to remain anonymous because they are The Canadian Press

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to see the kind of Senate reform that Harper has proposed in the past, but not at any cost. “If it comes to pass that (reform) cannot happen without some kind of constitutional upheaval – meaning the general amending formula and all the provinces have to agree – if we’re going to go down that path, then certainly abolition might be the better bet,” Stanton said. Other MPs are holding out for a healthy discussion inside caucus – and later this month at the Conservative convention in Calgary – on possible solutions for making the Senate more effective and less costly. “You still need that sober second thought because we could still ram stuff through Parliament rather quickly if we wanted to, and that may feel good one day but the damage could be a year or two down the road when you don’t take the time to really vet something properly,”

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go about abolition. As a result, Senate reform is not expected to garner but a passing reference in Wednesday’s throne speech. Harper has tried unsuccessfully to introduce term limits to the Senate, and to create a framework whereby the provinces could elect their senators. Industry Minister James Moore raised the threat of abolition last weekend, saying taxpayers should have some sort of election process to allow them to do away with senators they feel aren’t up to the task. “But if we can’t do that, then the Senate should be abolished,” Moore told CTV’s Question Period. “Either elect or abolish, but serious reform or abolition has to happen, and we want it to happen yesterday.” Ontario MP Bruce Stanton said the Senate expenses issues became “water-cooler talk” in his riding over the summer. He would prefer

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one western Conservative MP said. “That’s where the Senate provides that strength – do we really need to have them here doing that committee work? Do we need to have them travelling all over the world?” Manitoba MP Steven Fletcher, the former minister of state for democratic reform, said the legal advice he’s seen would suggest that introducing Senate elections and term limits is entirely possible. Expecting Canadians to unite in supporting abolition, however, is unrealistic, Fletcher said. “Anyone who says that the Senate as a first choice should be abolished, such as the NDP, are being disingenuous when they say it because they know that’s not going to happen,” he said. “That’s not because we don’t want it to happen, it’s just because it can’t happen.”


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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Conservative throne speech marks unofficial start of race to 2015 election Terry Pedwell

up passengers on the social and consumer issues track. The speech is expected to OTTAWA focus on bedrock Conservahe Harper Conservatives will tive issues – creating jobs and hit the gas pedal this week in rebuilding the economy – with the race toward the next election particular themes targeted at crein 2015. ating employment opportunities But the opposition parties are and providing job training for vowing to push down hard on aboriginals in the resource sector. the brakes in reminding CanBut several consumer-friendly adians about what they call the measures will also be incorporatgovernment’s lapse in ethics in ed into the blueprint document, the Senate. designed to counter proposals In a speech from the throne expected from the Opposition today, the Tories will be drivNew Democrats and Liberals. ing ahead with their jobs and Those measures are also tough-on-crime agendas while aimed at turning the attention steering slightly to the left to pick The Canadian Press

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Senate workers prepare for the Throne Speech on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. The Harper Conservatives will hit the gas pedal this week in the race toward the next election in 2015.

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of voters away from the Senate spending controversy that has seen several Conservative appointees and one Liberal taken to task over their travel and living expenses. The sales pitch will include measures directed at alleviating consumer irritants, such as a plan to force cable and satellite TV providers to adopt a pickand-pay price model, in conjunction with the bundled channel payment plans they currently

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offer. The Tories also hope voters will appreciate moves to create an airline passenger bill of rights, designed to compensate people who are inconvenienced when air carriers overbook flights. There will also likely be references to increasing competition in the wireless sector and to capping domestic cellphone roaming fees. “We think roaming fees have been a long-standing concern for not only consumers but for competition within the telecom sector,” Industry Minister James Moore said in an interview with The Canadian Press. But if the government is serious about helping consum-

ers, it will reduce the price gap between goods sold in Canada and the United States by further lowering tariffs and cutting costs for retailers by placing a cap on credit card fees charged to business, says the Retail Council of Canada. “What we’re very much eagerly awaiting is a recognition that addressing each one of those areas will result in benefits to Canadian consumers, and a signal from the government that they’re continuing to explore opportunities to reduce those costs,” said council senior vicepresident David Wilkes. However, the credit card fee issue is not expected to make its way into the throne speech, said

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Moore. The federal Competition Tribunal struck down a complaint against Visa and Mastercard in July over the processing fees they charge businesses for using their cards, and a government finance committee has been grappling with the issue ever since. The Conservatives already have a website and Twitter app set up to bring Canadians highlights from the throne speech under the banner “Seizing Canada’s Moment – Security and Prosperity in an Uncertain World.” The speech, opening the delayed second session of Canada’s 41st Parliament, will be read by Gov. Gen. David Johnston in the Senate – the very chamber at the centre of an expense scandal that has dogged the Conservatives since the last session. And no matter its content, the Opposition is sure to take advantage of the optics. “I don’t know what you would write down in words that the governor general is meant to relay to Canadians that will take attention away from the harsh realities (of the Senate scandal),” says NDP House Leader Nathan Cullen. Still, the government is not expected to say much about Senate reform, waiting instead to hear back from the Supreme Court of Canada about a reference that asks whether the red chamber can be reformed, or even abolished. The throne speech will include a handful of new promises

13

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 to further crack down on crime. But don’t expect any big new initiatives that would risk spending lots of money or that cannot be completed in time for the election, say insiders. Public safety and protecting the environment will likely also go hand-in-hand in segments of the speech that touch on the LacMegantic derailment disaster and recent oil pipeline leaks. But even that will be a balancing act as the Harper Conservatives hope to convince Canadians that getting oil and other commodities to market is essential to creating jobs and economic wealth. The Tories, says Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, cannot be trusted to do any of the things they’ll promise in the speech. “You asked for open and honest government,” Trudeau says in a video message posted on the

party’s website. “Instead, you’re getting secrecy, distrust and scandal.” Trudeau accuses the Conservatives of giving Canadians “partisan games and gimmicks” rather than real action on jobs and security. Still, the Conservatives are expected to make further reference to veterans, and the need to better incorporate them into the workforce and match their skills to jobs. First Nations could also hear a more conciliatory tone on resource development. The Conservatives were told over the summer that their omnibus budget bills, C38 and C45, which sparked the Idle-No-More movement, have caused more harm than good, and that they need to signal a change in approach to win people over. The Tories are expected to

signal a renewed commitment to passing legislation on First Nations education in time for fall 2014. The speech will also likely make some reference to preparations for the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, and the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, among other notable historical milestones. Security may be a little tighter for this throne speech. The last

time Gov. Gen. Johnston read from the Harper Conservatives’ blueprint for governing, in June 2011, a Senate page disrupted the speech by holding up a “Stop Harper” sign in the middle of the proceedings. Brigette DePape of Manitoba was immediately removed from the Senate chamber and fired from her job, but later became an icon for critics of the Conservatives.

yukon council on aging

bi-annual general meeting friday, october 18th Golden Age Society Registration: 9:00am Meeting 9:30am Guest Speaker Donald Knutson Co-Chair Vimy Heritage Housing Society Lunch will be served Travel allowance will be paid for Seniors and Elders traveling from the Communities.

Poverty and Homelessness action Week october 16 – 23, 2013

CAN YOU SEE ME?

Wednesday,   October  16  

Thursday,   October  17  

Friday,   October  18  

Saturday,   October  19  

Sunday,   October  20  

Monday,   October  21  

Tuesday,   October  22  

    World  Food  Day  

International   Day  for  the   Eradication  of   Poverty  

 

 

 

Tenant  Wisdom   Course  facilitated   by  Blood  Ties   Four  Directions   Centre  

Tenant  Wisdom   Course  facilitated   by  Blood  Ties  Four   Directions  Centre  

Wednesday,   October  23    

                            10am-­‐2pm:               Judy  Graves  is   Whitehorse   Judy  Graves  is             meeting  with   Connects  @  Old   meeting  with     12noon-­‐1:30pm:       12:00pm:  Enjoy   local  leaders,   Fire  Hall,  1105  1st   local  leaders,   1:30-­‐3pm:  Let’s   Chew  on  this!  @       a  hot  drink  &   organizations,   Ave.   organizations,   Talk  About  Food   Various       snack  &  stay  to       individuals  and     individuals   Security:  Part  4   locations     6pm:  Bring  a   Link  Hands  at   students  all  day.   12noon  –  Judy   and  students   @  L’AFY,  302   around     Blanket,  Leave   12:30pm  @  the     Graves  speaks  @   all  day.   Strickland   Whitehorse     a  Blanket:   riverfront,  Main     the  Yukon  College         Community   &  1st.       Pit         Movie  Night  @         3:30pm:     5-­‐11pm:  Many   Shipyards  Park         Opening  Press     Rivers   6-­‐8pm:  Family         Conference  with     sponsored  event   Movie  -­‐  UP,         7pm:  Judy  Graves,   Dr.  Anna  Reid  of   5-­‐7pm  –  YAPC   -­‐  Keeping  the   8-­‐9pm  meet  the     Seeing  through   CMA  @  L’AFY,   Community   Spirit  Alive  @   Outreach  Van,       the  eyes  of  an   302  Strickland   Meeting  @  CYO   The  Old  Fire   9-­‐11pm:  Adult   advocate  @  L’AFY,     Hall,  corner  of   Hall,  with  BYTE   Movie  –  Being   302  Strickland     4th  &  Steele   facilitated  Youth   Flynn.  Dress     Panel  @  5:30pm     warmly.       *  For  more  information,  please  contact  Kate  Mechan,  PHAW  Coordinator  @  335.4323  or  Kristina  Craig,  Yukon  Anti  Poverty  Coalition  @  334-­‐9317  

***  In  addition  to  our  daily  events,  we  invite  you  to  walk  down  Main  Street  to  see  the  Photography  for  Social  Change  exhibit,  keep   an  ear  out  for  the  CBC  Book  Panel  with  Dave  White,  and  keep  your  eyes  peeled  for  some  larger-­‐than-­‐life  silhouettes.    More  stories,   interviews  and  events  may  also  pop  up  over  the  week.  YAPC  encourages  you  to  support  the  CBC  Sock  Drive.  


12

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Conservative throne speech marks unofficial start of race to 2015 election Terry Pedwell

up passengers on the social and consumer issues track. The speech is expected to OTTAWA focus on bedrock Conservahe Harper Conservatives will tive issues – creating jobs and hit the gas pedal this week in rebuilding the economy – with the race toward the next election particular themes targeted at crein 2015. ating employment opportunities But the opposition parties are and providing job training for vowing to push down hard on aboriginals in the resource sector. the brakes in reminding CanBut several consumer-friendly adians about what they call the measures will also be incorporatgovernment’s lapse in ethics in ed into the blueprint document, the Senate. designed to counter proposals In a speech from the throne expected from the Opposition today, the Tories will be drivNew Democrats and Liberals. ing ahead with their jobs and Those measures are also tough-on-crime agendas while aimed at turning the attention steering slightly to the left to pick The Canadian Press

T

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Senate workers prepare for the Throne Speech on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. The Harper Conservatives will hit the gas pedal this week in the race toward the next election in 2015.

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of voters away from the Senate spending controversy that has seen several Conservative appointees and one Liberal taken to task over their travel and living expenses. The sales pitch will include measures directed at alleviating consumer irritants, such as a plan to force cable and satellite TV providers to adopt a pickand-pay price model, in conjunction with the bundled channel payment plans they currently

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offer. The Tories also hope voters will appreciate moves to create an airline passenger bill of rights, designed to compensate people who are inconvenienced when air carriers overbook flights. There will also likely be references to increasing competition in the wireless sector and to capping domestic cellphone roaming fees. “We think roaming fees have been a long-standing concern for not only consumers but for competition within the telecom sector,” Industry Minister James Moore said in an interview with The Canadian Press. But if the government is serious about helping consum-

ers, it will reduce the price gap between goods sold in Canada and the United States by further lowering tariffs and cutting costs for retailers by placing a cap on credit card fees charged to business, says the Retail Council of Canada. “What we’re very much eagerly awaiting is a recognition that addressing each one of those areas will result in benefits to Canadian consumers, and a signal from the government that they’re continuing to explore opportunities to reduce those costs,” said council senior vicepresident David Wilkes. However, the credit card fee issue is not expected to make its way into the throne speech, said

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Moore. The federal Competition Tribunal struck down a complaint against Visa and Mastercard in July over the processing fees they charge businesses for using their cards, and a government finance committee has been grappling with the issue ever since. The Conservatives already have a website and Twitter app set up to bring Canadians highlights from the throne speech under the banner “Seizing Canada’s Moment – Security and Prosperity in an Uncertain World.” The speech, opening the delayed second session of Canada’s 41st Parliament, will be read by Gov. Gen. David Johnston in the Senate – the very chamber at the centre of an expense scandal that has dogged the Conservatives since the last session. And no matter its content, the Opposition is sure to take advantage of the optics. “I don’t know what you would write down in words that the governor general is meant to relay to Canadians that will take attention away from the harsh realities (of the Senate scandal),” says NDP House Leader Nathan Cullen. Still, the government is not expected to say much about Senate reform, waiting instead to hear back from the Supreme Court of Canada about a reference that asks whether the red chamber can be reformed, or even abolished. The throne speech will include a handful of new promises

13

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 to further crack down on crime. But don’t expect any big new initiatives that would risk spending lots of money or that cannot be completed in time for the election, say insiders. Public safety and protecting the environment will likely also go hand-in-hand in segments of the speech that touch on the LacMegantic derailment disaster and recent oil pipeline leaks. But even that will be a balancing act as the Harper Conservatives hope to convince Canadians that getting oil and other commodities to market is essential to creating jobs and economic wealth. The Tories, says Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, cannot be trusted to do any of the things they’ll promise in the speech. “You asked for open and honest government,” Trudeau says in a video message posted on the

party’s website. “Instead, you’re getting secrecy, distrust and scandal.” Trudeau accuses the Conservatives of giving Canadians “partisan games and gimmicks” rather than real action on jobs and security. Still, the Conservatives are expected to make further reference to veterans, and the need to better incorporate them into the workforce and match their skills to jobs. First Nations could also hear a more conciliatory tone on resource development. The Conservatives were told over the summer that their omnibus budget bills, C38 and C45, which sparked the Idle-No-More movement, have caused more harm than good, and that they need to signal a change in approach to win people over. The Tories are expected to

signal a renewed commitment to passing legislation on First Nations education in time for fall 2014. The speech will also likely make some reference to preparations for the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, and the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, among other notable historical milestones. Security may be a little tighter for this throne speech. The last

time Gov. Gen. Johnston read from the Harper Conservatives’ blueprint for governing, in June 2011, a Senate page disrupted the speech by holding up a “Stop Harper” sign in the middle of the proceedings. Brigette DePape of Manitoba was immediately removed from the Senate chamber and fired from her job, but later became an icon for critics of the Conservatives.

yukon council on aging

bi-annual general meeting friday, october 18th Golden Age Society Registration: 9:00am Meeting 9:30am Guest Speaker Donald Knutson Co-Chair Vimy Heritage Housing Society Lunch will be served Travel allowance will be paid for Seniors and Elders traveling from the Communities.

Poverty and Homelessness action Week october 16 – 23, 2013

CAN YOU SEE ME?

Wednesday,   October  16  

Thursday,   October  17  

Friday,   October  18  

Saturday,   October  19  

Sunday,   October  20  

Monday,   October  21  

Tuesday,   October  22  

    World  Food  Day  

International   Day  for  the   Eradication  of   Poverty  

 

 

 

Tenant  Wisdom   Course  facilitated   by  Blood  Ties   Four  Directions   Centre  

Tenant  Wisdom   Course  facilitated   by  Blood  Ties  Four   Directions  Centre  

Wednesday,   October  23    

                            10am-­‐2pm:               Judy  Graves  is   Whitehorse   Judy  Graves  is             meeting  with   Connects  @  Old   meeting  with     12noon-­‐1:30pm:       12:00pm:  Enjoy   local  leaders,   Fire  Hall,  1105  1st   local  leaders,   1:30-­‐3pm:  Let’s   Chew  on  this!  @       a  hot  drink  &   organizations,   Ave.   organizations,   Talk  About  Food   Various       snack  &  stay  to       individuals  and     individuals   Security:  Part  4   locations     6pm:  Bring  a   Link  Hands  at   students  all  day.   12noon  –  Judy   and  students   @  L’AFY,  302   around     Blanket,  Leave   12:30pm  @  the     Graves  speaks  @   all  day.   Strickland   Whitehorse     a  Blanket:   riverfront,  Main     the  Yukon  College         Community   &  1st.       Pit         Movie  Night  @         3:30pm:     5-­‐11pm:  Many   Shipyards  Park         Opening  Press     Rivers   6-­‐8pm:  Family         Conference  with     sponsored  event   Movie  -­‐  UP,         7pm:  Judy  Graves,   Dr.  Anna  Reid  of   5-­‐7pm  –  YAPC   -­‐  Keeping  the   8-­‐9pm  meet  the     Seeing  through   CMA  @  L’AFY,   Community   Spirit  Alive  @   Outreach  Van,       the  eyes  of  an   302  Strickland   Meeting  @  CYO   The  Old  Fire   9-­‐11pm:  Adult   advocate  @  L’AFY,     Hall,  corner  of   Hall,  with  BYTE   Movie  –  Being   302  Strickland     4th  &  Steele   facilitated  Youth   Flynn.  Dress     Panel  @  5:30pm     warmly.       *  For  more  information,  please  contact  Kate  Mechan,  PHAW  Coordinator  @  335.4323  or  Kristina  Craig,  Yukon  Anti  Poverty  Coalition  @  334-­‐9317  

***  In  addition  to  our  daily  events,  we  invite  you  to  walk  down  Main  Street  to  see  the  Photography  for  Social  Change  exhibit,  keep   an  ear  out  for  the  CBC  Book  Panel  with  Dave  White,  and  keep  your  eyes  peeled  for  some  larger-­‐than-­‐life  silhouettes.    More  stories,   interviews  and  events  may  also  pop  up  over  the  week.  YAPC  encourages  you  to  support  the  CBC  Sock  Drive.  


14

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Inquest into police shooting deaths to highlight treatment of mentally ill Diana Mehta

this week will now take a hard look at the lives and deaths of Reyal Jardine-Douglas, Sylvia TORONTO Klibingaitis and Michael Eligon hey lived entirely separate – a process which is expected to lives but the circumstances raise questions about police use of of their deaths were strikingly force and how front-line officers similar. deal with the mentally ill. Three Toronto-area residents “I hope there will be a very who were gunned down by police strong message in the form of at different times over the past various recommendations to three years were all thought to be police that they must attempt deexperiencing mental health issues escalation in any situation where when they approached officers it’s feasible,” Peter Rosenthal, a with sharp objects. lawyer for the Eligon family, told The province’s police watchThe Canadian Press. dog later cleared authorities of “The problem, I think, is that wrongdoing in all three cases, no police officer to my knowledge prompting calls for justice from has ever been disciplined for the families of those killed. failing to de-escalate a situation. A coroner’s inquest that begins In my view the police have to be The Canadian Press

T

properly policed.” Eligon died in February 2012 after fleeing from a Toronto hospital, where he had been involuntarily admitted under the Mental Health Act. The 29-year-old was dressed in a hospital gown and armed with two pairs of scissors at the time. His father has said there didn’t appear to be any justification for the death of his son, who he described as a non-violent man who had a child of his own. The province’s police watchdog ruled there were no grounds to charge the officer who shot Eligon. Rosenthal said he wasn’t looking for new weapons like Tasers – which all front-line officers in

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Ontario can now carry – to be suggested as a better way to deal with someone like Eligon. “People mistakenly believe that if police have Tasers they use them instead of firearms – they won’t. They’ll use them in addition to firearms,” he said. “It’s not weapons that are needed. It’s approaching people in a reasonable way that’s needed.” A better approach to dealing with the mentally ill, particularly when police have been alerted to their condition, is what JardineDouglas’s family is looking for as well. “This is a family that called the police for assistance when their son jumped on a bus because he was trying to avoid an examination at a hospital,” explained lawyer John Weingust. “An hour later (police) come back and they said ‘Your son is dead.’ We were completely shocked by it.” Twenty-five-year-old JardineDouglas died in August 2010 after pulling a knife out of his bag and advancing on an officer when police confronted him on a public transit bus for acting irrationally. “The police are alleging self defence in this particular matter ...There’s something wrong with that type of training which appears to be shoot first and ask questions later. Something has to be done,” said Weingust. “The family misses their son very much. We intend to show that he was not a violent person.” In Klibingaitis’s case, the 52-year-old called 911 herself in October 2011, saying she was going to commit a crime. When officers went to her house, she walked toward police with the knife in her hand in what the SIU described as a threatening manner. She did not drop the knife in response to officers’ demands and when she moved closer she was shot. The SIU called her death a “tragic event” but said the officer was justified in using lethal force under the circumstances. The inquest into all three deaths comes on the heels of another police shooting that claimed the life of a Toronto teen. Sammy Yatim, 18, was killed on an empty streetcar on July 27 in an incident that sparked public outrage over police use of force. Yatim’s case led Toronto’s police chief to order a review of use-of-force policies which has been described as “extraordinary in scope.” The incident also triggered an investigation by Ontario’s ombudsman into what kind of direction the provincial government provides to police for defusing conflict situations. The new Yukon home of

But those in the policing world say people need to realize officers always strive to keep the public safe. “We have become the first call for help and the last resort when help can’t be found elsewhere. As such we are dealing with the full range of human issues, not just crime,” said Dave McFadden, president of the Police Association of Ontario. “More often than ever before, police are challenged to deal with the social issues that mental illness presents in a community and which can present as criminal and violent behaviour threatening the safety of the public and officers.” It’s not that police don’t want to deal with the mentally ill in the best possible way, said one observer, it’s that they often don’t have the resources to do so. “The police are totally on board, it’s the politicians and the legislatures have to put this in writing and then put some money behind it,” said Rick Parent, a former officer who teaches police studies at Simon Fraser University. Different forces also have different levels of training and support when it comes to dealing with the mentally ill, which can result in a patchwork approach, said Parent. Some forces, like the Vancouver Police, have a mental health care liaison on call at all hours which can conduct on-site assessments and interventions, a force in Delta, B.C., has an officer who proactively contacts those with mental issue who might pose a problem in the future and some forces offer extensive officer training. Many other forces, however, have little to no resources – and even if they did it doesn’t take away from the fact that other parties – like hospitals, community housing and caregivers – need to deal better with the mentally ill, said Parent. “The police are at the rear end,” he said. “We can train them as much as we can and give them all these less lethal weapons, that’s not the solution. The solution is to deal with these individuals at the front end and to continue to deal with them and don’t let them down.” The public also needs to realize that the police aren’t perfect, said Parent. “Police will always make mistakes,” he said. “We have to limit the risk or limit the liability that we place police officers in. And we haven’t been doing that. We just kind of throw them out and hope for this flawlessly perfect situation.” The inquest, which begins Tuesday in Toronto, is expected to last eight weeks and will hear from more than 50 witnesses. A jury may make recommendations at preventing similar deaths but is not tasked with finding fault or laying any blame.


15

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Documents held by PM’s former aide raise new Duffy questions

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Nigel Wright, former chief of staff for Stephen Harper. Wright had a binder full of details on Mike Duffy’s official and personal activities, but appears not to have provided it to auditors nor to police.

Jennifer Ditchburn Canadian Press

OTTAWA tephen Harper’s former chief of staff had a binder full of details on Sen. Mike Duffy’s official and personal activities, but appears not to have provided it to auditors reviewing Duffy’s expenses nor to police when they first opened an investigation. The existence of a binder of calendars, chronicling Duffy’s life over four years, was revealed in RCMP documents filed in court last week. It raises a host of new questions about how much the prime minister’s office knew about Duffy’s movements, at a time when the former Tory senator’s expenses were under the microscope. “The calendar is quite detailed and contains notes of Sen. Duffy’s travel, meetings, teleconferences, social events, holidays, noteworthy current events, speeches, and political interactions,” Cpl. Greg Horton wrote in a court filing. In early February, the Senate asked independent auditors to look into Duffy’s expenses following allegations he was improperly claiming a home in P.E.I. as his main residence. Some time that month, Duffy couriered the binder of calendars to Nigel Wright, who was then Harper’s right-hand man. “Mary and I copied and redacted my four years of diaries; added a summary of my days in P.E.I, and pics of the cottage under construction etc. and sent it to Nigel by Purolator,” Duffy wrote in a Feb. 20 email obtained by police. Duffy never gave those calendars to the Deloitte auditors and they

S

finished their report in May pointing out the many questions they still had about Duffy’s whereabouts and expense claims. Still, the Conservative Senate leadership did not demand more detail and backed a report that contained no criticism of Duffy. The news broke shortly afterward that Wright had given Duffy a $90,000 cheque in March to repay questionable expenses. A Senate committee started scrutinizing Duffy’s expenses again, this time connecting more dots with the help of detailed information from Senate finance officials. The matter was forwarded to the RCMP. By mid-June, the RCMP were talking to Wright’s lawyers about the controversy. But Wright’s legal counsel did not send the binder of calendars to the police until more than two months later. The Canadian Press put questions to Wright about the documents through his lawyers. Peter Mantas responded last week that they “could not comment on the matter.” The prime minister’s office also did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the new information. Duffy has said he will not comment. The RCMP have outlined four areas of investigation as they file production orders for documents: * The $90,000 transaction between Duffy and Wright. * Duffy’s housing expense claims. * Duffy’s travel expense claims. * $65,000 worth of Senate-paid contracts Duffy provided to a friend over three years.

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16

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Startup tries to spark more interest in smoke, carbon monoxide detectors Michael Liedtke

to wait until the middle of the night to chirp when their batteries run low. Tony Fadell, a gadget guru who SAN FRANCISCO helped design the iPod and original moke detectors frequently proiPhone while working at Apple, is duce more headaches than useful counting on his latest innovation to warnings. The devices have an irritat- prove that a smoke detector can be ing habit of shrieking when there’s sleek, smart and appreciated. no cause for alarm, and always seem The device, called “Nest Protect,” Associated Press

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is the second product hatched from Nest Labs Inc., a startup founded by Fadell in 2010 in an attempt to infuse homes with more of the high-tech wizardry that people take for granted in smartphones. The Palo Alto, Calif. company has 270 employees and has raised tens of millions of dollars from investors that include

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Google Inc.’s venture-capital arm and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a venture capital firm with a long record of backing innovative ideas. Besides sensing smoke, Nest Protect is designed to detect unsafe levels of carbon monoxide. That could broaden the square-shaped device’s appeal, especially in the growing number of states that require homeowners to install carbon monoxide detectors. Nest Protect’s price will probably turn off many consumers. It will go on sale next month for $129 in more than 5,000 stores in the U.S., Canada and United Kingdom. Other less-sophisticated devices that detect both smoke and carbon monoxide typically sell for $50 to $80 apiece. Fadell, who ended an eight-year stint at Apple Inc. in 2009, is aiming for an audience that appreciates sleekly designed products that provide peace of mind and simplicity. “We want to take the unloved products in your own home and bring them to life in a way that makes them beautiful,” Fadell said while proudly showing off the Nest Protect. “There has been very little innovation with smoke detectors in the past 35 years and now we think we have found a way to make them less annoying.” Nest Labs’ first device was a digital thermostat designed to learn how to cool and heat homes to suit the needs and habits of the inhabitants. It went on sale two years ago for

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$249. Fadell won’t say how many thermostats have been sold so far, but it’s done well enough to reinforce his belief that there is increasing interest in furnishing homes with the latest trappings of technology, even if it costs slightly more to do it. The Nest Protect is equipped with a variety of sensors for detecting heat, smoke, carbon monoxide, light and motion. It also is programmed to deliver early warnings in spoken words instead of a shrill alarm to give a home’s occupants a chance to check on whether there’s just too much smoke coming from the oven, steam from the shower or a real fire hazard. If it’s determined that there is nothing to worry about, all it takes it’s a wave of the arm to tell Nest Protect to be quiet. Multiple devices in the same home can also communicate each other through wireless connections. They can be programmed to send warnings about possible hazards and low batteries to smartphones and tablet computers. The Nest Protect can even communicate with the company’s thermostat product to inform it about unsafe levels of carbon monoxide so the furnace can be automatically turned off. The Nest Protect also lights up in white when it senses someone in the house walking by it in the dark. The device emits green glow when the lights are first turned out in the room as a signal that it’s working fine. For those who don’t want the hassle of batteries, one of the Nest Protect models can be plugged into a power outlet. Only a white model will be sold in stores, although a black version will be sold through Nest Labs’ website.

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17

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

BUSINESS

ENVIRONMENT

Yukon distillery inks a deal with a dragon Jesse Winter News Reporter

W

ho knew booze could be such a burdensome busi-

ness? Not Karlo Krauzig, that’s for sure. Five years after the Whitehorse resident decided to launch Yukon Shine distillery, Krauzig says, if he knew then what he knows now, he never would have made that decision. “Knowing all of the risks and challenges that couldn’t have been predicted even by any industry experts, I probably would have gone somewhere a little less risky,” Krauzig said. “I started a family at the same time, and that was too much risk. They’ve been along for this whole rollercoaster ride. “That being said, I’m not complaining. It’s gotten me this far and I’m going to take it all the way,” he said. That roller-coaster hit a high point this fall when Krauzig finally inked a deal with Canadian business tycoon Arlene Dickinson after a year of negotiations. The partnership will see Dickinson on board to provide financing and marketing expertise to back up Krauzig’s blossoming vodka and gin business. Krauzig said the talks took as long as they did in part because of Dickinson’s hectic schedule. “Arlene being as big as she is and being involved with many businesses, she’s very tough to pin down. People who work closest with her have a hard time to sit her down and get signatures,” he said. Along with her job as the CEO of Venture Communications, Dickinson is a self-made millionaire and one of the stars on CBC’s popular reality show Dragon’s Den. Krauzig met Dickinson on the set of that show where, after theatrically stripping off a Canada Goose parka, Krauzig first pitched his plan for a madefrom-scratch Yukon vodka. The pitch was an almost instant success, or so it seemed on the broadcast version. When he first proposed the idea, Krauzig got an offer from Dragon Jim Treliving, the owner of Boston Pizza. “They filmed me for almost an hour, and ended up cutting it down to about seven minutes. In the part that they cut out, I tried to negotiate Jim and Arlene coming together for a deal. I kept telling him we needed Arlene, and this company wouldn’t survive without marketing. He said if we need marketing we’ll hire Arlene,” he said. Krauzig hoped that by bringing Treliving on board, he could get his Yukon Winter Vodka

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Karlo Krauzig at the Yukon Shine Distillery in 2012. Krauzig has sealed a deal with financier Arlene Dickinson after pitching his Yukon-made vodka and gin on CBC’s Dragon’s Den.

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

placed in more than 500 Boston Pizza and Keg restaurants. “Even if you only did one bottle a month at each location, which is considered really poor, you’d still be doing almost 1,000 bottles a month. Most places go through a bottle or two a day,” Krauzig said. Considering that his beverages retail for $50 a pop, the potential was huge, he said. But Treliving apparently had different ideas. “I never spoke to Jim after the show. He had one of his investment advisors – who was half my age – dealing with me. I was

trying to push things along and it just wasn’t moving,” Krauzig said. Eventually, Krauzig learned that Treliving had wanted to pitch Yukon Shine to global corporate liquor heavyweights Bacardi (which owns Bombay Sapphire, and Grey Goose) and Diageo (which owns Smirnoff, Baileys, Johnny Walker and Guinness). But it turns out that neither were interested and Treliving nixed the deal with Krauzig. “Bacardi bought Grey Goose for $2.3 billion. We’re just not at that stage yet. I would have thought that was something Jim

would have known. Had he been upfront about that, I would have said I wasn’t interested,” he said. That letdown was the lowest point on Krauzig’s roller-coaster. “I was actually kind of ticked off. They had essentially wasted months of my time from the filming in April to the airing in October (2012). He canceled the deal two weeks before the airing of the show,” he said. But rather than give up, Krauzig decided to press on, going back to Dickinson and pitching her again. She said yes almost immediately.

“When I spoke with Arlene, she completely agreed and started giving me contacts to call right away, before we even signed the deal,” he said. Yukon Shine is already in liquor stores here at home, in B.C., Alberta, and Ontario. With Dickinson behind him, Krauzig is now setting his sights on the wider Canadian market. Soon his booze will be in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Quebec, and he has designs on the East Coast as well, he said. And if first Canada, why not the world? “She’ll get international contacts and open doors that I wouldn’t be able to on my own. She’s also got financial resources to help get to that place,” Krauzig said. In order to meet the demands of those markets, Krauzig is looking at quadrupling his production, but says his system can handle the increase with only modest upgrades. It’s been a long and frustrating ride, but Krauzig is determined to find the end of it successfully. “I thought I’d be a lot further than this, to be honest. I’m at the start-up stage, and it’s taken me five years to get to this point. But now that I’m here, I’m not stopping. It’s going to be a very large company when I’m done with it,” he says. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com


18

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Britain’s powerful Daily Mail under pressure over attack on politician’s father Jill Lawless

Miliband, leader of the left-ofcentre Labour Party, by running a story about Miliband’s LONDON late father, a leading socialist ritain’s Daily Mail newsintellectual, headlined “the paper will tell you that man who hated Britain.” many things you eat can give The Mail warned readers you cancer, global warming is that “Red Ed,” who is Britain’s probably bunk and the Britmain opposition leader and ish way of life is under threat hopes to be its next prime from pernicious Eurocrats in minister, had inherited father Brussels. Ralph’s commitment to class The Mail is Britain’s most warfare. polarizing paper, and one of Miliband wrote a rebuttal the most powerful. To fans, defending his dad, who came it’s the voice of old-fashioned to Britain as a teenage refugee British values and the enemy from the Nazis and served with of meddling bureaucrats and the Royal Navy in World War stultifying political correctness. II. “I loved him and he loved To critics it’s a sensationalist, Britain,” Miliband wrote of his small-minded rag that demon- father, who died in 1994. “I izes feminists, foreigners and know they say ‘you can’t libel the poor. the dead,’ but you can smear To politicians, the Mail is a them.” formidable force whose blessThe paper’s attack has won ing can help deliver crucial Miliband wide sympathy, and swing votes and whose wrath has brought the rare spectacle is best avoided. It’s not the of politicians from all parties paper’s conservative bent criticizing the Daily Mail. that bothers them – in BritFormer Conservative Cabiain, unlike the United States, net Minister Michael Heseltine newspapers are expected to accused the Mail of “carrying have a strong political stance politics to an extent that is just that comes through in news demeaning.” coverage as well as editoriDeputy Prime Minister Nick als. (Television stations, again Clegg, a Liberal Democrat, said in contrast to the U.S., are Thursday that “if anyone excels expected to remain broadly in denigrating and often vilifyneutral). ing a lot about modern Britain, But many feel the Mail went it’s the Daily Mail.” too far when it angered Ed Clegg had a point – the Associated Press

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ATTENTION North Klondike Hwy Residents Yukon Electrical is hosting an open house to provide information about an upcoming improvement project. Yukon Electrical will be working along approximately 8 kilometers from the corner of the North Klondike Highway to Yukon Energy substation.

Open House will be at the Hootalinqua Firehall Saturday, October 19

Mail exudes a deep ambivalence about British society. Its successful formula is to offer readers a mix of anxiety and reassurance, spiced with a dash of sex. Journalism professor and Guardian media columnist Roy Greenslade said the Mail is often described as the paper that “speaks for Middle England – that segment of the working class which has middle-class aspirations and wishes to defend them against all comers.” “It is vaguely anti-immigrant. It has opposed in the past social liberal moves such as gay rights,” he said. Among the things the Mail approves of are British troops, hardworking “mums and dads” and cute domestic animals. It dislikes unemployed “benefit scroungers” – especially if they’re immigrants – Brussels bureaucrats, badly behaved celebrities and left-wing politicians like Ed Miliband. In the newspaper’s pages, common foods regularly turn out to cause cancer – or obesity – and climate change is treated with skepticism. One recent headline had scientists saying “Global warning just half what we said,” while another read “World’s top climate scientists confess: Global warming is just quarter what we thought.” Another article this week said global warming was “on pause.” Now the Mail itself has become the story. The furor began Saturday with the article excoriating

A popular online quiz asks “Does the Daily Mail Hate You?” Factors include being a woman and having parents born outside the U.K. There’s also the “Daily Mail-o-matic” headline generator – click a button and it throws together phrases such as “Could Muslims ruin pensioners?” and “Are feral children giving Britain’s swans diabetes?” Now this powerful media player is on the defensive. Opponents have pointed out that the Mail supported the Nazis during the 1930s, and Labour lawmaker John Mann – chair of Parliament’s all-party group against anti-Semitism – said the newspaper’s attack on Ralph Miliband, who was Jewish, smacked of “the classical age old anti-Semitic smear about disloyal Jews.” Calls for an advertising boycott have been backed by Labour figures including former Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott. And the furor has reanimated a debate about press regulation that has been swirling since the scandal over tabloid phone hacking. The Mail has not been implicated in hacking, but Dacre, like other newspaper editors, strongly opposes any form of state regulation. Bob Satchwell, executive editor of the Society of Editors, said he hoped the Miliband affair would not trigger restrictions on the press. “If you’ve got a free press it must be free to express itself,” Satchwell told Sky News.

Prevention of Violence Against Aboriginal Women Fund (2013-14) The Women’s Directorate invites applications to the Prevention of Violence Against Aboriginal Women Project Funding. The fund provides assistance to community based violence prevention projects, designed and developed by and for Aboriginal women. The deadline for applications is Friday, November 23, 2012 by 5:00 pm. Projects may apply for up to $25,000 for one-year projects or $50,000 for two-year projects. Please contact Amanda Mudry (667-8675 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 8675), or Lorie Larose (667-3026 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3026) if you would like help or support in developing ideas for your proposal.

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Ralph Miliband for his Marxist views. It flared again on Thursday when Ed Miliband wrote to Lord Rothermere – chairman of the paper’s owner, Daily Mail and General Trust PLC– complaining that a reporter from the Daily Mail’s Sunday sister paper had showed up at his uncle’s memorial service this week and tried to interview mourners. Mail on Sunday editor Geordie Greig quickly apologized for the “terrible lapse of judgment.” In contrast, Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre has been silent, though he dispatched a deputy to defend the story on television. It is unwelcome attention for the publicity-shy, 64-yearold Dacre, the Mail’s editor since 1992. He has built the paper into a powerful media institution, with a circulation of 1.8 million, second only to the Rupert Murdoch-owned Sun among Britain’s daily newspapers. The Mail’s website – light on politics, heavy on celebrity snapshots – is one of the most widely read news sites in the world. Even the paper’s critics acknowledge its skill at understanding what readers want, and its campaigning energy – it waged a long fight to bring to justice the racist killers of black teenager Stephen Lawrence, a notorious murder case. And even those who call the paper the “Hate Mail” have helped secure its place in popular culture.

Women’s Directorate


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

19

Yukon News

France upholds ban on hydraulic fracturing Lori Hinnant

by his predecessor in 2011, even though France had been named among the most PARIS promising European countries rance’s constitutional for shale gas extraction. The council upheld a ban on French, who rely largely on the energy extraction process nuclear energy, fear the enknown as fracking on Friday, vironmental costs of hydraulic two days after the European fracturing are too steep. Parliament voted to require Laszlo Varro, head of the full environmental reports International Energy Agency from companies that want to division that monitors hyestablish hydraulic fracturing draulic fracturing, said fears sites. in Europe were overblown but The decision comes the added that it was too early to predict the effects of the Eurosame day the International pean Parliament regulations. Energy Agency predicted the “You can have an environUnited States would overtake Russia next year to become the mental assessment framework which is the functional equivaworld’s largest oil producer outside OPEC, renewing ques- lent of killing the industry” or tions about Europe’s ability to it could be one that ensures protections while letting incompete in a shifting energy dustry flourish, he said. landscape. French President Francois Hollande had promised to How fracking works A high-pressure mixture maintain the ban imposed The Associated Press

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2014 Arctic Winter Games Basketball Trials Basketball Yukon will be hosting a second trial opportunity or the Men’s and Women’s basketball teams competing in the 2014 Arctic Winter Games in Fairbanks Alaska March 15-22. This trials will take place on Saturday October 19 at the FH Collins gym. Eligible athletes are those born in 1995 or later. Athletes participating in Post Secondary school basketball programs are ineligible.

Men’s second trial Saturday, October 19th • 10:00am - noon WoMen’s second trail Saturday, October 19th • 2:00 - 5:00pm Participants can register at Sport Yukon in advance of this trial. Participant cost for the trial is $20. Checks can be made payable to Basketball Yukon.

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France’s constitutional council upheld a law banning fracking in France, a law that had been a centrepiece of the Socialist president’s campaign.

of water, sand and chemicals blasts deep into shale, splitting it open and allowing oil and gas to flow. Improved technology has given energy companies access to stores of natural gas underneath states from Wyoming to New York in the U.S. In Europe, Poland is considered the most promising location.

Environmental fears Fracking is hard on the

environment and has triggered minor earthquakes. It consumes enormous amounts of water and leaves chemicals behind. France banned fracking in 2011. In Britain, where permits may be granted in the next two years, the prospect has touched off protests. A September U.S. study found that drilling and fracking don’t seem to spew immense amounts of methane, strengthening a big selling point for

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Yukon News

Bites Into Winter Not Your Wallet.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Real wages in federal public service virtually stagnant over last decade ‘They are using the public service as whipping boys and as a wedge between those who are having a hard time at the moment and public servants.’ Julian Beltrame Canadian Press

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OTTAWA he latest report by Canada’s parliamentary budget office appears to put to rest the myth of fat-cat public servants collecting far larger pay packets than their counterparts in the private sector. Virtually all growth in federal public service pay over the last 11 years has merely kept up with inflation, and additional hires comprised about half of the extra $7.8 billion in pay for public servants between 2001-02 and 2011-12, the report shows. Salaries accounted for about 47 per cent of the increase, the office says, but 96 per cent of that was just to keep pace with inflation – only four per cent could be counted as real income gains over the 11-year period covered by the study. New Democrat critics were quick to jump on the findings as evidence that the Harper government unfairly targeted public servants in their austerity measures. “The Conservatives like to point the finger at workers, unions and everyone but themselves for increasing costs, but this report shows the real story,” said NDP Treasury Board critic Mathieu Ravignat. “The reality is, employees took a pay cut while the Conservatives went on a hiring binge.” The report was compiled at the request of NDP MP Paul Dewar, who asked the budget office to determine what was driving increases in federal labour costs. Dewar said the findings show Treasury Board President Tony Clement did not have the facts before launching an attack against the public service as bloated, accusing the government of targeting public servants for political reasons. “They are using the public service as whipping boys and as a wedge between those who are having a hard time at the moment and public servants,” Dewar said. In an email response, Clement’s spokesman noted that at $43 billion annually, public sector pay and benefits account for the government’s largest operating expenditure. “We have taken reasonable steps through the 2009 Expenditure Restraint Act and Budget 2012’s taxpayer savings measures

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Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

NDP Treasury Board critic Mathieu Ravignat. The latest report by Canada’s parliamentary budget office debunks the myth of fat-cat public servants collecting far greater pay than their counterparts in the private sector.

to keep public sector labour spending in check,” the statement adds. On average, public servants earned slightly less than $70,000 last year, according to the data in the report. That’s less than the $114,000 estimate the budget office reported last December, but officials said a different methodology was used – the new calculation does not include benefits and does not include salaries for the RCMP and the military. The report does not attempt to compare public to private sector salary scales, only whether public service remuneration had grown substantially in the past decade or so. The PBO also appeared to dismiss the myth that costs have been driven by reclassification, involving moving public servants to higher-paying categories

even though their duties have remained largely the same. Costs due to classification added less than five per cent of the total increase, the PBO found. “Cumulatively, changes in classification and real wage growth contributed little to overall labour cost growth,” the report, one of the first by new watchdog Jean-Denis Frechette, concludes. “Recent reductions in the level of employment and the Expenditure Restraint Act of 2009 have been successful in limiting the growth in labour costs,” it adds. However, it notes that some labour cost growth is inevitable if public servants are to maintain a constant standard of living. Over the 11 years surveyed, the federal government spent $354 billion on compensation for its employees, exclusive of the RCMP and the military.


21

BlackBerry appeals to customers to stay on The Canadian Press TORONTO lackBerry is appealing to its customers to stay with the troubled smartphone maker as it restructures. In an open letter released Monday afternoon on Twitter and Facebook, BlackBerry tells its “customers, partners and fans” that they can continue to count on the Waterloo, Ont.-based company. The letter is designed to “set the record straight for the tens of millions of users who depend on BlackBerry every single day,” the company said Monday night in an email. The letter alludes to BlackBerry’s recent US$965-million quarterly loss and possible ownership change, noting those issues could be a concern for customers. But it says BlackBerry has substantial cash on hand, a balance sheet that is debt free, and is restructuring with a goal to cut expenses by 50 per cent. It also says BlackBerry doesn’t underestimate the situation it faces, and is making “difficult changes” – such as a 40 per cent reduction of its global workforce – to strengthen the company. The open letter, which the company says is being published in newspapers around the world, also touts BlackBerry’s security measures

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and notes its system will work with Apple iOS and Android devices. “We are bringing the most engaging mobile messaging platform to all, with our BBM launch for Android and iPhone,” the letter stated. “There are already around six million customers pre-registered to be notified of our roll out.” And the letter also stressed the company’s BlackBerry 10 devices, saying BlackBerry continues “to offer the best mobile typing experience – no ifs, ands or buts about it.” BlackBerry has struggled this year as sales of its latest smartphones failed to catch fire, and some carriers decided not to sell BlackBerry’s new Z30 smartphone. Rogers Communications reversed its decision not to sell the Z30 last week following a backlash from customers on message boards and Twitter. Fairfax Financial, BlackBerry’s largest shareholder, has made a conditional takeover bid worth US$9 per share and values the company at US$4.7 billion. The Fairfax consortium is expected to complete its due diligence by Nov. 4. Until then, BlackBerry is allowed to actively solicit and evaluate rival offers. BlackBerry co-founders Mike Lazaridis and Douglas Fregin have

said they are looking at making a potential takeover bid. According to documents filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission last week, the two are “interested in pursuing a joint bid” with “the goal of stabilizing and ultimately reinventing the company.” Together, Lazaridis and Fregin own roughly an eight per cent stake in BlackBerry, while Fairfax holds about 10 per cent. Meanwhile, a class-action lawsuit was filed last Thursday at the Ontario Superior Court on behalf of all Canadian BlackBerry shareholders. In a statement, the Merchant Law Group LLP said the suit was on behalf of shareholders who purchased the stock between Sept. 27, 2012 and Sept. 20, 2013. The lawsuit alleges the company and its senior management “knowingly or negligently misrepresented” that the BlackBerry 10 smartphones had been well received by customers and in a “strong financial position,” according to a news release. The representative plaintiff is alleged to have lost $55,000 after buying BlackBerry shares in the last year. None of the allegations have been proven in court.

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Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

THE

ARTS

Growing up in a theatre full of ghosts Max Leighton Special for the News

W

hen Arizona Charlie Meadows came to Dawson City in 1898, he wanted to build “the prettiest little theatre north of San Francisco,” and back when Dawson was the Paris of the North, that’s just what his Palace Grand theatre was. Over a century later, local playwright Bronwyn Jones has brought the story of the Palace Grand back to the Yukon stage – and the old cast has come along with it. The Prettiest Little Theatre North of San Francisco makes its Yukon debut this week at the Guild Hall. It’s a onewoman show, written and performed by Jones, and directed by her husband, Alyx Jones. It’s based on their experiences as the stage managers at the Palace Grand from 2002 to 2004. “When you write, you have to write about what you know,” she says. “You can’t be too clever, don’t start researching things too much.” It’s a young woman’s account of growing up in the theatre, loosely based on the life of the Jones’ teenage daughter, with a liberal dose of mystery and vaudeville. “In my daughter’s world, she’d hear actors talking, ropes coming down, conspiracies and arguments, human relationships playing out and you couldn’t see her because she was so small,” she says. “If she came across something that was ephemeral, she would take it at face value, even if she were sitting beside something that only she saw.” Though the modern Palace Grand is, essentially, a replica of its gold rush predecessor, Jones believes it has held on to a spiritual energy – an energy that inspires the often-dark tone of her performance. “The timeframe of the Klondike Gold Rush is such a small, saturated history, the amount that happened in such a short time is incredible,” she says. “The amount of young people who came up, and lost their lives, sometimes very quickly and in horrifying ways … you can still feel the residual human energy there.” Throughout the play the young girl “channels” the spirits of Klondike luminaries like Charlie Meadows, a theatre impresario and sharpshooter with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, as well as Klondike Kate Rockwell and former stage manager and theatre magnate Alexander Pantages. For Jones,

Anna Crawford photo

Bronwyn Jones performs a scene from The Prettiest Little Theatre North of San Francisco, which runs at the Guild Hall from October 17-19.

run a place like this.’” Prettiest Little Theatre debuted this summer at the Toronto Fringe Festival. Fittingly, it premiered at the Annex Theatre in Mirvish Village, named for businessman and philanthropist Ed Mirvish, for whom Toronto’s Pantages Theatre was later renamed. “There are these waves throughout our lives, our history, and sometimes they are just ripples, and sometimes they are tsunamis,” says Jones. After taking her show on the road, Jones says she’s ready for a hometown crowd. “We should tell our own stories,” she says. “And it’s nerve-wracking to come home and tell mine. This is for all the people who have watched me over the years. This is my imagination. Anna Crawford photo This is how I write. This is me.” Jones performing at the Annex Theatre during the Toronto Fringe Festival in July. The Prettiest Little Theatre North of San Francisco opens lives today, and Jones uses the it was important to re-imagine justice.” at the Guild Hall on ThursPalace Grand as a living exOf course, there’s a strong these characters as both comday the 17th, with nightly ample of that. The theatre was element of fantasy as well. At plex and multi-dimensional, performances until Saturday, inspired by the Folies Bergere, beyond the caricatures painted one point there is a brief apOct.19. Showtime is 8 p.m. pearance by a dog with the face a Gilded Age Parisian cabaret by the tourist brochures. Tickets are $15 and are on sale “These characters have all been of a man. “I saw it on Princess hall, re-imagined in the Yukon at Midnight Sun Coffee Roastby the entrepreneurial young St., in Dawson City in the Disneyfied, and you think, ers. All proceeds from ticket minds of the era. “You couldn’t sales will be donated to the summer of 1987,” she says. “It ‘How would I feel if that haphave travelled with Buffalo pened to me?’” she says. “These was one of the strangest dogs Whitehorse Food Bank. Food Bill and not gone to Paris,” she donations are also encouraged. I’ve come across.” guys were real wheelers and The play explores the notion says. “(Meadows) was probably There will be a deep freeze, dealers, sometimes they were just like me in 1984. He said to for frozen food and wild game that history not only lives on, bad and sometimes good and but continues to influence our himself, ‘Wow, I wish I could I wanted to do them some donations.


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Beth J. Harpaz NEW YORK randon Stanton rounds the corner, spots a tiny blur of pink, and runs over to ask if he can take a picture. He crouches in a busy Manhattan bike lane to get the shot: a beautiful little girl with pink leg braces, a walker and a big smile, her dad posed behind her. Stanton posts the picture on his website, HumansofNewYork.com – known to fans as HONY – with a mere two sentences from the father: “We go to four appointments every week, but I don’t mind. She’s my blood.” No names or other details. Within an hour, the image has 22,000 likes. Comments like this pour in: “HONY. Restoring my faith in humanity, one photostory at a time.” Stanton’s magical blend of portraits and poignant, pithy storytelling has earned HONY more than 2 million followers online. Now he’s putting his work in a book, Humans of New York, out this week from St. Martin’s Press. Not bad for a guy who once flunked out of college, was fired from his first job as a bond trader and didn’t own a regular camera until 2010. Stanton, 29, who’s from Marietta, Ga., and lives in Brooklyn, shoots every day, taking 5,000 street portraits over the past three years. As he strolls around, Canon in hand, wearing a backward baseball cap and New Balance sneakers, he’s stopped every few minutes by fans, many of them teenagers. “Thanks for inspiring me,” Sebastian Sayegh, 19, told him. Part of his genius is offering short, provocative captions that allow readers to imagine the rest of the story. He quotes a thin, pensive man with a cigarette as saying: “I’m a little bit separated with wife now.” A guy carrying a bouquet says: “Sometimes, when I’m going home to see her, I think: ‘Nobody should be this happy on a Tuesday.”’ Some photos are pure celebration, like pictures of kids titled “Today in microfashion”: a dapper boy in blue suit and sunglasses, a smiling girl in a bright red, Islamicstyle headscarf and tunic. Tender stories are featured, too, often emerging from the questions Stanton has designed to quickly

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23

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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Sally Macdonald Medical Practice

After almost 36 years in the north and 34 years in the Yukon, I will be leaving my office practice on October 25th 2013. Dr. Keddy Adams will be returning to her home in the Yukon to replace me in the practice. She will also be continuing with my outreach clients. No one is orphaned! I would like to thank all of my patients, colleagues and fellow health professionals for your help and support over all of these years. It has been a wonderful privilege to be a part of your lives and to be a physician in Whitehorse. All the Best, Sally Macdonald

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Kathy Willens/AP Photo

Brandon Stanton, creator of the Humans of New York blog, near Union Square in New York.

“uncover the most meaningful events in a person’s life.” His recurring “What was your saddest moment?” query elicits a lot of “the day my mother died” quotes. HONY has even inspired a parody, Hummus of New York, and copycats – Humans of Sydney, Humans of Portland – but they are pale imitations. Stanton accepts no advertising for HONY, but he occasionally asks fans to support causes related to his photos. HONY followers donated $300,000 for Hurricane Sandy relief; $30,000 to send a kid to camp and $100,000 to a YMCA. (Stanton wanted the fashion label DKNY to give $100,000 to the YMCA after his photos appeared in a window display without permission; when the company only gave $25,000, his fans made up the rest.) He doesn’t take notes or use a tape recorder: “Once they say the quote I am going to use, I know it. So I don’t have to remember the entire conversation.” The Associated Press asked Stanton to answer some of the questions he asks his subjects – and a few others. AP: What was your saddest moment? STANTON: I had flunked out of college and lived with my grandparents for a couple of years. And during that time my grandfather got really bad Alzheimer’s. I got back into the University of Georgia right as his Alzheimer’s was starting to get kind of bad. I knew when I was leaving he wasn’t going to be the same person when I came back. AP: What’s your biggest struggle right now? STANTON: I’m a single content producer of a blog seen by millions of people. I don’t want to mess it up and I don’t want to lose it. So it’s always on my mind. My greatest struggle is hanging out with friends, family and my girlfriend, and being present. AP: What advice would you give a large group of people? STANTON: Don’t wait for the perfect moment. Humans of New York, when I started it, was nothing like it is now. ... It didn’t emerge from me thinking a fully formed idea and executing it. It emerged from me tinkering and working and evolving. So many people

wait until the pieces are in place to start, and often that moment never comes. AP: In 2011, the AP wrote a story about your plan to take a visual census of 10,000 New Yorkers. What happened to that project? STANTON: HONY’s evolved so much. It’s so different from when you guys wrote that first article. It used to be a photography blog. I can’t call it that any more. It’s a storytelling blog. Before, I was visually responding to the street. I wasn’t looking for anything in particular. Now I look for someone sitting alone. I look for people who are approachable. AP: What was your happiest moment? STANTON: That (AP) story was written after six months of obsessively doing this all day, every day, walking thousands of miles and taking thousands of portraits and I really hadn’t been able to get any traction or develop an audience. After that article was written, my Facebook fans jumped from 220 to 770. ... I remember going to sleep that night the happiest man in the world. After all that struggle, I finally thought it was going to work. AP: As HONY grew, so did comments mocking or insulting the people you photographed. You finally told readers “the right to free speech does not apply here.” What happens to negative comments now? STANTON: My assistants delete, ban, delete, ban. AP: You often photograph homeless people and people with disabilities. Does anyone complain about being a poster child? STANTON: I’ve gotten some great portraits. I’ve also been cussed out. I just have to approach everybody the same way and keep my intentions clear. ... If somebody asks me to take their picture down, I do it. AP: What’s the most shocking thing that’s happened to you? STANTON: My fans trend young and they trend female, but one night I was in Bryant Park and there was this man, about 70, sitting alone on a computer. I took his photo and said I run a site called Humans of New York. Then he flipped his computer around. He’d been looking at it.


24

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

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Wednesday, October 16, 2013

25

Yukon News

SPORTS AND

RECREATION

First line propels Peewee Mustangs to gold in Richmond Tom Patrick News Reporter

P

eewee A Mustangs head coach Kirk Gale is “very pleased” with his team. He has plenty of reason to be. His Whitehorse rep team rallied from an opening loss to win four straight and claim gold at the 11th annual International Seafair Icebreaker Rep Tournament in Richmond, B.C., over the holiday weekend. “Their play on the ice was excellent and their professionalism off the ice – everyone did well on and off the ice,” said Gale. “It was great to have them down there for the first tournament of the year. It was a lot of fun and the kids enjoyed it.” The Mustangs took gold with a 7-4 win over the South Delta Storm from Delta, B.C. on Monday in the Tier 2 tournament. “Our kids were very disciplined,” said Gale. “We took a few penalties we probably shouldn’t have taken, but for the most part the kids played well, they were disciplined, and they got better every game, which is really important. “We have a few first-years and it’s a bit of a jump to play against second-year players, especially in the second tier because we’re Tier 3. Every kid on the team got better and more comfortable as the games went along.” The Mustangs’ first line of Dylan Cozens, Bryce Anderson and Isaac Williamson did a lot of the heavy lifting over the weekend. Cozens scored 21 of his team’s 30 goals in Richmond. In two games he played a part in all of the Mustangs goals. Cozens and Anderson also play up an age division with the Bantam A Mustangs. “Those guys have been playing together for a little while now and they see each other well on the ice, for sure,” said Gale. “They were really strong; they tallied 90 per cent of the goals.” In Monday’s final, Cozens

Pat Stevens/Yukon News

Peewee A Mustangs defenceman Kyle Schwantz handles the puck during play at the International Seafair Icebreaker Rep Tournament in Richmond, B.C. over the weekend. The Mustangs took gold in the Tier 2 tournament.

registered five goals and two assists, while Williamson had a goal and three assists, and Anderson racked up five assists. Teammate Brett Walchuck, who was named Player of the Game, contributed a goal, and Liam Hudson had two assists for Whitehorse. The final was also retribution for the tournament opener. The Mustangs lost 5-4 to the Storm on Friday. Winger Cozens, who was named Player of the Game, had three goals and two asPat Stevens/Yukon News sists. Centre Anderson had a Mustangs defenceman Oscar Burgis brings the puck up-ice goal and two assists while his against the South Delta Storm on Friday.

other winger, Williamson, had a goal and assist. The Mustangs reached the final with a 5-1 thumping of the Portland Junior Hawks, the first place team from the other pool, in the semi. Cozens finished with three goals and an assist and Anderson with a goal and assist. Teammate Oscar Sawicki also found the back of the Hawks net. Walchuck, Kyron Crosby and Player of the Game Wyatt Peterson each had an assist. Cozens and Anderson are not the only players on the team that play up a division. Both Peewee A Mustangs goalies – Dawson Smith and Quinn Howard – are atom age. Smith has a few seasons with the Mustangs program under his belt while Howard is new to the organization. “The goalies are looking great,” said Gale. “They’re last-year atoms, so they’re not even peewee age. “It’s really nice having two really good goaltenders. They push each other, they get along with each other and they’re there to learn and there to compete. “There were a few jitters for both of them when they first started for a couple games, not knowing what to expect … But they held us in there, made some big saves when we needed them. It was great.” Following the loss to the Storm, the Mustangs downed Vancouver T-Birds 8-2 on Saturday. Cozens’ stick was on fire in the game, amassing seven goals. Anderson had a goal and four assists while Player of the Game Williamson left with three assists. Sawicki and Walchuck each finished with an assist. Whitehorse then beat the Everett Junior Silvertips from Washington State 6-2 Sunday to reach the semifinal. Cozens had three goals and three assists. Peterson and Williamson also scored. Anderson, who got the Playerof-the-Game nod, racked up a goal and assist. Sawacki and Hudson also had assists. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


26

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Strikers give strong second halfs at club nationals Tom Patrick News Reporter

T

he Yukon Strikers U14 girls team needs a little more get-up-and-go when they take to the soccer pitch. Slow starts with lacklustre first halfs hurt the team at the 2013 National Club Championships last week at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta. “I’m pretty happy actually,” said Strikers coach Tony Gaw. “We’re slow starters. The girls were very nervous to start and it was difficult for them to start strong. “In the second half, they always came out strong and the game sheets show we kept all the other teams to a tie or we were outplayed by one goal in the second half of four of the games we played.” Though the Strikers went winless while competing for the U14 Cup at the nationals, their trip was not without a high point. The Strikers had a 0-0 tie with Summerside United SC from P.E.I. on Saturday. Summerside United went on to place second last, just ahead of Yukon, as decided by the two teams’ goal differential at the tournament.

Yukon goalkeeper Jayden Demchuk was in net for the shutout tie. “(Goalie) Isabel (Magsucang) played the bulk of the games and she was good too,” said Gaw. “It’s pretty positive we have two goalies that like to play the position and were starting to get some good training in Whitehorse. They are starting to move forward fairly well.” Yukon finished the championship with a 6-1 loss to St. John’s Soccer Club from Newfoundland on Monday. Yukon was outscored just 2-1 in the second half. Striker Tyra Jones put Yukon on the board with her second goal of the championships “She was in the right place at the right time,” said Gaw. The Strikers lost 13-0 to open the championship against second seed Nova Scotia on Wednesday. The team rebounded with a much closer 4-1 loss to the Aurora Concordes of Saskatchewan on Thursday. The Saskatchewan squad went up 3-1 by half before the Yukon Strikers found their footing. Yukon also lost 6-0 to New Brunswick on Sunday, keeping New Brunswick scoreless in the second half.

took in a lesson or two. “Hopefully the boys learned something from it,” said MacPhail. “In the Yukon, we have to figure out how to get to that level … How do we help these kids get there?” The Strikers’ boys team lost 4-2 to the Eastern Eagles SC from P.E.I. on Thursday in their closest battle. The match was tied 2-2 after the first half with goals from Yukon striker Morgan Ramsay and centre mid RJ Smallwood. Yukon’s boys squad lost 18-0 to Alberta’s Foothills club to start the championships on Wednesday. Following the P.E.I. match Yukon lost 13-0 to Nova Scotia Photo by Ian Martens on Saturday, 17-0 to NewNova Scotia Halifax County United’s Jane Stevens, left, foundland and Labrador on tries to gain possession of the ball from Yukon Strikers’ Sunday and 9-1 to New BrunsBryn Peterson during the U14 National Club Championship wick on Monday. on Oct. 9 in Lethbridge, Alta. Midfielder Tyler Milton scored on a penalty kick early couple of goals on us early and “In the second half of the on against New Brunswick. last four games, we played the girls get deflated and it’s “A lot of teams were runexcellent,” said Gaw. hard for them to recover.” ning up scores on us – the “The girls were nervous, same with the others,” said they were playing against girls Yukon boys have who are a year older, and we MacPhail. “Some of the other rough go at U14 Cup don’t get a lot of games,” he scores in the tournament, added. “As we move forward there were some 11-0s and The Yukon Strikers U14 and get more game experience, 9-0s. We weren’t the only ones boys didn’t take in a win at the getting beaten up pretty good.” I think we’ll be able to start a club nationals, but coach John little bit better. I think that’s Contact Tom Patrick at our biggest problem. We get a MacPhail hopes they at least tomp@yukon-news.com

TOURISM

OPEN HOUSE INVITATION TO BUSINESSES, TOURISM OPERATORS, CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS, FRONT LINE STAFF AND ANYONE INVOLVED WITH VISITORS TO YUKON When:

Friday, October 25 starting with refreshments at 8:30 a.m.

Where:

Yukon Visitor Information Centre, 100 Hanson Street, Whitehorse

What:

A day of tourism-related activities including: information sessions on funding opportunities, new trends in marketing, one-on-one meetings with Tourism Branch staff and more.

travelyukon.com For more information or to register for the event, visit tc.gov.yk.ca or call 867-667-8410 REGISTRATION DEADLINE: OCTOBER 23


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

27

Yukon News

Beaver-friendly Meadow Lakes starts selling season passes Tom Patrick

of people that comment on them,” said general manager Johnny Enns. “Just in the last hitehorse’s Meadow Lakes couple of weeks I’ve caught Golf Resort has decided people walking down number to begin selling season passes for nine and I go, ‘Can I help you?’ unlimited golf next season. ‘Oh yeah, just going to show my The passes include beaverwife the beavers.’ viewing at no extra cost. “I even called Copper Ridge A family of four beavers cur(Place) care facility to let them rently calls a pond between the know, if they want to bring sixth and seventh holes home. some residents out and view the As the winter months approach, beavers.” they have been busy as, well, beaIt is believed the beavers, vers building a lodge. which share their pond with two The beavers bravely cross fair- muskrats, have been wintering ways to take down trees, chewing at the course the last three to five through a new wood fence when years. necessary. They were originally living in You’d think management the pond between holes 5 and would be ready to give them the 8, but owner Jeff Luehmann boot, but that’s not the case. encouraged them to relocate “It’s unbelievable the amount over concerns of them harming News Reporter

W

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Tom Patrick/Yukon News

A beaver chews through a log at the Meadow Lakes Golf Resort on Monday. The resort, which has four beavers living in a pond, is selling season passes for the first time.

a water fountain and damming a stream that flows through the course. The beavers have actually made hole 9 a little more accommodating, clearing trees and making it easier for golfers to cut the corner and reach the green. “(Luehmann) has no problem

with them taking down trees on nine,” said Enns. “In fact, he helps them; he cuts them down as well and will actually throw them in the pond. He did that a lot last year for various parts of the golf course.” Meadow Lakes has given the beavers a free pass and are

Dännach’ea – Welcome Everyone!

Celebrating 10YEARS of Self Government!

Kluane First Nation invites you to join us for a day of feasting, speeches, special presentations, and celebrations!

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2013 starting at 12: 00 pm

Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com

JACQUOT BUILDING BURWASH LANDING, YUKON Traditional regalia and drums are encouraged! For more information contact Katie Johnson at (867) 332-5283 or bellaeliteconsulting@gmail.com

selling season passes for golfers for the first time in the resort’s 15-year history. Golfers can now purchase passes for unlimited play next season at the nine-hole executive course. “We’ve had a lot of requests and a lot of people asking why we don’t sell yearly memberships, so we decided it would be a trial year,” said Enns. “We’ll see how it goes after next year.” “We’re going to try a limited amount of memberships for next year at $950 plus GST, and that’s unlimited golf. The early-bird special that we have running right now until the end of October is a 10 per cent discount.” Meadow Lakes will continue to sell “non-prime” season passes for the third year. The nonprime passes offer unlimited play Monday to Friday, from open to 3 p.m. “They’ve been increasing every year and we’ll do it again for a third year in 2014,” said Enns. For more information contact the resort at 668-4653, info@ meadowlakesgolfresort.com or at the clubhouse before the end of the month. “We do have ideas for next year that we’ll be working on over the winter and I think we’ll emphasize a few more tournaments,” added Enns. Meadow Lakes management hopes to keep the course open through this weekend.

The Yukon Indian Hockey Association is committed to promoting Aboriginal Hockey for all ages in the spirit of friendship, Goodwill on a local, regional and national level.

CHECK OUT THE JOB SECTION IN THE


28

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

ANNIE'S

COMICS

MAILBOX

ADAM

Dear Annie: This is my second marriage. My husband has two children from his first marriage and a stepdaughter. His first wife had several affairs. I feel it may have been due to his lack of support for her. He was always working and never had time for his wife and kids. We married five years after his divorce. My husband and I are happy, and he is devoted to me. But he continues to work a great deal, and I am often lonely. I know it would help to have my own outside interests and hobbies and to go out with my friends, but I miss the closeness I had with my first husband. We did everything together. The problem now is his kids. We have not spoken to them in nearly three years. When his oldest granddaughter sent us a graduation invitation, I sent her a text thanking her for inviting us. She wrote back, “Who is this? I do not recognize the number.” That really hurt me. I gave nine years of my life to that little girl, trying to be a good step-grandmother. I wrote her back and said, “Once upon a time, you called me Grandmommie. I still love and miss you.” I have heard nothing more from her. My husband’s children have no respect for their father because he was always gone. I tried to overcome that for many years, but it went sour. What can we do to get these problems corrected? Should we send a graduation gift? — Hurting in Oklahoma Dear Oklahoma: First, while your relationship with these children seems distant, let’s not mix apples and oranges. Unless your phone number is programmed into this grandchild’s phone, your name would not come up when you texted, and she would not have known who was contacting her. You can call the children and grandchildren directly and ask how to warm up the relationship. But we can’t promise anything will change unless your husband becomes more involved, and he does not seem inclined. But please send a graduation gift. It’s a start.

DILBERT

Kakuro

Sudoku

By The Mepham Group

Level: Gentle

By The Mepham Group Level: 1

2

3

4

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

No digit can be repeated in a solution, so a 4 can only produce 1 and 3, never 2 and 2. Solution published tomorrow. © 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

11/4/13

11/4/13

To solve Kakuro, you must enter a number between 1 and 9 in the empty squares. The clues are the numbers in the white circles that give the sum of the solution numbers: above the line are across clues and below the line are down clues. Thus, a clue of 3 will produce a solution of 2 and 1 and a 5 will produce 4 and 1, or 2 and 3, but, of course, which squares they go in will depend on the solution of a clue in the other direction.

© 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

COMICS THE OTHER COAST

BOUND AND GAGGED

BREWSTER ROCKET

29

Yukon News

RUBES速

by Leigh Rubin


30

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Kids Korner Younger kids can enjoy Uncle Art’s Funland, while older ones can test their knowledge with Shortcuts.

luminum is the third mostabundant element on earth and the most abundant metal found in the Earth’s crust. It took humans hundreds of years to discover how to refine aluminum into a useful material, and today we use more aluminum than any other metal except iron and steel. Why did

This edition of Shortcuts is sponsored by Can-dace.

This cartoon needs to be recycled.

You are so busted!

the orchestra hire the aluminum wire? It was a good conductor.

Pure aluminum is a soft and weak metal. It is usually combined with other metals to form a stronger and harder “alloy.” Most of the aluminum used in the world is in the form of an alloy.

Pure aluminum is never found in nature. It is a very reactive metal and is always found chemically combined with other elements. A cost-effective way of refining and producing aluminum was not discovered until the late 1800s. The first effective aluminum foil was created in the 1940s. Aluminum cans gained popularity during the 1960s.

Some alloys of aluminum are as strong as steel.

Most of the aluminum produced in the world is used to make packaging.

Aluminum alloys are very popular for producing products because they are lightweight, strong, corrosion-resistant, good conductors of electricity and reflect light and heat.

Can you find the hidden words? Search carefully because some words are backward or diagonal. ALUMINUM CAN PURE RECYCLE CRUST HEAT BAUXITE WEAK SOFT STRONG LIGHT BOB METAL STEEL FOIL ALLOY IRON ORE

What is aluminum’s favorite type of music? Metal.

Most of the rocks and soil on our planet contain aluminum, but only an ore called “bauxite” contains enough aluminum for the economical production of aluminum. Aluminum reflects heat very well and is often part of suits used by astronauts and firefighters in extreme environments.

What did the leftovers say when they were wrapped in aluminum? Curses, foiled again!

B L A C K B E A R D A N G H E Y O L L A L O L O O P P E E L C R Y U U U S R Y G T O Y S I L M X F O I L N S C L A M I

I B I F O L

O E O R P N G N E S T R M R A I N U S H WW A T E R T A B M R S T E E C T A N S O M E E A T H P A N T S B A N A N A K I L N K E Y

GAME ANSWERS: 1. Sign is different. 2. Eyebrows are missing. 3. Heart is missing. 4. Heart is moved. 5. Eyes are different. 6. Can top is different.

Can you spot all six differences between these two scenes?

Recycling aluminum is very important and cost-effective. Making a product with recycled aluminum requires only 5 percent of the energy needed to make that same product by refining new aluminum from bauxite.

For more information on aluminum, check out these books: “Aluminum” by Brian Knapp (Grolier) or “A Metal Can” by Sarah Ridley (Gareth Stevens).

What is aluminum’s favorite dance? The can-can.

www.shortcutscomic.com

The name aluminum comes from the Latin word “alumen.” Aluminum was first referred to as “alumine,” or “alumium.” Today, most English-speaking countries, except for the U.S., refer to it as “aluminium.”

Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc.

© Jeff Harris 2013

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31

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

ENTER YOUR COLOURING FOR A CHANCE TO WIN!

WINNERS… Up to five years

Bree Monkman Six to eight years

Layla Grace Wheeler Nine to twelve years

Wesley Vangel

Name:_________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________ ______________________________________________ Phone: ________________________________________ Age Up to five Six to eight Nine to years years twelve years Group:

ENTER YOUR DRAWING FOR A CHANCE TO WIN!

WINNERS... Up to five years

Emily Vangel

Six to eight years

Zared Netro

Nine to twelve years

Felicity Vangel

Congratulations to our winners and runners-up and good luck to those of you entering next week’s competition. Open to kids up to age 12. Entries for this week’s contests must be received by 12 pm next Monday in order to appear in next week’s paper. If your entry arrives late (which may happen with out-of-town entries), it will be judged along with the contestants from the following week. Please limit entries to ONE PER CHILD PER WEEK. The contests are divided into three age groups: Up to five years, Six to eight years, Nine to twelve years. Drawings for the drawing contest must be on a separate piece of paper and reproducible on a photocopier to win. (Black and white drawings on white paper are easier to reproduce.) Winners will receive their prizes by mail so be sure to include your complete address! Please note that only winning entries will be returned. Winners receive Gift Certificates for the “Dollar Store with More”.

Entries for both contests should be dropped off or mailed to:

211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2E4.


32

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

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HOUSE HUNTERS

60

$ + GST picture & text in 1x3 ad any 3 issues within a 3 week period.

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6+gst per issue/$9+gst boxed & bolded 30+gst per month $ 45+gst per month boxed & bolded $ $

www.yukon-news.com • 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2E4 • Phone: (867) 667-6285 • Fax: (867) 668-3755 For Rent ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com $575, $775, $900, ROOMS. BACHELORS. 1-BDRMS. Clean, bright, furnished, all utilities incl, laundry facilities. Close to college & downtown. Bus stop, security doors. Live-in manager. 667-4576 or Email: barracksapt@hotmail.com SKYLINE APTS: 2-bdrm apartments, Riverdale. Parking & laundry facilities. 667-6958 HOBAH APARTMENTS: Clean, spacious, walking distance downtown, security entrance, laundry room, plug-ins, rent includes heat & hot water, no pets. References required. 668-2005 WEEKEND GET AWAY Rustic Cabin-45 minutes from town Hiking Trails in the summer Skiing in the winter Includes sauna. Reasonable rates. Rent out by the week or for a weekend. 867-821-4443 ARE YOU New to Whitehorse? Pick up a free Welcome to Whitehorse package at The Smith House, 3128-3rd Ave. Information on transit, recreation programs, waste collection & diversion. 668-8629 FOR RENT - house in country. 2 bedroom plus den, Large deck with beautiful views. Available now. $1,600/mon. 633-4496 2 EASY going professionals looking for 3rd roommate in Mountain View townhouse, $530/mon + 1/3 utils 335-6462 1-BDRM APT in Porter Creek. heat and electric inclʼd, $1,200/mon. 633-2901 or 334-1051 for more info or to view. FURNISHED ROOM in comfortable home in Porter Creek. Incl. cable TV, WiFi, phone, utils. Washer/dryer available. On bus route or parking available, $650/mon. Available immed. 332-7054 RIVERDALE: FURNISHED room, N/S, N/P, no drinking, clean, quiet home, serious inquiries only, $600/mon. 667-2452 2-BDRM SUITE in riverdale, available Nov 1, N/S, N/P. Refs reqʼd, $1,675/mon. 334-3878

3-BDRM, 2-BATH duplex in Crestview, 6 appliances, lg. lot with mtn. view, N/S, N/P. 1 yr. lease, DD required. $1,700/mon. plus utils. 633-4106 ROOM IN 3-bdrm house in Valleyview. One minute walk to CGC, $600 all included, outdoor friendly, reliable person. 333-9514 HAINES, ASLASKA! Swan View Rental Cabins Right on the lake! 50 kms north of Haines, Alaska. www.tourhaines.com/lodging Ask about our special rates for Yukoners. (907)766-3576

AVAILABLE CONDO in Riverdale, 3-bdrms, 1.5-baths, plug-in parking, fenced backyard. Close to schools, groceries & trails, N/P, N/S, $1,450/mon + util. DD and refs reqʼd. 335-8617

3-BDRM, 1-BATH duplex in Riverdale, convenient location, private fenced backyard, sun deck. N/P, N/S. Long term only $1,400/mon + util. Avail Nov 1. 456-7397

Small country house 5 mi. from Whitehorse, wood heat, power incl. N/S, N/P, quiet people preferred, $750/mon. 633-3086

AVAILABLE IMMED, 2-bdrm bsmnt suite, Granger area. Newly renovated, separate entrance. Kitchen & laundry. $1700/mon includes utilities & backup baseboard heating. Refs & damage deposit reqʼd. 334-9788 or kennyjdliu@hotmail.com

1-BDRM NEW apt in Riverdale, avail immed, N/S, N/P,no parties, includes heat, hot water, lights responsible tenant only, $1,200/mon. 668-5558 MARSH LAKE, Avail immediately,newly renovated 3-bdrm, 2-bath log house on private acre. washer & dryer. N/S, $1,300/mon + elec & DD. (250) 864-4499 DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE •Shared space with Cambio Consulting •Access to boardroom, coffee bar •See Kijiji ad ID 466620854 and Borealist 335-3499 Available Now Newly renovated OFFICE SPACE & RETAIL SPACE Close to Library & City Hall A short walk to Main Street Phone 633-6396 BRIGHT 1-BDRM suite, Porter Creek. Full bath, in suite laundry, attached greenhouse, on bus route, available immed, $840/mon. + utils, N/S only. Suites@auroramusic.ca or 604-595-4895 RENDEZVOUS PLAZA on Lewes Blvd, Riverdale Lots of parking 4,000 sq ft (previously child care centre) 1,100 sq ft (previously flower shop, studio) 7,000 sq ft (previously Frazerʼs) Call 667-7370

PORTER CREEK, 2 rooms w/own bathrm, living rm, shared kitchen. Incls internet, 46” TV, Bell satellite, $550/mon & $575/mon. N/P. Nov 1. 334-4113 ROOM IN Northland, run of the house, w/d, no drinking or drugs in house. $600/mon. 668-4776 NICELY FURNISHED room. Incl small fridge, sat TV, laundry & kitchen privileges, close to amenities, refs & dd reqʼd, $750/mon, avai immed, smoking permitted in designated areas. 335-2231 aft 6pm RIVERDALE 3-BDRM main floor suite. N/S, N/P, 1yr lease. $1,500/mon + utils + sec deposit. Refs reqʼd. 667-2452 PORTER CREEK 1 & 2-bdrm apt. 2-bdrm trailer, N/S, no parties. Available immed. 633-2046 1-BDRM BASEMENT suite dt, close to HIgh Country Inn, responsible tenant, bright & clean, heat inclʼd, $900/mon. 334-5448 3-BDRM DUPLEX in Riverdale. Available Nov 1, 1.5 baths, washer, dryer, fridge & stove. Heat inclʼd, N/S. Refs reqʼd. 334-4431 1-BDRM MODERN house on private acreage, Robinson subdivision, 25 mins from downtown, $750/mon. 668-2769 lv msg 2-BDRM HOUSE on Hotsprings Rd available Nov 1, oil heat, power, water delivery, $1,000/mon + utilities. 633-6178 RIVERDALE, LEGAL, 1-bdrm basement suite, good natural light. $1,000/mon incls heat, electricity, shared laundry. N/P, N/S, no parties. Refs & DD reqʼd. 335-8817 COZY WOLF Creek part furnished 1-bed apt available Nov 1. Private w/own laundry. N/S, n/p, no dogs. $975/mth plus utilities.  Suitable for one mature, responsible tenant. Ref & dd required. 668-3335

CABIN 25 min S of downtown Whitehorse.  2-rm, 400ft, wood heat, privacy, trails & river access, N/S, pet ok.  $590 + elec, Nov.1.  Refs req.  668-2703 3-BDRM, 1-BATH Takhini duplex Nov 1, $1,475/mon + oil & elec.  N/S, pet ok.  Laundry in full basement.   Large yard, not fenced, no garage.  Refs req.  668-2703 MODERN 1-BDRM downtown condo, Availa b l e i m m e d i a t e l y . Stove/fridge/washer/dryer/microwave/storage area/plug in parking. 1 year lease. References please. $1,300/mon + utils. 336-4888. ROOMMATE WANTED. You get 1 bdrm + a spare room. Shared bath & kitchen. Must be compatible with current tenant. Heat & elec inclʼd. Avail Nov 1, $800/mon. April 335-9375 2-BDRM, 2-BATH mobile home in Mary Lake, N/S, N/P, no parties. Refs & DD reqʼd. Utils inclʼd. Responsible tenant. $1,500/mon. 335-3738 AVAILABLE NOV 1st 3-bdrm trailer in Lobird. Oil furnace & wood stove, N/P, N/S. Refs & DD reqʼd, $1,350/mon + utils. 393-3823 BEAUTIFUL NEW 1-bdrm apt in Takhini North. Full appliances, sound proofed, lots of storage, Eco Friendly, hardwood floors, tiled bathrm, $975/mon. 334-4541 COPPER RIDGE 1-bdrm N/S, N/P, walkout basement suite, Refs & DD reqʼd, $1,000/mon + utils 393-3823 OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE For Rent Location: 129 Copper Road. Approx. 850 sq ft.   $500 per month includes utilities. Call 667-2614 ask for Brenda or Michelle or Email: totalfire@northwestel.net LARGE 1-BDRM apt available, 129 Copper Rd. Approx. 1500 sq ft, utils inclʼd, $1,500/mon. Email: totalfire@northwestel.net or call Brenda or Michelle 667-2614 1-BDRM APT available, 129 Copper Rd, approx. 700 sq ft, utils inclʼd, $1,000/mon. E-mail: totalfire@northwestel.net or call Brenda or Michelle 667-2614 DOWNTOWN 1-BDRM suite, sep entrance, laundry & heat incl, n/s, n/p, $1,050/mon. 334-6510

for rent for rent

Beautifully finished office space is available in the Taku Building at 309 Main Street.

Call 867-333-0144

1200 SQ ft newer shop/studio for lease in Marwell, available October 1. $15/sq ft. Check out Kijiji Whitehorse Ad ID 510028138 for more details. Or 668-3408

DOWNTOWN OFFICE for rent Main floor sunny office with hardwood floors, ensuite and storage closets. 280 square feet $750/mon includes electricity 456-8004

2-BDRM NEW apt in Riverdale, avail immed, N/S, N/P, no parties, includes heat, hot water, lights, responsible tenant only please, $1,550/mon. 668-5558

ONE BEDROOM apartment in downtown Whitehorse. Rent $850+ Electricity. References and damage deposit required. Call 334-9087 to view. Available immediately. ONE-BDRM ONE-BATH apt. in quiet neighbourhood of Granger.  Close to bus- stop, grocery store. Heat, parking spot with plug-in, outdoor storage, own laundry included.  Utilities not included. $1100/mos. 335-1173

ROOM IN Takhini duplex available now for single in quiet living space, large window, furnished, N/S, N/P, no partying, close to bus, college, CGC, trails, $600/mon. 668-4129

FOR LEASE

This historic building is the first L.E.E.D. certified green building in Yukon. It features state of the art heat and ventilation, LAN rooms, elevator, bike storage, shower, accessibility and more.

ESCAPE WINTER to beautiful Gabriola Island! Private 2-bdrm guesthouse, self-contained, fully furnished, 20 minute ferry from Nanaimo.  Winter special, $600/week. www.thegardenbed.ca, 250-247-7457

Approx. 270 sq ft

1140 sq.ft. Corner of 4th & Olgilvie

4198 Fourth Avenue

For more details call: 403-861-4748

of high-end rental space with fantastic view available immediately. Elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, large windows, lots of natural light.

Please call Kevin at 334-6575 for more information.

Approx. 1650 sq ft

of high-end rental space available immediately. Independent HVAC system, elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, move-in ready.

Please call Kevin at 334-6575 for more information.

ROOM IN Hillcrest duplex, N/S, N/P because we already have some. No drinking or drugs. DD reqʼd, incls utils, $625/mon. 334-5032 2/3-BDRM TOP floor of house on Annie Lake Rd. Well, wood heat, storage, pet friendly, incls utils, $1,450/mon. 334-8271 3-BDRM HOUSE w/lrg rec rm, 2 baths, Copper Ridge avail Nov 1. On grnblt, incls appl, fenced back yard, deck & shed. N/S. Refs reqʼd, $1,700/mon + utils. topazcrescent@hotmail.com COUNTRY LIVING 20 minutes south of Whitehorse. Individual studio suite with common areas, also one bedroom apt. n/s. For more info call 456 - 2135 after 8pm ROOM IN Riverdale, incls utils, internet & cable, N/P, $600/mon. Rick 332-6030 AVAILABLE NOV 1st- 4 BDRM Copper Ridge Duplex ,2 full baths, rec-room, 5 appliances, large yard, deck. $1700/mth plus oil & electric. N/S N/P reference & deposit required. Call 334-2145. MAIN ST 2-bdrm, 1-bath apt w/appliances on greenbelt. Available Nov 1. Refs & DD reqʼd, $1,700/mon + utils. + 1st. Email:nsevergreenoffice@gmail.com 667-7462 2 BEDROOM FULLY FURNISHED CABIN, 30 minutes from Whitehorse, Army Beach, c/w water, electricity, wood, oil, electric heat. Available Nov. 1st - Apr. 30, 2014. $900/ month + utilities. 334-2716 ROOM FOR rent, looking for a friendly, clean roommate in Mountainview area, close to the Yukon College and bus stop, $700/mos includes utilities. 456-2680, 332-1678 leave message. COPPER RIDGE 1-bdrm, private kitchen, bathroom, living room. Shared w/d.  Incls heat/electricity, $800 + DD, N/S, N/P. Available now. 336-0627 2-BEDROOM FULLY FURNISHED CABIN, 30 minutes from Whitehorse, Army Beach. Cabin c/w water, electricity, wood, oil and electric heat. Nov. 1st - Apr. 30, 2014. $900.00/ month + utilities. 334-2716 LOVELY MAIN floor 2 bdrm suite in Porter Creek, new appliances, laundry, carport, large deck & yard, quiet couple preferred, ns, $1600/mo. + u & dep. Francine 334-2747. NEWER 1200 sq ft shop/studio/office in Marwell. $1500/mos .Lots of natural light, in-slab heat with Veisman boiler. Bathroom and small kitchen. See kijiji AD ID 510028138 or call 668-3408 NOV 1, clean furnished bedroom, $700/mon includes utilities, Hot Springs Rd., n/p - must like dogs. DD & references required, reliable person preferred. 633-2119 2-BDRM TRAILER, P.C., $1350/mos, plus heat and hydro, 1st and last and references required. 334-8381 3-BDRM, 2-BATH bright & clean located in Copper Ridge, N/P, N/S, no partying, $1,700/mon + utils available October 15. 333-6410 lv msg D/T BRIGHT and spacious, 2-bdrm, main floor home, shared laundry, $1275/mon plus heat and electric, avail Nov 1, n/p 393-3005 3-BDRM HOUSE downtown, laundry, 2 baths, $650/mon + half utils. Walking distance to shopping . N/P, N/S inside. 778-868-9563 2 BDRM basement suite, Wolf Creek, private entrance, designated parking, laundry room, $1100/mos. 333-0005 DAWSON CITY, executive 3-storey house, 1 block from Commissionerʼs residence and nearly as big. 3,800 sq ft, 4-bdrms, huge living area, separate apt., 2-car garage, large yard. 867-993-6109


ROOM AVAILABLE in 3-bdrm townhouse in Riverdale, $600/mon incls heat, electricity, w/d & BBQ. Refs & DD reqʼd. 335-8617 2-BDRM HOUSE in Riverdale. Available Nov 1/13-July 31/14. Cute home w/big backyard, hardwood floors, easy walk to downtown. Refs reqʼd, N/S, $1,300/mon + utils. Call or text 647-471-2027 1/2 DUPLEX, 2-bdrm, wood heat & oil heat backup, $1300/mon, 1st and last, kids and pets welcome, n/s. 334-1816 ROOMMATE NEEDED in d/t house, prefer female, prefer clean, mature, responsible person, references required, asking $630 including heat, kitchen, cable, laundry facilities. n/s, n/p. 668-5185 days or 667-7840 eves, weekends. ROOM, FULLY furnished if needed. Semi-private bathroom. Easy access to laundry room. Parking. Must be okay with small dog and cat. $750/month. Call 334-4134. 2 BED, 1 bath unfurnished condo for rent in Hillcrest. Balcony, great view, 1-car parking. N/S, N/P, refs. required. $1,400/mon., 1st month and DD. Leave msg 633-3453 COMMERCIAL UNIT, located on main floor, 3151A 3rd Ave, 850 sqft, bathroom & kitchen facility, incls heat. Unit can be leased for $1,491/mon + utils. Month to month rent. 667-2090 DOWNTOWN, 1 bdrm. bsmt. suite c/w office & util. room, bright, spacious, sep. entrance, w/d. NS/, NP. $1,100/mon. plus utils. 667-2255 3-BDRM. FULLY furnished house, Takhini West, very nice. N/S, no cats. $1,800/mon. plus utilities. 334-2777 2-3 BDRM apt. Riverdale, upper level, bright & clean, c/w sundeck, carport, fireplace. Heat incl. Mature tenants. Avail. Nov. 1. $1,650/mon. 334-5448 ONE BDRM. apt. Crestview, bright & clean, wood heat, ptly. furn., pet ok. N/S. Quiet place for 1 person. $800/mon. 633-2455 CABIN, 2 bdrm. incl. elec., phone, Internet, no water. N/S, N/P. Refs. & dd required. $800/mon. 660-5545 2-BDRM. SUITE in Takhini, new, main floor, sunny & bright, near College, school, Games Centre, prefer mature person. Avail. Nov. 1. $1,250/mon. plus utils. 336-0444

Wanted to Rent HOUSESITTER AVAILABLE Mature, responsible person   Call Suat at 668-6871 HOUSE-SITTER AND pet care openings for November and part of January. Mature, reliable adult with references. Linda, 867-399-3063 or 667-3003 MID-30S PROFESSIONAL female looking for bright shared accommodation or 1-bdrm apt south of town, Wolf Creek/Mary Lake/Cowley Creek. Furnished or not, flexible w/pets, male or female. 333 9604

Real Estate

DOWNTOWN RESTAURANT Seeking Cooks, Kitchen Helpers & Servers Spanish speaking an asset Competitive wages Please send info to: patronamexfood@gmail.com 668-7372

TAYLOR SOFT ICE CREAM machine $5,595 Char broiler $650 Pizza warmer $450 867-862-7111

WANT to work as a part-time tour guide? Do you speak Spanish? We are a local tour company looking for Spanish-speaking tour guides for this winter. Call 667-2209

INVERSION BALANCING back board stretcher, relives disks & pinched nerves, $200 obo. 2 hanging lights, 5 bulb, nickel finish, $100 obo. Diesel generator, air cooled, 4 stroke, $1,200 obo. 667-7107

Miscellaneous for Sale

1 CORD of nice dry spruce firewood in Riverdale. You pick up only. $225. 336-1990

BETTER BID NORTH AUCTIONS Foreclosure, bankruptcy De-junking, down-sizing Estate sales. Specializing in estate clean-up & buy-outs. The best way to deal with your concerns. Free, no obligation consultation. 333-0717

LPG TANK for automotive use. Manchester 29 gallon. Still has propane in it, $50. 668-3243 MOSQUITO MAGNET, the good version that sucks them into a basket, c/w some spare accessories. Used 2 summers, works well. Paid $4--, asking $75. Moving south. 668-3243

We will pay CASH for anything of value Tools, electronics, gold & jewelry, cameras, furniture, antiques, artwork, chainsaws, camping & outdoor gear, hunting & fishing supplies, vehicles & ATVs. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS

INTERTHERM FURNACE, c/w chimney. 667-6770

LAKE LABERGE Lions Christmas cakes & cookies have arrived. Get yours now while supplies last. Ann at 633-5493

FREE TO charity group or individual an abundant yarn stash. Incls wool & synthetic yarn for all types of projects. Great for craft group. 633-6687

FURNACE BURNER, fully reconditioned, new motor, transformer & pump, $200. 633-3053

INSULATED CHIMNEY, 12ft x7in id, 1inch insulated $100 obo 668-3508

MILLER ECONO Tig with gun, remote and electrode holder, hardly used, $1350 obo. Mike 335-1888

SEVEN INUIT and Haida Stone and Argillite carvings. One piece is an Argillite carved pendant by Denny Dixon. $500 for all. Call Jack at 336-1990

HOTSY 110V hot water pressure washer, $1,800. 336-0995 WOOD BURNING stove. 667-6770 HOTSY 220V hot water pressure washer, $2,800. 336-0995

OSBORNE WOOD-BURNING fireplace insert in gd cond, $350. 633-6238 aft 6pm FRANKLIN MINT collectable plates in orig box w/papers. Assortment of antique glassware collection, 8 sets of salt & pepper shakers. 667-2844 9000 WATT generator Work Force, $700 obo. 660-5922 VARIOUS CAMERAS & film projector w/screen, 1920s to 1970s. 667-2844 lv msg SILVER FLAT framed mirror, 37.5x26”, $40. Totem food smoker, $50. Vintage milk can, painted silver, $40. 667-2844 5 HP Sears Craftsman tiller. Front tine, 18”, chain driven, $300 obo. 335-7455 HOUSEPLANTS, SPIDER plants, grape ivy 4ʼ long, lipstick vine 4ʼ long, $5-$30/ 660-4321 SLATE flagstones, available in design bundles for special projects such as stepping stone walk ways. Prices according to bundle, eg $180 for bundle of 9. 668-1850

EXQUISITELY CARVED Haida pipe... very old, in mint condition. $750. Call Jack at 336-1990 ALASKA-YUKON PACIFIC Exposition plate. Seattle 1909. $45. 1898 Tlingit cedar bark encased ink bottle. $65. Beautiful carved Haida Sheephorn ladle circa 1900-1930. perfect condition. $400. Call Jack at 336-1990 ORIGINAL WATERCOLOUR painting of the SS Klondike in it's last year of operation. Original Frame. Painted in 1955 by BL Greene in Whitehorse. $475 firm. Call Jack at 336-1990 FIRST EDITION A.C. Harris book “Alaska and the Klondike Gold Fields” excellent condition with fold out 1989 map. Mining in the Klondike. $350 firm. Call Jack at 336-1990 FIRST EDITION Jack London book “Smoke Bellow” excellent condition. Collection of stories of the Klondike. $375 firm. Call Jack at 336-1990 441 MONITOR heater with fuel tank, $200. 633-3648 aft 6pm or lv msg

HoUSe HUNTerS

NEW PRICE. Country residential in town, 11 Canyon Cres, 2.72 acres, 3150 sqft living space + 700 sqft garage. 5 bdrms, 3 baths. Motivated to sell, $678,000. 333-0262 or 333-0262

1856 SQFT ranch home in Marsh Lake. Private, quiet area, 5 minute walk to park & beach. Close to Community Centre, firehall & marina. 3 bdrms, 1 bath. 660-5855 8-BDRM, 28 acre, 20 minutes from Whitehorse, country residential, home or business. divided into 2 full suites plus 5-room B&B. View at Property Guys.com, ID # 143483. 456-2135 after 8pm.

Copper ridge

11 grizzly Circle

2 bed, 2 bath, big corner lot, fully landscaped, fenced yard. garage and partially finished basement. priced to sell below it’s appraised value.

$359.900

Call realtor® Mike racz

333-6410

HOUSE HUNTERS

2-BDRM, 1-BATH mobile home in TTC, refurbished in 2007, fenced yard, backs onto greenbelt, extremely quite neighbours. $125,000 firm. 780-257-2928

Help Wanted LOOKING FOR experienced housekeepers/front desk persons to work. Please apply with resume to Bonny, Stratford Motel, 401 Jarvis Street. No phone calls, please.

Coordinator of Regulatory Programs This is an exciting and transformational time for self-regulation in nursing The Yukon Registered Nurses Association (YRNA) is the regulatory body and professional association for registered nurses in the Yukon. YRNA is responsible for establishing and promoting standards of practice for registered nurses, for regulating nursing practice and for advancing professional excellence in the interest of the public. YRNA advocates for nursing and health policies and practices which support safe and ethical care and promotes healthy public policy. STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS • A good understanding of legislative and regulatory issues • Knowledge of nursing and health policy • A demonstrated ability in leadership, communication, interpersonal and critical thinking skills • An ability to manage competing priorities • Considerable independent judgment and decision-making skills • Ability to understand broad policy implications, yet ensure attention to detail • Experience working with governing bodies and committees • Administrative experience is desirable • Minimum of five years nursing practice • Practicing registration with YRNA For more information, please contact the YRNA office. Please note this position is half-time. Please address your résumé to Joy Peacock, RN, MSc, Executive Director of YRNA. Applications may be submitted in person, by mail, email or fax and will be accepted until noon, 28 October 2013. Yukon Registered Nurses Association 204 – 4133 – 4th Avenue Whitehorse, YT Y1A 1H8 Phone: 867-667-4062 Fax: 867-668-5123 Email: exec.director@yrna.ca Website: www.yrna.ca

ACTIVE IN YOUR COMMUNITY Are you looking for volunteer opportunities? Please check www.volunteeryukon.ca to find more volunteer opportunities.

Gwaandak Theatre is looking for volunteers Gwaandak Theatre is organizing on October 18 2013 an original Yukon-themed Trivia Night inspired by TV trivia shows. Corporate and community teams will compete for the first prize, with plenty of breaks for delectable appetizers by Antoinette’s, live Yukon music and a silent auction. Special guests: Sharon Shorty, Dennis Allen, Brass Knucle Society and others to be announced. Looking for Volunteers: · One sound Technician from 7pm to 11pm · One Barman/Barmaid from 7pm to 11pm · Two Judges from 7:30pm to 9:30pm Contact us: info@gwaandaktheatre.com | 393.2676

TESLIN LAKE, 4-bdrm, 2-bath newer 1800 sq ft home w/detached garage. Nicely landscaped. More info available on property guys.com. Price reduced $375,000. 633-4778 CABIN FOR sale, new, 10ʼx14ʼ, wired, insulated, c/w propane stove, fridge, heater. Can be moved. $15,000. 660-5545

Leadership OppOrtunity

FREE MOOSE bones and some scrap meat available - suitable for dogs. 456-7490

HAINES JUNCTION 2-storey house. Contemporary design, open concept on cul-de-sac, 10+ acres, Fire-smarted around house, lots of trees left, view of St. Elias Mtns, 1350 sq. ft. Rod 634-2240

12X68 MOBILE home, 2 bdrms, 1 bath, all new flooring, counter tops, washer, dryer, stove, new fridge, wood & oil heat, new fuel tank. Move in ready. Pad rent, $375/mon. 668-4070

33

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

EXCEPTIONAL DUPLEX FOR SALE: 2A HAyES PLACE, QUIET GRANGER NEIGHBOURHOOD

Over 2,100 sq. ft. of living space w/attached single garage. Upstairs: 3 bdrms, large living room, kitchen & a main 3-pce bathroom; master bdrm has 2-pce ensuite bath. Kitchen: Beautiful tile detailing & rear deck for BBQing. Downstairs: Family room, laundry & in-law suite (1 bdrm, 1 bath, living/kitchen, separate parking & entrance). Beautifully landscaped corner lot, fenced back yard. Construction: 1993, Heat: Electric and Oil, Bath: 2.5, Bed: 4 possibly 5, Crawl Space - 5’, quiet street, Possession: Immediate

You work for a non-profit organization and you would like to add your volunteer opportunities? Please click on http://www.volunteeryukon.ca/.

333,000.00

$

VIEW AT PROPERTyGUyS.COM | ID# 143233 Ryan – 867-335-1598 OR Kate – kolynyk@hotmail.com

MONDAY • WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

Community Services


34

Yukon News KICK SLED, $350 obo. 633-4018

Seeking a

F/T Customer Service Representitive You are a mature person who is looking for a long term position with an established company that has a competitive wage and benefits package. You also enjoy giving a high level of customer service to people looking for fine gifts and jewellery.

Please apply in person with resume to

Murdoch’s, 207 Main Street

VINTAGE KEEPER wine cooler, with bullet-proof glass doors, holds 500 bottles, $1,000. 334-3238 4 PLATE-GLASS shelves, 12” deep by 8ʼ long, 8 plate-glass shelves, 10” deep by 8ʼ long. They come with brackets for slotted wallboard, all for $350 obo. 633-3476 3 FREE-STANDING display cabinets, custom built, sold oak on pedestal bases, 7ʼx3ʼ, 5ʼx3ʼ, 3ʼx3ʼ, 38” high. Previously @ Northend Gallery & Lapis, $1,500 obo. 633-3476 SHEET SET for queen size bed. 1 flat, 1 deep-pocket fitted, 2 pillow cases. Sage colour fleece. New, $20. 668-2877 BOWMAN BOLTS.  1 box of 300 pieces.  6” long x 3/8 NC grade 5.  (57 pounds). 6 boxes total, $50/ea obo. 668-5207 BLUE 4” square cushion for hip-replacement patient, new - $100, asking $60 obo. 633-6213

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 MASTER CRAFT variable speeds wood lathe, Phillips deep fryer, $25, Conair remote control foot spa, $35, alovara plants, $2 each. 456-2633 8-PLACE STAINLESS steel flatware set, in case, asking $30. 668-5537 NIGHT VISION monoculars, $300. Great deal. Like new in case w/instruction booklet. Nightfall 2X24 / 4X50 unit. 333-9549 or 514-266-1737 DOUBLE GLAZE windows, 4' X 8' living room picture window, $100. 4' x 6' dining room window w/2' opener, $75. 668-4575 TRAP LINE for lease, Tagish area, further info call 867-399-3001 DEVILBISS INDUSTRIAL horizontal compressor, 80 gal tank, 3-phase, 10 hp motor. Good running cond, $600 obo. 667-6315 for more info WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER, 25 pint, $50. 660-4425

E M P L OY M E N T O P P O RT U N I T Y Porter Creek Super A has the following positions available:

Full-time Bakery Clerk

No experience necessary.Wage negotiable and includes flight benefits and a great benefit package.

TUTOR (Part-Time Term to Dec 31, 2013) Department: Education Closing: Oct. 22, 2013 Salary: $25-$30/hour, depending on experience To view full details on all opportunities, visit www.kwanlindun.com/employment

Part-time Grocery/Bakery/Produce Clerks

IC-V82 VHF transceiver, brand new, $225. New in box, never used, $225 obo. 333-9549 or 514-266-1737 DOWN DUVET, double, Northern feather, $30. 633-4152 ELECTRICAL GENERATOR, sets up to 3,000 watts and smaller. 668-2332 COFFEE 633-4152

MAKER, electric drip, $10.

SKI-DOO & motorbike helmet, $150. Brand: Zox, DOT certified, black & grey, sz XL. Nidecker snowboard 160 with bindings, $80. Needs a good wax. 333-9549 or 514-266-1737 NEW LAST fall, 200 gal home heating fuel tank made by Tidy tank with double bottom, c/w fill kit, new - $2000, $1000 firm. 668-2866 or 334-9958 FOR SALE, Geographique National collection, 1967 to 1997, perfect shape. Offers. 332-5192 LOG SPLITTER, 4-ton, Yardworks, used 2 seasons. $150. 668-7584 FOOT Surgery? Have clean AIRCAST pneumatic SP Walker Boot sz 5-8 F or 4-7 M, gently used twice. New liner $45, will sell boot & del to WH $45. 633-5774 PANASONIC FAX machine, $40 obo. Living Well Montel Healthmaster machine, $120. 633-6208

Electrical Appliances

Must be available for nights/weekends.

KENMORE DRYER, front loader, works great, $300. Also nw pump out of Kenmore washer, $40. 332-7797

Please drop of resume with references in person to the manager. No phone calls please.

SEARS BEST refrigerator, $200. 633-2580 eves STACKABLE WASHER & dryer, microwave, stove, portable dishwasher, 50 gal hot water tank. 667-6770

trying to find a great local deal? You can find all the display ads in this newspaper online at our website:

www.yukon-news.com Just click on the Marketplace tab and all the ads will be sorted and categorized for easy viewing. Hassle free shopping, so you can find what you need fast!

Selkirk First Nation

P.O. Box 40, Pelly Crossing, YT Y0B 1P0 Phone: 867-537-3060 Fax: 867-537-3075

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Finance Manager Job Summary Reporting to the Director of Finance, the Finance Manager is responsible for the management of the day to day monitoring and internal auditing functions of all accounting operations, functions, records and transactions relating to all Selkirk First Nation Departments and Programs. Qualifications • Accounting or Finance Diploma or successful completion of a minimum four years Post-Secondary education in Accounting. Equivalencies may be accepted at the recommendation of the Director of Finance. • Knowledge of accounting principles and practices in relationship to internal auditing, annual external auditing, financial reporting and financial controls. • Must be willing to enroll in the CAFM program. • Knowledge of QuickBooks will be considered an asset. Closing Date: November 5, 2013 For additional information please contact John Igbokwe provide your resume and cover letter in confidence to: John Igbokwe by Email: financedirector@selkirkfn.com

G&P Steakhouse is Now Hiring!

★ Pizza Cook ★ ★ Dishwasher ★ Kitchen Helper ★ Willing to train. Kitchen experience would be an asset. Apply in Person between 4pm - 6pm: Ask for MJ 91888 Alaska Highway (Beside the Kopper King)

FREE INGLIS dryer, extra large capacity. 456-7852 GE DRYER, 1 yr old. Offers. 633-5938 FREE FRIDGE, 28”x65” high. 456-7852 PROPANE STOVE, 20", 4 burners, oven & broiler drawer, works well. Compact, ideal for cottage/camp use, $120. 667-6951 eves WASHER & dryer set, gd working order, $100. 334-2902 52” DEEPFREEZE. 821-3591 BOSCH FRONT loading washer and dryer. Good shape. $200 o.b.o. 332-7174

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

HOTPOINT DRYER, gd working cond, $50. 668-4575

Language & CuLture Coordinator

FRIGIDAIRE DEEP freezer, very clean, dividers and 2 baskets included. 4ʼ x 34.5” x 27.5”, $300 firm. 633-3982

Term Position: October 2013 – April 2014 (may extend) Burwash Landing, Yukon Territory SALARY: $18.09 - $21.18 (Entry Level w/option for training) APPLICATION DEADLINE: 3:00 p.m. – Thursday, October 24th, 2013 oBJeCtiVeS: Reporting to the Heritage Manager, the incumbent is responsible for coordinating initiatives and options for the protection, enhancement and preservation of the Southern Tutchone language; and, the coordination, promotion and implementation of activities promoting Kluane First Nation culture. The position will work closely with the Heritage Manager to coordinate activities that incorporate language and culture into KFN government functions, program materials and content. The position will be a touchstone for language & culture promotion, Southern Tutchone translation, family tree database and identifying geographical place names. The ability to speak and understand the Southern Tutchone language will be considered an asset. The successful candidate will have knowledge of KFN’s history, culture, and demographics. Knowledge of computer programs, as well as excellent communication skills, report writing skills and with demonstrated experience in language and cultural event coordination is a must. The incumbent must be able to work independently and be able to foster trust at the community level. Field work and travel will be required. A Class 5 Drivers Licence and basic first aid is required. The ideal candidate would have one year college/university or equivalent in related fields of cultural heritage, linguistics and/or language certification. An acceptable combination of education and experience will be considered. Eligible candidates should be prepared to start work October 31, 2013. Please submit resume, cover letter: Kluane First Nation P.O. Box 20, Burwash Landing, Yukon Territory, Y0B 1V0 Ph. (867) 841-4274 ext.: 229 Fax: (867) 841-5900 attention: Human Resources Capacity Officer hr.capacityofficer@kfn.ca

FREE WASHER, 1998 Maytag Neptune, front-loading washing machine, works but door doesn't lock so no spin cycle. Perhaps new mother board required at cost of $300. 333-0510.

TVs & Stereos Paying cash for good quality modern electronics. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS INTERNET RADIO (CD, USB, WiFi, PC), player micro hi-fi system, perfect cond, remote & 2 speakers inclʼd, everything works, great deal, $75. 333-9549 or 514-266-1737 PHILLIPS DVD, VCR combo player w/manual & remote, $40, Satelite rec, General instrument, Star Choice navigo, $20. 633-4152

Computers & Accessories CORNER COMPUTER desk, $80. 667-2844 lv msg DELL DESKTOP computer. Just nuked and paved. WinXP, MSOffice, 19” LCD monitor, speakers, $100. 332-1680 lv msg EPSON PRINTER. FREE, works great, has installation CD. l 633-6687 VARIOUS COMPUTER accessories. Free. Incls keyboards, speakers, d-links card & CD cases. 633-6687 PSP 3000, great cond, c/w charger, case, memory card, lots of games, movies & tv shows, $120 obo. 334-8287 XBOX 360 with controllers and a couple games with the bigger hard drive. Lots of room left, $120 obo. 334-8287 X-BOX 360 w.2 control and 32 games, $100. 333-9060. P53 500 GB HDD (hard drive) with GTA 5, $150. 334-0586


Musical Instruments We will buy your musical instrument or lend you money against it. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS PIANO TUNING & REPAIR by certified piano technician Call Barry Kitchen @ 633-5191 email:bfkitchen@hotmail.com PIANO LESSONS Being offered in my studio with European Conservatory Experience 1-RCM exams 2-Music festivals 3-Christmas concert 4-Lessons designed especially for adults Teacher with lots of patience Call Dusica 668-6970 CHILDʼS QUARTER size McMahon violin, exc cond, c/w book. Paid $525 new, Make an offer. 668-2750 VICTOR VICTORIA - antique serial # VX3 A, 1918 model, 4-doors upright, red mahogany, attic cond. $200 obo. 660-4806

Firewood FIREWOOD FOR SALE 20-cord orders Big or small tree length Logging truck loads $150/cord Delivered to Whitehorse Call Clayton: 335-0894 HURLBURT ENTERPRISES $250 per cord We have wood. You-cut available. Discount for larger quantities. PROMPT Scheduled Delivery Visa, M/C, Check, Cash Dev Hurlburt 335-5192 • 335-5193 EVF FUELWOOD ENT Year Round Delivery • Dry accurate cords • Clean shavings available • VISA/M.C. accepted Member of Yukon Wood Producers Association Costs will rise. ORDER NOW 456-7432 FIREWOOD $250 per cord Cut to length 4-cord load 667-6185 DONʼS FIREWOOD Prompt daily deliveries Commercially harvested beetle kill Social Services & Kwanlin Dun Price as of October 1st: $265 per cord 393-4397 FIREWOOD:  $170.00 per cord 20 ft. logs 5 cord loads. Small delivery charge. 867-668-6564 Leave message 10 cords 3ʼ furnace wood, $1,350 picked up. 16” firewood delivered in Haines Jct, $160/cord “The Tree Huggers Woodchopper” “Earth first, weʼll FireSmart the other planets later” 336-4976

H AND R Sportster break action 22 lr 4x Bushnell scope, great cond, $190. 334-7664 REMINGTON MODEL 10 pump action shotgun 12 gauge, $150. 334-3800 NEW UNFIRED CZ 550 in 375 H&H Kevlor stock, $1200, trades considered, Coey model 75 .22 cal, bolt action rifle, $125, Stevens 12 guage bolt action shotgun, $175. 334-7465 BELGIAN B R O W N I N G Bar - 7mm Remm.mag. with sights, scope rings, ammo and dies, $600, trades considered, Ruger 77 with custom 22- 250 AI barrel, brass dies, ammo, $775, trades considered. 334-7465 CO-EY BOLT action .22, $75, bear protection Rem - wingmaster, 12-guage with sights, pistol grip and fold-over stock, $350, RCBS jr reloading press and RCBS powder measure, $100 for pair. 334-7465

Wanted

WANTED: USED PWF pressure treated wood  2x6 or 2x8 or 2x10, 8ʼ or longer. 668-5207 WANTED: SNOWPLOW for a ATC 3-wheel Honda 200 ES. 633-2241 or 335-0252 WANTED: COPY of Glacial Erraticsʼ first CD or info about where to reach Kim Barlow. 668-4348 WANTED: WOOD cook stove. 668-4885 MECHANIC NEEDED to fix my clutch, 1991 Jeep Cherokee, simple job. 667-0422

WANTED - free meat, bones suitable for dogs. 399-3920

Cars

Certified

used vehicles

HUNTING TREE stand. 2-5ʼ lengths + 3ʼ high hunterʼs seat. Made of metal, $40. 633-3113 REMINGTON 700, 308 heavy barrel rifle, B&L Elite 4000 scope, tactical stock, $1,100 obo. 668-2773 CZ 452 Scout, .22 cal, bolt action, 16” barrel, in excell cond, $400, trades considered, Mauser 98 bolt action 12 guage shotgun, $125. 334-7465

1997 PONTIAC grand am, 146,000 km. passed safety inspection. $900 obo, quick sale. Call in the evenings. 667 2973 1996 PONTIAC Bonneville v6/3.8 L, all brakes done, whole tune-up, needs the reverse shift to be fixed. $500 or best offer. 660-4425 1993 EAGLE Talon Awd Turbo, standard, New radiator, stereo, thermostat, and battery Newer tires, $2000 obo. 336-0909

1992 CROWN Vic LX 100,000kms, old guy car hardly driven always kept indoors never winter driven almost like new cond, $2,800 obo. 335-2387 1986 TOYOTA Camry, 205,477kms, owner, $450. 668-2857

CLASSIC 1979 Cadillac Coupe De ville, V8,Auto Trans ,Sun Roof and much more, priced to sell, Call 668-1477

Trucks

We Sell Trucks!

1

1985 CLASSIC Chevy Citation II, restored with low miles. New paint, spare set of winter tires. Collector car, $2,350 obo. 335-2312 or 668-3243 1982 VW Rabbit, passed mechanical inspection. $1,800. 821-3364

1-866-269-2783 • 9039 Quartz Rd. • Fraserway.com

2012 D O D G E Ram 1500 ST, only 23,000kms. Quad cab 4.7L V8 4WD. Silver, in great shape with brand new summer & winter tires, $25,900. 335-1173 1980 FORD Bronco, $500 obo. 660-5922

WHERE DO I GET THE NEWS? The Yukon News is available at these wonderful stores in Whitehorse:

HILLCREST

PORTER CREEK

RIVERDALE:

Airport Chalet Airport Snacks & Gifts

Coyote Video Goody’s Gas Green Garden Restaurant Heather’s Haven Super A Porter Creek Trails North

38 Famous Video Super A Riverdale Tempo Gas Bar

GRANGER Bernie’s Race-Trac Gas Bigway Foods

DOWNTOWN: online at

www.drivingforce.ca

2007 PONTIAC G5 Sedan. Well maintained, keyless entry, p/windows, cruise, a/c, c/w 18” Primax wheels/ low profile tires & set of winter tires on rims (1 season), 95,050kms, $7,500. 668-7709 2007 TOYOTA Sienna limited AWD 7 passenger minivan, only 72,000 kms, power sliding doors / rear hatch, sunroof, every option available....$19,800. 333-9020 2006 SATURN Ion Quad Coupe, under 180 000 kms, well maintained. Winter tires only used few months. Upgraded HID headlights, great on fuel, super reliable car. $5000 OBO Call 250-734-3390 2005 CHEV Impala, 110,000 kms, v-6 auto, remote entry, runs good, looks good, burgundy, $5000. 668-2014

2002 CAMRY SE, 4 dr, manual trans, 4 cyl, $6,250. 334-3160 or 633-3116

ZEISS CONQUEST 3-9x40 riflescope, rapid z 600 reticle. exc. conditon. $475 335-8925

1997 DODGE Caravan, 7 passenger, removable seats, 3.3L engine, Bluetooth media player, roof rack. 247,000 kms, exc cond, $2,200 obo. 668-3814

1992 BUICK Regal, Grande sport, 4-dr, sunroof, good reliable car. $1250. obo. 335-5046

1976 TRANS Am, 400 cu. “ motor, great. Taking bids. 334-3493

WANTED: DVDS, TV series "Frasier".  456-4459

Guns & Bows

SKULL CLEANING European mounts using Dismasted beetles From a mouse to a moose Very reasonable rates 335-2034

1999 PONTIAC Grande Pris, immaculate cond, brand new winter tires, c/w mechanical inspection. $3000. 867-334-1374

1994 DODGE Caravan, seats up to 7, nearly new all-season tires, rust on driver's door, burns some oil but runs fine. $1,200 obo. 334-4340

WANTED: LARGER size snowblower app. 30'' wide in working condition to keep my long driveway open. 667-7877

2004 TOYOTA Echo, good cond, very clean, $3500. 660-4870

FOUND: SCOPED rifle in case on Aishihik Road. 633-5526

2000 SUBARU Forester, all-wheel drive, c/w roof-rack and cargo box, $4000 obo 334-1252

WANTED: RED wigglers for a classroom compost project.  Kevin 667-7684

WOODPILE, 15”X19” bucked up, $40 face cord, $150 full cord. Wolf Creek. You pick up. 335-2921

Case cutlery, high quality hand-crafted pocket and hunting knives available at G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS

35

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

2002 CHRYSLER Concorde LX sedan, 2.7L V6 automatic, all options, inclʼg leather in spotless cond, in top running cond, glass in perfect cond, 117,000 kms, $4,200. 335-3868

The Deli Extra Foods Fourth Avenue Petro Gold Rush Inn Cashplan Klondike Inn Mac’s Fireweed Books Ricky’s Restaurant Riverside Grocery Riverview Hotel Shoppers on Main Shoppers Qwanlin Mall Superstore Superstore Gas Bar Tags Well-Read Books Westmark Whitehorse Yukon Inn Yukon News Yukon Tire Edgewater Hotel

2002 MUSTANG, 80,000kms, 4.6L 5 speed, winter special. 633-2740 2002 PONTIAC Sunfire, clean, low kms. 660-5545 2001 CHEVY Malibu, 160,000 km, new wheel bearings , brakes done, power seats power windows.$2500, call in the evenings. 667-2973

THE YuKoN NEWS IS AlSo AVAIlABlE AT No CHARGE IN All YuKoN CoMMuNITIES AND ATlIN, B.C.

2001 HONDA Prelude, black, loaded, leather, new battery, timing belt, rear brakes, regular maintenance, 147,000kms, well maintained, no accidents, all original, no modifications, $8,500 obo. 336-4402 2000 AUTOMATIC Ford Taurus wagon, 4-door, 8 seats, 175,000 kms, great cond, 5-disc, cd player, tape deck, ac and heating system works perfectly, c/w command start, $4000 obo. 333-9549 2000 CHRYSLER Intrepid ES, 2.7L, V6, auto, fully loaded. New battery & front struts. Just needs alternator,  $2,100 obo. 335-2196 1990 TOYOTA Camry, 5-spd standard. 668-2253

MONDAY • WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

“YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION” WEDNESDAY * FRIDAY

AND …

Kopper King Hi-Country RV Park McCrae Petro Takhini Gas Yukon College Bookstore


36

Yukon News

Pet Report Hours of operation for tHe sHelter: Tues - Fri: 12:00pm-7:00pm • Sat 10:00am-6:00pm CloSed Sundays & Mondays

633-6019 weDNeSDay, oCtoBeR 16

2013

Help control the pet overpopulation problem

have your pets spayed or neutered. FoR iNFoRmatioN CaLL

633-6019

Dog Wash Fundraiser 3rd Saturday of each month. Next Date:

Saturday, October 19

th

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

2012 NISSAN XTerra, Trail, green colour, trailer pkg, hatch tent, Bluetooth. Pd $41,000 a year ago, Reduced $31,900. 336-0375

2003 FORD Explorer SportTrac, 4x4, 4-door, heated leather seats, sunroof, c/w 4 winter tires, p/u box cover & extension rack, $7,500. 667-6951 eves

2010 Ford Ranger Sport. 2WD. Extended Cab. Manual Transmission. Less than 13,000km. Redfire Metallic. Tonneau Cover. Perfect Condition. $12,000. 456-7830.

2003 FORD Ranger p/u, 200,000kms, 1 cyl blown, gd set of winter tires, $1,000. 334-6092

2009 DODGE Journey R/T. Fully loaded, AWD, remote start, heated leather seats, c/w set of winter tires, 65,000 kms, exc cond, $18,500 obo. 336-2289

2002 CHEVROLET Venture mini van, seats 7, c/w auto start, keyless entry, tinted windows, recent new front tires. Good shape. $2,800 obo. 333-0747

2009 FORD Ranger XCab 4x4, 6 cyl, 5-sp. std. power options, matching canopy, towing pkg., much more, 14,600 kms. $19,900. 668-1477

2002 F250 ext cab long box lariat, 5.4 gas, new factory Ford transmission, 230,000kms, fully loaded with leather, $8,600 obo. 668-5882

2008 FORD F150 4x4 quad cab, 5.4L, PS, PL, PW, cruise, tow pkg w/brake controller, back-up camera, K&N filter,k 3 pc tonneaul, w 18” tires, 120,000 kms. $17,500 obo. 660-4806

2002 MAZDA B2200 p/u, c/w canopy, studded winter tires 150,000 km, great running cond, timing chain replaced ($1800 in parts & labour), $5,500 obo. 334-8287

2008 TOYOTA Tacoma, extra cab, canopy, 4 cyl, manual, 93,000 kms, mostly highway, excell cond, winter tires on rims, great gas mileage, $15,500. 668-3584 2007 DODGE Ram 1500, V8 Hemi, no accidents, auto, 95,000kms, p/windows & seats, 4 dr, a/c, canopy, dark blue, $14,500. 334-4798

at The Feed Store Pet Junction 10:00am - 2:00pm

2006 F-250 Superduty 4X4, 5.4L, 147,000 kms, 8' box w/liner & canopy, tow pkg, summer/winter rims/tires, new windshield, extʼd warranty. $15,900. 335-0277 2006 FORD Ranger 4.0L V6, 4x4, extʼd cab, standard trans. Bed mat, front & rear receiver hitch, 105,000kms, $9,200 obo. 668-4836

$10 advance tickets available at the Mae Bachur Animal shelter or $15 at the door.

Costumes prizes photo Booth 9-11pm

Proceeds go to the Mae Bachur Animal Shelter

lost/found lost • Barnoff trailer Ct, small black dog with white on the chest, male, no collar answers to Rowdy, contact Freda @3343288 (15/10/13). • Porter Creek black and brown shepherd, male answers to Kato, contact Ben @ 335-7241 (09/10/13).

• Porter Creek, neutered male, grey tabby, no collar answer sammy, contact Nancey @ 633-6162. (12/10/13). found • Found out at mccrae a black and grey dog with boxer type face has a collar but no tags contact Lori @ 633-3218.(05/10/13)

RunninG At lARGE...If you have lost a pet, remember to check with City Bylaw: 668-8382

AVAilABlE foR Adoption in fostER HoMEs doGs • 6 yr old, neutered male, Husky/GSDx, black and tan (Nitro) • 11 mos old, spayed female, RetrieverX, tan (Jewel) • 1 yr old, neutered male, Husky, black and white (Copper) • 2 yr old, neutered male, Husky, grey and white (Jake)

• 2 yr old, neutered male, husky/GSDx, black and tan (Spaz) • 1.5yr old, neutered male, LabX, tan and white (Homer) CAts

• 5 yr old female, Lab/Pit Bull X (Gaia) • 3yr old, neutered male, akita, grey, white (a.J.) • 2 yr old, neutered male, bear dog, black (Danny) • 1 yr old, neutered male, LabX, black ( tuck)

• 2 yr old, neutered male, GSDX, brown and black ( muttley) CAts • 6yr old, maine CoonX, neutered male, grey and white (tinker) • 11mos, DSH, white and black, neutered male (max)

spECiAl • Homes needed for retired sled dogs. they would make excellent pets. Contact Sandra at 668-3647 if your lost animal has been inadvertently left off the pet report or for more info on any of these animals, call 633-6019 or stop by 126 tlingit street.

Pets will be posted on the Pet Report for two weeks. Please let us know after that time if you need them re-posted.

You can also check out our award winning website at:

www.Humanesocietyyukon.ca

2000 DODGE Caravan, 209,000kms, extra set of winter tires, command start, engine in great condition, some rust on the body, $3,000. 334-3308 2000 GMC extended cab 1/2 ton, 2-wheel drive, new front end, new fuel pump, mechanically sound, $6500. 334-1374 1999 DODGE Ram diesel 3/4 ton extʼd cab short box, c/w canopy, gd tires, moose bumper. Needs fuel pump, 160,000kms, $5,000. 456-7840 or 335-0495 1998 DODGE Dakota Sport, 4x4, std, candy apple red, new tires, front end & brakes, $6,500. 336-3566 or 393-3490 1998 FORD F-150, reg cab, 2-wheel drive, v-6, 5-speed, $3500. 633-6213

1995 BRONCO, 1 yr. old engine & trans, new tires, leather interior all power, remote start. $6,500 obo. 334-3582 1995 F350 Crew Cab, great cond, $2,200. 335-5789 1995 FORD Explorer, XLT, all options, everything works, 201,000 kms, $1000. 633-6421 1995 FORD F250 4x4, 5.8 liter, 5-speed, new windshield, batteries, clutch, tires, shocks replaced in April. 3 - 35 Lewes Blvd. 456-3608 1994 E350 7.3 litre diesel shuttle bus, 170,000 km, one ton, has diesel coolant heater, no seats, use as work truck, shelving throughout. $3500. 335-5046 1990 TOYOTA Hiace, 4-wheel drive, 4 cylinder diesel engine, automatic transmission, excellent fuel consumption, 8-passengers, middle seats swivel, only 128,000 kms, offers. 333-9020 1988 DODGE Ram, full size van, V6, 5 speed standard, gd glass all around, was safety inspected 1.5 yrs ago, $800 obo. 456-7490 1987 F250 diesel, 4x4 5spd manual. Reg cab, long box. Great work truck, $2,000. 334-7373 1987 T O Y O T A 4x4 p/u, standard, 197,000kms, belly bars/chains & wired for camper, canopy, $2,000.  668-4613 1986 2.8 Chevy Blazer 2-wd. Runs well $1200. 867-399-3001 1984 DODGE 3/4 ton, 4x4, newer 318 2bbl, new clutch, 4-speed, new windshield, ideal wood truck, first $1000. 456-9608

2005 F150 Super Crew, loaded, leather int, FX4, sun roof, 135,000kms, black, $17,800. 334-3160 or 633-3116

1998 FORD Ranger p/u club cab, gd running cond, but needs a battery, spotless interior, new windshield, std, 2WD, 180,800kms, must sell before winter. Make an offer. 668-3579

84 F-350 4x4 crew cab 4 spd manual, gas, long box w/wood side panels. Good work truck, $1,800. 334-773

2004 TOYOTA Tacoma extra cab 4x4, 3400cc, v6, auto trans, new timing belt, receiver hitch, 92,000 miles, $12,000 obo.  633-2181 

1997 CHEV 3500 tow-truck, 2-wheel drive, Century 411 wrecker, 3500 lb wheel lift, new tires, batteries, new diesel engine, $10,000. 334-3497

1984 FORD F250. Free. Good parts & it runs. A good fixer-upper for someone with skills. You haul it from Marsh Lake. Drew 660-4095

Inventory

1979 DODGE Power Wagon 200, PuRam, Clubcab, 4x4, V8, 6.3l, Automatic, 93,000Km, Black, Adventurer SE, tires like new, 2 Spares, 8ft Box, BC Plates. $ 2200. email: heidiwirth47@gmail.com, message: 250-483-1276.

2009 Yamaha Big Bear 250 ..........................................................$3,499 2009 Yamaha Wolverine 450 .......................................................$4,999 2011 Yamaha Bruin 350 ...............................................................$5,499

1950 DODGE p/u, candy apple red, has 289 Ford V8, 4x4, drive train, gas guzzling piece of junk, totally unreliable. Needs lots of money/work. In Dawson, $10,000 firm. 867-993-5164

Gently Used

Atv’s:

snowmobiles:

2006 Yamaha Venture Tf 2up 2900km ........................................$3,999 2007 Yamaha Apex Gt 121" .........................................................$5,999 2007 Yamaha Vk Professional Widetrack ..................................$5,499 2008 Yamaha Phazer Mtx 144" Timbersled Suspension ..........$6,499 2009 Yamaha Phazer Rtx 121" ....................................................$5,499 2009 Yamaha Nytro Rtx Se 121" Sno X Edition 1275km ...........$7,999 2010 Yamaha Nytro Xtx 144" .......................................................$6,999 2010 Yamaha Nytro Mtx 162" 180hp Turbo 1800km ..................$8,999 2012 Yamaha Nytro Xtx 144" Speed Racer Edition ...................$9,999 2012 Yamaha Nytro Mtx 162" 270hp Turbo ..............................$15,999

YUKON

YAMAHA

(867) 668-2101 or 1-800-661-0430

• 1.5yr old, DSH, grey and white, neutered male (Sappy)

At tHE sHEltER doGs

2006 JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo, 3.7 V6, 4x4, in good shape, runs excellent, p/windows, locks & seat. Rood rack, alloy wheels with summer & winter tires. Recent safety, 192,000kms, $6,900 obo. 668-2262

2001 DODGE Dakota Sport RT, 5.9L, runs exc, auto, new tires, very fast, low kms, rare, $7,200. 633-2740

1996 NISSAN Quest, minivan, V6, auto, p/mirrors, seats, windows, sunroof, CD-changer, winter/summer tires, block heater, 255,000kms, new brakes, runs well, $2,500. 633-6389

1 KM south of Robert Service Way, Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, Y.T.

Pet of the Week!

J

ewel

I’m Jewel. I am a calm and sweet pooch. I would do well in a family. I do need training, but the staff think that would be fairly easy as I am eager to please.

Better Bid North Auction Vehicle Sales. 1987 Pontiac Tempest car $1,850. 2002 Pontiac Sunfire $2,750. 1997 Pontiac Grand Am $2,450. 1989 GMC 4x4 wood truck $995. 1987 Nissan Super Cab $1,800. 333-0717 FORD F-150 truck. Regular cab 4x2, 5-speed manual trans. 4.2 V-6 engine, good on gas. 163,225 km. New battery in March. C/w matching canopy and factory box liner. $5,500 333-9084.

Auto Parts & Accessories TRUCK CANOPIES - in stock * new Dodge long/short box * new GM long/short box * new Ford long/short box Hi-Rise & Cab Hi - several in stock View at centennialmotors.com 393-8100 TIRES! TIRES! TIRES! Seasonal Changeover Lots of good used tires–15”,16”,17”,18”,19” and 20”–lots to choose from. $25 to $150 a tire. $25 to mount and balance per tire. Call Art 334-4608 1993 SUBARU Loyale, runs, but only good for parts. Extra Parts inclʼd such as radiator, alternator, water pump, etc. $450 obo. 668-1040 FORD V6 4L drop in, complete, $350. 633-2740 LADDER JACKS, $25. Boat rack for Toyota long-box, $120. 667-2521 2004 5.9 Cummins diesel with A/T & transfer case, this unit came out of 2500 4x4 Dodge, $5,300. 668-5906 or 668-1281

633-6019 126 Tlingit Street

www.humanesocietyyukon.ca

BRAND NEW 155/80r13 all season tires bought and used for a week, now car is sold. Just want them gone, paid $200, selling $80 obo 336-2052 AUTO TRANS & trans case for mid 80s -90s jeep $500. Ford C-4 trans $300. Chev metric auto trans $300 obo. 668-3508 GENTLY USED winter tires.  Nokian Hakkapeliitta Q 155/80 13. $50 each OBO. 633-6462.


255 70/R18 tires and rims, Goodyear Fortera Tripletread, ideal winters for new Toyota Tundras, 1 year used, $650, 332-1463.

1983 DOUBLE track skidoo, like new cond and ready to work. Also one ski-boose to tow behind double track. 668-2332

ROLL BAR for small truck, $60. New 215/75/14, $30. 1-265/75/16 $60. 3-235/85/16 $40/ea. 3-class 3 hitches $40/ea. Assorted sets of tire chains. 668-3508

OLD CROW-TYPE toboggan/skimmer, hickory w/Teflon bottom and runners, 14ʼ x 21” wide, canvas cargo bag. $600. more info 332-1680 leave message.

14” TRAILER tires & white spoke rims. 1 new, 2 in vg cond, $150. 633-2740

1993 POLARIS Indy 440 snow machine, still runs, very used, to give away. Must have own way of transporting. Mike 667-4233

GOOD SERVICEABLE winter tires on rims, 185/70R14, 5 bolt, from an older Camry, 215/70R15, 5 bolt Plymouth Grand Voyageur Minivan. 456-4492 WANTED 235/75R15 5 bolt for older Suburban. 456-4492 SET OF 4 Michelin X-ICE winter tires with lots of tread left. Size 205/55R16, $200 obo. 633-4508 4-17” TIRES, exc shape, $100/ea. 633-4018 WANTED: TRANSMISSION for 96 Dodge 4x4 Daytona. 634-3861 4 TOYOTA Observe GSI-5 studless snow- tires 225/60 R16 , on genuine Toyota Rims. Were on 2007 Seinna Van .Paid $1200  for tires, rims. Used one winter. Excellent  tread left. $750 obo 332-7174 SEMI-RETIRED LICENSED mechanic looking for work. Gas - diesel. Have own shop. Willing to do mobile work. 456-9608 SMALL CAR winter tires on freshly painted steel rims, Nokian Hakkapeliitta RSi 175/65 R14 82R. From Toyota Echo, will fit other makes. $240. 335-7475.  TRUCK CANOPY, white high rise, 80”L x 60” wide x 28” high, lots of windows, $300 obo. 660-4806 TAILGATE FOR 98/99 Ford Truck, white, $150 obo, older style headache rack, $80 obo. 456-7354 4 WINTER tires, 1 rim, Goodyear Nordic, 1-yr old, P215/65R15, $200, 4 winter tires, 1-yr old, 175/65 R14, $100, 660-4425 2 BRIDGESTONE mud and snow tires w/about 60-70% tread left, load rating of E, 245/75R16, $100/both. 456-7354 BED BAR(ROLL-BAR) for 1988 Toyota 4x4 long-box, $100. 667-2521 REAR DOOR hatch for 2004 Toyota Matrix, door is light grey. Surrounding parts also available. $400. 334-6087 FOUR SLIGHTLY used winter tires, 235 75 R16, c/w rims for 1991 1500 6 Bolt. $300 obo. 336-2013

Pets PETMATE DOG crate, 3ʼLx2ʼWx2ʼ3”H, wire mesh, $40. 667-4589 BEAR DOG puppies. 334-5573 lv msg KITTEN FOR sale, female, calico, born August 1, 2013  $50.00  667-7448

Motorcycles & Snowmobiles TAITʼS CUSTOM TRAILER SALES 2-3-4- place snowmobile & ATV trailers Drive on Drive off 3500 lb axles by Trailtech - SWS & Featherlight CALL ANYTIME: 334-2194 www/taittrailers.com RONʼS SMALL ENGINE SERVICES Repairs to Snowmobiles, Chainsaws, Lawnmowers, ATVʼs, Small industrial equipment. Light welding repairs available 633-6161 lv msg 1995 HARLEY-DAVIDSON Dyna, custom wide-glide, headlight, paint,(aqua Marine) back fender and grips tank/fender airbrushed, murals wort-hog, extra chrome, 25,000kms,Til Oct 21, $6000. If doesnʼt sell original price applies, $8000. 390-2773 2 SETS of wheels & tires, one set fits 09 Polaris RZR, the other set fits 2012 Polaris Ranger XP, both sets are new, never used. 334-2902 1992 POLARIS Indy Star Lite GT, 250 cc, long track, cargo rack, hitch, heated grips, ski skins. Full tune up, new belt and carbides. Mint cond, $1,900 obo. 633-4322 POWER TILTING aluminum sled deck, fits long box p/u truck,  $1,500. 333-0117 1998 YAMAHA 600 Venture Triple,trail machine, lots of power, electric & pull start, $3,200 obo. 633-4018 1992 ARCTIC Cat 340 snowmobile, needs fuel tank, $150 obo. 668-2773 2005 700 Arctic Cat m7, excell cond, asking $4500, 2003 Skidoo Summit 800, good working cond, asking $3500, 1992 Skidoo Formula Plus MX, good working cond, asking $2000, 633-2602 YAMAHA VENTURE 2007 500cc 2-stroke, back & front adjustable hand warmer/ adjustable back rest, revers / elect start 1600 km, c/w small skimmer, registered with license bureau. $4500 o.b.o 667-4236, 335-7450 TUNDRA II skidoo, has reverse, needs windshield, asking $2000. 867-536-7610 MID-80S POLARIS 250 Trail Boss. Runs, good tires. $350. 668-6943

37

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Marine PROFESSIONAL BOAT REPAIR Fiberglass Supplies Marine Accessories FAR NORTH FIBERGLASS 49D MacDonald Rd Whitehorse, Yukon 393-2467 LUND SSV boat, 16ʼ, deep hull, high transom, 30 hp Yamaha oil injected 2 stroke long shaft. Nice trailer w/new tires, rims & bearing buddies. $5,500 obo. 633-4322 40 HP Yamaha o/b motor, new cond, with spare prop, $3500. 867-536-7610 2012 HEWESCRAFT 22ʼ hardtop, twin 115 Yamahas, used 85 hrs. 4G radar, Lowrance HD8, Garmin GPS, downriggers, Sirius stereo, life raft, Wallas heater, Rocna anchor. Asking $73,500 w/options. 668-2255

Heavy Equipment NEW & USED EQUIPMENT For Sale Come see MACPHERSON RENTALS @ 117 Copper Rd or call 633-4426

Coming Events ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com ATLIN - GLACIER VIEW CABINS “your quiet get away” Cozy self contained log cabins canoes, kayaks for rent Fax/Phone 250-651-7691 e-mail sidkatours@ atlin.net www.glacierviewcabins.ca THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone w/dementia. Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713 MULTICULTURAL CENTRE of the Yukon Free Citizenship Exam Preparation Course for ESL Learners. 5 Saturday classes 9am-noon begin October 19. Call 667-4733 to register. HULLANDʼS HAUNTS & Holly Craft Fair, Oct 26, 10am-3pm @ Jack Hulland Elementary School, Porter Crk. To book your table call 667-8496 HOSPICE YUKON: Free, confidential services offering compassionate support to those facing advanced illness, death and bereavement.  Visit our lending library @ 409 Jarvis M-F 11:30-3, 667-7429 www.hospiceyukon.net MENTAL HEALTH Caregivers Support Group meets the third Thursday of every month, 7-9 pm, #4 Hospital Rd, main floor resource room, in Whitehorse.  667-8346.

1998 PETERBILT HIGHWAY tractor, ready to work, $14,900. 1989 Freightliner parting out at $6,900. 30ʼ Jeep trailer $7,900. Estate sale. Sell all for $25,000 package deal. 333-0717

A CARE Affair! Fri, Oct 18, Westmark Hotel, 5:00pm-8:00pm. Goods & Services Auction, Live music, Food, Comedy. Fundraiser for Little Footprints Big Steps work in Haiti. Info: 334-3928 or karenwienberg@gmail.com

9-20ʼ SEA Cans. Upgrading. Various conditions. Some leakers, some in good condition. Prices range from $1,800 up to $3,000. Cans can be delivered in city limits for $150 charge. 333-0717

SALSA YUKONʼS Latin Dance classes are every Friday @ Leaping Feats Dance Studio, 38 Lewes Blvd. 7:30pm Beginner. 8:45pm Intermediate. For info     335-0909 salsayukon@gmail.com

1979 KENWORTH W900 gravel truck. 400 Big Cam 2, 15 spd, 44 diff, $5,700. 668-5906 or 668-1281

NAKWAYE KU Childcare Society AGM, Fri, Oct 18, 6pm at Yukon College. 668-8860

225 AMP welder/powerplant. 17 hp Kohler engine mounted on  a steel wagon with 4 wheels & a hitch, $2,000 obo. 333-9790 HITACHI 450LC for long term rent or for hire, c/w 84" clean-up bucket & 40" digging bucket. Presently located in Dawson. 604-218-6862 225 A twin cylinder 17H.P. Kohler powered ARC welder/power plant, c/w HD steel 4 wheeled trailer with hitch, $2,000 obo or sell on 2 wheeled cart for $1,500 obo. 867-633-6502

Campers & Trailers NEW OR USED TRAILERS For Sale or Rent MACPHERSON RENTALS 117 Copper Road 633-4426 TAITʼS TRAILERS www.taittrailers.com taits@northwestel.net Quality new and used Horse * Cargo * Equipment trailers For sale or rent Call Anytime 334-2194 Southern prices delivered to the Yukon 30FT LONG tandem axle gooseneck flat deck trailer, ready to work and 12,000lb electric winch as new to pull stuff on trailer 668-2332 UTILITY TRAILER made from the back of a truck box, $700 obo. 668-1040 8ʼ CAMPER, propane fridge & stove in working cond, $700 obo. 334-9144 1988 GMC Motorhome 21', runs well, sound structure & frame. Fridge, stove, furnace. Functional bathrm w/toilet & shower. Queen size alcove bed. No leaks, needs TLC, $2,250 or trade. 668-5511 45ʼ VAN trailer, made into a home, 4-piece bathrm, kitchen, livingrm, one bdrm, generator, inverter, water system in water cube van. All for $18,500. OBO 335-5046 1972 WESTFALIA camper van, rare model, very clean, no damage, $7000 obo. 334-1252 7ʼ UTILITY trailer, 1500 lb towing capacity, hitch, lights and spare tire. $700 firm. 633-3982

GREAT NORTHERN Ski Society would like to notify all its members that the AGM for the society will occur on Oct 16, 2013, 7pm, Sport Yukon Boardroom, #1 4061-4th Ave, Whitehorse, Yukon. GOLD FEVER award winning film. Presented by Amnesty International Whitehorse Action Circle, Old Fire Hall, Wednesday, October 16.  Doors open at 6:30pm, film at 7:00pm.  Entry by donation. www.goldfevermovie.com STORYTIME: AGES: 6 - 24 months & caregiver(s) until Wed Nov 27, 10:30 a.m. Whitehorse Library. Free registration necessary. Space is limited. 667-5239 FREE CHILDREN'S art activities! Kids Kreate runs at the Yukon Arts Centre one Sunday per month through April. Activities relate to current exhibitions. For more information, contact Jessica Vellenga, 393-7109. THE PAN-TERRITORIAL Air Cadet Committee of the Air Cadet League of Canada AGM, Sat, Oct 19, 10 am PDT, 309 Lambert. All are invited to attend. Info Ken - 456-7297. MAIN STREET Society Annual General Meeting to take place Tuesday November 5th at noon at the T.C. Richards Building. LADIES AUXILIARY, R.C. Legion, Yukon Inn, Christmas Craft Fair, Nov. 2nd Saturday, 9 AM - 3 PM. First Nations and Yukon -made  arts and crafts. Bake table , raffles. info 633-4583 YUKON INDIAN Hockey Association Annual General Meeting, Sunday, October 20th, 2013, 3:00 to 5;00pm, Canada Games Centre, Boardroom .For more info:(867) 456-7294.Email: yihahockey@gmail.com WHITEHORSE WOOFERS Dog Club is holding its AGM Thursday, October17/13, 6:45pm at the Canada Games Centre.  Call 633-4822 for info. OA SPEAKER Marathon. Come & listen to OA members share their experience of recovery. Everyone welcome! Sunday October 20th – 10 to 1 pm. 4071- 4th Avenue, Whitehorse. oayukon@gmail.com THE FRIENDS of the Gallery AGM will be held Wednesday, November 13th, 7-8pm in the Yukon Arts Centre Green Room. New & current members welcome. Refreshments provided. IRIS FOLDED Christmas Card Classes every Thursday In October, 7-9:30pm. Contact Shannon @ 633-3883

50ʼ LONG x 10ʼ or 11ʼ wide x 10ʼ high skid, shack on steel skids, very movable. 668-2332

KIDZSWAPMEET, YUKON'S largest indoor garage sale for kids' stuff, Saturday October 19, Whitehorse Elementary School Gym, 9:30am-12:30pm. Fundraiser for Whitehorse Elementary. Tables available $20. www.kidzswapmeet.ca

UTILITY TRAILER, enclosed, 4x8. Lightweight, sturdy, 950 lb. capacity. 3 yrs. old, great shape. $2,200 obo. 333-0747

THE NEXT Multiple Sclerosis Association meeting is October 20 at 10:30am at Copper Ridge Place in the Multipurpose Room.

TINY HOUSE Workshop hosted by Leaf House Small Space Design and Build. Learn how to build and design your own tiny house! 10am to 4pm, October 19th and 20th.

LATIN DANCE classes are every Friday night. Latin Fiesta October 19th at Antoinette's restaurant. 335-0909 or salsayukon@gmail.com for info

SKI SWAP and Winter gear sale October 26, 9am-noon, Mt McIntyre Rec Centre. Winter Fair downstairs 9am-noon. Information & displays to get ready for winter. Info: 668-4477

KLUANE QUILTER'S Guild, AGM, Monday, November 4th following the Pine Tree Meeting. Members welcome.

YUKON ARTIST Relief Fund is holding annual General meeting at 7:00pm on Wednesday, October 23rd in Art Underground Studio.

LETʼS PLAY! Trivia Night Fundraiser for Gwaandak Theatre, Oct.18, Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre. 7pm. Guest Artists, Appetizers from Antoinetteʼs & Chances to win Air North tickets. Info: info@gwaandaktheatre.com. 393-2676

ADULT BIATHLON: The most fun you can have on skis. Beginners welcome. Season begins with Introductory courses Oct 16 and 23rd. Come on out! For more Info, cowleycreek@hotmail.com FIDDLEHEADS AGM November 6 @ 6pm, Selkirk Elementary School. FAMILY FUN Nights, October 25 & November 22, 6-8pm. Yukon College gym, drop-in tennis. All welcome. Free. 393-2621 TAGISH PANCAKE Breakfast Oct 20, 9:30am-12pm, Tagish Community Centre. $8/adult, $3/child. Everyone is welcome to attend.

COFFEE HOUSE! Sat. Nov 2. Featuring: Dan Halen + Chic Callas + the Open Stage! Help set up 6pm, 7pm Open stage sign-up, 730pm show! $5 United Church Bsmt, 6th+Main, 633-4255 SNOWBOARD YUKON AGM, Thurs Nov 14, 7pm at Sport Yukon WILDERNESS TOURISM Workshop. Business Interest? Expand opportunities? Nov. 16-17, 8:30-5:00. Vista Outdoor Learning Centre. $25. Prereg. by Nov. 8 at www.tc.gov.yk.ca/tourism. Space limited. More info rjantzen@shaw.ca

FRANCOPHONE FILM Festival - drama, documentary, comedy, shorts films. Opening Oct 18, Yukon Arts Centre. Oct 19-20 at the Old Fire Hall. French with English subtitles for some films. www.afy.yk.ca

NEW YORK jazz duo. Alto sax & piano. Sun, Oct 27, 7:30 pm cabaret. Arts Centre. Tix yukontickets.com. YAC Box Office, Arts Underground or door.

NOMINATIONS FOR the Yukon Commissionerʼs volunteer public service and bravery awards are due October 31st. For more information Email: commissioner@gov.yk.ca

YUKON HOME Education Society AGM, Friday October 25, 3 - 5 pm, Family Literacy Centre at the Canada Games Centre. Anyone interested in homeschooling is welcome. More info: Jody 660-5347

CRAFT FAIR & Flea Market at Marsh Lake Community Centre, Sat Oct 19th 11am-4pm. Vendors tables $15. To book tables call 660-4999

YUKONEVENTS DAILY Digest for Events, Activities and Classes. www.facebook.com/YukonEvents

WHITEHORSE S T R I N G Ensemble AGM  8pm   Thursday, November 14. (Following the weekly practice)  Hellaby Hall at Christ Church Cathedral, 4th Ave & Elliott St. (Across from RCMP). Everyone welcome. 667-4630

WHITEHORSE MINOR Soccer AGM, Saturday, October 26th, 1:00 pm, Boardroom, Sport Yukon. New members welcome! Player numbers are strong, volunteer numbers not so much! Please come and help. Information 667-2445

VinceYoung March 24, 1927 – OctOber 9, 2013

The family and friends of Vince Young are saddened by his recent passing on October 9, 2013 at Whitehorse General Hospital. Earl Vincent Young was born on March 24, 1927 at Delia, AB to Earl Mackie and Anna Marie (Hepper) Young. He is survived by his sisters Beatrice and Thelma (George); his brothers Aaron (Marion), Stirling (Thelma), Joseph (Barbara) and Dohnovar (Doreen), as well as many nieces and nephews. Vince moved to the Yukon in 1952. Most well known for his refrigeration and insulation businesses that took him across the north, he also touched lives through his generous support of many church projects, including the founding of Bethany Pentecostal Tabernacle, Camp Yukon, Teslin Sunday School and at the Skaguay Assemblies of God church. A Celebration of Life will be held in early November. He will be interred at the Delia Cemetery. Vince will be missed by all who knew him.

Donna Spofford June 1, 1948 – October 11, 2013

Donna Spofford passed away peacefully on October 11, 2013 at Whitehorse General Hospital after her long battle with cancer. Donna passed with her loving husband Stuart by her side at the age of 65. Donna will be dearly missed and lovingly remembered by her husband Stuart, son Kevin, step-daughter Ingrid, granddaughters Alice and Robin, and many wonderful friends. A viewing and reception will be held for Donna on Thursday, October 17, 2013 at Heritage North Funeral Home located on 412 Cook Street from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Canadian Cancer Society in Donna’s honour.


38

Yukon News

SACRED CHORAL Music Concert with Besig and Price ,7pm Saturday October 19 at Whitehorse United.  Admission by donation. All are welcome! COMMUNITY BARN Dance, Saturday, Oct 19, 7:30pm, Lorne Mountain Community Centre:  Master fiddler & dance caller Gordon Stobbe, Annie Avery & the Fiddleheads Barndance Band. 667-7083 VELONORTH CYCLING CLUB'S AGM will be on November 14, 2013 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at Sport Yukon. Textile arts talk on Felting with Tammy Deck, 5:30 on October 23 at the Old Fire Hall, presented by Yukon Arts Centre, call 393 7109 for more info. Yukon Science Institute presents Communities tracking environmental change: The Local Environmental Observer Network with Mike Brubaker, Thursday, October 17, 7:30pm, Beringia Centre, Whitehorse. Free.

Services SHARPENING SERVICES. For all your sharpening needs - quality sharpening, fair price & good service. At corner of 6th & Strickland. 667-2988

do you have a problem with food? meetings

mondays 7:30 p.m.

4071 4th avenue oayukon@gmail.com • www.oa.org

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Yukon Communities & Atlin, B.C.

Beaver Creek

Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Y.T.

Carcross Y.T. Wednesday - 7:30 p.m. Library Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Carmacks

Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Dawson City

Y.T. Thursday - 8:00 p.m. New Beginners Group Richard Martin Chapel Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Saturday 7:00 p.m. Community Support Centre 1233 2nd Ave.

Destruction Bay Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Y.T.

Faro Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Haines Junction Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Y.T.

Mayo

Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Old Crow

Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Pelly Crossing

Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Y.T.

Ross River

Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Tagish Y.T. Monday 7:30pm Lightwalkers Group Bishop’s Cabin, end of road along California Beach Telegraph Creek

B.C. Tuesday - 8:00 p.m. Soaring Eagles Sewing Centre

Teslin Y.T. Wednesday - 7:00pm Wellness Centre #4 McLeary Friday - 1:30p.m. Health Centre Watson Lake

Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

- INSULATION Upgrade your insulation & reduce your heating bills Energy North Construction Inc. (1994) for all your insulation & coating needs Cellulose & polyurethane spray foam Free estimate: 667-7414 Full Dimensional Rough Lumber Cabin Logs Staking Posts & Timbers ARCTIC INLAND BUILDING PRODUCTS Serving the Yukon for 30 years Whitehorse 668-5991 Dawson 867-993-5240 BACKHAULS, WHITEHORSE to Alberta. Vehicles, Furniture, Personal effects etc. Daily departures, safe secure dependable transportation at affordable rates. Please call Pacific Northwest Freight Systems @ 667-2050 MC RENOVATION Construction & Renovations Laminated floor, siding, decks, tiles Kitchen, Bathroom, Doors, Windows Framing, Board, Drywall, Painting Drop Ceiling, Fences No job too small Free estimates Michael 336-0468 yt.mcr@hotmail.com BLUE HILL MASONRY • Cultured Stone • Ceramic Tile • Brick Andre Jobin 633-2286

DRUG PROBLEM?

ART CONTEST. The Rotary Music Festival invites Yukon youth aged 5 to 18 to create an artwork for its program cover. Check the rules at www.rmfestival.ca. Deadline: January 15, 2014.

Narcotics

Anonymous

MEETINGS:

Wednesdays 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. <BYTE> Fridays 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm 4071 - 4th Ave. <Many Rivers>

THOMAS FINE CARPENTRY • construction • renovation • finishing • cabinets • tiling • flooring • repairs • specialty woodwork • custom kitchens 867-633-3878 or cell 867-332-5531 thomasfinecarpentry@northwestel.net ANGYʼS MASSAGE Mobile Service. Therapeutic Massage & Reflexology. Angelica Ramirez Licensed Massage Therapist. 867-335-3592 or 867-668-7724 angysmassage@hotmail.com 200-26 Azure Rd Whitehorse YT, Y1A 6E1 NORTHRIDGE BOBCAT SERVICES • Snow Plowing • Site Prep & Backfills • Driveways • Post Hole Augering • Light Land Clearing • General Bobcat Work Fast, Friendly Service 867-335-1106 BUSY BEAVERS Painting, Pruning Hauling, Snow Shovelling and General Labour Call Francois & Katherine 456-4755 LOG CABINS & LOG HOMES Quality custom craftsmanship Using only standing dead local timber For free estimate & consultation contact: Eldorado Log Builders Inc. phone: 867.393.2452 website: www.ykloghomes.com ARMOUR-ALL DETAILING Reliable, Professional Service 633-6855

www.aa.org

bcyukonaa.org

AA 867-668-5878 24 HRS A DAY

IBEX BOBCAT SERVICES “Country Residential Snow Plowing” •Post hole augering •Light landscaping •Preps & Backfills Honest & Prompt Service Amy Iles Call 667-4981 or 334-6369 TCM MAID SERVICE Reliable, Thorough & Professional Reasonable Rates References available 335-4421or 393-3868 LOG CABINS: Professional Scribe Fit log buildings at affordable rates. Contact: PF Watson, Box 40187, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 6M9 668-3632

JOURNEYMAN CARPENTER/PAINTER 35 years experience For house repairs Renovations • Kitchens • Bathrooms Flooring • Drywall • Etc References Available Honest • Reliable • Meticulous Call Brad 335-8924

Commercial & Residential

Snow Removal (867) 336-3570 For all your snow removal needs. No jobs too small.

AL-ANON MEETINGS contact 667-7142

someone’s drinking ???

“SPECIALIZING IN BATHROOMS” Start to Finish • FLOORING • TILE • CARPENTRY • PAINTING • FENCING • DECKS “ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!! DON: 334-2699 don.brook@hotmail.com

CITYLIGHT RENOS Flooring, tiling, custom closets Painting & trim, kitchens & bathrooms Fences & gates Landscaping & gardening Quality work at reasonable rates Free estimates Sean 867-332-1659 citylightrenos@gmail.com

60 Below Snow Management

affected by

KLASSIC HANDYMAN SERVICES “HOME RENOVATION SPECIALIST”

BOBCAT AND BACKHOE SERVICES in Whitehorse, Marsh Lake, Tagish area Call Andreas 660-4813

668-2963

life been

WHITE TORNADO CLEANING SERVICES Construction final initial cleans Final and Initial cleanings Construction Sites/Buildings Private homes Offices Good for Contractors Professional Reasonable Rates Bonded “All work Guaranteed” 667-2988 or 334-0514

TOMBSTONE CONTRACTING Loader and dump truck services     Driveways, parking lots, concrete driveways, sidewalks and pads.    Fork lift, lifting boom    Snow haul and removal     Free quotes Call  334 2142

Call Dirtball

Has your

LUIS RENOVATIONS Over 20 yearsʼ experience. Specializing in home renovation. Drywall, painting, ceilings, counter tops, flooring, decks, patios. 335-1269

PASCAL PAINTING CONTRACTOR PASCAL AND REGINE Residential - Commercial Ceilings, Walls Textures, Floors Spray work Excellent quality workmanship Free estimates pascalreginepainting@northwestel.net 633-6368

TOPSOIL

in Whitehorse

NS - No Smoking OM - open mixed, includes anyone CM - closed mixed, includes anyone with a desire to stop drinking

S.V.P. CARPENTRY Journey Woman Carpenter Interior/Exterior Finishing/Framing Small & Medium Jobs “Make it work and look good.” Call Susana (867) 335-5957 susanavalerap@live.com

ow! N e labl Avai

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS MONDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 8:00 pm New Beginnings Group (OM,NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. TUESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 7:00 pm Juste Pour Aujourd’hui 4141B - 4th Avenue. 8:00 pm Ugly Duckling Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. WEDNESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St.. 8:00 pm Porter Crk Step Meeting (CM) Our Lady of Victory, 1607 Birch St. 8:00 pm No Puffin (CM,NS) Big Book Study Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. THURSDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Grapevine Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 6:00 pm Young People’s Meeting BYTE Office, 2-407 Ogilvie Street 7:30 pm Polar Group (OM) Seventh Day Adventist Church 1609 Birch Street (Porter Creek) FRIDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Big Book Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 1:30 pm #4 Hospital Rd. (Resource Room) 9:00 pm Whitehorse Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. SATURDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 2:30 pm Women’s Meeting (OM) Whitehorse General Hospital (room across from Emergency) 7:00 pm Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS) SUNDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 7:00 pm Marble Group Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS)

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

WEDNESDAY 12:00 noon Hellaby Hall, 4th & Elliott

FRIDAY

7:00 pm Lutheran Church Basement Beginners Mtg ( 4th & Strickland ) 8:00 pm Lutheran Church Basment Regular Mtg ( 4th & Strickland )

PLUMBING & HEATING SERVICES Available in Whitehorse & Communities Rough-in, service, maintenance & repair Residential & Commercial 16 years experience Excellent workmanship $75/hr 867-334-5161 TITAN DRYWALL Taping & Textured Ceilings 27 years experience Residential or Commercial No job too small Call Dave 336-3865 SUBARU GURU Fix•Buy•Sell Used Subarus 30 year Journeyman Mechanic Towing available Mario 333-4585 ELECTRICIAN FOR all your jobs Large or small Licensed Electrician Call MACK N MACK ELECTRIC for a competitive quote! 867-332-7879 SNOW CLEARING Sidewalks, Driveways, Commercial, Residential Call Francis at Speedy Sparkle 668-6481 or cell 334-8480 SMALL ELECTRICAL JOBS Light fixtures & lamp repairs Painting in and out Basic plumbing Window washing, Yard clean-up. Small furniture repairs 393-2275 or 1-604-989-5110 ZEN SALON & SPA Menʼs, Ladies, Childrenʼs Hairstyling & Esthetics on the corner of 4th and Strickland 667-7936 Open 8am-7pm EXPERIENCED CARPENTER OFFERING: - Siding - Roofing - Framing and Renovations Free estimates and competitive rates. Call Adam 334-3416 Residential Snow Removal Competitive Rates 633-6855 Armour Lawn Care, Design & Snow Removal Reliable, Professional Service


Lost & Found LOST - Men's gold wedding band. Likely at the Canada Games Centre, Saturday, Sept 29. Please contact James at 393.7062. LOST: BLACKBERRY phone with blue protector & dinosaur sticker on the back. Lost somewhere downtown. Naomi 335-5920 FOUND - on South Access, large black Pit-bull cross male, has collar, no tags. 334-4995 LOST: CANON camera in Walmart, Sept 16. Would like to have the memory card returned. Mail to Box 10007, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 7A1 FOUND; CHILDʼS scooter on Lewes Blvd. Identify by calling. 668-4026

Business Opportunities

Looking for New Business / Clients? Advertise in The Yukon News Classifieds!

Take Advantage of our 6 month Deal... Advertise for 5 Months and

Get 1 MONTH OF FREE ADVERTISING Book Your Ad Today! T: 667-6285 • F: 668-3755 E: wordads@yukon-news.com DISTRIBUTOR REQUIRED for beautiful costume jewelry, hand-painted oil paintings, LED signs & chef supplies. Open your own Classic Designs store or add our products to your business. 778-233-4842 www.ourclassicdesigns.com FOR SALE THE WEENIE WAGON Seasonal business Call now for details, Set up for spring 2014 Ph 867-334-4338

Sports Equipment YORK & Wider weights with steel bars. 667-2844 lv msg MOUNTAIN HARDWEAR Ghost -40 down Goretex sleeping bag. Size long. Used 4 nights, $800. 668-4634 DIRT JUMPER Bike, selling doberman pinscher with titanium parts in great running condition, frame is handmade in Canada out of chromoly, $1,000 obo. 334-8287 RECUMBENT EXERCISE bicycle, $75, like new. 660-4806 MENʼS SIZE 12 Techno Pro snowboard boots, new, still in box, paid $160, asking $120 obo 456-4766 2013 NEVER Summer SL 154, ridden once, c/w medium Burton Co2 bindings. Willing to sell separately.  $300 obo. Call/text 867-334-3021

Livestock QUALITY YUKON MEAT Dev & Louise Hurlburt Grain-finished Hereford beef Domestic wild boar Order now for full delivery Payment plan available Samples on request 668-7218 335-5192 HORSE HAVEN HAY RANCH Dev & Louise Hurlburt Irrigated Timothy/Brome mix Small square & round bales Discounts for field pick up or delivery Straw bales also for sale 335-5192 • 668-7218

Advertising

39

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 HAY FOR SALE Dry bales kept under a shelter. $12/bale   astra@northwestel.net 633-4496

NOT-FOR-PROFIT DAYCARE seeks full-time employee for break relief position.  Must love children. Level 3 or will train.  We offer benefits and a paid mental health day per month. 667-7012.

FRESH CUT 1,000 lb+ hay bales Field delivered $100 each 633-3388

INFANT CAR seat, 0-12 mon., $40. Baby swing, like new, $60. 334-7061

LAYER PULLETS. 25 Red Rock Cross 20-week old ready to lay pullets. Raised on organic feed and never had antibiotics etc. 25$ for 1-4, $20 5 and up. 456-2062 ROASTING CHICKENS for sale. Raised free range and all natural. Call 867-537-3458 or email: mccabecreekfarm@hotmail.com HORSE BOARDING $130/month Pasture & hay Large or small groups Tagish area 867-399-7010 FARM RAISED pork available. Sold by whole pig or half. $4 per pound. 332-8996 LOCAL ORGANIC VEGETABLES Rivendell Farm Km 6.5 Hot Springs Rd www.rivendellfarm.ca 633-6178 CIRCLE J, tandem axle, two -horse bumper pull  slant-load horse trailer,  all aluminum, very light and easy to pull, excellent shape.   Has dressing/tack room. very nice.  $6500 or best.  633-6502 PORK MEAT For Sale Sold by the half or cut & wrapped All animals are raised naturally No hormones/antibiotics YUKON VALLEY FARM 334-5384

Furniture LEATHER OFFICE chair, $15. Kitchen table w/leaf extension, $75. 2 lg matching vintage storage cabinets. Wood/glass coffee table, 53x23”. 5-shelf book cases, $150/both or $75/ea, Rocking chair, $75. 667-2844 COUCH AND Loveseat, Green.  Glass coffee and end tables.  $400 obo. Craig 633-6760. PATIO FURNITURE: 2 sturdy metal chairs w/ cushions, umbrella and round glass/metal table (42" diameter), $50. call 633-2362 SECTIONAL COUCH. 667-6770 VINTAGE FORMICA kitchen table w/leaf extention. 667-2844 OFFICE CHAIR, adjustable arms & seat, $100. Maple wooden rocking chair, $50 obo. 667-7107 LARGE YUKON Burl coffee table, totally unique, excell christmas gift, $200, brass and glass tea trolley server cart, $40. 660-4806 REAL WOOD chairs, need new upholstery, $5 ea, side tables, $25 ea. 393-2275 BED FRAME with 2 mattresses, ivory, asking $250, coffee table with 2 matching side tables, metal frame with glass tops, $120 for set, 2 Ikea lamps, $10 ea. 393-2275 BEAUTIFUL DARK cherry wood 11-piece dining set. Must be seen to be appreciated. $1800 obo. Tom 633-5766

Baby & Child Items

CAST IRON wood stove, old style, heats very well, great cond, Model #42985, dimensions: 25”x25”x2ʼ high, $400. 333-9549 or 514-266-1737

CHILDRENʼS CLOTHING in excellent condition, given freely the first & third Saturday monthly at the Church of the Nazarene, 2111 Centennial. 633-4903

SINGLE PINE bed, 2 drawers under bed c/w bookcase, headboard, $300. 2 bedside tables, one armoire, one dresser w. mirror, solid wood. Best offer. 667-6630

Kitchen or Restaurant for Lease Town and Mountain Hotel 401 Main Street Apply to Kayle Tel: 668-7644 Fax: 668-5822 Email: info@townmountain.com

Notification of Harvesting Licence Applications Pursuant to Section 18 of the Forest Resources Act, Forest Management Branch notifies the public of applications made for the commercial harvesting of forest resources. Current applications for harvesting licences are available for comment for a minimum of 30 days at www.forestry.gov.yk.ca or through the Client Services and Inspections Office in your community. Commercial harvesting of forest resources occurs in accordance with an approved Timber Harvest Plan that has undergone public review. These plans are available online. For more information, email forestry@gov.yk.ca or phone 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3999.

Personals ARE YOU MÉTIS? Are you registered? Would you like to be involved? There is a Yukon Metis Nation that needs your support Contact 668-6845 CITIZENS ON PATROL. Do you have concerns in your neighborhood & community? Be part of the solution! Volunteer valuable time to the C.O.P.S. program. With your eyes & ears we can help stomp out crime. Info: RCMP 867-667-5555 HEPATITIS C or HIV Positive? Counseling, support, advocacy, nursing & naturopathic services available free of charge at Blood Ties Four Directions Centre. 633-2437 or 1-877-333-2437. All calls confidential

PUBLIC TENDER FIRE ALARM YUKON VISITOR INFORMATION CENTRE BLDG.#1364 WHITEHORSE, YUKON 2013/2014 Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, October 30, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Laura Vanderkley at 393-7125. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

DRUG PROBLEM? Narcotics Anonymous meetings Wed. 7pm-8pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. BYTE Office FRI. 7pm-8:30pm 4071 - 4th Ave Many Rivers Office

Garage Sales IF JAMES could please contact 668-5111 or cell 333-4394 concerning items purchased at garage sale , Sat Oct 5, 5118 - 5th Ave.

REqUEST FOR PROPOSAlS REMOTE SENSING SUPPORT FOR GEOMATICS YUKON Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, November 05, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Tim Green, PEng at (867) 456-5570. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

Highways and Public Works

Highways and Public Works

PUblIc TENDER

REqUEST foR PRoPoSALS PLANNING AND BUSINESS ANALYSIS SERVICES

Project Description: To provide roatary wing support for moose surveys in Faro area. Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, October 31, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Rose Heisz at (867) 667- 5989. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

Project Description: Provide planning and business analysis services to support information technology projects. Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, November 06, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Tim Green, PEng at (867) 456-5570. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

Environment

Highways and Public Works

ROTARY WING SUPPORT FOR MOOSE SURVEYS IN FARO AREA

It’s good for you.


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Finance offers are now available on new 2013 Rogue S FWD (W6RG13 AA00), CVT transmission/2014 Versa Note 1.6 S (B5RG54 AA00), manual transmission/2013 Sentra 1.8 S (C4LG53 AA00), manual transmission. Selling Price is $25,728/$13,665/$15,915 financed at 0%/0.9%/0% APR equals 182 bi-weekly payments of $128/$78/$88 for an 84/84/84 month term. $2,500/$0/$0 down payment required. Cost of borrowing is $0/$440.28/$0 for a total obligation of $25,728/$14,105/$15,915. $500/$1,250 NCF Finance Cash included in advertised price, applicable only on 2013 Sentra 1.8 S (C4LG53 AA00/C4LG53 BK00), manual transmission/Versa Note 1.6 S (B5RG54 AA00/ B5RG14 AE00) on finance purchases through subvented loan contracts only through Nissan Canada Finance. This offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Conditions apply. ‡13,000 cash discount is valid on all 2013 Titan models except the Titan 4X2 King Cab S SWB (1KAG73 AA00)/ ‡$5,000 Cash Purchaser’s Discount is based on nonstackable trading dollars and is applicable to all 2013 Nissan Rogue models except 2013 Rogue S FWD (W6RG13 AA00), CVT transmission. The $5,000 cash purchaser’s discounts is only available on the cash purchase of select new 2013 Rogue models (excluding the W6RG13 AA00 trim model) when registered and delivered between October 1-31st, 2013. The cash discount is only available on the cash purchase, and will be deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease or finance rates. This offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Conditions apply. ◆ $25,728/$13,665/$15,915 Selling Price for a new 2013 Rogue S FWD (W6RG13 AA00), CVT transmission/2014 Versa Note 1.6 S (B5RG54 AA00), manual transmission/2013 Sentra 1.8 S (C4LG53 AA00), manual transmission. $500/$1,250 NCF Finance Cash included in advertised price, applicable only on 2013 Sentra 1.8 S (C4LG53 AA00)/C4LG53 BK00), manual transmission/Versa Note 1.6 S (B5RG54 AA00/ B5RG14 AE00) on finance purchases through subvented loan contracts only through NCF. This offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Conditions apply. s Models shown $36,148/$20,585/$21,515 Selling Price for a new 2013 Rogue SL AWD (Y6TG13 AA00), CVT transmission/2014 Versa Note 1.6 SL TECH (B5TG14 NA00), Xtronic CVT® transmission/2013 Sentra 1.8 SR (C4RG13 RT00), CVT transmission. ≠‡◆sFreight and PDE charges ($1,750/$1,567/$1,567), certain fees, manufacturer’s rebate and dealer participation where applicable are included. License, registration, air-conditioning levy ($100) where applicable, insurance and applicable taxes are extra. Finance and lease offers are available on approved credit through Nissan Canada Finance for a limited time, may change without notice and cannot be combined with any other offers except stackable trading dollars. Retailers are free to set individual prices. Offers valid between October 1-31st, 2013. †Association of International Automobile Manufacturers of Canada (AIAMC) Entry Level Segmentation. MY14 Versa Note v. MY13/14 competitors. Offers subject to change, continuation or cancellation without notice. Offers have no cash alternative value. See your participating Nissan retailer for complete details. ©1998-2013 Nissan Canada Inc. and Nissan Canada Financial Services Inc. a division of Nissan Canada Inc.

40 Wednesday, October 16, 2013


The next challenge

It takes a village

Retired Olympian weightlifter Jean Lassen guides a new generation of athletes.

A loving community helped a transgendered person become the man he was meant to be.

Page 24

Page 19 Your Community Connection

Wednesday â&#x20AC;˘ Friday

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Established 1960

$

1 Including Gst

A pleasant surprise for Sima PAGE 3

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Louis Vasquez of J&L Concrete edges fresh cement at the old Canadian Tire building in downtown Whitehorse on Tuesday.

Cornell trial wraps up PAGE 4 Talk about pitching in.

VOLUME 53 â&#x20AC;˘ NUMBER 77

www.yukon-news.com


2

Yukon News

Ross River footbridge collapse imminent

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The ferry will not take passengers, only vehicles. Members of the public may cross in the Community he Ross River bridge is at imServices boat. minent risk of collapse. Only two crew members will The 70-year-old walkway over travel in the ferry, an operator and a the Pelly River has sustained much spotter, said Black. more significant damage than was There will be a second spotter previously thought, according to an watching from the ground. engineering report. And a rescue boat will travel “They showed us pictures and with the ferry during crossings, said video of the amount of damage on Black. the crossbeam, which is supporting “Should there be any movement the weight of the bridge,” said Brian of the bridge at any time during the Ladue, chief of the Ross River Dena crossing, the operators will disemCouncil. “It’s severely cracked. If it bark the ferry to the rescue boat.” was to snow, a little bit of wet snow Crossings will be cancelled if with that extra weight, it would conditions are not favourable, said cause the bridge to collapse.” Black. The bridge is located just October 10 is the scheduled end upstream from the ferry crossing. date for ferry service for the season. Operations were suspended Sunday The bridge was chained off and because of the risk of the bridge col- closed to the public in August of lapsing onto the ferry. 2012. That left an estimated 40 or 50 But the public continued to use people stranded on the North Canol the bridge to access the other side of with no way to get back. the river, said Chief Ladue. The RCMP began ferrying people “Up to this point, really we had across in a boat on Monday evening, no idea how severely damaged the said Kendra Black, a spokesperson bridge was. And so people were just for Highways and Public Works, on using it, figuring it wasn’t damaged Tuesday. that much.” On Tuesday staff from ComNow, stairs to the bridge have munity Services took over that role, been removed to prevent the public she said. from using it. And the ferry is also back up and “We really depend on that running, in a limited way. bridge,” said Ladue. “It’s been a part From now until October 10, of the community for 70 years. A lot the ferry will make crossings at 9 of our members go across the river. a.m. and at 5 p.m. every day under They have cabins just down the road restricted conditions, said Black. here.” News Reporter

1,000 MILE INTERNATIONA

CLEARANCE Spring Step Clogs SALE CONTINUES!

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204C M a i n S t r e e t • w h i t e h o r S e • 667-2409

Not having that access, especially between when ferry service stops and the ice freezes, “is going to have a huge impact,” said Ladue. He will host a community meeting to discuss the issue within the next week or so, he said. Kevin Barr, the NDP’s critic for community services, wants to know why it took so long to figure out that the bridge was so unsafe, he said. “This bridge has been in disarray for quite some time, and they haven’t acted on it.” He asked the Yukon Party in April why the bridge had been allowed to fall into disrepair. Elaine Taylor, then minister of Community Services, responded. “Community Services is looking at options for repairs or replacement of the bridge structure and have undertaken the assessment services of an engineering firm as well,” said Taylor. “In the meantime, we have put up a caution sign, and a chain has been installed just to ensure that individuals are aware of the issues with respect to the current state of the bridge.” In June, the government announced $1.1 million towards repairing the bridge, with the work to be completed by the end of the year. But the start date for the engineering consultant contract wasn’t until July 23, according to the government’s contract registry. “How come we’re still waiting? It’s October first,” said Barr. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

Liard First Nation’s social assistance in disarray Jesse Winter

handing responsibility for running the program back to the Canadian government because it wasn’t getting he Liard First Nation says there enough support to deal with the are 30 social assistance clients workload. still waiting for payments for Sep“I called them back in September tember, and an expected 300 more and said, ‘We still have 90 clients left who will need help in October. to see, and this is becoming a real Time is running out, workers are problem. We’re not going to be able burning out, and the First Nation to take in October clients because we still doesn’t know how the federal still haven’t seen our list of Septemgovernment plans to take over the ber clients,’” Hombert said. program a week from now, said PJ “They’ve just been kind of Hombert, the First Nation’s execuschlepping it off, like, ‘No, it’s your tive director. responsibility. We’ve given you your “It’s been very frustrating,” she six per cent admin fee, so deal with said. “We’re feeling that there is a lack it,’” she said. Hombert said that, right now, her of planning. They are not willing to government has two workers trying take any responsibility. They’ve put to manage a heavy workload that it on our shoulders to provide soluisn’t sustainable. tions with the funding that we have,” “They are still working on those Hombert said. 30 clients left to see. They are also The social assistance program is working on preparing fuel orders funded by the federal government, and administered by the First Nation for social assistance clients because in accordance with the Yukon Social people are running out of fuel and it’s getting cold out. Assistance Act. But that doesn’t “They are also working on getting provide enough funding to run the adult care payments out for October, program properly, Hombert said. and arranging firewood for our Two weeks ago, the First Nation government announced it was elders. Do we want to see people out News Reporter

T

there not getting October payments? No, of course not. It just breaks my heart to see this happening,” Hombert said. The First Nation’s plan is still to have the federal government take over the program next Friday, Hombert said, but this whole month was supposed to be a transition period and the First Nation doesn’t know what the feds have been up to or how they are preparing for the transfer. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development declined to provide a spokesperson to comment. Nor did the department answer questions emailed by the News. Instead, it only provided a short written statement. “Liard First Nation indicated to the department that it would not issue benefit cheques to existing clients, despite the legal obligation to deliver assistance as determined in their funding arrangement,” the email said. The department said it will be in Watson Lake today to offer emergency assistance to those who need it. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

3

Yukon News

Softball Yukon steps up to Sima plate Jesse Winter News Reporter

W

hen the City of Whitehorse said no to the Friends of Sima Society last week, the volunteers went looking for help somewhere else. They found it in a surprising place. At a press conference on Tuesday, Softball Yukon announced it is stepping up to the plate with a $20,000 donation and a $50,000 loan to the new society. The total is nearly everything the Friends of Sima had asked for from city councillors last week, only to be rejected. Softball and snow sports may seem like an odd couple, but George Arcand, the executive director of Softball Yukon, said it’s all about supporting fellow athletes. “We felt it was important to have that hill open for kids in this community,” said Arcand. The support is a one-time contribution that won’t curtail Softball Yukon’s ability to host the upcoming world championships or impact its other programs, Arcand said. Softball Yukon isn’t the only organization stepping up, either. Community Services Minister Brad Cathers said the Yukon government will make good on its promise to match funding up to $70,000, regardless of whether the city puts up any cash. That removes a condition that the government had placed on its support, which made the money dependent on a “significant contribution” from the city. That contribution was expected to come in the form of $65,000 – the same amount it would cost to temporarily close the ski hill – that city administration had recommended be given to the Friends of Sima. But last week, city council voted against the funding. “Quite frankly we don’t understand why the decision would be made to spend $65,000 to mothball it and yet not be prepared to contribute that same amount even if it was contingent on Friends of Sima reaching certain milestones in terms of pledges

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

George Arcand, executive director of Softball Yukon, announced a $20,000 donation and a $50,000 loan to the Friends of Sima Society on Monday. or fundraising,” Cathers said. All told, the newly formed society has pulled in promises totaling approximately $605,000. That includes around $320,000 in pledged season passes. But right now, the society doesn’t have a single penny in the bank. “I have a cheque that I’ve been carrying around for a week now for a ski pass from a city councillor. That will be the first deposit that I make,” said the society’s newly minted president, Laurie Henderson. “We have been very clear on all of this. As generous as this money is, we’re not taking it without considerable thought. Realization of these dollars will depend on getting the pledge money in the bank,” she said. That will be the next big push, Henderson said. The society will make an announcement by Friday telling people

how to go about paying up, and anyone who hasn’t yet made a pledge can still do so, she said. “How many passes we sell in the next three weeks will be the crucial part. There’s no way we would turn someone away who hasn’t made a pledge yet,” she said. Along with the pledges, the group still needs to find an additional $50,000 from the business community, said society vice-president Rod Taylor. “Ideally we’d like to raise $75,000 because we know that one of the issues in the past has been those contingencies … like mechanical breakdown, weather, etc.,” Taylor said. At last week’s city council meeting, the Friends of Sima asked the city for a total of $72,500. The $70,000 in funding promised by Softball Yukon still leaves them $2,500 short. Councillor Kirk Cameron an-

nounced at the press conference that his company, northSense, will step up and fill that $2,500 gap. “These guys get 100 per cent of my support on anything they do. I’ll continue to work with them over the winter, and push and prod the business community,” Cameron said. Cameron and Coun. John Streicker were the only two who voted in favour of the city providing funding at last week’s meeting. “City council set the bar 10 weeks ago saying, ‘Community, you’ve got to step forward.’ And in spades, they did just that. This is a groundswell like none other that I’ve ever seen in this community,” he said. Coun. Betty Irwin was also at Tuesday’s announcement. Last week she voted against funding the hill with city money. On Tuesday, she said that seeing the community come forward to fill the gap was exactly what

city council had hoped for. “I think this is a wonderful thing that has happened. It’s what, I think, all of us on council wanted. I’m absolutely delighted to see how it has worked out,” she said. After last week’s council meeting, the implication was that if the city wasn’t going to fund an open hill, it would have to pay the $65,000 to mothball the facility. But Irwin disputed that. “We never said that we were going to mothball the facility. That was just one of the things that was talked about. As for the city’s part from now on, I don’t know. If the Friends of Mount Sima come forward with another proposal, another request for assistance, of course we’ll consider it,” she said. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

Magnetite mining plan could be derailed Jesse Winter

we don’t have a project,” Eaton said. The existing terminal isn’t huck Eaton’s plan to reclaim large enough to meet Eagle’s magnetite from the old needs, Eaton said, so he has been Whitehorse Copper tailings has negotiating with the export auhit a serious snag. thority to expand it. Eaton’s Eagle Industrial Miner“The deal that we have been als Corp. wants to begin mintalking about for a couple of years ing the old iron-rich tailings for with AIDEA, is that since ours magnetite, and ship that ore south is a fairly short-term project, we to Skagway. The plan has all the would borrow the money to build necessary environmental permits the building, and then repay part and been given a green light by of that over the short term of our the Yukon government. project,” Eaton said. But the operation hinges on Eagle shouldn’t be expected to shipping ore from the Skagway pay the full cost of the expansion, ore terminal to international said Eaton, because the project is markets, and negotiations with only slated for a five-year producthe Alaska Industrial Develoption run. The building will last ment and Export Authority, upwards of 50 years, giving the which owns the terminal, have export authority decades to make money from other mines wanting run aground. to ship from Skagway, Eaton said. “If we don’t have a terminal, News Reporter

C

In August, the export authority announced plans for a $7.5-million expansion of the terminal, including extending the ore storage facility, building more truck loading bays and a covered stockpile area. Under that plan, Eagle would help pay back the cost of the building with lease payments over the five-year life of the magnetite project. At the time, AIDEA spokesman Karston Rodvik said the deal had been two years in the making, and that it just needed to be finalized. But now the problem, Eaton said, is that suddenly AIDEA is being unreasonable in its negotiation demands. “They have insisted not only that we pay for 100 per cent of the building, and that we pay for it in a four-year period, but to make

it even worse they’ve front-end loaded the payments so that we pay two-thirds of the amount in the first two years and the other third in the next two years,” he said. Rodvik declined to comment, other than to issue a one-line email that stated: “It is not accurate for Mr. Eaton to describe our negotiations as ‘broken down.’ We recently provided him with more information and are awaiting his response.” Eaton thinks that AIDEA has lost sight of its job. “They are doing this because they are so risk-averse, and we think they have lost track of their purported primary goal, which is to promote economic exports from Alaska. We think they are now just so focused on risk mitigation that they demand crazy

things,” he said. Eagle will keep trying to negotiate with AIDEA, Eaton said, but his hopes are not high. There is one other option. Eagle Minerals could find a way to build its own facility and load ore without using the Skagway ore terminal itself. That would be more expensive, but it would give Eagle the power to charge other mines for the use of the facility into the future. “We would build our own building and ship loader. We’d have a nice, permanent building that other potential miners like Western Copper could use. We’d be doing what AIDEA should be doing,” Eaton said. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com


4

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Attempted murder case in the hands of the jury today Ashley Joannou

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said. Johnson was found with needles when she was arrested alongside Cornell, the lawyer reminded the jury. Those needles were considered a risk and led to a more thorough search, he said. Parkkari encouraged the jury to look at the case as a whole, not the single pieces of evidence in isolation. He was critical of Cornell’s version of events, particularly the part where he claimed to have jogged 12 kilometres in about an hour from the vehicle he says he was in to Johnson in the damaged Blazer. For a drug addict travelling at night through the bush at the side of the highway, that’s not realistic, Parkkari said. He also suggested it is unlikely Cornell would leave his fiancee alone to go off and do a drug deal with someone he doesn’t know. He pointed out that Cornell was seen later that morning with a rifle and was arrested with a bag containing bear spray. Cornell claims he picked up those things from the Blazer when he met up with Johnson. Parkkari noted the bag also contained a brown outer shell of a jacket. Oakley testified one of the people he saw was wearing a brown parka. The prosecutor suggested that, overtop of all the other layers Cornell was wearing, the brown shell may have looked like a parka. Cornell’s DNA was only found on a crack pipe and the rifle, both of which he admitted to handling. No unidentified samples were found, said Parkkari, including nothing that would point to someone else. The jury is scheduled to receive its final instructions from Justice Leigh Gower this morning. After that, they will be sequestered, away from any outside contact until they reach a verdict. Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com

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with an alternate story of looking for drugs before sending his girlfriend, Jessica Johnson, f all goes as planned, the jury alone in the Blazer with a in the Christopher Cornell drug dealer identified only as attempted murder trial should “Rider.” be considering its verdict by The alleged drug dealer was this afternoon. never seen again. The group of nine women Johnson also faces the same and five men heard closing ar- charges. Only Cornell is on guments from both the Crown trial at this time. and defence lawyers yesterday The 31-year-old’s lawyer, after nearly four weeks of David Tarnow, insisted there testimony in Yukon Supreme isn’t enough evidence to conCourt. vict his client. In a passionate closing stateCornell is facing eight charges including the attempt- ment, Tarnow questioned the police work done in the case, ed murder of Haines Junction RCMP Cpl. Kim MacKellar and particularly surrounding one bullet officers claim was found deputy conservation officer in Cornell’s pocket. Shane Oakley during a chase The .375 H&H bullet was with police after an attempted found in Cornell’s jeans at the robbery at Madley’s General police station after his arrest, Store. He is also accused of assault- one officer testified. A second officer told the jury ing the custodian at the store he felt a cylindrical object in with bear spray. Cornell’s pocket when he was The jury has heard how a dark-coloured SUV sped away first arrested, but left it there. Cornell has denied ever havfrom Madley’s when MacKeling the bullet. lar and Oakley showed up in Tarnow suggested it is una marked police vehicle. The realistic for the bullet to have chase ended when a bullet from a high-powered rifle came been left in Cornell’s pocket through the front window and when he was first searched after his arrest near the Pine Lake the veteran police officer was campground. injured. “Do you really think that No eyewitnesses were able to could be missed? No way. It definitively place Cornell at the wasn’t there,” the lawyer said. store in September 2011. He pointed out that when When he took the stand last Johnson was searched during week he flatly denied being reher arrest, everything came out sponsible for any of the crimes. of her pockets. He said he wasn’t even in the “Can you trust the evidence Chevy Blazer that police claim of the Crown?” he said later on. was involved in the chase at “That’s my point.” around 6:30 that morning. Tarnow said the jury should Instead he provided the jury believe his client’s story, or at the very least have enough Wed, Oct 2 & reasonable doubt to find him Thurs, Oct 3 not guilty. Whitehorse Yukon Cinema Whi8thorse In his last chance to speak 304 Wood Street Ph: 668-6644 to the jury, prosecutor Keith Parkkari responded to Tarnow’s suggestion about the bullet. He said searches of people when they are first arrested are (G) Nightly in 3D at 7:00 & 9:20 PM meant to find things considered a threat to police. A bullet, on its own, is not a threat, he News Reporter

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5

Yukon News

Toddler burned at local daycare Both parents want answers about what happened, and especially about why they were not ess than a year after a territotold about the incident. rial government inspection “Did somebody just walk away found unsafe heaters at a local for a second? Are these heaters daycare, a toddler there has been on the floor? Why wasn’t first aid burned. administered right away? Why Martin Lehner said when he wasn’t it reported to us when it came home from work on Sept. happened, why wasn’t it reported 16 to play with his 11-month-old when my wife went to pick him son Ethan, he noticed a pockup? Why wasn’t there an incident marked red blister on his son’s report made to (the Yukon govhand. ernment)?” The burn didn’t appear serious While Lehner was reluctant to enough for an emergency room name the daycare for fear of posvisit, but a pharmacist at Shopsible legal action, there is only one pers Drug Mart that evening conlicensed daycare in the Marwell firmed it as a burn and suggested industrial area: the Little Dreampain-relief medication and a cold ers daycare. compress. Records of daycare investigaLehner’s wife, Katelyn, who tions are not made public. The had picked Ethan up from his only public records are those regular daycare in the Marwell of daycare inspections, which industrial area, said no one had typically take about a week to be mentioned anything about a burn released. The most recent inspecto her when she picked up her tion record for Little Dreamers is son. from June 2013. The Department “Neither one of us was conof Health and Social Services did tacted by the daycare during the not return repeated calls for comday, when it presumably would ment by press time. have happened, and nothing was According to records, the daysaid to my wife when we picked care failed a government inspechim up at the end of the day,” tion in January 2013 for having Lehner said. space heaters that were accessible The next day his wife called the to children. daycare and spoke to the owner, Jesse Winter/Yukon News The same daycare also failed to who at first was unaware of the Martin Lehner’s son, 11-month-old Ethan, suffered a burn after touching a meet government rules in April incident as well, said Lehner. heater at a Whitehorse daycare. 2011 for baseboard heaters that After speaking with staff, the owner told Katelyn that her son some grates on top of the heater’ and the owner’s daughter stopped you had this incident before with were too hot; in February 2010 for having exposed telephone wires in had indeed burned himself on a another child. You were told to him by the door, said Lehner. … but they knew that the heater the preschool area; and in Decemheater the day before, but couldn’t rectify it, you admittedly say they “On the way out, the owner’s still got hot,” said Lehner. ber 2010 for having Tylenol that say why the parents weren’t notiare still too hot for kids to touch, daughter said, ‘You know, you Unsatisfied with the answer, fied immediately, said Lehner. was accessible to children. but they’re still available,’” he said. can’t say anything about this to Lehner said he went to the dayIt also wasn’t the first time a When the News spoke to Lehner reported the incident anyone until you speak to my care the following day, hoping to toddler had been burned by the Lori Austin, the owner of Little to child care services, who are mom,’” he said. see the heaters for himself and heaters, he said. Dreamers, in person, she declined investigating, he said. “That kind of thing started to speak to the owner. She wasn’t “What was explained to my to comment. She also did not “They explained to me that the return repeated phone calls and wife, is that they have these heat- there, and staff at the daycare told get a little concerning. I underlegislation requires (the daycare) stand that daycares have to live him they weren’t allowed to talk ers near the ground, and about a emails sent by the News seeking to file a report, and to notify me, on their reputation, and they’re year ago an infant was burned by about what had happened, he comment for this story. all things that didn’t happen,” said pretty fierce about protecting the heater. Child care services in- said. Contact Jesse Winter at Lehner. Frustrated, he turned to leave, it. That said, you guys have said spected, and said, ‘You have to put jessew@yukon-news.com Jesse Winter News Reporter

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6

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

$4M bid missed the deadline: judge Jacqueline Ronson

contract in the next few days, a spokesperson with Highways and Public Works confirmed Monday. enders for government conJudge Veale concluded that tracts will not be accepted on written instructions to bidders Yukon Time, a territorial judge were clear. Tenders had to be has found. submitted before the deadline and P.S. Sidhu Trucking Ltd. missed not after. The deadline was 4 p.m. the deadline when it resubmitted He dismissed arguments that a bid after 4:00, but before the instructions in newspaper ads clock struck 4:01, concluded Jus- and on the government’s tender tice Ron Veale in territorial court management system website said Friday afternoon. that bids could be submitted up At $4.24 million, Sidhu Truck- to and including at 4 p.m. ing would be the lowest bid Those sources are not contract on the contract, if it had been documents and, in the case of the deemed compliant. government website, included a The next lowest bidder was specific disclaimer urging bidders CMF Construction Ltd, at $4.86 not to rely on that information, million. concluded Veale. The Yukon government is conThe judge also dismissed the sidering the impact of the judge’s argument that Ruben Bicudo, decision, and will award the who submitted the tender on beNews Reporter

T

Body of missing man found taken it upon themselves to do a

search along the highway,” RCMP Const. Dean Hoogland said After nearly a month, the body of a missing Whitehorse man has today. Police say the truck had driven been found. off the highway down a steep Police were notified Friday embankment and collided with evening after two people found the white truck David Boyle had several large trees, causing extenbeen driving when he went miss- sive damage. It was partially camouflaged ing. The truck was found down an by trees and foliage that fell after embankment near Jake’s Corner the collision. Boyle, 53, was found dead off the Alaska Highway. “They were a couple of friends just outside the vehicle. As for whether he was thrown from the of Mr. Boyle’s and they had

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half of Sidhu Trucking, relied on information from Yukon government staff who told him that bids would be accepted until the clock struck 4:01. According to documents before the court, Bicudo entered the contract services office at approximately 3:55 p.m. on Aug 15, the day of the deadline. He was trying to add up the unit prices in the bid to come up with the final total, but his calculator broke. Staff at the office told him that they could add up the total so long as the rest of the information was complete. Bicudo sealed the bid and a staff member timestamped it at 3:59. He then asked for the sealed Mike Thomas/Yukon News bid back. Justice Ron Veale. A second staff member

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checked the time by stamping a scrap of paper. Finding it to be 4:00, she handed the bid back to Bicudo and told him it would be accepted until the clock struck 4:01. Bicudo ripped open the package and made a small mark on the document. It was then resealed, and then time-stamped a second time, this time with “4:00.” Perhaps government staff should not have returned the document to Bicudo after the deadline, but he violated the rules simply by asking for it, said Veale. According to the instructions to bidders, tenders can only be returned by written request submitted before the deadline. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

Whitehorse sacks city boss

medical leave. “The reality is that he was suspended on April 5, and Whitehorse’s city manager has vehicle or got out on his own and terminated on Friday. He was been fired. then collapsed, Hoogland said suspended the whole time but Stan Westby’s contract was that is still under investigation. there was a stint in the middle officially terminated on Friday Foul play is not suspected. where he was on medical leave,” after a special council meeting The area where the truck was Curtis said. on Thursday, said Mayor Dan found had been searched before, Westby was fired with cause, Curtis. both by air and by road, but the meaning that he doesn’t qualify When reached at his home on fallen trees obstructed the view for a severance package. Monday morning, Westby said during aerial searches, police say. Brian Crist has served as acthe couldn’t comment on the Both the RCMP and Boyle’s ing city manager in Westby’s absituation because he is considfamily organized searches since sence. He will continue to do so ering legal action against the he was first reported missing by while city council decides how city. his employer, Skookum Asphalt, to fill the position permanently, “I would love to say my piece, on Sept. 3. said Curtis. and hopefully the time will He was last seen on Aug. 30, Crist couldn’t be reached come once I’ve had the opat approximately 10 a.m. at his for comment – his voicemail portunity to chat this a little bit office. says that he is out of the office further with my lawyer,” Westby The coroner has ordered an until mid-October, and that said. autopsy. Mike Gau, the city’s director of Westby had been suspended In an RCMP statement, development services, is filling since April 5. But, until last Boyle’s family said they would in while he is away. week, the city would only publike to “deeply thank everyone “We need to find a full time licly say that he was on medical who was involved in the investicity manager as soon as we can,” leave. gation and search.” Curtis said. The delay was due to the The police also thanked “That’s the person that really city’s manager bylaw, which reeveryone who called in tips and quired a hearing before council steers the ship. Brian has done offered their time and effort to could make a decision, and that phenomenal job keeping things the search. hearing was delayed by Westby’s afloat, and I don’t think anyone (Ashley Joannou) would notice any kind of disruption of any service. Things have been great,” he said. City council will meet in the “immediate future” to decide how to proceed, Curtis said. Westby started as the city • Team orders • CorporaTe apparel • CusTom designs manager in August 2012, having been recruited from Powell Fast, Friendly and printed locally! River, B.C. He had served as that city’s chief administrative officer 207 main street • Tel: 633-4842 for more a decade. terrafirmapromo@murdochs.ca (Jesse Winter)

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7

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Yukon predicts bumper year ahead Jacqueline Ronson News Reporter

T

he Yukon government has forecast a dramatic recovery for the mining industry in 2014. The economic outlook report was released last week. It predicts the territory’s gross domestic product will have grown by 0.9 per cent in 2013. That’s among the slowest in Canada, according to TD Economics’ July report. But for 2014, Yukon has predicted 8.8 per cent GDP growth, driven largely by increased mining production and construction, as well as government capital expenditures. That forecast depends on a relatively small number of mining projects sticking to ambitious timelines. Victoria Gold must secure $400 million in financing if it is to begin major earthworks as scheduled for next spring. Alexco’s Bellekeno mine has shuttered for the winter, and whether or not it restarts production depends both on a recovery in the silver price and the company’s ability to cut underlying costs. Derrick Hynes, the government’s director of business and economic research, said the report is not specifically counting on any particular project to go ahead.

Dawson hospital insulation being replaced Dawson City’s new hospital has hit yet another problem with defective materials. Much of the spray-foam insulation underneath the siding is being replaced after it was discovered that it had not cured properly, said Jason Bilsky, CEO of the Yukon Hospital

“What we don’t want to do in exercises like this is start naming off particular mines and what month of the year we anticipate that they’re going to start producing.” But the government does expect a recovery in the mining sector in the next year, he said. “All indications are for 2014 that the mining sector in particular will be healthy and robust. While there has been a slight decline in some commodity prices over this summer, it’s expected that in most cases they will rebound in 2014.” Keith Halliday, a Yukon economist and self-professed lover of economic forecasts, said businesses need to understand the risk in interpreting reports like this one. “It’s that old Yogi Berra quote: There’s nothing harder to predict than the future.” Predicting Yukon’s economic future is particularly tricky, he said. “The fact that our economy is smaller and more exposed to the mining sector means that our forecast will have more volatility than a larger province with a more diversified economy.” Businesses must be ready for a scenario where the Yukon economy does really well and also for one where the outlook is not so great, he said.

“We have to be prepared for the possibility of bad news.” Rick Karp, president of the Whitehorse Chamber of Commerce, is not feeling terribly optimistic, he said. “It doesn’t seem to us as if the mining sector is going to produce what the department thinks it’s going to produce.” While the economic outlook report shows modest declines in the retail sector for this year, the actual impact has been quite large, he said. What’s hidden in the numbers is that while overall retail sales are in decline, gasoline sales are up quite a bit, said Karp. So retailers that do not sell gasoline have taken a bigger hit than is immediately obvious, he said. “When you’re talking about small businesses on Main Street, we’re seeing declines. We’re seeing consistent declines.” While the chamber would be very pleased if the predicted growth for 2014 materialized, it is “a little skeptical,” said Karp. “We’re pleased in a way that the Department of Economic Development is being so positive and so pumped, and that’s really good, but of course we would like to see some facts.”

Corporation. The problem was noticed as workers were replacing the siding on the building, which was also defective and couldn’t withstand Dawson’s harsh climate, Bilsky said. The siding problems were discovered earlier this summer. “The last of the siding is in Whitehorse today, and should be installed by the end of the week,” said hospital corporation spokeswoman Val Pike.

Pike said the problem doesn’t affect all of the insulation, only what was underneath the defective siding. The replacement isn’t expected to delay the opening of the new hospital, still expected sometime before the end of the year, Bilsky said. He couldn’t say at this point how much this latest problem will cost, or whether it might be covered by the company that installed the insulation to begin with. (Jesse Winter)

Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

Mike Thomas/Yukon News

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8

Opinion

Yukon News

EDITORIAL

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

INSIGHT

LETTERS

COMMENTARY There’s little doubt the Earth is warming Phil Elder

change. The Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. is on board too. And surely the precautionary he Intergovernmental Panel principle dictates action even withon Climate Change recently out 100 per cent certainty. issued its fifth assessment report, a Let us acknowledge, however, follow-up to its 2007 version. It is that although the “greenhouse efboth sobering and persuasive, and fect” accords with common sense, even stronger in stating that Earth’s global climate is extremely complex. climate is warming and that human For example, even with the warmactivity is now the main driver. ing, some parts of the globe will According to the report’s turn colder and trends need many summary, “most aspects of cliyears to allow conclusive certainty. mate change will persist for many Vigorous and informed scientific centuries even if emissions of CO2 debate is healthy for those who are stopped. … Depending on the want to better understand global scenario, about 15 to 40 per cent warming’s drivers and then to deof emitted CO2 will remain in velop effective remedial measures. the atmosphere longer than 1,000 It is also true that some people years.” on both sides on the debate have In other words, things will get exaggerated, which has increased worse before they get better, so depublic cynicism. niers can be expected to complain Naysayers tend to “cherry-pick” every decade that we should give their data – for example, they seize up because nothing we did worked. on the fact that the warming trend But our descendants will simply has been cut in half in the past few have to soldier on if they are to solve the problem we have created. years, even while greenhouse gas emissions continue. Therefore, they The usual sources are lining up to deny these claims. Some work in say, mainstream science is wrong. There isn’t enough room to or are financed by the hydrocarbon debunk all the challenges to climate energy industry, so their objections change data have also been made. to the science are not surprising. But let’s stay with this one for a Some deniers resist the analysis for minute. First, choosing an unideological reasons – they believe usually warm year as the baseline to in less government and more assess global warming distorts the personal freedom and sometimes evidence. even that the market is the only Given that climate change hapcredible decision-mechanism. Still others don’t want to accept human- pens over generations, and that weather varies from year to year in induced (anthropogenic) global a zigzag pattern, it’s no surprise that warming because responding to it may involve uncomfortable changes 15 years of relatively little rises in temperature should occur from an to the status quo. When the denial industry claims unusually high base line. Looking the scientific community is split on at greenhouse gas levels since 1900, this question, it’s not surprising that the upward trend could not be clearer. laypersons get confused. Yet there We must agree with the deniers is a 97 per cent consensus in the that warming and cooling cycles peer-reviewed scientific literature that anthropogenic climate change occurred well before human activity could have had any discernible is real. (This figure is also chaleffect. Things like el Nino, la Nina, lenged by climate skeptics.) And it’s not only the IPCC which warns wobbles in the Earth’s rotation and us about anthropogenic climate orbit, fluctuations in its magnetic Troy Media

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field, or solar storms and cosmic rays have in the past influenced climate change. Let us note three things, however. First, the most powerful climate change cycles occurred slowly, perhaps over millennia, so many species were able to migrate fast enough to remain viable as temperature zones shifted. Today’s changes, however, are orders of magnitude faster, even considering the present slowdown of the warming. Second, given these natural cycles, we are a couple of thousand years overdue for re-glaciation, yet temperatures have been moving in the opposite direction. Third, radical physical changes on Earth like the ice age and then de-glaciation resulted from comparatively small changes in temperature. Climate experts acknowledge these natural cycles, but most believe that they have caused much less than half and more probably about 15 per cent of the present warming trend. Are any explanations for this pause in warming since about the turn of the century consistent with global warming? Yes. For one, oceans have absorbed more heat than expected, due to changes in wind and current patterns, and have thus reduced the impact on air temperatures. (This rise, by the way, threatens many ocean species and is ominous for Reporters

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coral reef ecosystems. Also, since much greenhouse gas is eventually sequestered in the oceans, their increased acidification will also be a major threat to marine life.) Another factor reducing the warming impact of greenhouse gases is, counter-intuitively, the burning of huge amounts of coal, because it produces vast amounts of particulates which in the short term help shield the earth from solar radiation. Unfortunately, this apparently benign effect lasts only months or years, while the increased greenhouse gases from that combustion will remain in the atmosphere for centuries. So coal has to be phased out fast. Also worthy of note is the cooling effect observed from 2008-11 because of volcanic eruptions and aerosols in the air and perhaps lower solar radiation at the present stage of the solar cycle. I do not doubt the sincerity of many people who reject the scientific consensus, but urge undecided

readers to check out the affiliations and academic qualifications of the few ostensible “experts” who debunk anthropogenic climate change. True, climate change is extraordinarily complex and not all its mechanisms are entirely understood. But as a legally-trained layman, I have weighed the evidence (as I was taught to do) and conclude both that anthropogenic climate change is occurring and that it poses an existential threat to modern civilization. I say this, not to induce panic or hopelessness, but to urge all interested citizens (is anyone dull enough to believe that such a threat should just be ignored?) to inform themselves and then insist that our political leaders respond with ingenuity and vigour. Phil Elder is emeritus professor of environmental and planning law with the faculty of environmental design at the University of Calgary. Courtesy www.troymedia.com.

Quote of the Day “We really depend on that bridge. It’s been a part of the community for 70 years. A lot of our members go across the river. They have cabins just down the road here.” Chief Brian Ladue of the Ross River Dena Council responding to the closure of the unsafe bridge in his community. Page 2

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INSIGHT

Seen from the other side of the world project near Dawson Creek and the natural gas export by Keith terminal being built near Halliday Kitimat. There are no prizes for guessing why Australian papers are writing about Fort Nelson. Australia exports a huge amount of natural gas to Asia, and the development of fracking has turned the gas t’s always interesting to see fields of northeastern British Columbia into major new how other people look at competition. you. I’m in Australia this week Australian companies and have been watching the have made huge bets on gas. papers here for mentions of The Gorgon project alone the Yukon, or at least Western in Western Australia has an Canada. investment budget in the I have to admit that I was $30-billion range, making surprised that it was our some Fort McMurray projects friends in Fort Nelson who look small. made the headlines first. The Australia exports so much Australian, the paper with the gas that there is a looming biggest circulation here, had shortage in New South Wales a prominent story entitled and Victoria. “Japan and Canada in shale One gas market analyst told gas supply deal.” It mentioned The Australian that the deal the Cordova Embayment just between Canada and Japan south of the Yukon border, “should send a shudder down the spines” of natural gas the Cutbank Ridge shale gas

YUKONOMIST

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LETTERS

Let’s discuss fracking with the experts Open letter to Patti McLeod and the select committee on hydraulic fracturing, Thank you for the update you provided in your open letter of September 24, 2013. The Yukon Conservation Society is encouraged by the work you describe in your letter and would like to follow up on some points. We look forward to reviewing the presentations and briefing notes on hydraulic fracturing that you receive from Yukon government departments, the water board and YESAB. When can the public expect to see them on your website? It was in the spirit of the educational process you refer to in your public letter that we invited the committee to the recent workshop on hydraulic fracturing facilitated by Andrew Nikiforuk. We were pleased that some of you were able to attend the evening public lecture. YCS notes that the committee plans to visit a gas field that uses hydraulic fracturing. It would be most educational to visit sites that are examples of best practices and others that show negative impacts from fracking. Another way to understand risks as well industry’s benefit claims would be to engage two guides/ interpreters: one from industry and another to talk about the risks to the local environment, communities and traditional lifestyles. Caleb Behn from Treaty 8 territory, which includes the Horn River Basin, would be a good

executives here. Meanwhile, The Australian’s Tokyo correspondent reports that the Nikkei Shimbun predicts that 10 per cent of Japan’s massive gas appetite will be fed by Western Canadian gas by 2020. Japan’s demand for natural gas is expected to grow even more now that the country is shutting down its nuclear reactors following the Fukushima disaster last year. Japanese Prime Minister Abe made Ottawa the first stop on his recent North American tour, saying that Japan wanted to “secure a stable supply of LNG (liquefied natural gas) at competitive prices.” Plenty of Australians have qualms about the environmental impact of natural gas extraction, and the risk that the economy will become too reliant on gas exports. Some politicians have complained about exporting so much Australian gas to Asia that local prices have gone up. The

example of someone to provide the community perspective. He is a graduate of the University of Victoria’s faculty of law, and is a well-known public speaker about the effects of the oil and gas industry on his community and traditional territory. When the select committee was initially struck, its mandate included community visits to Watson Lake and Old Crow. It now appears that Whitehorse has been added to the list with the possibility of additional communities. YCS cannot reiterate strongly enough that all Yukoners need to be consulted because fracking would affect everyone. The select committee must hold public hearings in all Yukon communities and offer to meet with all First Nations. We were encouraged to read in your letter that you are committed to learning about both the potential benefits and risks of hydraulic fracturing. To help you achieve this balance, it is necessary to engage experts who will share with you and the Yukon public some of the environmental, social and economic risks of fracking. YCS would be happy to partner with the select committee to bring any or all of the following experts to the territory: • Anthony Ingraffea, a professor of engineering at Cornell University in New York, where he studies how solids fracture. He is an expert on the risks associated with well integrity and fracking

Australian Financial Review reports that households in the state of Victoria will see $300 spikes in their annual gas bills, and that Australian manufacturers are struggling under the double whammy of a high dollar and high energy costs. The Australian papers have also been full of news about the most recent scientific reports on climate change. Dry and hot weather has made bush fires a top news item. The newly elected coalition government, led by rightwinger Tony Abbott, doesn’t look worried. They are pushing hard on energy production. On the day the government was sworn in, Abbott ordered an end to Australia’s carbon tax. It’s not clear he has the votes in the Senate to kill the tax, but his intentions are clear. The coalition government has also made coal-bed methane a priority, much to the horror of Australian environmentalists.

It looks like Canadian and Australian gas will be competing for Asian buyers, along with gas from Russia, Central Asia, Burma and maybe even Vietnam. Northwestern North America’s huge gas reserves are attracting attention from around the Pacific. Big name energy companies from Korea, Japan and China have made big investments in northern British Columbia already. Our corner of North America can expect plenty more attention from global energy markets in the years to come. We might hope to be known for our mountains, rivers and northern lights. But at the moment the world seems more interested in our fracking. Keith Halliday is a Yukon economist and author of the MacBride Museum’s Aurore of the Yukon series of historical children’s adventure novels. You can follow him on Twitter @hallidaykeith

“Where feasible, consideration shall be made to separate multiuse trails (which accommodate motorized and non-motorized in general. guidelines from previous city recreation) from non-motorized • David Hughes, a geoscientist consultation processes. trails. Future multi-use trail Excerpt from the Riverdale with the Geological Survey of development shall avoid environCanada for 32 years, and uncon- Neighbourhood Plan’s section mentally sensitive areas wherever on the questionnaire outcomes: ventional gas specialist on the possible.” “Motorized recreational vehicles Canadian Gas Potential Com(ATVs, snowmobiles) were identiThe trail plan recommends mittee. fied as a major point of conten• Deborah Rogers, a Texasthe creation of a map of “out and tion in the community. Many feel away” trails for motorized recreabased economist and financial analyst who studies the econom- disturbed by motorized activity tion vehicle usage. This map shall and identify it as a safety issue, ics of shale oil and gas. be designed to strongly discourparticularly in regards to children. • Gilles Wendling, a B.C.age the use of all terrain vehicles The consensus seems to be that based hydrogeologist who on non-motorized trails and in specializes in the assessment and laws regarding these vehicles are environmentally sensitive areas. not being respected and must be protection of water, specifically The above plans are available more stringently enforced.” groundwater. from the City of Whitehorse “Furthermore, trails need to YCS looks forward to the opwebsite, as well as EYR survey be strongly designated as motorportunity to present to the select ized or non-motorized. Many information: www.whitehorse.ca/ committee this fall. also expressed concern regarding trails the erosion of trails, and general ATWA fully supports “out and Sebastian Jones environmental damage caused by away” trails for motorized vehicles Energy Co-ordinator these vehicles.” Yukon Conservation Society as conceived in the Whitehorse Excerpt from the Official Com- Official Community Plan. We are munity Plan’s section on motorRiverdale trail concerned, however, that several ized recreation: “Many residents plan raises worries of the trails currently proposed of Whitehorse enjoy motorized for motorized multi-use designarecreation, such as ATVs and The City of Whitehorse is snow machines. However, not all tion in the East Yukon River area conducting another survey on do not support this concept but residents appreciate motorized motorized multi-use trail desigrather would allow recreational vehicles on local walking and nation for the East Yukon River or skiing trails. To avoid conflict motorized vehicle use on sections Riverdale area. Whitehorse resibetween motorized and nonof ski trails, within local green dents and trail users are invited to motorized trail users, the City spaces and close to residential participate in that survey. A porParks & Recreation Master Plan areas. tion of the survey is for Riverdale and Trail Plan recommend the For further information about residents only. The deadline for idea of “out and away” trails. these issues, visit ATWA’s website: responding is Oct. 4, 2013. These trails would be designated www.activetwa.org The Active Trails Whitehorse for motorized use, allowing those Association has several concerns residents routes to get away from about the survey’s proposed the local green space and into the Dorothy Lebel motorized multi-use trails. We larger hinterland, where they will Director would like to bring the public’s not be a nuisance to non-motor- Active Trails attention to trail designation Whitehorse Association ized users.”


10

Yukon News

LETTERS

The issue is accountability Open letter to Yukon News and Whitehorse Star: Your publications, as well as the CBC, CHON and CKRW, go a long way to shape the views of Yukon citizens. Recently, I have read the letter to the editor from both the Yukon and Whitehorse aboriginal women’s councils in response to Liard First Nation’s decision to withdraw support for the Liard Aboriginal Women’s Society (LAWS). You, as the print media, did not print my full letter to the LAWS board. As such the story has evolved with the perception that LFN is withdrawing support because this is a women’s group.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

This is of course fundamentally not the case and it would have been evident to the public if you had chosen to actually print my letter. In that letter I made it very clear that LFN was withdrawing support for LAWS because LAWS had received very significant amounts of public funding, yet it has taken the position through its legal counsel over the last year that it is not accountable to the membership of Liard First Nation or other Kaska citizens. The issue is not the goals that LAWS has with respect to violence.

I and my council have steadfastly supported those goals over the years and have placed our names on numerous funding applications to that end. The issue, fundamentally, is accountability. There are many residential school survivors, young LFN citizens, and individuals in need of drug and alcohol or sexual abuse counselling that could have benefitted from the resources LAWS receives. I and my council endorse and commend the Yukon and Whitehorse aboriginal women’s councils for an extremely well-written statement in the Wednesday newspaper. The whole letter was well done and in particular the final paragraphs where it stated: “We support a right to freedom from violence for all community members but particularly women, children, elders and others who may be vulnerable. We are here to help people and strengthen a zero-tolerance policy against all actions that violate the emotional and physical safety of

others.” Yes, violence and intimidation are unfortunately still far too common in our society. I have had LFN members who are women complain about the violence and shunning and the abuse of power that goes on in our community in the present day. Perhaps some of these women will one day find the strength to talk to YAWC and WAWC and share their thoughts on what is going on in our community. Chief Liard McMillan Liard First Nation

Thanks for help following plane crash On Wednesday, Sept. 25, Ken Rombough took flight from Fort Nelson’s Gordon Airfield in a Seawind 2000. These planes are considered amateur or kit built; however, this particular aircraft was built at the Seawind factory.

Shortly after takeoff a loud noise was heard which we now know was a mechanical engine failure that subsequently caused an in-flight fire. Ken called an emergency into flight services before losing engine power. We are thankful that Ken is a very experienced pilot and was able to fly the plane without the engine running, in an attempt to land on a street in Fort Nelson. He managed to fly between the power lines; however, on the last set of lines the landing gear clipped the silver and white neutral line that is very difficult to see. We are extremely grateful that he did not sustain extremely serious injuries. Ken would like to thank the folks at flight services for their immediate response. We would like to thank all of those people who work in the emergency services who responded to the accident: Dr. Hattingh and nurse Alonnie; the folks who assisted Ken once he had gotten himself out of the plane; Lou, Scott and Alisha from Brandt Tractor; and Victoria from Cat Rentals. Special thanks to Dave Soles, Brent Munro, Travis Hunter, Marty Wells, Dean Lorenz, Kevin Elgie and Lorne Kelly. Thank you to everyone for your calls of concern and support. Also special thanks to Wade Roberts and Rick Nielson of Whitehorse for getting our Chris and Ralph to us. We apologize for anyone that we may have missed. Tammi Krehbiel, on behalf of the Rombough families Fort Nelson

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Commission scolaire francophone du Yukon

List of Candidates General Election

Liste des candidats et des candidates aux élections générales Les personnes suivantes sont candidats et candidates à l’élection pour les postes de commissaires à la Commission scolaire francophone du Yukon, le lundi 7 octobre 2013.

Name • Nom

j k l m v b x WHITEHORSE g j k l m v b WEATHER s g j k l m v 5-Day Forecast f s g j k l m

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The following people have been nominated as candidates for election as trustees of the Yukon Francophone School Board on Monday, October 7, 2013.

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Environmentalists, loggers seek consensus as Boreal Forest Agreement hits reset Bruce Cheadle Canadian Press

OTTAWA We’re not out of the woods yet.” In her rush to explain the promise and the peril of the three-year-old Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement, Janet Sumner doesn’t even pause to consider her unintended pun. Sumner, a spokeswoman for the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, is among those heralding a “reset” in a groundbreaking co-operative experiment between environmental groups and the forestry industry. The agreement, known as the CBFA, could serve as a model for industry and environmental groups that shout past one another while polarizing their constituencies and solving nothing. But the agreement has to be shown to produce real results and so far those have been hard to come by. “We all share that frustration,” Aran O’Carroll, the group’s interim executive director, said Wednesday in an interview with The Canadian Press. “We set out a very ambitious and aggressive set of milestones.” The 2010 agreement, which currently includes 19 forestry companies and seven environmental organizations, was coming apart at the seams last spring after two major environmental groups quit and negotiations with Resolute Forest Products reached

a stalemate. “This summer all the signatories sat down, reaffirmed their commitment to the agreement and we’ve been working hard over the summer to recalibrate our work plans, identify priorities for our work and set new milestones,” said O’Carroll. A series of agreements will be announced this fall and winter, said O’Carroll. And the CBFA is still waiting on the province of Ontario to sign off on an agreement in northeastern Ontario that has been approved by local communities, First Nations and non-signatory forest companies. The proposal protects over 800,000 hectares of forest while increasing harvestable timber by 20 per cent, thus protecting local mills. However negotiators were simply unable to get a satisfactory agreement on the vast, top priority “phase one” forest areas in Quebec and Ontario, Sumner said in a phone interview. Talks had been “bubbling away” in other regions and the focus has shifted to those more productive discussions, she said. “For (Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society) very specifically, we’re working in Newfoundland, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and seeing those conversations with those companies really starting to bear some fruit.” And that has advocates of the Canadian Boreal Forest Agree-

Canada has about a third of the world’s boreal forest; getting co-operation on its management between environmentalists and loggers is seen as a potential model for other resource sectors, including oil and gas. Lazar contrasts the “tug of war” over the oilsands – “I’ll get my billionaire to beat up on your billionaire,” he says – with the forest talks. “You have grown-up humans sitting in a room together with a map.” A hard-won agreement among the CBFA signatories on scientific methodology is “a small miracle of consensus ment back on a public relations building,” said Lazar. offensive this fall. The modelling shows how Bruce Lourie of the Ivey much habitat woodland caribou Foundation, which helps fund the require. Logging maps reveal how participation of a number of enmuch timber a community mill – vironmental groups in the agree- and the community itself – needs ment, says neither conservationto survive. ists nor industry want to go back The CBFA is designed to use to the days when they warred over that common methodology to forestry practices. map out agreements that environ“This is clearly the right way mentalists, forestry companies, to do things,” said Lourie, who First Nations and local communijoined O’Carroll and former ties all can live with. forestry executive Avrim Lazar in Sumner said in her talks in pitching CBFA’s merits WednesAlberta, Saskatchewan and Maniday. toba, “I feel like we’re just light “It’s just more complex than years away from where we were anyone imagined.”

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with other industrial sectors.” But some key environmental groups have walked away from the agreement. Both Greenpeace and Canopy, an advocacy group for sustainable forestry that was involved in the CBFA’s creation, bowed out last spring, citing a lack of progress. “Our assessment coming up to the third anniversary, when there was not a single hectare protected on the ground, or even jointly recommended to governments for protection, was that it just wasn’t the most effective vehicle,” said Nicole Rycroft, Canopy’s executive director. “Success is ultimately measured by results on the ground.” Sumner argues that it’s better to have environmentalists “inside the tent” seeing industry and government data and understanding the trade-offs that can be made. But the environmental campaigner agrees the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement was in serious trouble this summer. “Oh yeah,” Sumner said, emphatically. “We’re not out of the woods yet. We’ve got to produce some results. Otherwise, we’ve just agreed on a bunch of process.”

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Nairobi mall victims looted during terror attack Jason Straziuso And Rukmini Callimachi

international airport. Now shop owners at Westgate Associated Press Mall are returning to their stores following a devastating terrorist NAIROBI, Kenya attack, in which at least 67 were ewelry cases smashed and loot- killed, to find items ransacked and ed. Mobile phones ripped from valuables stolen. displays. Cash registers emptied. One witness told The AssociAlcohol stocks plundered. ated Press that he even saw a For the second straight Kenyan Kenyan soldier take cigarettes out tragedy, poorly paid security of a dead man’s pocket. forces that moved in control the Shop owners and managers chaos are being accused of robspent Monday carting merchanbing the premises. First the troops dise and other valuables out of were accused of looting during a their shops and restaurants to huge fire in August at Nairobi’s prevent anything more from being

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taken. No one can say for sure, but Kenya’s security forces are strongly suspected. Soon after the attack began on Sept. 21, Kenyan officials put a security cordon around the mall, allowing only security forces and a few government personnel to pass through. Alcohol stocks from the restaurants have been depleted. One business owner at the mall said money and mobile phones were taken from bags and purses left behind in the mayhem. The owner insisted on anonymity to avoid retribution from Kenya’s government. Employees of a book shop on the mall’s second floor returned to the corner shop to find cash registers yanked open and the cash gone. The store’s laptops were also stolen. All the shop’s books remained in place, said owner Paku Tsavani. Perhaps reluctant to blame Kenyan security forces, Tsavani said he doesn’t know who took his goods. “Obviously the terrorists wouldn’t steal those things, so we just don’t know,” Tsavani said. Sandeep Vidyarthi went into the mall on Sunday to help a relative retrieve equipment from his dental practice. Inside he said he passed shop after shop that had been looted, including the Rado shop that sells high-end Swiss watches. As he was exiting the mall, Vidyarthi passed a jewelry shop near the front entrance. The owner, Vidyarthi said, was presenting security officials with a long list of missing precious stones and highend necklaces now gone. “The jeweler had written down this very long list,” he said. It is ironic, the management team of one Westgate business told AP, that store owners now must make reports of stolen goods

and present them to security forces, when most here suspect the security forces of having done the thieving. Interior Minister Joseph Ole Lenku confirmed the reports of theft in a news conference Sunday. The majority of the responders to the terrorist attack came from Kenya’s military. A military spokesman didn’t answer repeated calls for comment. “Those responsible for looting will be prosecuted,” Lenku said. The mall attack also saw good Samaritans. Paresh Shah, a volunteer who helped evacuate the injured and the dead during the first day of the attack, said he carried out the body of Aleem Jamal. Shah frowned at the memory and said he saw a Kenyan soldier take Jamal’s cigarettes while in the ambulance. “I could never do that, take a dead man’s cigarettes,” Shah said. Jamal’s family retrieved the body at the morgue, where his wife, Taz Jamal, said her husband’s wallet was missing. A team of terrorists entered Westgate Mall shortly after noon on a busy Saturday, firing guns and throwing grenades. The attackers – the Somali extremist group al-Shabab claimed responsibility – held off Kenya’s military and controlled at least parts of the mall for four days. The mall now has a gaping three-story hole in it from the siege. More than three dozen people remain unaccounted for almost a week after the end of the fourday attack that killed at least 61 civilians and six security forces, the head of the Kenyan Red Cross said Monday. The government contends there are no remaining missing people. “The only way to verify this is when the government declares the Westgate Mall 100 per cent cleared, then we can resolve it,” Red Cross head Abbas Gullet said.

A morgue worker told AP on Monday that six body parts have been found in the rubble. The worker, who insisted on anonymity because he was not authorized to speak about information not yet released, said it wasn’t clear if the parts came from one or multiple bodies. Five terrorists are believed to be under the building’s rubble but no dead hostages, said Interior Minister Lenku on Sunday. Government officials have said 10 to 15 terrorists attacked the mall. Lenku said some attackers might have escaped. “We do not rule out the possibility that when we were evacuating people in the first stages of the operation it is possible some could have slipped out,” he said. FBI agents, along with investigators from Britain, Canada and Germany, are participating in the investigation into the attack and are aiding Kenyan forensic experts. Results are not expected until later this week at the earliest. Kenyan authorities have detained a total of 12 people in connection with the attack under the country’s anti-terrorism laws, including one on Sunday. Three have been set free, including a British man who was reportedly arrested last week as he tried to board a flight from Nairobi to Turkey with a bruised face and while acting suspiciously, the British Foreign Office confirmed Monday. Ndung’u Githinji, chairman of parliament’s foreign relations committee, said officials will “rethink” Kenya’s hospitality in supporting refugee camps, a reference to Dadaab, a refugee camp near Somalia filled with more than 400,000 Somalis. Security officials say some elements in the camp support and facilitate terror attacks.

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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Danish-owned coal cargo ship sails through Northwest Passage Charmaine Noronha

He said it is expected to dock in Finland next week after traversing waters once-impenetrable with TORONTO thick ice. Danish-owned coal-laden Interest in the Northwest cargo ship has sailed through Passage is on the rise as climate the Northwest Passage for the first change is melting Arctic sea ice, time and into the history books creating open waterways. The as the second bulk carrier to navi- melting ice could make it a regugate the Arctic route. lar Atlantic-Pacific shipping lane. The Nordic Orion left Vancou“Climate change is advancver on Sept. 17 carrying 15,000 ing more quickly to the point tonnes of coal. Ed Coll, CEO of where the Northwest Passage has Bulk Partners, an operational become a more viable shipping partner of ship-owner Nordic route, roughly 30 years earlier Bulk Carriers, said Friday that the than most scientists estimated it freighter has passed Greenland. would,” said Michael Byers, an Associated Press

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international law expert at the University of British Columbia. “I don’t celebrate the opening of the Northwest Passage to shipping because it does raise enormous challenges to Canada and for countries around the world in terms of dealing with climate change and its consequences.” Coll said while the reality of melting ice is somewhat unsettling, it has also opened up a new frontier. Canada has laid claim over ownership of the passage but it is joined by Russia, the U.S., and Denmark in drafting claims before a U.N. commission to extend their undersea boundaries into ice-blocked areas. The Nordic Orion will not undermine Canada’s legal position that the Northwest Passage constitutes internal waters, since the

ship has registered its voyage with the Canadian Coast Guard, which means it has received Canada’s permission. It’s been more than four decades since the oil tanker SS Manhattan sailed through the Northwest Passage to test its feasibility as a trade route to deliver Alaskan oil to the U.S. East Coast, avoiding a long trip south to the Panama Canal. But its ice-hampered 1969 journey deterred others and the Americans opted for an oil pipeline to move Alaskan crude south. The Nordic Orion has sailed through the west coast of Greenland – an area Coll described as the most dangerous, hampered with floating icebergs – but he said the vessel incurred only one choke point at Peel Sound in northern Canada in Qikiqtaaluk, Nunavut, leaving it well on its way

to having successfully navigated the passage. The 738-foot (225-metre) long Nordic Orion, a Panamax-sized ship, has a strengthened bulk to cope with floating ice, as well as more steel and other features that make the heavy vessel suitable for the extreme Arctic conditions. By sailing through the Northwest Passage, the Nordic Orion was able to trim about 1,000 nautical miles, which translates to four days, from its usual route through the Panama Canal. It was also able to carry about 25 per cent more coal, given how shallow the canal is. These benefits have resulted in savings of nearly $200,000 said Bulk Partners. “But even if there wasn’t huge savings we would have done it just to do it, to pioneer it,” said Coll.

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Our Conference Funders Yukon Government, Community Development Fund for providing funding to Yukon Food for Learning General Mills – for providing funding to Breakfast Club of Canada

Our Other Supporters Yukon Government, Education – for supporting the project and approving the attendance of their staff Yukon Government , H&SS – for their ongoing support for Yukon’s school food programs

Our Welcomer Jessie Dawson – who opened the conference with a prayer and a welcome to Yukon First Nations Traditional Territory

Our Presenters Melaina Patenaude, Breakfast Club of Canada Emily Kampman, Breakfast Club of Canada Matt Ball, Yukon Agriculture Melissa Fernandez , Whitehorse General Hospital Kim Neufeld, Yukon H&SS, Health Promotions Bruno Bourdache & Linda Casson, Volunteer Benevoles Yukon Gene Batten & Ryan Cummings, Yukon College

Our Participants

3173 Third Avenue, Whitehorse

Phone 667-4275

Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00 to 5:30 • Sat 8:30 to 4:00

Thank you to the school staff, volunteers and school council members, who took the time out of their busy schedules to attend this conference. We would especially like to thank those participants from Yukon’s rural schools. We know it is a long way to come.

Our Hosts Thank you to the Yukon Inn and particularly the catering staff and Manager, Reba Parris Beckett. The food was delicious and the service was exemplary.

Our Moderator & Master of Ceremonies John Wright

Sandi Coleman (CBC)

Our Entertainers and Sound Diyet Dahka Kwaan Junior Dancers Steve Hare Robbyn Chiles

Our Friday Night Celebrants Thank you to everyone who joined us on Friday night for our appreciation evening. Yukon Food for Learning has been so beautifully supported by the Yukon community over the last 15 years. This was our way of saying “thanks” — and if you were not able to join us — our appreciation is just as sincere.

Our Friend and Chair A very special “Thank You” to Sheila Rose for being our inspiration and for reminding us always how important the work that YFFLA does is to the children of the Yukon and how much support we have received over the years from the Yukon community at large. In her wonderful speech at the Friday night Celebration, Sheila thanked everyone who has helped Yukon Food for Learning Association get to where it is today. For our part, we want to thank Sheila for her part in that journey — to steal a line from the iconic film Casablanca — “Here’s looking at you, kid!”


17

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Tainted tells story of Canada’s blood scandal through affected family’s eyes Sheryl Ubelacker The Canadian Press

TORONTO t’s been called one of the worst public health crises in Canadian history – the contaminated blood scandal that left more than 1,000 Canadians infected with HIV and another 30,000 with hepatitis C. Some contracted both. The majority were hemophiliacs who had been given blood products meant to save their lives, but the treatment turned out to be a death warrant not only for many of them, but also for loved ones whom they unwittingly infected. Tainted, a play debuting this week in Toronto, recalls the tragic events through the eyes of a family with three hemophiliac sons who discover they have contracted both deadly diseases from the clotting factor made from contaminated blood. Written by Kat Lanteigne, Tainted is a labour of love for the Toronto-based actor/producer, who was inspired by an extended family member who was infected prior to the overhaul of Canada’s blood system and mandatory screening and treatment of blood donations in 1985. “It had always really haunted me that there was nothing out there in an artistic model to tell the story,” says Lanteigne, 38, who began researching the subject 10 years ago, initially with the idea of producing a film, which she was unable to get off the ground. “And so I realized that if I didn’t do something that it was going to be forgotten because it was highly unlikely that people would click onto Health Canada’s website and download the Krever inquiry.” That inquiry, led by Justice Horace Krever, began in October 1993 and heard two years of testimony about how the federal and provincial governments, the Canadian Red Cross and others had failed to protect the blood supply. Krever’s November 1997 report found government and the Red Cross had no national blood policy, and that no single authority was accountable for the safety of the blood supply. He also concluded Ottawa had acted too slowly to deal with the threat of blood-borne viruses such as HIV and hepatitis C. Krever also slammed the Red Cross for failing to recognize the threat and not implementing an adequate screening program. Perhaps most damning was his finding that the agency had chosen to use up supplies of untreated blood products before switching to those heat-treated to kill infectious pathogens. In fact, 98 vials of untreated blood were sent to Toronto’s

I

Hospital for Sick Children, says Lanteigne. “It’s hard for people to wrap their heads around so many people making so many bad choices,” she says, stressing the scandal is a part of the country’s history that all Canadians need to know about. “It’s really dangerous if we forget stories like the tainted blood crisis and the systemic failings of our system and the level of betrayal that was enacted by our government. Things like that can happen again.” Thousands of Canadians who received tainted blood in the 1970s and ‘80s eventually died from AIDS or complications arising from hepatitis C, including liver failure from cirrhosis or cancer of the liver. As a result of Krever’s report, responsibility for most of Canada’s blood supply was turned over to Canadian Blood Services; Quebec has its own agency, Hema Quebec. In 2004, Ottawa and the provinces announced the first national standards for the quality and safety of the blood system. Lanteigne interviewed families of hemophiliacs who had died and survivors across the country, and spent two years writing “Tainted,” which she describes as a love story. “Tainted is a love story of a family trying to stay intact when the unimaginable happens,” she says. The play follows the family as they contend with illness, death and the fight for compensation and justice. While those infected by contaminated blood did receive some compensation in a controversial agreement with the federal government, three former Canadian health officials, a U.S. pharmaceutical company and one of its former executives were acquitted in 2007 by an Ontario Superior Court judge on charges of criminal negligence.

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What struck Lanteigne most when she spoke to families and survivors was “their incredible ability to forgive.” “That really sat with me because the reality is they’re all gripped in unyielding grief because they lived with the knowledge that many of those infections could have been prevented. And that part never leaves any of them.” Coincidentally, the play comes at a time when the blood supply Colin O’Connor/GromKat Productions/The Canadian Press is facing another threat, she says. Playwright Kat Lanteigne, author of Tainted, about the A U.S. company wants to open Krever inquiry into the tainted blood scandal. private clinics in Canada that would pay donors for plasma, an ingredient in certain drugs. The federal government is deciding whether to grant licences for three clinics in Toronto and Hamilton. News of the would-be clinics was like “kicking dirt in the faces” of those affected by the contaminated blood scandal, says Lanteigne, who has been lobbying with a group of hemophiliacs against their approval. “The reality is that thousands of people across the country are still living with HIV and hepatitis C because of tainted blood. And Canadians are getting buried all the time,” she says of those who continue to succumb to the infections. She believes the blood system should be managed in the most risk-averse manner possible to avoid history repeating itself, and she hopes her play helps drive home that message to politicians. “I hope that once (people) have seen this play that they will connect with their elected officials and demand these paid blood donor clinics do not open in Canada.”

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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013


19

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

LIFE Becoming a man ‘More people are coming out of the closet as being transgendered, and I think people need to hear that there are transgendered people in the Yukon, living here.’ Jacqueline Ronson News Reporter

S

haun LaDue was a fiveyear-old girl when he picked the name “Shaun” for himself. He was 44 before he told anyone. LaDue, a First Nation man from Ross River, is transgendered. He was born with a female body, but feels more comfortable living and identifying as a man. But it took him a long time to come to that realization. “I didn’t tell anybody because the people in my life at the time weren’t listening to me and didn’t really care about me. It was a secret I kept to myself.” It was a counsellor in Vancouver who broke the silence. “One day I talked to a counsellor and said, ‘I’ve had these dreams about being a man all my life.’ “He said, ‘You’re transgender.’ “It was like a light bulb going off. I grabbed a computer and typed in ‘transgender’ and started reading other men’s stories about transitioning, and the knowing that we all seem to have.” LaDue had never heard the word “transgender” before. He finally had a name for the feelings he had been living with his whole life. He started taking testosterone a year ago. He injects himself every Sunday morning. “Your body changes. It masculinizes the body. Your voice deepens. You get muscles.” It also changed the ways he perceived the world, he said. Watching TV, he would notice a deeper identification with male characters, seeing the world a little more clearly through a man’s perspective, said LaDue. Everything has changed for LaDue since coming out as a man, he said. He feels more confident, more comfortable in his own skin. The people in his life have been incredibly supportive, he said. “I haven’t lost any friends. My ex-husband said, ‘It’s about time you came out.’ He’s my best friend. My ex-girlfriend, now she calls me her brother, her big brother.” He came out to his family

Mike Thomas/Yukon News

Shaun LaDue is a transgendered man from Ross River. “I’ve had these dreams about being a man all my life,” he said.

and community in Ross River through a letter to his brother. “The letter explained very specifically what I was going to do, and that my name was now Shaun. Explaining about HRT, hormone replacement therapy, and about the surgeries I was going to be undergoing in the future. I explained that I was a lousy woman but I was a good human being, and I was meant to be a man.” He told his brother to share the letter with anyone he thought should see it.

“I think he took it around to everybody in the community.” He was nervous coming home for the first time after that, he said. “I hitchhiked home. I was walking on crutches back then, because I had a minor nerve conduction problem, I wasn’t walking real stable. “My aunt’s man picked me up, and he recognized me. “He said, ‘Oh, you’re Shaun.’ “I went, ‘Yeah.’ “‘Oh, good to see you again.’ “Everybody said they loved

me, and they accepted me for who I am. They were proud that I was willing to come home and show them that this is who I am.” Growing up wasn’t easy for LaDue. He was taken from his parents as a baby, and adopted into a “very destructive household,” he said. “I bounced through life for quite a while, just going from one plan to the next. I was in the army for a while, I was in university for a while, just

going back and forth, and not sure what I wanted to do.” LaDue eventually graduated from the Yukon Native Teacher’s Education Program, he said. He did teaching stints in Yukon, South Korea, and British Columbia. He returned to Ross River and taught at that community’s Yukon College campus. Now he splits his time between Ross River and Vancouver, mostly for health reasons, he said. He is a writer and an actor. LaDue is working with a new television comedy, The Switch, about living as a trans person in Canada. He also has written a chapter for an upcoming book, Manning Up: Transexual Men on Finding Brotherhood, Family & Themselves. He wants more people to hear his story, especially here in the Yukon, he said. “More people are coming out of the closet as being transgendered, and I think people need to hear that there are transgendered people in the Yukon, living here. I think the government needs to know it, too, so they can have a transgender health program.” He doesn’t know any other trans people from the Yukon, he said. But they have always been here. “I know a story from a long time ago, that there were transgendered people living amongst the Kaska people. “It was usually a ceremony where, when a family had too many daughters, the girls who were closest to the age of about five were part of a dance that happened where they had two blankets. “On one blanket they had all men’s tools and on another blanket they had all the women’s tools. And the girls would be danced around these two blankets. The girls would pick up the tools that called to them. “The girl that picked up men’s tools, from that day on, she would be raised up as a boy, as a man. And she’d even be given a wife. That couple would be given any orphan children to raise up.” Forty years late, finally, LaDue is coming home. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com


20

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

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Yukon News

Formation en maquillage : transformations fantaisistes Cette formation vous permet d’apprendre des techniques de maquillage pour enfant. Samedi 5 octobre, de 9 h à 17 h au Centre de la francophonie. Apportez votre repas. Rens. : Suzanne 668-2663, poste 223 scaron@afy.yk.ca Minibibliothèque roulante Ce service de minibibliothèque roulante est offert aux personnes isolées, à mobilité réduite ou en résidence de soins prolongés des environs de Whitehorse. Pour une visite à la maison, vous pouvez contacter l’AFY, jusqu’au 13 décembre. Rens. : Suzanne (867) 668-2663, poste 223; scaron@afy.yk.ca Location de salles pour spectacle Vous cherchez un lieu pour vos rassemblements en plein centre-ville? Louez la salle communautaire du Centre de la francophonie pour des spectacles, évènements ou réunions et bénéficiez d’un projecteur et d’un écran, d’un système de son, d’une cuisine tout équipée, et d’une connexion WiFi. Pour en savoir plus, consultez : www.sify-yukon.ca Rens. : SIFY 668-2663, poste 550; sify@afy.yk.ca Expo formation, carrière et bénévolat 2013 Vous cherchez un emploi ? Vous considérez poursuivre vos études ? Vous souhaitez découvrir des opportunités de bénévolat ? Explorez les possibilités que le Yukon peut vous offrir à l’Expo formation, carrière et bénévolat 2013! Le jeudi 10 octobre de 10 h 30 à 17 h, venez rencontrer des institutions scolaires, des employeurs et une variété d’organismes qui peuvent vous appuyer et vous orienter dans vos démarches. Expo gratuite au Collège du Yukon. Rens. : 456-4304; executivedirector@volunteeryukon.ca Fantômes franco-yukonnais L’éditeur du What’s Up Yukon est à la recherche d’un fantôme francophone ! Le 31 octobre, il y aura une série d’articles dans le journal sur des fantômes qui hantent les demeures yukonnaises. Si vous avez une histoire d’un fantôme chez vous, contactez Geneviève Doyon. Rens. : 668-2663, poste 214; immigration@afy.yk.ca

Retrouvez votre association francophone sur Facebook : AFY.Yukon Présentée par l’Association franco-yukonnaise 302, rue Strickland, Whitehorse (Yukon) Y1A 2K1 Tél. : (867) 668-2663 Courriel : afy@afy.yk.ca www.afy.yk.ca

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Spectacle One/Un GAGNEZ DES BILLETS pour le spectacle One/Un d’Orange Noyée, en français le jeudi 10 octobre. Découvrez une pièce sur le multiculturalisme, l’identité et les origines, de Téhéran à Montréal. Pour participer, envoyer avant le vendredi 4 octobre votre nom et vos coordonnées à immigration@afy.yk.ca. Café-rencontre Franco50 Pour souligner la Journée internationale des personnes aînées, Franco50 vous invite au lancement de ses nouveaux programmes. Joignez-vous au Café-rencontre du vendredi 4 octobre pour prendre part à une soirée de jeux et de discussions sur la sensibilisation et la prévention d’abus et d’exploitation envers les personnes aînées. Repas dès 17 h, présentation à 18 h 30. Rens. : Patricia 668-2663, poste 320; pbrennan@afy.yk.ca

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Girls: Dates:

FH Collins Secondary School Friday October 11, 7:00 to 9:00 PM, Saturday Oct. 12 10:00 AM to noon and 1:00 to 3:00 PM. Saturday October 12, 2:00 to 4:30 PM, Sunday Oct. 13 10:00 AM to noon.

WHERE DO I GET THE NEWS? The Yukon News is available at these wonderful stores in Whitehorse:

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013

23

Yukon News

Let visiting relatives do their laundry if they wish

by Judith Martin

MISS

MANNERS DEAR MISS MANNERS: My husband and I disagree on the subject of what constitutes a house guest overstepping the line when it comes to laundry. His family comes to visit us once a year — usually for one week — and he feels it’s OK for them to have unlimited laundry privileges. They will want to do a load about every other day, and always right before leaving, which makes me feel taken advantage of. For the time span of their visit, I feel like one load is plenty — two would be the max if there was an unexpected problem. Please let us know what is appropriate. GENTLE READER: You really dislike your in-laws, don’t you?

As Miss Manners understands it, they visit once a year for a week, so laundry every second day would be four times a year — at most. Apparently they do not ask you to do it, but only to use your washing machine. Small acts of sabotage are unlikely to curb these visits. These are your husband’s relatives, and he disapproves of your ploy. It will only make you look petty and inhospitable, to him as well as to them. DEAR MISS MANNERS: I am a senior citizen who is quite often unseated on public transportation by someone younger and fitter than I am. Yesterday, after I had taken the last seat, I noticed that someone even older and less fit than I was being outraced by a man in his early 20s. I stood up and gave the loser of the race my seat. So far, so good, as far as my behavior was concerned. Now the evil part: I was really tempted to say to the young man who had won the race, “If you’re disabled, please keep your seat,” or “If you’re disabled, don’t get up. I’ll give her my seat.” Later, as I sat there watching him in his oblivion, I wanted to whip

out my camera and ask, “Do you because you would be pretending to your impulses to be rude and came mind if I take a picture of you sitting be correcting the very behavior you up with a way of allowing the couple beneath the sign saying, ‘The law to vacate their seats without being are practicing. requires you to make seats available embarrassed. Congratulations. But you didn’t. You squelched to seniors and persons with disabilities’?” Once, when I was really tired and Ta’an Kwäch’än council traveling with someone 10 years older than I am, I actually told a invites TKc citizens to attend: young couple, “Thanks for saving Referendum Community these seats for us. You can get up now.” (They did.) Consultations What can I do to keep myself from behaving in a way that Miss wednesday, october 9th at 6 p.m Manners would not approve — or a at the Mount Mcintyre centre way that will get me shot? GENTLE READER: If you are wednesday, october 30th at 6 p.m shot, you may take comfort in at the old Fire hall knowing that the shooter was behaving worse than you. If, however, you decided that the behavior of others Please join us for supper and discussions. justifies your retaliating in kind, you would be no better. Worse, Miss Manners would say,

For more information contact: Communications Coordinator Samantha Dawson at the TKC administration office: (867) 668-3613 ext. 253 or by email: sdawson@taan.ca

The new Yukon home of

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Monday to Friday WHITEHORSE 9:00 to 11:30 a.m. at Selkirk Elementary School 12:30 to 3:00 p.m. at Hidden Valley Elementary School PELLY CROSSING 9:00 to 11:30 a.m. at Eliza Van Bibber School WATSON LAKE 12:30 to 3:00 p.m. at Johnson Elementary School

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24

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

SPORTS AND

RECREATION

In retirement, Olympian Jeane Lassen pumps up weightlifting club Tom Patrick

placing eighth in the 75-kilogram division, is now working towards rebuilding the sport hitehorse’s Jeane Lasin Yukon. sen has lifted millions When she took up weightof kilograms over her career, lifting in Whitehorse, there now she has her sights set on was a weightlifting club that elevating the sport of weight- has since dissolved. In the lifting in her community. latter part of her career she The former Olympian is trained more or less on her working towards establishing own at Whitehorse’s Better a weightlifting club in White- Bodies gym. But that’s not the horse now that she recently same as training with coaches decided to retire from compe- and other athletes at a facility tition. specifically geared towards the “I knew this time that it’s sport, said Lassen. over because it’s been so long “In the ‘80s and ‘90s there since I’ve been able to have an was a pretty strong club in actual training routine,” said Whitehorse,” said Lassen. Lassen. “I hurt my back most “Now that I’m done my carecently in August. I didn’t reer, I want to get that going even pick a weight up, I was again. just bending down to pick “We even had two other it up and I hurt it. So that’s Commonwealth (Games) when I went, OK, this is getmedalists. That’s a pretty huge ting bad.” thing for a town our size, to The 33-year-old has strug- have three medalists at the gled with back injuries for the Commonwealth Games (inlast 15 years. A back injury cluding) Emily Quarton and sidelined Lassen from 2000 to Scott McCarthy. 2003. “We’ve been really fortunMore recently, herniated ate to have Better Bodies for and bulged discs in her back quite a number of years, but kept her from competing at we haven’t had a coach or the 2012 Canadian Senior several people all training Weightlifting Championships, together. It’s just been a few of which eliminated her chance us loners over in the corner.” at making Canada’s weightliftThe club she plans to create ing team at the 2012 London doesn’t yet have a name, but it Olympic Games. Lassen was does have a location. still named an alternate for At the start of last month, the team based on previous the Yukon government and performances. Sport Yukon announced the “It wasn’t lifting weights launch of a pilot program that did that to me,” said based on the Canadian Sport Lassen. “It was lifting weights School program used in Britwhen my back wasn’t mobile ish Columbia. The program, enough for that day of trainwhich will take place at F.H. ing, which happens more fre- Collins Secondary School, quently when you don’t have provides select students the the proper treatments in place opportunity to split school for high performance sport.” days between athletic training Lassen hoped to continue and academics. competing at the start of the F.H. Collins has granted summer, but continuing back Lassen permission to use its problems made that impracweight room that will also tical. be used for the sport school “Every time I thought my program. back would be doing better, it Lassen, who is the physical would be some silly thing, like literacy co-ordinator at sitting at a desk for too long, Sport Yukon, played a part in that would completely flare introducing the sport school it up,” said Lassen. “It wasn’t program to the territory. even lifting weights that She became an advocate of would irritate it. I realized the program after seeing it this pain could be forever if I firsthand while training and didn’t take better care of my studying in B.C. health. I’ll still train for fun, “When I first went down to but there’s not going to be big Victoria in 2011 to go back to weights for me.” school and train for London Lassen, who competed for (Olympics), they had (the Canada at the 2008 Olymprogram) at the Canadian pic Games in Beijing, China, Sport Institute I was trainNews Reporter

W

Games for Team Yukon as mission staff made me go, ‘Holy, this is the best thing ever, I’ve got to make a comeback.’” After her first Canada Games experience, Lassen went on to become the first female to compete at six junior world championships before competing at a total of seven senior world championships. She won medals at both, including bronze for overall and silver in the clean and jerk at the 2006 senior worlds. Lassen also won gold and set a Games record at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne, Australia, in the 69-kilogram class. She captured a total of nine medals at Pan American Championships between 2000 and 2008 and won 15 medals at the University World Championships between 1999 and 2005. Following her 2011 comeback, Lassen lifted silver at the Canadian Senior Weightlifting Championships and took 15th at the World Weightlifting Championships. Weightlifting has even beRandall J. Strossen/IronMind come a family affair. Lassen’s Whitehorse’s Jeane Lassen competes at the 2011 World mother, Moira, was elected Weightlifting Championships in France. Lassen recently to the International Weightretired from competition but plans to establish a lifting Federation’s executive Whitehorse weightlifting club. board last May. She is the first together the year before when woman on the federation’s ing at,” said Lassen. “When I I moved down to Vancouver,” executive board in its 108-year saw these kids doing sprinthistory. she said. ing, and gymnastics, doing “The cool thing about Lassen was born in Victoria tumbling work, and Olympic weightlifting is it’s accessible and moved to Whitehorse lifting, I was blown away. to all ages, abilities and sizes, “The other Olympians and while in Grade 4. She took up so we want to have a club that I were watching a lot of these weightlifting a couple years has all skill levels,” said Lassen. later at age 12. kids train and were like, ‘If “The goal is to get people to The Canada Games twice only we had that when we understand the sport more played a major role in her were kids,’ because they were and if they so choose, they can career. She first realized her learning about injury mancompete. We’re going to get potential after winning silver agement, proper nutrition, some stuff going with the Alwarm-up/cool down, all these at the 1995 Canada Winter Games in Grande Prairie, Alta. askan association because they amazing things. just started holding Alaskan at the age of 14. “Ever since then, I’ve been After retiring from compe- championships. going on to everyone who will listen about how cool this tition in 2009, Lassen decided “The reason I started was to to return to the sport when set-up is.” get better at other sports. All inspired by the spirit of com- the athletes that train at the When the new club gets petition she felt as a mission rolling, not only will its athCanadian Sport Institute that letes have a former world-class staffer for the Yukon women’s are Olympians in other sports, hockey team at the 2011 Can- do lifting to train because it lifter to mentor them, Lassen ada Winter Games in Halifax. has such a high transferability has also shown her cachet as “(The 1995 Games) was a coach. She helped coach to other sports.” the major hook for me,” said Canada’s Christine Girard, More information on who won a bronze at the 2012 Lassen. “That Canada Games the Whitehorse club can be will always be one of my best London Olympics. It was the obtained through email to first Olympic medal for Can- memories. yukonweightlifting@gmail. “I did stop (competing) ada in women’s weightlifting com. after the Olympics, and going in almost three decades. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com back to the (2011) Canada “We started working


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

25

Yukon News

Squash season opens with handicap tourney Tom Patrick

Are you mulling over job market ideas?

News Reporter

Interested in furthering your education?

in the junior division with a 57-43 win over ne point made all the differKatrina Dobush. ence at the end of the Dust It was WilliamOff the Shoes squash tournament son’s first tourat Better Bodies Whitehorse on nament win. Saturday. The 12-yearUsually a player needs to win old has been by two points, but not in a timed playing for just tournament. In a close, timed one year. Friends match it pays to know how much is from Elijah left on the clock. Smith Elemen“There’s a bit of strategy there,” tary, where he said Kyle Marchuk. “I heard some- attends school, one yell ‘30 seconds’ and in the last convinced him point when I was up by one, I was to take up the lobbing the ball, keeping it slow, sport. making sure the point wasn’t over Williamson right away.” tried to keep Marchuk ran the clock out Dobush on the to win Division 1 of the tournarun, he said. ment, which marked the launch “Movement,” of Squash Yukon’s 2013-14 season. explained WilHe won 33-32 over runner-up Kai liamson. “I tried Knorr in the final. to make her “That was my first time playmove as much as Tom Patrick/Yukon News ing Kai, and the guy hustles like no I could.” Kyle Marchuk winds up for a backhand durone I’ve seen,” said Marchuk. “The Dylan Massie ing the final of the season-opening Dust guy gets to everything. When they placed third Off the Shoes tournament at Better Bodies keep it in play, it doesn’t have to with a win over Whitehorse on Saturday. Marchuk defeated be a great shot or anything. It just Christine Miral Kai Knorr in the final. makes you make one more shot in the junior and you never know, you can make division’s bronze Squash Yukon plans to hold the an unforced error, which happens match. Early Bird Squash Tournament in often.” Kayden King was first in the the middle of October. Within the tournament’s handi- junior consolation with a win over Contact Tom Patrick at cap format lower ranked players Emily Johnson. tomp@yukon-news.com were given a certain amount of points to begin with when playing higher ranked players. The winner was decided by who had the most points at the end of 17-minute time slots. 2013/2014 Dart League Knorr was given an eight-point lead at the start of the final. Registration “It was definitely much tougher When: Wednesday, October 9/13 • Time: 7:00 - 9:00 PM • Cost: $50 than I was expecting,” said Knorr. Where: Whitehorse Curling Club • League Play Starts October16/13 “I think this was the first time I’ve For More InFo ContaCt: played him and it was definitely a Tim McLachlan @ 633-6804 • John Hadvick @ 667-2464 neck-to-neck competition. “I think it was a pretty decent tournament for the beginning of FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY CLOSE TO HOME the season. “No one has made me work that hard in a long time. Mixing up his shots. Usually I can’t be deceived that much – lots of drops and lobs General and Cosmetic Dentistry •Full Range of Denture Options were tricking me.” Dylan Letang placed third in First Nations/Status Insurance Accepted Division 1 with a win over Lori Muir. Dental Implants • Crowns, Bridges, Veneers The Division 2 final didn’t end Assignment of Insurance Accepted • Oral Sedation Available with a one-point gap but a more dramatic comeback. ZOOM! Teeth Whitening • Dental Surgery “He was killing me. It was game over,” said winner Jodi Tuton. Or so she thought. Tuton fought back from down 11-1 to defeat finalist Matt Brown 42-39 for the division title. The two players, who are also co-workers, had the same handicap and therefore began the match at 0-0. “Matt and I play together often and so I told myself I couldn’t give Now Accepting New Patients up,” said Tuton. “So I had to give him a good enough game to beat 867-668-3909 me and somehow I came back.” Andre Benoit snagged third www.alderbrookdental.com with a win over Shirley Chua. Jen 202-A Strickland St. Meurer won the consolation round, Whitehorse, Yukon topping Doug Dawley in the final. Isaac Williamson claimed first

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Rendezvous Rotary Club

22nd Annual

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Yukon Convention Centre at the Coast High Country Inn

Thursday, October 24, 2013 7:00 pm to 9:30 pm

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26

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

ANNIE'S

COMICS

MAILBOX

ADAM

Dear Annie: My mother-in-law and her husband moved in with us 10 years ago. They even built an addition onto our house, from which we will gain financially if we ever sell it. During this time, I’ve enjoyed Mom’s help with our two kids and the freedom it gives my husband and me. We enjoy childfree vacations every year and go out to dinner without the kids four times a week. My mother-in-law takes care of all the childcare in our home. My husband and I rarely do any parenting except to enjoy our time with the kids and bask in all the extra achievements they have gained as a result of having four loving parents. The problem is that my husband has two siblings, and my mother-in-law has never done anything for them. She has never even babysat her other grandchildren. She hardly knows the youngest in the family, and I am now ashamed that I have monopolized her time and love. I feel terrible when I’m with my sisters-in-law. I have gained so much while they have had to pay for childcare all these years and struggle through the typical childhood problems without assistance. Their children barely know their Grandma. What can I do about it now? I want to express my feelings to my sisters-in-law, but I am not sure what to say. I feel terrible around them. Please help. — Monica Dear Monica: Chances are, your sisters-in-law have a relationship with Mom that is more complicated than yours. They may not get along as well. Or they may wish she were closer to their children, but might not be interested in having Mom and her husband live with them. It’s OK to tell them that you wish Mom spent more time with their kids and ask what you can do about it. But also encourage Mom to see her other grandchildren more often. Invite the families to your home (but do not expect Mom to babysit all those children). You are in a position to facilitate a better relationship. We hope everyone will cooperate.

DILBERT

Kakuro

Sudoku

By The Mepham Group

Level: Moderate

By The Mepham Group Level: 1

2

3

4

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Tuesday’s puzzle

Solution to Tuesday’s puzzle

No digit can be repeated in a solution, so a 4 can only produce 1 and 3, never 2 and 2. Solution published tomorrow. © 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

7/17/13

7/17/13

To solve Kakuro, you must enter a number between 1 and 9 in the empty squares. The clues are the numbers in the white circles that give the sum of the solution numbers: above the line are across clues and below the line are down clues. Thus, a clue of 3 will produce a solution of 2 and 1 and a 5 will produce 4 and 1, or 2 and 3, but, of course, which squares they go in will depend on the solution of a clue in the other direction.

© 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

COMICS THE OTHER COAST

BOUND AND GAGGED

BREWSTER ROCKET

27

Yukon News

RUBES速

by Leigh Rubin


28

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Kids Korner Younger kids can enjoy Uncle Art’s Funland, while older ones can test their knowledge with Shortcuts.

This edition of Shortcuts is This sponsored by Billy Crystal. cartoon gets nlike most other domestic my goat. I like livestock, goats are able to thrive my movie, but in harsh environments, such as the book was mountains and deserts, with dry, better. rocky terrain and very little plant life. That is probably one of the Goats have reasons why the goat became Most two hoofed one of the first animals species of toes on each to be domesticated goats have foot. by humans more horns. Knock, knock. than 9,000 Who's there? years ago. Goat. Both male Goat, who? and female The smallest breeds Go to the front door goats have of goats, such as the because someone is Pakistani dwarf and knocking. beards. the African pygmy, Goats are What do may weigh less than extremely good climbers goats have that no 9 kg (20 lbs.). other animal has? and can easily scale obstacles Goats eat a wide variety of vegetation, Baby goats. such as cliffs, buildings The mountain goat, including bushes, leaves and tree bark. Some breeds of and fences. found in northeastern They will even eat plants with thorns. goats, such as the angora North America, is and cashmere, are raised to produce Goats do not have incisor teeth on their not a true goat. It Millions of people very high quality wool. The wool upper jaw. Instead, they have a hard pad that is classified as a around the world drink goat’s produced by an angora goat is used to hold vegetation in place while the goat-antelope. milk. For some people, goat’s milk is called “mohair.” goat uses its lower teeth to tear it off. is easier to digest than An adult cow’s milk. The largest male goat is called T U N D R A E X P L O R E species of goat is a “buck,” or “billy goat.” Can you find the hidden words? A P I O N E R R O X A R Y An adult female is called a the ibex. Some grow to Search carefully because some O K E E F E L O N G E R S weigh nearly 140 kg “doe, ” or “nanny goat. ” A words are backward or diagonal. G Y M M O O W I G M O B S (310 lbs.). young goat is called CASHMERE DOE BILLY E Y E D O L D S H N N A I a “kid. ” ANGORA BREED A L L E H H R S H E A R S MOHAIR NANNY HORNS BEARD

WOOL GOAT HOOF BUCK

TOES IBEX BOB PAD KID

A L S E O T A L K S N O B P I E R P C E I B E N D U A B N B A N B O R N Y E C E S H A D O B R A N D S K

Can you spot all six differences between these two scenes?

Why is it hard to have a conversation with a goat? They’re always butting in.

What do you call a goat on a mountain? A hill-billy.

GAME ANSWERS: 1. Mountain is missing. 2. Snow is different. 3. Flower is moved. 4. Horns are smaller. 5. Tail is missing. 6. Ear is different.

For more information on goats, check out these books: “Goats” by Ann Larkin Hansen (Checkerboard Library) or “Goats” by Justine Ciovacco (Gareth Stevens). www.shortcutscomic.com

Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc.

© Jeff Harris 2012

2/18


29

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

ENTER YOUR COLOURING FOR A CHANCE TO WIN!

WINNERS… Up to five years

Trinity Schwalm Six to eight years

Hannah Phillips Nine to twelve years

Adrian Schwalm

Name:_________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________ ______________________________________________ Phone: ________________________________________ Age Up to five Six to eight Nine to years years twelve years Group:

ENTER YOUR DRAWING FOR A CHANCE TO WIN!

WINNERS... Up to five years

Olivia Halliday

Six to eight years

Madison Sutherland

Nine to twelve years

Donald Halliday

Congratulations to our winners and runners-up and good luck to those of you entering next week’s competition. Open to kids up to age 12. Entries for this week’s contests must be received by 12 pm next Monday in order to appear in next week’s paper. If your entry arrives late (which may happen with out-of-town entries), it will be judged along with the contestants from the following week. Please limit entries to ONE PER CHILD PER WEEK. The contests are divided into three age groups: Up to five years, Six to eight years, Nine to twelve years. Drawings for the drawing contest must be on a separate piece of paper and reproducible on a photocopier to win. (Black and white drawings on white paper are easier to reproduce.) Winners will receive their prizes by mail so be sure to include your complete address! Please note that only winning entries will be returned. Winners receive Gift Certificates for the “Dollar Store with More”.

Entries for both contests should be dropped off or mailed to:

211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2E4.


30

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

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www.yukon-news.com • 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2E4 • Phone: (867) 667-6285 • Fax: (867) 668-3755 For Rent ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com $550, $750, $850, ROOMS. BACHELORS. 1-BDRMS. Clean, bright, furnished, all utilities incl, laundry facilities. Close to college & downtown. Bus stop, security doors. Live-in manager. 667-4576 or Email: barracksapt@hotmail.com HOBAH APARTMENTS: Clean, spacious, walking distance downtown, security entrance, laundry room, plug-ins, rent includes heat & hot water, no pets. References required. 668-2005 SKYLINE APTS: 2-bdrm apartments, Riverdale. Parking & laundry facilities. 667-6958 WEEKEND GET AWAY Rustic Cabin-45 minutes from town Hiking Trails in the summer Skiing in the winter Includes sauna. Reasonable rates. Rent out by the week or for a weekend. 867-821-4443 ARE YOU New to Whitehorse? Pick up a free Welcome to Whitehorse package at The Smith House, 3128-3rd Ave. Information on transit, recreation programs, waste collection & diversion. 668-8629 1-BDRM WALK-OUT bsmt suite in Porter Creek, w/private bath, kitchen, & laundry, n/s, avai Dec 1-April 30, $900/mon. 335-1230 2-BDRM HOUSE on Hotsprings Rd available October 1, $1,000/mon + utilities. 633-6178 LARGE 12X24 furnished room in Porter Creek, private entrance. Available immed, $750/mon + DD. 668-7213 3-BDRM GRANGER condo, available immediately, N/S, N/P, refs reqʼd. $1,650/mon + utils. 335-8640 RIVERDALE: FURNISHED room, N/S, N/P, no drinking, clean, quiet home, serious inquiries only, $600/mon. 667-2452 CABIN IN Judas Creek (March Lake)  for rent. $450/mon. 660-4813 SMALL ROOM in Northland, smoking home. 668-4776 between 4pm-7pm

HAINES, ASLASKA! Swan View Rental Cabins Right on the lake! 50 kms north of Haines, Alaska. www.tourhaines.com/lodging Ask about our special rates for Yukoners. (907)766-3576 3-BDRM IN Crestview.  Bright, above-ground, lower level of landscaped home.   $1300/mon + utilities.  No smoking, no pets, no parties.  Refs & damage deposit reqʼd. 667-4858

Office Space fOr LeaSe Above Starbucks on Main Street.

344 Sq. Ft. • $25 per sq.ft./Gross • Avail. June 1st Additional 344 sq.ft. • Avail. Oct. 1st

Sandor@yukon.net 501B OGILVIE. 2-bdrm basement, kitchen & bath, N/S, N/P, no parties, incls heat & elec, $1,200/mon + $900 DD. 334-3735 COPPER RIDGE, 1 or 2 bdrm, basement, bright, separate entrance, shared laundry. Nw hardwd floors. N/S, N/P, 1 min to bus, available September, $1,300/mon includes utilites TV incl. 334-7872 BACHELOR APT downtown. Heat, lights, basic cable inclʼd. Fully furnished, laundry facilities, N/P, no parties, $875/mon. 668-5558 1-BDRM APT downtown, available Oct 1, fully furnished, utils inclʼd, responsible tenant, N/P, $950/mon. 668-5558 ROOOMMATE WANTED to share waterfront home aty Matrsh Lk. Ski trails, close to community center. Animals welcome. N/S. $500/mon share utilities. 660-4321 3-BDRM HOUSE, Porter Creek, lg deck & carport. Available Oct 1.  $1500/mon plus utilities. NO Pets. Non Smokers. Landlord shares property. Call 335-8815 LARGE 1-BDRM apt in Crestview, N/S, shared wood heat, quiet place for 1 person, partly furnished, all inclusive, $800/mon. 633-2455 BRIGHT 1-BDRM suite, Porter Creek. Full bath, in suite laundry, attached greenhouse, on bus route, Oct 1. $840/mth + utilities, non-smokers only. suites@auroramusic.ca or 604-595-4895 Available Now Newly renovated OFFICE SPACE & RETAIL SPACE Close to Library & City Hall A short walk to Main Street Phone 633-6396

FOR LEASE

Call 867-333-0144

RENDEZVOUS PLAZA on Lewes Blvd, Riverdale Lots of parking 4,000 sq ft (previously child care centre) 1,100 sq ft (previously flower shop, studio) 7,000 sq ft (previously Frazerʼs) Call 667-7370 2500 sq ft bldg on Strickland at 2nd, suitable for retail or office.  Well maintained. Asking $18.72/sq.ft. triple net (approx. $3,900/mon) for long term lease.  Incls 6 parking spaces. 334-5464 1200 SQ ft newer shop/studio for lease in Marwell, available October 1. $15/sq ft. Check out Kijiji Whitehorse Ad ID 510028138 for more details. Or 668-3408 IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY.  Country residential 3-bdrm garden suite.  Large fenced yard for dogs.  Smokers OK.  Primary heat wood; propane backup.  Greenhouse; wood shed. On water delivery. $1600/mon. 633-5499. RIVERDALE 3-BDRM, 1.5-bathrm Townhouse: no smoking, no pets, deposit req, $1450/mon + heat & utilities. Perfect for professionals! Available for leasing Oct 1. 335-8617. DOWNTOWN OFFICE for rent Main floor sunny office with hardwood floors, ensuite and storage closets. 280 square feet $750/mon includes electricity 456-8004 SUBLET: NOV 1 thru Apr 30. Beautiful 2-bdrm, 1-bath, fully furnished suite. Riverdale. Incl. utilities, laundry, all appl incl dishwasher, private entrance. Big windows, newly reno'd. n/s, no dogs. $1450/mon. 335-0305 $400 FURNISHED room.  Separate entrance. 1/2 bathroom. No shower.  1/2 kitchen.  Immaculate, tiny and bright.  $300DD NP/NS/Nopets   Single ONLY.  Utilities included.  In Northland. Sheltered parking. Claire 456-7833 $1100 ALL inclusive (heat, utilities, electric, tv, internet) 1-bdrm, bsmnt suite.  The suite is two years old with a brand new bathrm.  No pets, no smoking. Info: 867-334-3044 1-BDRM IN Crestview for female. $625/mon all inclusive. Clean, private, fenced yard, deck. Pets negotiable. Trails and bus stop nearby. 335-2083

1-BDRM SUITE in Copper Ridge, available Oct 1st, N/S, N/P. $950/mon includes cable. Damage deposit & refs reqʼd. 867-335-8089 HOUSE TO share, downtown. Yard, parking, pet & party welcome. No couples, only easy going person. $675/mon + electricity. Marie 334-4526 aft 6:30pm 3-BDRM, 1.5 bath home on acreage, utilities, sat internet included. 15 minutes from Whse. Caretaker on site. N/S Pets considered. $2,250/mon DD & refs reqʼd. 780-915-2940 AVAILABLE NOV 1st - 1/2 Duplex for rent. Located in Takhini East, close to Yukon College, CGC, downtown, and outdoor trails.  $1300/mon + utilities. N/S N/P.  Mature person(s) preferred. 336-0444 YUKON APTS 28 Lewes Blvd now taking applications for 2-bdrm. Heat, cable, electric included. Available mid Oct.  667-4076 .55KM OUT of Whitehorse, 24x15 cabin, 2 floors, fully equipped fridge, Toyo stover. Beautiful view. For more details 633-2156 CABIN 24X12, 40 minutes out of Whitehorse, fully equipped, fridge, woodstove. For more details 633-2156 FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted, downtown house. Electricity, cable & heat included (laundry & kitchen facilites). Must be clean, responsible, hold a job. Refs reqʼd. 668-5185 dys, or 667-7840 eves/wkends. $630/mon 1-BDRM FULLY handicapped access, downtown, N/P, N/S, available Oct 1. 633-3940 aft 3pm. AVAILABLE OCT 1st, 2-bdrm bsmnt suite, Granger area. Newly renovated, seperate entrance. Kitchen & laundry. $1700/mon includes utilities & backup baseboard heating. Refs & damage deposit reqʼd. 334-9788 or kennyjdliu@hotmail.com PORTER CREEK TWO BDRMS w/own bathrm, living rm, shared kitchen. Includes internet, TV, Bell satellite, $550/mon & $575/mon. N/P. Nov 1. 334-4113 1-BDRM CABIN on Annie Lake Rd. Electricity, no running water but water/showers nearby, wood heat, pets negotiable. Available Oct 15th. $650/mon + DD. 334-8271 TAGISH, 3 bdrm, 1-1/2 bath house on 1 acre, lg liv, din, kit, laundry, fenced yd, propane furn, 2 wood stoves, septic, water del, all amenities, school bus to Carcross. $800/mon+utils+dd. N/S in house, pets OK. 633-6060 MOBILE FOR rent on shared private property. 3 bdrms, 2 baths. Looking for 1-2 people max, no parties, no smoking, no pets. $1,400/mon. 633-2498

2-BDRM APT, Riverdale. Available for rent November 1st. Apartment is brand new (built last year) on greenbelt. $1200/mon. N/S. 393-2377

1-BDRM APT downtown, $900/mon+elec, no pets, no smoking inside the unit. Refs & dd reqʼd. Avai Oct 1. 334-9087

DOWNTOWN, BRIGHT, clean, 1-bdrm apt on 2nd floor. Hillcrest 1-bdrm apt, heat and hot water included. Available Oct 1. 668-2416

ROOM FOR rent downtown, new condo within walking distance of all amenities, modern facilities. $750/mon inclʼs utils & internet & dd. 335-2417

for rent for rent

Beautifully finished office space is available in the Taku Building at 309 Main Street. This historic building is the first L.E.E.D. certified green building in Yukon. It features state of the art heat and ventilation, LAN rooms, elevator, bike storage, shower, accessibility and more.

FULLY FURNISHED room in Copper Ridge. Close to amenities.  Includes utilities, cable, internet and more. Available immediately. $635/mon. 456-7855

Approx. 270 sq ft

1140 sq.ft. Corner of 4th & Olgilvie

4198 Fourth Avenue

For more details call: 403-861-4748

of high-end rental space with fantastic view available immediately. Elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, large windows, lots of natural light.

Please call Kevin at 334-6575 for more information.

Approx. 1650 sq ft

of high-end rental space available immediately. Independent HVAC system, elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, move-in ready.

Please call Kevin at 334-6575 for more information.

3-BDRM, 2-BATH home in Copper Ridge. Has large office, double car garage & lots of parking for RV, boat, motorhome etc. $1,700+utils or $2,000 all inclusive. Kristi 335-3428 3-BDRM, 1-1/2 bath in triplex, Riverdale, $1,700/mon. Kristi 335-3428 NICELY FURNISHED room for rent. Incl small fridge, sat TV, laundry & kitchen privileges, close to bus stop, refs&dd reqʼd, $750/mon, avai imme, smoking permitted in designated areas. 335-2231 after 6pm 1-BDRM ABOVE ground bsmt suite, Porter Creek, $900/mon inclʼs heat & power. W&D, n/s, 1 small dog OK, avai Nov 1. 633-4136 2-BDRM CABIN, wood heat, elec, internet, phone, no running water, 1/2 hr from town, n/s, n/p, refs reqʼd, $800/mon+utils, avai Nov 1. 660-5545 RIVERDALE 3-BDRM main floor suite. N/S, N/P, 1yr lease. $1,500/mon + utils + sec deposit. Refs reqʼd. 667-2452 AVAILABLE NOV 1st, Riverdale 4-bdrm, 2-bath house, laundry, carport, DD reqʼd, N/S, N/P, no parties, $2,000/mon + heat & utils. 335-5976 SMALL 1-BDRM suite in Porter Creek. On bus route, close to shopping. Refs & DD reqʼd, $900/mon + hydro. 333-9400 HOUSEMATE WANTED in Riverdale, friendly, responsible, NS. Furnished room, internet, laundry, by bus stop. Refs req'd. Sorry, already have cat/dog. Avail Nov 1. pics avail, $600/mon + $400 DD. 456-7490 3-BDRM, 2-BATH upper level of house in Copper Ridge. Shared laundry. N/P N/S, $1,700/mon + elec. Email: carolinetran22@hotmail.ca 335-6410 lv msg 3-BDRM HOUSE, Pine Ridge area, 1.5 acres, 1,100 sq ft. Available immed, $1,800/mon. 335-3253 INTERESTED IN living on an acreage not far from town in your own moveable unit or cabin on skids? N/S, responsible person. 333-0744 HOUSE TO sublet from Nov/13 to April/14, incls all but internet, downtown, $1,500/mon. 334-1252 1-BDRM, FURNISHED apt with office space, incls heat, elec & basic cable, N/S, no parties, $1,000/mon. 335-7223 2-BDRM HOME in downtown, $1,450/mon + $1.450 last month + heat. Rick 668-2998 or 336-0125 ROOMMATE WANTED, available immed or NOv 1, 1 bdrm for single person downtown, $600/mon + DD. 334-1252

Wanted to Rent HOUSESITTER AVAILABLE Mature, responsible person   Call Suat at 668-6871

Real Estate 2-BDRM CABIN, Tagish, Sidney Str, Lot 12, blue siding. Electric ready to hook up. Gd location, 5 minutes to bridge for fishing. Serious Inquiries only. Tony 780-926-1966 WATSON LAKE split level home. 2 acres, private well, 3 bdrms, 2 full baths, custom kitchen, attached heated workshop, garage & outbuildings, cement patio. Appraised at $250,000, asking $199,000. 867-536-7757 HAINES JUNCTION 2-storey house. Contemporary design, open concept on cul-de-sac, 10+ acres, Fire-smarted around house, lots of trees left, view of St. Elias Mtns, 1350 sq. ft. Rod 634-2240


Real Estate FSBO-$219,000, 3-BDRM, 1.5 bath condo in Riverdale. Close to bus route, schools, grocery store, Grey Mtn, Yukon River, & many lakes. Walking distance to downtown. Viewing (867) 335-7083 NEW 2-BDRM upscale mobile home for only $124,000. 334-6094

31

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEPER required for fast-growing accounting services company. Experience using Sage 50 (Simply Accounting) required. Must have ability to work with minimal supervision and deal directly with clients. Email resumes: admin@accurateyt.ca

Journeyman Automotive Technician required for domestic light truck repair shop. Must have diesel experience. For more info and to schedule an interview Call Adam at: 334-6378

Family Day Home in Cowley Creek seeking level 1 childcare worker 2 days per week (flexible on days).   References, Police check, 1st Aid/CPR, medical & TB testing required. Perfect for stay at home mom, as there is potential to bring a child along. FDH closed Christmas holidays and Spring Break. Start date DECEMBER 2,  2013 Please call Mary @ 668-3348

HOUSE HUNTERS

5 ATLIN lake view town lots. Prime location, top of Discovery Ave & 3rd St. 1 double lot incls old log house, $165,000 takes all. Email: mjbhome14@live.co.uk or John 250-676-9597

WANT to work as a part-time tour guide? Do you speak Spanish? We are a local tour company looking for Spanish-speaking tour guides for this winter. Call 667-2209 Looking for experienced housekeepers/front desk persons to work. Please apply with resume to Bonny, Stratford Motel, 401 Jarvis Street. No phone calls, please.

Seeking a

F/T Customer Service Representitive

ATLIN, 16'X20'LOG Cabin on 2' pony wall on compacted gravel pad. 50' x 100' Town lot. Overgrown firelanes on 2 sides. 100amp, 2 phone lines, Outhouse-no running water. $50,000. gacrawford@hughes.net

You are a mature person who is looking for a long term position with an established company that has a competitive wage and benefits package. You also enjoy giving a high level of customer service to people looking for fine gifts and jewellery.

3-BDRM 2-BATH house on large treed lot, full bsmnt suite, will sell completely furnished or unfurnished.  49 Redwood St. 633-6553

Murdoch’s, 207 Main Street

SOOKE, BC. Mobile home. Lovely adult park. Sunny and bright w/flowers in March and a place to go year round! Get out of the snow without leaving Canada! $129,000! 456-7140

Please apply in person with resume to

EXCEPTIONAL DUPLEX FOR SALE: 2A HAyES PLACE, QUIET GRANGER NEIGHBOURHOOD

Over 2,100 sq. ft. of living space w/attached single garage. Upstairs: 3 bdrms, large living room, kitchen & a main 3-pce bathroom; master bdrm has 2-pce ensuite bath. Kitchen: Beautiful tile detailing & rear deck for BBQing. Downstairs: Family room, laundry & in-law suite (1 bdrm, 1 bath, living/kitchen, separate parking & entrance). Beautifully landscaped corner lot, fenced back yard. Construction: 1993, Heat: Electric and Oil, Bath: 2.5, Bed: 4 possibly 5, Crawl Space - 5’, quiet street, Possession: Immediate

333,000.00

$

VIEW AT PROPERTyGUyS.COM | ID# 143233 Ryan – 867-335-1598 OR Kate – kolynyk@hotmail.com

LOOKING FOR small lot - about 1/2 acre 30-45 minues from Whitehorse. 332-0235 TRAILER FOR sale. 3 bdrms, new furnace, large deck, storage shed, 4 appliances, 102 Benchmark Trailer Park, $35,000. 335-3071 OPEN HOUSE Sat Oct 5, 1-3pm, 81-100 Lewes Blvd. 3 bdrms, 1.5 baths. Newly renoʼd, efficient oil monitor, huge deck, close to schools, buses & shopping. 668-6081

Amazing Home Priced To Sell Immediately! Private Sale By Owners Extremely Motivated To Sell! Over $10,000 Worth Of Furniture And Appliances Included In Sale!

House Hunters

HOUSE HUNTERS OPEn HOUSE Thursday, October 3 from 5pm to 8pm

129 FINCH CRESCENT

369,000

$

A MUST SEE!

USE 4 PM N HO M to OPEt 28 & 29 • 10 A ep S ent , n tm Sat & Su or by Appoin

Call 334-4224 or 667-7704 to arrange a viewing. Let’s negotiate your new home today!

This 1900 square foot bi-level home is on prime, much sought-after greenbelt. Fully renovated 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom. Country-style kitchen, dining room, 2 bedrooms and living room on the main level. Lower level has another bedroom, huge open area ideal for studio or fourth bedroom, laundry tucked away behind closet doors, another bathroom, storage room and an incredible entertainment room – with custom shelving, gorgeous cherry floors, and wired surround sound in the walls. Durable laminate throughout with carpets in bedrooms. Back entrance off the main level has dog door built-in, and opens onto a huge recently built and finished deck. New low-maintenance landscaping and fully fenced backyard is specifically designed with large dogs in mind! Long driveway, Auto Tent, new shed and ample storage accompany this property. Additional parking in front, close to schools, school bus pick up right out the door, 30 second walk to bus route, great parks within minutes. Cost effective propane heat with new propane tanks, and Energy Star appliances ensure lower electricity bills. Vivint security system for entire home will save you money on insurance plus detect fire, smoke and carbon monoxide! Furniture includes Shaw satellite, dining room table and chairs, two leather couches, chaise lounge, sofa, bookshelves, patio furniture and stone deck fire pit.

We are looking for a gluten free/raw - cook/baker 4 days a week Mon-Thurs 7am 3pm

We are looking for an enthusiastic mature individual with an appreciation for punctuality, quality baking, cleanliness and a healthy lifestyle. Please bring your resume explaining why you are interested in helping us.

WATERFRONT PRimE RESidENcE plus Additional Two-bedroom Guest House 2 detached double garages plus an attached double garage

106 Judas creek drive $775,000.00

867-660-4106 for appointment & directions

House Hunters Advertise your Home

Help Wanted

in 3 issues (3 consecutive weeks)

LANDSCAPERS, LABOURER(S), Equipment Operator (skid steer) needed immediately until the end of the season (Oct 31) in Fort St John, BC. Preferably have driverʼs licence. Travelling South on your way back from the Yukon and are wanting to extend your working season? Call 250-787-8788 or email: midsun2@telus.net for more information  

for only $60+GST PHONE: 867-667-6283

Chief Administrative Officer

Village of Haines Junction

The Village of Haines Junction invites applications for consideration for the position of CAO. Reporting to Mayor and Council, the position is responsible for the overall administration functions of the municipal departments, as per the Yukon Municipal Act and the policies and bylaws of the Village. The ideal candidate should have a minimum of five years’ experience in municipal senior management and should have:

Now HiriNg The Real Canadian Superstore in Whitehorse, YT has immediate opportunities for talented part-time colleagues who are passionate about providing an exceptional shopping experience for customers and delighting them every step of the way! We are currently recruiting for:

• Joe Apparel Clerks • Front End-Cashiers, Courtesy Clerks • Optical Clerks We offer our colleagues progressive careers, comprehensive training, flexibility and a benefits package. Interested applicants please apply online at www.loblaw.ca or in person at the Real Canadian Superstore. No phone calls please.

• • • • •

Proven track record in municipal operations Excellent communications and interpersonal skills Growth and infrastructure renewal experience Grant development and budget preparation Certificate in local government or relevant post-secondary education

The pay range for this position is $81,510 - $103,740 per annum and includes an attractive benefits package.

The closing date for applications will be 5:00 p.m., Friday, October 11, 2013. Please address resumes and cover letter to: Acting Mayor / CAO Michael Crawshay Village of Haines Junction Box 5339 Haines Junction, Yukon Y0B 1L0 Ph.: (867)634-7100 Fax: (867)634-2008 Email: vhj@yknet.ca The Village of Haines Junction thanks everyone for their interest, however only those selected for an interview will be contacted.


32

Yukon News employment Opportunity

The Carcross Tagish RRC is recruiting for an:

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Yukon News Classified/Order Entry 25-30 hours per week

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR for their office in Tagish, Yukon

The award winning

The CTRRC is an advisory Council which is the primary instrument for local renewable resources management in the Carcross Tagish First Nation Traditional Territory, which includes the communities of: Mt. Lorne; Marsh Lake; Tagish; and Carcross. Duties: • Manage an office in the Tagish Community Centre. • Coordinate public meetings, take minutes, draft agendas, and work closely with the communities. • Undertake activities related to the task of researching materials and issues and providing background. • Draft letters, reports, and other routine correspondence. • Work closely with both governmental and non-government organizations. • Handle administrative and finance related tasks including budgets, workplans, and reports. • May include bookkeeping duties if applicant is qualified.

• An understanding of the Carcross Tagish First Nation Final Agreement: Chapter 16. QualificatiOns: • Ability to work independently and as a team member in an office environment. • Good verbal and written communications skills. • Excellent organizational skills. • Proficiency using Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook. • Bookkeeping knowledge and skills an asset. • Good interpersonal skills: public queries, permits and applications, cooperate and work with organizations. • Ability to work in a cross cultural environment wage: Negotiable DOE HOurs: 25 - 30 hrs/week

DesireD KnOwleDge & sKills: start: As soon as possible • Knowledge of the CTFN Traditional Territory. Please submit cover letter and resume by October 4, 2013. By mail: Box 70, Tagish, YT Y0B 1T0; by Fax: (867) 399-4978; by email: carcrosstagishrrc@gmail.com For more information about this position, please call Wendy at (867) 399-4923.

has an exciting opportunity for a

classified/order entry clerk The successful candidate will be responsible for booking and servicing classified orders along with order entry duties and clerical responsibilities. This person must be a team player with exceptional customer service skills, solid English grammar, have attention to detail and the ability to work in a fast paced environment. Black Press is an internationally recognized newspaperpublishing group with more than 190 publications in B.C, Yukon, Alberta, Washington State, Hawaii, California and Ohio. Interested candidates please submit resumes to wordads@yukon-news.com, attention Operations Manager, or forward to Yukon News, 211 Wood Street Whitehorse, Yukon YIA 2E4.

JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages from $30/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrylser.ca. Fax 403-854-2845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net. GROWING OKANAGAN KIA dealership looking for technicians and apprentices to fill full time positions. Offering a competitive salary, commensurate with experience.Please email resumes to ron@kelownakia.com. AUTOMATED TANK Manufacturing Inc. is looking for experienced welders. Competitive wages, profit sharing bonus plus manufacturing bonus incentive. Full insurance package 100% paid by company. Good working environment. Keep your feet on the ground in a safe welding environment through in hole manufacturing process. No scaffolding or elevated work platform. Call Cindy for an appointment or send resume to: cindy@autotanks.ca. 780-846-2231 (Office); 780-846-2241 (Fax).

Miscellaneous for Sale BETTER BID NORTH AUCTIONS Foreclosure, bankruptcy De-junking, down-sizing Estate sales. Specializing in estate clean-up & buy-outs. The best way to deal with your concerns. Free, no obligation consultation. 333-0717 MEADE SCHMIDT-CASSEGRAIN 8" Telescope.  Too many accessories to list. Asking $1250 obo. Contact 867-335-7154 YOUTH WINTER jackets, Lands End, girls sz 10-12, $30. Loki, sz 10/12 patagonia, xl, $35. 311B Hanson Str

invites applications on behalf of the TESLIN TLINGIT JUSTICE COUNCIL for the position of

LADIES "COWBOY Threads" western style vest. New, never worn, with tags. Small. $25. 667-6717.  MODEL CARS & trucks, 1/24th -1/25th scale. Most are new/sealed, many to choose from  $10-$20 each & up. 667-6717.

Peacemakers

This position is appointed by the Teslin Tlingit Justice Council (s. 8 of the Teslin Tlingit Council Peacemaker Court& Justice Act) Teslin Tlingit Peacemakers will provide an invaluable service to the community and represent an important element to public confidence in the administration of justice as represented within and provided by the Peacemaker Court. Teslin Tlingit Peacemakers will handle both Stage I: Years 1-4 court matters (conflict resolution and mediation) and Stage II: Years 5+ matters (adjudication of Teslin Tlingit Laws and other federal and/or territorial laws based upon agreement with Teslin Tlingit Council). The Peacemakers may have senior administrative duties in relation to the operation of Peacemaker Court. A Peacemaker must have: • Knowledge and understanding of Ha Kus Teyea (Tlingit Way), Teslin Tlingit Council structure and operations including: 9 Teslin Tlingit Final Agreement and Implementation Plan 9 Self Government Agreement and Implementation Plan 9 Teslin Tlingit Constitution 9 Administration of Justice Agreement and Implementation Plan 9 Teslin Tlingit Council Peacemaker Court and Justice Council Act 9 Teslin Tlingit Council Laws, Regulations and Policies 9 Teslin Tlingit Council Strategic Framework • Knowledge and understanding of the principles of judicial independence, impartiality and fairness within the Peacemaker Court operations, principles of natural justice and rules of evidence • Knowledge and understanding of Yukon Court processes and Court Registry Services • Capacity to exercise sound judgment based upon common sense and Ha Kus Teyea • Ability to communicate effectively, clearly and concisely orally and in writing • Excellent analytical skills Education & Experience • Successful completion of BC Justice Institute Professional Certification which includes but is not exclusive to: conflict resolution, mediation, how to conduct a fair and impartial hearing, conflict of interest rules, dealing with victim/offender dynamics, victim psychology • Experience in the administration of justice and/or restorative justice services beneficial • Demonstrated experience as a team leader and/or managerial experience • Experience in a legal and/or court proceedings • Experience in dealing with a wide variety of professionals, and officials from other levels of governments, Territorial Courts, Clan Leaders, Elders and TTC Citizens For more information please call Georgina Sydney, Justice Implementation Coordinator at 867.390.2532 ext 400 To apply, please submit a cover letter and resume to Teslin Tlingit Justice Council c/o: Justice Implementation Coordinator Teslin Tlingit Council Box 133 Teslin, Yukon Y0A 1B0 Email: georgina.sydney@ttc-teslin.com

Closing Date: Wednesday, October 9th, 2013 **no later than 4pm**

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY www.ttc-teslin.com

GeoTir is looking for temporary field workers for various seismic positions this winter in the Old Crow area. Food, lodging and training for workers shall be provided. Prescreening drug and alcohol test is mandatory by all candidates. POsiTiOns are as FOllOws:

Wildlife Monitor:

This individual will travel around the program and camp perimeter by aTV and by foot inspecting the area for any wildlife that might be present and report these sightings back to their supervisor.

FN Monitor:

The Fn Monitor will travel around the program by aTV and by foot to ensure the traditional land use areas are not being disturbed.

Cruiser:

COLLECTORʼS ITEM, extra large Bowie knife, engraved blade. $150. Serious inquiries only. 668-2011 NEST HERO Classic Educational VHS videos. 11 complete with activity books for each. Hard to find! $50 for the set. 667-6717. NEW WALL tent + bag. 10x12 with aluminum frame $1300. 12x14 with frame $1500. Top quality marine grade canvas. Canadian Made. 335-1713 HONDA GENERATOR EB 2200X, like new. 633-6553 MENʼS SEIKO quartz watch w/gold nuggets on face, as new, $700. Menʼs gold wedding ring w/3 diamonds. Appraised @ $875. Offers. 332-6565 9000 WATT generator Work Force, $700 obo. 660-5922 FENCE POSTS. 4 Bundles of 8 ft x 5-6” treated blunt fence posts. 60/bundle.  $2200.  Call 335-2648

Using a handheld GPs, the cruiser will be walking through the bush following a specific route as marked out by their GPs. The cruiser will attach survey flagging to trees, marking the trail along which the slashers will follow to cut down timber. (These will become the source or receiver lines). some aTV use may be necessary.

KODAK CAROUSEL slide projector model 760H, with 8 trays, $50. 668-2802

Slasher:

COMMERCIAL PROPANE QUEST 48” griddle. $600. 333-0943

slasher will report to and be under the direction of the lead Faller. They are responsible for safe operation and upkeep of their chainsaw. They will only slash / buck standing timber less than 4 inches diameter at breast height. slashers will be responsible for limbing and bucking fallen timber that lies across the trail. worker must have a chainsaw training ticket (not provided).

Packer:

This is a very physical position. The packer will walk behind the slashing crew and clear the trails of wood debris left by the slashers. They will ensure no pokers have been missed and there are no tripping hazards left behind that may pose danger to the crews that will be following. The packers carry by hand the Jerry Cans of fuel for the chainsaws.

Water Truck Driver:

responsible for loading the water truck with water from creeks and driving the truck along straight or articulated roads and dispense the water into the drills as needed. Must have a valid driver’s license.

Line Crew:

This is a very physical position. The line Crew will carry and position seismic cables and stomp geophones though all types of terrain. Please send resUMes TO Val@GeOTir.COM Or TO reqUesT MOre inFOrMaTiOn. salaries are TBd.

1970-1980 SOUVENIR collection of Canadian postage stamps, Olympic collection Cdn Indian collection. All stamps & albums new cond, as sent from postal service, $500 obo. 393-2729

PATIO-GRADE SLATE flagstones, 80-90 stones, covers approx 110 sq ft. Must be picked up. Asking $1860 for all. 668-1850 TESTING SLUICE custom built 8 ft but breaks down to put in a chopper, comes with Honda Pump and venturie hose, all new. 633-6553 PRINTS ALL framed, with glass and signed by artists:  Jim Robb, Moon Over The KLondyke and Caribou Crossing. Robert Bateman, End of Season Griizzley. 633-6553 3 TON chain hoist,   new. 633-6553 FORCED AIR propane heater 30,000 BTU, like new. 633-6553 2 WATER pumps:    Briggs and Stratton 21/2 inch  and   Honda 11/2 inch. 633-6553 WINDOOR RECYCLER We buy and sell, new/used windows, doors and other hardware building supplies. We now carry brand new exterior doors prehung, windows, etc. 333-0717 BROWN MUMMY synthetic sleeping bag. 668-5188 lv msg, will call back TWO LG indoor/outdoor plants: pink bougainville & pink & white single fuschia. Both pruned into lovely wind swept shapes. 668-5188 lv msg, will call back. CAMPING STOVE. Fountain. 667-2583 TRAMPOLINE- LARGER rectangle, good quality $250.  335-9292


33

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 VACUUUM CLEANERS: Kenmore upright w/accessories, $60. Kenmore canister w/power brush & accessories, $90. 456-7030 APPROX 140 sq ft of 12.3 mm "Soft Caramel" Aurora laminate tile flooring. 15-1/2” x 15-1/2”, $250 or offers. 633-2962

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations

OLDER STRIKE welder w/box of stuff, $180. 336-0460 LAMINATE FLOORING, exc cond, approx 350 sq ft, $325. Small fridge, $50. UHaul boxes, nw, 1/12 price. Bathrm vanity, nw, $300. 633-5866 APPROX 140 sq ft of laminate plank flooring. Still in the box. $140 or offers .  633-2962 STEGER MUKLUKS Arctic with ribbon, brand new (too small). Ladies 9 regular, will fit 7 or 8. 334-9406 or 456-2239 lv msg TAYLOR SOFT ICE CREAM machine $5,595 Char broiler $650 Pizza warmer $450 867-862-7111 WANTED: 2ND hand rear tine garden rotor tiller in gd cond. 633-4135 or 456-3802 MOROCCAN CARPETS, $320-$420. 335-8964

authentic,

TELESCOPIC ALUMINUM plank ladder, nw, $65. 335-8964 ELECTRIC STEAMER Tobi upright/portable for steaming clothing, curtains, etc. $20. 667-6966

JOB OPPORTUNITY – SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

Collections Officer\Exhibit Designer Regular Full Time Salary: $56,657.17 - $66,280.88 Location: Haines Junction Reporting to the Director of Language, Culture & Heritage, the Collections Officer\Exhibit Designer is responsible for the care of CAFN’s Heritage Collection, including overseeing the development, maintenance, preservation, research, collection, cataloging, storage and shipping of artwork, artifacts, specimens and cultural objects. Planning, organizing and participating in the design of exhibit displays and special projects of the Da Ku Cultural Centre; utilizing design techniques to produce desired visual effect and educational messages. An Eligibility List will be established from this posting.

CDʼS 3 for $5. bread maker. 393-2600 or 335-7052

Underfills will be considered.

CATERPILLER LEATHER boot [looks like a workboot but no steel], mens 10 wide, very gd cond, $10. 633-3114 lv msg

Application deadline: 4:30 p.m. on October 15, 2013 Send Applications and/or resumes to: Human Resource Assistant Champagne & Aishihik First Nations Fax: (867) 634-2108 | Ph: (867) 634-4244 | Email: jgraham@cafn.ca

ICEFIELDS WINTERBOOT, mens 8 [sorel type like], like new $10. Sugi low winter boot mens 7, w/thinsulate, removeable liners, used but gd cond, $5. 633-3114 lv msg SIX INCH jiffy ice auger, hand powered, $25. 333-9084 ALPINETEK MENS 10 boot, leather upper, rubber bottom, w/thinsulate, brand new. $10. 633-3114 lv msg POULAN 14 inch model P3314 chainsaw, low hours on this saw. $60. 333-9084 TEXTBOOKS FOR Yukon College Math 050.  Half Price! Intermediate Algebra 11th edition $95, companion Student's Solutions Manual $27.50.  Call 667-4583. THREE OUTSIDE metal doors w/jams/hardware. 2.8 x 6.8 door w/20 x 64 glass insert. 3.0 x 6.8 door w/1/2 moon glass. Full Metal door 2.8 x 6.8 . $400 obo. 333-9953 BAMBOO BLINDS. 72x60 $15, 36x72 $10. View at 311B Hanson HOBBY TRUCK/CAR kits, not opened (lace trim - R/R tracks, accessories). Free small toilet & sink. 667-7144 COLEMAN LIQUID gas 2 burner camp stove, burns white gas camping fuel. $30. 333-9084 LANDS END womens down, full length coat, sz med, $150. 555-0600 HOT WHEELS cases of 72 brand new cars. One all GM, one all Mopar, and one First Edition. $150 each. 667-6717.  VANGUARD ENDEAVOR ed 8x42 binoculars, camo, like new, $350. 335-9510 12” SLIDING Dual Compound Mitre Saw, model 8390 (King). True -cut twin laser blade system, brand new cond, inclʼs Benchmark universal power tool stand (new), $375 obo. 667-2040 CLARK 5-SPD bench mounted drill press, new in box, $180 obo. 332-7879 BOOK ON Colt single actions from Patersons to Peacemakers, mint cond. 668-2011 200 GAL home heating fuel tank, Tidy Tank, new last fall, c/w fill kit. $2,000 new, asking $1,000 firm. 668-2866 or 333-9958 TOYO STOVE, Laser 60AT, $2,000. Tank, $1,300. Propane stove, $400. Tom 667-2075 “WEE PEGGY” New Zealand spinning wheel in immaculate cond, $150. 633-2493 CHILTON TRUCK & van repair manual, 1982-1988.668-2011 FARM RAISED PORK AVAILABLE. Sold by whole pig or half. $4 per pound. 332-8996 METAL DOME garage 16 x 20. Currently standing, will be taken down for transport, c/w man door & garage door, $5,000 firm. 334-4134 SMALL CERAMIC Christmas Tree with twinkle lights, $25. 668-5882

ACTIVE IN YOUR COMMUNITY Are you looking for volunteer opportunities? Please check www.volunteeryukon.ca to find more volunteer opportunities.

Macaulay Lodge Several Volunteer Opportunities Friday Morning Community Walks

Walk with residents along our beautiful Millennium Trail or indoors at the Canada Games Centre or Yukon College. All walks will be under the leadership of Therapy staff. 9:30 a.m. to-11:30 a.m. each Friday. It’s a great way to end the week! Criminal record check required. Orientation/training provided. A six month commitment is preferred. For more information, call Lisa or Ellen, Coordinators of Volunteer Services at 393-7111. # volunteers: 2

BINGO!

Wednesdays from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Come have fun while sharing your time with seniors at Macaulay Lodge in Riverdale. We are seeking a caring individual who enjoys socializing with seniors to assist with our weekly BINGO program. Please phone Lisa or Ellen at 393-7111 for more information. Criminal record check required. Orientation provided. Six month commitment requested. # volunteers: 1 Contact: Ellen Thomas Coordinator, Volunteer Services Phone: (867) 393-7111 ellen.thomas@gov.yk.ca You work for a non-profit organization and you would like to add your volunteer opportunities? Please click on http://www.volunteeryukon.ca/.

STEGER MUKLUKS, Yukon Jack style. Men Sz 12 wide New in box, never worn. Save the shipping to Yukon, $200. 334-5110 ASSORTED VINYL siding accessories & heating/venting materials (left over from building a new home). Best offer. 334-9903

MONDAY • WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

Community Services

CHAMPAGNE and AiSHiHiK First Nations

EMPLOYMENT OPPOrTuNiTiES

Director of Finance & Administration regular Full Time Salary: $79,674.12 - $93,207.45 Location: Haines Junction.

Reporting to the Executive Director, this key senior position performs as a member of the Management Committee, giving support to the Chief and Council to ensure that the Finance and Administration strategies and commitments delegated through political direction is effectively translated and implemented into policies, programs and services; coordinates the planning, development, implementation and evaluation of the Department of Finance and Administration in the areas of accounting services to effectively coordinate and regulate departmental activities; and perform other duties. CAFN’s Human Resources Policy will apply. For complete job description please check the CAFN website at http://www.cafn.ca/ jobs.html or contact below. We thank all those who apply but only those selected for further consideration will be contacted. Application deadline: 4:30 p.m. on October 3, 2013 Send Applications and/or resumes to: Human Resource Assistant Champagne & Aishihik First Nations Fax: (867) 634-2108 Phone: (867) 634-4244 Email: jgraham@cafn.ca


34

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Native Brain-Tanned

2 WOODS 5 Star Arctic sleeping bags. New, never used, rated -50. Retail price $749/ea. Asking $600/ea or $1,100/both. Daryl 634-2321 eves @ 7pm

PANNINI SANDWICH maker by Pane Bella, model USA 24-6, ideal for commercial use, $350 obo. Don 335-0629 aft 5pm

8 CU ft HD deep freeze. New this year, used only this summer. Has a few scratches on the exterior as we just moved with it. New $300 asking $150. 667-6651

AT REASONABLE PRICES

K&E BRUNTEN compass with case. Offers. 332-6565

CONVECTION OVEN, professional HD, ideal for restaurant, Turbo Chef model #HHB, $1,500 obo. Don 335-0629 aft 5pm

HOT POINT range, gd working cond. $100. Call 633 3705

NEW 2500 gal Fibreglass septic tank, $2,500. rickaley@yahoo.ca or 867-851-6451

WASHER & dryer, $200 obo. 393-2600 or 335-7052

FREE! MICROWAVE, 32” television. Both in gd working order. 633-2751

PIANO LESSONS Being offered in my studio with European Conservatory Experience 1-RCM exams 2-Music festivals 3-Christmas concert 4-Lessons designed especially for adults Teacher with lots of patience Call Dusica 668-6970

NEW 2013 GE 50 gallon liquid propane water heater, 36,000 BTUs, recovers @ GPM, 6 yr warranty. Does not work for the heating system we are installing, $600 firm. 333-0744

KENMORE WASHER and Dryer, cannot deliver, asking $400. Info: 332-1967

KENMORE PORTABLE dishwasher, exc cond, $150. 633-4772

2 ACCORDIONS: 2 row Hohner, 3 row Hohner. Both in exc cond. 867-994-2233

KENMORE VACUUM cleaner (canister style); with attachments. Works fine, we have upgraded. Free. 633-3154

BRASS TRUMPET by Boosy & Hawkes England # 21612, fair cond, needs tune up, model Oxford, $150 obo. 393-2729

Moose Hides Tanned beaver & other furs also available.

Ph (780) 355-3557 or (780) 461-9677

or write Lodge Fur and Hides, Box 87, Faust AB, T0G 0X0 SPILSBURY TINDALL SBX 11 2-way radio with aerial, exc shape, $600. 332-6565 DEEP FRYER, commercial use. Propane Frymaster by Garland, $400 obo. 335-0629 aft 5pm

Electrical Appliances KENMORE DRYER, front loader, works great, $300. Also nw pump out of Kenmore washer, $40. 332-7797 WASHER & dryer, $300 obo. 456-2406

SHARP 900 watt nuker, w/revoling glass plate, clean, works well, has manual, $10. 633-3114 lv msg SEARS BEST refrigerator, $200. 633-2580 eves EUREKA VICTORY upright vac w/light,11 amps, new belt, bag. Has cleaning tools, manual, air filter. Has floor height selector. Is clean, works well. $25. 633-3114 lv msg

TVs & Stereos Paying cash for good quality modern electronics. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS BELL EXPRESSVU 60 cm dish, qty 2, new, $20 each. 667-8726 TWO TVʼS, older models, various size. 393-2600 or 335-7052 50” SONY LCD TV. gd cond, needs bulb . $500 obo. 334-6103

WHERE DO I GET THE NEWS?

Computers & Accessories PS3: 2 remotes, Blueray, HDMI cable, 15 games: Red Dead Redemption, Blazing Angels 2, Battlefield 3, GoldenEye, Call of Duty Black Ops, Heroes Over Europe, Grand Theft Auto 4, etc. 335-8483

The Yukon News is available at these wonderful stores in Whitehorse:

HILLCREST

PORTER CREEK

RIVERDALE:

Airport Chalet Airport Snacks & Gifts

Coyote Video Goody’s Gas Green Garden Restaurant Heather’s Haven Super A Porter Creek Trails North

38 Famous Video Super A Riverdale Tempo Gas Bar

GRANGER Bernie’s Race-Trac Gas Bigway Foods

DELL OPTIPLEX745 computer w/Windows XP, 4GB RAM, 150GB hard drive, large monitor, w/Canon MP560 4-in-1 printer & laser fax machine, $275. 660-4443

Musical Instruments We will buy your musical instrument or lend you money against it. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS PIANO TUNING & REPAIR by certified piano technician Call Barry Kitchen @ 633-5191 email:bfkitchen@hotmail.com

DOWNTOWN: The Deli Extra Foods Fourth Avenue Petro Gold Rush Inn Cashplan Klondike Inn Mac’s Fireweed Books Ricky’s Restaurant Riverside Grocery Riverview Hotel Shoppers on Main Shoppers Qwanlin Mall Superstore Superstore Gas Bar Tags Well-Read Books Westmark Whitehorse Yukon Inn Yukon News Yukon Tire Edgewater Hotel

LINKSYS WIRELESS G Router (in box) and 2 Adapters (1 new in box). Exc shape. $50. 667-6717

AND …

Kopper King Hi-Country RV Park McCrae Petro Takhini Gas Yukon College Bookstore

M-AUDIO FIREWIRE 18/14 Professional Computer Recording Interface. It features 8x4 analog I/O at up to 24-bit/96kHz. Check features on Internet. Pd $650 asking $200. Serge 667-2196 12 STRING guitar $275. 668-2968 YAMAHA ELECTRIC guitar and practice amp .C/W tuner, soft shell case, cord and strap. $130. 333-9084 FENDER ELECTRIC guitar w/hardshell case & amp, exc cond, $600 obo. 334-6103 WILLIS UPRIGHT piano (Montreal) 3ʼx2ʼx5ʼ, never goes out of tune, a little beauty, $500. 633-2493 PIANO & matching storage bench. Beautifully ornamented upright, rich brown/ reddish tints, tuned & appraised locally. Must sell before first snow, $1,800. 668-5701

Firewood FIREWOOD FOR SALE 20-cord orders Big or small tree length Logging truck loads $150/cord Delivered to Whitehorse Call Clayton: 335-0894 HURLBURT ENTERPRISES $250 per cord We have wood. You-cut available. Discount for larger quantities. PROMPT Scheduled Delivery Visa, M/C, Check, Cash Dev Hurlburt 335-5192 • 335-5193 FIREWOOD 4 SALE Dry standing spruce cut to length. Delivered within City Limits $250/Cord or $130/ Half Cord Call Stu @ 633-5041

ORTHODONTIC OFFICE Clinical Assistant & Reception Staff needed for Orthodontic office

Fulltime/Part-time. Certification or experience helpful but not necessary. Please email your resume to astrelzow@telus.net or call our Vancouver office at 604-738-8448. NortherN VisioN DeVelopmeNt operates four year-rouND full-serVice yukoN hotels

(www.yukonhotels.com)

THE YuKoN NEWS IS AlSo AVAIlABlE AT No CHARGE IN All YuKoN CoMMuNITIES AND ATlIN, B.C.

MONDAY • WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

“YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION” WEDNESDAY * FRIDAY

• Best Western Gold Rush Inn • Coast High Country Inn & Yukon Convention Centre • The Edgewater Hotel • The Downtown Hotel, Dawson City We are accepting resumes for current and anticipated future openings for the following positions, both full-time and part-time/casual: • line cook and kitchen helper (chef@nvdlp.com) • food & Beverage servers (fbdirector@yukonhotels.com) • front Desk / Night audit (reservations@yukonhotels.com) • housekeeping / Janitorial (madelyn@yukonhotels.com) Please forward you resume to the appropriate email address above or drop-off in person at any of our hotel front desks.


EVF FUELWOOD ENT Year Round Delivery • Dry accurate cords • Clean shavings available • VISA/M.C. accepted Member of Yukon Wood Producers Association Costs will rise. ORDER NOW 456-7432 FIREWOOD $250 per cord Cut to length 4-cord load 667-6185 DIMOK TIMBER 6 cord or 22 cord loads of firewood logs. Call 634-2311 CHAINSAW, 351 Husky 16” bar, 2 extra chains, not used since last service. $200 firm. 334-5408 DONʼS FIREWOOD Prompt daily deliveries Commercially harvested beetle kill Social Services & Kwanlin Dun Price as of October 1st: $265 per cord 393-4397

LOOKING FOR some solid wood interior doors (used or new), in any shape. Will pay reasonable price and  will pick up! 393-2041 WANTED: USED 32” flatscreem TV for $300. 668-4190 rm #23 LOOKING FOR freezer space to store a frozen moose for a couple months, or a deep freeze for sale. 335-9925 LOOKING FOR a Yamaha Phazar or Mtn Lite, btwn years 1987-1998. For parts. 667-6525 WANTED: A small heating pad for the bed, in exc cond. 456-7059. LOOKING FOR a ride share from Skagway to Whitehorse or Atlin for the 25th or 27th October. Contact: flo-flo-56@hotmail.fr WANTED: MAPS & books on Route 66 in USA. Virginia 633-3388 WANTED: LIGHT blue and/or black marble-look self adhesive tiles that used to be sold at Home Hardware. Have extras? 668-5188 WANTED: “TORCH-ON” roofing material for 200 sq ft or more. Will pay. 333-0744 WANTED: THE lady who phoned me about 1992 Black Pathfinder being towed from a lot of Centennial St. Please call 333-9305

WANTED: 3 cords of firewood delivered to our home. 633-4874 FIREWOOD:  $170.00 per cord 20 ft. logs 5 cord loads. Small delivery charge. 867-668-6564 Leave message

Cars

Certified

used vehicles

Guns & Bows Case cutlery, high quality hand-crafted pocket and hunting knives available at G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS LEE ENFIELD No 1 Mk 3, 303 British, 10 rd mag, sporterized wood, very good bore, military sights, steel scope rings mounted, $300, or $360 with decent 3-9x40mm scope mounted. PAL req'd. 667-2276 BRAZILIAN MAUSER in 8mm Mauser, handmade hardwood stock, bedded and floated, recent refinish of whole rifle, inexpensive scope already mounted, $350, PAL req'd. 667-2276

online at

www.drivingforce.ca

2013 DODGE Dart,  rand new, raffle prize.  Nice car, just don't need a car.  Make us an offer.  Email rjmoore56@northwestel.net or more info, 867-634-2720. 2012 DODGE Challenger SRT8, 1700kms, as new. rickaley@yahoo.ca or 867-851-6451 aft 9pm 2007 CHEV Impala LS, 4-dr, V6 auto, w/remote start, summer & ice tires, 160,000kms, blue, runs great, $6,900. 334-6685

MOSSBERG SHOTGUN GA410 3”, choke, full bolt action model 183 DD, cond extremely gd, asking $300 obo. Will trade for early model Martini falling block action in .223. 393-2729

2007 D O D G E Caliber, like new, 126,000kms, stnd. c/w extra tires, tow pkg, stereo system, garage door opener. $10,000 but open to offers. 867-456-4112 or 867-333-0236

CANADIAN FIREARMS safety course. Presented by Whitehorse Rifle and Pistol Club. Oct 5 & 6. Info: 334-1688 or 667-6728

2007 HONDA Civic, great on gas. $12,500  with 2 sets tires/rims, remote start, manual 5-spd. Clear windshield, new battery, maintenance records, detailed. 77,000 kms. 335-2648

NIKON MONARCH 2-8x32 scope, BDC reticle, like new $300. 7mm-08 ammo. Hornady gmx $20 . 335-9510 SAVAGE MARC 2, 22 caliber rifle w/ammo, bolt action w/clip, exc cond, FAC reqʼd. $200 obo. 334-1514 NIKON FIELDSCOPE ED82 with 38X Zoom and FSA 1 and 2 and FSB 6 attachments for digiscoping. Nikon Fieldcase. Like New.  $1150 obo. 334-9551 PENTAX PF 80ED Spotting Scope with SMC 8-24mm Zoom, nw cond. $950 obo. 334-9551 RUGER MINI 14 $875 Mint Condition . Remington 870 12. gauge $550 New.  Lee Enfield 4MK1 303. Vg. $300. Contact 867-335-7154 TURKISH MAUSER, .308 in working cond, must have valid PAL.  $225 firm. 335-2182 SAVAGE, 25C, P series, .22 barrel on top, 20 gauge under, vg cond, great grouse gun, $300. 667-2607 HUNTING RIFLE, Ruger, M77, 270 Win, Leupold scope, M8x4, must have firearms licence, $550. 334-1326

1994 PLYMOUTH Voyager, nw Michelin tires, nw brakes & struts & many other nw parts. Was asking $3400 now $3000 because of crack on windshield. Very reliable. 668-4885 or 1-250-321-4884 1990 EI50 immaculate interior by North American Coach. Exterior 9/10. 332-2246 1989 CHRYSLER Daytona, PW, PL, 2-dr hatchback, $1200 obo. Needs to be gone. 335-3333 1986 TOYOTA Celica, 126,000kms. runs. Free to good home. 633-5583 1985 CHEVY Camaro, 120,000 kms, summer/winter tires, nw parts & paint, $3800 obo. Needs to be gone. 335-3333 1984 MAZDA 626, new motor, tires, windshield, stereo, vg shape, $1,500. 821-4924 1983 TOYOTO Celica Supra, exc running cond. C/w box of spare parts. Asking $6,000 obo. 334-9823 1981 CHEVY Malibu 2dr, has v8 swap. Newer transmission, rad, alternator, starter, and battery. New 245/60/15 on blk wheels. Gd heat and stereo. $2500 obo. Txt or call 867-334-8454 1979 CADILLAC Coupe DeVille 2 door, V8, auto, sun roof, velour interior, loaded with options, 72,000 original kms, 1 owner,. Make an offer, I need room. 668-1477 1978 MERCEDES 280SLC sport, rare, coupe, rare 4-spd, 6 cyl in line, 151,000kms. Any reasonable offer. Located in Whse. Email mslc280@gmail.com or 604-522-3405 BEAUTIFUL IN/OUT red 2007 WV Jetta City, 2.0  4 cylinders with only 35,000 kms. Manual transmission. $ 13,000 obo. Call eves to see. 633-6768

Trucks

RARE 30-30 Winchester model 1894,  , manufactured  1906, octagonal nickel-steel barrel  excellent condition. 633-6553

MARLIN SBL 45-70, pre remington rifle. Leupold FX-II Scout IER 2.5x28mm scope and leupold QRW rings. In mint shape. $1600. 334-5983

2006 PONTIAC Solstice convertible sports car.  A modern classic. 65,000 km, 2.4 4 cyl 177hp; 5 spd stnd.  Immaculate. Great sound, great heater.  $19,500.   633-5470. 2006 PONTIAC Wave, comand start, CD, bluetooth, near mint, only 82,000 kms. Exc on gas, 5 spd manual. Super clean. Dealer maintained. $5800. 456-9531 2005 MAZDA 6, 4 door, 4 cyl, auto, 160,000kms, loaded, $8,500 obo. 334-1115 2005 PONTIAC Grand Am, 150,000 kms, very gd cond, $5500. 867-335-8089 2002 NISSAN Sentra GXE, 4dr, 1.8l, 154,000kms, summer & winter tires, insured & safety inspected, $3,000 obo. 332-1939 2002 SUBARU Impreza WRX, 179,000 kms.  $5000 obo.  White,  roof rack, extra muffler.  Priced to sell as it requires some work. 660-5505 2002 TOYOTA Corolla, 5 spd, manual, 85,500 kms, nw tires, complete 2nd set of mounted tires. Great cond. Exc mileage. Kept in heated garage. $5000. 633-2293 2000 J E E P Cherokee 4X4. Well maintained,new brakes, seals, battery, belts, hoses. Interior, exterior in gd cond. Electric locks and windows. 379,000 kms. $3200 o b o . 6 3 3 - 3 7 3 8 . christinestephen7@hotmail.com.

We Sell Trucks! 1-866-269-2783 • 9039 Quartz Rd. • Fraserway.com

2013 FORD Flex, ruby red, loaded for comfort/convenience. Leather seating for seven. Media centre w/ MyFordTouch, sunroof w/panoramic view, keyless entry. 25,500 kms. View details on Kijiji. $32,500. 456-7030 2012 FORD Escape XLT, Canadian winter pkg. Sirius radio, bluetooth. Gd on gas. Premium warranty that is transferable. Other extras. $23,500 firm. Can be viewed at 5039-5th Ave. 336-3500 2010 4X4 F150, 5.4L, 52,000kms, 2" leveling kit, magnaflow dual exhaust, aftermarket wheels, tow package, boxliner, heated leather, beautiful truck in mint cond, $32,500 obo. 334-3350

2003 CHEV extended cab, short box, 4WD, Durmax deisel, most options. 211,000 kms. $11,000 obo. 399-3014

1995 F350 Crew Cab with canopy, trailer hitch and brake controller. $4,000. Phone 335-5789.

2003 FORD Ranger, 200,000kms, 1 cyl blown, gd set of winter tires, $1,000. 334-6092

1995 GMC, exc running cond, nw transmission, 280,000 kms, $4500 obo. 334-6103

2003 HONDA CRV, 224,800 kms, 4WD, automatic, fully loaded, Well maintained, recent brake and suspension work, new tires, new battery. See Kijiji. $6,200 obo. Need a bigger vehicle, 335-7184. 2003 TOYOTA Tacoma.  V6 engine, stnd transmission, 161,000 kms, well maintained.  Spray in box liner, matching canopy, winter tires (1 season), tow hitch.  $14,000 obo. 333-0346 2002 F250 ext cab long box lariat, 5.4 gas, nw factory Ford transmission, 225,000kms, fully loaded with leather, $8600 obo. 668-5882 2001 CHEV Jimmy, leather, On Star, auto lock, 200,000 kms, 4.0L. 335-4387 2001 CHRYSLER Town & Country van, 155,000kms, fully loaded, leather. No dogs or smoking, command start, new tires, $4,750 obo. 633-4025

2000 CHEVY Astro van, 2wd, 4.3L, very gd cond,166,000 kms. Runs very well. $5000/obo. 633-3371 2000 DODGE DAKOTA Sport Club Cab, V-8, 4x4. Exc cond. 105,000 kms. 8,500 obo. 668-7503 lv msg 2000 DODGE Ram 1500 4x4, 318 (5.2) V8 magnum, auto, 222,000kms. 4x4 not engaging, but runs & drives great, doesn't use oil, lots of new parts, $2,500 obo. Mark 334-7335

2005 CHEVY Trail Blazer, 226,000kms, seats 8, back seats fold down to seat 5, c/w 4 new winter ties & full size spare on rim, $8,000 obo. 336-0360 or 336-6855

Wanted

2005 NISSAN Frontier, extʼd cab, 4WD, automatic, 159,000kms, new windshield, newer tires, brakes, wheel-bearings, serviced regularly, $8,500. 667-2607

WANTED: AUTO tow dolly for small car. Pivot point(s) & surge brakes preferred. 667-2356

1997 COUGAR XR7, Gold Edition, never winter driven, exc cond, ivory, 142,000 kms. $8500 obo. 633-3116 or 334-3160

2004 CADILLAC Escalade SUV AWD, 6 passenger, heated leather seats, sun roof, very nice cond, $14,900. 660-4220

RCMP VICTIM Assistance Volunteers are looking for volunters. Offers immediate help to victims of crime. Security clearnace required. For additional info Cst. Phil Whiles 335-2083

1997 FORD, 9 passenger van, exc cond. Clean inside. $21,000. 365,000 kms. 335-5500

2004 SIERRA 3500 dually crew cab, loaded, 4x4, diesel. Mech records. Nw tires, 211,000 kms. $22,000. 668-4663

FOR two dining rm chairs.

1996 HONDA Civic CX 5-spd, new pads, tire, battery, approx. 180,000kms, $2,500 obo. Dave or Gus 393-4796

WANTED ASAP: "I walk freely" leg support. Mike 335-1888

1995 FORD Taurus, auto, air, nw battery, 205,000 kms. Runs well. Clean & well maintained. $1500 obo. 633-2125

2004 SILVERADO RWD, 135,000 kms, asking $10,000 obo. All nw ball joints, tires are nw, water pump was replaced. 8ft box, regular cab. 867-335-2780 2002 FORD F150, burgundy, 4x4, 4.8l Triton V8, 230,000kms, $5,000 obo. 334-3937

1987 FORD Ranger XLT std 2WD, 2 gas tanks, gray w/white canopy, engine runs well & fires quick, front passenger side is damaged due to a minor accident, rear passenger tire has a slow leak, $500. 335-1404

1986 FLAT deck Chevy, exc cond. Great wood truck. $3600 obo. 334-6103

1980 FORD Bronco, needs new trans, $500 obo, 660-5922 1979 FORD F250 4x4, body rust, engine needs rebuild, trans & all 4x4 parts, in gd cond, offers. 332-6565 Better Bid North Auction Vehicle Sales. 1987 Pontiac Tempest car $1,850. 2002 Pontiac Sunfire $2,750. 1997 Pontiac Grand Am $2,450. 1989 GMC 4x4 wood truck $995. 1987 Nissan Super Cab $1,800. 333-0717

Auto Parts & Accessories

1999 CHEVY Tracker, 4wd, 184K, hard and soft top, BC plates (in Atlin). $3,250 obo. email gacrawford@hughes.net

TRUCK CANOPIES - in stock * new Dodge long/short box * new GM long/short box * new Ford long/short box

1999 TOYOTA Sienna XLE van, fully loaded w/leather, seating for seven, sunroof, pwr slider, roof rack, hitch, & floor mats. Exc running cond. Clean/polished. $6500. 456-7030

Hi-Rise & Cab Hi - several in stock View at centennialmotors.com 393-8100

1998 AWD Chev Astro van in running cond, needs new battery. $1000 takes it. (867) 634-2422 or yukonjackyt@yahoo.ca

TONNO COVER, fits Toyota Tacoma., pd $1200, asking $450. 667-6966

1998 DODGE Dakota Sport, 4x4, 5 spd manual, rear airbag ride. Nw: front brakes, roters, ball joints, tie rod & a boxliner. Candy apple red. 229,000kms. $6500obo. 633-3116 or 334-3160

1997 PLYMOUTH Voyager van, 3l, new windshield, fuel pump, battery, replaced bucket seat, gd rubber, no rust. Gus or Dave 393-4796

2007 TOYOTA Highlander AWD SUV, command start, extra set winter tires, towing pkg, approx 128,000 kms, $16,000. 332-4143

1990 DODGE Ram 250 and 8' truck camper, look at details: www.kijiji.ca - AD-ID: Ad ID 523636025. $2500 obo. Separate sale possible. 660-4646

1999 CHEV Suburban LT 4x4, 7 passenger, heated leather seats, vg cond, $5,900. 660-4220

2008 FORD F450 SD 4WD king ranch, $32,000. 334-1326

2008 JEEP Patriot North Edition. Black w/ alloy rims. 75,000 kms. $14500 obo. Exc cond w/great fuel economy. 335-7154

1992 FORD Wheelchair Astrovan, $2,000 obo. 332-2246

84 F350 crew cab 4x4 gas. Safety passed last year, hardly driven since. $1800. 334-7373

1997 F-150 XLT 4.6l V8 4X4, auto, blue, engine runs well but is making some noise, the body is in great shape, all season tires, command start, winter care package, box liner, $5,500 obo. 335-1404

2008 HONDA Ridgeline, full luxury pkg. C/W complete trailering set up, custom canopy & two sets of roof racks. Asking $22,000. Michael 668-7090

1992 CHEV Silverado 4x4, extʼd cab, $1,600. 334-1252

2001 NISSAN Xterra. Lightly used for past 2 years. Runs fabulously in winter w/absolutely no issues. This SUV runs and handles like a dream! 195,000kms, $5,895 obo. 633-4501

2008 FORD F250 SD 4x4 Crew Cab. 155kms. Well Maintained. 13,000lb winch. Great tires. Wood Boxliner. New exhaust manifolds installed. Inspection report available. $13,000 obo. 335-1713

2008 HONDA Ridgeline LX, 83,000kms.  Great condition. 18,500 obo. 334-9551

1994 CHEV Silverado 2500 ext cab, 2WD, long box, auto, 6.5l diesel, 282,000kms, $5,500. 667-7649

1987 TOYOTA truck, 22R, standard, 2WD, $1,000. Richard. 821-4924

1997 CHEVY Blazer, black, 4x4, 4.3l, V6, auto, 348,000kms, alum wheels +2 spare rims, runs well, $1,500 obo. 633-2575

2008 GMC 2500 HD Duramax diesel. 4WD. Fully loaded, gd tires, headache rack, dry box. $18,000 obo or trades considered. 399-3014

1995 RHD Mitsubishi Delica 8 pass van, 4WD w/locking diff, 89,000 orig kms, 2.4L gas, summer use only, $7,500 obo. 667-3259, 667-4497

2001 NISSAN Pathfinder, $5,500 obo, black, 130,000kms, V6, 4x4, remote start, c/c, p/w&l, cage in rear, tinted rear windows. Runs well, could use some work, body damage, new battery. 334-6250

2010 DODGE Ram 1500, SLT, silver, quad cab, 4x4, 5.7 V8 Hemi, 3.92 diffs. RamBox Cargo MNGMT System only 13,248kms. Extra features, this one has it all, showroom cond. $33,500. 393-3123

1999 ACURA, 3.2, 4-dr sedan, exc cond, sun-roof, leather, 170,000 kms. $6800. 667-7370

LOOKING 393-2275

35

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

NOKIAN STUDDED 175/65R14, brand new. 334-9406 or 456-2239 lv msg NEW 2007-2013 GMC Pickup Grille with GMC Emblem, in box. $150. 667-6717 PLASTIC TRUCKBOX liner, will fit any Chevy 6'6" box, in exc cond, $80. 667-4859 ARCTIC CLAW winter tires Xsi studded tires 245/70R16 M&S, less than 2 monthsʼ use. Set of 4, $200. 667-4859 4 G O O D Y E A R Nordic winter tires P205/75R14 w/rims (5-hole), used on Buick for 2 seasons, $275. 667-8726 TRUCK BOX, black for full sized truck, 70” in length, $55. 660-4321 OLDER CHEV p/u box trailer, $350 obo. 633-4246 lv msg

1996 FORD Ranger XLT super cab 4x4, V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, Am/Fm, CD, 143,400 miles, $3,900. 660-4220

PILOT CAR sign & full sz p/u box mount, complete, $1,200 obo. 633-4246 lv msg

87 F-250 4x4 diesel, 5 spd. $2000. 334-7373

SET OF Ride-Rite Firestone air bags off a 1999 GMC Sierra, $200 obo. 334-6776

Please join us in a Celebration of life Saturday, OctOber 5th, 2013 2:00pm at the haineS JunctiOn cOnventiOn centre. ~Everyone Welcome~

David Christopher

Forever loved and missed by family and friends.

Boyle MarCh 7, 1960 ~ august 30th, 2013


36

Yukon News

Pet Report Hours of operation for tHe sHelter: Tues - Fri: 12:00pm-7:00pm • Sat 10:00am-6:00pm CloSed Sundays & Mondays

633-6019 WeDNeSDay, octoBeR 2

2013

Help control the pet overpopulation problem

have your pets spayed or neutered. FoR iNFoRmatioN call

633-6019

FOUR 235/75R15 Goodyear Wrangler on 5 bolt F150 Sport rims w/caps. $400. 334-5408 SET OF tire chains, nw, Z-chain, fits from 14-19” tire. $50. 633-6114 FOUR CHROME wheel covers, perfect cond, w/valve extensions, 20”, fits 1 or 2 ton vehicles. $100. 633-3251 FOUR ALUMINUM rims, Ford Taurus, 205/65 R15, never damaged. Gd for winter rims. $60. 633-4810 REAR HITCH for 1/14" Toyota hitch.  Fits Toyota Sienna, plus many other vehicles. $50 obo. 668-7361 HEAVY DUTY receiver hitch that specifically will fit a 2011 Chev/GMC 3/4 or 1-Ton Longbox. Gd shape. C/w bolts. ($800 new), $200. 667-6717.

Dog Wash Fundraiser 3rd Saturday of each month. Next Date:

Saturday, October 19

th

at The Feed Store Pet Junction 10:00am - 2:00pm

lost/found lost • Hamilton Blvd, small female, tricolour short hair dog, no collar, contact tracy @ 334-4329 (20/09/13). • mountainview, lost last Wednesday, small female DlH, black, brown with white patch on chest, no collar, contact Shawna @ 667-2078 (24/09/2013) • Holly street in porter creek, white canadian female shepherd answer to moa, contact Hannah @ 6677801. (25/09/13).

• Wheeler street, white and grey with blue eyes, DSH, male answers to Blazzre contect Susan @335-2286.( 25/09/13). • Robson subdivision male Bernese mountain Dog, black, wearing yellow collar contact Dane @667-7827. (26/09/13) found

2005 GMC, exc cond, 4x4, 364 Vortech, $12,000 obo. 250,000 kms. 334-6103 FOUR GOODYEAR Wrangler tires, 17”, steel, gd tread. $25 ea. 667-7144 ROOF RACK, made in California, exc cond, $200 obo. 334-6103 CHROME RIMS and tires. 305/35/24  will fit GM Chev 6 bolt 1/2 ton, Suburban, Tahoe, Yukon, Escalade. Also Toyota truck and 4 runner and import  6X139.7 bolt pattern  $2100 obo. 333-9551 SET OF 4 Toyo M/T LT265/70R 17 truck tires, $1,300 obo. 332-7879

AVAilABlE foR Adoption

CAts

• 6 yr old, neutered male, Husky/GSDx, black and tan (Nitro) • 11 mos old, spayed female, RetrieverX, tan (Jewel)

• None available at this time. Please check back.

doGs

CAts

• 5 yr old female, lab/Pit Bull X (Gaia) • 3yr old, neutered male, akita, grey, white (a.J.) • 2 yr old, neutered male, husky/GSDx, black and tan (Spaz) • 1 yr old, neutered male, Husky, black and white (copper) • 1.5yr old, neutered male, labX, tan and white (Homer) • 5yr old, neutered male, Husky, white and grey (Nuvik)

• 6yr old, maine coonX, neutered male, grey and white (tinker) • 6yr old, DSH, neutered male, black (Butler) • 11mos, DSH, white and black, neutered male (max) • 1.5yr old, DSH, grey and white, neutered male (Sappy)

spECiAl • Homes needed for retired sled dogs. they would make excellent pets. contact Sandra at 668-3647 if your lost animal has been inadvertently left off the pet report or for more info on any of these animals, call 633-6019 or stop by 126 tlingit street.

Pets will be posted on the Pet Report for two weeks. Please let us know after that time if you need them re-posted.

You can also check out our award winning website at:

www.Humanesocietyyukon.ca

TAITʼS CUSTOM TRAILER SALES 2-3-4- place snowmobile & ATV trailers Drive on Drive off 3500 lb axles by Trailtech - SWS & Featherlight CALL ANYTIME: 334-2194 www/taittrailers.com RONʼS SMALL ENGINE SERVICES Repairs to Snowmobiles, Chainsaws, Lawnmowers, ATVʼs, Small industrial equipment. Light welding repairs available 633-6161 lv msg

2007 ARGO Avenger  regular maintenance, $12,000. obo. 867-335-4419

FORD 4X4 5-spd tranny & transfer case, $300. 334-3822

2010 ARCTIC Cat MudPro 650, plow, winch, 400 miles, gd shape, $6,200 obo, make an offer. Mark 334-7335

WINTER TIRES (no rims) LT235/75-R15 Arctic Claw brand. Designed for SUVs, small trucks & cross-overs. $1,000 new from Kal Tire in Whitehorse, asking $600. (778) 350-5071 1993 SUBARU Loyale, runs, but only good for parts. Extra Parts inclʼd such as radiator, alternator, water pump, etc. $450 obo. 668-1040 100ʼ OF 3/4” towing cable with loops on ends. Offers. 332-6565

2008 GIO 250cc 4-stroke dirt bike, runs well, $750 obo. 334-6776 2000 ARCTIC Cat Bear Cat 440 Snowmobile.  Only 120kms on New Engine.  New Skis and Track. Includes cover & new adult helmet.  $3999.  Call 335-2648 GRIZZLY 125 quad with a broken engine, housing for parts or for sled dog training. Asking $500. Call (no texts please) 335-2675 ATV PLOW, verg gd cond, $400. 633-6114

PETMATE DOG crate, 3ʼLx2ʼWx2ʼ3”H, wire mesh, $40. 667-4589

BOSS MOTORCYCLE Carrier, new, fits 2-inch hitch class III or IV, up to 500lb bikes, tilts down for one-person operation.  C/w heavy duty ratchet straps.  Pd $550, asking $350. 335-8483

TO GIVE away, 2 Pointer Husky Cross sled dogs (no puppies), their dog houses optional. Call (no texts) 335-2675

2007 HONDA 500 Foreman ATV, low kms, great cond, c/w winch, $5750 obo. Gary 335-9596

Pets

PUREBRED FEMALE Siamese cat to give away to good home. Very friendly, gentle and loving.  Gets along with dogs. Call 335-6343

CHOCOLATE POINT six wk old Siamese kitten, litter trained & weaned. Great behavior. $100. 633-2837 FOUND:  FRIDAY Sept. 20 on Hamilton Blvd extension: small female dog mixed breed, imaculate manners, appears well cared for,  1-2 yrs old.  Black head to tip, honey brown mask, white paws/chest. 334-4329

At tHE sHEltER

Motorcycles & Snowmobiles

BF GOODRICH tire, LT225/75R16, studded, pd $1,050, used 1 winter, $400 firm. Gus or Dave 393-4796

2 ADULT Red Slider turtles, large aquarium, 36" x 18" x 20" $75 or offers. Serious inquiries to dinyxy@gmail.com

doGs

PROVEN WORLD champion 6-dog sprint team for lease for the racing season to the right person. They are being trained and will be ready to go for the season. 867-633-6502

2009 SUMMIT 800, 1,700 miles, has a ceramic coated can, otherwise bone stock. Gd shape, $7,000 obo. (867)333-0484

KICKSLED, BRAND new, never used, asking $250. 334-2525

in fostER HoMEs

THE YUKON Kennel Club is excited to announce our new course line up! We have a new Certified Training Director! Puppy Pre-School. October 9 – 26, 2013: Tuesdays and Saturdays  Leash manners, Nutrition, Grooming and MORE! Pre-Register for Puppy Kindergarten and Novice Obedience starting in January 2014! Please contact Wendi @ 633-4952 www.Facebook.com/YukonKennelClub

4 EXCELLENT winter tires, used only 1 season, 185x15”, $200. 332-7545

• None at this time.

RunninG At lARGE...If you have lost a pet, remember to check with City Bylaw: 668-8382

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

ATV RACK boxes, front & rear, almost nw $350 obo. 336-0460

2011 OUTLANDER Car Am 800, less than 500 kms, $9,000 rickaley@yahoo.ca or 851-6451 aft 9pm 2008 YAMAHA Venture, 2up, loaded, low kms, $5,000. rickaley@yahoo.ca or 867-851-6451 aft 9pm 1992 POLARIS MKS 440 liquid cool, motor & undercarriage in exc cond, $1,600. 334-1252

Marine PROFESSIONAL BOAT REPAIR Fiberglass Supplies Marine Accessories FAR NORTH FIBERGLASS 49D MacDonald Rd Whitehorse, Yukon 393-2467 18FT LUND Jon Boat with Duncan's reinforced transom. 115 HP Yamaha Jet with 102 hrs. Comes with EZload trailer, 12V trolling motor and fish finder. $12,000 obo. 668-1043 15HP 4 stroke o/b, very little use, as nw cond. $2,200. 335-1019 16ʼ MISTY River, custom built aluminum counsel, c/o 40HP Suzuki, w/controls, $10,500 obo. 334-6103 SPEED BOAT w/350HP Chev & jet pump, Fibreglass hull, $5,000, c/w trailer. rickaley@yahoo.ca 867-851-6451 aft 9pm

Heavy Equipment NEW & USED EQUIPMENT For Sale Come see MACPHERSON RENTALS @ 117 Copper Rd or call 633-4426 NEW PORTABLE sawmill. Manufactured in Yukon. Cuts logs 2ʼ diameter, 20ʼ long. $4,850 obo. Check it out on www.pro-cut.com 334-6094 RUBBERLINED 150HP 10”x10” slurry pump with controls, electronic eye, and tank. Approx. 200 hrs. use—$40,000. Superior variable speed grizzly belt feeder. Hopper is 20-ton capacity. Approx. 200 hrs. use—$40,000. All located in the Yukon. Email auremalliance@hotmail.com Or call (867)332-2040. STORM HIGH PRESSURE WASHER 3500psi/gas engine. New price $7,700 sell for $3,500. 1998 Peterbuilt highway tractor. Ready to work $14,900. Estate Sale. 333-0717

2011 SKIDOO backcountry 800etec, 4,100kms, new engine at 3,100kms after recall, new clutch & belt, c/w 2 seatup, hitch, high windshield, $9,500. 993-3648

WANTED - implements for tractor with standard three-point PTO. Roto-tiller, mower, snow plow.  Call 668-2162 or 633-4806

2003 MOUNTAIN Cat 900, 2.5”x151" track, c/w a spare track, needs clogs, chaincase sprockets & chain, $1,100 firm. 334-6776

18FT FLAT deck trailer equipment/wood hauler. 12,500 lb. GVW. Electric brakes, loading ramps, stake board sides. Holds 4 cords of cut wood. Exc shape. $5800. 334-7635.

1999 SUMMIT X670, exc shape, no leaks, runs great, like new 2"x136" track, $2,000 firm. 334-6776 2007 M8, rebuilt motor from the crank up, 153x2.25, C&A skis, high-rise seat, $5,500 obo. Mark 334-7335 2006 CRF Honda 70F, $1,500 obo. 2004 CRF Honda 80F, $1,350 obo. Both bikes are in gd cond. 633-6027

Pet of the Week!

N

2004 MXZ Renegade 800HO. 4,520 miles, 100 miles on rebuilt motor. Reverse, dirt bike handlebars w/riser, hand warmers. 136"x1.75 track, c/w repair manual & stock pipe. $3,500 obo. 335-0305

1998 PETERBILT HIGHWAY tractor, ready to work, $14,900. 1989 Freightliner parting out at $6,900. 30ʼ Jeep trailer $7,900. Estate sale. Sell all for $25,000 package deal. 333-0717 9-20ʼ SEA Cans. Upgrading. Various conditions. Some leakers, some in good condition. Prices range from $1,800 up to $3,000. Cans can be delivered in city limits for $150 charge. 333-0717 KOMATSU WA350 wheel loader bucket & grapple, $20,000. rickaley@yahoo.ca or 867-851-6451 aft 9pm

Aircraft 17H.P.  KOHLER powered Hobart 225 amp welder/generator. Mounted on four wheeled steel wagon.  $2000 obo. 867-633-6502

itro

Hi, I’m Nitro. I’m really new here but so far I have been really nice. I have been a bit shy but say the word “walk” and I come to life! I am house trained and get along with other animals and children. Stay tuned for more info on me as the staff 126 Tlingit Street get to know me! www.humanesocietyyukon.ca

633-6019

UNMANNED LONG range aerial aircraft for filming or photography. Limited by your imagination only. Call us for any project where a regular sized aircraft is needed. 633-6502

Campers & Trailers NEW OR USED TRAILERS For Sale or Rent MACPHERSON RENTALS 117 Copper Road 633-4426 2007 DESSERT Fox Toyhauler trailer, 24ʼ, Arctic Fox brand, dbl pane windows, 4 season/insulation, sleeps 8, ensuite master, electric bunk bed, solar panels, alarm system. 393 4700 1984 FORD motorhome, 20ʼ, vg shape, low miles, gd tires, everything works, $5,000 obo. 821-4924


2005 OPEN Road, 5th wheel trailer, 36 ft, many upgrades, three slides, king bed, lots of room, price reduced again, $22,000 obo. 633-4796. 2005 20ʼ enclosed cargo trailer, side & barn doors, roof vent, side window, wired 110, fluorescent lights, 16” tires, $7,800 obo. Gary 335-9596 or 334-6449

2012 COACHMAN Freedom Express 29QBS. Quad bunks in back. Queen up front. Power everything. Flat screen tv. Great shape. Asking $21,000. Call or text. 334-6344.

FREE 10 week Women's Support Group Wednesday evenings from 630-830 pm, starting October 2nd @ the Victoria Faulkner Womens Centre. Contact VFWC to sign up @ 667-2693

2000 MOTORHOME Chev 2500, 177 Km, well maintained. Gd fuel consumption. Gotta see it! $15,000. 393-2868 or 668-4058. $

MULTICULTURAL CENTRE of the Yukon Free Driver's Licence Exam Preparation Course for ESL Learners. 5 Saturday classes 9am-noon begin October 19. Call 667-4733 to register.

2005 NORTHERN Lite camper, 5 star, 9ʼ6” classic, 855kg, north/south beds, bathroom, hot water tank, vg cond, $16,000. 667-7649 1999 CLASS B 20' Vanguard camper van, vg cond, runs great, everything works, $12,500. 334-9903 UTILITY TRAILER made from the back of a truck box, $700 obo. 668-1040

HUNTERʼS SPECIAL. 1992 F250 4X4 ext cab. Low mileage, manual trans, new tires, older 10ʼ camper. $5,000. 633-2580

Coming Events

2010 JAYCO 29' BHS trailer, sleeps up to 9, CD/DVD/I POD JK.SND.SYS., electric patio awning, micro wave, outside BBQ, & more, used less than 14 days, like new, $25,500. 393-3123

ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com

SHASTA TRAVEL trailer, 24ʼ dbl axle, triple power, reasonably priced. 393-2729 1989 CHEV camper van, 81,000 miles. Fridge, stove top, sink. Nw tires. Gd running cond. $5000. 667-2480 2012 FOREST River 8.5ʼx16ʼ cargo trailer, tandem axle, rear ramp door, plywood lining, 6 tie downs, roof vent, dome light, $7,500. 660-4220 LIKE NEW!  2000 26' Rustler 5th wheel, sleeps 6, fridge freezer, 3 burner stove, microwave, a/c, stand up shower, many more options, $10,800obo. 668-5882 also 2002 F250 sell as package 2011 WILDWOOD 26ʼ Travel Trailer, immaculate cond, 1/2 ton towable, $14,500. 633-4246 lv msg. 1993 CHEVY camper van, 199,000 kms, auto V8 5.7 engine, air cond, windows, engine runs like new. Nw transmision and water pump.A lot of storage. Camping equipments. $3,500obo. Txt 604-698-8281 14ʼ GOOSENECK trailer, needs axle & a nw deck, includes hitch, $700 obo. 336-0460 14ʼ X 5ʼ tandem axle frame, $300 obo. 336-0460 8FT HEATHER camper. 399-4899 2005 SNOWBEAR Utility Trailer, 4'x8' deck, 2090 LB axel, Weights 450LBS, Removable steel rails and ramp, tilting deck, 4 way connector, 2' ball receiver, new deck, $1100 obo. 332-4174 1993 INTERNATIONAL bus, 72 passengers, clean, inspected. 668-2958 2013 GOOSENECK trailer, Big Tex, 25ʼ, deck on the neck, beavertail w/ramps, 2-10,000lb axle dually, equipment hauler, $12,500. 393-6550

ATLIN - GLACIER VIEW CABINS “your quiet get away” Cozy self contained log cabins canoes, kayaks for rent Fax/Phone 250-651-7691 e-mail sidkatours@ atlin.net www.glacierviewcabins.ca THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone w/dementia. Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713 YRTA (YUKON Retired Teachers) Breakfast Tues. Oct 8th, 9:30 am at Ricky's at The Ramada. Guests welcome! Info: 667-2644 WHITEHORSE G E N E R A L Hospital Women's Auxiliary monthly meeting, Mon. Oct 7th, 7:30 pm at WGH. New members welcome! Info: Barb @ 667-2087 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Action Circle.  Letter writing to protect and promote human rights worldwide. Tuesday, Oct 22 at Whitehorse United Church (upstairs) 7-9pm.   www.amnesty.ca Info call 667-2389 YUKON BROOMBALL AGM meeting October 5 @ 1pm, Sports Yukon. All welcome. YUKON SUPPORT Group for Women who have had a diagnosis of breast cancer meets the first Monday of each month at Copper Ridge Place from 7:00-9:00 pm. Next meeting October 7th. yukonsupport@hotmail.com COFFEE HOUSE! Sat, Oct 5. Featuring: Second Cousins + the Open Stage! Help set up 6pm, 7pm Open stage sign-up, 7:30pm show! $5 United Church Bsmt, 6th & Main. 633-4255 NAKWAYE KU Childcare Society AGM, Fri, Oct 18, 6pm at Yukon College. 668-8860

GROW MARIJUANA COMMERCIALLY. Canadian Commercial Production Licensing Convention October 26th & 27th. Toronto Airport, Marriott Hotel. www.greenlineacademy.com. Tickets 1-855-860-8611 or 250-870-1882. A 1960'S F.H. Collins High School Reunion is being organized by former graduating members of the school. The planned date is the weekend of July 11, 2015 in Whitehorse. Info: http://fhcollins60sreunion.com YOU'RE INVITED to the 2013 United Way Breakfast! Friday, October 4, 6:30-9:30am, Yukon Convention Centre. Tickets available at the door, $10 for adults, $5 for kids & senior. WHITEHORSE  STRING Ensemble new season at the Hellaby Hall, 4th at Elliott.  Every Thursday 6:30pm.  New members welcome! Info: Pam 667-4630 HULLANDʼS HAUNTS & Holly Craft Fair, Oct 26, 10am-3pm @ Jack Hulland Elementary School, Porter Crk. To book your table call 667-8496 ACTIVE TRAILS Whitehorse Assoc. (ATWA) – Annual General Meeting, Oct 3, 7 to 9 PM, Whitehorse Public Library meeting room. Info:  www.activetwa.org WHITEHORSE CROSS Country Ski Annual General Meeting, October 2nd, 7pm, Curling Club lounge at Mt Mac. Info: 668-4477 MENTAL HEALTH Caregivers Support Group meets the third Thursday of every month, 7-9 pm, #4 Hospital Rd, main floor resource room, in Whitehorse.  667-8346. HOSPICE YUKON: Free, confidential services offering compassionate support to those facing advanced illness, death and bereavement.  Visit our lending library @ 409 Jarvis M-F 11:30-3, 667-7429 www.hospiceyukon.net JACKRABBIT AND Bunny registration with take place Sat, Oct 5th, 10:00am-noon at Mt. McIntyre Recreation Centre - downstairs in The Chalet F.H. COLLINS School Council Regular meeting @ 6:30 pm, Oct 2, in the Fine Dining Room at the school. Everyone Welcome SALSA YUKONʼS Latin Dance classes are every Friday @ Leaping Feats Dance Studio, 38 Lewes Blvd. 7:30pm Beginner. 8:45pm Intermediate. For info     335-0909 salsayukon@gmail.com A CARE Affair! Fri, Oct 18, Westmark Hotel, 5:00pm-8:00pm. Goods & Services Auction, Live music, Food, Comedy. Fundraiser for Little Footprints Big Steps work in Haiti. Info: 334-3928 or karenwienberg@gmail.com YUKONERS CONCERNED About Oil/Gas Exploration/Development will be holding a public meeting on the consequences of fracking in Ross River on Oct. 3/13, starting at 7:00 pm in the Hope Centre QUEER YUKON: upcoming social events for the LGBT community. www.queeryukon.com.

Little Footprints, Big Steps was founded to provide ongoing care and protection for the children of Haiti. We welcome and greatly appreciate your support. Check our website for more information!

GOT ACHES? GOT PAINS? NuGrowth Therapeutics will be in Watson Lake Sept. 27-Oct. 7, offering manual soft tissue and cold laser therapies.   Appts./Info.:  250-567-8878 Cash, Visa, Mastercard

TGIF for Haiti

JACK HULLAND School Council is holding its Regular Meeting, Oct 2, 7:00 pm in the School Library. Everyone is Welcome

JAZZ IN the Hall. Thurs, Oct 3. Steve Gedrose educational vignette. Vocalist Nicole Edwards latin project. Jazz jam. Old Fire Hall, 7:00 pm. Tix at door.

STORYTIME: AGES: 6 - 24 months & caregiver(s), Wed Oct 9 - Wed Nov 27, 10:30 a.m. Whitehorse Library. Free registration necessary. Space is limited. 667-5239

MACAULAY LODGE is looking for volunteers interested in visiting with our residents or helping out with recreational programs. Phone Lisa or Ellen at 393-7111.

FAMILY STORY Time Fri Oct 11 (one time only) 10:30-11:15 am, Whitehorse Public Library. Free registration necessary. Space limited. For children ages 3-6, accompanied by an adult. Info: 667-5239

WHEELCHAIR CURLING! Wednesday afternoons at Mount Mac with residents of Macaulay Lodge. Phone Lisa or Ellen at 393-7111. MACAULAY LODGE is looking for volunteers to help us with our community walks on Friday mornings. Phone Lisa or Ellen at 393-7111.

Energy North Construction Inc. (1994) for all your insulation & coating needs Cellulose & polyurethane spray foam Free estimate: 667-7414

MT. LORNE Volunteer Fire Department open house/AGM Thur, Oct 10th, 7 pm at firehall on Robinson Subdivision Rd.  New volunteers and board members always welcome. Info Judy 668-2849.

BACKHAULS, WHITEHORSE to Alberta. Vehicles, Furniture, Personal effects etc. Daily departures, safe secure dependable transportation at affordable rates. Please call Pacific Northwest Freight Systems @ 667-2050

COME SING those old favorite hymns! Sunday Oct 6 7pm at Whitehorse United Church. We take requests. 667-8929. UNITED WAY of Yukon Annual General Meeting, Wednesday October 2, 7:00 pm, Yukon Teachers Association Board Room A CHRISTMAS Bazaar at the Gold Rush Inn Saturday, November 2, 10-4. For crafters/home businesses. For info Jean 667-6772 (or Shelly 667-7629 after 6pm) GREAT NORTHERN Ski Society would like to notify all its members that the AGM for the society will occur on Oct 16, 2013, 7pm, Sport Yukon Boardroom, #1 4061-4th Ave, Whitehorse, Yukon. SENIORS! ELDERS! Learn about your legal rights. Drop in 11-3:300, Old Fire Hall, Tues, Oct 1. International Day of Older Persons. Free lunch. Yukon Public Legal Education Association 393-2044 YUKONERS CONCERNED About Oil/Gas Exploration/Development will be holding a public meeting on the consequences of fracking in Faro on Oct 3, 2013, starting at 7 pm in the Sportsman Lounge. WHOLE CHILD Program Annual General Meeting: Whitehorse Elementary School 4181 Fourth Ave, Mon, Nov 18, 2013, 7pm. Everyone Welcome, especially Whole Child Program families! 456-3871 BISHOP JOSE Salmorin Bantolo from the Diocese of Masbate in the Philippines will speak on environmental responsibility Sat, Oct 5, 7:30pm, Vanier Catholic Secondary School 16 Duke St, Riverdale. A coffee & potluck dessert reception will follow. Information 633-6579 THE SEARCH is on again! We are looking for our 2014 Miss and Teen Yukon candidates to represent us at Miss Canada 2014! Please email your submissions to misscanadascout@hotmail.com ! Now is your chance! LEUKEMIA & Lymphoma Society is hosting a fun & exciting fundraising evening at the Roadhouse on Friday, October 4th, 4pm. Lots of fun prizes, silent auction, door prizes. GOLD FEVER award winning film. Presented by Amnesty International Whitehorse Action Circle, Old Fire Hall, Wednesday, October 16.  Doors open at 6:30pm, film at 7:00pm.  Entry by donation. www.goldfevermovie.com YUKON AFRICAN Caribbean Association (YACA) AGM Thursday, October 31st, 6pm-8pm at Whitehorse Public Library. Contact 335-8510 FUNDRAISER LEUKEMIA and Lymphoma Society, October 8th at Earlʼs, 4:00 join us after work for good food, great door prizes! Thank you for your support !

Dare to Care!

$20 includes hors d’oeurves, live music, auctions, comedy tickets, more info, or to add your service/item to the auction: Karen 334-3928 | karenwienberg@gmail.com John 334-4597 | jpwright66@gmail.com tickets also at Westmark Hotel, Java Connection and the Alpine Bakery www.littlefootprintsbigsteps.com

This ad sponsored by the

- INSULATION Upgrade your insulation & reduce your heating bills

TAI CHI Yukon is offering two beginner courses on Tuesday and Wed evenings at Elijah Smith School. Check www.taichi-yukon.ca, write info@taichi-yukon.ca or call Helene at 668-3814

A muLti-FACeted event tO rAiSe FundS FOr HAiti

WHEN? Friday, October 18 WHERE? Westmark Hotel TIME? 5:O0 to 8:00

Services

want to get involved with

the Humane Society? Become a volunteer and join the Board, walk dogs or help with a fundraiser; it all helps!

Call 633-6019 today to find out how you can become involved!

Full Dimensional Rough Lumber Cabin Logs Staking Posts & Timbers ARCTIC INLAND BUILDING PRODUCTS Serving the Yukon for 30 years Whitehorse 668-5991 Dawson 867-993-5240 SHARPENING SERVICES. For all your sharpening needs - quality sharpening, fair price & good service. At corner of 6th & Strickland. 667-2988

DRUG PROBLEM?

TAITʼS TRAILERS www.taittrailers.com taits@northwestel.net Quality new and used Horse * Cargo * Equipment trailers For sale or rent Call Anytime 334-2194 Southern prices delivered to the Yukon

37

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Narcotics

Anonymous

MEETINGS:

Wednesdays 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. <BYTE> Fridays 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm 4071 - 4th Ave. <Many Rivers>

do you have a problem with food? meetings

mondays 7:30 p.m.

4071 4th avenue oayukon@gmail.com • www.oa.org


38

Yukon News

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS in Whitehorse

MONDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 8:00 pm New Beginnings Group (OM,NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. TUESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 7:00 pm Juste Pour Aujourd’hui 4141B - 4th Avenue. 8:00 pm Ugly Duckling Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. WEDNESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St.. 8:00 pm Porter Crk Step Meeting (CM) Our Lady of Victory, 1607 Birch St. 8:00 pm No Puffin (CM,NS) Big Book Study Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. THURSDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Grapevine Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 6:00 pm Young People’s Meeting BYTE Office, 2-407 Ogilvie Street 7:30 pm Polar Group (OM) Seventh Day Adventist Church 1609 Birch Street (Porter Creek) FRIDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Big Book Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 1:30 pm #4 Hospital Rd. (Resource Room) 9:00 pm Whitehorse Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. SATURDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 2:30 pm Women’s Meeting (OM) Whitehorse General Hospital (room across from Emergency) 7:00 pm Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS) SUNDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 7:00 pm Marble Group Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS)

NS - No Smoking OM - open mixed, includes anyone CM - closed mixed, includes anyone with a desire to stop drinking

WHITE TORNADO CLEANING SERVICES Construction final initial cleans Final and Initial cleanings Construction Sites/Buildings Private homes Offices Good for Contractors Professional Reasonable Rates Bonded “All work Guaranteed” 667-2988 or 334-0514 KLASSIC HANDYMAN SERVICES “HOME RENOVATION SPECIALIST” “SPECIALIZING IN BATHROOMS” Start to Finish • FLOORING • TILE • CARPENTRY • PAINTING • FENCING • DECKS “ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!! DON: 334-2699 don.brook@hotmail.com MC RENOVATION Construction & Renovations Laminated floor, siding, decks, tiles Kitchen, Bathroom, Doors, Windows Framing, Board, Drywall, Painting Drop Ceiling, Fences No job too small Free estimates Michael 336-0468 yt.mcr@hotmail.com ANGYʼS MASSAGE Mobile Service. Therapeutic Massage & Reflexology. Angelica Ramirez Licensed Massage Therapist. 867-335-3592 or 867-668-7724 angysmassage@hotmail.com 200-26 Azure Rd Whitehorse YT, Y1A 6E1 S.V.P. CARPENTRY Journey Woman Carpenter Interior/Exterior Finishing/Framing Small & Medium Jobs “Make it work and look good.” Call Susana (867) 335-5957 susanavalerap@live.com TOMBSTONE CONTRACTING Loader and dump truck services     Driveways, parking lots, concrete driveways, sidewalks and pads.    Fork lift, lifting boom    Snow haul and removal     Free quotes Call  334 2142

www.aa.org

bcyukonaa.org

AA 867-668-5878 24 HRS A DAY

TITAN DRYWALL Taping & Textured Ceilings 27 years experience Residential or Commercial No job too small Call Dave 336-3865

TOPSOIL Call Dirtball

668-2963

AL-ANON MEETINGS contact 667-7142

life been affected by someone’s drinking ???

THOMAS FINE CARPENTRY • construction • renovation • finishing • cabinets • tiling • flooring • repairs • specialty woodwork • custom kitchens 867-633-3878 or cell 867-332-5531 thomasfinecarpentry@northwestel.net NORTHRIDGE BOBCAT SERVICES • Snow Plowing • Site Prep & Backfills • Driveways • Post Hole Augering • Light Land Clearing • General Bobcat Work Fast, Friendly Service 867-335-1106

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Yukon Communities & Atlin, B.C.

Beaver Creek Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Carcross Y.T. Wednesday - 7:30 p.m. Library Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Carmacks Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Dawson City Y.T.

Thursday - 8:00 p.m. New Beginners Group Richard Martin Chapel Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Saturday 7:00 p.m. Community Support Centre 1233 2nd Ave.

Destruction Bay Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Faro Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

ow! N e l lab Avai

Has your

RED BEAR PAINTING Journeyman Painter with 10 years experience. High quality work Residential/Commercial Interior/Exterior For free estimates call 867-334-5134

WEDNESDAY 12:00 noon Hellaby Hall, 4th & Elliott

FRIDAY

7:00 pm Lutheran Church Basement Beginners Mtg ( 4th & Strickland ) 8:00 pm Lutheran Church Basment Regular Mtg ( 4th & Strickland )

Haines Junction Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Mayo Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Old Crow Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Pelly Crossing Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Ross River Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Tagish Y.T. Monday 7:30pm Lightwalkers Group Bishop’s Cabin, end of road along California Beach Telegraph Creek B.C. Tuesday - 8:00 p.m. Soaring Eagles Sewing Centre

Teslin Y.T. Wednesday - 7:00pm Wellness Centre #4 McLeary Friday - 1:30p.m. Health Centre Watson Lake Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 BUSY BEAVERS Painting, Pruning Hauling, Snow Shovelling and General Labour Call Francois & Katherine 456-4755

SNOW CLEARING Sidewalks, Driveways, Commercial, Residential Call Francis at Speedy Sparkle 668-6481 or cell 334-8480 SMALL ELECTRICAL JOBS Light fixtures & lamp repairs Painting in and out Basic plumbing Window washing, Yard clean-up. Small furniture repairs 393-2275 or 1-604-989-5110

LOG CABINS & LOG HOMES Quality custom craftsmanship Using only standing dead local timber For free estimate & consultation contact: Eldorado Log Builders Inc. phone: 867.393.2452 website: www.ykloghomes.com HOUSECLEANER AVAILABLE Fast and thorough No criminal record 30-year Yukon resident $30/hr 335-0009 TCM MAID SERVICE Reliable, Thorough & Professional Reasonable Rates References available 335-4421or 393-3868 LOG CABINS: Professional Scribe Fit log buildings at affordable rates. Contact: PF Watson, Box 40187, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 6M9 668-3632 PASCAL PAINTING CONTRACTOR PASCAL AND REGINE Residential - Commercial Ceilings, Walls Textures, Floors Spray work Excellent quality workmanship Free estimates pascalreginepainting@northwestel.net 633-6368 LUIS RENOVATIONS Over 20 yearsʼ experience. Specializing in home renovation. Drywall, painting, ceilings, counter tops, flooring, decks, patios. 335-1269 IF YOU own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS can lend you money: It's That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1-800-587-2161. DROWNING IN DEBT? Cut debts more than 50% & DEBT FREE in half the time! AVOID BANKRUPTCY! Free Consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1-877-556-3500 BBB Rated A+ BLUE HILL MASONRY • Cultured Stone • Ceramic Tile • Brick Andre Jobin 633-2286 CITYLIGHT RENOS Flooring, tiling, custom closets Painting & trim, kitchens & bathrooms Fences & gates Landscaping & gardening Quality work at reasonable rates Free estimates Sean 867-332-1659 citylightrenos@gmail.com BOBCAT AND BACKHOE SERVICES in Whitehorse, Marsh Lake, Tagish area Call Andreas 660-4813 CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION Licensed, insured, WCB certified Small or big contracting Specialize in new or tiled bathroom renovation Phone David: 333-0772 PLUMBING & HEATING SERVICES Available in Whitehorse & Communities Rough-in, service, maintenance & repair Residential & Commercial 16 years experience Excellent workmanship $75/hr 867-334-5161 SUBARU GURU Fix•Buy•Sell Used Subarus 30 year Journeyman Mechanic Towing available Mario 333-4585 ELECTRICIAN FOR all your jobs Large or small Licensed Electrician Call MACK N MACK ELECTRIC for a competitive quote! 867-332-7879

ZEN SALON & SPA Menʼs, Ladies, Childrenʼs Hairstyling & Esthetics on the corner of 4th and Strickland 667-7936 Open 8am-7pm EXPERIENCED CARPENTER OFFERING: - Siding - Roofing - Framing and Renovations Free estimates and competitive rates. Call Adam 334-3416 DISCONNECTED PHONE? National Teleconnect Home Phone Service. No One Refused! Low Monthly Rate! Calling Features and Unlimited Long Distance Available. Call National Teleconnect Today! 1-866-443-4408. www.nationalteleconnect.com.

Lost & Found FOUND: WATCH, near Mount Lorne Community Centre. Identify to claim @ 667-4603 FOUND:  FRIDAY Sept. 20 on Hamilton Blvd extension: small female dog mixed breed, imaculate manners, appears well cared for,  1-2 yrs old.  Black head to tip, honey brown mask, white paws/chest. 334-4329 FOUND AT Wolf Creek Campground Sept 12, brown/grey & white small teddy bear, campsite by the creek. 633-3332 LOST: 16G black ipod nano w/touch screen, lost on Copper Ridge trail Sept 23rd. 668-6058

Business Opportunities

Looking for New Business / Clients? Advertise in The Yukon News Classifieds!

Take Advantage of our 6 month Deal... Advertise for 5 Months and

Get 1 MONTH OF FREE ADVERTISING Book Your Ad Today! T: 667-6285 • F: 668-3755 E: wordads@yukon-news.com DISTRIBUTOR REQUIRED for beautiful costume jewelry, hand-painted oil paintings, LED signs & chef supplies. Open your own Classic Designs store or add our products to your business. 778-233-4842 www.ourclassicdesigns.com FOR SALE THE WEENIE WAGON Seasonal business Call now for details, Set up for spring 2014 Ph 867-334-4338

Sports Equipment MOTOR BIKE helmet for child 7-11 year old. $10. 667-6966 ASSORTMENT OF XCountry skis, ski poles w/harnesses, boots. Juvenile-adults.. 867-994-2233 TEMPO 610T Treadmill. Used lightly for 6 months, exc shape. Nice & simple. $250. 667-6717.

Kitchen or Restaurant for Lease Town and Mountain Hotel 401 Main Street Apply to Kayle Tel: 668-7644 Fax: 668-5822 Email: info@townmountain.com


WEIDER HOME gym, provides exercise for the entire body, nw cond. Complete w/exercise program. Trimline treadmill, walk-run-climb, etc. Used very sparingly. Take the two at a bargain price. 668-5786 PROFESSIONAL SKI outfit, used 2 seasons, Garmont boots, sz 10, 3 items of outerwear, all exc cond, sz 34. New $900, asking $200 obo. 393-2729 WEIGHT BENCH. 668-2253 DART BOARDS, mounted on wooden frames, ideal for rec room or bar, $100. Don 335-0629 aft 5pm SHOES: SALOMON Elios II, Size 10.5, brand new, never worn!  Bought online for $150 but too small.  Let go for $90. 335-8483 STATIONARY EXERCISE bike,  rowing machine.  $200 for both, exc shape. 633-5470 EXERCISE 335-7052

MACHINE. 393-2600 or

GIRLS SKATES. Mens skates CCM. 393-2600 or 335-7052 CONCEPT 2 indoor power rowing machine. Pacemaster Pro Plus treadmill. Both puchased @ Waterstone, recently serviced. Selling for 1/2 price. $2100. 668-2214 A COMPLETELY assembled Tempo 615 E Eliptical exercise machine in exc shape. Asking $250 obo. See pictures on Kijji. Call 633-6855 if interested. PUNCHING BAG. 668-2253 COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED Tempo 615 E Elliptical exercise machine in exc shape, $250 obo. 633-6855 PRO QUALITY Goalie Gear - 36+2 Reebok p3 leg pads and matching Vaughn trapper and blocker. Sell as set $900. Great condition. Other goalie gear also available. 334-9280. BICYCLE RACK - Rear hitch mount. Holds up to 4 bicycles.  Fits 2" hitch (comes w/adapter to fit a 1 1/4" hitch). Stealth brand.  Pd over $250, asking $100obo. 668-7361 HOCKEY TABLE by CarromSports, plastic dome w/scoreboard+sound, 58"long x 46"H x 34"W, lg players, made in USA, like new. $125. 633-3114 lv msg KINETIC ROAD machine, 2010, bike trainer, used 3x, exc cond, inclʼs hub + 26x1.75 skin & DVD, $200. 633-4772 FREE STANDING basketball net with adjustable height basket. Free, if you take away. 633 6711 FOLDING 393-3753

WEIGHT bench, $60 obo.

Livestock

PORK MEAT For Sale Sold by the half or cut & wrapped All animals are raised naturally No hormones/antibiotics YUKON VALLEY FARM 335-4431 QUALITY YUKON MEAT Dev & Louise Hurlburt Grain-finished Hereford beef Domestic wild boar Order now for full delivery Payment plan available Samples on request 668-7218 335-5192 HORSE HAVEN HAY RANCH Dev & Louise Hurlburt Irrigated Timothy/Brome mix Small square & round bales Discounts for field pick up or delivery Straw bales also for sale 335-5192 • 668-7218 HAY FOR SALE Dry bales kept under a shelter. $12/bale   astra@northwestel.net 633-4496 FRESH CUT 1,000 lb+ hay bales Field delivered $100 each 633-3388

SUPPLY OF TABLETS & ACCESSORIES Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, October 23, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Jenny Richards at (867) 393-6387. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

Baby & Child Items CHILDRENʼS CLOTHING in excellent condition, given freely the first & third Saturday monthly at the Church of the Nazarene, 2111 Centennial. 633-4903 EVENFLO HAPPY CAMPER child's playpen w/storage/travel bag, gd cond, $25. Lightweight & compact stroller, gd cond, $10. 667-8726

Childcare BUBBLEʼS PRESCHOOL 18 months to 12 years This program is opening September 1st Donʼt miss this opportunity to enroll your child. Great program. Great location - Mahʼs Point We offer Quality Care 334-6552 LOLAʼS DAYHOME Located downtown Has spaces available for children 18 months & older. Come to a relaxed environment with Early Childhood Educators, Level 2 & 2A Fully licenced. Call 668-5185

Furniture

Organic Hay from Dawson Creek Timothy, Brome, Alfalfa mix 17 ton load of rounds Delivered 46 bales for $7480 or $160 per bale (740 lbs.) 633-6603

2 DINING chairs, brownish lacquer, seats w/leather look cushions, reg height chairs, brand new, $50 ea. 633-3114 lv msg.

ROASTING CHICKENS for sale. Raised free range and all natural. Call 867-537-3458 or email: mccabecreekfarm@hotmail.com

ROUND WOODEN table, black base, green/blue natural wood color circle. Black suede look bed couch. 668-5188 lv msg, will call back.

HORSE BOARDING $130/month Pasture & hay Large or small groups Tagish area 867-399-7010 ROOSTERS FOR sale, spring 2013, Americana, Buff Orpington, Buff Brahma. 668-4816 TWO LG gelding pack horses. One four yr old green broke pinto mare. $1200 per horse obo. 867-390-2235. Can view in Teslin

REGISTERED AQHA 2 yr old gelding. He already stands at 15.2HH. He loads, trims & is UTD on everything. He is calm & a pleasure to look at & work with, $2,200. 456-7720

PUBLIC TEndER

39

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

LARGE OFFICE desk and matching credenza plus two large filing cabinets. 633-6553

MILTON 2-PIECE Sofa Sectional, L-shape, beige, mint condition, great comfort, great style, bought 6 months ago, barely ever used, delivered, pd $2000, let go for $700. 335-8483 LOFT BED. Beautiful pine twin loft bed with full desk and shelves below. See pic on Kajiji. Perfect for growing kids. $299 obo. Call 633-4699. BLUE HIDE-A-BED. $50. Small computer desk & chair, $25. White bookshelf, $15. Lg oak table. 633-5866 IKEA OFFICE/COMPUTER  desks for sale. 3ʼx4ʼ wooden desktops with pull out shelves-metal frame. Contact Cathy 334-1548 to view

CONSTRUCTION OF THREE (3) STORAGE LOCKER BUILDINGS RIVERDALE AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMPLEX – 60 SELKIRK WHITEHORSE, YUKON 2013 Sealed tenders, plainly marked “with the above project title” will be received up to 2:00 p.m. local time, Wednesday, October 16, 2013, at Yukon Housing Corporation, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2H5. Tender documents may be obtained from Yukon Housing Corporation Office, 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2H5, phone (867) 667-5759. For technical questions you may call the project manager, Mike O’Connor at (867) 667-8114. For questions regarding the bidding requirements, you may call the contract administrator, Sharon McCreadie at (867) 667-5796.

FOUR STOOLS. End table with magazine rack. Room divider. Roll top desk. 667-2583 COUNTRY HOUSE 2-level coffee table (19"hx54"lx30"w), $300. Matching 3-level end table (28"hx28"lx20"w), $225. $475 for both. 667-8726 COUNTRY HOUSE elegant, dark espresso parsonʼs storage bench with beige/light tan microsuede seating, new, $325. 667-8726 GLASS KITCHEN table w/3 chairs. Side table. 393-2600 or 335-7052 TWO BOXSPRINGS, queen sz. 393-2600 or 335-7052 CANWOOD PINE twin bed w/firm foam, high quality mattress. 456-8004 GLIDER CHAIR w/ottoman, wood, blue upholstery, nw $300 asking $100. 3-shelf bookcase, 42”Hx31”Wx11”D, light color, $30. 668-2968 ANTIQUE WOODEN child desk w/built-in height adjustable seat, unique, $140. Green 50”x42” chalkboard in wooden frame, detachable legs, $10. 668-2968 SEALY BED, gd cond, worth $1600 asking $500 obo. 334-6103 ROUND COFFEE table, reddish brown lacquer, 40"W x 17.5"tall, glass 32.5"W, brand new, $50. 633-3114 lv msg. MIRROR [FOR dresser], lacquer, 38"H x 41.5"W, w/, mounting supports, brand new, $25. 633-3114 lv msg MIRROR IN maple frame, 34x48, $150. Maple swivel rocker $30. Antique high back chairs (4), hemp seats, $160. View at 311B Hanson Styr SOLID WOOD 8-drawer desk, nice antique look, $50. 633-2493 2 SINGLE mattresses & wood bedsteads, $100 obo each. Only avai until Oct 6. 633-2493 WOOD ENTERTAINMENT centre, 4ʼhx2ʼd, glass doors, brass fittings, rolltop cover, free. 633-2493

Personals DRUG PROBLEM? Narcotics Anonymous meetings Wed. 7pm-8pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. BYTE Office FRI. 7pm-8:30pm 4071 - 4th Ave Many Rivers Office THE FAIR Exchange Rate for the Week of September 30, 2013 is $0.95 CDN for One U.S. Dollar. CITIZENS ON PATROL. Do you have concerns in your neighborhood & community? Be part of the solution! Volunteer valuable time to the C.O.P.S. program. With your eyes & ears we can help stomp out crime. Info: RCMP 867-667-5555 HEPATITIS C or HIV Positive? Counseling, support, advocacy, nursing & naturopathic services available free of charge at Blood Ties Four Directions Centre. 633-2437 or 1-877-333-2437. All calls confidential ARE YOU MÉTIS? Are you registered? Would you like to be involved? There is a Yukon Metis Nation that needs your support Contact 668-6845

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Project Description: Re-profiling of Waterfront Drive in Carcross, Yukon. Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, October 08, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Kyle Rolling at (867) 667-3553. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

Project Description: Purchase Road Equipment graders, Highway Tractors, Service Truck, Cargo Vans Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, October 22, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to David Knight at (867) 667-3114. Questions on Specifications must be submitted in writing to the project manager by 12:00 pm pdt October 15, 2013. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, October 24, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Muhammad Idrees at (867) 633-7943. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

Community Services

Highways and Public Works

Highways and Public Works

PubLIC TeNDeR TENDER NOTICE

MATCHING SOFA & chair. 668-2253

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The lowest or any tender is not necessarily accepted.

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Yukon Housing Corporation now has all public tenders listed on our website at www.housing.yk.ca/tenders


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40 Wednesday, October 2, 2013


Rough passage

The beauty of beasts

Despite losing essential gear, intrepid filmmakers capture the beauty of the Peel watershed.

An artist transforms the fossil record into fine art.

Page 21

Page 19 Your Community Connection

Wednesday â&#x20AC;˘ Friday

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

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Legal aid slams funding shortfall

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PAGE 3

Jesse Winter/Yukon News

Dustin Foss goes for a joyride in the Carcross Desert on Saturday.

Leef contradicts Harper Gumming the hand that feeds.

VOLUME 53 â&#x20AC;˘ NUMBER 79

PAGE 5 www.yukon-news.com


2

Yukon News

City stages meeting to discuss tax increases

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reation spending or if we added $200,000 to bylaw services, or kept the fire hall as it is,” Curtis hitehorse residents are said. likely looking at a tax inBut the consultation is not crease for 2014, but exactly what enough, according to the Whitesize may depend on their feedhorse Chamber of Commerce. back at a public consultation on “We had asked for about four Thursday. to five weeks notice. This one was Whitehorse Mayor Dan Curtis about a week. So it was difficult said the city is hoping to keep the for people to clear their slates,” increase at the rate of inflation, or said chamber president Rick Karp. about 1.5 per cent. “We applaud the city for actu“It’s going to take some tightally doing a consultation. This is ening of the belt; maybe some something that the Whitehorse service reductions and some rev- chamber has been pushing for for enue generation,” Curtis said. quite a while now,” Karp said. The city is holding a public The biggest problem is that the consultation on Thursday evening city hasn’t released a draft budget from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the or any year-to-date financial inWestmark Hotel. It’s a chance formation, so it’s nearly impossifor the city to explain how much ble for business owners to provide money it has, where its increased an informed opinion, Karp said. costs are coming from, and to get “When you go to the city’s feedback on how citizens want website, and you look at the their taxes collected and spent, budget for 2014, there’s no budget Curtis said. there. What’s there is a questionThe city is also putting naire, and an explanation that we together a website that allows want you to come out and give people to tinker with the city’s feedback,” Karp said. numbers themselves, and see how The city has run budget surthat would affect various user fees pluses since 2008, Karp said, and and taxes. that makes him doubtful that a “It’s not an Excel spreadsheet, tax increase is necessary. but it’s a program that would “If the difference between give people an idea and an unrevenue and expense turns into derstanding how much of a tax a negative, a loss, then of course reduction there would be if we there will be all sorts of discustook, say, $300,000 out of recsion about OK, what are we going News Reporter

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to do. That sort of would justify a tax increase, but we don’t have that and we don’t know,” he said. “We’re saying, ‘Lets look at where you are. What was your 2013 budget, and let’s look at a year-to-date comparatively and see where you are? How can we comment on a budgetary process if we don’t have a proposed budget, if we don’t know what your year-to-date numbers look like?” Karp asked. To Curtis, that request seems odd; he said it was Karp who suggested not releasing a draft budget in the first place. “The Whitehorse chamber were the ones who suggested that they didn’t want a draft budget to come forward because it would look like we’ve already made conclusions as to where and how much was going to be spent,” Curtis said. “His suggestion is quite contraire to his last comment … I’m not quite sure where he’s coming from, but we’ve certainly taken a lead from the chamber in saying that they would support a tax increase no more than the rate of inflation, which we’re striving for. To suggest that there should be zero increase, well, inflation is more than zero,” the mayor said.

The City of Whitehorse could pay up to $15,000 to find out if government grant money was spent effectively on Mount Sima. On Monday, city council approved a motion to hire an independent auditor to gauge the performance of government spending on the troubled ski hill, going back about three years. “We’re going back about two or three years just to see some of the larger grants that have been provided,” said Mayor Dan Curtis. “It would include the Build Canada fund, for instance. There has been about $3 million put through the City of Whitehorse through the federal government or through the territorial government over the last couple of years.” The city has also given Sima between $30,000 and

$40,000 over the last 19 years, said Curtis. But he wants to see whether all public money was spent well or not. The contract will be awarded only to a successful bidder that hasn’t had any previous dealings with either the former Great Northern Ski Society, which ran the hill until this year, or with the city, Curtis said. If the bids come back below $15,000, the administration will immediately award to the lowest successful bidder. If the bids come back higher, it will have to go back to council for another decision. “We’d like to get it done, not only for moving forward with Mount Sima, but for other organizations that might be looking at using this model. This will help them along and avoid the pitfalls that perhaps have been made and look at the good things that have happened,” Curtis said. (Jesse Winter)

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Wednesday, October 9, 2013

3

Yukon News

Legal aid funding ‘yet another Band-Aid’ Ashley Joannou News Reporter

Y

ukon Legal Aid has suspended some of the services it offers to those who can’t afford to otherwise hire a lawyer. When one of the small group’s lawyers left at the end of September, executive director Nils Clarke says he didn’t feel comfortable filling the vacancy until the Yukon government stepped up with more cash to fund his office. As a result, legal aid’s poverty law assistance – which includes representation in disputes over employment insurance, social assistance benefits, landlord and tenant matters and refugee cases – has not been accepting new clients since the beginning of the month. On Tuesday afternoon, the government announced it will be providing legal aid with an additional $200,000 in one-time funding. Clarke says that will allow him to go to his board of directors and recommend that the vacant position be filled. A new lawyer will likely not be in place until the new year, meaning there may still be a gap in services. Situations will be looked at on a case-by-case basis, he said. The long-time lawyer said he was appreciative of the announcement but called the one-time funding “yet another Band-Aid” for the larger problem in the territory – an underfunded legal aid system. “This does not address the issue of appropriate core funding. This addresses the issues of us, for this year, being able to keep the lights on,” he said. In an interview yesterday, Justice Minister Mike Nixon said he was not aware legal aid had suspended some services. Aside from the money, Nixon has ordered a budgetary review of legal aid. Officials are to report back to him before the end of the year with recommendations regarding funding. An increase in core funding

This extra $400,000 is not about being greedy, he says. It’s about fairness. “If they don’t start to recognize the imbalance or the lack of responsibility the territorial government has taken for their portion of the funding, then at some point hard decisions have to be made with respect to the funding of legal aid,” Clarke said. He called that “completely unnecessary, given the fact that the current justice system in the Yukon is extremely well-funded.” The 2013-2014 territorial budget lists the total budget for the Department of Justice as approximately $65 million. The equivalent of 7.5 lawyers work for legal aid. Clarke says he is the only executive director in the country who also takes on cases of his own. The office generally has between 475 and 525 files open at any given time. Ian Stewart/Yukon News A lawyer dealing with only Legal Aid executive director Nils Clarke said his office was forced to suspend some services criminal matters will usually this month due to insufficient funding. have between 60 and 80 open files, while a purely civil lawyer for legal aid is something Clarke other northern territories. government’s contribution was will have around 40 cases and has been advocating for years. According to the most recent 45 per cent. someone with a mixed practice This is the third year the numbers from the Canadian In the N.W.T. the territorial will have from 50 to 60, he said. government has stepped in with Centre for Justice Statistics government paid 81 per cent of Clarke didn’t have specific a one-time increase to make ends (CCJS) report, the total amount the bills that year. In Nunavut numbers for how many people meet. of money spent on legal aid in that number is 78 per cent. were seen by the poverty law lawLegal aid was provided with the Northwest Territories for the There is no more core money yer, but he said the services were an extra $180,000 in the 20102011/2012 year was about $5.3 coming from Ottawa, Clarke used steadily. 11 year to cover high-cost cases million. In Nunavut it was $8.3 said. Legal aid across the country According to the CCJS statisbefore the courts. A year later million. That year in the Yukon is coming to the end of year two tics, in 2011/2012 Yukon’s legal the government gave another legal aid cost $1.9 million. of a five-year funding freeze, he aid had 1,390 approved applica$235,000 in one-time funding to Legal aid across Canada is said. tions and only 51 refusals. That cover more cases. funded through a combination “It all falls to the territory is the highest among the three “There’s a bit of a pattern of federal money and cash from right now. And the territory has territories. developing here, so let’s get to the respective provincial and ter- been able to, with all due respect, His program is being “starved” the core of it. Let’s look into the ritorial governments. abdicate its responsibility for the in the face of an “an objecdetails. I’ll have the department According to the most recent last 13 years.” tively fat justice system” on the work with the society and from Yukon budget, $864,000 of legal When Clarke first spoke to other side, he said. That includes there we’ll see what information aid’s $1.618 million core funding the News on Friday, before the multiple government lawyers, a there is,” Nixon said. comes from the federal governannouncement was made, he said fully funded Public Prosecution The current way of budgeting ment. That works out to about he would like to see the territoService office and other layers of makes it difficult to run services, 53 per cent of funding from rial government increase its core help within the justice system, Clarke said, and is a “constant federal dollars, leaving about 47 contribution to legal aid from funded by both the territorial stress that we face.” per cent from the territory. about $700,000 a year to $1.1 and federal governments. Without the $200,000 influx With the extra $200,000, the million. “There has to be some fairness of cash, the legal aid core budget territory’s contribution jumps to He called on the government or the teeter totter is sitting on for 2013-2014 is listed at apabout 52 per cent per cent. to then link that guaranteed one side and there’s no prospect proximately $1.6 million. According to the CCJS report money to a 2.75 per cent “escala- of it even creaking up,” he said. That is significantly less than numbers provided by Clarke, in tor” used by other departments Contact Ashley Joannou at the budget of legal aid in the two 2011-2012 the Yukon territorial ashleyj@yukon-news.com for increases every year.

Caribou hunting banned on Dempster Highway Ashley Joannou

The ban was put in place because both the small Hart River caribou herd and the Fortymile nvironment Yukon has caribou herd are in the area, issued an emergency ban but none of the larger Porcuon all hunting of all caribou pine caribou herd. in areas around the Dempster When dealing with just the Highway. Porcupine and Hart caribou, a The ban covers nine game ban would not likely be needed management zones surroundif the larger Porcupine herd – ing the highway. It runs until about 169,000 animals – was July 31, 2014. mixing with the Hart in the This is the first time in area, Campbell said. decades that the rare Fortymile There is no hunting of the caribou herd has made an apFortymile herd – about 52,000 pearance this far into the Yukon animals – in Yukon as part of from Alaska, Environment a recovery plan created by the Yukon spokesperson Nancy Alaska and Yukon governments. Campbell said. News Reporter

E

This emergency closure applies to all Yukon resident and non-resident hunters. The Fortymile herd was originally huge. In the 1920s there were stories of animals being seen in Whitehorse and Fairbanks, Campbell said. According to a report done by the Tr’ondek Hwech’in First Nation, the herd declined from an estimated high of 568,000 animals in 1920 to a low of 5,000 in 1976. When the herd first moved back across the border from Alaska into the Yukon in 2002 it was “big news,” Campbell said.

Until now, they were mostly found in the Dawson area. Campbell said it’s not uncommon for caribou to move around. “There’s good eating apparently,” she said of the area around the highway. The caribou hunting ban applies to GMS 2-16, 2-23, 2-24, 2-25, 2-27, 2-28, 2-29, 2-39, and 2-51, which includes the Dempster Highway from Dempster Corner to the Ogilvie River bridge (km 0 to km 195). The ban covers all hunters except members of the Tr’ondek Hwech’in and Nacho Nyak Dun First Nations.

Those governments are responsible for deciding on their own if they want to implement bans, Campbell said. The Porcupine Caribou herd has split into two groups this season. One group is near Arctic Village in Alaska while the other is spread out from Old Crow to the Miner River area in the Ogilvie Mountains. If the smaller herds move on or the Porcupine caribou come to the area, the government may consider reversing the ban, Campbell said. Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com


4

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Judge challenges Truth in Sentencing Act Ashley Joannou News Reporter

A

Yukon judge has ruled that the federal government’s Truth in Sentencing Act violates a man’s rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. In a 62-page decision made public last week, judge Karen Ruddy was deciding how much credit Yukoner David Chambers should receive for the time he spent behind bars prior to being sentenced for break and enter, assault and uttering threats. The Truth in Sentencing Act was passed in late 2009 and came into force on February 22, 2010. Its major impact was to limit the amount of credit a judge can give a person for time spent in

custody. In the Yukon, like many other jurisdictions, it is common for offenders to receive as much as a day and a half credit for every day spent in pre-trial custody. The question in this case comes when a person has been rearrested after already being released before sentencing. In those cases, the act says a person should not get any extra credit for that time in jail, only a 1:1 ratio. The Crown argued that the new rules should be applied to Chambers, leaving the 31-yearold member of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations with about four months left to serve in his sentence. But Ruddy sided with the

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of systemic discrimination which has led to the overrepresentation of aboriginal offenders in the Canadian criminal justice system and in Canadian jails, would consider that the impugned portion of the provision operates in a fundamentally unfair manner with respect to aboriginal individuals, such as Mr. Chambers,” she said. “It will undeniably lead to lengthier sentences for aboriginal offenders, and this is not only contrary to the express direction of the Supreme Court of Canada in Gladue and Ipeelee, but also contrary to the principles of fundamental justice.” Chambers was released with credit for time served. He will be on probation for 12 months. Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com

Federal job program draws ire Jacqueline Ronson

market agreement funding has supported programs like Skookum Jim Friendship Centre’s youth ukon MLA Ryan Leef says a employment centre, the Kwancontentious new federal job lin Dun House of Learning and program will better support the Challenge Community Vocational needs of industry. Alternatives’ Bridges employability “The job grant itself has been program. widely supported and hailed as That funding was over $1 million a great initiative from industry. for this fiscal year. They’re excited and happy to be Under the proposed schedule for involved in the process now, and de- the Canada Job Grant roll-out, over fine what those training needs are.” four years that funding would be Provincial and territorial leaders cut to $200,000. across the country have denounced An additional $300,000 would the program as proposed, saying pay for the job grants themselves. it will detract from successful job The idea behind the program is training initiatives for underserved that the federal government, territopeople. rial government and an employer Here in the Yukon, federal labour would each contribute up to $5,000 for the training of an employee or Fri, Oct. 4 thru potential employee for an available Thurs, Oct 10 job. “It’s fairly well established that Whitehorse Yukon Cinema Whi8thorse 304 Wood Street Ph: 668-6644 investment by employers into the training of their employees is a great way to improve retention and to improve morale and to improve an overall teamwork setting,” said Leef. And it’s what industry has asked for, he said. (PG) Nightly in 3D at 7:00 & 9:20 PM “The job grant had a number Sat & Sun Matinees in 3D at 1:00 and in 2D at 3:20 of consultations around it and industry here in the Yukon was able to provide feedback and input. So a large part of that has been built (PG) Fri thru Wed in 3D into this program, right across the at 6:50 & 9:15 PM country.” Sat & Sun Matinees in 3D But Rick Karp, president of the News Reporter

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Whitehorse Chamber of Commerce, says no consultation occurred that he is aware of. “If there was consultation, it wasn’t with anyone here as far as I know. I would like to meet a person who was consulted.” The Yukon already has a successful business training fund paid for by the federal and territorial governments and employers, said Karp. “It’s very active. We have to meet almost every two weeks, we have to call the committee together, because we’re getting a lot of applications from business.” And the Canada Job Grant would not pay for travel expenses, which can be a big cost for training in the Yukon, he said. Leef said that Karp’s criticism of the program demonstrates a failure to acknowledge the full suite of job training programs that the federal government has brought to the territory. That includes expanding community college campuses and investing in a mobile mine training simulator so that people do not have to travel, said Leef. The existing business training program has some issues in terms of timing and access, and the Canada Job Grant is designed to be as flexible as possible, he said. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

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and R. v. Ipeelee, as well as other cases related to aboriginal people in the justice system. “The Supreme Court of Canada has, in powerful language, spoken at length about the experience of aboriginal persons in Canada; how that history has negatively impacted on them resulting in a gross overrepresentation of aboriginal offenders in the criminal justice system and in Canadian jails; and of the obligation of all judges to consider the systemic or background factors which may have brought an aboriginal offender before the courts,” she said. “I conclude that a reasonable person, knowledgeable about both the philosophy and principles of sentencing and the history

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defence, ruling that portion of the law “has a grossly disproportionate impact on aboriginal offenders and is overbroad in its reach” and therefore violated the charter. In making her decision to give Chambers the most credit possible for his time in custody, Ruddy pointed to other court decisions that take into account a person’s aboriginal history. “In my view, penal legislation that disallows any consideration of an individual’s aboriginal status is constitutionally flawed, offends the principles of fundamental justice, and can only be considered to have a grossly disproportionate impact on aboriginal offenders,” she said. Ruddy pointed to two major cases in recent years, R. v. Gladue

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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Leef pledges support for missing women inquiry

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ukon MLA Ryan Leef has announced that he will support a federal inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women and girls. He has heard “loud and clear” from Yukoners that this is something that they want, said Leef. People have told him that inquiry would give closure, answers and hopefully solutions, he said. “I’ve committed to Yukoners that if the call for an inquest reaches the floor of the House of Commons that I will indeed vote for that, regardless of who tables it in the House.” Premiers of Canada’s 13 provinces and territories have all joined together to ask for a federal inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women and girls. But Prime Minister Stephen Harper has, so far, rejected the call. When Harper visited the Yukon in August, he dodged a reporter’s question on if he would support an inquiry. “It’s our strong belief that there has been a lot of study of this particular issue, and we have taken a number of steps to deal with this,” Harper said. He added that the focus should be on protecting all Canadians. “We think that what is important is that we look for ways of taking action, not just for missing and murdered aboriginal women but more broadly. It’s about securing safe streets and communities,” he said. While Leef is prepared to go against party leadership on this issue, this does not signal a rift between him and the party or the prime minister, he said. “The reality is, I’m not defying leadership, I’m standing up for Yukon constituents.” The Conservative Party has been clear on the issue of free votes in the House, so a vote

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Participants during Friday’s Sisters in Spirit silent march make their way along the waterfront in Whitehorse. Vigils, walks and rallies were held across Canada on October 4 to honour the lives of missing and murdered aboriginal women.

against party lines is no act of defiance, he said. Leef agrees with the prime minister that there are many concrete actions that the government is already taking on this issue, he said. He criticized the NDP Opposition for failing to support these initiatives. “I’d certainly be calling on the Opposition to join the government on a lot of the substantive and concrete measures that we’ve already taken to eliminate and reduce violence, to improve the social conditions for First Nation women and girls,” said Leef. He mentioned specifically the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act. “That body of legislation provided First Nation women the same property rights as any other woman in Canada when they are divorced. Before that, they had no right of claim to property they were

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living on when a divorce occurred.” The act received royal assent in June, but has not yet come into force. “We were able to get that piece of legislation through, despite the Opposition not supporting it, which is absolutely alarming, to me, that they wouldn’t have supported that body of legislation,” said Leef. Some First Nation groups have raised concerns with the legislation, arguing that it steps on their sovereignty over their jurisdictions and fails to guarantee the resources necessary to administer the law. It has no effect in the Yukon, since there are no reserves in this territory. Leef also mentioned $182,000 in federal money directed at engaging Yukon men and boys to end violence against women and girls, and various other investments in

education, housing and training. “It’s the social conditions that are contributing the greatest to the higher level of risk that aboriginal women and girls are facing,” said Leef. Leef also agrees with Harper that inquiries are often unfocused and sometimes fail to provide real solutions, he said. He is therefore calling on provinces, territories and First Nations to agree to contribute financial and human resources to any inquiry on missing and murdered aboriginal women. That would ensure that the inquiry has a sharp focus, stays on track, and acknowledges regional differences, said Leef. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

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6

Yukon News

Opinion

EDITORIAL

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

INSIGHT

LETTERS

COMMENTARY The Canada Job Grant only benefits big corporations Linda Leon

be split three ways between the provinces and territories, Open letter to MP Ryan Leef: the federal government and ast month Canada’s teremployers. ritorial and provincial Since small and mediumpremiers met to discuss the sized businesses cannot afford Canada Job Grant, which the these training costs, the only federal government wants to employers to benefit from launch with their co-operthis program would be large ation. The premiers are not corporations, many of them happy. foreign owned and most of The new program is prothem in the resource extracposed as a replacement for tion business. Is this another the labour market agreeindirect subsidy to the fossil ment, which was designed fuel industry? to “increase labour market The provinces and territorparticipation of groups that ies would see $300 million of are under-represented in the $500 million, once dediCanada’s labour force and to cated to the labour market enhance the employability agreement, clawed back. and skills of the labour.” They are also being asked It was a bilateral agreeto contribute an additional ment with up to $500 million $300 million to support the in transfer-payment support new program. This does not from the federal government. include the costs of adminIt was a way to devolve labour istering this program, which management to the provinces the provinces and territories and territories and to increase would be asked to undertake. the number of skilled workers As Rick Karp from the Whitein Canada. On the whole it horse Chamber of Commerce worked, in large part because has pointed out, this fund it could be tailored to the won’t cover the costs of travel unique needs of each jurisdic- and housing that are necestion. sary for trainees from remote The purpose of the Cancommunities. ada Job Grant is “to ensure Where are the study groups that skills training funds are or pilot programs that supbeing used to help Canadians port the Conservative governobtain the qualifications they ment’s claim that this will need to get jobs in highbring jobs and prosperity to demand fields.” With this Canadians? Are there docugrant, the cost of training, up mented programs of similar to $15,000 per trainee, would design in other countries?

L

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The federal government didn’t even bother to consult with the premiers about this program. The Conservative government was so confident that the premiers would sign off on the Canada Job Grant that it sent out advertisements as though it was a done deal. The prime-time ads are estimated to cost “hundreds of thousands” according to the National Post. Citizens complained to Advertising Standards Canada about the ads because they did not supply relevant information. The advertisements were pulled before they could be listed on the council’s online “ad complaints report” as being in breach of Canadian Code of Advertising Standards. Ryan, as well as the television advertisements, there were two Ten Percenters with the same misinformation on them. Your member’s expenses will be open to public scrutiny for this year and, since I am still collecting Ten Percenters, it will be very easy to figure out exactly how much of our money you spent on misleading advertisements. So why is the Conservative government so enamoured with their Canada Jobs Grant program? Are they ideologicReporters

Jacqueline Ronson

jronson@yukon-news.com

Jesse Winter

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Ashley Joannou

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ally averse to helping those on the bottom of the economic totem pole? Are large industries seen as the only constituency that counts? Is it because they don’t receive political currency from the labour market agreement while they could claim all of the credit from the Canada Job Grant? If they insist on going down this my-way-or-thehighway road without consulting with the provinces and territories or listening to education and labour experts, the Conservative government may find themselves in the uncomfortable position of taking all of the blame. Now that the premiers have refused to co-operate, the federal government is approaching the industrial sector hoping that the Canada Job Grant could work in a

bilateral way. I haven’t heard that there is much enthusiasm there, either. Perhaps if Mr. Harper had held a real job before he became a politician he would have understood, as a result of hands-on experience, the wisdom of, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” The labour market agreement provided funding that helped train unskilled workers in the Yukon. The territorial government has spoken out against the Canada Job Grant. The Whitehorse Chamber of Commerce agrees that this is a bad deal for Yukon. Will you speak out against the Canada Job Grant? May you walk on the high road. Linda Leon is a Whitehorse freelance writer.

Quote of the Day “The reality is, I’m not defying leadership, I’m standing up for Yukon constituents.” Yukon MP Ryan Leef explaining why he supports a federal inquiry into the death and disappearance of hundreds of aboriginal women, despite the prime minister’s stance. Page 5

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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

INSIGHT

Billion-dollar bets mere $430 million in construction and working capital for its proposed Yukon mine. It would by Keith take roughly 90 Victoria Golds to Halliday equal the economic footprint of just the Petronas project. Given the much lower profit margin a typical mine has compared to a gas well, the tax revenues from the Petronas project are probably much more than 90 times bigger than what a mine like Victoria Gold’s would generate. ast week I wrote about how These billion-dollar investnorthern B.C.’s fracking industry had garnered global at- ments, assuming they actually happen, will change the ecotention. This week the news got nomic map of our region. It even bigger, and turned into a used to be that our part of North regional story involving Alaska. America was in the upper left of Malaysia’s prime minister a map with Toronto and New announced that Petronas, the government-owned energy com- York at the centre. Now Asia is pany, will invest an eye-popping at the centre of the map, and $36 billion to move B.C. natural natural gas trade routes converge there from around the periphgas to Asia. Meanwhile, Alaska’s ery of the Pacific Ocean: Kenai, big three oil companies and pipeline company Trans-Canada Kitimat, Oregon, Latin America and Australia. announced that the Kenai PenLike it or not, and many don’t, insula was the leading contender liquefied natural gas looks like for a gas export terminal for a new Alaskan gas pipeline system it will be the central part of the economic story in our part of that could cost anywhere from the world for the next few dec$45 billion to $65 billion. ades. Alberta has a long-standing On top of these announcegas industry too, and even the ments, China’s CNOOC and N.W.T. hopes to get in on the acother North American energy tion with its Canol shale gas play. companies have announced several other multi-billion-dollar N.W.T. politicians were recently in North Dakota marvelling at natural gas projects in B.C. the opportunities and excesses To put this in perspective, that state’s fracking boom have Victoria Gold is looking for a

YUKONOMIST L

created. There is strong opposition to natural gas production in the Yukon. Anti-fracking groups have dominated the headlines. The Yukon Party government, keen as it appears to be to mine the Peel watershed, even took gas exploration in the Whitehorse trough off the table last year. Unresolved land claim issues in southeastern Yukon also limit the potential in that potentially gas-rich region, just across the border from the now worldfamous gas fields of Fort Nelson. The regional natural gas mega-trend has big implications for the Yukon, even if we don’t end up with a natural gas industry of our own. This is because, although the tax revenues from gas mostly stay where it is produced and transported, the economic impacts and climate impacts travel across borders. Consider a future where we have a gas industry similar in scale to Fort McMurray spread out from Kitimat to Fort Nelson, and another in Alaska. Businesses will be attracted to invest in nearby regions rather than the Yukon. Workers will be getting offered higher pay and better benefits to work in the gas sector. All of this will put upward pressure on costs here in the Yukon. Even if our mining industry is in the doldrums in a few years,

it will still cost us top dollar to build new schools or renovate our houses. This is because we’ll be competing with booming regions for businesses and labour. Some businesses and workers based in the Yukon will be able to travel to the boom regions, which will be good for them, but the rest of the Yukon population may not share in the benefits. The incremental tax revenue to the Yukon government may be more than outweighed by the higher prices it ends up paying for infrastructure and construction. Climate change also crosses borders. All those wells, flare stacks, pipeline compressors, LNG tankers and Asian power plants will be pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Even if the Yukon says no to fracking and a big natural gas industry, global warming will affect us as much as it does everyone else. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s most recent report says it is extremely likely that humans have been the primary cause of warming observed since 1950, and that increases in global surface temperatures are likely to exceed 1.5 C this century in most scenarios. There are also scenarios where temperatures go much higher. The effects would be very serious.

Future generations may wonder whether responding to recent climate change science by building an enormous natural gas industry in northwestern North America was a good idea. Nonetheless, elected governments in our region are charging ahead with natural gas. The recently elected B.C. government has appointed a special minister for natural gas development. Premier Alison Redford of Alberta is headed for China soon to discuss petrochemical business opportunities. N.W.T. ministers, as noted above, are touring North Dakota’s energy industry. Even the left of the Alaskan political spectrum is pro-gas. Here’s what Senator Mark Begich, a Democrat who is up for re-election in 2014, had to say recently: a “liquefaction plant and export terminal will be a multi-billion investment and huge shot in the arm to both Alaska’s economy and confidence in our state’s energy future… a gas line from Prudhoe Bay to the Kenai Peninsula can meet Alaska’s in-state energy needs while supplying the energy-thirsty countries of the Asia Pacific.” Keith Halliday is a Yukon economist and author of the MacBride Museum’s Aurore of the Yukon series of historical children’s adventure novels. You can follow him on Twitter @hallidaykeith

Missing and murdered aboriginal women deserve an inquest Ryan Leef

T

here has been a lot of discussion around the call for an inquiry into the serious and troubling issue of murdered and missing aboriginal women in Canada. In the Yukon, this was cemented by Premier Darrell Pasloski passing a unanimous motion in the Yukon legislature calling for a national inquiry. This decision was born from the premiers’ meeting on July 24 of this year at Niagara-on-theLake where our country’s 13 provincial and territorial leaders called on the federal government to have such an inquiry. At that time, Prime Minister Stephen Harper stated that he remains skeptical of commissions of inquiry generally – not to say they never work, or never produce good recommendations, but his experience has been they almost always run over time, over budget, and often the recommendations prove to be of limited utility. The federal government has taken concrete and measurable action that deals, head on, with many of the conditions that contribute to the alarming rates of murdered and missing aboriginal women. We have been studying several different venues and have provided funding for multi-year studies within various branches of our government.

Funding elements within the justice system have been provided to increase the efficacy of both prevention programs as well as investigative techniques delivered by organizations and police services. In the House of Commons we supported a unanimous motion calling for a parliamentary committee on murdered and missing aboriginal women: a report is due in 2014. This committee is continuing its in-depth study, and parliamentary committees have a much higher impact on legislation necessary to address Canadian issues. While the opposition has been calling for an inquest, it is important to note that an inquest alone is not the solution in and of itself, and to stop short with merely a call for action is not a genuine effort to address the issue. The opposition has failed to support our government’s very real efforts to improve the lives of aboriginal women. Our introduction of real matrimonial property rights legislation; budget measures to support groups and organizations that focus on violence

prevention; literacy investments; affordable housing funding like the $110 million for Nunavut and $600 million Canada-wide in Budget 2013; education and job-specific training initiatives; all of which are designed to improve social conditions providing opportunities that help reduce the risks currently faced by aboriginal women and girls. Inquests can provide some challenges, and in the worst cases they fail to honour the victims and the families seeking closure, answers, and solutions. To that end, I believe that a meaningful and complete inquest requires the participation both in human resources and financial terms from the provinces, territories, and the First Nation governments. Many of the social conditions that enhance the risk and account for the disproportionate percentage of aboriginal women that go missing, are murdered, and suffer desperately low solution rates fall within the jurisdictional control of the provinces. From social services, to housing, to municipal and provincial

police forces, education and health care delivery, an inquest that does not have a solid partnership and participation of the provincial and territorial premiers and First Nation governments will only disappoint and frustrate those we seek to serve – those who deserve answers, solutions and closure. As a former member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and as an investigator with Yukon’s Safer Communities and Neighborhoods Unit, I have seen firsthand the path that leads an individual to increased risk and the impact of violence on individuals, families, communities, and our territory. I do understand why Yukoners are seeking such an inquest, and it is my job as their representative to carry their message forward. So, I have joined the voice of Yukon citizens asking for a national inquest on missing and murdered aboriginal women. I also believe, that done properly, an inquest will serve to complement the already outstanding efforts our government is making to provide opportunity, hope, healing and prosperity to all First Nation communities in Canada. Ryan Leef is Yukon’s member of Parliament.


8

Yukon News

LETTERS

Please join us to celebrate

Jim Robb’s 80th

Thank you, Softball Yukon

Birthday! October 17th 3pm – 7pm Gold Rush Town Hall

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Wednesday, October 9, 2013

els out there, and it is a queswidely seen as a sound investtion of finding the one best ment made by Softball Yukon, Open letter to George Arcand, suited to one’s organization. made at a critical moment, in Bill Stonehouse and the board Of course our work for the a partner in the sport and rec of Softball Yukon: coming year at Mount Sima community. Please accept my deepest includes developing a susWhile each of us may inthanks for Softball Yukon’s tainable financial strategy to dulge in different sports, from support of Mount Sima, the allow us to deliver service to hockey to softball to snowusers of the hill and Friends our community and to meet board or skiing, the higher of Mount Sima. As a founding our obligations, including values of good sportsmanmember of Friends of Mount the timely repayment of the ship, building value, openSima and the chair of the long- $50,000 loan from Softball ness, honesty and a strong term revenue group, I appreYukon. sense of community are values ciate the support and vote of As importantly, in Friends worth upholding on the ball confidence in the work of so of Mount Sima you will find diamond, at the rink, on the many volunteers to keep the a core of people dedicated slopes and in our respective hill going. to the high ideals reflected societies’ boardrooms. As you know, we worked in your generous support. swiftly and hard to develop Cristina Pekarik and deploy a plan to secure the Over the longer term, I hope your support will come to be Whitehorse core winter operations of the hill over the last three months, adjusting to changing circumstances as they arose. Obviously, I am grateful for the The Yukon News welcomes letters from its readers. financial support. But I am as Letters should be no longer than 500 words and must be signed thankful for the time you took with your full name and place of residence. A daytime phone to go over the plan and budget number is also required for verification purposes only. We reserve and to share your depth of exthe right to edit letters for clarity, length, accuracy and legality. perience in delivering worldYou can send submissions to editor@yukon-news.com. They can class sport and recreation in be faxed to 867-668-3755 or mailed to 211 Wood St., Whitehorse, our community. As you noted, Yukon Y1A 2E4. there is an abundance of mod-

Letters to the editor

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9

Yukon News

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Talking prisons and human rights Jesse Winter News Reporter

W

hen it comes to prisons and aboriginal women, the numbers are startling. Over the past decade, the number of incarcerated aboriginal women has jumped by more than 90 per cent, according to a Public Safety Department report last year. Overwhelmingly, Canadian First Nations women are more likely to be jailed, often for simply trying to survive in dangerous environments, said Kim Pate, the executive director of Elizabeth Fry societies in Canada. “Often in violent situations, women can’t engage in hand-tohand combat, so they end up picking up something that is later labeled as a weapon,” Pate said. The practice is known as countercharging, and sometimes happens when there is a domestic assault where both attacker and victim are injured. The attacker will say “she hit me first,” or accuse his victim of inciting the attack, and both parties end up charged with a crime. It’s particularly a problem in the Yukon, where the rate of sexual assault is three times the national average. Aboriginal women are also three times more likely to be the victims of violence than non-aboriginal women. In those cases, self-defence can often lead to counter-charges. “The record is pretty abysmal in terms of police response,” said Elizabeth Sheehy, an expert who studies how the justice system handles battered women who are charged with killing their abusive partners. “Aboriginal women are really on their own when it comes to violence. They have a higher rate of being assaulted because of the dysfunctional communities that have been created (by colonial history),” she said. It’s a problem that’s reaching epidemic proportions across the

country, and it’s getting worse, especially in the North where there is a lack of support and treatment services, Pate said. “In Whitehorse itself, there have been a couple of cases where women were jailed because of mental health issues when there weren’t any resources in the community,” Pate said. “I’ve spoken to police officers who said, ‘The last place I wanted to take her was to jail, but no hospital would take her.’” Pate and Sheehy joined human rights philosopher (and former Yukoner) Lisa Guenther in Whitehorse over the weekend for a public forum discussing the issues affecting aboriginal women in the justice system. The three women also gave presentations at Yukon College on Monday. Sheehy’s work has focussed on 91 women across Canada who were charged with murder after killing abusive spouses. Forty-one percent of the women whose cases she studied were aboriginal. “Overwhelmingly, aboriginal women are more likely to plead guilty to manslaughter instead of going to trial,” Sheehy said, “even though if they do make it to trial, they are far more likely to successfully argue self-defence and be acquitted.” Sheehy said there are many contributing factors including a lack of adequate legal support, but colonial history, residential schools and the often-dysfunctional communities those issues have left behind certainly play a part as well. “Why do so many of them find themselves in those positions of kill or be killed? Aboriginal women are acutely endangered. It has set aboriginal women up as targets of male violence,” she said. “Basically historically they were

non-citizens. They were dispossessed of their access to land, their access to family ties. There are many legal interventions that created aboriginal women as non-citizens and almost non-persons,” she said. Guenther’s work takes a more philosophic approach, examining issues like incarceration and its effect on both prisoners and the communities they are removed from. Much of her recent work focuses on solitary confinement. “Solitary confinement treats people as if they are separable from the world, as if you could just pluck them from the world and other people, put them in a cement box and expect them to become accountable for their actions. It makes people mentally ill, and undermines their capacity to make sense of themselves and perceive the world,” Guenther said. That can have devastating, and often counter-productive, results when applied to marginalized prison populations like aboriginal women. Guenther has spent years studying prison populations in the U.S., where young black men are disproportionately targeted and incarcerated. The number of AfricanAmerican youth being arrested in the States as part of the decadeslong war on drugs is becoming an increasingly contentious issue south of the border. “But it’s actually worse for indigenous Canadians here,” Guenther said. Canada’s First Nations make up a little over four per cent of the total Canadian population, but constitute more than 20 per cent of Canadians behind bars, according to Statistics Canada. One in three Canadian women sentenced to federal prison is aboriginal. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

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Yukon News

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is United Way Month Your donation is directed towards building healthy Yukon communities with innovative projects that: tFOSJDIUIFMJWFTPGDIJMESFO ZPVUIBOEGBNJMJFT tBTTJTUQFPQMFMJWJOHXJUIEJTBCJMJUJFT tDPNCBUQPWFSUZBOE tDPNCBUESVHBOEBMDPIPMBCVTF PGXPSLQMBDFEPOBUJPOTTUBZJO:VLPO

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12

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Tory Senator being eyed by elections chief Jennifer Ditchburn

bitterly left his post after only three weeks. “I would have cleaned OTTAWA things up if I had stayed, but uebec’s electoral watchsince I left I handed it over to dog says that illegal the police. At the time, it was a financing of Quebec’s now de- bit strange to go to the police funct ADQ may have occurred about that, but now I think – and the time frame overlaps I was right to do it because with Tory Senator Leo Housa- today we know what was going kos’s time as chief fundraiser on wasn’t pretty.” for the provincial party. Housakos responded by reMeanwhile, the former iterating he did not participate leader of the ADQ, Gilles Tail- nor did he have any knowledge lon, told The Canadian Press of wrongdoing while he was on Tuesday he gave a deposithe chairman of the ADQ’s tion to Quebec police in 2009 fundraising arm from 2002 to outlining his concerns that the 2008. He said nobody in any party had been taking in illegal position of authority, includdonations in previous years. ing the Quebec provincial “In 2009, we were calling for police, has ever contacted him an inquiry into the construcfor questioning. tion industry, and to clean “I can tell you that all the up political financing. (Party fundraising we did followed insiders) came back and said the law, from A to Z, with no to me, be careful what you’re exception” he said in an intersaying Gilles, because these view Tuesday. things are going on in your The comments come a day after construction boss Lino own house,” said Taillon, who Canadian Press

Q

Ta’an Kwäch’än council invites TKc citizens to attend:

Referendum Community Consultations wednesday, october 9th at 6 p.m at the Mount Mcintyre centre

Zambito told CBC News that Housakos had asked him to make a donation of nearly $30,000 to the ADQ in 2008. At the time, Housakos was also Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s appointee on the board of Via Rail. Zambito said the money was collected by asking friends and staff at his firm to write cheques and then reimbursing them. Such a system of “borrowed names” has been described in detail at the Charbonneau inquiry into contract corruption in Quebec. Zambito expressed his suspicion that the senator knew how the money was raised, saying, “They all knew the system. No one’s going to make me believe they didn’t know what was happening.” Housakos said he did not have any knowledge the donors were later being reimbursed. “Throughout that whole interview (Zambito) acknowl-

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edged he’s the one that did the illegal activity. The only thing he said that was a stretch was ‘He must have known, because it was going on all over the place...,”’ Housakos said. “What was my participation in illegal activities? I took an envelope full of cheques?” Former ADQ president Mario Dumont had a similar comment Tuesday, saying it would have been impossible for parties to prevent or check for such schemes. “The truth is that you have a cheque in your hands, it comes from a citizen, it’s legal. You deposit it, it clears the bank and it’s a perfectly legal donation,” Dumont told Montreal’s 98.5 radio station. “The next week, the person who made the contribution is reimbursed by their boss. The contribution becomes illegal and the political party never knew.” A spokesman for Quebec’s

hours: Northern Hospital & Safety Supply Inc. 4200B 4th Ave. 668-5083 • www.norhosp.com 9am to 5pm Monday-Friday We do not close for lunch.

chief electoral officer says the office has taken interest in cases where it is clear that a party has received significant amounts of “sectoral financing,” or money that comes from a single type of business – law, engineering or construction firms, for example. “What we’ve established is that the ADQ has effectively received $800,000 in sectoral financing, and a part of that might be illegal,” said spokesman Denis Dion, referring to a time frame of 2006 to 2011. “It’s possible we are investigating, but we can’t confirm that.” Over the months at the Charbonneau inquiry, different witnesses have raised their contributions to the ADQ. The former president of Genius Conseil said he gave to all political parties in a bid to curry favour, using the same system of borrowed names for contributions as Zambito described. Quebec’s elections office calculated the amount Genius gave to the ADQ as $28,700 between 1996 and 2010. Engineering firm BPR is another example of a business that gave generously to the ADQ. Former president Pierre Lavallee testified before the Charbonneau commission that all political parties, including the ADQ, had solicited tens of thousands of dollars from his firm. BPR gave $42,420 to the ADQ between 2006 and 2008. The following year, Lavallee hired the newly named Senator Housakos to work at the company. Lavallee said all the donations from the company were made legally by staff members. In the meantime, Lavallee has

Volunteering where we live, work and play Our commitment to supporting the North continues Emily demonstrates Northwestel’s commitment to bringing us together – from the past to the present and into the future. Last year, she and fellow employees volunteered more than 28,000 hours of their time in their communities and Northwestel donated more than $600,000 to local charities, non-profits and cultural organizations.

Emily Corporate Communications, Whitehorse

More than 30 years of Northwestel sponsorship— that’s alotta loppets!


admitted to participating in a kickback scheme on municipal contracts in Montreal and resigned from his post. BPR executives were among the engineering consulting firms that bought tickets en masse to a Conservative fundraiser featuring Harper in May 2009. Housakos was one of the key organizers. The fundraiser helped the Laurier Ste-Marie Conservative riding association rake in $288,823, or five times more funds than Harper’s riding association of Calgary Southwest that year. “The fact that eight people in an office contribute to a political party doesn’t mean that the employer reimbursed those employees, but it gives you a hint,” said Dion of Quebec’s elections office. “When we see that, it makes us want to go have a look, and maybe eventually lead to an investigation.” Housakos describes the ADQ as being a “minnow” among Quebec political parties with minimal support from the construction industry over the years. The party has since been folded into the Coalition Avenir Quebec. “Except for a basically six or seven month period, we were piss poor running on fumes,” Housakos said. “In 2005, 2006, 2007, we were raising $100,000 a year, and I can tell you how we were raising that money, penny by penny, dollar by dollar.” Other former associates of Housakos are facing charges in connection with contract fraud in Quebec. Former construction boss Tony Accurso faces fraud, breach of trust and corruption charges by Quebec’s anti-corruption squad, a range of federal charges in connection with

newborn keepsakes

13

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013 tax evasion, plus hundreds of charges laid by Quebec’s tax agency. Accurso told La Presse newspaper in a rare interview a year ago that he has never stolen anything from anyone, and is proud of the company he built. Housakos has publicly called Accurso a great businessman. A telephone conversation purporting to be between Accurso and Housakos was mysteriously posted to YouTube during the 2011 federal election in which the two discuss meeting a developer at Accurso’s office. Dumont and Housakos met up by chance with Accurso during a trip to Hawaii and the three families shared meals together, according to Dumont. Another construction boss, Paolo Catania, was arrested and faces charges of fraud and conspiracy in connection with the sale of a plot of land for condo development in Montreal. The Charbonneau Commission released information last year that showed Catania and Housakos met at an exclusive Montreal club for lunch in April 2008. Another person who Housakos met at the club for breakfast, Bernard Trepanier, is also facing charges in connection with the same land deal. He’s been dubbed “Mr. Three Per Cent” by the Quebec media for allegedly collecting kickbacks for Montreal’s ruling party, an allegation he has denied at the

inquiry. Accurso and Trepanier have both complained that the public testimony at the Charbonneau commission is impairing their chances at a fair trial. The senator’s name has come up twice at the Charbonneau commission, but he had never been accused of any wrongdoing nor have the inquiry’s lawyers explained why they brought him up. Housakos has said he feels he is being declared guilty by association, when he could have had no knowledge that such figures would have been engaged in alleged illegal activity. “Do I know them? Yes. Had I interacted with some of them, had I solicited for political contributions some of them? Absolutely,” Housakos said. “But to insinuate that these individuals, some of them who are accused of serious crimes, are colleagues of mine again is another attempt to attach me and accuse me and make me guilty by association where it’s not warranted.” Jason MacDonald, a spokesman for the prime minister’s office, offered a terse response to questions about Housakos and the ADQ. “Senator Housakos has denied these allegations. Questions should be directed to his office.”

Executive Chef Rob Luxemburger has introduced several new items to The Wheelhouse Restaurant menu, in keeping with the change of season. Added to ‘The Launch’ are Duck Confit & Sweet Potato Perogies; Split Pea & Ham Soup; Smoked Salmon Caesar Salad; and Char & Halibut Cakes. Joining our most popular entreés are some comfort food selections of Elk Shepard’s Pie, and White Bean with Roasted Root Vegetables & Wild Mushroom Stew. Wild game entreés also being offered are Pan Seared Pheasant Breast, and Birch Syrup & Beer Braised Bison Short Ribs. Chef Rob and his talented team are devoted to making everything - breads, pastas, sauces and smoked meats - ‘in house’, using #1 organically grown food from local sources ue 70 whenever possible to create inspired - 2 2 3 7 S co n d Ave n e Northern Canadian Cuisine. We look forward to serving you! Waterfront Station • 456-2982

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12

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Tory Senator being eyed by elections chief Jennifer Ditchburn

bitterly left his post after only three weeks. “I would have cleaned OTTAWA things up if I had stayed, but uebec’s electoral watchsince I left I handed it over to dog says that illegal the police. At the time, it was a financing of Quebec’s now de- bit strange to go to the police funct ADQ may have occurred about that, but now I think – and the time frame overlaps I was right to do it because with Tory Senator Leo Housa- today we know what was going kos’s time as chief fundraiser on wasn’t pretty.” for the provincial party. Housakos responded by reMeanwhile, the former iterating he did not participate leader of the ADQ, Gilles Tail- nor did he have any knowledge lon, told The Canadian Press of wrongdoing while he was on Tuesday he gave a deposithe chairman of the ADQ’s tion to Quebec police in 2009 fundraising arm from 2002 to outlining his concerns that the 2008. He said nobody in any party had been taking in illegal position of authority, includdonations in previous years. ing the Quebec provincial “In 2009, we were calling for police, has ever contacted him an inquiry into the construcfor questioning. tion industry, and to clean “I can tell you that all the up political financing. (Party fundraising we did followed insiders) came back and said the law, from A to Z, with no to me, be careful what you’re exception” he said in an intersaying Gilles, because these view Tuesday. things are going on in your The comments come a day after construction boss Lino own house,” said Taillon, who Canadian Press

Q

Ta’an Kwäch’än council invites TKc citizens to attend:

Referendum Community Consultations wednesday, october 9th at 6 p.m at the Mount Mcintyre centre

Zambito told CBC News that Housakos had asked him to make a donation of nearly $30,000 to the ADQ in 2008. At the time, Housakos was also Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s appointee on the board of Via Rail. Zambito said the money was collected by asking friends and staff at his firm to write cheques and then reimbursing them. Such a system of “borrowed names” has been described in detail at the Charbonneau inquiry into contract corruption in Quebec. Zambito expressed his suspicion that the senator knew how the money was raised, saying, “They all knew the system. No one’s going to make me believe they didn’t know what was happening.” Housakos said he did not have any knowledge the donors were later being reimbursed. “Throughout that whole interview (Zambito) acknowl-

Available Now!

Dolomite teX

Starting this September we w line are adding a beautiful ne led of German hiking boots cal Dachstein. ces of

Introductory sales pri

%

15 off

wednesday, october 30th at 6 p.m at the old Fire hall

sherpa lth Dolomite teX - WmN

Please join us for supper and discussions. For more information contact: Communications Coordinator Samantha Dawson at the TKC administration office: (867) 668-3613 ext. 253 or by email: sdawson@taan.ca

edged he’s the one that did the illegal activity. The only thing he said that was a stretch was ‘He must have known, because it was going on all over the place...,”’ Housakos said. “What was my participation in illegal activities? I took an envelope full of cheques?” Former ADQ president Mario Dumont had a similar comment Tuesday, saying it would have been impossible for parties to prevent or check for such schemes. “The truth is that you have a cheque in your hands, it comes from a citizen, it’s legal. You deposit it, it clears the bank and it’s a perfectly legal donation,” Dumont told Montreal’s 98.5 radio station. “The next week, the person who made the contribution is reimbursed by their boss. The contribution becomes illegal and the political party never knew.” A spokesman for Quebec’s

hours: Northern Hospital & Safety Supply Inc. 4200B 4th Ave. 668-5083 • www.norhosp.com 9am to 5pm Monday-Friday We do not close for lunch.

chief electoral officer says the office has taken interest in cases where it is clear that a party has received significant amounts of “sectoral financing,” or money that comes from a single type of business – law, engineering or construction firms, for example. “What we’ve established is that the ADQ has effectively received $800,000 in sectoral financing, and a part of that might be illegal,” said spokesman Denis Dion, referring to a time frame of 2006 to 2011. “It’s possible we are investigating, but we can’t confirm that.” Over the months at the Charbonneau inquiry, different witnesses have raised their contributions to the ADQ. The former president of Genius Conseil said he gave to all political parties in a bid to curry favour, using the same system of borrowed names for contributions as Zambito described. Quebec’s elections office calculated the amount Genius gave to the ADQ as $28,700 between 1996 and 2010. Engineering firm BPR is another example of a business that gave generously to the ADQ. Former president Pierre Lavallee testified before the Charbonneau commission that all political parties, including the ADQ, had solicited tens of thousands of dollars from his firm. BPR gave $42,420 to the ADQ between 2006 and 2008. The following year, Lavallee hired the newly named Senator Housakos to work at the company. Lavallee said all the donations from the company were made legally by staff members. In the meantime, Lavallee has

Volunteering where we live, work and play Our commitment to supporting the North continues Emily demonstrates Northwestel’s commitment to bringing us together – from the past to the present and into the future. Last year, she and fellow employees volunteered more than 28,000 hours of their time in their communities and Northwestel donated more than $600,000 to local charities, non-profits and cultural organizations.

Emily Corporate Communications, Whitehorse

More than 30 years of Northwestel sponsorship— that’s alotta loppets!


admitted to participating in a kickback scheme on municipal contracts in Montreal and resigned from his post. BPR executives were among the engineering consulting firms that bought tickets en masse to a Conservative fundraiser featuring Harper in May 2009. Housakos was one of the key organizers. The fundraiser helped the Laurier Ste-Marie Conservative riding association rake in $288,823, or five times more funds than Harper’s riding association of Calgary Southwest that year. “The fact that eight people in an office contribute to a political party doesn’t mean that the employer reimbursed those employees, but it gives you a hint,” said Dion of Quebec’s elections office. “When we see that, it makes us want to go have a look, and maybe eventually lead to an investigation.” Housakos describes the ADQ as being a “minnow” among Quebec political parties with minimal support from the construction industry over the years. The party has since been folded into the Coalition Avenir Quebec. “Except for a basically six or seven month period, we were piss poor running on fumes,” Housakos said. “In 2005, 2006, 2007, we were raising $100,000 a year, and I can tell you how we were raising that money, penny by penny, dollar by dollar.” Other former associates of Housakos are facing charges in connection with contract fraud in Quebec. Former construction boss Tony Accurso faces fraud, breach of trust and corruption charges by Quebec’s anti-corruption squad, a range of federal charges in connection with

newborn keepsakes

13

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013 tax evasion, plus hundreds of charges laid by Quebec’s tax agency. Accurso told La Presse newspaper in a rare interview a year ago that he has never stolen anything from anyone, and is proud of the company he built. Housakos has publicly called Accurso a great businessman. A telephone conversation purporting to be between Accurso and Housakos was mysteriously posted to YouTube during the 2011 federal election in which the two discuss meeting a developer at Accurso’s office. Dumont and Housakos met up by chance with Accurso during a trip to Hawaii and the three families shared meals together, according to Dumont. Another construction boss, Paolo Catania, was arrested and faces charges of fraud and conspiracy in connection with the sale of a plot of land for condo development in Montreal. The Charbonneau Commission released information last year that showed Catania and Housakos met at an exclusive Montreal club for lunch in April 2008. Another person who Housakos met at the club for breakfast, Bernard Trepanier, is also facing charges in connection with the same land deal. He’s been dubbed “Mr. Three Per Cent” by the Quebec media for allegedly collecting kickbacks for Montreal’s ruling party, an allegation he has denied at the

inquiry. Accurso and Trepanier have both complained that the public testimony at the Charbonneau commission is impairing their chances at a fair trial. The senator’s name has come up twice at the Charbonneau commission, but he had never been accused of any wrongdoing nor have the inquiry’s lawyers explained why they brought him up. Housakos has said he feels he is being declared guilty by association, when he could have had no knowledge that such figures would have been engaged in alleged illegal activity. “Do I know them? Yes. Had I interacted with some of them, had I solicited for political contributions some of them? Absolutely,” Housakos said. “But to insinuate that these individuals, some of them who are accused of serious crimes, are colleagues of mine again is another attempt to attach me and accuse me and make me guilty by association where it’s not warranted.” Jason MacDonald, a spokesman for the prime minister’s office, offered a terse response to questions about Housakos and the ADQ. “Senator Housakos has denied these allegations. Questions should be directed to his office.”

Executive Chef Rob Luxemburger has introduced several new items to The Wheelhouse Restaurant menu, in keeping with the change of season. Added to ‘The Launch’ are Duck Confit & Sweet Potato Perogies; Split Pea & Ham Soup; Smoked Salmon Caesar Salad; and Char & Halibut Cakes. Joining our most popular entreés are some comfort food selections of Elk Shepard’s Pie, and White Bean with Roasted Root Vegetables & Wild Mushroom Stew. Wild game entreés also being offered are Pan Seared Pheasant Breast, and Birch Syrup & Beer Braised Bison Short Ribs. Chef Rob and his talented team are devoted to making everything - breads, pastas, sauces and smoked meats - ‘in house’, using #1 organically grown food from local sources ue 70 whenever possible to create inspired - 2 2 3 7 S co n d Ave n e Northern Canadian Cuisine. We look forward to serving you! Waterfront Station • 456-2982

BDC SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

TM

October 20–26, 2013 SUCCESS AHEAD!

MAP YOUR FUTURE GROWTH Learn, network, celebrate! FOLLOW US @bdc_news #sbw2013 BDC Entrepreneur bdc.ca/sbw

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14

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Saskatchewan reserve providing boots, bus rides to help get people working ‘We try to eliminate all the obstacles they face in order for them to work all the time, full-time jobs.’ Jennifer Graham

placement program began in August 2012. Chief Wayne Semaganis CUT KNIFE, Sask. said the program started with oots and bus rides have two people who were hired helped a Saskatchewan to gather resumes from band First Nation cut the number of members and match their its members on welfare by 33 skills with jobs in the surper cent in one year. rounding communities. The Little Pine First Nation, “From there, we also idennear Cut Knife, Sask., west of tify if they need safety tickets Battleford, says more than 100 to be brought up to current people have gotten jobs since standards, if they need work the band’s life skills and job equipment – steel-toe boots, Canadian Press

B

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hard hats – if they need transportation,” Semaganis said in an interview with The Canadian Press. “We try to eliminate all the obstacles they face in order for them to work all the time, fulltime jobs.” The chief said it cost the band $7,000 to buy steel-toe boots for the latest group of 70 members who got new jobs in Lloydminster, “but we did it because they needed them.” A person living on welfare can’t afford the boots themselves, he said. The band also runs two buses and two shuttles to get workers to their jobs. Semaganis said the benefits

far outweigh the cost. “If we spend $30,000, $40,000 hiring two people to put 100 and some people to work, that’s worth it,” he said. Band members have been employed recently at the Husky Upgrader and at the exhibition grounds as well as in the energy, agriculture and hotel industries. When Semaganis became chief about four years ago, he said more than 400 people were receiving social assistance, about half the people living on the reserve. That doesn’t count band members living off reserve. He’s happy the number is going down.

“It makes me feel good because I know we’re providing solutions instead of finding excuses as to why we can’t do anything,” said Semaganis. The chief said there has also been a positive change in the attitude of people on the reserve. “You don’t really notice it right at the beginning when you’re starting out on things,” he said. “But you’ll see it further down the road when children have more pride, their parents are working, they have more access to better clothing, the ability to enjoy life more because they can get more.”

friday, october 18th Golden Age Society Registration: 9:00am Meeting 9:30am Guest Speaker Donald Knutson Co-Chair Vimy Heritage Housing Society Lunch will be served Travel allowance will be paid for Seniors and Elders traveling from the Communities.

September 2013

Golden Host Winners! Thirteen nominations were collected, for the September 2013 Golden Host Awards, which recognizes front-line tourism workers for extraordinary service to our visitors in the Yukon. The Yukon Tourism Education Council, along with partners the Whitehorse Chamber of Commerce and the Tourism Industry Association of the Yukon, are pleased to announce the winner of the Golden Host Award program for September 2013.

The September 2013 Golden Host Winner: Chris Beel, Chris Beel Auto, WATSon LAkE, YT “He went out of his way to help me when my vehicle broke down. He spent his own time asking around the community to find someone who could take my vehicle to Whitehorse. He arranged for this to happen and we were taken to Whitehorse the following day. He also assessed my vehicle and told me it needed a specialist transmission shop and would be unable to fix it himself. He never asked for money in return for doing me a good turn.” Ian Flood, Hay River nT. The partners gratefully acknowledge The RUSH, northern native Broadcasting Yukon, and the Yukon news for their promotional support. If you know of someone who has provided extraordinary service, please let us know! Golden Host nomination forms can be found throughout the Yukon at businesses and Visitor Information Centres. You can also submit nominations online at

www.goldenhost.ca For more information about the Golden Host program, please contact: Suzanne Blackjack, Programming Coordinator, YTEC (867) 667-4733 suzanneblackjack@yukontec.com Want to get involved with the Humane Society? Become a volunteer and join the Board, walk dogs or help with a fundraiser; it all helps!

Call 633-6019 today to find out how you can become involved!


15

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

In quest to scuttle Obama’s health care overhaul, GOP gets unintended result David Espo Associated Press

WASHINGTON epublicans insisted they wanted to shut down the US’s three-year-old health care overhaul, not the government. They got the opposite, and now struggle to convince the public that responsibility for partial closure of the federal establishment lies with President Barack Obama and the Democrats. There’s ample evidence otherwise, beginning with Speaker John Boehner’s refusal to permit the House to vote on Senate-passed legislation devoted solely to reopening the government. In the days leading to the impasse, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas said he would do “everything and anything possible to defund Obamacare,” including a filibuster against legislation to prevent a partial closure of the federal government. In the House, Rep. Jack Kingston told reporters his Georgia constituents would rather have a shutdown than Obamacare, and Rep. Tim Huelskamp added recently that in his Kansas district, “If you say government is going to shut down, they say, ‘OK, which part can we shut down?”’ Ironically, Republican leaders urged the rank and file not to link a defunding of Obamacare to federal spending for fear the unavoidable outcome would be a shutdown that would harm the party politically. Yet Boehner, who survived a conservative-led attempt on his tenure in January, and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, who faces a primary challenge from a Tea Party-backed rival in Kentucky, were unable to prevail. Instead, they were steamrolled by Cruz, his allies in Congress and Heritage Action, Club for Growth, the Tea Party Express and other groups that have used the issue to raise funds. The strategy in effect, Republicans negotiated exclusively with themselves in the days leading to the shutdown as they sought the demise of “Obamacare.” First, they passed legislation demanding the health care law be defunded in exchange for a bill providing essential government

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funding. When the Senate rejected that, they scaled back. Instead, they sought a one-year delay in the law, combined with the permanent repeal of a tax on medical devices and creation of new barriers to contraceptive coverage for women purchasing insurance. That, too, was torpedoed in the Senate. The next GOP demand was for a one-year delay in the requirement for individuals to purchase coverage, along with a provision that would oblige the president, vicepresident and members of Congress and their aides to purchase insurance under the same system as the rest of the country without receiving the customary employer contribution from the government, for which they work. The principal impact of that is to raise the cost of insurance dramatically for thousands of congressional aides and political appointees of the administration. That, too, fell in the Senate. There have been ideological retrenchments, as well. Despite their long-held positions against government mandates, House Republicans agreed beginning last week to leave in effect requirements in the health care law they have refused to embrace in the past. Among them is a requirement for insurers to cover individuals with pre-existing conditions and another to allow children up to age 26 to remain on their parents’ plans. All are politically popular, although rarely mentioned by Republican lawmakers who say the country clamours for a total repeal of the law. Despite pledging in the 2010 campaign to “repeal and replace” the law known as Obamacare, Republicans have yet to offer a comprehensive alternative. Efforts to create one have been hampered by opposition from conservatives to some of the mandates they tacitly agreed last week to leave in effect. Conceding as much, Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., said that as a conservative, he had often found during Obama’s presidency that his choice was “between something bad or (something) horrible.”

Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Rick Hohensee of Washington holds a Fire Congress sign near the House steps on Capitol Hill in Washington in the second week of the partial government shutdown.

Republican unity, so valuable in pushing to reduce spending in the past three years, shows signs of fraying. Even before the shutdown began, some moderates said it was time to shift the fight against Obamacare to another arena and allow the government to remain open. A handful of conservatives, backed by outside groups, rebelled when GOP demands for changes in the law were scaled back. “I feel like we’re retreating,” said Rep. Phil Gingrey, R-Ga., while the conservative group Heritage Action said it opposed the last in a series of GOP manoeuvres because it fell short of “fully defunding the president’s failed law.” Restlessness grows. In the Senate, Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., says routinely, “We’re in a box canyon,” and Sen. John McCain of Arizona observed, “We can’t win” when it comes to using a federal spending measure to squeeze out concessions on health care. Ironically, Obama and Senate Democratic leaders have said repeatedly in recent days they are willing to negotiate changes in the health care law – on another day and another bill. Even Democrats privately concede that a tax on medical devices isn’t likely to survive long, given that 79 members of the Senate backed its repeal on a nonbinding test vote last spring. What survives is the expansion of the health care law that was passed in 2010, the opportunity for uninsured Americans to obtain private insurance at a cost oftentimes subsidized by the government.

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Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013


17

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

N.W.T. politicians tour southern fracking sites for taste of what North may expect Lauren Krugel

border. The potential jobs created by developing the Canol shale formaeaders from the Northwest Ter- tion in the Central Mackenzie ritories are touring the boomValley would be welcome in a ing Bakken region of Saskatchewan region plagued by high unemployand North Dakota to get a taste of ment. But there are challenges well, what might be in store if the terri- such as a higher cost of living and tory’s own shale oil play takes off. increased pressure on government David Ramsay, the minister in services. charge of resource development Government officials in North in the territory, said Thursday that Dakota and Saskatchewan had the economic impact has been ap- some advice for the Northwest parent, from the brand new trucks Territories. driving around Estevan, Sask., to “The main thing they’ve said the homes, roads, hotels and offices to us over and over again is just under construction south of the prepare yourself, get ready. The Canadian Press

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more upfront work you can do, the better off you’ll be,” Ramsay said in an interview from Williston, N.D. “They’re saying if they could do it all over again, they’d plan better and that’s what we’re trying to do.” Joining Ramsay on the tour were representatives from the towns of Normal Wells, Tulita and Fort Good Hope, as well as the MLA for the Sahtu region, where the Canol is located 2.5 kilometres underground. The delegation viewed a hydraulic fracturing operation in action. That method – which would be used in the Canol – involves

drilling long horizontal wells deep underground and cracking the rock with a mixture of high-pressure water, sand and chemicals. Ramsay, whose portfolios include industry, tourism investment and transportation, said he’s confident that hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, can be done safely in the Central Mackenzie Valley, although drilling into permafrost would pose a challenge that operators in the Bakken don’t have to deal with. “A big part of this is to let people back in the Northwest Territories know that we’re talking to other jurisdictions that have

experience with hydraulic fracturing and it’s not an issue and it shouldn’t be an issue for us,” he said. “It can be done in a safe manner. That’s the message that we really need to deliver.” Development of the Canol is in its very early stages, with the first horizontal wells set to be drilled this winter. Companies such as Imperial Oil, Royal Dutch Shell Shell, ConocoPhillips, MGM Energy and Husky have already committed to spend a combined $630 million on drilling.

Suit against Quebec fracking ban show perils of free trade deals, say critics Canadian Press

OTTAWA ree trade critics say a damage suit being pursued as a result of Quebec’s moratorium on fracking is proof Canada needs to be careful in negotiating trade pacts around the world. The Council of Canadians, the Sierra Club and Quebec-based Eau secours say the suit by Lone Pine Resources Inc. proves that

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trade deals that include investor protection clauses are a bad idea because they can prevent governments from passing laws to protect the environment. Lone Pine president Tim Granger says the $250-million suit is to recover expenses and expected returns after Quebec slapped a moratorium on the controversial hydraulic fracturing process for oil and gas exploration underneath the St. Lawrence in 2011.

The moratorium is scheduled to be reviewed next year, but Granger says he has doubts the new Parti Quebecois government will lift it. He says his company would drop the suit if it did. Council of Canadians trade campaigner Stuart Trew says Quebec was perfectly within its rights to ban fracking under a major waterway, but investor protection clauses in trade deals leave governments vulnerable to having to compensate firms

that are affected. He says Canada can expect more of these law suits if it goes ahead and signs free trade deals with Europe and the TransPacific Partnership. Another unusual aspect of the case is that Lone Pine is a Calgary-based firm and would not have standing as a foreign entity to sue Canada under NAFTA, but Granger says it can do so because it is registered in Delaware.

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18

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

‘Poop’ pills successful at treating C. difficile but not ready for mass production Helen Branswell Canadian Press

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orget the enema bag and the tube that snakes down the throat to the intestines. The future of treatment for persistent C. difficile infections may come in pill form. A Calgary doctor who has been treating difficult-to-cure C. difficile for years with fecal transplants is reporting he has created what are in essence poop pills – and they do the trick. Infectious diseases expert Dr. Tom Louie, a pioneer in the use of fecal transplants for C. difficile in Canada, has treated 27 patients with his handmade pills, and all 27 were cleared of their infections. “They came in for lunch on an empty stomach … and took 24 to 30 pills on average,” Louie, said of the regimen, which he described to fellow scientists recently at the IDWeek conference in San Francisco. IDWeek is an annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, the HIV Medicine Association and the U.S. Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. Louie teaches at the University of Calgary. In a telephone interview, he said he saw no side effects, and the regime was surprisingly well tolerated by patients. “Nobody’s thrown up. And nobody’s complained of belly pain.” Other physicians who treat recurrent Clostridium difficile with fecal transplants called the development good progress towards a day when there may be ready-to-use pills that can re-establish the bacterial balance for people suffering from the debilitating infection. But they – and Louie himself – suggested this work is more a case of proving treatment in pill form can work than an immediate pivot point for the way fecal transplants for C. difficile will be administered. That’s because the pills currently used by Louie can’t be mass produced and given to anyone who wants to try a fecal transplant for recurrent C. diff infection. Each

But from my experience, almost everybody goes along with the NG tube or the enema because they’re past the icky phase, the patients,” said Silverman. “The patients, by the time they have multiple recurrences of diarrhea, are willing to do anything to make this not happen again.” Silverman said Louie’s pill treatment would be a “nice additional option” but he doesn’t anticipate all practitioners will move away from the nasogastric tube or reverse enema delivery any time soon. “Because not everybody’s going to have the ability to set up to start manufacturing capsules on site. And it’s got to be on site, because the donor’s on site. And it’s got to be done fresh. So it can’t be mass produced and shipped all over, at least at this point,” he said. But Allen-Vercoe sees this as a step towards a more final answer – a bacterial cocktail that could be Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press produced, stored and administered Dr. Thomas Louie, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Calgary, in a consistent and timely way. holds a container of stool pills in triple-coated gel capsules in his lab. Louie said he is working with collaborators in Britain to try to patient is administered his or her that. It’s not the sort of thing that transferred into the gastro-intestinal own set of pills, containing bacteria you can just do in your garage, you system of the patient, either using a determine which bacteria are key to from the stools of a healthy relative know, or even in a clinical microbi- reverse colonoscopy approach – the re-establishing a healthy balance in in most cases. ology lab,” she said. enema bag – or down into the stom- the gut, with the aim of moving to a pill treatment that wouldn’t have to To make his capsules, Louie took C. difficile infections can occur ach and intestine via a nasogastric be tailor-made for each patient. stool from donors and processed the when people who are on antibiot(NG) tube inserted in a nostril. “We’ve already talked about the material down to just the bacteria ics ingest spores of the bacterium. The idea is that the fecal matewithin the stool. From between 150 Because the antibiotics disrupt the rial from a healthy person, which is idea that eventually we’re going to end up looking at an artificial prep and 200 grams of stool he got two person’s normal gut flora – various rich with normal gut bacteria, will with components,” he said. to three teaspoons of concentrate bacteria that normally live harmoni- re-establish balance in the colon of But Dr. Christine Lee of St. which he said had the consistency of ously in a person’s gastro-intestinal the C. diff sufferer. And in many river mud or clay, and that, diluted, tract – C. difficile bacteria can cases it does. Doctors who perform Joseph’s Hospital in Hamilton said was piped into capsules. Each pill flourish and cause persistent and the procedure report very high cure this delivery method still needs to be more rigorously tested. was encased in three layers of gelatin lifestyle-limiting diarrhea. rates. Lee, who has done scores of capsules, to ensure they could While most people who develop But some physicians and hospisurvive the trip through the highly C. difficile will be cured by strong tals have been squeamish about do- fecal transplants, said the capsule acidic stomach. antibiotics, some fail treatment ing the procedure, said Dr. Michael treatment will need to be the subject of a randomized controlled trial “The downside of this whole repeatedly. It’s people like that who Silverman, of Lakeridge Health, a study is that it is a bespoke proare at their wit’s end when they hospital in Oshawa, Ont., who does (RCT) – the gold standard of clinical studies. cess that you have to prepare it for turn to Louie or a select number of fecal transplants. “Because you don’t know (if each individual,” explained Emma other infectious diseases specialists He says contrary to what one something really works) until you Allen-Vercoe, a microbiologist at the in Canada and elsewhere who have might expect, patients themselves do the formal RCT,” Lee said. University of Guelph who has been been using fecal transplants to cure are well beyond “the ick factor” by “Any observational study,” – working on developing a ready-tothe infection. the time they come to him. Weeks which is the type Louie performed use treatment called Repoopulate. They take stool from a healthy or longer spent tethered to a toilet – “it just looks great until you do an “I think the thing is that if you’re person – screened to ensure he or have that effect, he suggested. RCT,” she said. “But if it really pans going to take poop and process it she is free of diseases like HIV – “There will be some patients out that the pill form is effective into capsules, you need to have a and mix it with saline to create a who will find the other things too then that would be fantastic.” specific lab that is geared up to do slurry. The fecal material is then icky and will be willing to do this.

Planned Power outage notices ALL CUSTOMERS: on North Klondike Highway (MAYO ROAD) from the corner up to & including Grizzly Valley Subdivision & ALL CUSTOMERS: on the ALASKA HIGHWAY NORTH past Crestview up to & Including Takhini River Subdivision. When: THURSDAYAFTERNOON OCTOBER 10, 2013 Time: 1:00PM to 5:00pm Why: This outage is required to accommodate upgrades to electrical equipment For further information go to www.yukonelectrical.com or call 633-7000 Yukon electrical thanks all our customers for their cooperation during these outages as we work to continue to provide you a safe, reliable, and affordable electrical system.


19

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

THE

ARTS Fleshing out the fossil record Ian Stewart News Reporter

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ulius Csotonyi is a time traveller. With his scientific mind and artist’s eye, he produces a vision of the prehistoric world, a time before humanity. “My whole mission is to show things we cannot see for ourselves,” said Csotonyi. His preferred destination: the age of dinosaurs. During a presentation at the Yukon Beringia Centre last week, Csotonyi explained the job of paleoartist is to take the scientific data produced by paleontologists and bring it to life. The Edmonton-based artist has created images for Science Magazine, National Geographic and Scholastic publishing, and large-scale murals for the Royal Tyrrell Museum, the Royal Ontario Museum and the Houston Museum of Natural Science, among others. As scientific illustration, Csotonyi’s images must be rooted in hard fact. That means anatomy, behaviour patterns, environment and plant life, even lighting conditions, are extrapolated from evidence in the fossil record and ecological history. A fossil of a mummified dinosaur found in 2007 was invaluable for understanding skin textures and soft Paleo-artist Julius Csotonyi brings scientific discoveries to a mass audience through tissue construction, and the contents his illustrations of dinosaurs and other prehistoric life. of the gut gave valuable insight into

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Julius Csotonyi/Yukon News

Pannoniasaurus in an aquatic environment.

the diet, and flora, of the beast’s world. Before that, clues were extrapolated only from fossilized bones. “This is the golden age of dinosaur research,” said Csotonyi. “I’m fortunate that I’ve been brought into the loop in new discoveries.” Working closely with scientists and museums for the bulk of his work means Csotonyi needs to be flexible for late-breaking discoveries, which happen often. With that in mind, Csotonyi has embraced digital painting in programs like Photoshop. A digital piece, built with different layers, allows the artist to make changes as new evidence emerges, instead of starting from scratch. Not a bad tool when it takes days to build up a piece, some

more than 45 metres long and three metres tall. One feathered dino illustration was nearly complete when new evidence in sub-cellular structures in the feathers indicated specific colouration. His red anchiornis ended up being dark grey with white and cinnamon on the tail and a red crest on its head. “I’m connected to the frontier of science in this area, and it’s very exiting for me.” With no formal art education, it’s been an unexpected career path for Csotonyi, who was trained as a scientist. He earned his PhD studying the micro-life forms living in extreme environments, like salt springs or hydrothermal vents at the bottom of the ocean. This work honed his eye for detail, he said.

Julius Csotonyi/Yukon News

This digital painting of a Brachylophosurus won Csotonyi the Lanzendorf Prize from the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

Since childhood, he always liked to draw dinosaurs. “I thought the artwork would be a hobby.” By 2005, paleo art started taking up more and more of his time, slowing down his PhD research. Once he finished his schooling, his art career took off. He said that as the amount of research grows, the amount of work for paleo artists grows, and public interest grows, in an upward spiral. “The field has

exploded,” he said. His specialized niche keeps him busy: “I rarely find time to play around with it,” he said, but he’s happy for the work. “I try not to turn down anything – but that’s because I forego sleep.” An image of high Arctic camels of the Pliocene period was recently published in Ice Age Old Crow, a Yukon government publication. Csotonyi hopes to collaborate with

Yukon paleontologist Grant Zazula for future projects. His work has appeared on coins from the Canadian Mint, and his first collection, The Paleo Art of Julius Csotonyi, will be published next year by Titan Books. More of Csotonyi’s work can be seen at his website, www.csotonyi. com Contact Ian Stewart at istewart@yukon-news.com


20

Yukon News

The new Yukon home of

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Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Milan Lapres, left, and Alyssa Bunce clown around at Whitehorse Motors during a Family Day promotion on Saturday.

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Did you know? All display ads in the Yukon News are online. You can increase your online results by adding more information about your business. • More Photos • Videos • News and Information • Special Deals and Offers • FAQs There is NO additional cost to get started. Email ads@ShopLOCALNow.ca or call 1-888-879-6085 www.yukon-news.com/marketplace


Wednesday, October 9, 2013

21

Yukon News

LIFE

Up Rat River without a paddle Jesse Winter News Reporter

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ixty-three days on the water, six lost paddles, one busted laptop, two waterlogged cameras, 40,000 photos and more than 100 hours of video footage. Paddle for the North’s filming expedition in the Peel watershed is done, and team member Gabe Rivest says the six friends learned a number of important lessons on the trip. Always tie down your paddles and canoes when you make camp, for instance. The adventure was nearly cut short when, in early July on the Rat River, a massive flood almost stole all the team’s gear. “We’d paddled for nine hours the day before. The whole nine hours it was pouring,” Rivest said. “I mean torrential rain, like nothing I’ve ever seen in the Yukon. It was like being in South America or something, but it was cold. By the time we got there we were all freezing.” When the team of six stopped to make camp that night, they were exhausted. They rushed through setting up camp, wolfed down a freezedried dinner, and went straight to bed. “When Simon (Lucas, the team’s web designer and photographer) got up to take a leak at 8:30 the next morning, only five and a half hours later, the river was two metres higher,” Rivest said. “We had lost five of our nine paddles. That became a bit of an issue. Luckily all the boats were tied down really well, but we did everything so quick the night before, it could have been a lot worse than paddles,” he said. A sat-phone call to the RCMP netted them replacement paddles a day later, but the experience still shook the team, he said. Earlier this summer, Rivest and five friends – Simon Lucas, Scott Sinton, Matt Holmes, Alexandre Deschenes and Michah Rauguth – set out to paddle the Hart, Peel, Rat, Yukon, Porcupine and Bell rivers, and to document the whole trip. When the project started, Rivest said it was about giving Canadians an intimate look at a beautifully wild space that might not stay that way forever. The Yukon government’s plans to open the Peel watershed to potential road construction and eventual mining is one of the most hotly contested issues in the territory, and Rivest wanted to give an impartial, neutral view of the place.

Submitted photo/Yukon News

Simon Lucas and Alexandre Deschenes paddle a remote northern river during their two-month journey on the Peel, Rat, Bell, Porcupine and Hart rivers. The group is working on a feature-length documentary film about the trip.

leave super late in the morning. “You’d have to climb up a cliff, wait for the others to pass by, shoot it, and then hike back down,” he said. If it hadn’t been for this summer’s incredibly good weather, Rivest said he isn’t sure how they could have pulled off the project. The rain on the Rat was the only time things looked really dicey. Even with all the sunshine, the team still sacrificed one laptop and two DSLRs to the wilderness. They also had to fashion a spare paddle by hand from a white spruce log. “It actually turned out great. Some of the guys used it for hours,” Rivest said. The trip ended in early September, but the work to produce the film is just beginning. Rivest said the team is expecting to take a full year to edit and produce a featureSubmitted photo/Yukon News length documentary about the Gabriel Rivest, right, takes a photo of himself and the trip’s canoes rigged for sailing. trip. In the mean time, they’re At least, that’s how it started. horse told me, ‘Oh, we need the ing. hoping to get a teaser trailer The trip was also physiceconomy and go back home. But there’s another lesson released in the next few weeks, This isn’t your home.’ Well, the ally demanding, he said. Two the team learned in their two to help keep people engaged months of paddling is hard at months on the rivers: You have Peel is no more your home if with the project. you’re not going to live with the the best of times, but doing it to listen to the people who As challenging as the trip with heaps of camera and video was, Rivest said he would be consequences,” he said. actually live there. equipment made things even It was an emotional jour“We wanted to start neutral happy to keep doing this kind more complicated. and see what people would say ney as well as a challenging of documentary work in the “We’d have to wake up and one, Rivest said. Listening to along the way. We talked to so future. break camp and get ready to people from Fort McPherson many people who live there, “I would definitely like to do go, and then stop and think, or Old Crow tell stories to the and definitely don’t want the this kind of work again. It was team about how their lives will ‘OK, we need to get a shot right an amazing experience.” Peel watershed to change,” he change if industry comes to the now.’ We’d have to wait even said. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com Peel was sometimes heartbreak- longer and sometimes we’d “If someone from White-


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Yukon News

Author hopes to preserve memory of Canada’s vanishing jobs Lacrosse

coacH NeeDeD

Sheryl Ubelacker Canadian Press

TORONTO hen John DeMont was completing his book about vanishing traditional jobs in this country – think lighthouse keeper or milkman – he found A Good Day’s Work had become much more than just a discourse on how some Canadians bring home the bacon. “It sort of morphed into this book about Canada, using the disappearing work as a jumping-off point to talk about different aspects of Canada and the different things that are going,” says the Halifax-based journalist and author. “Not just work,” he says, but “the iconic Canada – close-knit communities and small towns and everybody knowing everybody and being interested in a positive way.” A Good Day’s Work: In Pursuit of a Disappearing Canada (Doubleday Canada) seems a natural followup to his previous book, 2009’s Coal Black Heart: The Story of Coal and the Lives it Ruled, a history of coal mining in Nova Scotia and the toll that disasters in the deeps took on colliers and their families. Ancestors on both sides of his family were part of that history – one grandfather went down into the pit at age 11 to mine the black gold – but DeMont’s father eschewed what had been the family business to work above-ground as a stockbroker. And as the author writes in the prologue of A Good Day’s Work, growing up as a child in Halifax was an idyllic time for him – and for the country as a whole. His reference year – 1967, when he was 11 – sees Canada celebrating its 100th birthday, with millions drawn from around the world to Expo 67 in Montreal, the Canadian economy at its post-war peak and the Toronto Maple Leafs winning their last Stanley Cup. It was also a time when the milkman still delivered cows’ bounty to many homeowners’ doors, beef came from family-owned and family-worked farms, and parents and kids – and hormone-fuelled teens – piled into the station wagon on a summer’s night to take in a drive-in movie. It is that world that DeMont evokes in A Good Day’s Work, or rather what is left of it, as he tracks down Canadians still engaged in time-honoured work, the kind of jobs that built this country but are perhaps soon to be but a memory. While natural resources jobs – forestry and fishing, for example – might have seemed an obvious fit, DeMont chose to go beyond “guys in the woods” and look into a broad range of skills among people in different parts of the country. “I wanted jobs that in themselves were interesting, interesting enough that you could write about them, build a chapter around them,” the 57-year-old explains during a recent visit to Toronto, one stop on a crosscountry, multi-city book tour. A cowgirl – well, a woman

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John Demont is the author of A Good Day’s Work: In Pursuit of a Disappearing Canada. rancher really – takes him to Alberta, where long-held family acreages supporting herds of beef cattle are fast giving way to vast tracts owned by anonymous agribusiness conglomerates. Marj Veno along with second husband Murray McArthur own more than 5,000 hectares of prime prairie grassland, raising 600 head of Angus cattle for breeding and beef. And although Veno’s daughter and son-in-law have chosen to stay in the beef business on a nearby ranch, the 50-something cowgirl who saddles up her horse at first light for a day checking the herds and mending fences is among the relatively few survivors of what is more and more considered a dying breed. “She’s hoping she can pass it on,” DeMont says of the ranch, located in an area that has seen 40 neighbouring families sell off their farms in the last 30-plus years. “But it just gets harder and harder. Who wants to work those staggering hours? Ninety-nine per cent of kids today want to go play hockey or Grand Theft Auto down in the basement.” A Good Day’s Work also profiles other disappearing vocations, among them a blacksmith, a travelling salesman and engineers on Via Rail’s flagship train “the Canadian,” which takes awe-struck passengers from Toronto to the lakes and forests of northern Ontario, across the prairies

and through the Rockies to Canada’s Pacific terminus, Vancouver. As such jobs fade into history, it will not be just such workers’ skills that will be lost, but also the sense of connectivity and community that they represent, DeMont laments. Take Bill Bennett, the secondgeneration milkman who still delivers a few litres of one per cent to DeMont’s house twice a week and occasionally shows up at the door to chat. For the author, Bennett speaks to continuity, the way business was once conducted, when all kinds of products were delivered to consumers’ homes. “Now for a lot of people, you can drive through, get your coffee, get your food, you can bank,” he says. All manner of goods – even groceries – can be purchased online, doing away with verbal exchanges between customers and sales clerks. Home milk delivery is already a service of the past for most Canadians, particularly those dwelling in large cities, and it’s likely to go the way of the dodo in the not too distant future. DeMont hopes his book is one means of making sure these jobs and those who perform them are not forgotten. “I think it’s good for people and hopefully future generations to know that these people walked the Earth,” he says. “Because there will come a time when they don’t.”

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Yukon News

NOTICE OF DESIGNATION

OF A HISTORIC SITE

August 30, 2013 Pursuant to Section 19 of the Historic Resources Act

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Dollar store delicacies in newly released cookbook Sidhartha Banerjee Canadian Press

MONTREAL Montreal man who spent three years consuming meals consisting mainly of staples found at the local dollar store has parlayed his culinary journey into a cheap-eats cookbook. But as Jonathan Lemieux tells it, the exercise wasn’t a wild attempt to lose weight or partake in a dieting fad – it was driven by necessity. The cookbook, Survivre avec une poignee de change, translates loosely to “Surviving With a Handful of Change,” and chronicles his time as a student trying to make do with limited funds. Lemieux, now 30, had gone back to school at the time to do a second university degree in fine arts. With a bit of money from working and a budget based on loans and bursaries, he found himself on a very strict food budget. “I decided it was too expensive for me to go to the grocery store, it was almost a luxury,” Lemieux said in a recent interview. He worked with a monthly food budget of between $75 and $115 – or roughly $20 to $25 a week. Armed with basic cooking skills, he was trying to figure out how to stay fed. A trip to the local dollar store triggered an idea. “One day I was shopping at Dollarama for pens and pencils and I’d forgotten they sell food, so I started to buy all my food there,” Lemieux said. He estimates that 90 per cent of what he ate was bought at the store. He would supplement those foods on occasion with discounted, and nearly expired, meats and vegetables from the grocery store. Lemieux said he tried to clip coupons when he could or go to the open-air market to pick up fresh foods in season. “But most of the time I’d end up at Dollarama,” Lemieux said. Instead of eggs and milk, he used plenty of mayonnaise, soup base and oil. Dollar-store bread was a staple as were chick peas – lots and lots of chick peas. Some of his favourite recipes include a version of seafood paella using canned mussels and oysters and with beef jerky replacing chorzio sausage. “It was probably much more fattening but it was still good,” assures Lemieux. He made a shepherd’s pie using tinned beef, canned corn and a box of mashed potatoes. Another favourite was a beet soup, which he said was much like Polish borscht. There was also a pickle soup, “which sounds disgusting, but it’s actually pretty good,” he added. Lemieux even found a way to come up with desserts, which he qualified as a luxury while

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Fall Meet & Greet Come visit with the Board!

Wye Lake Cabin, Watson Lake Tuesday, October 8, 2013 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm W

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The Kwanlin Dün First Nation (KDFN) is seeking interested Citizens to sit on the following KDFN Committees: • • •

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Please submit a completed Boards & Committees application form along with a resume for consideration. Terms of Reference for each Committee are available upon request. Application will be accepted until October 11, 2013 at 4:00pm. Teresa Ward Senior Administration Coordinator teresa.ward@kwanlindun.com Phone: (867) 633-7849

Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press

Jonathan Lemieux, author of Survivre avec une poignee de change (Surviving on a Handfull of Change.)

on budget. His favourite was mustard cookies, which include mustard and lots of sugar. “I like them, they’re pretty good, and I still make them actually.” The Montreal-area native kept his dietary habits from his family. He said he never told them because it was important to him to take care of himself without seeking handouts. “I think they knew I was struggling with money but they didn’t know it was to that extent,” Lemieux said. “I saw my mother and I gave her the book (recently) and she said to me ‘I had no idea you ate like this.’” Lemieux no longer does. After completing his second degree, he’s been working steadily since 2011. But he still had the recipes he’d tried over the years scribbled out on paper. Of those, more than 90 made it into the book. Lemieux stands by the recipes – including a lot of soups, pastas and salads. The book was a bit of an accident – joking around with a teacher about his eating habits led to the idea of publishing a book for friends. But then the publisher expressed interest. It’s not the first time the socalled dollar-store diet has been attempted and experts often say consumption of that much processed food can be problematic in the short term and long term. Genevieve Nadeau, a dietitian who oversaw a local newspaper reporter’s own one-week Dollarama diet this summer, said the premise of the Metro newspaper’s report was to see if the journalist could meet standard nutritional requirements by eating dollarstore food. Assessing a food diary, she found way too much salt in such a diet, which is common when eating canned items. Lots of canned meats are high in fat, while canned vegetables are heavy in salt and have little protein. So Nadeau was alarmed to hear about a three-year diet and couldn’t imagine it was much fun eating such bland food.

She said there are other options: planning, checking for grocery store specials and buying local. Also, going frozen over canned for vegetables is better. If meat and fish are too expensive, then opt for items like tofu, eggs, and beans. “Honestly, I’d love to see a blood sample from this individual,” said Nadeau, who has never met Lemieux. “I wonder if this person would be able to maintain basic nutritional requirements, because if one is mildly active, it takes vitamins, minerals and, without fresh products, I don’t see how you can get what you need.” Amazingly enough, according to Lemieux, he didn’t have any major health issues during the three years. “I was focused on surviving,” he said. “A lot of people talk to me about it now but I was never sick, I never felt bad, I never went to the hospital.” Lemieux said he rationalized that eating the dollar-store food was probably better than eating cheap junk food. “Maybe my levels of sodium and cholesterol went through the roof, I don’t know,” Lemieux said. “But I’m sure making meals … even with those ingredients, was perhaps a little bit better.” The book was released at the end of September in French. Lemieux says it’s too early to say if the book will have an English translation, but he’d welcome one. Meanwhile, he will spend the next two months living in New York City for professional reasons. He says he might pay the local dollar store a visit to check out what is available, but more out of curiosity. His budget will be roughly $30 a day while living the U.S. “I might go there just to see,” he joked. “But I think I will be fine.” – Jonathan Lemieux’s Survivre avec une poignee de change, by Transcontinental, is available in bookstores and for purchase online for $19.95.


Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

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Appel aux artistes visuels - Exposition Onde de choc Date limite : Vendredi 18 octobre 2013 L’Association franco-yukonnaise est à la recherche d’œuvres qui explorent le thème Onde de choc à travers des interprétations diverses d’éléments du titre tels qu’onde (fréquence) et choc (surprise), mais aussi des sujets comme le changement, la transition ou la déstabilisation. Pour connaître les détails relatifs aux candidatures, consultez afy.yk.ca. Rens. : Geneviève 668-2663, poste 232; ggagnon@afy.yk.ca Festival de films francophones Le Festival de Films francophones vous invite à découvrir une grande variété de films du 18 au 20 octobre. Le lancement se fera au Centre des Arts le vendredi 18 octobre avec le film Louis Cyr : l’homme le plus fort du monde, qui a remporté un très vif succès lors de sa sortie en salle. Durant la fin de semaine, vous pourrez découvrir des documentaires, comédie romantique, films d’animation pour enfants, et courtsmétrages au Old Fire Hall. Certains films sont sous-titrés en anglais. Pour découvrir les bandes-annonces et les horaires, consultez www.afy.yk.ca. Rens. : Virginie Hamel 668-2663, poste 221; vhamel@afy.yk.ca Offre de financement touristique Vous cherchez une aide financière pour développer un produit ou un service touristique bilingue au Yukon? L’Association franco-yukonnaise peut vous aider à réaliser votre projet en vous offrant un montant entre 5 000 $ et 15 000 $. Soumettez votre projet avant le 27 octobre 2013. Pour plus de détails, consultez : afy.yk.ca/financement. Rens. : Sophie Gauthier 668-2663, poste 232 tourisme@afy.yk.ca Spectacle One/Un La pièce de théâtre One/Un d’Orange Noyée sera présentée en français le mercredi 9 et le jeudi 10 octobre, au Old Fire Hall. Découvrez une pièce sur le multiculturalisme, l’identité et les origines, de Téhéran à Montréal. Rens. : Centre des Arts 667-8574; www.yukontickets.com La mini-école de médecine Inscrivez-vous pour deux vidéoconférences adaptées au grand public qui traitent des urgences médicales. Les séances ont lieu les mercredis 23 et 30 octobre de 16 h à 18 h, dans la salle de formation du Centre de la francophonie. Gratuit pour les cinq premières inscriptions provenant du Yukon! Inscription : Université d’Ottawa www.miniecole.uottawa.ca/fra/index.html Location de salles pour spectacle Vous cherchez un lieu pour vos rassemblements en plein centre-ville? Louez la salle communautaire du Centre de la francophonie pour des spectacles, évènements ou réunions et bénéficiez d’un projecteur et d’un écran, d’un système de son, d’une cuisine tout équipée, et d’une connexion WiFi. Pour en savoir plus, consultez : www.sify-yukon.ca Rens. : SIFY 668-2663, poste 550; sify@afy.yk.ca

Retrouvez votre association francophone sur Facebook : AFY.Yukon Présentée par l’Association franco-yukonnaise 302, rue Strickland, Whitehorse (Yukon) Y1A 2K1 Tél. : (867) 668-2663 Courriel : afy@afy.yk.ca www.afy.yk.ca


26

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Early morning email doesn’t have to wake you up Are you mulling over job market ideas? Interested in furthering your education? Looking for volunteer work experience?

tion, 2013 Educra& carEE Expo VoluntEEr Gym ge

Yukon Colle

Find out about opportunities that will build the skills and knowledge you need to land in the career that you want! Come meet educational institutions, employers, and non-profit organizations who can inform you about your future prospects and plans!

octobtoEr5:0100pm

10:30 am ce fee No entran s! Take the bu om y fr rl ou h e bl Availa ge. to the Colle downtown

Presented by YuWIN, Yukon College and Volunteer Bénévoles Yukon DiamonD sponsor: silver sponsors:

Grande prairie regional College association franco-yukonnaise and northwestel

For more information, contact Bruno Bourdache at executivedirector@yuwin.ca, 867 393-3874

Public review of Environment Act changes The Government of Yukon seeks public comment on seven proposed changes to modernize the Environment Act. These changes meet the needs of and support an effective environmental protection regime for the territory. The proposed changes reduce risk to human health and the environment, advance sustainable development and/or improve consistency with Yukon’s current legislative practices. You can provide comments online or by email, fax or mail. The deadline for comments is October 14, 2013.

Share your ideas to help maintain a healthy, natural environment. For more information visit: www.env.gov.yk.ca

by Judith Martin

MISS

MANNERS DEAR MISS MANNERS: I just received a sharp rebuke from a co-worker for sending him a personal email (following up on a prior conversation) at 5:45 in the

Open House Wednesday, October 16, 2013 12:00 - 3:00 p.m.

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Visit Yukon’s largest natural resources library!

morning. His reply stated only that “this exchange should not occur before 7 a.m.” I was taken aback by the tone of his reply. I have never exchanged emails with him outside of business hours before. Presumably, his smartphone alerts him of incoming email and my message disturbed his sleep. I hadn’t anticipated this — I may be old-fashioned, but I still think of email as a desktop activity. Should I apologize for this apparent intrusion? GENTLE READER: It used to be that surprise, late-night house calls were understood to

Energy, Mines and Resources Library Agriculture • Energy Forestry • Geology Land Use • Mining Oil & Gas Aerial Photos • Assessment Reports Books • Journals Maps We’re located on the 3rd floor Elijah Smith Building – Room 335 300 Main St. Whitehorse Phone: (867) 667-3111 Visit our website at: www.emr.gov.yk.ca/library

be limited to those who could expect to be welcomed with open arms. Exceptions were made for emergencies, warrants and comic figures in Shakespeare plays. But nocturnal knocks on the door and emails are not the same thing. You did not expect your co-worker instantly to act upon — or even to see — the early-morning email, any more than you would have expected an immediate response to a posted letter. That the mail came early and set the dog barking, which in turn woke up the baby, who toddled down the stairs to the kitchen, terrifying grandma, who spilled her coffee, is not your responsibility. That said, the best answer to your co-worker is to apologize and gently say that you were having the same problem until you discovered that it was possible to mute the sound announcing new emails on your phone. DEAR MISS MANNERS: Is it necessary to bring the hostess of a potluck family dinner a hostess gift? Or is my contribution (as per her request), which is often more food than the hostess herself prepares, a hostess gift enough? GENTLE READER: Hostess? What hostess? Miss Manners has trouble thinking of someone who orders catered food from you as a hostess. And while you should not expect to be tipped if you also partook of these meals, the optional courtesy of another contribution is unnecessary. The new Yukon home of

No Caribou Hunting on Dempster Highway The Department of Environment has ordered an emergency conservation closure from Oct. 8, 2013 to July 31, 2014 to protect the Hart River and Fortymile caribou herds. The closure applies to Game Management Subzones 2-16, 2-23, 2-24, 2-25, 2-27, 2-28, 2-29, 2-39 and 2-51 and includes the highway from Dempster Corner (km 0) to the Ogilvie River Bridge (km 195). As well, all subzones in Game Management Zone 3 remain closed to caribou harvest (e.g., Goldfields, Top of the World Highway). This emergency closure applies to Yukon resident and non-resident hunters. The Yukon government will consider reopening some or all of these subzones should the caribou move elsewhere. Caribou in these subzones are not considered Porcupine caribou. Harvesting rights under the Porcupine Caribou Management Agreement do not extend to these subzones at this time.

Help conserve the Hart River and Fortymile caribou herds. For more information visit: www.env.gov.yk.ca

funding Tourism

opportunit y

To develop bilingual tourism products and services in Yukon, in both official languages.

The Association franco-yukonnaise will grant between $5,000 and $15,000 to each project selected. Projects must be developed and market ready by March 31, 2014. Submit your project before October 27,  2013. Information: Sophie Gauthier, 867 668-2668, ext. 232

afy.yk.ca/funding This funding initiative is made possible by the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)


Wednesday, October 9, 2013

27

Yukon News

SPORTS AND

RECREATION

Crusaders, Rams claim first wins of Super Volley season Tom Patrick News Reporter

T

here was some added pressure for teams to perform well in the Super Volley season openers last Thursday at Vanier Catholic Secondary School. The bleachers were almost full as the Vanier Crusaders and the F.H. Collins Warriors took the court in senior girls high school volleyball. Vanier fans would not be disappointed. The Crusaders came back from down two sets to one to defeat the Warriors 25-20, 2325, 19-25, 25-23, 15-13. “The first set was good, but then we went a bit downhill,” said Crusaders co-head coach Jenna Tait. “It was a close match, but we’d be happy if it went the other way. The girls fought hard and we were very happy with the result.” The Crusaders were just two points from defeat in the fourth and fifth set. Down 23-21, the Crusaders won four straight, capped with a kill from Youranty Pourier to take the fourth set. Tied 13-13 in the fifth set, Crusaders’ Mel Moya dug a wellplaced serve and found a hole on the Warriors’ side of the court. Vanier then took the match on a missed spike from the Warriors. “I think the girls played pretty well,” said Warriors assistant coach Adam Robinson. “They really improved their net play, which we’ve been prasticing. “They did a good job with their hits – they played smart front-row. It was really nice to see.” Unfortunately for the Crusaders, momentum didn’t carry over to the following night. Hosting the defending Yukon champion Porter Creek Rams, the Crusaders fell 25-13, 25-13, 22-25, 25-23 on Friday. The Crusaders, who were missing three starting players on Friday including co-captain Kate Power, were twice penalized for falling out of rotation. “Tonight’s game the girls started a little slower,” said Crusaders co-head coach Roz Tait on Friday. “We had a new rotation, we had a different setter to start off, so the girls might have been a bit flustered. So it took a little longer to warm up. Once they got more comfortable with each other and had more fun, things looked up.” The Rams came into the game like a finely tuned machine, jumping out to a 7-1 lead with some fireball serves from Hannah Milner in the opening set. Milner later delivered three straight unreturned serves to win

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Top: Vanier Crusaders’ Tara Kehoe digs the ball during her team’s loss to the Porter Creek Rams in Super Volley action at Vanier Catholic Secondary on Friday. The Crusaders defeated the F.H. Collins Warrior the previous night in the season opener. Left: Porter Creek Ram Teah Dickson misses a spike from the Crusaders.

the set. The Rams snagged the second set on a back-row kill from captain Daria Jordan for set-point

and a kill from Alex Schultz. “She’s a natural leader,” said Rams coach Amy Palamar of her captain. “The girls look to her

for guidance and she’s a great allaround player, and I know I can count on her out there.” Milner was again threading

needles from the service line in the fourth set, helping her team go on a six-point run with her serve to go up 21-16. The Rams took the set and match on a missed kill by Vanier. “I thought it was excellent,” said Palamar. “Everyone played well. I got to play everybody and we played a great game. There were poor moments, but no one played poorly.” Super Volley will continue October 17 and 18 as the Porter Creek Rams take over the hosting duties. The Crusaders will visit on the 17th and the Warriors on the 18th. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


28

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Vanier senior boys split home openers Tom Patrick

track, said head coach Shaun McLoughlin. “The biggest thing in the sets long week of school, practice we won was communication,” and back-to-back games said McLoughlin. “A lot of the didn’t prevent the Vanier Crusadguys on the team – not all of ers senior boys from ending it on them – are laid-back, quiet guys. a positive note. And we have a lot of Grade 11s The Crusaders dropped their on the team who didn’t get as Super Volley season opener but much playing time last year. So bounced back the following I think the biggest transition for night to claim their first win. this team is stepping out of that The Crusaders lost 25-21, quiet, laid-back personality and 25-11, 24-26, 25-23 to the F.H. communicating on the court, Collins Warriors on Thursday talking the whole time, and before topping the Porter Creek bringing up that intensity. Rams 25-19, 25-17, 20-25, 26-24 “We start getting in trouble on Friday at Vanier Catholic when they are quiet and aren’t Secondary. talking, calling for the ball.” “They’ve had a tough week The F.H. Collins team has a of volleyball – I’ve really thrown bit more high-level play under them into it here,” said Crusaders their belt this season than their head coach Jeremy Staveley. “It’s Whitehorse competition. been pretty much full-on this The Warriors competed at week. the UBC Senior Boys Volleyball “They found a way to win Invitational at the University of there and they did play well. It’s British Columbia in Vancouver always tough to play in these the weekend before last, prior back-to-back games, with a week to the start of the Super Volley of practice and a week of school. season. But they pushed through and I The team placed 19th out of thought they did well.” 40 teams at the tournament for After cruising through the first the same result as last year. They two sets, the Crusaders seemed placed third out of five in their to let off the gas in the third and pool with teams from the Vanfourth as the Rams started to Tom Patrick/Yukon News couver area. show some life. Vanier Crusaders’ Ethan Robinson, top, attempts to make a save during his team’s four-set “The reason I like taking kids The Rams jumped out to a win over the Porter Creek Rams in Super Volley on Friday at Vanier Catholic Secondary. down to that tournament is it 10-3 lead in the third and took gives them more experience the set on a crafty tip from Kyle with the other team.” probably be a little more consist- against teams that play at a more Yukon champion Crusaders. Lowes, one of just two returning ent, until then there’ll probably Tied 23-23 in the fourth, the “I’m a little disappointed with competitive level,” said Mcplayers on this year’s team. be a lot of inconsistent play on Crusaders claimed victory on a how they started, but I like the Loughlin. “In the Yukon it’s not Porter Creek then overcame a our part,” added Bilodeau. “They as competitive up here. So you’re way that they ended,” said Rams kill from Stephen Wohlfarth for 10-3 deficit in the fourth – a large definitely have the skill to put playing against teams that aren’t head coach Derick Bilodeau. “It match point and an unreturned part due to a string of kills from together some exciting matches as intense and aren’t as polished was good to end on a positive serve from Ethan Robinson for power Tanner Borsa – and came in the season.” game-wise. You get lots of pracnote where we were forcing some the win. to within two points of forcing The Crusaders, who are playtice, but not much game play. a fifth set against the defending of the play and actually playing “Later in the season we’ll ing with just three returning “Down there you play against players from last year’s champion teams that are used to playing team, were held to one set on high-pressure matches in tournaThursday against F.H. Collins. ments, in league games.” The Warriors must be loquaContact Tom Patrick at cious on the court to stay on tomp@yukon-news.com News Reporter

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Wednesday, October 9, 2013

29

Yukon News

Nathan MacKinnon all smiles about NHL rookie experience, says life is awesome Neil Davidson

come in here and be himself and play.” “We’re extremely happy with TORONTO our decision (to draft him),” eenager Nathan MacKinadded Roy. “He’s been outnon is clearly enjoying his standing in the first two games, NHL rookie season ride. despite the fact that he had an The 18-year-old centre from injury in training camp. We’re Cole Harbour, N.S., was all very excited and we love what smiles Tuesday as the media de- we have seen so far of him.” scended on his stall in the boxAway from the rink, MacKsized visitors’ dressing room at innon lives with veteran Air Canada Centre. Jean-Sebastien Giguere. The The Colorado rookie took 36-year-old goalie is married the time to pull on an Avato a Halifax native and there is lanche cap and then enthused a family atmosphere with six-, about life in the big league. four-, and one-year-old sons in Asked what has surprised the house. him about the NHL, he replied: “It’s still early,” centre Matt “I guess how good they treat us Duchene said of MacKinnon. here. “He’s still making the transi“It’s awesome. I’m loving tion. It takes a while. It takes a every second of it. The travelcouple of years, I think. But he’s ling with the team, the way that had a good start. We’re all pullthey treat the players is pretty ing for him, for sure.” special. Obviously a little difThe Avs are 2-0-0 to begin a ferent than junior but I can’t season for the first time since complain about that either, it’s 2009-10 and only the third time been great.” since 1995. MacKinnon’s parents flew It’s the first meeting between out for the Toronto game. Colorado and Toronto (3-0-0) The Avs are taking care not since October 2011. to pile on the pressure on the Roy was the other centre of top overall pick in the 2013 attention Tuesday. draft. MacKinnon, who has The former star goalie and three assists in two games, is rookie NHL coach has already playing on the third line with made headlines for an outburst Jamie McGinn and P.A. Parenbehind the bench directed teau. at his Anaheim counterpart “It’s the perfect fit for him,” Bruce Boudreau. He was fined said head coach Patrick Roy. US$10,000 for his glass-rattling action, prompted by a concern “He doesn’t have to come here that a Ducks player had gone and be the saviour. He can Canadian Press

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after MacKinnon. “I felt like a kid again,” Duchene said, recalling the moment. “I felt like I was watching him fight (Mike) Vernon back in the day. It was pretty funny.” Roy preferred to talk about the game ahead rather than his outburst, but his players spoke warmly about his passion. “He wants the best for his players, no doubt about it,” said winger Alex Tanguay. “We saw what happened with Nathan in the first game, the intensity and things like that. He wants us to succeed. “I think the quality he has above all is he wants to win. He was like that as a player and he’s certainly like that as a coach.” Added MacKinnon: “He’s a players’ coach but the same time he’s all business when he’s at the rink. “He’s a very good man as well, treats everybody very well. Everybody wants to play for him, I think that’s huge. ... We all love him here and he’s doing a great job.” Duchene described the players’ relationship with Roy as “more of a partnership.” “It’s hard to describe. It’s just more of a winning feeling. We all feel like it’s within our control where before we didn’t really know what was going on sometimes, just in terms of stuff in the (dressing) room.”

Roy also used the word partner, saying he is there to help players achieve their goal. “Our relationship right now is fantastic and everybody seems to be enjoying themselves. There’s a lot of energy on our team. We just want to bring it on the ice and see how far we

can go.” Some Avs players seemed taken back by the media horde that descended upon their locker-room. “The circus is here,” said centre John Mitchell as he tried to figure out how to get past the reporters to his stall.

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30

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Midget Mustangs open season with last-minute win Tom Patrick

“Any time you win, it’s great, but against a team like that is nice,” said Mustangs head ith an early-season road coach Barry Blisner. “Certainly trip slated for this week- it gives them a little bit of conend, the Midget A Mustangs fidence before we leave.” needed a confidence builder in Nine Mustangs players their first game of the season. left the ice with one or more They got it. points in the game, a good The Whitehorse rep team sign for a team that has just overcame a 2-0 deficit to detwo returning players from last feat the Yukon Brewing Lead season. Dawgs in both teams’ season In addition to the gameopener in the Whitehorse Rec winner, Paun-Burnett had Hockey League A division two assists. Teammate Chance at Canada Games Centre on Goodman also had two assists Saturday. and a goal while Tyson Hope The Mustangs won the game had the reverse with two goals 7-6 on a power play goal from and an assist. Braeden Paun-Burnett, asMustangs’ Spencer Lessard sisted by Nick Dobush, with 54 amassed three assists. Jack seconds left on the clock. Blisner found the back of the News Reporter

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Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Top: Midget A Mustangs goalie Josh Tetlichi prepares to make a save as teammate Kaleb Millwater looks on during the team’s season opener against Yukon Brewing in the Whitehorse Rec Hockey League on Saturday. The Mustangs won 7-6 with a goal in the final minute. Right: Yukon Brewing’s Kirk Gale, left, keeps Mustangs’ Braeden Paun-Burnett at bay.

Yukon Brewing net twice and Dobush had a goal and assist. “Normally we don’t dress four lines, but we said we might as well get everyone in the game to see, and it worked out pretty well,” said Barry. “Yukon Brewing has two or three top-end guys in the league. So we told them before there are a couple guys out here that are way better than anyone we’re going to see this year. “It was a good test. They got up a couple on us right off the bat, but we battled back.” The Mustangs, who will play

in a tournament in Richmond, B.C. this weekend, also survived a two-man advantage for Yukon Brewing spanning more than a minute-and-a-half late in the game at 6-6. Mustangs goalie Josh Tetlichi made some key saves but was later taken out of the game with a leg injury resulting from a hard shot from Brewing’s Kirk Gale that caught Tetlichi just above the knee. Mustangs’ Devon Troke filled in between the pipes for the final eight minutes of the

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game and kept the net sealed. “Considering we haven’t been able to work on special teams that much … I thought we did a pretty good job,” said Barry. Rob Warner led the way for the brew team with a goal and three assists while teammate Jeff Pike had one of each. Teammates Frank Aucoin, Ryan Martin and Derek Klassen each had a goal. “It was a good game. Those kids worked really hard, stayed on us and didn’t get down when they were behind and kept coming back,” said Yukon Brewing’s Mike Cozens, who is starting his 19th season with the team. “They’re a good team to play against … “We’re not used to playing on the ATCO ice surface – it’s a little bigger – and the speed these kids have is pretty noticeable on the big ice surface.” Yukon Brewing went on to defeat the Southpaw Rednex 10-7 on Sunday. The Southpaw Rednex defeated the Mustangs 6-3 on Monday. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


31

Yukon News

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

ANNIE'S

COMICS

MAILBOX

ADAM

Dear Annie: I am 15 and the oldest of four boys. During one of many fights between my parents, my mom left the house with my brothers and me, and we spent the night at a shelter. Our grandparents told our father that we have no values because we went with our mom. They say we are old enough to know better. This makes us feel guilty about the fights. Now my grandparents refuse to see us even for our birthdays, because they say we are not loyal to the family and don’t deserve them. Annie, we are losing our family and our grandparents all at once. Our school guidance counselor tells us it’s not our fault, but we feel like outcasts. We are no longer invited to any family events with our cousins. We feel abandoned. — Scared in Massachusetts Dear Scared: Your grandparents don’t know how to fix the situation with your parents, so they take their frustrations out on you. You are an easy target and can’t fight back. Shame on them. If you have other family members who are not part of this manipulative blackmail, please get closer to them. Otherwise, “family” can mean many things — including good friends, teachers, neighbors and others who take an interest in your life and are good influences. Lean on them. And continue to talk to your guidance counselor, who obviously understands the problem and can help. Dear Annie: I am a working professional woman in my 50s. For some reason, my dentist, a man in his 30s, calls me “dear.” The first time he did this, I was mortified and didn