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Two Knights teams made it to this year’s Dawson Invitational Volleyball Tournament.

Martha Wainwright will personally grace the Yukon with her moving songs next week.

Page 51

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Friday, November 1, 2013

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he former president of Humane Society Yukon was sentenced this morning to two years probation and ordered to pay a $500 donation to the society for failing to follow government orders. Shelley Cuthbert was at the helm of the society during a highly publicized investigation by the Yukon registrar of societies over the board’s refusal to reinstate memberships to six people they had previously denied. Judge Karen Ruddy said that Cuthbert’s position as the president of the board gave her A Bean North day is a good day.

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more responsibility to ensure the registrar’s order was followed, and that her inaction was a breach of her fiduciary duties to the society. “In my view it was incumbent on Ms. Cuthbert to take some steps towards resolving the society’s position and complying with the registrar’s orders,” Rudy said. But Cuthbert took no such steps. The registrar had ordered the board to call a special meeting to address the membership concerns, but Cuthbert maintained that calling such a meeting would have been a breach of the Societies Act. She claimed she was operating on flawed legal advice but couldn’t provide any proof of that legal advice. “Passive ignorance is not a defence under Canadian law,” Ruddy said. “The ‘it was my lawyer’s fault’ defence simply does not constitute due diligence,” she said. Under the sentence, Cuthbert is prevented from being an officer or a director of any society for two years, and has 18 months to pay her $500 donation. Cuthbert declined to comment after the sentencing, saying only, “It’s over. What’s the point?” The former president, along with other members of the board of directors, were charged under the Societies Act last year. In May, board members Maryanne Baer, Isabelle Cote and Gerald Thompson pleaded guilty in court for their role. They were each sentenced to two years probation and ordered not to serve

on the board of any registered societies during that time. Cuthbert chose to plead not guilty and went to trial in September. On the stand in her own defence, Cuthbert insisted she did her best to follow the orders and believed that the society’s lawyer was going to file for a judicial review of the decision. That never happened. In December 2012, Justice Leigh Gower ordered the society to hold a special meeting to elect a new board and accept new members. At the time of Gower’s decision, there were questions about whether or not the Mae Bachur Animal Shelter, which is operated by the society, could keep its doors open. Since the new board was elected, they have been able to get back into good standing with the government. The non-profit was most recently in the news asking Whitehorse city council for help to expand the outdoor dog runs. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com and Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com

Correction In Wednesday’s sports story “Mustangs cream the competition in Revelstoke,” there was a mistake in the photo caption and credit. The Mustangs player is Johnny Elias, not Dylan Cozens, and Susan Anderson was the photographer, not Tom Patrick.


3

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Anti-frackers spook legislature on opening day Jacqueline Ronson News Reporter

J

ody Overduin came to the opening day of the Yukon legislative assembly in a wolf costume, but it was no Halloween joke. She was one of about 60 protesters who shivered outside the government administration building to voice their opposition to hydraulic fracturing and burning liquefied natural gas in the territory. Overduin is the outreach co-ordinator for Yukon’s chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. The group speaks on behalf of the environment and the wildlife, including her favourite animal, the wolf, she said. “What is clear about fracking is that it takes an enormous amount of water, and that then turns into hazardous liquid waste,” she said. “What is clear is that wildlife habitat is mowed down in order to build well platforms, and access roads are spreading like cancer to each well. What is clear is that, in the end, LNG is still a non-renewable resource, meaning that after all that destruction, we still do not have a long-term solution.” Yukon Energy has a plan to replace aging diesel generators with liquefied natural gas generators, which the corporation says will save Yukoners money and be better for the environment. That proposal is currently before the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board. Protesters came with the message that natural gas development is equal to fracking, and it should be opposed even if it is happening outside of Yukon and even if Yukon Energy currently has a contract to buy conventional gas. Malcolm Mills, who represented the Yukoners Concerned about Oil and Gas Exploration/Development, said it is a hopeful sign to see the industry

NDP calls for timelines on land use plans NDP Opposition Leader Liz Hanson has asked the government to set timelines to finish land-use plans for the Yukon. Land-use planning is essential to economic certainty, she said in the legislature yesterday. Chiefs and former chiefs at a Conference Board of Canada hearing in October all called for action on land-use plans to bring certainty for First Nations and for industry. “Even the Fraser Institute has said that land-use planning is essential for economic certainty, but the Yukon Party

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Jody Overduin of CPAWS, dressed as a wolf, waits to speak to the crowd at an anti-fracking rally outside the Yukon legislature on Thursday.

representatives fighting back in the media. Kevin Heffernan, president of the Canadian Society for Unconventional Resources, spoke with the Yukon News last week in advance of his visit to the territory. “In looking at the media lately, we’re starting to see the other side being a little bit more vocal, which actually gets me really excited,” said Mills. “When we started this process, coming up on two years ago, we were told that we were a group of radicals, we didn’t know what we were talking about, we didn’t have the engineering principles or the capacity to understand the engineering principles involved in this industry. That industry is fighting back “means we’re winning,” said Mills. “It means that we’re making an impact. We’re starting to take the debate away and out of their control, because we have become educated. We have become vocal, we have become unified.”

government treats land-use planning with contempt,” said Hanson. Twenty years after Yukon First Nations signed the first land claims agreements, only one land-use plan has been finalized. Resource Minister Scott Kent pointed out that it was a Yukon Party government that signed off on the North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan. “It has been completed and implemented,” said Kent. “Currently, we have two landuse plans underway – the Peel Watershed Land Use Plan and the Dawson Regional Planning Commission – and we continue to look for ways to learn

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Premier Darrell Pasloski addresses the gallery during the opening of the Yukon legislative assembly’s fall sitting.

J.P. Pinard, an engineer and expert on wind power technology, urged Yukoners to tell the assessment board that they do not want natural gas power in the Yukon. “Please write letters to YESAB about it, saying, ‘No, we don’t want it. No, we don’t

BRIEFS and build upon each commission as we move forward into others. “It’s not that we’re abandoning the long-term planning. As I said, that’s something that we’re very committed to as a government, and we continue to look for improvements to the planning process. Completing the Peel watershed plan is a priority and completing the Dawson regional land use plan is a priority. We’ll look for other opportunities for improvement as we move through the remainder of the plans that need to be developed here in

want to invest our money into more fossil fuel for the Yukon.’ Remember, Yukon Energy’s going to have to borrow $40 million for this, and you know where that money is going to come from? It’s going to come from all of you.” That money should be

the territory.” (Jacqueline Ronson)

Yukon government releases public accounts The Yukon government accumulated a surplus of $119 million over the 2012/2013 fiscal year, according to public accounts released this week. The accounts have been audited and approved by the Auditor General of Canada. “This is the Yukon government’s 10th annual reported surplus during the past 11 years,” said Premier Darrell Pasloski in a press release. “Our healthy surplus is a reflection of our financial

invested instead in developing renewable power, he said. Yukon Energy’s proposal has not yet been opened up for public comment, and is currently in the adequacy review stage. The fracking debate continued inside the legislature, when NDP MLA Kate White asked the minister of Energy, Mines and Resources to explain where all the water necessary to support fracking in the Yukon would come from. “To put it mildly, fracking is water-intensive,” said White. “A single moderate-sized hydraulic fracture uses 1,000 tonnes of sand, 300 cubic metres of chemical additives and 15,000 cubic metres of water. To help visualize what these numbers mean, that’s 40 B-train trucks of sand, seven B‑train trucks of chemicals and 500 B-trains to deliver fresh water to the well site — and this is only on one single frack job. “The average well is fracked 12 times to get it into production and many need to be fracked on an ongoing basis to maintain production levels. On a typical pad site, there are 12 to 16 wells.” These numbers came from Energy, Mines and Resources, she said. A legislative committee has been formed to review the risks and benefits of fracking before it is allowed in the territory. Energy Minister Scott Kent said he is waiting to see what that committee reports back to the legislature in spring 2014 when its recommendations are due. “It’s an emotional issue for Yukoners. It’s an emotional issue across the country and indeed around the world, when it comes to hydraulic fracturing. I have the confidence in the members who sit on that select committee that they will go in and be able to separate that emotion. It’s sometimes a difficult job.” Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

strength and will help the Yukon government continue to respond to emerging priorities and pressures.” The government plans to invest in new schools and an expansion for the Whitehorse General Hospital, he said. “Yukon’s expanding economy will also require more investment in energy, transportation and communication infrastructure. Positive financial results mean we can meet these challenges without mortgaging the future. We intend to continue to demonstrate this fiscally responsible management throughout this mandate.” (Jacqueline Ronson)


4

Yukon News

Old Crow residents plan co-op store

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“It’s to decrease the prices and also to meet the community needs. What does the community really want to see in their store, and how can we work towards that?” Jacqueline Ronson News Reporter

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group of Old Crow residents have banded together to start a co-operative retail store. Tracy Rispin is one of eight founding directors. “The reason we want a co-op store is to decrease the high prices of good food in our community,” she said. “As you know, we’re an isolated community and we have all our produce and groceries flown in.” Currently, the only store in town is the Northern Store. That store benefits from the federal Nutrition North program, which subsidizes shipping prices on healthy foods. But many Old Crow residents preferred the previous Food Mail program, which allowed them to buy their own groceries in Whitehorse and ship them up at subsidized rates. Shipping to the community is still subsidized, but to a much lesser extent. Darius Elias, the MLA for Vuntut Gwitchin, has spoken out against the Nutrition North program, saying it does not ursd

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Groceries at Old Crow’s Northern Store. A group of Old Crow residents are planning a retail co-operative that would compete with the Northern.

meet the needs of residents of Old Crow. It costs $26.16 per kilogram for red seedless grapes in Old Crow, he said in April. Rispin said that a co-op store will allow the community to make the kind of store that it wants. “It’s to decrease the prices and also to meet the community needs. What does the community really want to see in their store, and how can we work towards that?” In addition to the store, the plan is for the co-operative to manage two rental suites for visitors to the community. Currently, two bed-andbreakfasts are the only shortterm rentals available. The new suites “will be another place for accommodations for visitors,” said Rispin. “With that happening, money will be generated back into the co-op, and therefore we will offer lower food prices.” In order to establish the cooperative, the directors must submit an application to the Yukon government.

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Then, Old Crow residents will be asked to purchase shares in the co-op. Within 90 days, a meeting must be held to elect a chair and board members. The co-op will be located next to the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation’s maintenance compound. The plan is to have the store open in July 2014. The directors have been working closely with Arctic Co-operatives Ltd. to make this happen, said Rispin. That group co-ordinates 31 community co-operatives across the North. A co-op for Old Crow is “a long time coming,” said Rispin. “What people like about the co-op is, and this is why I volunteered myself to sit on the board, 100 per cent of the profit from the co-op gets invested back into the community. And that’s what I like. Because we can’t solely depend on our First Nation government to fund everything that we want to see in our community, so this will be another business where we can invest in our community.” Neither the NorthWest Company, which runs the Northern, nor Arctic Co-operatives Ltd. could be reached for comment by press time. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

New F.H. Collins excludes local contractors: NDP ‘The message is clear: Yukon contractors need not apply.’ Jesse Winter News Reporter

U

nder fire from both opposition parties, Premier Darrell Pasloski defended his government’s handling of the F.H. Collins school replacement in the legislature on Thursday, one day after the project was publicly tendered for the second time. The new tender, released on Wednesday, is seeking bids on a design-build contract to construct a new 750-student facility based on a design imported from Alberta. But it includes criteria that will essentially exclude local contractors from bidding on the project, according to the NDP. “The message is clear: Yukon contractors need not apply,” said NDP Leader Liz Hanson. “Bidders must have built three projects in the last three years that are similar to the new F. H. Collins Secondary School. So why on earth would the Yukon Party deliberately structure the tender to reduce job opportunities for Yukoners?” Hanson asked. Pasloski dodged the question, saying nothing about the tenders and instead attacking the NDP for being bad financial managers themselves. He also spoke about a recent Standard and Poor’s report which gave the territorial government a AA credit rating. “That’s because we know how to balance the books; we know when to make a decision, when to invest and when to say we cannot afford this decision,” Pasloski said. Last spring, the government announced it was cancelling the first iteration of the F.H. Collins project because, Pasloski said, bids for the school’s construction came back too high. Pasloski said that two inde-

Submitted Photo/Yukon News

An artist’s rendition of the new design for F.H. Collins Secondary School.

pendent estimates had helped the government generate its approved budget, and that the lowest bid was nearly $10 million higher. But information obtained by the News through an access-toinformation request shows that there was a third estimate which told the government its original design for F.H. Collins would likely cost $43.7 million, not the $38.6 million it had budgeted for the project. Both Hanson and interim Liberal Leader Sandy Silver hammered Pasloski on how his government handled the previous tenders for the now-defunct original design, which was cancelled in March. “Why did the premier tell the public that two estimates told them that they could build the new school for $38.6 million when that was not in fact what the estimates said?” Silver asked. The premier again skirted the question, arguing that the Liberals and the NDP would both have chosen to go ahead with an over-

budget project. “That’s a great writing team. I want the premier to answer the question,” Silver retorted. “The government did its best to keep these documents out of the public eye. Now we know why.” In an interview Wednesday afternoon, Pasloski said that the government stuck to its $38.6 million budget because it was trying to be fiscally responsible. “When we haven’t even turned a shovel and it’s already $10 million over what was budgeted, then I made the decision that we had to look at this again and I believe we made the right one,” Pasloski said. Except that the government already had put a shovel in the ground, literally wielded by Pasloski himself at the F.H. Collins official groundbreaking ceremony in 2011 – months before the last territorial election. There had also been more than $2.6 million worth of sitepreparation work done before the original project was sent out to

tender. Pasloski said it was his decision to evaluate the bids based on the original budget, knowing it excluded the costs of the temporary gym and geothermal heat, and that he made it because he was looking out for taxpayers’ interests. “If the bids would have come in slightly above what we had budgeted and it was reflected that (the contractors) had added the money in for the temporary gym, we probably would have had to look at it differently than we did,” he said. The temporary gym was promised in December after the original project had been put out to tender. The government adjusted the tender documents to include the geothermal heat and the gym heat after a public outcry demanding it. However, it did not adjust the budget to include those additions. That decision may have violated public contracting standards. “A tender is supposed to repre-

sent a legitimate opportunity for business for a private sector firm,” explained Michael Asner, a B.C.based expert in public procurement. Asner said he couldn’t comment on the specifics of the F.H. Collins tenders because he hadn’t seen them. Generally speaking, “the fundamental public policy on tendering is that it be fair, open, and transparent,” he said. “The way you prove the legitimacy is that you have approved the budget. A further test on it in some jurisdictions is that there must be either intention to do it or in fact there have been budget allocations for it,” Asner said. When the government decided to import a school design from Outside, it granted Barr Ryder Architects a sole-sourced $900,000 contract to adapt the design to Yukon climate standards and oversee the project. Highways and Public Works spokeswoman Kendra Black said that because Barr Ryder were the architects behind the Alberta version of the school, they would be best suited to adapt the design in the North. Among the changes, the new design is 1,345 square metres smaller than the old design and is two storeys tall instead of three. About 60 per cent of the total design work has been done, mostly involving changes to the layout and including a cafeteria and culinary arts program, Black said. That leaves about 40 per cent of the design up to the bidding contractors. The closing date for submissions on the new tender is Dec. 12. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Yukon schools on shaky ground Ashley Joannou

risk while Kluane Lake, Nelnah Bessie John and St. Elias were found to be at high risk. he Yukon government has “When measured against the current building code, high risk means ordered some changes to eight there is a major deficiency in some schools after a study revealed they’d portion of the structure in the event be at risk during an earthquake. of a major earthquake in close proxThe report by a Vancouver company describes Whitehorse Elementa- imity to the school building,” said ry, Wood Street, Selkirk, Takhini and Kendra Black, a spokesperson with Highways and Public Works. Christ the King schools at moderate The report is based on the 2010 national building code, she said. The new Yukon home of A technical briefing to explain the findings in detail is scheduled for next week. Risk levels are based on things like the age of the schools, a structural evaluation, how much the ground New Inventory under the schools moves, and soil Arriving Weekly! conditions, explained Black. The calculations also take into account the high “importance factor” of a school that houses children and is used in emergencies. The findings rank how much the school would move in the event of an earthquake. The report was received by the 1•867•668•2137 www.drivingforce.ca government in September. It is a more extensive version of an earlier study completed in 2010. News Reporter

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Engineers recommend about $20 million worth of fixes to the schools at risk. In some cases this includes changes to the buildings’ roofs, walls and foundations, the report says. Black said the government is taking some time to review those recommendations. In the meantime the plan is to implement a “non-structural mitigation program” Black said. “Evidence shows that most of the injuries in an earthquake are not from buildings collapsing, they are actually from non-structural risks.” That could include things like bookshelves, suspended ceilings, or a building’s heating and ventilation system. A contractor will visit the schools and ensure that anything that could fall inside a school is made safe, said Black. “We are undertaking a nonstructural mitigation program, which means we are going to go into the eight medium- and high-risk schools and fix all of those things,” Black said. “We’ll tie back the suspended ceilings and pipes and secure bookcases to the walls and tie down equipment.” Tenders for the work will go out

this winter. It is expected to be completed by the end of the school year, she said. The government has not developed a budget for how much the work is going to cost. “We could have taken a few months to figure out pricing and costs and get a total number. We’ve decided we’re just going to move forward,” Black said. The work will mostly be done on evenings and weekends and not disrupt classes, she said. Meanwhile the government has asked the Vancouver company for a prioritized list of the $20 million in fixes it is recommending. Black notes that all eight of the schools in question are old and may be near the end of their lives. The buildings were all built in the 1950s and ‘60s. The youngest school in the group is St. Elias Community School, built in 1963. “Should we be replacing the school instead of spending more money is essentially part of what is being considered,” Black said. That decision-making process is expected to take 18 months. There are a few major fault lines

in the territory, including the Denali and Duke River fault systems. The schools that are listed as high risk are the closest ones to fault lines, Black said. She pointed out that the schools have survived earthquakes in the past. “All of our school buildings have withstood many earthquakes over the years and are expected to withstand many more. These are the same school buildings that our children attended yesterday. The risk is no greater today than it was before,” she said. “The seismic risk is based on a two per cent chance of a major seismic earthquake in the next 50 years. So, we are talking about a fairly small probability, not a foregone conclusion.” A similar seismic mitigation program has been happening in British Columbia for the last 13 years. The Department of Education has budgeted $2.2 billion to upgrade or replace 214 high-risk schools so far. It is anticipated it will cost a further $600 million to address the remaining 104 high-risk schools in the province. Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com

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open for a successor, McMillan said he’ll focus on continuing to serve his community in a private iard McMillan’s decade-long capacity. reign as chief of the Liard First McMillan leaves his post in the Nation is coming to an end. wake of two significant battles, one The First Nation is going to the with the federal government over polls on Dec. 2, but McMillan says the community’s social assistance he won’t run again. program, and the other with a local “I’ve served my community now non-profit, the Liard Aboriginal for over 10 years, and we’ve accom- Women’s Society. plished many things while asserting The social assistance fight saw ourselves outside of the land claims McMillan hand control of that box,” McMillan said. program back to Aboriginal Affairs “Those accomplishments because, he said, his government include building a development wasn’t given enough money to supcorporation that does business in port it. After two weeks of confuthe mining sector, and owning and sion, a contractor was brought in to operating hotels … I guess it’s just administer social assistance locally kind of reached a point where the on behalf of the federal governcommunity could benefit from ment, which pays for the program. The conflict with LAWS goes some change.” back further, with McMillan and While leaving the chief ’s chair News Reporter

L

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cil refuse, there would be penalties built into the law,” he said. Morgan acknowledged that Watson Lake struggles with a host of social ills and addictions issues, and he thinks some sort of supportive treatment or aftercare facility in the community would be a great help. However, for him the accountability issue is top of mind. “Even with social assistance … we don’t know which councillors agreed to this particular proposal to send the SA program back. For me, this is all about good governance. It leads to economic opportunities. In order for us to move forward on any of the social problems we’re facing, we must first consolidate how we relate to each other internally,” he said. As the election approaches, the News will be speaking with other candidates for chief to explore their platforms and ideas for the community. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

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the non-profit’s executive director, Ann Maje Raider, each accusing the other of poor financial accountability. Whoever takes over as chief likely won’t be sitting down in a cool seat. One candidate who has already put his name forward is George Morgan. He lost to McMillan in the last election and says he’s running again because he wants to see the First Nation create what he calls good governance laws. “Good governance is a concept that is widely known. It’s basically rules on how a household or any organization might run. The problem that we’re having is that we really don’t have any rules,” Morgan said. “We did not have a general assembly this year. This is something we used to do customarily, but we have not had one this year. A good governance rule or law would include a rule that said we are going to have a GA and if chief and coun-

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Northern priest remembered Ashley Joannou News Reporter

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long-time Anglican priest in the territory is being remembered as a man of faith who had a deep love for the North and its people. Ken Snider died Tuesday in his home in Dawson City. He was 80. Snider ministered across the North for decades. He worked in communities including Cambridge Bay, Hay River, Clinton Creek, Whitehorse, Inuvik, Elsa, Mayo, Pelly Crossing, Carmacks, Keno, Stewart Crossing and Dawson City. “I have never known a Dawson without Ken Snider,” Mayor Wayne Potoroka said. “He was an incredibly thoughtful and friendly individual. He was a faithful servant to his church and his community.” Snider was born on a farm near Toronto in 1933. He was the youngest of three children. Bishop Larry Robertson said he always felt inspired by the work his friend of 30 years did in the community. “He loved people so much, he wanted them to be strong. He wanted to share God’s love,” he said. Robertson said Snider was always there to support people but never looked for the limelight himself. “He wanted others to shine.” About 10 years ago – after he had retired – Snider found out about a group of eight or 10 people from Fort McPherson who wanted to come up to Whitehorse for Bible study and a leadership conference. Using mostly his own money, he rented a 15-person van and drove them himself. “On the way they got three flats,” Robertson remembered. When asked why he would

George Balmer photo

Yukon Anglican priest Ken Snider died on Tuesday. He was 80. Snider served as a minister in Dawson City and throughout the North for over 45 years.

spend more than $1,000 of his own money, Snider replied: “That’s just what you do. They needed a ride,” Robertson said. Trond’ek Hwech’in Chief

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Eddie Taylor was one of many people who connected with the priest. “He was our hockey coach,

Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com

Prevention of Violence Against Aboriginal Women Fund (2014-15) The Women’s Directorate invites applications to the Prevention of Violence Against Aboriginal Women Project Funding. The fund provides assistance to community based violence prevention projects, designed and developed by and for Aboriginal women. The deadline for applications is Friday, November 15, 2013 by 5:00 pm. Projects may apply for up to $25,000 for one-year projects or $50,000 for two-year projects. Please contact Amanda Mudry (667-8675 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 8675), or Lorie Larose (667-3026 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3026) if you would like help or support in developing ideas for your proposal.

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he used to always take us over to Clinton Creek, when Clinton Creek was a community,” Taylor said. “On the weekends we’d head

over and it didn’t matter what the weather was on The Top of the World, he’d get us all home safely.” “Hockey was definitely the way he would engage with youth in our community,” the chief said. Canada’s favourite winter sport appears to have been part of Snider from a very early age. In a eulogy prepared for the upcoming funeral, his family talks about their dad as a boy. “As a child, Dad played hockey with his friends, using Sears catalogues as shin pads because his family couldn’t afford to buy him proper equipment,” his daughter Grace writes. The hockey team in Dawson was Snider’s idea, his family says. He coached the group of boys, spending long hours at the community’s unheated rink and driving the team to tournaments in other communities. Taylor said the First Nation always had respect for the church’s leader. “The First Nation community had nothing but respect for Rev. Ken Snider. He has shown nothing but care and compassion to our people.” While in Dawson, Snider began the St. Paul’s Restoration Fund to restore the more than 100-year-old church structure. He also secured funding to purchase and restore Bishop Stringer’s Residence. As an adult Snider raised six children, mostly in the North alongside his wife Aldene. Funeral services for Snider will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at St. Paul’s Church in Dawson City followed by a feast at the Trond’ek Hwech’in Community Hall.

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Opinion

Yukon News

EDITORIAL

Friday, November 1, 2013

INSIGHT

LETTERS

EDITORIAL

It was an inside job

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

The new facility for F.H. Collins Secondary School is expected to be built by the 2015/2016 school year.

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major infrastructure project is a strange thing for the territorial cabinet to want to sabotage. Yet that appears to be what happened in the case of plans to rebuild F.H. Collins Secondary School. Rather than admit that cabinet had allowed costs to spiral out of control, our political leaders instead lay blame at the feet of contractors. Better to blame a construction company than your own staff – and in turn acknowledge that you share responsibility in the mess – seems to be the reasoning. Premier Darrell Pasloski and his ministers have long asserted that bids to rebuild the high school had overshot the mark by nearly $10 million. The government was merely being “fiscally responsible,” the story went, by abandoning several years of planning and several million in expenditures to start clean, with a new plan to crib designs from a school already built in Alberta. But the story is not so simple, as we reported last week. The government had piled on additional costs, such as a temporary gym and geothermal heat, worth more than $5 million, to the project. Yet the territory never increased the project’s budget to accommodate these costs, even after paying a

professional estimator to come up with a new figure. In other words, it looks like the project’s procurement was designed to fail. Why is this significant? To start, because it means that the premier and his government have been less than honest with the public. They’ve always indicated that the cost estimates for the project were close together. This was flat-out false. The premier would no doubt respond that two earlier estimates were indeed close together. This is called lying by omission. He knew about the third, higher figure, and he decided against disclosing it. And the territory tried its best to keep the higher figure a secret. We had to fight for it through an access-to-information request that the government initially denied. The premier contends that his cabinet merely tendered a contract burdened with an additional $5 million in costs and hoped it would somehow stay within budget. This seems implausible. It suggests that our ministers are especially naive, or, more likely, that they hope the public is especially gullible. Our territorial leaders’ initial refusal to speak to this matter Publisher

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further suggests they understood this was a big potential embarrassment, best kept under wraps. And their early response that this isn’t a ministerial responsibility was especially remarkable. If cabinet doesn’t make such decisions, who does, pray tell? Is this a tacit admission that the bureaucracy ran riot on the project while the minister ostensibly in charge sat on his thumbs? That’s certainly what appears to have happened. Without anyone showing actual leadership on the “fiscal accountability” file for the project, we wound up with designs for an ostentatious monument – pricey glass walls, curving walls, long roof spans. What’s more, the construction plans would see the new school built immediately beside the old one, ensuring that students would effectively be attending classes in a construction zone. And to top things off, these plans would see students with no gym for two years, ensuring a large number of fed-up students and parents. With all these warning lights Reporters

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flashing, the minister of the day still approved construction of the project. Why? Well, there was an election just around the corner. There’s good reason to think this produced a rush job. Recall how the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board concluded the territory had flouted the law by beginning construction before even receiving a green light from assessors. Then the whole project quickly ground to a halt. So the Yukon Party got their foolish sod-turning ceremony during the election campaign … at

what cost? Four years and several million dollars in public funds, to start. Of course, private contractors who bid on the contract also wasted their resources, chasing a lucrative contract that the government, apparently, never actually intended to tender. This may be yet another lawsuit waiting to happen. Meanwhile, the premier and his colleagues don’t even see this schmozzle as something that warrants a straight answer. You can call all of this plenty of things. But “fiscally responsible” is not one of them. (JT)

Quote of the Day “I have never known a Dawson without Ken Snider. He was an incredibly thoughtful and friendly individual. He was a faithful servant to his church and his community.” Dawson Mayor Wayne Potoroka remembering the beloved Anglican priest who died Tuesday. Page 7

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Lining up for question period House would reveal next. Today we await the answer to burning questions: who is by AL POPE two Arthur Hamilton, and where is Nigel Wright? If the Senate does for Harper what Watergate did for Nixon, the names of Hamilton and Wright will be forever joined in the history books as the two men who signed questionable cheques for Mike Duffy. Of the two, pit-bull party lawyer he National Post reports a Hamilton is most likely to slip curious phenomenon this week: the Parliament of Canada back into the shadows, where has become a popular enterhe has always insisted he is “not tainment. Spectators are lining the story.” up around the block to view When accused of tainting question period, and those who Elections Canada interviews in are left disappointed when the the robocalls investigation by great oak doors are pulled shut sitting in and coaching PMO rush down the hall to see what staffers, Hamilton was quiet. the Senate has to offer. When it was revealed that As one who used to skip at least one of those staffers high school to sit in my par“had no choice” in the matter, ents’ basement and watch the suggesting that Hamilton was Watergate hearings on TV, I there to represent the party think I understand what motiv- and not the individual, he said ates the crowds in the gallery. not a word in his own defence. It’s not the revelations we’ve When Federal Court Judge already heard that keep us Richard Mosley described his watching, it’s the unanswered attempts to suppress the roboquestions. Once we perched on calls case as “trench warfare,” the edges of our chairs waitHamilton remained silent. Uning to hear what the Johns less he’s called upon to testify and Bobs of the Nixon White under oath, it’s not likely he’ll

NORDICITY

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break from pattern in the Senate scandal. Wright was never a shadowy figure. A major Bay Street investor and a player in Canadian conservatism since the Mulroney days, Wright was, according to Conservative Party president John Walsh, “a huge coup for the Conservative government … one of the brightest and best Canada has to offer.” Others saw him as a traveller through the wellknown revolving door between conservative political parties and the corporate world. Wright’s appointment could hardly have been a better example of the revolving door phenomenon, given that he took leave of absence instead of resigning from his directorship at Onex Corporation, a holding company with a major interest in the F-35 fighter jet, and retained his company shares, said to be valued at $3.5 million. As Jack Layton said at the time, “the military industrial complex has come to Ottawa and come to the Prime Minister’s Office.” In response to these challenges, Wright insisted he had built an “ethical wall” around

his business interests that would keep him from violating conflict of interest rules. “The common sense protection of my reputation, and the reputation of the prime minister are absolutely critical, so this matters to me, this matters to the government, and we will get it right.” Today that reputation lies in tatters, clawed to bits by those two battling cats, Mike Duffy and Stephen Harper. Canada waits for Wright to come out swinging the way America once waited for the latest revelation from John Dean, or the truth about seven minutes of missing audio tape. Or as Toronto Star columnist Chantal Hebert puts it, “it is now in Wright’s power – if he has a case to make for himself to clear his name – to destroy the prime minister.” Without a doubt both Hamilton and Wright could shed much-needed light on Harper’s role in the Senate scandal. Hamilton won’t. He’s a party lawyer and a fierce partisan and Harper has so far said nothing disloyal about him in public. Cornered, Wright could be forced to defend himself, but don’t expect any of the kind of

lashing out we’ve seen from the disgraced senators. The Senate scandal is only one aspect of the never-ending project to maintain the most corporatefriendly government possible, and both of these men still believe in that project. Just like the Watergate burglary, the Senate scandal could be the can of worms out of which pops the truth about robocalls, the F-35 debacle, and who knows what slimy things connected to the get-electedat-all-costs mentality. The only sure way to pry the can open is to call a full inquiry, with power to subpoena witnesses, where there are no small fibs, only truth and perjury. Harper will never call that inquiry. He will rest his hopes on the public forgetting all about this latest scandal by the time election day rolls around. It could work for him. It has before. But let’s hope not. It would be a shame for a story like this to fade to black just when the public is starting to get interested in politics. Al Pope won the Canadian Community Newspaper Award for best columnist in 2013. He also won the Ma Murray Award for Best Columnist in B.C./Yukon in 2010 and 2002.

The spies who loved to damage our reputation by NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF

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erhaps there’s more we could do to antagonize American allies. The National Security Agency could tweet Chancellor Angela Merkel’s juicy phone conversations, or post video clips on YouTube of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan singing in the shower. The Pentagon could fly drones over Paris, dropping Big Macs on fine restaurants, just to show that we can. Government officials fume at Edward Snowden and Chelsea Manning for harm they did to American security. Fair enough. But the latest uproar over our NSA spying is a reminder of how senior American officials have themselves jeopardized our strategic interests – by overreaching and doing things just because they could. Our national security policy has gone off the rails since 9/11. For a dozen years, security has been an obsession, rarely constrained by a weighing of trade-offs, and to what result? We have sought every tactical advantage, and this sometimes leads – as in eavesdropping of foreign allies

– to strategic losses. We have doubled spending on intelligence, after inflation, to more than $70 billion annually. More people have “top secret” clearances than live in the District of Columbia – and it was inevitable that there would be some rogues among them. When everything is classified, the system loses credibility, transparency and accountability. The war on terror led us to fight wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, achieving few obvious gains but costing thousands of American lives. For every jihadi we killed, we appear to have created several new ones. As a Chinese saying goes, we lifted up a rock and dropped it on our own feet. When he took office, President Barack Obama seemed likely to reorient security policy. He did, indeed, bring troops back from Iraq and, after a misconceived “surge” in Afghanistan, is winding down our presence there. But, overall, his security policy is surprisingly similar to President George W. Bush’s: Guantanamo remains an affront to our values and the world’s, NSA spying programs continue in force, drone strikes have been stepped up, and the White House has tried to curb serious public conversation about drones, spying and cyberwarfare. The Obama administration has prosecuted more whistle-blowers under the Espionage Act than all pre-

vious administrations put together. The latest scandal involving our spying on European leaders is symptomatic of this larger myopia about our strategic interests. It’s true that some of the outrage in Europe is affected. As Bernard Kouchner, the former foreign minister of France, bluntly noted in a radio interview: “Let’s be honest. We eavesdrop, too. Everyone is listening to everyone else. But we don’t have the same means as the United States, which makes us jealous.” Still, our eavesdropping seems to have broken German law, as well as the first rule of spying: Don’t get caught. If Obama really didn’t know that 35 world leaders were being listened to, something was wrong with intelligence oversight. A former CIA senior official says that before 9/11, that kind of monitoring of world leaders was always cleared by the White House. “Anything with senior government officials or heads of state was checked quite carefully, at least with the national security adviser, if not the president,” the official told me. Yet, since 9/11, our security policy has been on autopilot: If we can spy on Merkel, let’s do it! If we can use a drone to kill a suspected terrorist, go for it! If we can keep people indefinitely in Guantanamo, why not? Our hubris has undercut America’s greatest foreign policy advantage: our

soft power. In Pakistan, for example, our drone strikes have removed some dangerous militants. But drone strikes deeply antagonized the Pakistani people, tarnishing our image and reducing our leverage in a pivotal country. Our drones damaged our own influence in Pakistan more than the Taliban’s. As David Rohde of Reuters puts it: “The United States obsession with al-Qaida is doing more damage to the nation than the terrorist group itself.” Richard Haass, the president of the Council on Foreign Relations, notes that the majority of Europeans today have no memory of the Cold War and that, as a result, we have less leeway today to antagonize our allies. “This is a different geopolitical era,” he said. “We can’t assume that people are for us.” Yes, there is still a place for drones, for spying on allies, for the NSA. But they need to be subjected to scrutiny, context and brakes, as they were before 9/11. Commercial aviation would be safer if we were all required to fly stark naked. But we accept trade-offs – such as clothing – and thus some small risk. In the same way, it’s time to pause for a breath in the security realm and start examining the tradeoffs, rather than just doing things because we can. Nicholas D. Kristof writes about international affairs for the New York Times.


10

Yukon News

Federal oversight could help protect the Peel Recently, Western Arctic MP Dennis Bevington introduced Bill C-543 in the House of Commons, which asked that the Peel River be added to the list of rivers protected under the Navigation Protection Act. Yukon MP Ryan Leef, has objected to this, calling Mr. Bevington names and stating that the bills were “useless.” Mr. Leef is correct in stating that the Navigation Protection Act is not about environmental protection. However, the act does contain sections that would insure greater environmental protection. Under Omnibus Budget Bill C-45, the Navigational Waters Protection Act was amended. Aside from changing the title of the act to the Navigation Protection Act, all but large navigable waters were removed from protection. Mr. Leef claims that this was done at the request of farm groups and municipalities who suffered unnecessary hardship caused by the obligation to protect drainage ditches. Surely, if the Conservative government was

Friday, November 1, 2013

LETTERS that concerned about the trouble caused to municipalities and farmers, they could have found a way within this legislation to deal only with those situations. It wouldn’t have been difficult. The industrial sector that benefits the most from this change to the new act are pipeline companies. Under this new legislation, standards for putting pipelines under the majority of waterways in Canada will be less stringent. I would suggest that these amendments were made to further the interests of the fossil fuel who can dispense with most of the costly mitigations they are currently required to do. It is unlikely that pipelines will be built under the Peel River in the near future. But there are other protections from harm included in the new act that would offer extra protection for the Peel River. Sections 21 and 22 of this act prohibit dumping. The Yukon government is contemplating considerable resource development in the Peel River watershed. Roads and highways will be built if this is allowed to proceed. How well constructed future bridges crossing the Peel River are and how

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careful resource companies are about dumping will be affected by inclusion under the new act. Linda Leon Whitehorse

LNG generators mean fracking in the Yukon It doesn’t matter how you say it or how you twist it, if Yukon Energy purchases liquefied natural gas generators, the Yukon Party government will allow fracking to take place in the Yukon. The only firm price that Yukon Energy has for the next five years from the Shell gas plant near Calgary is a set price on the conversion of natural gas to LNG. Yukon Energy does not determine the market price of LNG, nor do they set the price on the transportation of LNG to the Yukon. Currently North American natural gas prices are at rock bottom, but in the next few years, when LNG is exported to other countries, we will be paying the world price of natural gas, which is over $14 a unit compared to the North American price, which is now slightly over $3 a unit. Economists are stating very loudly that the current LNG prices are not sustainable and will rise rapidly in the near future. So my question has to be: “Why are we as Yukon ratepayers and owners of Yukon Energy accepting the decision of the chair of the Yukon Energy board, Piers McDonald, the president of Yukon Energy, David Morrison and the Yukon Party government to borrow close to $40 million to purchase LNG electric generators that in the future will cost double or quadruple to operate? Both McDonald and Morrison have stated publicly that when the prices of LNG increases in the future, we would then try to buy LNG closer to the Yukon either from Ft. Nelson or even in the Yukon. This means the Yukon Party government is coming through the back door to allow unconventional drilling, which means fracking and poisoning our fresh water forever. In June 2013, Morrison was speaking to an audience in Ottawa. Posted on the YouTube QUESTtalks, Morrison clearly states: “We are converting our backup generators to LNG and we will be looking at distributing natural gas

dollars of wealth generated from that so-called discovery. Today the ones still alive sit in their shacks in Ross River spendto homes in Whitehorse.” This talk ing their old age in poverty. They took place before Yukoners were are highly respected by their own informed that Yukon Energy had people even though forgotten in selected LNG as a transition fuel. the mining world. (I would suggest that Yukoners I had a property in Faro for a go to the “QUESTalks” YouTube while but some of the elders in and type in David Morrison and Ross River told me, “Don’t live hear for yourself what Morrison there. The wind brings poison and had to say about Yukon Energy.) you will die.” The Yukon Party government They are talking about the has not asked Yukoners if they want tailings from the Anvil Mine that to spend an additional $40 million snake down from the mountain on top of the $100 million they like a plague, killing all vegetation already owe for Mayo B. and creating a tumour on the earth Are we going to continue to let that can be seen from the moon. Yukon Energy and the Yukon Party No wonder they don’t want to government do as they please with- see that happen again. out consulting Yukoners? Cancer has killed a lot of people I know in Faro. It could have been Don Roberts caused by old age and smoking but Whitehorse who knows for sure. There are always exceptions to First Nations are right to any pattern. The Minto Mine near Pelly Crossing has done well by the distrust industrialists First Nation people there. But that, to anyone who knows Yukon hisThe Ross River First Nation has tory – is a rare occurrence. won a precedent-setting case. It So my old working hat comes will soon be obligatory for anyone off in respect to the Indians of mining or prospecting or staking Ross River – and to Indians everyon their land to notify the First Nation and get permission to go in where in their struggle to gain respect and freedom on their own there to make any sort of mess. land. And why not? The anger of First Nation Sam Holloway people toward mining and oil Ross River companies and their distrust of government has been held in That day in October memory for many generations. And if you knew how native Open letter to Yukon Senator Dan people in the Yukon have been Lang: pushed around by the governRegarding your statement to ment – sometimes so heartlessly Yukon people that was published that it makes me shudder to hear in the Whitehorse Star on Oct. 24. I the stories – you too would be would like to know if you were apapplauding when they sometimes pointed to the Senate by Stephen win a struggle. Harper on Dec. 22, 2008. If so, you I have met the seven Indian and 17 others were appointed on people who helped Al Kulan disthe same day, a record in Canadian cover the Anvil Range deposit. In history books. Other appointees fact, they took him into the bush that day? Mike Duffy, Pamela Waland showed it to him. lin and Patrick Brazeau. In the end they got nothing. Some of these trusting, real wilderSally Wright ness people thought they were getting shares in all the millions of Kluane Lake

Letters to the editor The Yukon News welcomes letters from its readers. Letters should be no longer than 500 words and must be signed with your full name and place of residence. A daytime phone number is also required for verification purposes only. We reserve the right to edit letters for clarity, length, accuracy and legality. You can send submissions to editor@yukon-news.com. They can be faxed to 867-668-3755 or mailed to 211 Wood St., Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2E4.

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Toronto Mayor Rob Ford’s video shocker makes international headlines who linked to an American story on the scandal. For some, the flurry around Ford was seen as a blemish on Toronto’s reputation. “The world sees Canada as Rob Ford right now! Ashamed!!!” said one person. “Toronto is

known as the city run by a crack cocaine user... #embarrassed,” tweeted another. One woman, who had recently moved from New York to Toronto, said she only learned about the mayor on Thursday when his name dominated headlines.

“People have every right to be outraged,” Heidi Choi, 26, said in an interview. “It was kind of shocking to see.” Ford said he couldn’t defend himself publicly as matters related to the video were before the courts.

Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press

Mayor Rob Ford talks to media at city hall in Toronto on Thursday. Ford says he has no reason to step down despite police confirmation that they have seized a video media have alleged appears to show him smoking crack cocaine.

Diana Mehta Canadian Press

TORONTO he drug scandal involving the mayor of Canada’s largest city received international attention as police revealed they had found an alleged video that appears to show Rob Ford smoking crack cocaine. Toronto’s controversial mayor has drawn the attention of friends and foes since May with his abrupt dismissal of media reports carrying details of the alleged video – which he had said did not exist, while denying that he ever smoked cocaine. But confirmation from the city’s police chief Thursday that the video was in the hands of authorities forced Ford into the spotlight, with his troubles becoming an international talking point. “Toronto police link mayor to cocaine,” blared a headline on the front page of the New York Times website. “Toronto mayor drugs video found,” said another on the home page of the BBC website. News outlets as far as India, Europe and Australia also carried coverage of Thursday’s bombshell revelations. U.S. gossip website Gawker, which along with the Toronto Star newspaper was the first to report on the alleged video earlier this year, criticized Ford after the mayor said he had no reason to resign. “Well, there’s the crack tape! But, sure, pal,” a piece on the website said. Vanity Fair chimed in: “the

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most anticipated film of the year is not Gravity or Blue is the Warmest Color or even Last Vegas ... it is an independently produced amateur documentary that purportedly shows Toronto Mayor Rob “Oh Yeah, Rob Ford” Ford smoking crack.“ Some U.S. observers compared the Ford affair to the case of former Washington, D.C. mayor Marion Barry, who was busted smoking crack cocaine by an FBI sting in 1990. “Marion Barry had one of the best mayors-smoking-crack videos of all time. Yes, even in terrible scandal, Canada is still decades behind the United States of America,” wrote the author of a cheeky piece on the National Journal political news website. The article noted that Barry was re-elected as mayor after serving a sentence for drug possession. “While the Rob Ford news is reasonably astonishing … it definitely isn’t unprecedented,” the piece said. “Canada just can’t escape its southern neighbour’s sad, sad shadow.” Ford’s name was trending on Twitter for much of Thursday with many noting that the news had resonated far beyond Toronto. “Rob Ford goes global!” tweeted one person. “And people say Canada never makes the news in the U.S.,” said another

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New Projects Open for Comment Yukon News

12

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j k l m v b x WHITEHORSE g j k l m v b WEATHER s g j k l m v 5-Day Forecast f s g j k l m

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1°C o low -5°C high

-3 °C Low: -10 High:

sUNDay

°C

9:26 Sunset: 18:02

°C -2 q °C low -6

high

Sunrise:

moNDay

7:01 Moonset: 17:17

°C 2 w °C low -6

Moonrise:

high

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°C -1 a °C low -9

w e q w zk q x-4/-9 z b x OLD CROW

New New Projects Open forPublic Public Comment Projects Open for Comment PROJECT TITLE

CLOSEST COMMUNITY

(Assessment Office)

SECTOR

PROJECT #

DEADLINE FOR COMMENTS

Patton Creek Placer Project

Dawson City (Dawson City)

Mining-Placer

2013-0143

November 12, 2013

Maisy May Placer Project

Dawson City (Dawson City)

Mining- Placer

2013-0140

November 12, 2013

Lot 1132 Driveway Widening- Mt. Lorne

Whitehorse (Whitehorse)

Residential, Commercial and Industrial Land Development

2013-0131

EXTENDED: November 13, 2013

Powerline to Lot 1351 Takhini River Road

Whitehorse (Whitehorse)

Energy Transmission: (Gas, Electricity)

2013-0142

November 12, 2013

To moreinformation informationand/or and/or submit comments ononany project To Visit getget more submit comments any project – www.yesab.ca/registry OR Call Toll Free 1-866-322-4040 Visit - www.yesab.ca/registry or Call Toll Free 1-866-322-4040

Paddlers Abreast 2013 YRQ team would like to thank…

high

q z x b v

Friday, November 1, 2013

Our major sponsors:

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i u o p r i u o e yUKoN r i u communities w e r i q w e r

k -3/-7 k -1/-6 o k r 0/-7 -3/-10 -1/-8

Community and Individual Supporters: Carolyn O’Hagen Dolly Robertson John Rapp Extra Foods

Phil Robertson Gerry Rivest Harry Kern Sandi Coleman

Helen Rapp-Bowen Superstore The Java Connection

Dale, Samantha & Chelsea Best and the staff of Coal Mine Campground Linda Taylor and the staff at Kirkman Creek Doug and Mitch Dupont at the Six Mile Resort in Tagish

DAWSON

MAYO

Our support team who makes everything come together:

BEAVER CREEK

k

3/-7

e

WHITEHORSE

2/-3

HAINES JUNCTION

w 3/-5

WATSON LAKE

caNaDa/Us

Vancouver Victoria

Edmonton Calgary Toronto

Yellowknife

12°C 11°C 8°C 8°C 11°C -4°C

Al Foster Annabelle Bennetts Blaine Rapp Cheryl Rivest Cindy Gilday Clarence Scott

ROSS RIVER

CARMACKS

Skagway Juneau

Grande Prairie Fort Nelson Smithers

Dawson Creek

7°C 5°C 8°C 6°C 5°C 8°C

Fred Mullet Heather McIntyre Jon Schmidt Karin Stephens Len Rice

Team 2013

AGM

January 16th 2014 5:30pm appies Canada Games Centre

Claire Desmarais Dawn Fralick Jane Haydock

Lionel Aubin Miko Kirby Pansy Rice Peggy Hanifan Peter Kirby

Rosalie Rogers Shannon Kmyta Stella Martin Vic Rideout Violet Mullet

Linda Rapp Lynn Rice-Rideout Michelle Wagner

Midori Kirby Maralyn Rogers

Applications now being accepted for Team 2014 @ www.paddlersabreast.org Deadline: December 31 2013


13

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Congratulations laboratoire dr. renaud, a leader in skin care, would like to congratulate

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FREE SKIN CONSULTATIONS


14

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Ottawa backs off oilsands assessments: greenhouse gas targets not met Bob Weber

to meeting greenhouse gas reduction targets. A final list of the types of OTTAWA projects that will require a federal he federal government has environmental assessment was confirmed that the fastestreleased last week. The list contains growing sector of the oilsands no mention of in-situ oilsands won’t come under federal environ- mines, which are expected to be mental assessment, one day after the industry’s most common type acknowledging it won’t come close of development in the future. Canadian Press

T

Celebrating 40 Years! Yukon Trappers associaTion

Fur Depot

Thursday from 12:00 pm to 3:00 pm & 5:30 to 7:30 pm Friday from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm & 5:30 to 7:30 pm saTurday from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm

Location: yukon Fish & Game association Building, 509 Strickland Street (back door) Phone 667-7091 yukonfur@yknet.ca We are a non-profit association, and we ship to Fur Harvesters Auction and to North American Fur Auctions. We also provide a fur sealing service.

“This is the largest single source of (greenhouse gas) growth in the country and yet the federal government is not going to be playing a role there,” said Keith Stewart of Greenpeace. On Thursday, Environment Canada released a report concluding that Canada is on pace to get halfway to its 2020 emissions target under the Copenhagen accord. In-situ mines involve heating underground bitumen deposits enough to soften them so they can be pumped up. In some ways, they are considered more environmentally friendly. They require no vast open pits or lake-sized tailings ponds of toxic water. Environmentalists have pointed out they still result in habitat fragmentation on the surface through seismic lines and roads to wellheads. But their most significant impact results from heating the bitumen, usually through steam. Generating that steam burns a lot of natural gas, increasing the carbon intensity of the resulting barrel of oil. The industry’s gradual shift toward in-situ production is generally blamed for a recent rise in the average amount of carbon dioxide released per barrel of oilsands

crude. About 80 per cent of the resource can only be recovered using in-situ methods. Alberta government figures say in-situ production creates anywhere from one to 10 more kilograms of CO2 per barrel than open-pit mining. Stewart said there are also unanswered questions about some in-situ techniques. He points to a Canadian Natural Resources project that has been leaking bitumen for months near Cold Lake, Alta., despite the company’s attempts to stop it. Large expansions to existing open-pit mines will still be reviewed. As well, the federal environment minister has discretion to call a review into any project if the minister feels it is warranted. And all new oilsands projects will still be reviewed by Alberta. Environmental lawyer Melissa Gorrie said the province seems to be tightening its idea of what needs to be reviewed. She said a recent decision means two in-situ projects won’t have any public review at all after the province ruled local aboriginal groups weren’t directly affected by them. “There’s been a lot of problems even getting hearings triggered for in-situ projects in the province.”

A spokeswoman with the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers said industry welcomes the finalized list. “The provincial government will still be doing a review and assessment and it’s equally stringent,” said Geraldine Anderson. “It’s basically a reduction in duplication.” In background documents, Ottawa says the goal of the changes is to “achieve more predictable and timely project reviews, reduce duplication, strengthen environmental protection and enhance consultation with aboriginal groups. “The amendments to the regulations ensure federal environmental assessment requirements are focused on those major projects that have the greatest potential for significant adverse environmental effects in areas of federal jurisdiction.” Gorrie said it’s a mistake to think in-situ facilities don’t have significant impacts. “Just because it’s not a big open-pit mine that everybody can see doesn’t mean that there aren’t significant impacts that need to be addressed and require an assessment.”

Kids at this age are so much fun, and constantly on the go! That’s why we’re getting the flu shot — and not missing a moment. Kids who don’t like needles can get the flu mist vaccine this year, available in limited quantities.

CARMACKS Nov 6 & 13 TBD Carmacks Health Centre CARCROSS M–Th: from Oct 21 9am – 11am, 1:30pm – 3pm Carcross Health Centre DESTRUCTION BAY M, W, F: from Oct 21 – Nov 29 1:30pm – 3:30pm Destruction Bay Health Centre OLD CROW M–Th: from Oct 21 9am – 12noon, 1pm – 4pm Old Crow Health Centre F: from Oct 25 9am – 12noon Old Crow Health Centre PELLY CROSSING T–F: from Oct 22 9am – 11am, 2pm – 4pm Pelly Crossing Health Centre ROSS RIVER During usual AM and PM Walk-in Clinics – M–F: 8:30am – 11:30am and M–Th: 3pm – 4pm; and Wednesdays from 1pm – 3pm

WATSON LAKE Nov 1 Nov 4 Nov 5 Nov 6 & 8 WHITEHORSE M–F: from Oct 21 Nov1 Nov 2 Nov 4–6 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8

9am – 12noon, 1pm – 3pm 11am – 1pm, 3pm – 6pm 1pm – 4pm 11am – 1pm, 3pm – 6pm

Liard First Nation Office Ambulance Station Health Centre Drop-in Clinic Ambulance Station

9am – 11:30am, 1pm – 4pm 10am – 6pm 10am – 4pm 9am – 4pm 9am – 11:30am, 1pm – 7pm 3:30pm – 6:30pm 3:30pm – 6:30pm

Kwanlin Dün Health Centre Canada Games Centre Board Room Canada Games Centre Board Room YG Main Administration Foyer Kwanlin Dün Health Centre FH Collins High School Cafeteria Porter Creek High School Cafeteria

For a complete schedule, dates and times of other community clinics, or for more information, please contact your local community health centre or visit yukonflushot.ca NOTE: A bilingual nurse will be on duty at most Whitehorse flu clinics.

YUKON NEWS: 1 November


15

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Efforts to fight homelessness paying off as many as 200,000 Canadians a year confront homelessness. OTTAWA The Conservative government ities across the country are seesurprised anti-poverty advocates in ing their homeless populations its March budget by announcing a shrink thanks to efforts by the federal five-year renewal of funding for the government and its partners to proHomelessness Partnering Strategy. vide permanent housing to those lanThe budget cited evidence from a guishing on the streets, says Canada’s massive Housing First pilot project, social development minister. run by the Mental Health CommisHomelessness in Edmonton sion of Canada, that helped find and dropped by 20 per cent between 2008 pay for homes for mentally ill homeand 2010 and about 4,000 people in less people in five cities. The pilot Toronto have moved into permanent also provided recipients with as many housing in the last eight years, Cansocial services as they needed to stay dice Bergen told the National Confer- housed. ence on Homelessness on Tuesday. The Tories were given high marks “These are some of the strongest from a non-profit group that fights results that we’ve ever seen in any homelessness on the first day of the attempt to reduce homelessness,” homelessness conference. Bergen said. “The policy shift that the federal The government, she added, is government announced in its budget committed to expanding the sothis year is going to radically overhaul called Housing First program that is Canada’s response to homelessness,” driving the trend. said Tim Richter, head of the Cana“Moving forward, we will be look- dian Alliance to End Homelessness. ing for even more ways to support “It changes our efforts from communities in developing local simply a response to an emergency solutions to homelessness and we’ll situation to one that focuses on help them capitalize on the effective- permanent housing for chronically ness of Housing First,” she said. homeless people. We’ve not seen Those efforts will involve requiranything like it in the past. It’s really ing communities with the worst going to shape how communities rehomelessness problems to invest spond to homelessness in the future.” much of their federal government The mental health commission funding into Housing First. estimates about half of homeless An estimated 30,000 people are people in Canada have severe mental homeless on any given night while illnesses. A study in Toronto found Canadian Press

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that 71 per cent of people in shelters have a mental illness, an addiction or both. Bergen says she’s committed as minister of state for social development to eradicate the problem. “I’m here today to tell you that my goal is not to be the minister who tries to manage homelessness,” she said. “I’m here to be the minister who put us on the track to end homelessness in Canada.”

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Shunned, then fired: a priest’s tale of what happened when he tried discussing sex abuse Andy Blatchford Canadian Press

MONTREAL Roman Catholic priest says his attempt to raise the issue of sexual abuse with colleagues resulted in him being ostracized and eventually fired from a famous Montreal church. The story told by Rev. Andre Samson suggests that the Vatican’s promises of a new, more open approach to dealing with sexual crimes has not necessarily translated through the church rank-and-file. Samson says his troubles at St. Joseph’s Oratory began in June, when a distraught young man confided in him about being sexually assaulted by a priest from another parish. He says he now wants to go public about what happened next, in order to break the “code of silence” that he says endures in an era when Pope Francis is taking concrete steps to increase transparency about sexual violence and crack down on guilty priests. “I had confidence in the church, I had confidence in St. Joseph’s Oratory,” Samson, a veteran priest of 30 years and a university professor, said in an interview. “Perhaps I am naive, but I never would have believed that it would go this far. “This is why I decided to speak out about it.” Two years ago, the Congregation of the Holy Cross, the organization that runs the oratory, agreed to issue an apology and pay up to $18 million in a historic compensation agreement for sexual abuse committed over a five-decade span. Samson said priests in the

A

Remi LaPrise/The Canadian Press

Rev. Andre Samson says his attempt to raise the issue of sexual abuse with colleagues resulted in him being fired from a famous Montreal church.

order often discussed the headline-grabbing, multimillion-dollar payout during their routine lunchtime gatherings. That’s why he was surprised when he was swiftly reprimanded in the dining hall for sharing the disturbing story of an 18-year-old man who had come to see him at confession. The man, he said, told him that he had been sexually assaulted by a priest at another parish. Samson added that the

man refused to name his aggressor or the church. Samson, 59, who served as a military chaplain during the Persian Gulf War and teaches counselling at the University of Ottawa, said over the years he had listened to many young people in crisis. But he said he never saw one in such “intense psychological distress.” He said he advised the man to seek professional counselling. Deeply troubled, Samson

thought it was important he recount the story to his colleagues. “I shared my suffering and my anger toward that priest who had ruined the life of a young person of 18 years old,” he said. But he said his story was quickly interrupted. He was cut off within two or three minutes, while discussing the issue with three other priests over lunch at the refec-

tory in June. “The community superior became enraged,” Samson said. “He said, ‘Don’t talk about this here. It can’t be. We don’t talk about this here.’” Later that day, he alleges that same community superior, Claudel Petit-Homme, barred him from eating lunch in the dining hall. At the time, Samson considered quitting, but said he was encouraged by a colleague to

Building on generations of quality customer service The North changes – our commitment grows Kathy demonstrates Northwestel’s commitment to bringing us together – from the past to the present and into the future. She serves customers in both English and Inuktitut, as her great aunt did before her. Next on her to-do list? Learning how to say “Smartphone” in different Inuit dialects.

Kathy Customer Service, Iqaluit

How we communicate has changed a lot since Kathy’s great aunt used this Northwestel headset in the mid-1900s.


stay on at the oratory where he had worked part-time since last year. The oratory declined a request by The Canadian Press to interview Petit-Homme. Last month, Samson said he unsuccessfully asked another superior to help him overturn his refectory expulsion. Then, on Sunday, he said he was fired for reasons that he described as relatively minor offences, such as failing to do up his collar all the way. The other reasons included Samson’s refusal to put the Host wafer on worshippers’ tongues during flu season (a stance he took because he has a heart condition) and because he had made mistakes in the wording of absolution during confession. He said his superior denied that his firing had anything to do with him rehashing the sexual-assault allegation over lunch. The oratory’s administration refused to comment on Samson’s allegations, saying the reasons for his removal are confidential. Spokeswoman Danielle Decelles told Quebec City’s Le Soleil earlier this week that he was let go due to worshippers’ complaints. But Samson insists he was well-liked by parishioners and believes he was fired for raising a taboo subject. “I find this difficult because as priests we give our lives to the church,” said Samson, as his voice cracking with emotion. “And it’s sad how we can be The new Yukon home of

17

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013 betrayed by this church.” St. Joseph’s Oratory, a towering house of worship perched on the slope of Mont Royal, attracts two million pilgrims and visitors each year from around the world. The impressive building was founded in 1904 by Saint Andre, a humble Quebec cleric then known as Brother Andre. He was credited with miracle healings before his death in 1937, and was canonized three years ago. Samson’s allegations surface as the Vatican tries to clean up its global image on the issue. Pope Francis has instructed the head of the Vatican office that handles abuse cases to act “decisively” to protect children, to help victims and to punish priests guilty of sexual crimes.

In July, Pope Francis introduced new legislation to cover clergy and staff who live and work in Vatican City. The law defines crimes of sexual violence, and has increased punishments to range from five to 10 years in prison. Aggravating circumstances bring the maximum sentence up to 12 years and a fine of 150,000 euros. Back in Montreal, Samson believes he was well-positioned to speak out. He earns a $139,000 salary as a full-time university professor, and his reasons for wanting to be a priest are not strictly a question of livelihood. “I told myself that if I don’t talk, who will? No one can really talk because they are too vulnerable.”

Deadline Reminder for Licensed Hunters

www.edwardjones.com

All the Usual Reasons to Invest with Edward Jones.

Plus One.

Now investors in Whitehorse have one more reason to feel confident about their financial future. Kevin Moore is here to deliver the expert advice they need. One thing will always remain the same, however: Every Edward Jones advisor is committed to helping individual investors make sense of investing with personal service and a time-tested approach.

To learn how Kevin can help you make sense of investing, call or stop by today.

Kill reports and compulsory submissions for most species are due no later than 15 days after the end of the month in which you successfully hunted. Find out more about compulsory submissions, biological samples and kill reports in this year’s Hunting Regulations Summary. Pick up a copy wherever hunting licences are sold or visit the Environment Yukon website.

Kevin G Moore

Financial Advisor .

307 Jarvis Street, Ste 101b Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2H3 867-393-2587

If you were successful in October, your deadline is November 15th. For more information, visit: www.env.gov.yk.ca

Member – Canadian Investor Protection Fund

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PRESENTS

Margaret Atwood Schwatka Lake Area Plan (West Shore) Online Survey: whitehorse.ca/ schwatkalake Available now until November 5. Respond for your chance to win a 10-admission pass to the Canada Games Centre!

Book Launch and Signing at the

Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre Saturday, November 23 – 7:30 PM $12/Adults – $8/Students Books available at the event Tickets available at Mac’s Fireweed

Public and Stakeholder Meeting: Thursday November 7, 7-9 pm at Mount McIntyre (venue change). RSVP to erica.beasley@ whitehorse.ca

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ON MAIN STREET • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK UNTIL 9 PM

• w w w. m a c s b o o k s . c a


16

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Shunned, then fired: a priest’s tale of what happened when he tried discussing sex abuse Andy Blatchford Canadian Press

MONTREAL Roman Catholic priest says his attempt to raise the issue of sexual abuse with colleagues resulted in him being ostracized and eventually fired from a famous Montreal church. The story told by Rev. Andre Samson suggests that the Vatican’s promises of a new, more open approach to dealing with sexual crimes has not necessarily translated through the church rank-and-file. Samson says his troubles at St. Joseph’s Oratory began in June, when a distraught young man confided in him about being sexually assaulted by a priest from another parish. He says he now wants to go public about what happened next, in order to break the “code of silence” that he says endures in an era when Pope Francis is taking concrete steps to increase transparency about sexual violence and crack down on guilty priests. “I had confidence in the church, I had confidence in St. Joseph’s Oratory,” Samson, a veteran priest of 30 years and a university professor, said in an interview. “Perhaps I am naive, but I never would have believed that it would go this far. “This is why I decided to speak out about it.” Two years ago, the Congregation of the Holy Cross, the organization that runs the oratory, agreed to issue an apology and pay up to $18 million in a historic compensation agreement for sexual abuse committed over a five-decade span. Samson said priests in the

A

Remi LaPrise/The Canadian Press

Rev. Andre Samson says his attempt to raise the issue of sexual abuse with colleagues resulted in him being fired from a famous Montreal church.

order often discussed the headline-grabbing, multimillion-dollar payout during their routine lunchtime gatherings. That’s why he was surprised when he was swiftly reprimanded in the dining hall for sharing the disturbing story of an 18-year-old man who had come to see him at confession. The man, he said, told him that he had been sexually assaulted by a priest at another parish. Samson added that the

man refused to name his aggressor or the church. Samson, 59, who served as a military chaplain during the Persian Gulf War and teaches counselling at the University of Ottawa, said over the years he had listened to many young people in crisis. But he said he never saw one in such “intense psychological distress.” He said he advised the man to seek professional counselling. Deeply troubled, Samson

thought it was important he recount the story to his colleagues. “I shared my suffering and my anger toward that priest who had ruined the life of a young person of 18 years old,” he said. But he said his story was quickly interrupted. He was cut off within two or three minutes, while discussing the issue with three other priests over lunch at the refec-

tory in June. “The community superior became enraged,” Samson said. “He said, ‘Don’t talk about this here. It can’t be. We don’t talk about this here.’” Later that day, he alleges that same community superior, Claudel Petit-Homme, barred him from eating lunch in the dining hall. At the time, Samson considered quitting, but said he was encouraged by a colleague to

Building on generations of quality customer service The North changes – our commitment grows Kathy demonstrates Northwestel’s commitment to bringing us together – from the past to the present and into the future. She serves customers in both English and Inuktitut, as her great aunt did before her. Next on her to-do list? Learning how to say “Smartphone” in different Inuit dialects.

Kathy Customer Service, Iqaluit

How we communicate has changed a lot since Kathy’s great aunt used this Northwestel headset in the mid-1900s.


stay on at the oratory where he had worked part-time since last year. The oratory declined a request by The Canadian Press to interview Petit-Homme. Last month, Samson said he unsuccessfully asked another superior to help him overturn his refectory expulsion. Then, on Sunday, he said he was fired for reasons that he described as relatively minor offences, such as failing to do up his collar all the way. The other reasons included Samson’s refusal to put the Host wafer on worshippers’ tongues during flu season (a stance he took because he has a heart condition) and because he had made mistakes in the wording of absolution during confession. He said his superior denied that his firing had anything to do with him rehashing the sexual-assault allegation over lunch. The oratory’s administration refused to comment on Samson’s allegations, saying the reasons for his removal are confidential. Spokeswoman Danielle Decelles told Quebec City’s Le Soleil earlier this week that he was let go due to worshippers’ complaints. But Samson insists he was well-liked by parishioners and believes he was fired for raising a taboo subject. “I find this difficult because as priests we give our lives to the church,” said Samson, as his voice cracking with emotion. “And it’s sad how we can be The new Yukon home of

17

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013 betrayed by this church.” St. Joseph’s Oratory, a towering house of worship perched on the slope of Mont Royal, attracts two million pilgrims and visitors each year from around the world. The impressive building was founded in 1904 by Saint Andre, a humble Quebec cleric then known as Brother Andre. He was credited with miracle healings before his death in 1937, and was canonized three years ago. Samson’s allegations surface as the Vatican tries to clean up its global image on the issue. Pope Francis has instructed the head of the Vatican office that handles abuse cases to act “decisively” to protect children, to help victims and to punish priests guilty of sexual crimes.

In July, Pope Francis introduced new legislation to cover clergy and staff who live and work in Vatican City. The law defines crimes of sexual violence, and has increased punishments to range from five to 10 years in prison. Aggravating circumstances bring the maximum sentence up to 12 years and a fine of 150,000 euros. Back in Montreal, Samson believes he was well-positioned to speak out. He earns a $139,000 salary as a full-time university professor, and his reasons for wanting to be a priest are not strictly a question of livelihood. “I told myself that if I don’t talk, who will? No one can really talk because they are too vulnerable.”

Deadline Reminder for Licensed Hunters

www.edwardjones.com

All the Usual Reasons to Invest with Edward Jones.

Plus One.

Now investors in Whitehorse have one more reason to feel confident about their financial future. Kevin Moore is here to deliver the expert advice they need. One thing will always remain the same, however: Every Edward Jones advisor is committed to helping individual investors make sense of investing with personal service and a time-tested approach.

To learn how Kevin can help you make sense of investing, call or stop by today.

Kill reports and compulsory submissions for most species are due no later than 15 days after the end of the month in which you successfully hunted. Find out more about compulsory submissions, biological samples and kill reports in this year’s Hunting Regulations Summary. Pick up a copy wherever hunting licences are sold or visit the Environment Yukon website.

Kevin G Moore

Financial Advisor .

307 Jarvis Street, Ste 101b Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2H3 867-393-2587

If you were successful in October, your deadline is November 15th. For more information, visit: www.env.gov.yk.ca

Member – Canadian Investor Protection Fund

w

PRESENTS

Margaret Atwood Schwatka Lake Area Plan (West Shore) Online Survey: whitehorse.ca/ schwatkalake Available now until November 5. Respond for your chance to win a 10-admission pass to the Canada Games Centre!

Book Launch and Signing at the

Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre Saturday, November 23 – 7:30 PM $12/Adults – $8/Students Books available at the event Tickets available at Mac’s Fireweed

Public and Stakeholder Meeting: Thursday November 7, 7-9 pm at Mount McIntyre (venue change). RSVP to erica.beasley@ whitehorse.ca

www.whitehorse.ca

ON MAIN STREET • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK UNTIL 9 PM

• w w w. m a c s b o o k s . c a


18

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Canada mounting surveillance from diplomatic premises: German magazine Jim Bronskill

abroad. Lauri Sullivan, a spokeswoman for Communications Security EstabOTTAWA lishment Canada, says the agency he national eavesdropping agency does not comment “on our foreign is refusing to comment on allega- intelligence collection activities or tions that it mounts foreign operacapabilities.” German magazine Der Spiegel says tions through Canada’s embassies Canadian Press

T

Canada is using diplomatic facilities to support surveillance operations in league with key allies the United States, Britain and Australia. Word of the Canadian reference – first reported by blogger Bill Robinson, who closely tracks CSEC – came as the NDP unsuccessfully sought S TA R S P O N S O R S

Magical events to remember Public Tree Viewing & Silent Auction

Main Yukon Government Building Thursday, November 21 – Wednesday, November 27

Capstone BAH Humbug Cocktail Party Main Yukon Government Building Thursday, November 21, 5:30 pm

Skookum Asphalt Santa Breakfast Main Yukon Government Building Saturday, November 23, 10 am

Outside the Cube Season’s Eatings

Breakfast, Your Office Monday, November 25 & Tuesday, November 26 Yukon Convention Centre Thursday, November 28, 5 pm Yukon Convention Centre Friday, November 29, 11 am

G20 summit four years ago. Britain’s Guardian newspaper published slides describing the operation, including one featuring the CSEC emblem. More recently, Brazil demanded answers following accusations CSEC initiated a sophisticated spy operation against the South American country’s ministry of mines and energy. CSEC, tasked with gathering foreign intelligence of interest to Canada, has a staff of more than 2,000 – including skilled mathematicians, linguists and computer analysts – and a budget of about $350 million. The recent revelations – including concerns that CSEC gathers information about Canadians in the course of its foreign spying – have sparked criticism from civil libertarians and opposition politicians. An NDP motion put forward Tuesday by defence critic Jack Harris called for a special committee to study the intelligence oversight systems of other countries and make recommendations “appropriate to Canada’s unique circumstances.” The committee would have reported its findings by May 30 next year. The motion quickly went down to defeat. The Conservative government maintains CSEC is already subject to scrutiny by an independent commissioner who has never found an instance of the spy service straying outside the law.

The Yukon Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce the

Community Open House Soirée Preview Lunch

support in the House of Commons to create a parliamentary committee that would look into stronger oversight for the intelligence community. The magazine report published this week cites presentation slides leaked by Edward Snowden, a former contractor with the National Security Agency, CSEC’s American counterpart. One slide indicates the Canadian spy agency hosts “Stateroom” sites – a term for covert signals-intelligence gathering bases hidden in consulates and embassies. “These sites are small in size and in number of personnel staffing them,” says the slide. “They are covert, and their true mission is not known by the majority of the diplomatic staff at the facility where they are assigned.” Der Spiegel alleges that the U.S. NSA, Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters and Australia’s Defense Signals Directorate also host such covert stations, with equipment installed on rooftops or upper floors of embassy buildings – protected from view by screens or false structures. It’s just the latest of several references to the Ottawa-based spy service in Snowden’s cache of leaked materials. Earlier documents suggest Canada helped the United States and Britain spy on participants at the London

ADAMS FAMILY

“Energy Talk Series” in addition to our “Lunch Lectures”!

Seniors’ Soirée

The following Yukon Chamber of Commerce Events will be taking place in WhiTEhorsE:

Alkan Air Grand Ball

November 6th - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Watson Lake Tree Decorating

Town Hall at the Best Western Gold Rush Inn “Hydro Quebec Lessons Learned” with David Morrissette

Yukon Convention Centre Friday, November 29, 6 pm Yukon Convention Centre Saturday, November 30, 6 pm Johnson Elementary School Thursday, December 5, 2 pm

Dawson City Tree Decorating Robert Service School Friday, December 6, 2:20 pm

November 13th - 12:00pm to 1:00pm Room A at the Coast High Country Inn “Yukon’s Electrical Loads and Supplies Part A” with John Maissan

November 20th - 12:00pm to 1:00pm The Old Firehall “The Business of Energy and Innovation” by Yukon College Energy Talk Events are open to the public, and admission is by donation.

www.yhf.ca

northern vision developments lp


19

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

U.S. weighs ending spying on allied leaders Associated Press

WASHINGTON he White House is considering ending its eavesdropping on friendly foreign leaders, a senior administration official said, as the U.S. confronts a flood of revelations about its spying practices. A final decision has not been made, the official said. The administration is trying to tamp down damage from the monthslong spying scandal – including the most recent disclosure that the National Security Agency monitored the communications of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. President Barack Obama said the U.S. government is conducting “a complete review of how our intelligence operates outside the country.” Interviewed on the new television network Fusion on Monday, Obama declined to say when he learned about the spying operations. “What we’ve seen over the last several years is their capacities continue to develop and expand, and that’s why I’m initiating now a review to make sure that what they’re able to do doesn’t necessarily mean what they should be doing,” Obama said. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, called for a “total review of all intelligence programs” following the Merkel allegations. In a statement Monday, the Democrat said the White House had informed her that “collection on our allies will not continue.” The administration official said that statement was not accurate, but added that some unspecified changes already had been made and more were being considered, including terminating the collection of communications from friendly heads of state.

T

The official was not authorized to discuss the review by name and insisted on anonymity. Lawmakers were set to press for more information about surveillance programs at a House Intelligence Committee hearing Tuesday. Reports based on new leaks from former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden indicate that the NSA listened to Merkel and 34 other foreign leaders. “With respect to NSA collection of intelligence on leaders of U.S. allies – including France, Spain, Mexico and Germany – let me state unequivocally: I am totally opposed,” Feinstein said. She added that the U.S. should not be “collecting phone calls or emails of friendly presidents and prime ministers” unless in an emergency with approval of the president. In response to the revelations, German officials said Monday that the U.S. could lose access to an important law enforcement tool used to track terrorist money flows. Other longtime allies have also expressed their displeasure about the U.S. spying on their leaders. Spain’s prosecutor’s office said Tuesday it has opened a preliminary inquiry to determine whether a crime was committed by NSA surveillance. As possible leverage, German authorities cited last week’s non-binding resolution by the European Parliament to suspend a post-Sept. 11 agreement allowing the Americans access to bank transfer data to track the flow of terrorist money. A top German official said Monday she believed the Americans were using the information to gather economic intelligence apart from terrorism and said the agreement, known as the SWIFT agreement, should be suspended.

European Union officials who are in Washington to meet with lawmakers ahead of White House talks said U.S. surveillance of their people could affect negotiations over a U.S.-Europe trade agreement. They said European privacy must be better protected. Many officials in Germany and other European governments have made clear, however, that they don’t favour suspending the

U.S.-EU trade talks which began last summer because both sides stand to gain so much through the proposed deal. Amid tensions with European allies, the top U.S. intelligence official declassified dozens of pages of top-secret documents in an apparent bid to show the NSA was acting legally when it gathered millions of Americans’ phone records.

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper said he was following the president’s direction to make public as much information as possible about how U.S. intelligence agencies spy under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Monday’s release of documents focused on Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which allows the bulk collection of U.S. phone records.

YUKON CANADA

A

GREETINGS

P R O C L A M AT I O N

WHEREAS, Canadian sailors, soldiers and air force members fought and died in many wars to protect that which Canadians hold dear; and WHEREAS, women and men in the Canadian Forces are still serving their country at home and abroad in the interest of world peace; and WHEREAS, the Royal Canadian Legion continues to serve those Canadians who have made and are still making sacrifices by aiding our Veterans and their families and by promoting Remembrance; THEREFORE, I, Doug Phillips, Commissioner of Yukon, do hereby proclaim the period of November 3, 2013 to November 11, 2013 to be in Yukon.

“REMEMBRANCE WEEK” GIVEN UNDER my hand and seal at Whitehorse, Yukon on 24 October, 2013.

Commissioner of Yukon

Remembrance Ceremony

Yukon Soccer Association is holding a

Youth Referee Clinic Dates: November 6, 7, & 9th, 2013 Location: Selkirk School – gym & library Times: 6:00 – 9:00pm Wednesday 6:00 – 9:00pm Thursday 9:00 – 4:00pm Saturday

This course is mandatory for referees wishing to officiate this

Existing Referees are only required to attend

• •

indoor season

Saturday morning from 9:00-11:00am

Participants must be at least 12 years old Cost of course: $20 (includes ref kit) new referees only Requirements for course: pen & paper Interested participants must pre-register in advance at Sport Yukon by noon Wednesday Nov 6th

The Whitehorse Legion invites the public to attend the Remembrance Day Ceremony at the Canada Games Centre starting at 10 AM on Monday the 11th of November, 2013.

Lest We Forget


20

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Hackers hit major Israeli roadway, a sign cyber warfare now reality Daniel Estrin Associated Press

HADERA, Israel hen Israel’s military chief delivered a high-profile speech this month outlining the greatest threats his country might face in the future, he listed computer sabotage as a top concern, warning a sophisticated cyberattack could one day bring the nation to a standstill. Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz was not speaking empty words. Exactly one month before his address, a major artery in Israel’s national road network in the northern city of Haifa was shut down because of a cyberattack, cybersecurity experts tell The Associated Press, knocking key operations out of commission two days in a row and causing hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage. One expert, speaking on condition of anonymity because the breach of security was a classified matter, said a Trojan horse attack targeted the security camera system in the Carmel Tunnels toll road on Sept. 8. A Trojan horse is a malicious computer program that users unknowingly install that can give hackers complete control over their systems. The attack caused an immedi-

W

ate 20-minute lockdown of the roadway. The next day, the expert said, it shut down the roadway again during morning rush hour. It remained shut for eight hours, causing massive congestion. The expert said investigators believe the attack was the work of unknown, sophisticated hackers, similar to the Anonymous

hacking group that led attacks on Israeli websites in April. He said investigators determined it was not sophisticated enough to be the work of an enemy government like Iran. The expert said Israel’s National Cyber Bureau, a two-year-old classified body that reports to the prime minister, was aware of the

incident. The bureau declined comment, while Carmelton, the company that oversees the toll road, denied being hacked, blaming only a “communication glitch” for the mishap. While Israel is a frequent target of hackers, the tunnel is the most high-profile landmark known to have been attacked. It is a major

thoroughfare for Israel’s thirdlargest city, and the city is looking to turn the tunnel into a public shelter in case of emergency, highlighting its importance. The incident is exactly the type of scenario that Gantz described in his recent address. He said Israel’s future battles might begin with “a cyberattack on websites which provide daily services to the citizens of Israel. Traffic lights could stop working, the banks could be shut down,” he said. There have been cases of traffic tampering before. In 2005, the United States outlawed the unauthorized use of traffic override devices installed in many police cars and ambulances after unscrupulous drivers started using them to turn lights from red to green. In 2008, two Los Angeles traffic engineers pleaded guilty to breaking into the city’s signal system and deliberately snarling traffic as part of a labour dispute. Oren David, a manager at international security firm RSA’s antifraud unit, said that although he didn’t have information about the tunnel incident, this kind of attack “is the hallmark of a new era.” “Most of these systems are automated, especially as far as security is concerned. They’re automated and they’re remotely

The 2013 United Way Breakfast raised $21,939 for United Way of Yukon through ticket sales, cash donations and the silent auction

thank you!

Major sponsors: Bean North Coffee Government of Yukon High Country Inn G-P Distributing Inc. RCMP Arctic Star Printing CBC North CHON FM Northern Native Broadcasting CKRW The Rush Inkspirationz Graphix L’aurore boréale Outcrop Yukon Yukon News Extra foods Real Canadian Superstore Super A Foods Porter Creek Celebrity servers: Darrell Pasloski Tammie Pasloski Elaine Taylor Currie Dixon Liz Hanson Darius Elias

Colleen Gillis Ryan Leef Jan Stick Kelvin Leary Valerie Royle Joy Waters Joe MacGillivray Jeff O’Farrell Mike Johnson Peter Clark Mike Nixon Dave Laxton Murray Arsenault Chris Simmons Will Tewnion Betty Irwin Richard Karp Valerie Stockdale Dan Curtis Mike Gladish Karen Barnes Paul Flaherty Dwight Redden Jay Massie Chris Simons Piers McDonald Jocelyn Curteanu

rCMp panCake servers:

Al Lucier Craig Thur Ken Foster Paul McConnell Jason Waldner Jim Giczi Tony Park Don Rogers Cathie Sands Trudy Pike Lynn Matthews Debbie Verhalle Stephanie Dewitt Vicky Stallabrass Mike Simpson silent auCtion sponsors: Access Consulting Group Air North Yukon’s Airline Alkan Air Alpine Aviation Alpine Health Supplies & Bra Boutique and MediChair

Alternative Fuels & Mechanical Barber Shoppe Booster Juice Boston Pizza Builders Supplyland Calligraphica Camp K-9 Pet Daycare Canada Flooring Enterprises Ltd. Canadian Tire CBC Yukon Chinook Bookkeeping Services Chris Meger City of Whitehorse Coast Mountain Co-operators Dall Contracting Ltd Duncan’s Mechanical Contractors Elena Matechuk Erik’s Audiotronic Faro Golf Club Fireweed Helicopters Ltd. Fireweed Plumbing and Heating Headless Owl Records Headquarters Hair Design Icy Waters Ltd. Icycle Sports

Judy Matechuk Kal Tire Kilrich Klondike Business Solutions Klondike Nugget & Ivory Shop Kobayashi & Zedda Architects Kutters Hairstyling MacPherson Rentals Mac’s Fireweed Books Mad Trapper Alley’s Moffat, G. Nicola Hanna Norcope/General Enterprises/J&L Concrete North Dragon Restaurant North End Gallery Northerm Windows Northland Beverages Northwest Vacuum Services Northwestel Office Supply Centre Off the Hook Meatworks Old Cabin Band Pacific Northwest Freight Systems Philmar RV Centre Pho 5Star Vietnamese Cuisine

Special thanks to United Way Honourary Chair Larry Bagnell, musician Nicholas Mah, staff of the High Country Inn, and volunteers from the Department of Justice and the Public Service Commission.

PickaPeppa Restaurant Plantation Flowers & Gifts Porter Creek Self-Storage Riverside Grocery Sanchez Cantina Shoes R Us Skookum Asphalt Smart Choices Business Machines Snap on Tools Something Simple Salon Zen Salon and Spa Stewart Hearing Health Terry Funk/Pampered Chef Consultant The Flower Press & Feather Art The UPS Store The Ridge Pub Grill The Studio Tim Horton’s Donuts Total North Communications Ltd. Whitehorse Beverages Whitehorse Massage Therapy Whitehorse Motors Ltd. Yukon Knots & Crafts Yukon Smoked Salmon Yukon Yamaha


controlled, either over the Internet or otherwise, so they’re vulnerable to cyberattack,” he said. Israel, he added, is “among the top-targeted countries.” In June, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Iran and its proxies Hezbollah and Hamas have targeted Israel’s “essential systems,” including its water system, electric grid, trains and banks. “Every sphere of civilian economic life, let’s not even talk about our security, is a potential or actual cyberattack target,” Netanyahu said at the time. Israeli government websites receive hundreds and sometimes thousands of cyberattacks each day, said Ofir Ben Avi, head of the government’s website division. During Israel’s military offensive on the Gaza Strip last year, tens of millions of website attacks took place, from denial of service attacks, which cripple websites by overloading them with traffic, to more sophisticated attempts to steal passwords, Ben Avi said. Under constant threat, Israel has emerged as a world leader in cybersecurity, with murky military units developing much of the

21

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013 technology. Last year, the military formed its first cyberdefence unit. Israeli cybersecurity experts say Iran and other hostile entities have successfully hacked into Israeli servers this year, and that Israel has quietly permitted those attacks to occur in order to track the hackers and feed them false intelligence. Israel is also widely believed to have launched its own sophisticated computer attacks on its enemies, including the Stuxnet worm that caused significant damage to Iran’s nuclear program. Bracing for serious attacks on Israeli civilian infrastructure, Israel’s national electric company launched a training program this month to teach engineers and power plant supervisors how to detect system infiltrations. The Israel Electric Corp. says its servers register about 6,000 unique computer attacks every second. “Big organizations and even countries are preparing for DDay,” said Yasha Hain, a senior executive vice-president at the company. “We decided to prepare ourselves to be first in line.” The training program is run

Think small Are you looking to start or expand your Yukonbased business? If so, a small loan can make a big difference with the Yukon Micro Loan Program. The Yukon Micro Loan Program lends small amounts of money starting at $3,000 for a first loan -- to individuals who want to start, maintain or expand small businesses. Those who repay their loans in a timely fashion may qualify for interest rate reductions on subsequent loans up to $12,000.

jointly with CyberGym, a cyberdefence company founded by ex-Israeli intelligence operatives that consults for Israeli oil, gas, transportation and financial companies. On a manicured campus of eucalyptus trees across from a power plant in Israel’s north, groups are divided into teams in a role-playing game of hackers and power plant engineers. The “hackers,” code-named the Red Team, sit in a dimly lit room decorated with cartoon villains on the walls. Darth Vader hovers

over binary code. Kermit the Frog flashes his middle finger. In another room, a miniature model of a power station overflows with water and the boiler’s thermometer shoots up as the role-playing hackers run a “Kill All” code. The exercise teaches employees how to detect a possible cyberattack even if their computer systems don’t register it. About 25 middle-aged employees attended the first day of training last week. The course will eventually train thousands of workers, the electric company said.

CyberGym co-founder Ofir Hason declined to comment on the toll road shutdown, but said the company has seen a number of cyberattacks on infrastructures in recent years. The country is especially susceptible because Israel has no electricity-sharing agreements with neighbouring states, and all of the country’s essential infrastructure depends on the company for power. “We’re an isolated island,” he said.

with a

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dNV paper ad: 2clm (4”) x 6”

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LISTERS MOTOR SPORTS Convenient Downtown Location: 3209 3RD AVENUE • 667-7491 OR TOLL-FREE 1-888-567-2187


20

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Hackers hit major Israeli roadway, a sign cyber warfare now reality Daniel Estrin Associated Press

HADERA, Israel hen Israel’s military chief delivered a high-profile speech this month outlining the greatest threats his country might face in the future, he listed computer sabotage as a top concern, warning a sophisticated cyberattack could one day bring the nation to a standstill. Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz was not speaking empty words. Exactly one month before his address, a major artery in Israel’s national road network in the northern city of Haifa was shut down because of a cyberattack, cybersecurity experts tell The Associated Press, knocking key operations out of commission two days in a row and causing hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage. One expert, speaking on condition of anonymity because the breach of security was a classified matter, said a Trojan horse attack targeted the security camera system in the Carmel Tunnels toll road on Sept. 8. A Trojan horse is a malicious computer program that users unknowingly install that can give hackers complete control over their systems. The attack caused an immedi-

W

ate 20-minute lockdown of the roadway. The next day, the expert said, it shut down the roadway again during morning rush hour. It remained shut for eight hours, causing massive congestion. The expert said investigators believe the attack was the work of unknown, sophisticated hackers, similar to the Anonymous

hacking group that led attacks on Israeli websites in April. He said investigators determined it was not sophisticated enough to be the work of an enemy government like Iran. The expert said Israel’s National Cyber Bureau, a two-year-old classified body that reports to the prime minister, was aware of the

incident. The bureau declined comment, while Carmelton, the company that oversees the toll road, denied being hacked, blaming only a “communication glitch” for the mishap. While Israel is a frequent target of hackers, the tunnel is the most high-profile landmark known to have been attacked. It is a major

thoroughfare for Israel’s thirdlargest city, and the city is looking to turn the tunnel into a public shelter in case of emergency, highlighting its importance. The incident is exactly the type of scenario that Gantz described in his recent address. He said Israel’s future battles might begin with “a cyberattack on websites which provide daily services to the citizens of Israel. Traffic lights could stop working, the banks could be shut down,” he said. There have been cases of traffic tampering before. In 2005, the United States outlawed the unauthorized use of traffic override devices installed in many police cars and ambulances after unscrupulous drivers started using them to turn lights from red to green. In 2008, two Los Angeles traffic engineers pleaded guilty to breaking into the city’s signal system and deliberately snarling traffic as part of a labour dispute. Oren David, a manager at international security firm RSA’s antifraud unit, said that although he didn’t have information about the tunnel incident, this kind of attack “is the hallmark of a new era.” “Most of these systems are automated, especially as far as security is concerned. They’re automated and they’re remotely

The 2013 United Way Breakfast raised $21,939 for United Way of Yukon through ticket sales, cash donations and the silent auction

thank you!

Major sponsors: Bean North Coffee Government of Yukon High Country Inn G-P Distributing Inc. RCMP Arctic Star Printing CBC North CHON FM Northern Native Broadcasting CKRW The Rush Inkspirationz Graphix L’aurore boréale Outcrop Yukon Yukon News Extra foods Real Canadian Superstore Super A Foods Porter Creek Celebrity servers: Darrell Pasloski Tammie Pasloski Elaine Taylor Currie Dixon Liz Hanson Darius Elias

Colleen Gillis Ryan Leef Jan Stick Kelvin Leary Valerie Royle Joy Waters Joe MacGillivray Jeff O’Farrell Mike Johnson Peter Clark Mike Nixon Dave Laxton Murray Arsenault Chris Simmons Will Tewnion Betty Irwin Richard Karp Valerie Stockdale Dan Curtis Mike Gladish Karen Barnes Paul Flaherty Dwight Redden Jay Massie Chris Simons Piers McDonald Jocelyn Curteanu

rCMp panCake servers:

Al Lucier Craig Thur Ken Foster Paul McConnell Jason Waldner Jim Giczi Tony Park Don Rogers Cathie Sands Trudy Pike Lynn Matthews Debbie Verhalle Stephanie Dewitt Vicky Stallabrass Mike Simpson silent auCtion sponsors: Access Consulting Group Air North Yukon’s Airline Alkan Air Alpine Aviation Alpine Health Supplies & Bra Boutique and MediChair

Alternative Fuels & Mechanical Barber Shoppe Booster Juice Boston Pizza Builders Supplyland Calligraphica Camp K-9 Pet Daycare Canada Flooring Enterprises Ltd. Canadian Tire CBC Yukon Chinook Bookkeeping Services Chris Meger City of Whitehorse Coast Mountain Co-operators Dall Contracting Ltd Duncan’s Mechanical Contractors Elena Matechuk Erik’s Audiotronic Faro Golf Club Fireweed Helicopters Ltd. Fireweed Plumbing and Heating Headless Owl Records Headquarters Hair Design Icy Waters Ltd. Icycle Sports

Judy Matechuk Kal Tire Kilrich Klondike Business Solutions Klondike Nugget & Ivory Shop Kobayashi & Zedda Architects Kutters Hairstyling MacPherson Rentals Mac’s Fireweed Books Mad Trapper Alley’s Moffat, G. Nicola Hanna Norcope/General Enterprises/J&L Concrete North Dragon Restaurant North End Gallery Northerm Windows Northland Beverages Northwest Vacuum Services Northwestel Office Supply Centre Off the Hook Meatworks Old Cabin Band Pacific Northwest Freight Systems Philmar RV Centre Pho 5Star Vietnamese Cuisine

Special thanks to United Way Honourary Chair Larry Bagnell, musician Nicholas Mah, staff of the High Country Inn, and volunteers from the Department of Justice and the Public Service Commission.

PickaPeppa Restaurant Plantation Flowers & Gifts Porter Creek Self-Storage Riverside Grocery Sanchez Cantina Shoes R Us Skookum Asphalt Smart Choices Business Machines Snap on Tools Something Simple Salon Zen Salon and Spa Stewart Hearing Health Terry Funk/Pampered Chef Consultant The Flower Press & Feather Art The UPS Store The Ridge Pub Grill The Studio Tim Horton’s Donuts Total North Communications Ltd. Whitehorse Beverages Whitehorse Massage Therapy Whitehorse Motors Ltd. Yukon Knots & Crafts Yukon Smoked Salmon Yukon Yamaha


controlled, either over the Internet or otherwise, so they’re vulnerable to cyberattack,” he said. Israel, he added, is “among the top-targeted countries.” In June, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Iran and its proxies Hezbollah and Hamas have targeted Israel’s “essential systems,” including its water system, electric grid, trains and banks. “Every sphere of civilian economic life, let’s not even talk about our security, is a potential or actual cyberattack target,” Netanyahu said at the time. Israeli government websites receive hundreds and sometimes thousands of cyberattacks each day, said Ofir Ben Avi, head of the government’s website division. During Israel’s military offensive on the Gaza Strip last year, tens of millions of website attacks took place, from denial of service attacks, which cripple websites by overloading them with traffic, to more sophisticated attempts to steal passwords, Ben Avi said. Under constant threat, Israel has emerged as a world leader in cybersecurity, with murky military units developing much of the

21

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013 technology. Last year, the military formed its first cyberdefence unit. Israeli cybersecurity experts say Iran and other hostile entities have successfully hacked into Israeli servers this year, and that Israel has quietly permitted those attacks to occur in order to track the hackers and feed them false intelligence. Israel is also widely believed to have launched its own sophisticated computer attacks on its enemies, including the Stuxnet worm that caused significant damage to Iran’s nuclear program. Bracing for serious attacks on Israeli civilian infrastructure, Israel’s national electric company launched a training program this month to teach engineers and power plant supervisors how to detect system infiltrations. The Israel Electric Corp. says its servers register about 6,000 unique computer attacks every second. “Big organizations and even countries are preparing for DDay,” said Yasha Hain, a senior executive vice-president at the company. “We decided to prepare ourselves to be first in line.” The training program is run

Think small Are you looking to start or expand your Yukonbased business? If so, a small loan can make a big difference with the Yukon Micro Loan Program. The Yukon Micro Loan Program lends small amounts of money starting at $3,000 for a first loan -- to individuals who want to start, maintain or expand small businesses. Those who repay their loans in a timely fashion may qualify for interest rate reductions on subsequent loans up to $12,000.

jointly with CyberGym, a cyberdefence company founded by ex-Israeli intelligence operatives that consults for Israeli oil, gas, transportation and financial companies. On a manicured campus of eucalyptus trees across from a power plant in Israel’s north, groups are divided into teams in a role-playing game of hackers and power plant engineers. The “hackers,” code-named the Red Team, sit in a dimly lit room decorated with cartoon villains on the walls. Darth Vader hovers

over binary code. Kermit the Frog flashes his middle finger. In another room, a miniature model of a power station overflows with water and the boiler’s thermometer shoots up as the role-playing hackers run a “Kill All” code. The exercise teaches employees how to detect a possible cyberattack even if their computer systems don’t register it. About 25 middle-aged employees attended the first day of training last week. The course will eventually train thousands of workers, the electric company said.

CyberGym co-founder Ofir Hason declined to comment on the toll road shutdown, but said the company has seen a number of cyberattacks on infrastructures in recent years. The country is especially susceptible because Israel has no electricity-sharing agreements with neighbouring states, and all of the country’s essential infrastructure depends on the company for power. “We’re an isolated island,” he said.

with a

STIHL

AST

Chain Saw

10

BUILT TO L

MS 170 GAS CHAIN SAW WITH 15"/16" BAR 30.1 CC/1.3 KW

%

It’s here! The annual wood-pro promotion!

PLUS

OFF FREE

*

WOOD-PRO™ KIT

receive a

an $85 value!

Kit includes:

FREE Woodsman® Carrying Case

FREE STIHL TIMBERSPORTS ® Hat

FREE Oilomatic ®

Chain Loop

FREE Chain Saw Operation

and Maintenance DVD

Micro Loans can be used for business purposes such as: • Buying or leasing equipment, tools or computers • Making leasehold improvements • Purchasing materials, supplies and inventory • Paying first and last month’s rent on a commercial space • Marketing and advertising • Establishing or rebuilding credit history

Take the first step towards business success… contact us today.

Growing Yukon businesses since 1985

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22

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Greenland removes uranium mining ban Jan M. Olsen

into rare earths, so the ban was blocking key mining activity. Cameco, one of the world’s COPENHAGEN, Denmark largest uranium producers, Greenland’s Parliament has welcomed the decision, adding agreed to remove a 25-year-old that it would be open to setting ban on uranium mining, pavup projects in Greenland. ing the way for an industrial “We are pleased to see that boom that the Arctic island Greenland has opened the hopes will help it gain indedoor to safe and responsible pendence from former colonial uranium mining,” said Rob master Denmark. Gereghty, a spokesman for the Greenland, a semi-autonoSaskatoon-based company. mous part of Denmark, wants “Currently, we are focusto step up its mining of rare ing our exploration efforts in earths, valuable elements used Canada, Australia, Kazakhstan in the production of smartand the United States. As we phones, weapons systems and look forward, the removal of other modern technologies. But this barrier will allow us to consider Greenland for pouranium is often found mixed Canadian Press

tential uranium exploration projects.” Experts estimate that a mine in southern Greenland could contain the largest rare-earth metals deposit outside of China, which currently accounts for more than 90 per cent of global production. An Australian company has estimated it could extract up to 40,000 tonnes of rare earth metals per year. In a 15-14 vote with two absentees, the Greenland Parliament backed late Thursday the centre-left governing coalition’s desire to remove the ban. The government also gave a British company a license to extract

iron. The company, London Mining, is now seeking investments to develop a mine northeast of Nuuk, the capital, and is expected to bring in foreign workers, possibly from China. Many Greenlanders want to use the island’s mineral resources as a way to reduce dependency on a subsidy from Denmark, which now accounts for about two-thirds of the island’s economy. Denmark is open to allowing Greenland greater independence, but there is currently no way the island can support its costs without the subsidy. Denmark’s foreign trade minister, Nick Haekkerup, sought to ease concerns that Greenland might sell the uranium it finds in the rare earths mining. He said Friday that the country cannot decide that alone because Denmark still

handles its security and foreign policy. Jens-Erik Kirkegaard, Greenland’s minister for natural resources, said after Thursday’s vote that several laws need to be changed before exports of rare earths can start “in a couple of years or more.” The government wants to introduce royalties on the mining industry and revise a law that would allow an influx of foreign labour. Environmental activists lamented Parliament’s narrow vote in favour of lifting the ban on uranium extraction. “It can have great consequences for the environment and the people of Greenland,” said Greenpeace spokesman Jon Burgwald in Copenhagen. “So we suggest that specific maximum limits on how much radiation, wastewater discharge, etc.” are allowed.

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outside inside Yukoners value fresh air both inside and outside their homes. If you depend on an oil-fired appliance in your home, make sure your indoor air stays healthy by doing these three things: 1. ensure all installations are by certified technicians 2. have all oil-fired appliances serviced annually 3. install a carbon monoxide detector and replace the batteries every year For more information on safe furnaces and carbon monoxide detection call Yukon Housing Corporation, 1-800-661-0408, ext. 5759.

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To all of Canada’s veterans and those in uniform today,

To all Canada’s theof Public Serviceveterans Alliance

and those in uniform today, the Public Service Alliance of Canada, North salutes you of Canada, North salutes you and thanks you for all you do and thanks you for all you do and all you have done to safeguard liberty and democracy.

and all you have done to safeguard Toliberty the families whodemocracy. have faced loss, and we shall remember the sacrifices made on behalf of us all.

To the families who have faced loss, we shall remember the sacrifices made on behalf of us all.

Thank you. Meegwetch. Quyanainni. Mahsi Cho. Thank you. Meegwetch. Quyanainni. Mahsi Cho.


23

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

B.C. booze review seriously pondering selling liquor in grocery stores

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which B.C. will examine before considering the concept further. He said other liquor policy VICTORIA changes suggested by British ritish Columbians appear Columbians, include allowing to be overwhelmingly in fa- craft beer and wine to be sold at vour of picking up a six-pack of farmer’s markets, streamlining beer or bottle wine at the same the liquor licence application neighbourhood grocery store process for special events and where they buy their bread and allowing children to accompany milk, says the Liberal governtheir parents at liquor estabment’s liquor policy reform lishments such as pubs and czar John Yap. legions. Yap said Tuesday the LiberA spokesman for B.C.’s prials are now seriously weighing vate liquor stores said the orgachanging B.C.’s liquor laws to nization opposes grocery store permit liquor sales at grocery liquor sales, both on safety and stores. economic grounds. He said up to 80 per cent of “The model we have now the people responding to the is working extremely well for government’s on-going liquor British Columbians,” said Ian policy review put selling alcoBaillie, Alliance of Beverage hol in grocery stores at the top Licensees of B.C. spokesman. of their wish list. “It’s virtually impossible The Liberals have embarked to find a grocery store in this on a review to modernize and province that is 100 to 200 feet update the province’s liquor away from a liquor store,” he laws, which were last reviewed said. in 1999. British Columbians Baillie said British Columbihave until Oct. 31 to provide ans are well-served by private input into the current review, and public liquor outlets and which Yap will submit to Justice an overstocked supply of liquor Minister Suzanne Anton on outlets raises health and busiNov. 25. ness concerns. He said there are “British Columbians value currently 1,400 liquor outlets convenience and our liquor in B.C. laws should reflect this changPrivate liquor stores employ ing dynamic,” Yap said at a 15,000 people, said Baillie. Vancouver news conference. He said the government’s “British Columbians have review of expanding liquor spoken and I want to let them sales to grocery stores should know this – I am listening. go beyond the criteria that “it’s The idea of selling beer and popular.” wine, particularly in grocery Yap said the policy review stores has been such a popular will focus on health and safety concerns, which could involve one that we are going to start exploring which models might maintaining a cap on the current number of liquor outlets, work for B.C.” but allow liquor operations Yap said Quebec, Nova Scoto set up shop within grocery tia and Ontario all have some stores. forms of liquor sales in stores, Canadian Press

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

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25

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Weak metal prices, murky markets keep miners’ earnings, expectations in check Romina Maurino Canadian Press

TORONTO ow metal prices and murky markets are keeping the expectations and expenses of Canadian mining companies in check as they try to boost profitability. Several major mining companies reported decreased profits Thursday and, while well-known miners such as Goldcorp Inc. and Teck Resources Ltd. both beat analyst expectations, they pledged a continued watch on spending and a paring down of projects. It’s a strategy Ian Nakamoto, director of research at MacDougall, MacDougall & MacTier Inc., expects will continue for the rest of the year and into 2014, and one he said miners are wise to adopt. “When the outlook is so cloudy, why would (shareholders) want companies to expand and spend a lot of money on projects that may or may not become profitable?” Nakamoto said. “You want to see them be cautious.” John Gravelle, global and Canadian mining leader at PwC, said that while cost-containment has been the clear focus for all miners, those companies may start seeing some cost relief heading into the new year. “There seems to be some bottom side of gold – it seems not to be going below certain levels, which means that hopefully most gold companies will be able to operate profitably at gold prices in the 1300s,” Gravelle said. “They spent 2013 focusing on cost containment and I think we’re going to start seeing the benefits of that by the end of the year (on the cost side).” Goldcorp chief executive Charles

L

Jeannes told analysts and investors Thursday that his company’s production was on track to meet 2013 guidance, with continued cost reduction a “key priority for the balance of the year and beyond.” “This higher production, in combination with operating cost moving lower toward the portfolio, means we’re looking forward to a very strong finish into 2013,” Jeannes said during a conference call. Goldcorp’s net earnings fell to US$5 million from US$498 million in the same period last year, while revenue dropped to US$929 million from US$1.3 billion, on an average realized gold price for the quarter of $1,339 per ounce compared with $1,685 an ounce in the year-ago quarter. Adjusted net earnings for the quarter were 23 cents per share, down from 54 cents per share, in the third quarter of 2012. According to Nakamoto, analysts had expected Goldcorp’s adjusted earnings to come in at 16 cents per share. The Vancouver-based company also said it was revising the initial cost and schedule at its Cerro Negro project in Argentina, which will affect the outlook for the project next year. Teck reported a third-quarter adjusted profit of $252 million, or 44 cents per share, down sharply from $425 million, or 73 cents, in the same period last year, as prices for all of its principal products fell. The results, however, were six cents per share above analyst estimates compiled by Thomson Reuters. Agnico Eagle Mines Ltd., which reported results Wednesday afternoon, said net income for the three months ended Sept. 30 was US$47.3 million,

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potash producers, sent the stock of potash-producing companies plummeting in July when it threatened to pull out of a marketing consortium in a move that threatened to undercut prices on the world market. As a result, key buyer delayed purchases or were reluctant to accept major shipments against existing contracts as they waited for more direction on how the system will work going forward. On the Toronto Stock Exchange, Goldcorp shares were trading up more than four per cent at $27.80 on Thursday, Teck was also up four per cent to $30.68, and Agnico-Eagle jumped 17 per cent to $31.44. PotashCorp., meanwhile, fell nearly three per cent to $31.97.

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“It all depends on what the (U.S.) Federal Reserve does,” Nakamoto said. “If they delay tapering more than expectations, gold prices should react positively; if they don’t, they’ll react negatively.” Saskatoon-based Potash Corp. also reported lower third-quarter earnings of 41 cents per share on $356 million in net earnings Thursday, down from 74 cents per share, or $645 million, in the same period last year as a result of weaker prices and lower potash sales volumes. That company’s biggest challenge, however, is a change in strategy by Russian-based Uralkali last summer which stalled global demand. Uralkali, one of the world’s largest

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down from US$106.3 million the same 2012 period, because of lower metal prices. It reported strong operational performance from its mines, however, which led to record quarterly gold production. Mining stocks began a decline in the first four months of year and, when price recovery finally begins, it will vary by commodity, Nakamoto said. Metallurgical coal seems to have bottomed and is slowing moving up, for example, while copper could come still come down a little more. The path gold prices, which have remained around the $1,300 mark and well below the $1,900 an ounce reached a couple of years ago, is more difficult to call.


26

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Securities regulators look at making financial services fees more transparent Linda Nguyen

fraud scandals. While industry and consumer advocates in Canada TORONTO are at odds over whether such The fees Canadians pay to a ban would meet the aim invest in mutual funds are of increased transparency in under scrutiny as the national the industry, they do agree securities regulator reviews change is needed. whether the often used em“It is very confusing for bedded compensation system consumers right now,” said is in the best interest of inves- Jonathan Bishop, a research tors. analyst with the Ottawa-based Earlier this year, Australia Public Interest Advocacy and the U.K. banned so-called Centre. “trailing commissions” in In Canada, mutual fund their financial services indus- and investment advisers can tries following two massive be paid by their clients in a Canadian Press

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number of ways, including an hourly rate or a flat fee. Most commonly, however, they are paid through an embedded fee system, usually a predetermined percentage taken directly from a client’s total investments. This amount, called a management expense ratio (MER) is set by fund companies and is generally around 2.5 per cent annually. It covers a variety of fees including the adviser’s cut, which ranges around one per cent. The industry has been criticized for a lack of regulation when it comes to disclosing embedded fees to consumers. Not all investors are aware of how much they pay in these fees, because they’re not billed, or know that other payment options are available. The Canadian Securities Administrators, responsible for securities regulations across the country, recently

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Notice to all Kwanlin Dun First Nation Citizens Post-Secondary Education Program

P O S T - S E C O N D A RY S T U D E N T S

Kwanlin Dun First Nation citizens are eligible to apply for financial assistance through the PostSecondary Education Program. To be eligible to receive Kwanlin Dun Student Financial Assistance the following criteria must be met:

• Be a Kwanlin Dun First Nation citizen; • Meet University or College entrance requirements; • Be enrolled in, or accepted for enrolment in a program of study at a recognized and accredited institution of learning. The deadline for submitting applications for financial assistance for the Fall term is: November 15th, 2013 Completed applications, most recent transcripts and the letter of acceptance must be submitted on or before this date. Any late applications will be deferred to the next term. For more information or to obtain an application please contact: Barb Crawford, Post Secondary & Specific Programs Coordinator Kwanlin Dun First Nation – House of Learning 35 McIntyre Drive Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5A5 Ph: (867) 633 8422 ext. 7895 Fax: (867) 633 7841 Email: barb.crawford@kwanlindun.com Website: www.kwanlindun.com

addressed the disclosure issue by requiring investors to be given a breakdown of embedded fees and the services they cover for each quarter. This requirement will be fully implemented by July 2016. The Ontario Securities Commission is planning a formal review of the fee system, the services available and whether further regulations are needed. During the summer, it collected feedback from a public forum it held with industry stakeholders. “Any step towards disclosure is a positive approach,” said Bishop, adding that the Public Interest Advocacy Centre would prefer to see embedded compensation in place until the industry can find “common ground” on the best approach for consumers. PIAC suggests stiffer regulations on how advisers describe the services they offer, and the cost. It also wants scheduled meetings between advisers and clients to discuss their portfolios and fees. Ed Skwarek with Advocis, a group which represents 11,000 financial advisers across the country, said demand for the embedded compensation system is driven by the market. “It’s always been that way; since inception,” he said. Skwarek, who will join a panel discussion Monday on the issue at the annual Advocis Regulatory Affairs Symposium in Toronto, said the

bans overseas may have been aimed at making the fee system more transparent but has pushed some investors out of the market. “With the switch that has taken place, they’re cutting out a large segment of people who aren’t investing because they can’t afford it,” he said, referring to rates for advisers that can average $300 an hour, or flat rates of between $1,000 and $3,000. But the Small Investor Protection Association, a national non-profit organization, said consumers would get a better deal if embedded compensation were to be banned because the increased competition would raise the quality of advice and products. “Even if it (the fees) were a little more expensive, the advice would be pure, would be tailored to that person and be in their interest,” said chair Ken Kivenko, whose group represents members with an average net worth of $500,000. He likened some financial advisers in the embedded fee system to “salesmen,” as their fees are derived from the sale of products such as mutual funds. “How much advice are you really getting?,” he said. If they (advisers) don’t make a sale, then they don’t eat. Is that advice?“ “Our members, there’s no question about it, they feel like they are being screwed,” he said.

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AGEndA ItEMS: 1) Settlement Lands 2) AHOP Appeal 3) Peel Watershed For Rides, please call: 332-1244. Refreshments will be provided. Citizens unable to participate in person can join the meeting via the Big Blue Button. Please contact Curtis Lafreniere at (867) 996-2265 ext. 124 for more information.

~All Citizens are Welcome to Attend~ For more information, please contact Ellenise Profeit at 867-996-2265 Ext. 213


27

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

THE

ARTS

For Martha Wainwright, music is a family affair Elaine Corden Special to the News

I

n the late morning on the last Thursday in October, Martha Wainwright’s publicist patches her through on the phone for a standard 15-minute interview, ostensibly to promote her sureto-sell out performances at the Yukon Arts Centre Nov. 4, and the Odd Fellows Hall in Dawson on Nov. 5. The line crackles, and the publicist advises that Wainwright is in a bad reception spot, and will call back in five minutes. It’s a good thing. Having just listened one more time to All Your Clothes, from Wainwright’s latest album, Come Home to Mama, the interviewer needs a moment to settle down the heaving sobs enough to get out a question. “All your clothes / I thought I could donate them to a theatre,” she sings, addressing her mother, the legendary Canadian musician Kate McGarrigle, who passed away from cancer in 2010. “They’d make up the wardrobe / To a great play a cast of characters, unknown / Who never took for granted, a sight, a sound, the smell of a rose / I hear you got lots of friends / But I’m worried you can’t hear music anymore.” It’s lump-in-throat heartbreaking, sung as it is in Wainwright’s honey-gilded howl that bears no small resemblance to her mother’s. But there’s no time right now for heaves or lumps. The satellites transmitting our voices to and from space align, the cellular signals clear, and Wainwright is on the phone. There’s just 15 minutes to discuss so much. Her first album of original songs in four years, Come Home to Mama, cements an idea that Wainwright’s hardcore fans have known for years, but casual admirers may not know: while she is a gifted interpreter of other songwriters’ work – Edith Piaf, Leonard Cohen, her own mother and her dickhead-cum-genius father, Loudon Wainwright III – she is also a stunning poet and songwriter in her own right. Wainwright had plenty of experiences to mine for Come Home to Mama – the birth of her first son, Arcangelo, in 2009, the near-dissipation of her marriage to her husband and musical collaborator, Brad Albetta, and of course, the death of her mother, who is a ghost dwelling in every note Wainwright sings. “In the case of (All Your

Submitted photo/Yukon News

Singer-songwriter Martha Wainwright performs at the Yukon Arts Centre on Monday.

Clothes), that was the first song that I wrote after my mom died, a couple months after when I was finally able to pick up the guitar and not completely crumble into a puddle. But it was certainly one I wrote through tears. It’s very open and honest. I was trying to completely connect with some way of describing the feelings that I had.” While one might imagine Wainwright falling to pieces every time she performs the song, she has negotiated a peace with the work over time. “I think it’s more powerful and more interesting if I can think of her when I’m performing it, but at this point, it’s four years later, and it’s not that difficult anymore,” she explains. “The tone becomes a bit more that you’re trying to show the emotion, to demonstrate it, but to still be in control.” Wainwright’s son, too, gets a searingly honest letter from his mother – Come Home to Mama is a multi-generational affair, and in Everything’s Wrong, she addresses her infant child as his future adult self. “I do most everything wrong / Even on the day you were born,” she sings, “My husband’s

been lyin’ and cheatin’ / I turned my cheek and reason / I change my tune every day / There is one thing I want you to be / That is smarter than me.” “It’s not a children’s song,” she says, with a hint of wry laughter. “But I’m using him as a subject to talk to, and I’m apologizing for my future mistakes and the mistakes I’ve made in the past, and the fear that I have. It’s almost like a speech.” “I allowed myself to be more open with some of the issues that I had because I felt I needed to,” says Wainwright, of the record’s numerous references to marital troubles. It’s perhaps remarkable then, that her husband played bass on many tracks on the album. “I think he was a little pissed off with some of the lyrics,” she admits, “but when you live with a writer, or a songwriter or somebody that lays it all out in what they do, that’s a danger. And for me it’s more important that I can express myself openly and in an interesting way. I want it to be effective. I wouldn’t want to be with someone who would put a muzzle on that.” “I think it might be hard for him to listen to some of that but you know….” she pauses for a

beat. “Time makes things better. And that’s just the nature of artistry.” It was her husband who suggested she collaborate with Yuka C. Honda, a multiinstrumentalist best known as a member of Japanese-American pop group Cibo Matto. Honda’s contributions give the album a slightly experimental feel that’s quite different from what fans of Wainwright have become accustomed to. The song Some People, for example, lopes along against bendy synths before diving headfirst into Portishead territory. Four Black Sheep, by contrast, sounds like a song broadcast from a radio station on Kate Bush’s home planet. Proserpina, the album’s only cover song (written by Kate McGarrigle) uses Honda’s talents to stunning effect, weaving layers of cello, vocals, and synthetic beats to an aching crescendo. But it’s no use bringing up these comparisons to Wainwright, who, growing up with a famous brother, mother, father, aunt, and countless shirttail relations who are bona fide musical legends, will undoubtedly always feel the little-discussed unease that comes with being so close to genius.

“I get frustrated,” she has said in the past, “when people always ask how I describe my music. First of all I tell them that’s their job. And then that also one day I hope to have things referred to as Martha Wainwright-esque.” Wainwright will arrive in the Yukon five-and-a-half months pregnant, with her second child with her husband, proving their marriage has withstood the scathing lyrics directed at him. She’s played Whitehorse years before, but never Dawson. Another quote Wainwright has repeated loudly and frequently to the press is that she hates talking about music. And so it feels like she’s partly relieved when the 15 minutes of allotted interview time are up. In some ways, it seems like an act of mercy to let her off the phone. To unhook our connection to satellites linking our voices way out there in space. To hang up, put All Your Clothes back on the stereo, and feel the lump in the throat begin to grow again. To hear a song only she could have written. It is, without question, beautiful poignant, and, let the record show, positively Martha Wainwright-esque. Elaine Corden is a Yukon freelance writer.


28

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Toronto’s Blue Rodeo, forced to adapt to survive, back with new album Nick Patch Canadian Press

TORONTO lue Rodeo’s last release, the sprawling double album The Things We Left Behind, was a critical and commercial success that returned the Toronto alt-country originals to platinum status for the first time since 2002. Creatively they were riding high – and yet, behind the scenes, it felt as though they could be nearing the end. Co-frontman Greg Keelor’s hearing issues had only been growing more severe, and performing live was such a painful chore that he couldn’t be around volume at all. In concert, he might as well have been relegated to specialguest status, limited as he was to materializing for a few acoustic songs scattered about the set. “That was getting really bad,” the band’s other mastermind, Jim Cuddy, said in a recent interview seated next to Keelor. “It was such a bad version of the band.” So, they changed the band – drastically. Very nearly four years elapsed between that album and this week’s release of their rich latest, In Our Nature. That’s the longest gap between studio albums in Blue Rodeo’s quarter-centuryplus history. The time away was necessary, Cuddy says, to reconfigure the 12time Juno-winning outfit’s setup. At Cuddy’s suggestion, the band swapped stage monitors for in-ear monitors that would be easier on Keelor’s battered ears. They made Colin Cripps an official member on electric guitar, so that Keelor could play only acoustic and sing. They stood in a different formation onstage, to keep Keelor away from the sources of the loudest noise. All common-sense solutions, perhaps, but for a band so wellestablished the adjustments took time. Cuddy notes that at first, without the monitors blaring in their faces, the band took a less physical approach to their performances, playing in a “really milquetoast way.” They eventually figured that out, and mutually agree that the changes were for the better.

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Patrick Doyle/The Canadian Press

Jim Cuddy of the band Blue Rodeo performs at the RBC Royal Bank Bluesfest in Ottawa in July. Blue Rodeo is back with a new album called In Our Nature.

“We had a long reinvention,” Cuddy said, before listing off the benefits of the new arrangement: singing was easier; onstage communication was easier; and there was more space for all the members to contribute, including piano player Mike Boguski, now a full-fledged member of the band. “It truly was like clearing the cobwebs away. This is a beautiful place.” And, Cuddy says, it fundamentally changed the sound of the band’s naturalistic new set of tunes. Hopeful opener New Morning Sun heralds the band’s refreshed state, before they set into an ambling groove. Cuddy is particularly pleased with the record’s light production touch – the instruments, played adroitly as always, sound clear and organic. The record ends with a version of the Band’s Out of

Buy One & Get the SecOnd

50 off %

the Blue lit by incandescent organ. “I think it’s one of our bestsounding records,” Cuddy says. “What we intended, that’s what it sounds like. It’s kind of woolly and comfortable. And I think it’s got a lot of strength and the stuff ’s really played (well).” Though they have a pristine studio in downtown Toronto, they headed off to Keelor’s country farm to make the album above Cuddy’s mild consternation (he says he dropped any objections once it became clear the rest of the band was determined, though Keelor wryly points out: “you could have used your executive veto.”) In reality, it was the only place Keelor was going to be able to make the record because he says he can’t comfortably use headphones anymore. He sits in a quiet room, singing and playing to one stereo

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my ears. I can’t listen to music in the car when I’m driving around. I can’t go to clubs. I can’t go out and play with friends, that used to be one of my favourite things.” “That’s why he’s single,” Cuddy jokes. “At first (it’s) quite daunting,” Keelor continues. “You think, oh my God, what am I going to do? But with time and quiet, they’ve sort of healed a bit. They’re nowhere near being good, but they’re tolerable. And I can make music and records again.”

Payroll donation helps sustain the United Way

Alkan Air Grand Ball

Yukon Convention Centre Saturday, November 30 at 6 pm Enjoy a magical evening featuring a champagne reception, dinner, dance & charity auction. Individual tickets $275. Corporate tables of 8 available. Partial tax receipt as per CRA guidelines.

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• Tired aching legs because you spend too much time standing or sitting • Lymphedema, swelling and venous disease • Varicose Veins • DVT’s • Air travel more than 2 hours We fit all genders, shapes and sizes from tall

Monday- Friday 10-5:30pm

seem keen as ever to continue on indefinitely. At this point, whether they’re able to do so or not lies mostly on Keelor’s shoulders – or, actually, his ears. “I never know what’s going to happen with my ears,” he says. “Right now, they’re in good shape. They have the resilience again. I wear the ear plugs all the time. It’s changed my whole life. It’s changed my social life a lot, because I can’t really go out to bars anymore, certainly if they’ve got a band. Even loud restaurants are hard on

S TA R S P O N S O R S

CLOSED NOVEMBER 2

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MediChair Yukon ~ horwood’s Mall

speaker. “It was the only place I knew I could contribute to the record the way I wanted to,” he says. “It was a way that I’d worked out for myself to play music again. So I’m very grateful to everyone for doing that for me.” Meanwhile, the rustic setting grew on Cuddy (for the record, the only reason he ever objected was because he liked the convenience of their other studio). When the band initially set out to record, Keelor says Cuddy “didn’t have any songs” because he’d released his second solo record, Skyscraper Soul, in 2011 and followed with a tour. (“It sounds bad when YOU say it,” Cuddy laments with a smile). So away from the distractions of the city, Cuddy would drive out to a little river near Keelor’s farm every morning and sit there for an

hour or two, tweaking his tunes. “It became this beautiful holiday all down in the country,” he said. “The band had coalesced because of all the playing we’d done.” Such harmony was a far cry from the experience the band had when they recorded 1995’s Nowhere to Here during a particularly fractious period. Keelor had hurt himself during the middle of that recording, which only made the situation worse, and it was the dead of winter – Cuddy compares the experience to “all those movies they made about Canadian winter isolation that (he) used to watch in the ‘70s and ‘80s. We were living it.” The band works as well as it does in part because of the friction between Cuddy and Keelor’s opposing styles – Cuddy with his approachably tuneful pop-country, Keelor with his tendency toward moodier material – and they’ve always been fairly open about occasional periods of internal discord. But it does seem like they’re in a good place at the moment. Begins Cuddy: “We’ve certainly had our times where it’s been difficult to –” “Look at each other,” Keelor interjects. “There’s a lot you have to work out,” Cuddy agrees. “And then we’ve had some pretty difficult members too and they’ve caused us a lot of grief. We don’t have that right now. For the last few years, we’ve had a very harmonious group of people. It’s not like stuff doesn’t happen. It’s sort of amazing. It’s a little microcosm of a society.” Adds a smiling Keelor: “We would be a worthy reality show, if we were so inclined.” “We’d be constantly closing the door,” Cuddy says with a laugh. “’They can’t hear this.”’ The band will embark on a twomonth Canadian tour in the new year, hitting all 10 provinces before wrapping on March 2 in Montreal. Cuddy’s son Devin will be the opener on the tour, which has the proud father feeling reflective. “We knew that he was touring with us, and his mother mentioned it to him at dinner, and he hadn’t sort of fully worked it out with his

partner,” Cuddy said. “Devin’s now at that stage where he’s getting … offers of longer tours. He’s away a lot. And that’s something that he may have to figure out. “I think he’s really happy with what’s happening to him and I think it’ll be really fun. I also remember what it was like when those opportunities came my way and I recognized how destructive it was going to be to my personal life. ‘You thought it was all fun and games? Well, watch this.”’ And yet, Cuddy and Keelor

29

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

www.yhf.ca

ADAMS FAMILY

The United Way Yukon helps Yukoners through charitable organizations all around the Territory. To do this United Way Yukon needs help from you. I had a chance to ask Dave Whiteside, the Chair of the Campaign Cabinet, about how funds are collected from Yukoners. He told me about the United Way payroll deduction program. He said, “Payroll deductions allow donors to give relatively small amounts from each pay cheque, amounts that are often hardly noticeable. The effect of the donation to Yukon charities is, however, very noticeable. For example a deduction of $5 per bi-weekly pay would create an annual donation of 130 dollars. That 130 dollars creates a significant impact in terms of programming for children, families living in poverty, people living with disabilities and all of the groups that rely on funding from United Way Yukon. “ Big Brothers and Big sisters is one example of your donation helping Yukoners. They provide mentoring services to children that enhance the lives of children and their families. Mentoring provides a benefit to our community as well by reducing costs for special education, costs associated with crime, substance abuse and low or failed education. “Payroll donations are, to me, one of the best examples of the idea that small changes accumulate to create large differences.” said Dave Whiteside. In the past year the United Way Society of Yukon has had the opportunity to enrich the lives of Yukoners through twenty four other programs just like the Big Brothers and Big Sisters. By giving $10 or $20 per month, you can help enrich the lives of your neighbors in the Yukon. Giving during United Way month and every month of the year is a great way to contribute to your community through our payroll deduction program. written by Chris Pinter


28

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Toronto’s Blue Rodeo, forced to adapt to survive, back with new album Nick Patch Canadian Press

TORONTO lue Rodeo’s last release, the sprawling double album The Things We Left Behind, was a critical and commercial success that returned the Toronto alt-country originals to platinum status for the first time since 2002. Creatively they were riding high – and yet, behind the scenes, it felt as though they could be nearing the end. Co-frontman Greg Keelor’s hearing issues had only been growing more severe, and performing live was such a painful chore that he couldn’t be around volume at all. In concert, he might as well have been relegated to specialguest status, limited as he was to materializing for a few acoustic songs scattered about the set. “That was getting really bad,” the band’s other mastermind, Jim Cuddy, said in a recent interview seated next to Keelor. “It was such a bad version of the band.” So, they changed the band – drastically. Very nearly four years elapsed between that album and this week’s release of their rich latest, In Our Nature. That’s the longest gap between studio albums in Blue Rodeo’s quarter-centuryplus history. The time away was necessary, Cuddy says, to reconfigure the 12time Juno-winning outfit’s setup. At Cuddy’s suggestion, the band swapped stage monitors for in-ear monitors that would be easier on Keelor’s battered ears. They made Colin Cripps an official member on electric guitar, so that Keelor could play only acoustic and sing. They stood in a different formation onstage, to keep Keelor away from the sources of the loudest noise. All common-sense solutions, perhaps, but for a band so wellestablished the adjustments took time. Cuddy notes that at first, without the monitors blaring in their faces, the band took a less physical approach to their performances, playing in a “really milquetoast way.” They eventually figured that out, and mutually agree that the changes were for the better.

B

Patrick Doyle/The Canadian Press

Jim Cuddy of the band Blue Rodeo performs at the RBC Royal Bank Bluesfest in Ottawa in July. Blue Rodeo is back with a new album called In Our Nature.

“We had a long reinvention,” Cuddy said, before listing off the benefits of the new arrangement: singing was easier; onstage communication was easier; and there was more space for all the members to contribute, including piano player Mike Boguski, now a full-fledged member of the band. “It truly was like clearing the cobwebs away. This is a beautiful place.” And, Cuddy says, it fundamentally changed the sound of the band’s naturalistic new set of tunes. Hopeful opener New Morning Sun heralds the band’s refreshed state, before they set into an ambling groove. Cuddy is particularly pleased with the record’s light production touch – the instruments, played adroitly as always, sound clear and organic. The record ends with a version of the Band’s Out of

Buy One & Get the SecOnd

50 off %

the Blue lit by incandescent organ. “I think it’s one of our bestsounding records,” Cuddy says. “What we intended, that’s what it sounds like. It’s kind of woolly and comfortable. And I think it’s got a lot of strength and the stuff ’s really played (well).” Though they have a pristine studio in downtown Toronto, they headed off to Keelor’s country farm to make the album above Cuddy’s mild consternation (he says he dropped any objections once it became clear the rest of the band was determined, though Keelor wryly points out: “you could have used your executive veto.”) In reality, it was the only place Keelor was going to be able to make the record because he says he can’t comfortably use headphones anymore. He sits in a quiet room, singing and playing to one stereo

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* no 3rd party billing - cash only sales; must be completed by Nov. 30/13

|

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|

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867 393-4967

my ears. I can’t listen to music in the car when I’m driving around. I can’t go to clubs. I can’t go out and play with friends, that used to be one of my favourite things.” “That’s why he’s single,” Cuddy jokes. “At first (it’s) quite daunting,” Keelor continues. “You think, oh my God, what am I going to do? But with time and quiet, they’ve sort of healed a bit. They’re nowhere near being good, but they’re tolerable. And I can make music and records again.”

Payroll donation helps sustain the United Way

Alkan Air Grand Ball

Yukon Convention Centre Saturday, November 30 at 6 pm Enjoy a magical evening featuring a champagne reception, dinner, dance & charity auction. Individual tickets $275. Corporate tables of 8 available. Partial tax receipt as per CRA guidelines.

For tickets please call Krista at 393-8930

• Tired aching legs because you spend too much time standing or sitting • Lymphedema, swelling and venous disease • Varicose Veins • DVT’s • Air travel more than 2 hours We fit all genders, shapes and sizes from tall

Monday- Friday 10-5:30pm

seem keen as ever to continue on indefinitely. At this point, whether they’re able to do so or not lies mostly on Keelor’s shoulders – or, actually, his ears. “I never know what’s going to happen with my ears,” he says. “Right now, they’re in good shape. They have the resilience again. I wear the ear plugs all the time. It’s changed my whole life. It’s changed my social life a lot, because I can’t really go out to bars anymore, certainly if they’ve got a band. Even loud restaurants are hard on

S TA R S P O N S O R S

CLOSED NOVEMBER 2

Do you suffer from:

Certified Fitter!

MediChair Yukon ~ horwood’s Mall

speaker. “It was the only place I knew I could contribute to the record the way I wanted to,” he says. “It was a way that I’d worked out for myself to play music again. So I’m very grateful to everyone for doing that for me.” Meanwhile, the rustic setting grew on Cuddy (for the record, the only reason he ever objected was because he liked the convenience of their other studio). When the band initially set out to record, Keelor says Cuddy “didn’t have any songs” because he’d released his second solo record, Skyscraper Soul, in 2011 and followed with a tour. (“It sounds bad when YOU say it,” Cuddy laments with a smile). So away from the distractions of the city, Cuddy would drive out to a little river near Keelor’s farm every morning and sit there for an

hour or two, tweaking his tunes. “It became this beautiful holiday all down in the country,” he said. “The band had coalesced because of all the playing we’d done.” Such harmony was a far cry from the experience the band had when they recorded 1995’s Nowhere to Here during a particularly fractious period. Keelor had hurt himself during the middle of that recording, which only made the situation worse, and it was the dead of winter – Cuddy compares the experience to “all those movies they made about Canadian winter isolation that (he) used to watch in the ‘70s and ‘80s. We were living it.” The band works as well as it does in part because of the friction between Cuddy and Keelor’s opposing styles – Cuddy with his approachably tuneful pop-country, Keelor with his tendency toward moodier material – and they’ve always been fairly open about occasional periods of internal discord. But it does seem like they’re in a good place at the moment. Begins Cuddy: “We’ve certainly had our times where it’s been difficult to –” “Look at each other,” Keelor interjects. “There’s a lot you have to work out,” Cuddy agrees. “And then we’ve had some pretty difficult members too and they’ve caused us a lot of grief. We don’t have that right now. For the last few years, we’ve had a very harmonious group of people. It’s not like stuff doesn’t happen. It’s sort of amazing. It’s a little microcosm of a society.” Adds a smiling Keelor: “We would be a worthy reality show, if we were so inclined.” “We’d be constantly closing the door,” Cuddy says with a laugh. “’They can’t hear this.”’ The band will embark on a twomonth Canadian tour in the new year, hitting all 10 provinces before wrapping on March 2 in Montreal. Cuddy’s son Devin will be the opener on the tour, which has the proud father feeling reflective. “We knew that he was touring with us, and his mother mentioned it to him at dinner, and he hadn’t sort of fully worked it out with his

partner,” Cuddy said. “Devin’s now at that stage where he’s getting … offers of longer tours. He’s away a lot. And that’s something that he may have to figure out. “I think he’s really happy with what’s happening to him and I think it’ll be really fun. I also remember what it was like when those opportunities came my way and I recognized how destructive it was going to be to my personal life. ‘You thought it was all fun and games? Well, watch this.”’ And yet, Cuddy and Keelor

29

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

www.yhf.ca

ADAMS FAMILY

The United Way Yukon helps Yukoners through charitable organizations all around the Territory. To do this United Way Yukon needs help from you. I had a chance to ask Dave Whiteside, the Chair of the Campaign Cabinet, about how funds are collected from Yukoners. He told me about the United Way payroll deduction program. He said, “Payroll deductions allow donors to give relatively small amounts from each pay cheque, amounts that are often hardly noticeable. The effect of the donation to Yukon charities is, however, very noticeable. For example a deduction of $5 per bi-weekly pay would create an annual donation of 130 dollars. That 130 dollars creates a significant impact in terms of programming for children, families living in poverty, people living with disabilities and all of the groups that rely on funding from United Way Yukon. “ Big Brothers and Big sisters is one example of your donation helping Yukoners. They provide mentoring services to children that enhance the lives of children and their families. Mentoring provides a benefit to our community as well by reducing costs for special education, costs associated with crime, substance abuse and low or failed education. “Payroll donations are, to me, one of the best examples of the idea that small changes accumulate to create large differences.” said Dave Whiteside. In the past year the United Way Society of Yukon has had the opportunity to enrich the lives of Yukoners through twenty four other programs just like the Big Brothers and Big Sisters. By giving $10 or $20 per month, you can help enrich the lives of your neighbors in the Yukon. Giving during United Way month and every month of the year is a great way to contribute to your community through our payroll deduction program. written by Chris Pinter


30

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Chris Hadfield settles back into Canada with new book and driver’s licence Victoria Ahearn Canadian Press

TORONTO e’s explored space several times, become a national treasure and global social media sensation, and even fielded record deals. But these days, what gets indefatigable former astronaut Chris Hadfield excited are his more humble, grounded accomplishments as he finally settles into a permanent home in his native province of Ontario. “I got my driver’s licence and I got my OHIP card and I’m getting moved back into the country,” Hadfield, 54, said in a recent interview in Toronto, where he and wife Helene just bought a house they plan to take possession of in December. ad 1 for Yukon News “I’m proud,” he added as he 3 columns (6 inches) by 3 inches pulled out his wallet to show to run Friday, October 25 and Friday, November 1 off his new licence. “I had a temporary (licence)contact for quite anda bill to: FOYAS, c/o Patricia Halladay, phone 667-6089 while.” For 26 years the moustachioed Sarnia, Ont., native has been outside of Canada – in Russia and the U.S. – building Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press a career which allowed him to Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has explored space several times, but these days Hadfield is finally settling into a became the first Canadian to operate the Canadarm in orbit, permanent home in his native province of Ontario. the first Canadian to walk in Space Station. as well as his life’s journey, in naut’s Guide to Life on Earth up and install Canadarm2, space and the first Canadian (Random House Canada). and in December 2012, when to command the International Hadfield details such feats, his new memoir, An AstroThe affable real-life rocket he became the first Canadian man writes he decided to commander of the ISS. become an astronaut as a On that last five-month farmboy at age nine, when he mission, Hadfield went viral watched Neil Armstrong land online with tweets, photos of Stereo photos from Yukon on the moon. Earth and videos of himself At the time, the goal seemed explaining everyday space We’ll provide the glasses. impossible, seeing as only oddities and singing and playAmericans were astronauts ing music on his guitar. His and Canada didn’t even have a songs included a revamped space agency (then there was version of David Bowie’s that little issue of Hadfield be“Space Oddity” and a tune he’d Opening reception: Friday, November 1, 5–7 p.m. ing afraid of heights). written with Ed Robertson of Hougen Heritage Gallery, Arts Underground But the strong-minded the Barenaked Ladies. Tuesday to Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hadfield was unfazed, and in Hadfield said his interest in Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. November 1995, he blasted off social media was sparked by Exhibit runs until January 25, 2014 on his first mission on Space his three children, particularly Come and see a 3D version of this glass plate Shuttle Atlantis. son Evan, who worked tirestereoscopic slide. Yukon Archives, Louis Jacquot fonds, 89/42 #17 He went to space two more lessly to post his father’s space times – in April 2001 to take messages on various sites.

H

YT in 3D

Tourism Culture Tourismand and Culture Yukon YukonArchives Archives

Tourisme et Culture Archives du Yukon

Friday

Nov. 01

2013

5-7pm

VegetAriAN style bAked beANs AlsO AVAilAble at Whitehorse United Church 6th & Main street (downtown) (elevator access) 667-2989 Adults $10 | seniors $7 | Children 12 & under $5 | Maximum family price $25

Doors open at 5pm

Proceeds go towards the NOAH fund


“It was just hugely affective and it’s what I’ve been trying to do for my whole astronaut career, is show people how cool this is. We’re leaving Earth, you can see the world in a whole new way, you can see each other differently as a result. “It’s a perspective builder for us all.” Such widespread recognition is rare, though, he writes in the book that reads as part self-help guide with tips on how to succeed with the right outlook. Hadfield notes astronauts don’t fly often – if they get to at all – and are always conducting research and training to acquire skills that, in some cases, they’re never going to use. “The job of an astronaut is not flying in space,” he said. “You think it is, but it’s not. The vast majority of your time is on Earth, of course. “Up until this last flight, I’d been an astronaut for 20 years and I’d been in space for 20 days, I think.” He also stresses it took determination, sacrifices and hard work – most of it Earthbound – for him to make the transition from engineer to fighter pilot to test pilot and then astronaut. “People don’t know how busy astronauts are,” he said. “A lot of people think we’re in like some sort of waiting room for the next rocket launch. And people ask me actually, ‘What do you do in between space flights?’ as if like, ‘Oh nothin’, just wait.’ It’s a really demanding life and very busy. You work seven days a week, like a lot of folks, but it’s a really busy life.” “It takes a tremendous amount of unrecognized work, like a lot of good things,” said Hadfield. “But the key is, don’t hate that part.” Getting rid of ego and being a team player is also key, he writes, noting astronauts also have to deal with some “surprisingly down-to-Earth” tasks – like fixing a broken toilet on the ISS or wearing a diaper during rocket flight. “My job is not glamorous,” he said with a laugh. Having the right personality – as well as a vast skillset – is even more important in these

31

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013 post-Shuttle days, when the only way to get to the ISS is on Russia’s smaller Soyuz spacecraft that carries just three astronauts, he writes. Hadfield said he feels this country’s space program is doing well, “considering the financial constraints that all governments are enduring, Canada included.” “We have our huge arms up on the Space Station being used almost weekly … we’re doing robotics research with the Dextre (the agency’s robotic handyman) that’s on the end, we have experiments onboard and we have two astronauts that are in training that will eventually live on the Space Station, so that side is good. “We just recently launched a research and communications satellite, we have all sorts of pollution- and Earth-monitoring satellites up, we have hardware driving around on Mars.” Hadfield also praised retired general Walt Natynczyk, the recently appointed Canadian Space Agency president, and suggested Canada might want to forge an alliance with China as that country plans a lunar landing. “It would be better if (China) were part of an international organization doing that, rather than unilaterally. It would be better, just like it was better when the Russians became part of the International Space Station in the early ‘90s.” Hadfield is also in support of space tourism. “I commend them for it and I think it’s good,” he said. “It’s a natural way to go and I hope they have a business model that succeeds. There will be a lot of teething troubles, like in aviation 100 years ago, but we’ll get there.” Hadfield retired from his career as an astronaut in July, shortly after getting back from the ISS. But as is typical for him, he’s not slowing down. Hadfield said he’s working with a Canadian illustrator on a second book, for children. He’s also been writing for various magazines, is in talks for a possible young adult version of An Astronaut’s Guide

to Life on Earth, and will start a new job as adjunct professor at the University of Waterloo next fall. Hadfield said he also cowrote and recorded a song with Emm Gryner, a former Bowie band member who played piano in Hadfield’s Space Oddity video. The new song will be on Gryner’s next CD. Then there’s the “entire CD’s worth of music” he wrote and

hips.” Hadfield figures it will take until next spring to grow back the “more flexible, spongy bone” that “got dissolved” while he was in space. At least he can drive now, though. Asked if he was nervous on his driving test, Hadfield laughed: “I try not to be nervous on tests. I try to get ready so that I know I’m going to pass.” S TA R S P O N S O R S

Start the holiday season off right, and treat your office to a delicious continental breakfast. Schedule delivery to your door on Monday, November 25 or Tuesday, November 26. You’ll be supporting the Yukon Hospital Foundation and just might be the office superhero!

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Sunday, November 10, 2013 at 1:00 PM at the Whitehorse Rifle & Pistol Club on Grey Mountain Road

recorded in orbit that he wants to do something with. And he still faces the weighty task of recovering from his last return to Earth, which takes a huge physical toll and many months to get over. “It took about four months to be able to run probably again,” said Hadfield. “It’s like a big illness that you’re recovering from, and I’m still growing bone back. I still have pretty fragile hips, like osteoperodic

www.yhf.ca

ADAMS FAMILY


30

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Chris Hadfield settles back into Canada with new book and driver’s licence Victoria Ahearn Canadian Press

TORONTO e’s explored space several times, become a national treasure and global social media sensation, and even fielded record deals. But these days, what gets indefatigable former astronaut Chris Hadfield excited are his more humble, grounded accomplishments as he finally settles into a permanent home in his native province of Ontario. “I got my driver’s licence and I got my OHIP card and I’m getting moved back into the country,” Hadfield, 54, said in a recent interview in Toronto, where he and wife Helene just bought a house they plan to take possession of in December. ad 1 for Yukon News “I’m proud,” he added as he 3 columns (6 inches) by 3 inches pulled out his wallet to show to run Friday, October 25 and Friday, November 1 off his new licence. “I had a temporary (licence)contact for quite anda bill to: FOYAS, c/o Patricia Halladay, phone 667-6089 while.” For 26 years the moustachioed Sarnia, Ont., native has been outside of Canada – in Russia and the U.S. – building Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press a career which allowed him to Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has explored space several times, but these days Hadfield is finally settling into a became the first Canadian to operate the Canadarm in orbit, permanent home in his native province of Ontario. the first Canadian to walk in Space Station. as well as his life’s journey, in naut’s Guide to Life on Earth up and install Canadarm2, space and the first Canadian (Random House Canada). and in December 2012, when to command the International Hadfield details such feats, his new memoir, An AstroThe affable real-life rocket he became the first Canadian man writes he decided to commander of the ISS. become an astronaut as a On that last five-month farmboy at age nine, when he mission, Hadfield went viral watched Neil Armstrong land online with tweets, photos of Stereo photos from Yukon on the moon. Earth and videos of himself At the time, the goal seemed explaining everyday space We’ll provide the glasses. impossible, seeing as only oddities and singing and playAmericans were astronauts ing music on his guitar. His and Canada didn’t even have a songs included a revamped space agency (then there was version of David Bowie’s that little issue of Hadfield be“Space Oddity” and a tune he’d Opening reception: Friday, November 1, 5–7 p.m. ing afraid of heights). written with Ed Robertson of Hougen Heritage Gallery, Arts Underground But the strong-minded the Barenaked Ladies. Tuesday to Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hadfield was unfazed, and in Hadfield said his interest in Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. November 1995, he blasted off social media was sparked by Exhibit runs until January 25, 2014 on his first mission on Space his three children, particularly Come and see a 3D version of this glass plate Shuttle Atlantis. son Evan, who worked tirestereoscopic slide. Yukon Archives, Louis Jacquot fonds, 89/42 #17 He went to space two more lessly to post his father’s space times – in April 2001 to take messages on various sites.

H

YT in 3D

Tourism Culture Tourismand and Culture Yukon YukonArchives Archives

Tourisme et Culture Archives du Yukon

Friday

Nov. 01

2013

5-7pm

VegetAriAN style bAked beANs AlsO AVAilAble at Whitehorse United Church 6th & Main street (downtown) (elevator access) 667-2989 Adults $10 | seniors $7 | Children 12 & under $5 | Maximum family price $25

Doors open at 5pm

Proceeds go towards the NOAH fund


“It was just hugely affective and it’s what I’ve been trying to do for my whole astronaut career, is show people how cool this is. We’re leaving Earth, you can see the world in a whole new way, you can see each other differently as a result. “It’s a perspective builder for us all.” Such widespread recognition is rare, though, he writes in the book that reads as part self-help guide with tips on how to succeed with the right outlook. Hadfield notes astronauts don’t fly often – if they get to at all – and are always conducting research and training to acquire skills that, in some cases, they’re never going to use. “The job of an astronaut is not flying in space,” he said. “You think it is, but it’s not. The vast majority of your time is on Earth, of course. “Up until this last flight, I’d been an astronaut for 20 years and I’d been in space for 20 days, I think.” He also stresses it took determination, sacrifices and hard work – most of it Earthbound – for him to make the transition from engineer to fighter pilot to test pilot and then astronaut. “People don’t know how busy astronauts are,” he said. “A lot of people think we’re in like some sort of waiting room for the next rocket launch. And people ask me actually, ‘What do you do in between space flights?’ as if like, ‘Oh nothin’, just wait.’ It’s a really demanding life and very busy. You work seven days a week, like a lot of folks, but it’s a really busy life.” “It takes a tremendous amount of unrecognized work, like a lot of good things,” said Hadfield. “But the key is, don’t hate that part.” Getting rid of ego and being a team player is also key, he writes, noting astronauts also have to deal with some “surprisingly down-to-Earth” tasks – like fixing a broken toilet on the ISS or wearing a diaper during rocket flight. “My job is not glamorous,” he said with a laugh. Having the right personality – as well as a vast skillset – is even more important in these

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Friday, November 1, 2013 post-Shuttle days, when the only way to get to the ISS is on Russia’s smaller Soyuz spacecraft that carries just three astronauts, he writes. Hadfield said he feels this country’s space program is doing well, “considering the financial constraints that all governments are enduring, Canada included.” “We have our huge arms up on the Space Station being used almost weekly … we’re doing robotics research with the Dextre (the agency’s robotic handyman) that’s on the end, we have experiments onboard and we have two astronauts that are in training that will eventually live on the Space Station, so that side is good. “We just recently launched a research and communications satellite, we have all sorts of pollution- and Earth-monitoring satellites up, we have hardware driving around on Mars.” Hadfield also praised retired general Walt Natynczyk, the recently appointed Canadian Space Agency president, and suggested Canada might want to forge an alliance with China as that country plans a lunar landing. “It would be better if (China) were part of an international organization doing that, rather than unilaterally. It would be better, just like it was better when the Russians became part of the International Space Station in the early ‘90s.” Hadfield is also in support of space tourism. “I commend them for it and I think it’s good,” he said. “It’s a natural way to go and I hope they have a business model that succeeds. There will be a lot of teething troubles, like in aviation 100 years ago, but we’ll get there.” Hadfield retired from his career as an astronaut in July, shortly after getting back from the ISS. But as is typical for him, he’s not slowing down. Hadfield said he’s working with a Canadian illustrator on a second book, for children. He’s also been writing for various magazines, is in talks for a possible young adult version of An Astronaut’s Guide

to Life on Earth, and will start a new job as adjunct professor at the University of Waterloo next fall. Hadfield said he also cowrote and recorded a song with Emm Gryner, a former Bowie band member who played piano in Hadfield’s Space Oddity video. The new song will be on Gryner’s next CD. Then there’s the “entire CD’s worth of music” he wrote and

hips.” Hadfield figures it will take until next spring to grow back the “more flexible, spongy bone” that “got dissolved” while he was in space. At least he can drive now, though. Asked if he was nervous on his driving test, Hadfield laughed: “I try not to be nervous on tests. I try to get ready so that I know I’m going to pass.” S TA R S P O N S O R S

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recorded in orbit that he wants to do something with. And he still faces the weighty task of recovering from his last return to Earth, which takes a huge physical toll and many months to get over. “It took about four months to be able to run probably again,” said Hadfield. “It’s like a big illness that you’re recovering from, and I’m still growing bone back. I still have pretty fragile hips, like osteoperodic

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ADAMS FAMILY


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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013


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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

B.C. policy requiring health-care workers to get flu shot or wear masks upheld Helen Branswell

much active resistance to the policy in health-care settings, noting last year between 68 and 72 per cent of B.C. health-care workers were vaccinated against influenza. The union had raised concerns about the requirement for unvaccinated staff to wear masks, suggesting it would impinge on the privacy of workers because it would be interpreted as a visible declaration that they had forgone flu shots. As well, the union raised concerns that some workers covered by the policy might not be able to do their jobs while wearing a mask – speech therapists, for instance. And others – staff on psychiatric wards working with psychotic patients – might find their safety jeopardized if they wore a mask. Kendall said employers are required to make accommodations in special circumstances and that would likely be done on a case-by-case basis. But Avery said with the provincial flu shot program starting and flu season perhaps only weeks away, it’s unclear how this will work. In his ruling, Diebolt noted that there is a duty under law to accommodate and he accepted the evidence produced by lawyers for the employers that this would happen. He suggested individual grievances could be filed if justified requests for accommodation are not granted. He also noted that British Columbia is not alone in instituting a flu shot policy for health-care workers. Many U.S. institutions have already put in place such requirements. And last year Horizon Health Network in New Brunswick, which oversees the operations of all Englishlanguage hospitals in the province, instituted a policy requiring staff to have a flu shot or wear a mask any time they are within two metres of patients during flu season.

Canadian Press

A

British Columbia health-care workers union has lost its grievance against a provincial policy requiring members to get a flu shot or wear a mask during flu season – a development that may embolden other provinces to follow suit. An arbitrator appointed by the provincial Labour Relations Board ruled the policy is reasonable, and a valid exercise of the employer’s management rights. “Health care workers do not have to immunize; they have a choice to immunize or mask during the influenza season,” Robert Diebolt wrote in his decision, dated Wednesday. “As to the mask, I am unable to characterize it as an invasive procedure. The union also characterizes a mask as stigmatizing. I am unable to agree.” The ruling upholding the B.C. policy is being closely scrutinized by lawyers for the union that brought the action, the B.C. Health Sciences Association. In coming days the ruling will also be studied by public health authorities across the country, some of whom are mulling over adopting similar actions in their jurisdictions. The chairman of the Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health, Dr. Robert Strang, said his provincial and territorial counterparts have been following the B.C. policy roll out closely. “I think today’s events … create the possibility of other jurisdictions – whether it’s provinces or individual health authorities – now feeling they can move ahead in this area,” Strang said from Halifax, where he is Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health. “Evidence is very clear that with a more persuasive education approach maybe 60 per cent (acceptance) seems

Chuck Stoody/Chuck Stoody

A B.C. arbitrator has upheld a provincial government policy requiring health-care workers in the province to get a flu shot or wear a mask while caring for patients during flu season. to be the kind of ceiling that you hit. ...Health-care workers are going to need to accept stronger measures, knowing that simply education, leaving it just to that, is not getting us nearly to levels of immunization that are adequate.” The president of the 16,000-member strong B.C. Health Sciences Association said that for the time being, the union will recommend members obey the rule. “Do one of the two: Either get immunized or put the mask on. And if there’s any other follow-up process we’ll see where it takes us. But comply with the policy and don’t put your occupation at risk,” Val Avery said in an interview. She said the union will consult

CARCROSS/TAGISH FIRST NATION

with its lawyers and with its membership and a decision will be made in the coming days about whether to continue to pursue the union’s objection to the policy. “My understanding is that there are two opportunities for follow up in terms of going back to the Labour Relations Board and asking for reconsideration or going to the B.C. Court of Appeals,” said Avery, who acknowledged the union is disappointed with the ruling. The policy, which came into effect last fall, states that health-care workers who don’t get a flu shot must wear a surgical mask while doing duties that bring them into contact with patients for the duration of flu season, which could run from late November

until late March. The policy includes provisions for progressively escalating disciplinary actions – up to and including dismissal – for employees who refuse to comply with its requirements. The province did not apply the teeth of the policy last year, while it was waiting for the grievance to be heard and ruled on. The arbitrator’s decision was applauded by Dr. Perry Kendall, the province’s chief medical officer of health. “I think that this is good news because I think it’s actually a win for patients and residents of long-term care facilities,” Kendall said in an interview. He said he did not anticipate

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Yukon News

 

   

Friday, November 1, 2013

Germ-hunting antibodies suppress HIV-like virus in monkeys Malcolm Ritter Associated Press

NEW YORK octors may one day be able to control a patient’s HIV infection in a new way: injecting swarms of germ-fighting antibodies, two new studies suggest. In monkeys, that strategy sharply reduced blood levels of a cousin of HIV. The results also gave tantalizing hints that someday the tactic might help destroy the AIDS virus in its hiding places in the body, something current drugs cannot do. The study results “could revolutionize efforts to cure HIV” if the approach is found to work in people, said a commentary published Wednesday by the journal Nature along with the monkey studies. Antibodies are proteins in the blood that grab onto specific germs and mark them for elimination. People infected with HIV naturally make antibodies to fight the AIDS virus, but they are generally ineffective. The two new studies used lab-made versions of rare antibodies with unusual potency against HIV. One study of rhesus monkeys showed a profound effect from a single injection of antibodies, said lead author Dr. Dan Barouch of Harvard and the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. The 18 animals had been infected with SHIV, a monkey version of HIV. In 13 animals, blood levels of SHIV became undetectable by standard tests within a week of the treatment. After the antibodies petered out, the virus came back. That happened one to three months after treatment. In three monkeys with the lowest levels of SHIV before treatment, the virus didn’t return

D

     

             

    

NIAID/AP Photo

Doctors may one day be able to control a patient’s HIV infection in a new way: injecting swarms of germ-fighting antibodies.

during an observation period of up to eight months. Barouch said the animals were not cured, but the treatment had apparently improved their immune systems enough to keep the virus in check. The two other monkeys started with the highest blood levels of SHIV. Treatment lowered those levels but not to the point where they were undetectable. The second study in Nature, from the National Institutes of Health, showed encouraging results in a smaller group of monkeys. In people, standard drugs routinely tamp down HIV to undetectable levels in the blood. But the antibody approach may someday help doctors attack virus that’s hiding in infected cells, beyond the reach of today’s drugs, said the Nature commentary by Dr. Steven Deeks of the Univer-

sity of California, San Francisco, and Dr. Louis Picker of the Oregon Health & Science University in Beaverton. In theory, antibodies might activate the body’s immune system to kill those infected cells, they wrote. Barouch’s results hinted at such an effect, they noted. Virus levels dropped faster in the monkeys than they do when people get standard HIV drugs, and when the monkey virus returned, it generally didn’t reach its pretreatment levels. Barouch also found virus levels reduced in cells and tissues after treatment. The findings of the two studies are “provocative” about prospects for attacking HIV’s hiding places, Deeks said in a telephone interview. “These studies raised more questions than they answered,” he said. “But that’s how science advances.”

Arctic Winter Games - Cultural Contingent Call-Out! Talented Youth Aged 15-21 Musicians, storytellers, dancers, performers born between 1993 and 1999 Represent the Yukon at Fairbanks 2014 Arctic Winter Games as members of Team Yukon AWG 2014 will be hosted in Fairbanks, Alaska March 15 - 22, 2014 To apply, applicants need a short prepared piece.

The cultural team is comprised of 6 performing artists and 1 chaperone.       

www.whitehorse.ca

Artists will perform publicly at community venues throughout the week and participate in daily workshops. Passports required to enter the United States. Deadline for submissions: Friday, November 22, 2013 Application forms for Team Yukon Artists available from: Arts Section, Department of Tourism and Culture 867.667.5264 toll free: 1.800.661.0408 ext. 5264 Email: arts.fund@gov.yk.ca Website: www.tc.gov.yk.ca Tourism and Culture Twitter: @insideyukon


National lab scientists work to fine tune possible Ebola virus therapy Helen Branswell Canadian Press

TORONTO cientists at Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory are continuing to fine-tune a possible treatment for Ebola virus infection, one of the deadliest known to humankind. In a newly published article, the Winnipeg-based scientists reported that their combination therapy saved three of four cynomolgus macaques and four of four rhesus macaques when it was given three days after the animals were infected with Ebola Zaire, the deadliest strain. The scientists hope to test the drug cocktail in humans beginning in late 2014 or early 2015, if they can get approval from Canadian and U.S. drug regulators. The work builds on earlier research which showed a cocktail of three cloned antibodies saved four of four primates when given 24 hours after infection and two of four treated 48 hours after infection. This time the researchers added interferon-alpha, a chemical made by the immune system, to the treatment regime. Two of four primates survived when they were given the chemical one day after infection, and then the antibody cocktail four days later. In order for a treatment to be useful against the five types of Ebola viruses or their cousin, the Marburg virus, it must be something that can enhance survival when given days after infection, which is when cases would typically come to light. “The concept of combining

S

35

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

different treatments to improve efficacy and extend the treatment window is certainly interesting and the data look promising,” Tom Geisbert, an expert in viral hemorrhagic fevers, said of the work. Geisbert is a researcher at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. The senior author of the study is Gary Kobinger, head of the special pathogens program at the Winnipeg lab. The laboratory is part of the Public Health Agency of Canada. He said in an interview that the aim of this work is to find a way to put a lid on the infection, to give the immune system a Christopher Black/The Canadian Press chance to fight it off. “The immune system is Gary Kobinger works in a mobile laboratory in Mweka, Congo. very efficient. It will clear the virus – it just never has the time to do it,” Kobinger cure infection; it simply shows that the therapy can be safely said. given to people. He said in conjunction with Kobinger said the World two biotech companies – DeHealth Organization would like fyrus, a Canadian firm, and Mapp Biopharmaceuticals from to be able to stockpile drugs for the U.S. – the group hopes to Ebola and Marburg infections conduct a Phase I trial in peoso they could deploy them when ple. That type of study doesn’t one of the rare but deadly outdetermine if the treatment can breaks of these diseases emerge. Local Y010

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Wednesday, November 6, 2013 Wednesday, November 6, 2013 At 6:00 pm At 6:00 pm 2285-2nd Avenue  667-2331  2285-2nd Avenue • 667-2331 Yukon Employees Union Hall YukonLucy Employees Union Hall Room Jackson Training Lucy Jackson Training Room

Thank you to all the sponsors who made the 2013 TIA Yukon Fall Round Up possible! Partner Sponsors

Economic Development

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In-Kind Sponsor Takhini Hot Springs

Healthy Leg Day MOnday, nOveMber 4th • 3:30-5:30pm with Kelly Prive from BSN JOBST and Shana MacLean from MediChair Yukon

Do you suffer from: • Tired aching legs because you are pregnant • Lymphedema, swelling and venous disease • Varicose Veins • DVT’s • Air travel more than 2 hours

Reducing the amount of energy we use is common sense. It saves us money and it reduces greenhouse gas emissions What makes even more sense is getting cash back: • Up to $100 when you have an energy assessment done on your house • Up to $800 when you upgrade your old appliances, heaters and toilets to qualifying, energy-efficient models • Up to $600 when you install an Energy Star® rated air source heat pump Go to energy.gov.yk.ca for up-to-date details about the Good Energy rebate program.

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36

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

As newer planes meet airlines’ needs, Boeing’s iconic 747 faces an uncertain future Joshua Freed And Scott Mayerowitz Associated Press

F

or decades, the Boeing 747 was the Queen of the Skies. But the glamorous double-decker jumbo jet that revolutionized air travel and shrunk the globe could be nearing the end of the line. Boeing has cut its production target twice in six months. Just 18 will be produced in each of the next two years. Counting cancellations, it hasn’t sold a single 747 this year. Some brand-new 747s go into storage as soon as they leave the plant. Boeing says it’s committed to the 747, and sees a market for it in regions like Asia. But most airlines simply don’t want big, four-engine planes anymore. They prefer newer two-engine jets that fly the same distance while burning less fuel. “We had four engines when jet engine technology wasn’t advanced,” Delta Air Lines Inc. CEO Richard Anderson said at a recent conference. “Now jet engines are amazing, amazing machines and you only need two of them.” Delta inherited 16 747s when it bought Northwest Airlines in 2008. Northwest last ordered a 747 in 2001, according to Flightglobal’s Ascend Online Fleets.

Seats to fill Part of the problem is all those seats. A 747 can seat from 380 to 560 people, depending on how an airline sets it up. A full one is a moneymaker. But an airline that

Nick Ut/AP Photo

A Lufthansa Boeing 747-8 arrives at Los Angeles International Airport. For decades, the 747 was the queen of the skies, but the reign may be coming to an end.

can’t fill all the seats has to spread the cost of 63,000 gallons of jet fuel – roughly $200,000 – among fewer passengers. They’re also too big for most markets. There aren’t enough passengers who want to fly each day between Atlanta and Paris, for example, to justify several jumbo jet flights. And business travellers want more than one flight to choose from. So airlines fly smaller planes several times a day instead. “No one wants the extra capacity” that comes with jumbo jets

Attention FoodSafe Level 2 Certificate Holders Your previous FoodSafe Level 2 certification has expired. All existing FoodSafe Level 2 holders are required to upgrade to the new FoodSafe Level 2 program to become current.

New participants are welcome! NOVEMBER 16 & 17, 2013 9:00 am to 5:00 pm YTEC Training Room Cost per person- $110.00 Space is limited Call 667-4733 to register.

tive bulbous upper deck was a lounge, so it had just six windows. The plane epitomized the modern age of international jet travel. “Everyone on the flight was The game changer dressed up,” recalls passenger Thomas Lee, who was 17 when he The 747 once stood alone, with took the inaugural passenger flight more seats than any other jet and on Pan Am from New York to Lona range of 6,000 miles (9,656 km), don in 1970. “After all, it was still longer than any other plane. back in the day when the romance The plane was massive: six stories tall and longer than the distance of flight was alive and thriving.” International travel was mostly the Wright Brothers travelled on limited to those who could afford their first flight. On the early planes, the distinc- the pricy flights. The 747 changed like the 747 and the Airbus A380, said Teal Group aviation consultant Richard Aboulafia.

CANARIE & Yukon Research Centre: Partnering in Research CANARIE and The Yukon Research Centre are hosting a research conference on November 4th at the Westmark Hotel & Conference Center. The Morning session is invitation only. It will feature Peter Wilenius of CANARIE (Canada’s highspeed research and education Internet network) speaking about his organization’s history in the Yukon. This will be followed by a demonstration of the database of historical weather data recently culled from the logs books of White Pass and Yukon Route train and riverboat stations. We believe this new weather data will be of considerable interest and importance in the study of historical climate conditions in the territory. In the Afternoon from 1pm to 5pm there will be a research poster event open to the public featuring environmental research projects from the Yukon Research Centre and other agencies from the Yukon scientific community. Snacks will be served.

that. The first 747s could seat twice as many passengers as the preferred international jet of the time, the Boeing 707. Long flights became more economical for the airlines. Ticket prices fell and soon a summer vacation in Europe was no longer just for the wealthy. The plane’s profile was enhanced by its role as Air Force One and by flying the space shuttle – piggyback – across the country. The 747 became the world’s most recognizable aircraft. Boeing began building 747s in the late 1960s. Production peaked at 122 in 1990. Overall, Boeing sold a total of 1,418 747s before redesigning the plane in 2011. The 747’s success helped put Boeing ahead of U.S. competitors Lockheed, which left the passenger jet business in 1983, and McDonnell Douglas, which Boeing acquired in 1997. But technology eventually caught up with the 747. As engines became more powerful and reliable, the government in 1988 started allowing certain planes with just two engines to fly over the ocean, as far as three hours away from the nearest airport. Within a decade, twin-engine planes like the Airbus A330 and the Boeing 777 began to dominate long-haul routes. Passenger airlines have ordered 31 747-8s, the current version of the plane. By comparison, airlines have ordered 979 of its smaller but ultrafuel-efficient 787 Dreamliner. The cost is a factor. The 747 is Boeing’s most expensive plane with a list price of around $350 million, compared with $320 million for Boeing’s biggest 777. “Several” brand-new 747s have gone into storage, the company said, “to balance production and delivery rates.”

Air Force One The Sequel At least the President of the United States still prefers to fly around in a jumbo jet. Air Force One is the world’s most visible airplane. The two modified Boeing 747-200s that do the job now will be 30 years old in 2017. The Air Force is seeking a four-engine replacement, making the Pentagon one of the last airplane shoppers eager to buy fuel for four engines instead of two. Boeing and Airbus are the only Western jetmakers with such a plane. Boeing has said it wants the job and has responded to a U.S. Air Force request for information. Airbus has not. The European company was widely assumed to be at a disadvantage against an American planemaker. It’s also possible that another company would buy planes and

TEMPORARY TATTOOS 207 Main Street Tel: 633-4842


modify them to be used as Air Force One. An Air Force spokesman confirmed on Monday that it received multiple responses, but no date has been set for discussing the project with potential bidders.

Impact on Boeing Boeing says that slowing 747 production won’t have a significant financial impact. Boeing’s stock hit an all-time high of $129.99 on Wednesday. It has gained 74 per cent so far this

37

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013 year, more than four times the gain in the Dow Jones industrial average. Boeing has a backlog of some 4,787 planes, most of that orders for the bestselling 737. It has sped up production of the 737, as well as the 777, and plans to boost its output of 787s in 2016. Boeing gets the bulk of the money from a new plane upon delivery, so faster deliveries mean better cash flow. Boeing is expected to begin offering customers a new version of the 777 by year end. With about 400 seats, that plane is widely expected

to kill off demand for the 747 from passenger airlines, although the freighter version may survive longer. Boeing isn’t giving up on its iconic airplane. Marketing chief Randy Tinseth says the economic downturn of the past five years has hurt 747 sales. Still, he says, “We think that market will come around.” Even if it doesn’t, 747 fans can take heart. Most planes last three decades or more, so there will be some 747s in the skies for a long time. S TA R S P O N S O R S

What’s New? November 4 Standing Committee City Council will meet at 5:30pm to discuss: Delegates - Kern Dillon (Whitehorse Waterfront Award); Fall Recreation Grants; Third Quarter Variance; Authorize Sales - Wann Road and Ogilvie Street. Agenda packages are available at whitehorse.ca/agendas

Council & Senior Management (CASM) For a complete meeting list please visit whitehorse.ca/CASM

Fuel Abatement Project in MacRae The Whitehorse Fire Department will be cleaning up material that was previously stacked, by burning and/or chipping. Burning will commence on or around November 1 and will continue daily until complete. A contractor will be on-site during the burning to ensure that all fires are controlled. Please direct any questions to the Acting Fire Chief at 668-2462.

Pioneer Cemetery Public Meeting The City is hosting a meeting on the proposed improvements to Pioneer Cemetery on Thursday November 7 from 7 pm – 8:30 pm at Whitehorse United Church (601 Main Street).

Soirée Preview

Please call 668-8325 for more information.

Parks and Protected Areas Bylaw

Enjoy a sumptious lunch buffet, live music and dance

Yukon Convention Centre Friday, November 29 - 11 am Individual tickets $30.00 Tickets on sale October 24 Transportation provided by Takhini Transport

For tickets please call Harmony at 393-8931

The City is putting a call out to community associations and stakeholders for a seat on the Parks & Protected Areas Bylaw Task Force, which will meet several times in 2014 to assist with recommendations for a new Bylaw.

ADAMS FAMILY

Application forms and supporting information may be downloaded at whitehorse.ca/bylawinput or picked up at the Public Safety Building, 305 Range Road. Please respond by November 28, 2013.

Transit Remembrance Day Service Transit will be operating on Monday, November 11, using the Saturday schedule. Transit will also be providing a shuttle bus service for the Remembrance Day ceremonies between the Takhini Arena and Canada Games Centre. Normal bus service will resume on Tuesday, November 12. For more schedules please visit whitehorse.ca/transit

Canadian Coalition of Municipalities Against Racism and Discrimination Are you able to contribute your time to some important volunteer work? Want to use your talents and insights to make a difference in our community? The City is seeking applications from Whitehorse residents interested in serving on the CCMARD Advisory Committee. The purpose of this committee is to advise City Council and City Administration on best practices to eliminate racism and discrimination in the development, implementation and operations of City plans, policies, services and facilities. For more information and an application form please visit whitehorse.ca/CCMARD or call the City Clerk at 668-8611. Please apply by January 10, 2014.

www.yhf.ca

www.whitehorse.ca


36

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

As newer planes meet airlines’ needs, Boeing’s iconic 747 faces an uncertain future Joshua Freed And Scott Mayerowitz Associated Press

F

or decades, the Boeing 747 was the Queen of the Skies. But the glamorous double-decker jumbo jet that revolutionized air travel and shrunk the globe could be nearing the end of the line. Boeing has cut its production target twice in six months. Just 18 will be produced in each of the next two years. Counting cancellations, it hasn’t sold a single 747 this year. Some brand-new 747s go into storage as soon as they leave the plant. Boeing says it’s committed to the 747, and sees a market for it in regions like Asia. But most airlines simply don’t want big, four-engine planes anymore. They prefer newer two-engine jets that fly the same distance while burning less fuel. “We had four engines when jet engine technology wasn’t advanced,” Delta Air Lines Inc. CEO Richard Anderson said at a recent conference. “Now jet engines are amazing, amazing machines and you only need two of them.” Delta inherited 16 747s when it bought Northwest Airlines in 2008. Northwest last ordered a 747 in 2001, according to Flightglobal’s Ascend Online Fleets.

Seats to fill Part of the problem is all those seats. A 747 can seat from 380 to 560 people, depending on how an airline sets it up. A full one is a moneymaker. But an airline that

Nick Ut/AP Photo

A Lufthansa Boeing 747-8 arrives at Los Angeles International Airport. For decades, the 747 was the queen of the skies, but the reign may be coming to an end.

can’t fill all the seats has to spread the cost of 63,000 gallons of jet fuel – roughly $200,000 – among fewer passengers. They’re also too big for most markets. There aren’t enough passengers who want to fly each day between Atlanta and Paris, for example, to justify several jumbo jet flights. And business travellers want more than one flight to choose from. So airlines fly smaller planes several times a day instead. “No one wants the extra capacity” that comes with jumbo jets

Attention FoodSafe Level 2 Certificate Holders Your previous FoodSafe Level 2 certification has expired. All existing FoodSafe Level 2 holders are required to upgrade to the new FoodSafe Level 2 program to become current.

New participants are welcome! NOVEMBER 16 & 17, 2013 9:00 am to 5:00 pm YTEC Training Room Cost per person- $110.00 Space is limited Call 667-4733 to register.

tive bulbous upper deck was a lounge, so it had just six windows. The plane epitomized the modern age of international jet travel. “Everyone on the flight was The game changer dressed up,” recalls passenger Thomas Lee, who was 17 when he The 747 once stood alone, with took the inaugural passenger flight more seats than any other jet and on Pan Am from New York to Lona range of 6,000 miles (9,656 km), don in 1970. “After all, it was still longer than any other plane. back in the day when the romance The plane was massive: six stories tall and longer than the distance of flight was alive and thriving.” International travel was mostly the Wright Brothers travelled on limited to those who could afford their first flight. On the early planes, the distinc- the pricy flights. The 747 changed like the 747 and the Airbus A380, said Teal Group aviation consultant Richard Aboulafia.

CANARIE & Yukon Research Centre: Partnering in Research CANARIE and The Yukon Research Centre are hosting a research conference on November 4th at the Westmark Hotel & Conference Center. The Morning session is invitation only. It will feature Peter Wilenius of CANARIE (Canada’s highspeed research and education Internet network) speaking about his organization’s history in the Yukon. This will be followed by a demonstration of the database of historical weather data recently culled from the logs books of White Pass and Yukon Route train and riverboat stations. We believe this new weather data will be of considerable interest and importance in the study of historical climate conditions in the territory. In the Afternoon from 1pm to 5pm there will be a research poster event open to the public featuring environmental research projects from the Yukon Research Centre and other agencies from the Yukon scientific community. Snacks will be served.

that. The first 747s could seat twice as many passengers as the preferred international jet of the time, the Boeing 707. Long flights became more economical for the airlines. Ticket prices fell and soon a summer vacation in Europe was no longer just for the wealthy. The plane’s profile was enhanced by its role as Air Force One and by flying the space shuttle – piggyback – across the country. The 747 became the world’s most recognizable aircraft. Boeing began building 747s in the late 1960s. Production peaked at 122 in 1990. Overall, Boeing sold a total of 1,418 747s before redesigning the plane in 2011. The 747’s success helped put Boeing ahead of U.S. competitors Lockheed, which left the passenger jet business in 1983, and McDonnell Douglas, which Boeing acquired in 1997. But technology eventually caught up with the 747. As engines became more powerful and reliable, the government in 1988 started allowing certain planes with just two engines to fly over the ocean, as far as three hours away from the nearest airport. Within a decade, twin-engine planes like the Airbus A330 and the Boeing 777 began to dominate long-haul routes. Passenger airlines have ordered 31 747-8s, the current version of the plane. By comparison, airlines have ordered 979 of its smaller but ultrafuel-efficient 787 Dreamliner. The cost is a factor. The 747 is Boeing’s most expensive plane with a list price of around $350 million, compared with $320 million for Boeing’s biggest 777. “Several” brand-new 747s have gone into storage, the company said, “to balance production and delivery rates.”

Air Force One The Sequel At least the President of the United States still prefers to fly around in a jumbo jet. Air Force One is the world’s most visible airplane. The two modified Boeing 747-200s that do the job now will be 30 years old in 2017. The Air Force is seeking a four-engine replacement, making the Pentagon one of the last airplane shoppers eager to buy fuel for four engines instead of two. Boeing and Airbus are the only Western jetmakers with such a plane. Boeing has said it wants the job and has responded to a U.S. Air Force request for information. Airbus has not. The European company was widely assumed to be at a disadvantage against an American planemaker. It’s also possible that another company would buy planes and

TEMPORARY TATTOOS 207 Main Street Tel: 633-4842


modify them to be used as Air Force One. An Air Force spokesman confirmed on Monday that it received multiple responses, but no date has been set for discussing the project with potential bidders.

Impact on Boeing Boeing says that slowing 747 production won’t have a significant financial impact. Boeing’s stock hit an all-time high of $129.99 on Wednesday. It has gained 74 per cent so far this

37

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013 year, more than four times the gain in the Dow Jones industrial average. Boeing has a backlog of some 4,787 planes, most of that orders for the bestselling 737. It has sped up production of the 737, as well as the 777, and plans to boost its output of 787s in 2016. Boeing gets the bulk of the money from a new plane upon delivery, so faster deliveries mean better cash flow. Boeing is expected to begin offering customers a new version of the 777 by year end. With about 400 seats, that plane is widely expected

to kill off demand for the 747 from passenger airlines, although the freighter version may survive longer. Boeing isn’t giving up on its iconic airplane. Marketing chief Randy Tinseth says the economic downturn of the past five years has hurt 747 sales. Still, he says, “We think that market will come around.” Even if it doesn’t, 747 fans can take heart. Most planes last three decades or more, so there will be some 747s in the skies for a long time. S TA R S P O N S O R S

What’s New? November 4 Standing Committee City Council will meet at 5:30pm to discuss: Delegates - Kern Dillon (Whitehorse Waterfront Award); Fall Recreation Grants; Third Quarter Variance; Authorize Sales - Wann Road and Ogilvie Street. Agenda packages are available at whitehorse.ca/agendas

Council & Senior Management (CASM) For a complete meeting list please visit whitehorse.ca/CASM

Fuel Abatement Project in MacRae The Whitehorse Fire Department will be cleaning up material that was previously stacked, by burning and/or chipping. Burning will commence on or around November 1 and will continue daily until complete. A contractor will be on-site during the burning to ensure that all fires are controlled. Please direct any questions to the Acting Fire Chief at 668-2462.

Pioneer Cemetery Public Meeting The City is hosting a meeting on the proposed improvements to Pioneer Cemetery on Thursday November 7 from 7 pm – 8:30 pm at Whitehorse United Church (601 Main Street).

Soirée Preview

Please call 668-8325 for more information.

Parks and Protected Areas Bylaw

Enjoy a sumptious lunch buffet, live music and dance

Yukon Convention Centre Friday, November 29 - 11 am Individual tickets $30.00 Tickets on sale October 24 Transportation provided by Takhini Transport

For tickets please call Harmony at 393-8931

The City is putting a call out to community associations and stakeholders for a seat on the Parks & Protected Areas Bylaw Task Force, which will meet several times in 2014 to assist with recommendations for a new Bylaw.

ADAMS FAMILY

Application forms and supporting information may be downloaded at whitehorse.ca/bylawinput or picked up at the Public Safety Building, 305 Range Road. Please respond by November 28, 2013.

Transit Remembrance Day Service Transit will be operating on Monday, November 11, using the Saturday schedule. Transit will also be providing a shuttle bus service for the Remembrance Day ceremonies between the Takhini Arena and Canada Games Centre. Normal bus service will resume on Tuesday, November 12. For more schedules please visit whitehorse.ca/transit

Canadian Coalition of Municipalities Against Racism and Discrimination Are you able to contribute your time to some important volunteer work? Want to use your talents and insights to make a difference in our community? The City is seeking applications from Whitehorse residents interested in serving on the CCMARD Advisory Committee. The purpose of this committee is to advise City Council and City Administration on best practices to eliminate racism and discrimination in the development, implementation and operations of City plans, policies, services and facilities. For more information and an application form please visit whitehorse.ca/CCMARD or call the City Clerk at 668-8611. Please apply by January 10, 2014.

www.yhf.ca

www.whitehorse.ca


38

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Elegant ‘Skeleton Lady’ spreads her allure as Mexico marks Day of the Dead Mark Stevenson and Adriana Gomez Licon Associated Press

MEXICO CITY exico’s elegant and classy “Skeleton Lady” is getting new attention more than a century after she was born, inspiring some movie and rock stars in the U.S. to don Halloween costumes based on the macabre figure that has grown to symbolize the Day of the Dead. As Mexico’s capital marks the 100th anniversary of the death of the artist who created Catrina, dozens of video bloggers are offering tips on how to nail her pale skull look. Jose Guadalupe Posada, the cartoonist who created Catrina, is being honoured by Mexico City with giant replicas of his illustrations and a display of skeleton statues for the Day of the Dead offering that opened on the capital’s main plaza Thursday. Such offerings traditionally consist of an altar with flowers, food and a photo of a departed loved one. The Skeleton Lady in her elegant broad-brimmed hat first appeared in a satirical engraving that Posada did sometime between 1910 and his death on Jan. 20, 1913. He wanted to mock those who pretended to be of a higher class, even if it meant starving, and going painfully thin, or without flesh. She became the most famous of Posada’s illustrations, with later sketches dressing her in classy Victorian-era garments with a high neckline. As Halloween celebrations make inroads in Mexico, the spooky and sexy Catrina look is spreading a Mexican touch to the north. Singer Fergie of the Black Eyed Peas sported a sexy Catrina outfit with a red-and-black shawl and headpiece and published a photo on her Instagram account. Sandra Bullock was caught by photographers in Los Angeles wearing Mexican-style skull makeup and a black dress. While it’s often called “Mexican Candy Skull” makeup, the Catrina touches of elegant scarves and veiled hats stem from the Skeleton Lady. Dozens of tutorials popped up in the last month on YouTube showing how to darken circles around the eyes and draw colorful shapes on the cheeks to create a frightening, yet festive look. At some online costume stores in the Unites States, short-skirted and tight-bodiced “muerta” or “sugarskull” costumes are on sale.

M

Integra Tire

667-6102 • 107 Industrial Rd.

www.yukontire.com Ser ving Whitehorse and Yukon Territory since 1946 integratire.com integratire.com

Winter is almost here, and Integra Tire wants to get you and your vehicle ready for a safe season of snowy driving with the Fall Love Your Ride Tire Event. From now until November 30th you could get huge savings up to $50 on select sets of tires. And when you visit your local Integra Tire this fall, you could WIN one of SIX $500 gift certificates.

See integratire.com/1yr for full details. integratire.com

Information Session for

Kwanlin Dün Beneficiaries The Trust Working Group of Kwanlin Dün First Nation is holding an information session to provide an overview of the Administrative Trust Model for Beneficiary Compensation Funds and a review of the Protector Model. Input gathered at the meeting will help inform the Trust Working Group and Council in moving forward with selecting a trust model for KDFN Beneficiaries that will meet the need of the community. Representatives from Deloitte and Boughton Law will be available at the meeting. Date: November 4, 2013 Time: 5:00 p.m. Location: Nàkwät’à Kü Potlatch House Light snacks and refreshments will be served. For further information, call 633-7811.

Marco Ugarte/AP Photo

A traditional Mexican Catrina during Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico City on Wednesday.

The Catrina is also trendy among young women in Mexico. Makeup studios and salons apply the complex face paint for as much as 1,000 pesos (about $80) for Halloween as Mexicans increasingly mix the U.S. festival with the Day of the Dead, which traditionally didn’t involve dressing up. For Andrew Chesnut, author of Devoted to Death: Santa Muerte, the Skeleton Saint and a professor of Catholic Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University, the Catrina’s rise in the U.S. is part of the increasing Mexican and Latin American influence in the United States. “She is kind of a perfect example of integrating both traditions and not seeing any contradiction or problems with that,” Chesnut said. He said more and more U.S. families, not only of Mexican descent, are setting up altars and celebrating Day of the Dead. The Catrina went through a cou-

A Christmas Bazaar will be held in the

Gold Rush Inn

Saturday, November 2nd from 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

This annual event features many great gift ideas from Yukon crafters and home businesses. FoR InFoRmatIon call 667-6772 oR 667-7629 (aFteR 6:00 Pm)

ple of incarnations before becoming a scary sex symbol. Posada created her to poke fun at “people who pretended to be European, but weren’t,” said Mercedes Sierra, a visual arts professor at Mexico’s National Autonomous University. Most Mexicans are of Indian descent, but given long-standing racism, many tried to look European with their clothing or makeup. So Posada created the elegantly dressed skeleton – “skeleton” being Mexican slang for someone so poor they couldn’t eat. Even though he mocked people with pretensions, Posada said that drawing her as a skeleton was also a way to reject social stratification. “Death is democratic. At the end, regardless of whether you are white, dark, rich or poor, we all end up as skeletons,” Posada said at the time. In the mid-1940s, Mexican artist Diego Rivera put Posada and the Skeleton Lady in the central position of his mural “Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in the Alameda Central,” which depicted iconic figures from Mexican arts and history. It was Rivera who gave the figure the name “Catrina,” Sierra said.

LAPEL PINS 207 Main Street Tel: 633-4842


39

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Tips for dog-proof living By Kim Campbell Thornton Every few years, when we get a new puppy or adopt an adult dog or have a foster dog spend some time with us, I have to dog-proof our home and learn some new tricks about interacting with particular dogs. You might think that I would have dog-proofing down by now, but each dog has been attracted to different items or has done things it didn’t occur to the other dogs to try. Our current “new dog” is Kibo, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel we’re fostering until he is adopted. One of the first things Kibo taught me was to put away my shoes and to close doors. None of our other dogs have been chewers, but Kibo likes to examine things with his mouth in the fervent hope that they will be edible. He has gone into the closet to chew on my leather sandals (caught before he did any damage) and explored the walk-in shower. There he found and carried away a plastic razor, which, fortunately, he abandoned in the hallway instead of swallowing. He is also fond of a tiny, gold papier-mache box. He hasn’t chewed it up or swallowed it, which he could easily do, but he likes to take it off the side table and lie with it. It’s now out of reach, too. Despite his short stature, Kibo tries hard to be a countertop surfer. We’ve learned not to hold or place food at any height where he could jump up and reach it. Our other dogs are also highly food-oriented, but they wouldn’t dream of snatching food out of our hands. Kibo does more than dream it – he tries it. I always push the chair in if I get up from the table because I can tell that the idea of jumping onto it to get at the food is running through his mind. If you are living with a Kibo of your own, here are some tips to keep your belongings safe, your house in one piece and your dog out of trouble. • Use a crate. When you can-

not supervise your dog, even if it’s just for a few minutes, put him in the crate to prevent any misbehaviour. Kibo hangs out in his crate on his own and he’s happy to go into it when asked because he knows he will get a treat. • Tether your dog. That means he is leashed at your side at all times. This is a great way to learn the signals a new dog or puppy gives when he needs to go potty. It keeps him under your watchful eye so he can’t get into mischief and helps build a bond between you. • Get down at dog’s-eye level to see what might attract the dog’s attention. Electrical cords, small trash containers and dangling dish towels all can pose threats. Bundle cords and encase them in tough plastic covers, put trash containers out of reach, and keep dish towels in drawers if your dog is attracted to them. Chair and table legs often look good to chew. Coat them with Bitter Apple spray to deter taste-testing (try it first in an inconspicuous area to make sure it doesn’t damage the finish). Make sure no sharp edges or choking hazards are within a dog’s reach. • Most important, never underestimate the intelligence and inventiveness of dogs. They can learn to open doors, climb up on counters and desks using other pieces of furniture as launch pads, and crawl under or wiggle into places you’ve never imagined they would go. Be smart and put away or block access to valuable, fragile or dangerous items and secure cabinets with childproof locks.

one. My spouse isn’t so sure. What are some of the benefits of a child having a dog? – via Facebook A: When I look back on the happiest times of my childhood, almost all of my favourite memories involve my dog Scooter. Besides being a playmate, he helped me in other ways. I was shy, and Scooter helped me to open up and gave me a way to relate to other people. For kids, a dog is someone to bond with and talk to who is always there and can be a trustworthy confidant. Caring for a dog teaches empathy and helps build responsibility. With supervision, a young child like your six-year-old can put fresh water in a dog’s dish, wash the food dish after the dog eats, and help put away the dog food. Older children can learn to brush the dog, measure out food at mealtime and take the dog for walks. Pets also have health benefits. I think kids with dogs are more likely to get up off the couch and get some exercise, and studies show that children with early exposure to dogs have a decreased risk of developing allergies, asthma and eczema. At every age, children are constantly going through changes, including going to school and learning how to deal with people. Some come from broken families and go back and forth between their parents’ homes. For any child, a dog or other pet can be a constant in their lives. With my own daughter, our two pugs provide consistency. Q&A No matter what else is going on Benefits of having dogs with her or whatever challenges include she is facing, she always has her friendship, health and con- dogs. They bring her comfort and stability. – Mikkel Becker fidence Do you have a pet question? Q: Our child is six years old. Send it to petconnection@gmail. She’s been asking for a dog, and com or visit Facebook.com/ DrMartyBecker I think it’s a good time to get

NORTHERN INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL JUSTICE, in coordination with INTERNATIONAL CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS FOUNDATION, TRAINING PROGRAMS: Completion of these courses and receipt of a certificate indicating full attendance (13 Contact Hours) qualifies as a class in ICISF’s Certificate of Specialized Training Program

Individual Crisis Intervention and Peer Support November 7-8, 2013 CRN: 10674 Yukon College: Room T1021

Group Crisis Intervention

November 21 –22, 2013 CRN: 10747 Yukon College: Room C1440 (Glass Class)

Thursday & Friday: 8:30am to 4:30pm $300 + gst

Thursday & Friday: 8:30am to 4:30pm $350 + gst

Please call Admissions at 668-8710 and quote the Course Registration Number (CRN). For more information on the Northern Institute of Social Justice and courses offered: Visit our website: http://www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/programs/info/nisj Call: 867.456.8589 Email: nisj@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Northern Institute of Social Justice

THE BUZZ

Beef, dairy products, chicken and wheat were responsible for A cat’s tail up? 78 percent of reported adverse Safe to approach food reactions in dogs. • Dogs eat the darndest • In a Washington Post article, things. Based on animal X-rays anthrozoologist John Bradshaw, submitted to the Veterinary who has studied cat behaviour Practice News’ “They Ate What?” for more than 30 years and is the author of the new book Cat contest, the following items Sense, writes that the key signal were found in the stomachs of some dogs with indiscriminate allowing cats to assess each eating habits: a long piece of other’s moods is the straightmetal with a two-inch curve; a up tail. Two cats checking each 14-inch wooden back scratcher; other out communicate their willingness to approach peacea wooden-handled hunting fully by raising the tail. It’s a knife; a mass of 70 rubber form of neoteny, a kitten-like hair bands, which were at first behaviour retained into adultmistaken for a tumour; a bread hood. “The tail-up signal almost knife; an electronics cable; a certainly evolved during domes- llama rib bone; a Playstation tication, arising from a posture controller; and an arrowhead. wildcat kittens use when greetThe takeaway? Never assume ing their mothers,” Bradshaw your dog won’t – or can’t – writes. “Adult wildcats do not swallow something. – Dr. Marty raise their tails to each other.” Becker and Kim Campbell • According to Winn Feline Thornton Foundation, a paper published in the April 2013 issue of Veter- Pet Connection is produced by a team of pet-care experts headed by Good inary Dermatology found that Morning America and The Dr. Oz beef, dairy products and fish Show veterinarian Dr. Marty Becker account for nearly 90 per cent and award-winning journalist Kim of all reported cases of adverse Campbell Thornton. They are joined food reactions in cats. Based by professional dog trainer and on a literature search of food behavior consultant Mikkel Becker. and food ingredients, the paper Dr. Becker can be found at Facebook. reports that the animal proteins com/DrMartyBecker or on Twitter generally caused skin lesions or at DrMartyBecker. Kim Campbell a combination of skin lesions Thornton is on Twitter at kkcthornand gastrointestinal sympton. Mikkel Becker is at Facebook. toms. Wheat and corn typically com/MikkelBecker and on Twitter at caused gastrointestinal upset. MikkelBecker.

Your Community Connection

Whitehorse Aboriginal Women’s Circle Presents:

Indigenous Wealth Dynamics

November 8 & 9th 2013 Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre - Multi Purpose Room Friday 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Indigenous Wealth Dynamics will examine our values, beliefs and behaviors around money, poverty and wealth as Indigenous People. Indigenous Wealth Dynamics is based on the founding principle ‘We can fulfill our roles and responsibilities of being Indigenous and also be good at money.’ The workshop will focus on three core areas: Family, Administration and Governance Wealth Dynamics is about questioning everything we believe about money and exploring in our Indigenous context to let go of limiting beliefs. Presented by Transformation: Social and Economic Development, Uniting business and culture. To register please email: wawc@northwestel.net or call (867) 668-7532

Transformation

Social and Economic Development ‘Uniting business and culture’ www.transformationinternational.ca

Whitehorse Aboriginal Women’s Circle Phone: 867-668-7532

Suite 202 - 307 Jarvis Street

Whitehorse, Yukon

Y1A 2H3


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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Pet owners gobble up grub labelled fresh, organic Michael Rubinkam

to make it happen. Marketed as a healthier, more nutritious alternative, BETHLEHEM, Pa. rganic kibble? All-natural some premium dog and cat cuisine has gone the Whole chow? Fido and Fluffy don’t know it, but their owners Foods route. Nowhere is that more eviwant them to eat better – and they are forking over big bucks dent than in the new $25-milAssociated Press

O

Yukon Soccer Association will be holding trials for the

2014 Arctic Winter Games

Indoor Soccer Teams in the following age categories:

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

Intermediate Female: born in 1994 or later Junior Male: born in 1996 or later Junior Female: born in 1996 or later Juvenile Male: born in 1998 or later Juvenile Female: born in 1998 or later

The trials will be held on November 23rd - November 24th, 2013 at the Canada Games Centre, in Whitehorse. Please note: the time schedule for the trials will be posted on the YSA website (www.yukonsoccer.yk.ca) on November 18th. Participants are asked to register no later than 5:00pm on November 12th, 2013 at Sport Yukon. Fee: $40 Participants must be members in good standing with Yukon Soccer Association (registered and currently playing indoor soccer with any YSA Affiliate). For more information contact Yukon Soccer Association at 633-4625.

Note: to be considered, players MUST attend trials unless you receive an exemption from Sport Yukon Games Committee by November 18th, 2013.

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The consumer mail-in and/or online rebate is offered on two selected eligible tire patterns, purchased between October 1st and December 15th, 2013 from a participating local Hankook Tire retailer located in Canada. Rebate amount differs on tire patterns. Visit hankooktire.ca for complete details of the rebate promotion. *2013 Hankook Winter Icebreaker Mail-in and/or Online Rebate/Not an Instant Rebate.

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lion eastern Pennsylvania factory of upstart pet food maker Freshpet, where thousands of pounds of fresh meat and poultry are pasteurized, mixed with vegetables and then immediately chilled, packaged and sent to branded, refrigerated display cases in more than 10,000 stores across America. The seven-year-old company, founded by former Purina executives, is trying to establish a new category in an industry long dominated by kibbles and cans: fresh, preservative-free food that requires refrigeration. With sales exceeding $100 million, executives say they’re on their way. “People are trying to eat healthier, less processed, simpler foods, and I think they are applying that logic when they’re making pet food decisions,” said Scott Morris, Freshpet’s president and co-founder. Major manufacturers like Nestle Purina and Del Monte Foods are also capitalizing on consumers’ willingness to spend more on food they perceive to be better for their furry friends. Even through the Great Recession, premium dog and cat food – the latest iteration of which is advertised as “natural” and “organic” – has been claiming an ever-bigger share of the market. Sales of the more expensive brands

jumped 68 per cent from 2002 to 2012, compared with 19 per cent for mid-priced brands and just eight per cent for economy brands, according to Euromonitor International. Marketing experts say manufacturers are tapping into a number of powerful trends and emotions: Americans’ interest in healthy eating, the rising popularity of organic food, the tendency to humanize pets. “People think of their pets not as pets, but as members of their family, and they want to treat the members of their family with the same respect as they treat themselves,” said Molly Maier, senior analyst at market research firm Mintel Group Ltd. Nestle, the No. 1 pet food maker, has reported solid growth in its high-end, “made with natural ingredients” Beyond line. Del Monte, whose brands include Kibbles ‘n Bits and Meow Mix, purchased premium pet food maker Natural Balance in July. “Higher consumer spending on more premium pet products will continue to drive market expansion,” Del Monte said. Despite its explosive growth, Secaucus, N.J.-based Freshpet remains a tiny player in the $17 billion dog and cat food market. Morris sees the company as fundamentally different, its new “Freshpet Kitchens” fac-

!

ATTENTION E M P L OY E R S

YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR A WAGE SUBSIDY OF $7.20 PER HOUR

Through the STUDENT TRAINING & EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (STEP) By offering a summer employment opportunity for a Yukon post-secondary student that: • Provides a minimum of 450 hours of summer employment • Relates to a student’s field of study • Will benefit a student’s future employability For 2014, STEP wages will be indexed based on Federal Student wage levels. New STEP wages will be communicated to employer applicants as soon as they are finalized. For more information or a STEP application, please visit our website at: www.education.gov.yk.ca/employers/step_ employer_info/index.html or contact: Department of Education Advanced Education Branch Eric Huggard, Employment Training 1000 Lewes Blvd., Whitehorse, YT Phone: 1-867-667-5927 Fax: 667-8555 Toll Free: 1-800-661-0408 ext. 5927 Email: eric.huggard@gov.yk.ca

tory in Bethlehem using ingredients and processes adapted from human food production. The company entered the market at an opportune time. A widespread pet food recall in early 2007 – which followed U.S. dog and cat deaths linked to tainted ingredients from China – jolted consumers and got them thinking about what they were feeding their pets. But the jury’s still out on whether food marketed as “fresh,” ‘’organic“ or ‘’natural“ helps pets lead longer or healthier lives. Theoretically, it’s hard to argue with the idea that minimally processed and preservativefree food like the kind Freshpet makes would be better for dogs and cats, said Amy Farcas, a veterinary clinical nutritionist at the University of Pennsylvania. But she said the research to prove it is lacking. Farcas routinely advises her clients that as long as their dog is the appropriate weight, healthy and energetic, they probably don’t need a diet change. “Nutritionally, most adult dog foods would be considered appropriate for most adult healthy dogs, though there are differences in ingredients, quality control, and other factors among products,” she said via email. Freshpet has embarked on a long-term study to measure whether dogs on a Freshpet diet fare better than dogs fed a more conventional diet. Until then, company executives say, common sense, anecdotal evidence and customer feedback tell them they’re on to something. Amy Eagle, 43, of Center Valley, Pa., stopped at a Freshpet display case at Target recently to pick up chow for her chocolate lab, Potroast. She said the dog turns up her nose at anything else. “It feels like it’s closer to the farm,” Eagle said. “I don’t think I would go to the length of making fresh chicken or beef for her, but it feels like I’m almost doing that.”

Got any Sports Tips?

PLEASE NOTE CLOSING DATE TO APPLY:

November 15, 2013

email:tomp@yukon-news.com

e


Be part of Media Literacy Week by YUKON PUBLIC LIBRARIES

NOT

JUST

BOOKS F

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Youth Contests

At Yukon public libraries youth aged 12 to 18 can enter a free contest during Media Literacy Week (November 4 to 8). Just “like” us on Yukon Public Libraries Facebook page to enter the contest. Lucky winners will have a chance to win great prizes during this special week. Please note proof of age will be required to collect a prize. Other contests for youth during Media Literacy Week include the Bad Ad and Counter Ad contests hosted by The Media Literacy Project. For more information go to medialiteracyproject.org or for information about Media Literary Week visit www.medialiteracyweek.ca.

version, just go to: http://elibraryoverdrive.gov.yk.ca and choose “Français” from the menu at the top. The e-library collection primarily features materials in English however, the French content is growing steadily with more than 100 titles to date. To browse the French titles, click on “collections à découvrir” (featured collections), choose “toutes les collections” (all collections) and select “titres en français” (French titles) from the drop down menu. For more information about our e-library phone Whitehorse Public Library at 667-5239 or the library in your area.

rom November 4 to 8, students, educators, parents and community organizations across the country will join in marking Canada’s eighth annual Media Literacy Week. The initiative, which is hosted by MediaSmarts and the Remembrance Day closure Canadian Teachers’ Federation, All Yukon public libraries aims to raise awareness of the will be closed for Rememimportance of media literacy brance Day on Monday, NovE-library news and digital literacy in the eduember 11. Yukon public libraries is cation of children and youth. pleased to announce a new The official theme of the This column is prepared by Yukon French interface at our epublic libraries, department week, “What’s Being Sold: of Community Services. library. To view the French Helping Kids Make Sense of Marketing Messages,” will encourage teachers and parents to talk to children and teens about the marketing they encounter on a daily basis. With young people surrounded by ads everywhere they turn, on more media platforms than ever, it’s important that they understand Complete Autobody Repair & Painting facility keeping the the messages targeting them. costs down for Yukoners for over 20 years. In Yukon, Media Literacy Week is supported by the • Heavy truck and RV repairs We Buy... Yukon Department of Educa• Insurance Claims late model rebuildable salvage. tion and the Yukon Teachers’ • Quality work Guaranteed Association. More information We Sell... for youth, parents and teach• Licensed technicians quality rebuilt vehicles. ers about digital literacy is • Free Estimates available online on the Yukon Education Student Network at #2 Glacier Rd. Whitehorse • Phone: 668-7455 www.yesnet.yk.ca.

By The Book

Craft & Art Sale

Well-Read Books invites you to join us for the

Opening Reception

Friday, December 6 • 7:00pm - 9:00pm Saturday, December 7 • 10:00am - 5:00pm Sunday, December 8 • 12:00pm - 5:00pm

Spiritual WiSdom from AnimAls A Free Public Workshop • All Welcome “You, me, our pets—we are all Soul dwelling here in the world of nature.” “All sing the glory of God; all teach the secrets of life.” —Harold Klemp, Spiritual Leader of ECKANKAR Share amazing stories and lessons from animals as... * teachers * survivors of death * learning to give and receive God’s love.

Sunday, November 3 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Whitehorse Library Meeting Room Presented by ECKANKAR Canada For information call 867-633-6594 or visit www.eckankar-yt.ca

Consider serving on one of the following boards and committees: „„Alsek Renewable Resources Council –

Craft Your Own Masterpiece!

Deadline: December 20, 2013 „„Dan Keyi Renewable Resources Council –

Deadline: December 20, 2013 „„Dawson District Renewable Resources Council –

with sElEction limitEd Edition sEriEs 2013

Deadline: December 20, 2013 „„Mayo District Renewable Resources Council –

Impart your personal artistic touch on this year’s five Selection Limited Edition varieties. Each year Winexpert produces only a limited quantity of five fabulous and unique varieties from around the world from January through April. These very special wines are only available during their month of release and are so immensely popular that they can be acquired by pre-order only.

Deadline: December 20, 2013 „„North Yukon Renewable Resources Council –

Deadline: December 20, 2013 „„Teslin Renewable Resources Council –

Deadline: December 20, 2013 „„Fish and Wildlife Management Board –

Deadline: December 20, 2013 „„Yukon Advisory Council on Women’s Issues –

Deadline: November 15, 2013

For application forms and more information visit www.eco.gov.yk.ca or call 667-8159 or toll-free 1-800-661-0408.

RESERVE YOUR SELECTION LIMITED EDITION WINE KITS TODAY. ORDER bY DECEMbER 6, 2013 VISIT YOUR AUThOIRzED WINExpERT RETAILER fOR DETAILS.

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42

Yukon News Y.O.O.P. LADIES AUXILIARY ANNUAL

Saturday, November 9th, 1:00-3:00 pm United Church Hall Come and enjoy our tea and goodies, bake table, handicrafts, white elephant, draw for raffle and much, much more!! Licence #2013-073

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Pot O' Gold

A map for miners: protecting Yukon archeological sites from development Vivian Belik

Feature of the week The Little Blue Store on 4th Monday to Saturday 9:30 - 5:30

Request for Board Members The Council of Yukon First Nations is requesting applications from Yukon First Nation Citizens for nominations on the following Boards and Committees: • Gas Tax Review Committee (2 alternate seats) • Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board (1 executive committee seat) • Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board (2 seats) DEADLINE for applications is November 8, 2013, at 4:30 PM. For application forms and, or, for more information, please visit our website at www.cyfn.ca or contact Jennifer Ward at (867) 393-9236 or by e-mail at jennifer.ward@cyfn.net

Starting Nov.2, we can recycle

*

* Only clean Styrofoam can be recycled. Please make sure you clean food residue off of takeout containers and meat trays.

Help us remove Styrofoam from our Landfills

Your community recycling centre

100 Galena Road • 867.667.7269 • www.ravenrecycling.org

Friday, November 1, 2013

bones that have been burned and preserved by fire, require radio-carbon dating to The Yukon’s most recent determine age. mining rush has been a boon Over the summer for prospectors, but it’s also months, hundreds of meant plenty of challenges for promising locations in the the territory’s archeologists. research area were “groundIn order for a mining protruthed” for archeological ject to get the go-ahead in the potential. “The study area is Yukon, archeological values huge and there’s been limon a site need to be assessed. ited archeological research Archeologists, however, have done in the past in this had difficulty keeping up with area,” says Heffner. The total the number of files landing inventory of pre-contact on their desks, which could sites was 170. “It’s a good be putting some archeological number, but over such a resources at risk. large region 170 sites is fairly The Yukon is one of the limited data to work with. last places in Canada to have a So one of the larger comGIS-based map that systemponents of the project was to atically details archeological conduct an inventory of as site potential in the territory. much of the 600,000 square With this model, land plankilometre study area as we ners can effectively decide Mark Nelson photo could to increase archeohow a mining project should Archeologist Jodie MacMillan holds a logical data for the area,” he proceed without disturbing spear point that’s 5,000 to 6,000 years says. The team was able to heritage resources. In the old. The stone tool was found during bring the total number of Yukon, a developer who disa GIS modelling project this summer. catalogued sites to 300. turbs a known archeological “There’s a huge amount site is breaking the law. would have been used by First Na- of archeological resources out there “Historical features from the tion people thousands of years ago. that we didn’t know about,” says gold rush are fairly recognizable by Artifacts made from organic maTr’ondek Hwech’in heritage officer people who aren’t trained in herit- terial like wood, bone, and antlers Lee Whalen. Linking First Nation age resources, but the pre-contact that were also used in hunting and traditional knowledge to these sites archeological remains are much fishing don’t preserve as well and helps contextualize where activities harder for a layperson to identify, are less commonly found. like caribou hunting and fishing and there’s a lot less known about To locate the archeological sites, would have happened and at what their distribution in the Yukon,” researchers carried out shovel time of year. “It puts a human face says Stantec’s Ty Heffner, who testing, a systematic process of dig- to these sites.” is the lead archeologist on the ging and sifting dirt through fine Elders from the First Nation project. mesh screens. When the dirt passes even accompanied the researchers This summer Matrix Research, through the screens, artifacts are into the field to show them campoperating as Stantec, along with the captured in the mesh. sites and prior hunting areas. “This Tr’ondek Hwech’in and the Nacho “In areas where there hasn’t allowed for traditional knowledge Nyak Dun First Nations, surveyed been a lot of sediment accumuto be integrated in a project that a vast swath of land across central lating over time, sometimes you could otherwise have been a Yukon that has been experiencing can find archeological evidence straight scientific project,” says a staking rush in placer and quartz right on the ground surface,” Whalen. The Tr’ondek Hwech’in claims. The 600,000-square-kilosays Heffner. But often these sites will use the GIS-map information metre area includes Dawson and become buried because of blowto help manage archeological sites. Mayo and reaches just north of ing silt or because they’re situated Whalen says these projects are Stewart Crossing. It’s an area that’s in areas that experience periodic important as they create a dialogue had very little of its archeology floods. That’s when shovel-testing between elders and youth about documented. becomes crucial. traditional land uses. Last year archeologists studBetween June and August, the For the Yukon government, the ied topographic maps and aerial team found a variety of artifacts. benefit of the project is enormous. photos to pinpoint potential loca- Most common were rock chips, a “It’s important to have a planning tions for heritage sites. They cross- by-product of shaping stone tools. tool that we can use to predict referenced known archeological Spear points and arrowheads were archeological sites,” says Yukon sites and traditional land use areas also discovered, some as old as development assessment archeolomentioned in First Nation oral 6,000 to 7,000 years. gist Christian Thomas. “Otherwise histories. They also created a GIS “Most stone chips that are pro- you’re left in a position of doing model for areas that might have duced through the manufacture of a fair amount of guesswork or been used as ancient campsites, stone tools aren’t time-diagnostic,” it would cost quite a bit to fly or such as flat land found near major says Heffner. “But there are certain drive out to a site every time an bodies of water. types of tools, projectile points be- application were to come in.” It’s a model that’s been success- ing a good example as well as spear The final data accumulated fully used to manage large-scale points and arrow heads, which from the project won’t be ready forestry and oil and gas projects in have certain shapes and forms that until the spring of 2014. But the British Columbia. In the absence of are time-diagnostic. A spear from Yukon government has already extensive archeological site inven6,000 years ago will look very difbeen able to access initial drafts of tories, GIS-based archeological site ferent from, say, 2,000 years ago.” the mapping information, which potential models are able to make That’s because attributes such as it’s now using to assess mining appredictions with a high degree of size, shape, and the hafting mechplications. reliability. anism of a spear (how it’s attached This column is co-ordinated by the In the summer the Matrix Yukon Research Centre at Yukon to the shaft) change over time. College with major financial support archeologists went into the field to Heffner and his team are from Environment Yukon and Yukon see if their modelling predictions sometimes able to date these tool College. The articles are archived at were correct. The scientists were artifacts in the field. Other finds, taiga.net/yourYukon mostly seeking stone tools that like charcoal remnants and animal


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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Critical issues deserve a higher standard by the Professional Institute of ignoring ideas and rational the Public Service of Canada argument in favour of lies, by DAVID found many have been told to innuendo, exaggeration and alter or exclude information personal attacks. SUZUKI from government documents Ironically, one source is a for non-scientific reasons and media personality with govprevented from speaking to the ernment ties who has dempublic or media about their onstrated a pattern of using work. The survey also revealed bogus arguments and faulty cases where political interferreasoning, leading to a string of ence actually compromised the libel charges and convictions, health and safety of Canadians censure over violations of the rom government scientists and the environment. Canadian Broadcast Standards to First Nations citizens Meanwhile, a recent EnCouncil ethics code and comand environmentalists, pretty vironment Canada report says plaints about racist statements. much everyone working to Canada is failing to meet its It’s sad to see so much of protect the air, water, land and 2020 greenhouse gas reducour media and governance in diversity of plants and animals tions targets under the Copen- such a sorry state that we can’t that keep us alive and healthy hagen Accord. With the federal even expect rational discussion has felt the sting of attacks and some provincial governof critical issues such as climate from sources in government, ments relying on oil sands change and energy policy. And media and beyond. Much of and gas fracking – mostly for there is room for debate – not the media spin is particularly export – as the cornerstones over the existence of climate absurd, relying on ad hominem of both economic and energy change or its causes; the sciattacks (focusing on perceived policy, the situation is likely to ence is clear that it is real and character flaws to deflect atten- get worse. that we are a major contribution from or invalidate arguThe campaign to promote tor, mainly through burning ments) that paint people who fossil fuels over clean energy fossil fuels and cutting down care about the world as greedy has also been taken up by forests. conspirators bent on personal others. In several cases, it has But there’s room for discusenrichment or even world devolved to the level of school- sion about ways to address domination! It would be laugh- yard taunts and bullying – in it. And address it we must. able if so many people didn’t government, but even more so We won’t get there, though, take it seriously. in certain mainstream media. if we hinder scientists from Government tactics have Some outlets have stooped to conducting their research and been more insidious, often designed to silence anyone who e ! could stand in the way of masacted sive resource extraction and exSpmi port policies. Politicians in the Li U.K., Australia, the U.S., Canada and elsewhere have created a false dichotomy between the environment and the economy in efforts to downplay the seriousness of issues like climate change and the need to address them. The arguments are wrong on so many levels. First, the economy is a human invention, a tool that can Banquet, Dinner, Silent Auction and Dancing to Live Country Music be changed when it no longer @ Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centure ntre suits our needs. The environment is the very air, water, Tickets available at: land and diversity of plant and For Tickets available at: animal life we cannot live withCash or Credit Card: out. Why not work to build a Yukon Outfitters 668-4118 healthy, prosperous economy Arts Underground Box Office featuring that protects those things? Lee Cash Only: Dinwoodie, C & D Feeds 633-4620 Volumes of research also from B.C. conclude ignoring climate change will be far more costly than addressing it. The massive bills for cleaning up after events related to extreme weather, such as flooding, are • PFAFF Creative Colour just a start. Climate change is Touch Screen also affecting water supplies • Over 300 stitches and the world’s ability to grow including maxi stitches food, and is contributing to a and monograms up to 48mm wide growing number of refugees. According to the World Health • Exclusive Stitch Organization, close to 150 milCreator TM feature: Create new 9mm lion people are already dying stitches or edit every year from causes related built-in stitches to global warming – and that • Creative signatureTM doesn’t include death and illSewing Programs ness related to pollution from burning fossil fuels. Plus save an Additional $150 Here in Canada, the rush with Mail-in rebate* SAVE $550* to exploit fossil fuels and get MSRP $2999 Visit: www.pfaff.com/ca/en them to market as quickly as to download Mail-in rebate forms. possible has sparked a con® certed effort to muzzle anyone who would stand in the way, 54 Tigereye CresCenT • 633-6548 including the government’s own scientists. A recent survey

speaking freely about it, and if we allow the discussion to be hijacked with petty name-calling and absurd allegations.

With contributions from David Suzuki Foundation senior editor Ian Hanington. Learn more at www.davidsuzuki.org.

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8:00 am to 4:30 pm

Tuesday

8:00 am to 6:30 pm

Wednesday

8:00 am to 4:30 pm

Thursday

8:00 am to 4:30 pm

Friday

8:00 am to 4:30 pm

Saturday and Sunday

closed

Dedicated drop-in hours: Monday to Friday

8:00 am to 8:45 am

Fridays

1:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Closed every day:

noon to 1:00 pm

Call 667-8864 to make an appointment.

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44

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Alaskans’ vitamin D production slows with the season by Ned Rozell

ALASKA

SCIENCE I

nterested people are needed to participate in a one-year study to assess the effects of long dark winters on the vitamin D and calcium levels of Fairbanks residents. So began a recruitment poster Meredith Tallas created more than 25 years ago. Now living in California, Tallas was, in 1983, a University of Alaska Fairbanks student who wanted to study how levels of a vitamin related to sun exposure fluctuated in people living so far from the equator. “The most obvious vitamin to study in Alaska is vitamin D, because of the low light in winter,” Tallas said over the phone from her office in Berkeley. Forty-seven people responded to Tallas’ 1983 request, and her master’s project was underway. By looking at the bloodwork of those Fairbanks residents every month and analyzing their diets, she charted their levels of vitamin D, which our skin magic-

Ned Rozell photo

Fairbanks’ low angle of light in early winter.

ally produces after exposure to a certain amount of sunshine. We also get vitamin D from foods, such as vitamin-D enriched milk and mar-

ESL

(English as a Second Language)

Evening ESL Classes to Improve Your Academic Reading, Writing and Speaking Skills Do you need to improve your skills to take academic courses at Yukon College? This is a 6-week program from November 4 to December 11, 2013 Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm Students need a Canadian Language Benchmark of 5 and above to qualify. For more information and to register please contact: School of Academic and Skill Development 867-668-8850 or Cathy Borsa at 867-668-5260

Timeline Lillian Loponen

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It is YAAW’s 10th Anniversary! Our own original member, the “Divine Miss Lily” is kicking off the celebrations with a melody of old and new visual tunes.

Opening Reception | Yukon Artists @ Work Gallery Friday, November 1st from 5:00 to 8:00 PM show continues to noVeMBeR 20th

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garine, and fish (salmon are a good source). Vitamin D is important for prevention of bone diseases, diabetes and other maladies. If you live at latitude farther north than about 42 degrees (Boston, Detroit, or Eugene, Oregon), the sun is too low on the horizon from November through February for your skin to produce vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health. Tallas also saw another potential Alaska limitation on the natural pathway to vitamin D production. “Most outdoor activity requires covering all but the face and hands approximately seven months of the year,” she wrote in her thesis. “During the summer months residents keep much of their bodies clothed because of the persistent and annoying mosquitoes and biting flies and because of this, an Alaskan summer

suntan becomes one of the face and hands.” But even overbundled Alaskans show signs of enhanced vitamin D production from the sun. Tallas found the highest levels of vitamin D in the Fairbanks volunteers’ blood in July, and the lowest levels in March. Tallas attributed the July high occurring about a month after summer solstice to the time needed for the body’s processing of sunlight and the conversion to vitamin D. In Tallas’ study, volunteers showed low levels of vitamin D in winter months, but most got sufficient doses of vitamin D from sources other than the sun. Tallas also found that males had an average of 16 per cent more vitamin D in their blood throughout the study, which she attributed in part to men being outside more. In charting an average for

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people’s time outside (you can’t convert sunlight to vitamin D through windows), she found December was the low point of sunlight exposure, when sun struck the skin of her volunteers for less than 20 minutes per day. People spent an average of more than two hours exposed to Alaska sunlight in June and July. They seemed to hunker down in October, when time outside in the sun dropped to about half an hour. That was after almost two hours of daily sun exposure in September. Vitamin D levels in the volunteers’ blood dropped in August, September, October, November, December, January, February, and March, but Tallas saw an occasional leap in midwinter. “When someone had gone to Hawaii, we could see, very exactly, a significant spike in their vitamin D levels,” Tallas said. “The only surprise was how it came a month or two after.” In her thesis, Tallas wrote that a midwinter trip to somewhere close to the equator would be a good thing for boosting Alaskans’ vitamin D levels. “Presuming that an individual’s lowest circulating vitamin D level in found in March or April, such trips could potentially have a very significant effect in improving late winter vitamin D status,” she wrote in her thesis. An easy alternative for Alaskans not traveling southward during the winter is eating foods rich in vitamin D or taking vitamin D supplements, Tallas said. Since the late 1970s, the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute has provided this column free in co-operation with the UAF research community. Ned Rozell is a science writer for the Geophysical Institute. A version of this column ran in 2008.


45

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Botswana’s Okavango Delta: Where the wild things really are Charmaine Noronha

American-bred fancy (I was born in is torn by a foraging giraffe, the plant Nairobi but raised in Canada), Chief emits an airborne gas, ethylene, alertbeckoned us to look to the right of ing nearby plants to increase tannin OKAVANGO DELTA, Botswana our jeep. production, which the giraffes don’t ’m jolted from sleep by a deep “Lions came through here this like. The animals then move upwind and rolling roar and what sounds morning, probably tracking the bufto dine on plants that failed to catch like the slithering paws of a large cat falo we saw yesterday. Those are their the drift. trawling through my cabin. footprints,” he said, instructing the Our exploration and biology “Oh my God, I think something’s driver to follow them. lessons were not limited to land. in our room,” I whisper, waking up We drove through the vast expanse We jumped into a boat and cruised my friend and roommate, Patricia of sun-drenched land, sprinkled down the Okavango River, where we Lawton. with acacia trees, bulbous baobab saw elephants frolicking in the water “I know,” she whispers back, add- trees and towering termite mounds, alongside their adorable offspring, ing a few expletives. steering over and through bushes. We glimpsed a hippo bobbing in and out It might sound like the start of turned a corner and spotted a pride of still water, and staked out a crocoa Maurice Sendak story, but as we of six lions sprawled in the grass, dile hoping to see its jaw snap. lay in our dreamy cabin in the great lounging in the blistering afternoon Back in the 4x4, a torrential downwilderness of Botswana’s Okavango sun in post-kill splendor. Their lolling pour suddenly lashed us without a Delta, we were truly snoozing where yawns revealed formidable fangs and moment’s notice. Chief hit the gas Charmaine Noronha/AP Photo the wild things are. hinted at the hard work that goes and it was like we were in our own Days before, when our safari into ruling such a fine kingdom. The Elephants in the Chobe National Park in Botswana. Safaris in version of Noah’s Ark meets Life of Pi began, we were told never to leave moment was pure magic, a “National this rich game-viewing destination offer up-close views of as animals whizzed past, the windelephants and many other animals, including lions, giraffes our tent at night to avoid encounters Geographic” episode come to life. swept rain making it difficult for us and hippos. with the wild things. But what if The big cats are among more to even open our eyes in the openthey came to us? For several hours, than 100 species of mammals and sided car. After hours exploring the bush, we to head to Chobe National Park, the Patricia and I lay still, so afraid to 400 species of birds that call the delta “You’re not in Canada, anymore, move that we dared not even call for home. This diversity found amid the headed back to our campsite, bathed third-largest game park in Botswana are you?” he shouted from his waterin a tepid outdoor rain shower under and one that boasts one of the largest soaked seat. help. If this creature was in our room, lily-speckled marshes, blue lagoons a sliver of a crescent moon and preconcentrations of game in Africa, inthe only thing that separated us from and picturesque woodlands make Definitely not, I thought, as water pared for a Botswanian feast of sescluding the largest herds of elephants. buffalo bolted by us. Drenched and the potential intruder was a flimsy this place, set along the banks of waa – beef stew served over thick pap, It lived up to its reputation: Just after slightly startled, though, there was no mosquito net billowing around our the Okavango River, one of Africa’s a type of maize porridge. We stuffed entering the gates into the lush terfour-poster bed. At one point it richest game-viewing destinations, place I’d rather have been than this ourselves silly and traded stories unrain, we were greeted by a journey of self-contained sanctuary where nearly sounded like an animal was dragalbeit for tourists one of the conder the stars with fellow safari-goers. giraffes munching on acacia trees that every creature I’d read about since ging our backpacks around. I cursed tinent’s pricier ones as well. Conde Tuckered out, we retreated to our dot the plains. Our guides imparted Patricia under my breath, thinking Nast Traveler magazine recognized childhood came out to play. luxury tents – with indoor plumbthis interesting fact: As a defence she had once again left the patio door the Botswana government’s efforts “Let the wild rumpus start!” I holto our cabin open – a massive no-no to conserve the Okavango’s environ- ing to boot – which we slept in every mechanism, once the acacia foliage lered back. night except the last, when we were in while lodging deep in the savannah. ment while balancing the needs of Finally I picked up the phone local people with a 2013 World Savers the cabins. A 5:30 a.m. wake-up call began beside the bed, punching in random Award for a sustainable destination another day of exploring where zenumbers since I had no directory. in a developing country. Our tour Porter Creek Secondary School bras, hyenas, water buffalo, elephants “Something is in our room, we company has also been working with need help,” I stuttered to the woman the government to reintroduce rhinos and giraffe coexist and roam free. We left the wilderness of the delta who answered. She alerted the safari into the delta. Join us for a staff on patrol. They discovered an elephant had been roaming around all night on the deck that lined the lodge perimeter, feasting on foliage shading our cabin. Saturday, November 30th • 10 am – 4 pm Drenched in sweat – not from Bo1399 Hamilton Blvd., Elijah Smith Elementary School tswana’s sweltering heat but from our Friday, November 08, 2013 • 11:00 am anxiety – Patricia and I hugged each in the school gym other and laughed, slightly embarCome on out, have some rassed that we genuinely thought we tea with bannock, and ❄ Carving support Elijah Smith were about to be a large cat’s meow. ❄ Traditional Beadwork Elementary in their That drama-filled last night of ❄ Tlingit Weaving fundraising efforts. our safari was a fitting end to what ❄ Concession had been a week of pure magic and ❄ Bannock & Tea Table bookings by donation. wonder. Contact ❄ Silent Auction We landed in Botswana zombieMelanie Bennett at 667-5992 or melanie.bennett@gov.yk.ca ❄ Raffle Baskets like but excited, after 48 hours with no sleep, traversing time zones on SponSorEd By ElijaH SmitH ElEmEntary ScHool. two back-to-back overnight flights and another four flights. The safari began as soon as we got to PomPom airport in Muan, Botswana. We jumped in a 4x4 after being greeted Contribute to the Yukon College Diversity Mural. Paint a by two guides from our safari comlittle corner. Even if you can’t paint…you can do this. pany andBeyond. Guide Kgosikebatho Marota asked that we call him This mural will feature prominently in the Chief, and guide Kutlwano Mobe said Yukon College, Ayamdigut campus for decades he goes by Kuks. to come. You’ll be able to point out your Minutes into driving deep into contribution to your friends and family. the savannah, we were shaken out of Don’t miss this chance! our bleariness by the sight of vervet Tuesday and Thursday – 2:00-6:00 pm monkeys swinging through tree tops, Wednesday – 11:00-3:00 pm herds of impalas prancing by and Until November 20 graceful woodland kingfishers with fringed, bright blue wings sweeping through the cloudless sky. As if this wasn’t enough to tickle my African-born but North PHONE: FAX: 667-2823 Associated Press

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46

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Alberta tour reveals unexpected Yukon connection HISTORY

HUNTER by Michael Gates

“I’d know you if you had your hat on!” That was the way that Bill Dunn introduced himself to me when he shook my hand outside of the Claresholm Library last week. Dunn is short and stocky, with a ruddy complexion, a smile from ear to ear, and wears the ubiquitous Stetson. Dunn is just one of the many industrious and dedicated history-lovers I met during my short visit to the province where I was born. Trisha Carleton, executive director of the Claresholm and District Museum, had jointly planned with the library to host my talk on Prairie cattle drives to the Klondike in 1898 in this small farming community, 125 kilometres south of Calgary. It was Friday afternoon, and Claresholm was the last stop on a speaking tour that took me through southern Alberta. Dunn, now 79 years old, has been on a one-man campaign to preserve the memory of the old MacLeod Trail. Once known as the “Old North Trail,” it is said

Terry Zwicker photo

The broad expanse of the autumn landscape in the southern Alberta foothills looks much like it must have when D. W. Davis made a living there as a whiskey trader, rancher and member of Parliament. Davis came to the Yukon as a customs inspector for the government in 1897.

to have been an aboriginal route from north to south, skirting the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. In early historic times, it was the main supply route for trade goods, up the Missouri River by steam boat to Fort Benton, in Montana, and then north, into what later became known as Alberta, by ox cart. In 1875, after Fort Calgary was

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established, the trail between there and Fort MacLeod, to the south, became more commonly known as the MacLeod Trail. Over the years, the trail fell into disuse, but the wagon ruts are still visible in numerous places between the two cities. In the 1980s, markers were put up along the trail to remind people of the old route, and Dunn has been restoring these and adding more. There are now 17 markers. The ones that I have seen consist of brightly painted wagon wheels set in a wooden frame, on posts, above the ground, with a sign, simply stating, “Old MacLeod Trail,” across the top. Dunn has been active in Alberta history ever since he arrived in the province in 1987. His first historical project was building a scale model of the old stockyards at Cayley, Alberta. He then helped create a historical sign to mark Cayley as the largest cattle shipping point in Western Canada. The sign went up on Highway 2A in 2001. Next, he became involved in the Bar U Ranch, a national historic site located south of Longview, where he promotes western values and the western lifestyle. He has also taken school groups on tours of Cayley, especially the Cayley

stockyards, and has talked about the MacLeod Trail. For all of this, he was awarded, in 2011, the Calgary Stampede Western Legacy Award for Innovation for sharing the “stories of the old west with his community, and mak(ing) it exciting to learn about western history.” Doug Wilson, whom I met after giving my first talk at historic Fort Calgary on Tuesday evening, is another man who is not only fascinated with Calgary history, but part of it. Four generations of Wilsons worked for Burns and Company, a historical institution in the Stampede City. He may be able to help me unravel the story of the Burns cattle drives to the Yukon, from the Alberta end of the trail. A few days later, I attended the Heritage Weekend activities at the Calgary Public Library, where Wilson showcased his informative new documentary Wings of Change: A History of Aviation in Calgary. I learned that the neighbourhood in northeast Calgary where I lived was once the site of the Calgary Airfield, before it was moved to its present location. I also learned that Wilson footed the bill for the production of this interesting piece of Alberta history from his own pocket. Donna and Terry Zwicker were my wonderful hosts during my

WORLD TOWN PLANNING DAY EVENT Putting the Possibility Back into Planning In celebration of World Town Planning Day, join the Planning Institute of BC - Yukon Chapter for a public lecture and discussion featuring Steve Frith from Urban Systems and other local speakers on how to keep the passion in community planning.

Nov. 6, 7:30-9:00 pm Baked Café (100 Main St.) For info: lcabott@urbansystems.ca

visit to Alberta, demonstrating Alberta hospitality and acting as guides as we travelled along the sun-drenched foothills of the Rocky Mountains, across a broad, treeless, sienna-tinted fall landscape, on Highway 22. Along the way we passed the historic Waldron Ranch, forests of windmills, and signs warning drivers of the strong winds that blow out of the Crowsnest Pass. The Waldron Ranch, initially formed in 1883, includes 12,357 hectares of native grasslands straddling the historic Cowboy Trail south of Calgary. In 1968, not far away in the eastern limit of the Porcupine Hills west of Claresholm, I gained my first experience in archeology, working on a dig along the banks of Willow Creek. In my first five weeks on the job, I uncovered what must have been a ton of bison bone before exposing my first artifact. Prior to my talk in Pincher Creek on Thursday night, Farley Wuth, curator of the Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village, took time to show me around the grounds of their wonderful assemblage of two dozen heritage buildings, and historic exhibits. For a small community, they have done a marvellous job of preserving their history. Farley later gave me a copy of Where the Rivers Meet, a history of the local area written by historian Barry Potyondi. Here is where my trip became interesting. I wasn’t having much luck tracking down leads to the Pat Burns cattle connection with the Klondike, but in the Potyondi book, I found reference to someone else of interest: D.W. Davis, the first member of Parliament elected to the House of Commons from Alberta back in 1887. In 1896, Davis was appointed as customs inspector in the Yukon and distinguished himself during the gold rush by maintaining order while other government officials were either overwhelmed by their duties, or corrupt. Davis remained in the Yukon after the gold rush, in a mining partnership with J.J. Rutledge on Gold Run Creek until he passed away in June of 1906. Davis was a whiskey trader in the early days of Alberta history, and was well acquainted with other Albertans with a Yukon connection, like Sam Steele of the North West Mounted Police, and John J, Healy, of old Fort WhoopUp, who established a trading post at Dyea and another at Fortymile before the Klondike was discovered. So my trip to Alberta yielded historical dividends where I hadn’t expected any, and the clear, sunny skies and warm fall weather made it all the more enjoyable. Michael Gates is a Yukon historian and sometimes adventurer based in Whitehorse. His latest book, Dalton’s Gold Rush Trail, is available in Yukon stores. You can contact him at msgates@northwestel.net


47

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Game seven, ninth inning and we are at the plate became the Cardinals played the first World ‘Championship’ by MICHAEL game west of the Mississippi DOUGHERTY River on October 15, 1885, against the National League winning Chicago White Stockings. It was the second game in their series. The first game in Chicago had been called on account of darkness back in the days well before lighted fields. It had ended in a 5 - 5 tie. he Boston Red Sox vanMy family still recalls the quished the St. Louis historic second game because Cardinals in game six on of a disputed call at first base Wednesday. With that win they during the sixth inning. Chibecame the 2013 World Series cago’s Billy Sunday, later to champions. From a last-place become a famous evangelist, finish in the American League doubled to right field and then East in the 2012 season they made it to third base on a pass climbed up to the pinnacle of ball at the plate. A bobbled baseball supremacy this year. grounder to the shortstop then The Red Sox now have an allowed Sunday to score. Howeighth World Series pennant ever the shortstop recovered in to hang. They still have a way time and threw the hitter out to go, though, to catch up with at first. the Cardinals who hold 11 Here is where family lore pennants. Of course, the Cards comes in. The umpire anticican argue that they have more. pating a play at the plate failed The World Series officially to watch first base. Though dates from 1903. However clearly out the umpire sigbaseball aficionados may nalled the runner safe at first. dispute this and count back a As Jon David Cash noted in few decades earlier. Indeed, the his 2002 book Before They American Association chamwere Cardinals: Major League Baseball in Nineteenth Century pion St. Louis Browns who

JUST

SOCIETY T

St. Louis, “Even the Chicago Tribune conceded “the ball beat Kelly to base (by) at least ten feet.” Charles Comisky, then player-manager of the Browns and later owner of the Chicago White Sox, immediately left the bench and confronted the umpire. My great-grandfather, John J. O’Neill, vice-president and part owner of the Browns as well as congressman for the Eighth Missouri Congressional District where the Browns’ home field Sportsman’s Park sat, jumped out of the stands to confront the Chicago player-manager Adrian ‘Cap’ Anson. Soon all the players from both teams joined in the wrangling. Order somehow was restored and play resumed until the frazzled umpire, appearing to favour Chicago, blew a foul ball call and then all hell broke loose with angry Browns fans flooding the field. Security personnel had to rescue the umpire. Chicago White Stocking players armed with their bats made it off the field safely. Comisky ordered his players off the diamond in protest. This act allowed the umpire to

later say that the Browns had forfeited the game. The 1885 ‘World Series’ would end in a disputed 3-3-1 tie. Chris Van der Ahe, owner of the Golden Lion Saloon a city block from Sportsman’s Park had purchased the St. Louis Browns basically to sell more beer. His saloon served also as the unofficial political headquarters for the Eighth Congressional District’s Democratic Committee which he chaired. Politics, business and professional sports mixed then as they do today. Bread and circuses or beer and baseball may draw our attention away from crucial concerns in the short run and allow the powers that be to continue profiting from our inattention. We must, however, recognize that on many fronts like the environment or growing global inequality we are indeed losing in the bottom of the ninth of our key game

seven in the real world. Can we keep our eye on the ball?

Namaste notes Saturday, November 2 – All Soul’s Day is a Christian day of prayers of remembrance and intercession for the dead. Sunday, November 3 – Thirtieth-first Sunday in Ordinary Time. A suggested reading is Luke 19:1-10. Sunday, November 3 – Diwali, the five day Hindu Festival of Lights, begins. It symbolizes the human urge to move toward the light, the good and awareness. Monday, November 4 – The Hijra when the prophet Muhammed and his followers escaped from Mecca to Medina in 622 marks the beginning of the Islamic New Year 1434. Friday, November 8 – Dorothy Day, co-founder of the Catholic Worker movement, pacifist and social activist, is born in 1897.

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Religious Organizations & Services Whitehorse United Church

Yukon Bible Fellowship

(Union of Methodist, Presbyterian & Congregational Churches) 10:30 a.m. - Sunday School & Worship Service Rev. Beverly C.S. Brazier

160 hillcrest Drive 668-5689 Sunday Service 10:00 a.m. Pre-Service Prayer 9:00 a.m. Family Worship & K.I.D.S. Church

Grace Community Church

Church Of The Nazarene

601 Main Street 667-2989

8th & Wheeler Street

Pastor Paul & Moreen Sharp 667-2134 10:30 aM FaMILY WoRShIP WeeKLY CaRe GRoUP STUDIeS Because He Cares, We Care.

The Salvation Army

311-B Black Street • 668-2327

Sunday Church Services: 11 am & 7 pm eveRYoNe WeLCoMe

Our Lady of Victory (Roman Catholic)

1607 Birch St. 633-2647

Saturday evening Mass: 7:30 p.m.

Confessions before Mass & by appointment. Monday 7:00 PM Novena Prayers & adoration Tuesday through Friday: Mass 11:30 a.m.

ALL WeLCOMe

TRINITY LUTHeRAN 4th Avenue & Strickland Street

668-4079 tlc@polarcom.com Sunday worship at 10:00 am Sunday school at 10:00 am Pastor Deborah Moroz eVeRYONe WeLCOMe!

Riverdale

Baptist Church

Canadian Baptist Ministries

15 Duke Road, Whse • 667-6620 Sunday Worship Service: 10:30 AM ReV. GReG ANDeRSON

www.rbchurch.ca

FoURSqUaRe ChURCh

PaSToR RICK TURNeR

2111 Centennial St. (Porter Creek) Sunday School & Morning Worship - 10:45 am

Call for Bible Study & Youth Group details

PaSToR NoRaYR (Norman) haJIaN

www.whitehorsenazarene.org 633-4903

First Pentecostal Church 149 Wilson Drive 668-5727

Sunday 10:00am Prayer / Sunday School 11:00 am Worship Wednesday Praise & Celebration 7:30 pm Pastor Roger Yadon

Whitehorse

Baptist Church 2060 2nD AvEnuE • 667-4889

Pastor Mark Carroll Family Worship at 11:00 am Sunday School 9:45 am

St. Nikolai Orthodox

Christian Mission

Reader Service Sundays 10:30 am 332-4171 for information

www.orthodoxwhitehorse.org

Quaker Worship Group ReLIGIoUS SoCIeTY oF FRIeNDS Meets regularly for Silent Worship. For information, call 667-4615 email: whitehorse-contact@quaker.ca

website: quaker.ca

Seventh Day Adventist Church

Rigdrol Dechen Ling,

Vajra North Buddhist Meditation Society Meditation Drop-in • Everyone Welcome!

403 Lowe Street

Mondays 5:15 to 6:15 PM

www.vajranorth.org • 667-6951

Christ Church Cathedral Anglican 4Th aveNUe & eLLIoTT STReeT

Services Sunday 8:30 aM & 10:00 aM Thursday Service 12:10 PM (with lunch) historical evening Prayer, Wed & Sun 7:00 PM, the old Log Church Museum, June 9 to aug 25.

eCKANKAR

Religion of the Light and Sound of God

For more information on monthly activities, call (867) 633-6594 or visit www.eckankar-yt.ca www.eckankar.org ALL ARe WeLCOMe.

Church of the Northern Apostles

An Anglican/episcopal Church Sunday Worship 10:00 aM

1609 Birch St. (Porter Creek) 633-5385 “We’re open Saturdays!” Worship Service 11:00 am Wednesday 7:00 pm - Prayer Meeting All are welcome.

oFFICe hoURS: Mon-Fri 9:00 aM to 12 Noon

Sacred Heart Cathedral

TAGISH Community Church

Box 31419, Whitehorse, YT Y1a 6K8 For information on regular community activities in Whitehorse contact:

www.tagishcc.com

The Church of Jesus Christ of

(Roman Catholic)

4th Avenue & Steele Street • 667-2437 Masses: Weekdays: 12:10 pm. Saturday 5 pm Sunday: 9 am - english; 10:10 am - French; 11:30 am english

Bethany Church

Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada early Service 9:00 - 10:00 am Family Service 10:30 am - Noon Filipino Service 4:00 - 5:00 pm Sunday School ages 0-12

91806 alaska highway

Ph: 668-4877 • www.bethanychurch.ca

The Temple of Set

The World’s Premier Left hand Path Religion

a not-for-prophet society. www.xeper.org

canadian affiliation information: northstarpylon@gmail.com

668-5530

Meeting First Sunday each Month Details, map and information at:

867-633-4903

Calvary Baptist

1301 FIR STReeT 633-2886

Sunday School during Service, Sept to May

THe ReV. ROB LANGMAID

45 Boxwood Crescent • Porter Creek 633-4032 • All Are Welcome

Bahá’í Faith

whitehorselsa@gmail.com

Latter Day Saints

108 WICKSTROM ROAD, WHITeHORSe

1-867-667-2353

Sunday Sacrament Service starts at 10:00 AM Sunday School at 11:00 AM and Priesthood hour will be from 12:00 to 1:00 PM

Northern Light Ministries Dale & Rena Mae McDonald Word of Faith Ministers & Teachers. check out our website!

Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor L.e. harrison 633-4089

www.northernlightministries.ca

St. Saviour’s

1154c 1st Ave • Entrance from Strickland

Regular Monthly Service: 1st and 3rd Sundays of the Month 11:00 AM • All are welcome. Rev. David Pritchard 668-5530

For further information about, and to discover Islam, please contact: Javed Muhammad (867) 332-8116 or Adil Khalik (867) 633-4078 or send an e-mail to info@yukonmuslims.ca

Anglican Church in Carcross

or call 456-7131

Yukon Muslim Association www.yukonmuslims.ca


48

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Host has no obligation to thank in-laws for visiting by Judith Martin

MISS

MANNERS

DEAR MISS MANNERS: I am one who is always on different committees, such as the retirement committee. When my grandbaby came, these same people on the committee didn’t have the decency to celebrate the new arrival with a grandma gift. What to do?

GENTLE READER: Grow up? DEAR MISS MANNERS: We have a “couple” in our neighborhood who have decided they do not want to associate with the rest of the neighborhood when it comes to BBQs,

parties, etc. Over the past year they have turned down multiple invitations. At the last event we had, another neighbor approached them to let them know we were having a party with a band. They kindly went out for the evening.

Ta’an Kwäch’än Council

Kwanlin Dün First Nation

117 Industrial Road Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2T8 Telephone: 867.668.3613 Facsimile: 867.668.3465 E-mail: nsmith@taan.ca

3 5 Mc I nt y r e D r i v e W h i t e h o r s e , Yuk o n Y1 A 5 A 5 Ph: (867) 633-7800 F ax: ( 8 6 7 ) 6 6 8 - 5 0 5 7

The Kwanlin Dün First Nation (KDFN) is seeking interested Citizens to sit on the following KDFN Committees: • 3 Citizens and 2 non-citizens for the Housing Committee • 1 Citizen for the Elijah Smith School Council • 3 Citizens for the Election Committee Please submit a completed Boards & Committees application form along with a resume for consideration. Terms of Reference for each Committee are available upon request. Application will be accepted until November 15, 2013 at 4:00pm.

Deadline For Student Assistance Program Applications.

Post-secondary: November 15th for the Winter Semester

Applications are available through the Ta’an Kwäch’än Council or TKC Website. Applications may be delivered to the address above or email: nsmith@taan.ca

Teresa Ward Senior Administration Coordinator teresa.ward@kwanlindun.com Phone: (867) 633-7878

There was some sort of incident that happened over a year ago that triggered this. I was not present, so I don’t know all the details, but it appeared to be petty. The neighbors in question have remained cordial by waving, saying hello, etc., to the rest of the neighbors — they just don’t want to go beyond that. After a year of inviting them, over and over, is it OK to finally say enough is enough and stop leaving an invitation at their door? GENTLE READER: Although Miss Manners has not heard directly from the “couple” you name, she has no trouble imagining what their question to her would be, namely, “How do we politely avoid endless, unwanted invitations from our neighbors?” It seems to her that as they probably picked up on your considering them a “couple” in quotations marks, they are behaving very well. Her advice to you is to stop. Not only will they not be offended if you stop issuing invitations, it is their most fervent wish. (Please send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, www. missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners(at)gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.)

Used Vehicles 2010 Nissan Frontier Crew Cab 4X4, auto, 59000 km .................. $21,000 2012 Nissan Versa SL, auto, 23000 km ......................................... $16,000 2009 Nissan Versa SL, auto, 64000 km ......................................... $10,000 2008 Nissan Versa SL, auto, 85000 km ............................................ $8,500 2004 Nissan Maxima, 98000 km ..................................................... $8,900 2002 Nissan Maxima, 121000 km ................................................... $6,500 2011 Nissan Juke AWD ................................................................. $24,995 2011 Nissan Quest ..........................................................................$24995 2012 Nissan Xterra Pro 4X, auto .................................................. $31,995 2012 Nissan Cube SL .................................................................... $19,995 2012 Nissan Sentra 2.0 S, 6 spd. manual...................................... $17,995 2261 Second Avenue Call Lee at 668-4436 Monday to Friday 9 am to 5:30 pm Sales OPEN Saturday 10 am to 2 pm For service on all makes call 667-4435

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49

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Business&Professional D I R E C T O R Y

mackay.ca

MacKay LLP *chartered accountants* Suite 200 - 303 Strickland (upstairs) Whitehorse, Y.T., 667-7651

ROLFING

®

Reg. Massage Therapist NORMAN HOLLER Certified Advanced Rolfer 804 Black St., • Whitehorse • 333-1492 • abraxas@klondiker.com BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

MARILYN SMITH, (867) 633-2476

lorraine stick

M.A. Licensed Psychologist

owner t. 867 633.3177 f. 867 633.3176 c. 867 333.0579 a. 124 -1116 1st avenue, whitehorse, yukon Y1A 1A3 w. www.climateclothing.ca | e.lorraine@climateclothing.ca

PERSONAL COUNSELLING • CONFIDENTIALITY ENSURED

MP COMPUTING

*computerized accounting service* Suite 200 – 303 Strickland (upstairs), Whitehorse, Y.T. 667-7651

Hellaby Hall Organizations & businesses:

$100 morning, afternoon, evening $250 all day kitchen available $75 extra 4TH & ELLIOTT

We have a medium-sized hall available.

Celtic Harp Counselling holistic mental health nursing services

Sean Hopkins RN BHScN CPMHN(C) Whitehorse: (867) 668 CELT (2358) Toll Free: 1 (877) 668 CELT (2358)

Individual Sessions Workshops Group Classes

Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionerTM Tellington Touch Equine Practitioner

Get yourself moving in new ways - with ease, comfort, reduced pain, and more strength! www.flowingmotion.ca 633-3154 Suite 4A, 403 Lowe Street

24 hours a day 365 days a year

867-335-3698

Bonded Residential and Commercial Alarm Response

n

co Your Health Bea

Kim Beacon

Holistic Health Coach, AADP

Food sensitivities / weight / fatigue / cravings / stress One-on-one coaching, workshops and more.

867.333.9001 Free health strategy session!

www.yourhealthbeacon

Raw Food Classes & ayuRveda CouRses massage therapy • colon hydrotherapy • nutritional consultation www.alpineayurveda.com 867-667-6067

.co

Leslie Knight Conversations MSW, RSW (B.C.) Counselling 334-6246 303 Hawkins Street Consultation Whitehorse, YT

Janice Millington,

Carpet • Upholstery • Tile/Grout • Residential & Commercial/Industrial Fire & Flood • Restoration • Mould Remediation

C ounsellor

Phone: (867) 668-5702 | www.carpetcleanyukon.com

Gray Management Services Residential & Condo management Professional, Efficient, Affordable

GrayManagementServices.com

Counsellor Elemental Holistic Therapies

www.elementalholistictherapies.ca 867.335.0078 • #203 – 107 Main Street

Sharon Moore,

M.Ed.

Canadian Certified Counsellor

867.334.5090

smfmoore@gmail.com

Body/Mind Healing for You and Your Animal Friends Hand & Foot Reflexology Quantum Touch® Energy Healing Distance Healing • Animal Bodywork • Workshops.

Alison Zeidler, RCRT, QTP/I, CEMT

Ms. Shawn Verrier, RMT Hands On Bodywork for Body Ease

 Massage  CranioSacral Therapy  Energy Body Aligning Sessions Available! 668-7029 403 Lowe Street

Counselling for Personal Growth & Healing

(867) 668-3440

867-456-7123

TO A DV E RT I S E I N T H E BU S I N E S S D I R E C TO RY, C A L L c r e e d AT 6 6 7 - 6 2 8 3 , E x t. # 2 1 5

(867) 333-0005

Margaret Nefstead M.A., R.C.C.

Nov 4 - 29 Mornings 6:15 - 7:45am Evenings 6:00 - 7:30pm www.sabuyoga.com

Shanti Yoga 303 Hawkins St.

(867) 456-4151 www.janicemillington.com

carpets clean enough TO LIVE ON

YOGA Intensives with sabu @

Salivary Hormone Testing and Balancing

Naturopathic Doctor

Call 668-5530 for bookings

Violet van Hees

Alpine Ayurveda

5A - 403 Lowe Street, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 1W7

WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

Trying to find a great local deal?

You can find all the display ads in this newspaper online at our website:

www.yukon-news.com

Just click on the MarkeTplace Tab and all the ads will be sorted and categorized for easy viewing. Hassle free shopping, so you can find what you need fast!


50

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

SPORTS AND

RECREATION

Whitehorse’s Harrison leads Vikes in postseason Tom Patrick News Reporter

T

he University of Victoria Vikes are a win away from a secondstraight trip to the CIS nationals and Whitehorse’s Jackie Harrison is a big part of the team’s success. The Vikes women’s soccer team began the Canada West playoffs with a 5-1 win over the University of Regina Cougars last Friday in Victoria. Midfielder Harrison scored two goals, including the game-winner on a penalty shot, in the match. “We played very well against Regina last Friday, primarily due to our high defensive pressure all over the pitch,” said Harrison in an email to the News. “We were able to win the ball in their end a lot, which gave us many opportunities to generate successful offensive plays. Our defensive line also played particularly strong that game and really controlled the pace of the game through accurate passing and possession.” The win over Regina puts the Vikes at an 11-2 season record. Harrison leads her team with seven goals this season, “but we are a well-rounded team with a number of high-scoring players from multiple positions,” said Harrison, who is one of three captains on the roster. “I think we have had such a successful season because we have a lot of experience on our team,” added the fifth-year player. “We have many fifth-, forth- and third-year players in our line-up and so that experience has really helped us succeed this season. In turn, we also have signed some very skillful rookies

Armando Tura/Yukon News

University of Victoria Vikes captain Jackie Harrison competes against the University of Regina Cougars in Victoria last week. Harrison scored two goals in the 5-1 win over Regina. this year that have added some key energy to our roster.” The Vikes are set to faceoff with the Trinity Western University Spartans on Friday in Victoria. A win for the Vikes would put

the team in the Canada West finals and provide a berth to the CIS Women’s Soccer Championship in Toronto. The Vikes defeated the Spartans 2-1 in the two teams’ one encounter

this season on Sept. 13 in Langley. “My team is feeling positive and ready to battle for Friday’s game, and it will be nice to play in front of our home crowd,” said Harrison. The Vikes finished third in

Canada last season, took second in the Canada West conference playoffs and Harrison was named a Canada West All-Star last season. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com

Yukon runner cracks top-20 at B.C. XC championship Tom Patrick

this was kind of a cross-country racing tune-up to get into it,” said Roots. “Now it’s buckling hitehorse runner Logan down for the nationals at the end Roots just keeps getting of November. faster and faster. “I didn’t really have any goals The 20-year-old placed 16th going into it. I just wanted to run at the British Columbia Cross hard and see how I placed. I was Country Championships in the happy with how it turned out.” open division (men 20-34) in Roots, who was the only Abbotsford on Saturday. Yukon runner at the event, com“My time this year was faster, peted for Prairie Inn Harriers which was definitely a good thing Running Club in Victoria. to see,” said Roots. “It’s a club I’ve been with for Roots completed the 10-kiloa couple years down in Victoria, metre course with a time of training and racing for,” said 33:43.52, less than three minutes Roots. “It’s great because the club behind the winner. pays for your entry and travel He placed 25th in the same and stuff. You get quite a few category, on the same course, costs covered.” with a time of 36:05.57 at last After nationals Roots intends year’s championship. to “just keep running hard,” he “My goal now is nationals, said. “All the other races will be which is on November 30, so in the spring, so there’ll be trainNews Reporter

W

Sandy Wilcox Pilgrim/Yukon News

Whitehorse’s Logan Roots races in the B.C. Cross Country Championships in Abbotsford on Saturday. Roots finished 16th in the Open Men’s 10-kilometre division.

ing season and then in January, February there’ll be road races again.”

Roots finished 12th overall and was third for men 20-24 in the half-distance of the Victoria

Marathon on Vancouver Island in the middle of October. He finished with a personal best time of 1:12:59, 54 seconds faster than his time from last year that set the 19-and-under record. Roots represented Yukon at the Canada Summer Games in August where he became the first Yukoner to make a final at the Canada Games in at least 20 years – maybe ever. (Previous records were not available.) He made the A final in the 1,500-metre race, setting a personal best time of 3:59.95 to place 11th overall out of 22 runners. Roots plans to compete in the Vancouver Island Race Series in the spring. He won his age group in the series the last three years. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


51

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Two Dawson teams make final at invitational our big right-side Max Clarke. Max absolutely took over.” On the girls side of the tournament the Vanier Crusaders defeated the Porter Creek Rams 25-14, 25-14 in the junior girls final. The Rams evened the score in the senior girls final with the Rams topping the Crusaders 2125, 25-13, 15-6. “I think the first set was a little bit of nerves and excitement and everything, so we just had to get that out,” said senior Rams head coach Amy Palamar.

Tom Patrick News Reporter

I

t had been a while since Dawson City volleyball fans got to cheer for a home team in a final at the Dawson Invitational Volleyball Tournament. They had a lot to cheer about on Saturday at the 35th annual event. Not one, but two Knights teams from Dawson’s Robert Service School made finals. It was the first time a Knights team pulled off the feat since 2006 when the Porter Creek Rams defeated the Knights in the junior girls final. “That was definitely the story of the tournament – Dawson making two finals,” said F.H. Collins Warriors senior boys coach Shaun McLoughlin. “I was getting ready for a hostile crowd.” Robert Service Knights reached the junior boys final and the senior boys final where they fell to Whitehorse schools. The Knights lost 25-19, 2225, 15-10 to Whitehorse’s Vanier Crusaders in the junior boys final. “Every tournament we play, we start a little rusty and then we gradually build our confidence and we gradually get a little stronger every game,” said Knights coach Steve Laszlo. The Knights squeaked into the final with a tough semifinal match against the F.H. Collins Warriors. Dawson dropped the second set 30-28 but took the third 15-13 to reach to the final. “Zack Bartholomeus, he was the setter for our team, and he really stood out,” said Laszlo. “He was setting all weekend and he made some big blocks at the net – at some key situations.” The junior Knights are an experienced team. The team – give or take a player – competed at the Canada West Open as Dawson City’s 14 Below in Abbotsford, B.C., this past May. The team took three wins in Tier 3 and reached the semifinal. Last school season the Knights, then a Grade 8 team, played up in the Grade 9/10 boys division of the Yukon Volleyball Championships, winning silver with just seven players. The team also won the Grade 8 division the previous year while still a Grade 7 team. The senior boy Knights lost 25-15, 25-15 to the F.H. Collins Warriors in the senior boys final. The Knights did take a set off the Warriors during the roundrobin play of the tournament. “They played really well,” said McLoughlin. “They’ve done a great job with that program up there in the last four, five years since I’ve been going up there. “They’re getting people involved in volleyball and you’re starting to see the results now. “Dawson stayed close to us at the beginning of the first set, but once again our outside hitters, Max Clarke and Kyle Wallace,

“Then we were able to come back and play our game.” “My entire team came and played excellent this weekend,” she added. “I can’t say one outshined the rest.” Porter Creek’s senior girls and F.H. Collins’ senior boys are the only two teams currently undefeated in the Whitehorse high school Super Volley league. Both teams also won the senior divisions at last year’s Dawson invitational. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com

The Yukon Crafts Society Presents

CHRISTMAS SPRUCE BOG CRAFT & GIFT SALE

Saturday, Nov.16, 2013 Canada Games Centre 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Open at 10:15 for Seniors (60+) and persons with mobility difficulties Draw for Fabulous Gift Baskets! Special Basket Draw for Kids! www.sprucebog.com Victoria Holmes/Yukon News

Robert Service School competes against F.H. Collins in the senior boys final at the Dawson Invitational Volleyball Tournament on Saturday in Dawson.

started taking over.” The Warriors reached the final with straight-set win over the Porter Creek Rams in the semi. The Rams jumped out to an 18-7 lead in the first set before the Warriors found their footing. “I pulled my setter off – Benjamin Grundmanis – and had

a little chat for with him for a couple points and sent him back out there,” said McLoughlin. “He ended up going back to serve and he served, I think, 13 in a row. “It was a huge turnaround. He did really well serving and at the same time I made sure he was setting every single ball to

Quality used tires

Wide Selection of Quality uSed tireS Seasonal Change-over Certified Vehicle Inspection

open Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon 11 PoPlar rd. (Porter Creek IndustrIal Park) (867) 334-4608

For the Sake of the Children Yukon Convention Bureau presents

The 10th Annual

RED CARPET TOUR Join us! Wednesday, November 20th, 2013 for our Red Carpet Tour

Learn more about facilities available for holding meetings & events in Whitehorse and/or

Thursday, November 21st, 2013 for our Red Carpet Tour Day 2 Learn more about pre-post and spousal programs & visit tour operators

*Transportation and Lunch included on both days Attendance Fee: Day 1 - $50 per person Day 2 - $30 person Join us for Day 1 and Day 2 for a reduced fee of $75 per person Sign up now, space is limited. RSVP by November 15th, 2013 to alida@ycb.ca or call 332-7232

www.meetingsyukon.ca 1.877.660.3555

Free Workshops for Separated Or Divorced Parents Wednesday, November 13, 2013 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. Lucy Jackson Training Room Yukon Employees Union Building (back entrance, beside Fountain Tire) 2285 – 2nd Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon This workshop is mandatory for parents in proceedings involving a claim for child custody, access or child support in Yukon Supreme Court For the Sake of the Children is a 3 hour information session that covers the following topics: • Resolving the legal issues • Relating to the other parent • Effects of separation/divorce on adults and children Certificates are issued upon completion of workshop and presentation of identification. For registration or further information, please contact Family Law Information Centre (FLIC), 2134 – 2nd Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon Phone: 867-456-6721 Toll Free 1-800-661-0408 local 6721 E-mail: FLIC@gov.yk.ca

Justice

(Funded with the Financial support oF department oF Justice canada)


52

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Phil Hoffman/Yukon News

Whitehorse Rapids speedskaters Michael Ritchie, #13, and Micah Taggart-Cox skate in the Medicine Hat Alberta Open Single Distance Championships over the weekend in Alberta. See www.yukon-news.com for full story.

Koltun, Scoffin rinks looking for their groove Tom Patrick News Reporter

W

hitehorse curling skips Sarah Koltun and Thomas Scoffin know they have good teams and are confident they can qualify for the junior nationals.

They simply want a few more check marks in their win columns. Koltun and Scoffin both hinted that their teams are still congealing following their performances at the 2013 Whitney Field Junior Curling Classic over the

VUNTUT GWITCHIN FIRST NATION Notice to all Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation

Post-secondary Students:

weekend in Lloydminster, Alta. “I think it was a good learning experience,” said Koltun. “Obviously we didn’t perform as well as we had hoped to because we had hoped to do a little bit better than that.” “We didn’t get the results we wanted this past weekend in Lloydminster,” said Scoffin. “But we’re feeling good, had some really strong games there and improved on things we had set our goals to improve on.

HOCKEY Complete equipment

The deadline for receiving applications for student assistance for all students who will be attending post-secondary institutions for the fall term is November 15, 2013 at 4:00 PM. Any late applications will be deferred to next term. For applications, please contact the

Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Education Department, Box 94, Old Crow, Yukon Y0B 1N0 (867) 966-3261

Skate Sharpening you can trust

305 Main St. 668-6848 The Hougen Centre, Whitehorse, Yukon

/SportslifeYukon

“In that respect we’re looking good. But there’s a lot more room to improve.” At the Alberta Junior Curling Tour event, Team Scoffin, who won the event last year, was knocked out in the semifinal by Alberta’s Team Lautner. Team Koltun went 1-3 and missed the playoff. The team, which includes Andrea Sinclair, Patty Wallingham and Jenna Duncan, was eliminated with a 6-5 loss to Manitoba’s Team MacKay. “In that qualifying game we were at a point where you win or you’re knocked out,” said Koltun. “We went into an extra end and she had to make a nice shot to win. We played a really strong extra end, but sometimes you can’t stop them from making their shot.” Scoffin is beginning his second season with the University of Alberta Junior Golden Bears team. The rink has undergone a facelift with two new curlers coming on board. Joining Scoffin is returning player Dylan Gosseau, plus new teammates Jaques Bellamy and lead Andrew O’Dell.

Team Scoffin won silver at the Canadian Junior Curling Championship last season. “We have our sights set on the junior nationals for sure,” said Scoffin. “It’s never easy in Alberta to win the provincials, but that’s our goal and we want to get back there and finish off the business that was left last year.” Koltun also has big plans. She hopes to take her junior rink to the junior nationals and her senior rink – swapping Jenna Duncan for sister Chelsea Duncan – to the Scotties Tournament of Hearts in January. If successful, Team Koltun will be the first Yukon rink to compete at the Scotties since Whitehorse’s Team Hatton in 2000. Koltun’s junior team is currently in Ottawa where they will compete at the OVCA Junior SuperSpiel this weekend. “We know we can perform better than we have been, so we’ve been working through some things and are drawing as many rocks as we can,” said Koltun. “We’re just trying to get some things sorted out.” Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


53

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

COMICS ADAM

O P E L

DILBERT

B A M A

A R N O

E N G C O M G L E A N O C H R E

C L A U S

H A R M S

S O L O S

E X A C T

A O R T A

M I S S J A P A N N Y P D O D D S O N

A S H E X C O R D O U N S I E L S S D O B I E D R L O O N V E T O

T O H E L E N I L S A L Y E E R I N

Kakuro

Sudoku

H O R N E F I N E T U N E S O R A L S

A W N A D S A G B O B O D R C U A C T S E C H E R B E D A V Y Y N B A T U S U S T S I Y S E L S E T

M E R R I E R R E L Y A N K S F T C

O N E A L S

T R I P S

T O N E

O N E L I B T C A R D A T E E T K A T E E M O N A D E A R D L A T A N A S S S H S T I A L A R R U I T E R R A P E

C L E E A X N U S R B O S P E D R N I T E E P L E L R S A F L L I A E

L A R V A

A I L E Y

P R E S S

T O R S O

S K I M P

E S T E S

E M I L

M E D T S A C

N I B S

N E R O

A S A P

Answers to Friday’s New York Times Crossword puzzle.

By The Mepham Group

Level: Moderate

By The Mepham Group Level: 1

2

3

4

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday’s puzzle

Solution to Friday’s puzzle

© 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

No digit can be repeated in a solution, so a 4 can only produce 1 and 3, never 2 and 2. Solution published tomorrow. 11/9/13

11/9/13

To solve Kakuro, you must enter a number between 1 and 9 in the empty squares. The clues are the numbers in the white circles that give the sum of the solution numbers: above the line are across clues and below the line are down clues. Thus, a clue of 3 will produce a solution of 2 and 1 and a 5 will produce 4 and 1, or 2 and 3, but, of course, which squares they go in will depend on the solution of a clue in the other direction.

© 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.


54

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 20139

COMICS

DEAR MARGO

BOUND AND GAGGED

Dear Margo: I have been in a three-year relationship and am struggling to let it go. Everything inside of me tells me he is the one I have waited for all of my life. I am 30 and have never had a healthy relationship, so maybe I did it again. He’s a few years older than I, so I assumed he was ready to settle down, but six months into the relationship he started to believe I was being unfaithful. I truly never was. We worked that out (or so I thought) and ended up having a son together. Recently he left again, and I am lost. It has been almost four months, and I can’t seem to shut down my feelings for this man. He put a wiretap on my phone to prove that I was cheating on him, accused me of sneaking out at night, etc. I told him that maybe counseling was an idea, but he says psychiatrists are the ones who make people crazy. He says he has a recording of my infidelity, but that’s impossible, since it never happened. He is the one now out sleeping with assorted women and still accusing me. How do I convince this man how wrong he is? If that’s not possible, how can I stop waiting for him to come home? — Truly Innocent Dear Tru: For you to wish for his return is both neurotic and masochistic. Consider his departure a gift from the gods. Loath as I am to guess at medical diagnoses, the word “paranoid” does come to mind. Also “projecting,” since he seems to be the one chasing around. Regarding a wiretap, this is likely more made-up nonsense. As to your question about how to convince him he is wrong, it would be impossible, so give up on that one. I urge you to try and understand that you were shot full of luck to have him walk out of your life, and that you surely could not have “waited all of your life” for a suspicious and punishing man. And, oh, nail down the child support, for which he is responsible. — Margo, fortuitously

T h e N e w Yo r k T i m e s M a g a z i n e C r o s s w o r d P u z z l e No. 1103 STOLEN PRODUCE By Andy Kravis and Victor Barocas / Edited by Will Shortz

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1 Winner of the 2005 and 2007 Gramm ys for B es t Spoken Word Album 6 R elief for the s nowbound 10 Seal words

15 Put one’s hands together

19 Setting for Henry J ames ’s “The American”

20 Actres s C haplin of “Game of Thrones” 21 C ompany whos e logo was , appropriately, crooked

22 B urrow, perhaps

23 Many s ervice dogs, after 29-Acros s ? 25 R oi’s wife

26 ___ Stanley Gardner

27 French colony un t i l 1953 28 The Warrior Princes s

RELEASE DATE: 11/10/2013

29 They get s tuffed at Greek res taurant s 31 R apper with the 2013 No. 1 album “B orn Sinner” 33 Sees red

34 Eighty-s ixes

40 S e r i ous br e a k, a f t e r 48- A c r oss? 42 A ut hor John D i c kson ___

43 M a o ___- t ung 46 H a r ve st s

47 “ I don’t know w hy ___ t hi s w a y” 48 S c he dul e pl a nne r s 50 Ye a r s, f or Ci c e r o 51 O n t he q. t .

53 S a i l e xt e nde r

54 S he , ove r se a s

56 G r e e k godde ss of w i t c hc r a f t

59 S a l i nge r t i t l e gi r l

60 L e ge nda r y S c ot t i sh sw i m m e r, a f t e r 66A c r oss? 66 Ta r t t r e a t s

68 P ot t e r ’s ba se

69 P a i nt e d c r ude l y 71 G ul f of ___

72 M a r x w i t hout m uc h t o sa y 74 Cr ui se r r e pa i r si t e 77 L i st c om pone nt

81 Ci r c us f ounde r s, a f t e r 89- A c r oss? 84 “ T he L i on K i ng” l i one ss 85 O ve r f l ow e d

87 S w e l l e d he a d?

35 Foil us er ’s words

88 I c e c r e a m br a nd

39 A/C meas ures

91 S hi e l d bor de r

38 Fores hadows

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

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92 M a st odon f e a t ur e s 93 Cl obbe r

94 Je t S ki c om pe t i t or

97 F or c e s f r om off i c e 98 Be gi ns t o w a ke

99 Whe re Marg aret T hat ch er s t u d i ed c he m i s t ry, aft er 108 -Acro s s ? 101 Wi n g l i k e

102 “ T he Ki n g an d I” r ol e

106 U l ri ch o f Met al l i ca 107 O bl i t erat e

108 S ho rt -l i v ed p es t s … or an al t ern at i v e t i t l e fo r t h i s p u zzl e 110 P r efi x wi t h ge nari an

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5 S m okes t ack emi s s i o n 6 P oe po em

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8 A l l t h at _ _ _ b ag o f c hi ps

9 S e c on d wo rd o f “A Ta l e o f Two Ci t i es ” 10 “ T he mo re t h e _ _ _ ” 11 N . B. A.’s Sh aq u i l l e a nd J ermai n e 12 P sych ed el i c e xperi en ces

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6 4 Man y a co l l ect o r ’s res o u rce

6 5 Preach er, fo r s h o rt 6 7 Fo u rt h -l o n g es t ri v er o f Eu ro p e

7 0 Po werfu l l i n e 7 3 Pu ck ’s mas t er 7 5 “Ov er Th ere” s o l d i ers

7 6 Wo rd o f wo e 7 8 Do es wh at Geo rg e Was h i n g t o n co u l d n ’t ?

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unaccom panied

95 P erfect 96 Vessel with an arch 97 S om e exam s 98 Drink loudly

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105 Quickly, quickly 108 Org. “protecting Am erica’s consum ers” 109 M arco R ubio’s hom e: Abbr.


55

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

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DEADLINES

FREE CLASSIFIED

3 PM MONDAY for Wednesday 3 PM WEDNESDAY for Friday

30 Words FREE in 4 issues

HOUSE HUNTERS

60

BUSINESS & PERSONALS

$ + GST picture & text in 1x3 ad any 3 issues within a 3 week period.

30 Words

6+gst per issue/$9+gst boxed & bolded 30+gst per month $ 45+gst per month boxed & bolded $ $

www.yukon-news.com • 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2E4 • Phone: (867) 667-6285 • Fax: (867) 668-3755 For Rent ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com

DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE •Shared space with Cambio Consulting •Access to boardroom, coffee bar •See Kijiji ad ID 466620854 and Borealist 335-3499 Available Now Newly renovated OFFICE SPACE & RETAIL SPACE Close to Library & City Hall A short walk to Main Street Phone 633-6396

FOX LAKE Great, cozy cabin for your next getaway Soak in the wonderful scenery and lose yourself in serenity Completely furnished and equipped Located 40 minutes from Whitehorse Beautiful trails at your door for hiking, skiing, bicycling Good lake for fishing Accommodates 2-6 people Call for rate, 633-2156 3-BDRM. APT, P.C., close to school & Super A, nice & clean. No dogs. $1,100/mon. 332-8801

HOBAH APARTMENTS: Clean, spacious, walking distance downtown, security entrance, laundry room, plug-ins, rent includes heat & hot water, no pets. References required. 668-2005

RENDEZVOUS PLAZA on Lewes Blvd, Riverdale Lots of parking 1,100 sq ft (previously flower shop, studio) 7,000 sq ft (previously Frazerʼs) Call 667-7370

WEEKEND GET AWAY Rustic Cabin-45 minutes from town Hiking Trails in the summer Skiing in the winter Includes sauna. Reasonable rates. Rent out by the week or for a weekend. 867-821-4443

RIVERDALE 3-BDRM main floor suite. N/S, N/P, 1yr lease. $1,500/mon + utils + sec deposit. Refs reqʼd. 667-2452

CABIN FOR rent in Judas Creek (Marsh Lake), lake view, sunny Hill, with outhouse, wood heat. $450/mon. plus power. 660-4813

3-BDRM DUPLEX in Riverdale. Available Dec. 1, 1.5 baths, washer, dryer, fridge & stove. Heat inclʼd, N/S. Refs reqʼd. $1,375/mon. 334-4431

3-BDRM TOP floor of house, Riverdale, avail Nov 1st, c/w laundry, heat, electric, tv and internet. N/S, no parties. $1,575/mon. 333-9000

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE For Rent Location: 129 Copper Road. Approx. 850 sq ft.   $500 per month includes utilities. Call 667-2614 ask for Brenda or Michelle or Email: totalfire@northwestel.net

2 BDRM with den, Porter Creek. Quiet upper level, very bright, 3 appliances, coin laundry on premises.  N/S, N/P, no pets. Refs & dd required. $1,250/mon. + utils. 334-9402

SKYLINE APTS: 2-bdrm apartments, Riverdale. Parking & laundry facilities. 667-6958 $575, $775, $900, ROOMS. BACHELORS. 1-BDRMS. Clean, bright, furnished, all utilities incl, laundry facilities. Close to college & downtown. Bus stop, security doors. Live-in manager. 667-4576 or Email: barracksapt@hotmail.com ARE YOU New to Whitehorse? Pick up a free Welcome to Whitehorse package at The Smith House, 3128-3rd Ave. Information on transit, recreation programs, waste collection & diversion. 668-8629 3-BDRM, 2 bath house, Crestview, avail Dec. 1.  Fully fenced yard, small dogs welcome. $1,800/mon + utils. DD&refs reqʼd. 334-5949. ROOM FOR rent in shared Hillcrest duplex, recently renovated, responsible tenant. $625/mon incl utils & wireless internet. DD reqʼd, N/S. 334-5032 RIVERDALE: FURNISHED room, N/S, N/P, no drinking, clean, quiet home, serious inquiries only, $600/mon. 667-2452 3-BDRM, 2-BATH DUPLEX in Crestview 6 appliances Large lot with mountain view No smoking, No pets,1 year lease Damage deposit required $1,700/mon + utilities 633-4106 HAINES, ASLASKA! Swan View Rental Cabins Right on the lake! 50 kms north of Haines, Alaska. www.tourhaines.com/lodging Ask about our special rates for Yukoners. (907)766-3576 1-BDRM APT in Porter Creek, close to Super A & bus stop, no dogs, $900/mon. 332-8801 2-BDRM NEW apt in Riverdale, avail immed, N/S, N/P, no parties, includes heat, hot water, lights, responsible tenant, $1,500/mon. 668-5558

NEWER 1,200 sq ft shop/studio/office in Marwell area lots of natural light, in-slab heat with Veisman boiler, bathroom and small kitchen, $1,500/mon. See kijiji AD ID 510028138 or call 668-3408 CABIN, 2 bdrm. incl. elec., phone, Internet, no water. N/S, N/P. Refs. & dd required. $800/mon. 660-5545 SMALL SPACE in the Sportees building, just under 300 sq ft.  Stop in to Sportees 6098 6th Ave. or call Andrea 668-2691 RIVERDALE CONDO for rent. 3 bedrooms. 1 & 1/2 bath. Non-smoking. Quiet neighbourhood. $1,600. plus utilities. Yukonnights@gmail.com CHARMING 3-BDRM. country residential, 35 mins. south of downtown Whitehorse. Wood stove, W/D, hardwood floors, storage space, views, pet friendly. $1,300/mon. incl. utils. 334-8271 CABIN FOR rent in Judas Creek (Marsh Lake), lake view, sunny hill, with outhouse, wood heat. 450/mon. + power. 660-4813 FULLY FURNISHED 1 bdrm. suite, Valleyview, incl. dishes and linens.  Private entrance, parking, appliances and laundry. Max 2 people. N/P.  Avail Dec 1st. $1,350/month + elec.   633-4778.

2 BDRM. house at  Deep Creek, Lake Laberge. Washer/dryer. Waterfront. Oil and electric heat.  $1,000.00 a month plus utils. 30 minutes from town. Pets considered. 332-4835

PRIVATE, 3 bedroom bungalow, 1 bath, in Marwell area. Smokers and/or pets welcome. Partially fenced back yard. Prefer long term lease. Available immed. $1,600/mon. + util. 333-0709 or kelsax@hotmail.com ONE BDRM. apt., Porter Creek. Clean, quite building, close to bus stop, looking for long term tenants.  $975 + utilities and sec deposit. 334-9402

BACHELOR APT., downtown, avail. Dec. 1, $900/mon. 668-5558

ROOM FOR rent, N/S, N/P, avail. Dec. 1. $750/mon. all incl. 393-2275

1-BDRM. COPPER Ridge, walkout basement suite, N/S, N/P, ref. reqʼd. $1,000/ mon. +utils + dd. 393-3823 BACHELOR APT. 15 mins from d/t, above ground, small deck, cable & utils inc, close to bus stop. N/S, N/P. $900/mon. 333-0497 2-BDRM SUITE, PC, ground level, sep. entry, c/w laundry & plug-in parking,, N/S, N/P, no pets. $1,200/mon. + utils. 335-2636

1-BDRM SUITE in Porter Creek, full bath, in-suite laundry, attached greenhouse, on bus route. $795/mon + utils, N/S, avail Nov 1. 604-595-4895 or suites@auroramusic.ca. FURNISHED ROOM D/T, responsible female tenant, refs. reqʼd. N/S, N/P, kitchen/laundry use, heat & cable. $620/mon. 668-5185 day, 667-7840 eve. & wknd. 1-BDRM BRIGHT basement suite PC, responsible tenants, N/S, no parties, avail Nov. 1. $950/mon. 633-2046 2  BEDROOM + den apt. in Porter Creek tri-plex incl. w/d, N/S, no pets, energy efficient bldg. Refʼs reqʼd. $1,350/mon. + utils, $1/350 dd. 633-5916

for rent for rent Approx. 900 sq ft

Approx. 1650 sq ft

of high-end rental space with fantastic view available immediately. Elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, large windows, lots of natural light.

of high-end rental space available immediately. Independent HVAC system, elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, move-in ready.

2-BDRM MAIN flr suite, redec, new floors/kit/appl & htng system, carport, partly furn, responsible tenants. Refs. reqʼd. N/S, dog ok.  $1,600/mon. & utils & dep. 334-9351 or 334-2747

Horwood’s Mall

Brand new storage Bay

2-BDRM. HOUSE in Copper Ridge, ensuite, laundry & all appl, carport + RV prkg, resp tenants/refs, N/S, avail Nov 1, $1,650/mon +util. & dep, 334-9351 or 393-2747

Office Spaces Available

3-BDRM, 2-BATH, upper level in Copper Ridge, bright, clean, N/S, no parties. Avail. Nov. 1. $1,700/mon. 335-6410 LARGE 1-BDRM suite, furnished, main floor of house, avail. Nov 1. Separate entrance, small desk, w/d, heat, electricity incl. Ref required, dd,, N/P, no parties, $1,300/mon. 668-4966 BACHELOR SUITE, downtown, furnished, no pets, avail. Nov. 1. $900/mon. all incl. 668-4321

Office Space fOr LeaSe

D/T LEGAL suite, secure access, parking, all included, can be furnished. N/P, N/D, no parties. $1,100. Avail. Nov. 1. 336-0112 for appt.

FURNISHED BEDROOM for one person in new home in Ingrid SD, incl. heat , elec, access to kitchen, bathroom, w/d, TV/internet. N/S, no pets, dd reqʼd. $700/mon. 334-3186

2-BDRM DUPLEX D/T, newly renovated, yard, laundry machines, bright, quiet, clean, pets negotiable. $1,350/mon. + utils. 335-3973

Please call Kevin at 334-6575 for more information.

ROOMMATE WANTED, Granger area. 1 bdrm., private bathroom, shared kitchen & laundry, parking. DD reqʼd. N/S, N/P. Avail. Nov. 1. $200/mon., utilities incl. 335-1786

MARSH LAKE, Avail immediately,newly renovated 3-bdrm, 2-bath log house on private acre. washer & dryer. N/S, $1,200/mon + elec & DD. (250) 864-4499

ROOM, LARGE 12x24 in Porter Creek, private entrance. Avail. Nov. 1. $750/mon. + dd. 668-7213

2-BDRM, BRIGHT basement suite PC, N/S, no partying, responsible tenants. $1,050/mon., avail Nov. 1. 633-2046

Please call Kevin at 334-6575 for more information.

2-BDRM, 2-BATH condo, Waterfront bldg across from SS Klondike, wonderful views. $1,600/mon. 668-7090

1-BDRM APT downtown, available Oct 1, fully furnished, utils inclʼd, responsible tenant, N/P, $950/mon. 668-5558

HOT SPRINGS Road, 2-bdrm cottage, c/w oil heat, water delivery, power, $1,000 + utils. 633-6178

1-BDRM CONDO d/t, bright, on 2nd floor, newer bldg., N/S, N/P, $1,200 + utils, avail Dec. 1. 393-3924

RENT ONE of our cozy cabins with sauna for a weekend getaway. Relax and enjoy the winter wonderland on the S. Canol Road. 332- 3824 or info@breathofwilderness.com.

CABIN FOR rent, Fox Lake. Nicely furnished, incl. small fridge, wood stove. 40 mins. from town. $450/mon. 633-2156

MAIN ST. 2 Bdrm. 1 bath apt. c/w appliances on greenbelt. Available Nov. 1, 2013 References req'd.  $1,575.00/m + utilities.  1st + security. 667-7462 Email nsevergreenoffice@gmail.com.

2-BDRM. UNIT in Granger, self contained, above  ground, c/w separate entrance, laundry, gas fireplace, bright, responsible tenant(s), refs. & dd required. $1,250/mon. utils incl. 332-4426

Above Starbuck’s on Main St. Nice clean, professional building, good natural light. 544 sq.ft. (can be leased as one office or can be split into two smaller spaces). Competitive lease rates offered.

Sandor@yukon.net or C: 333.9966

Main Street at First Avenue 2 - Second Floor units available. 250 & 350 sq. ft

Call 334-5553

FOR LEASE:

25 x 65 x 18’ with washroom and 16’ elecric garage door, radiant heat $2,000.00 + Utilities

Brand new office space

25 x 32’ with washroom, electric heat $1,000.00 + Utilities Both located @ 53 Macdonald road

Call 633-2907 or 633-2035

FOR LEASE

Beautifully finished office space is available in the Taku Building at 309 Main Street. 1140 sq.ft. Corner of 4th & Olgilvie

4198 Fourth Avenue

For more details call: 403-861-4748

This historic building is the first L.E.E.D. certified green building in Yukon. It features state of the art heat and ventilation, LAN rooms, elevator, bike storage, shower, accessibility and more.

Call 867-333-0144


56

Yukon News

3-BDRM, 1.5 bath townhouse, Riverdale, incl. 5 appliances, garage, avail Nov. 1. 633-3940 2 BDRM house to sublet d/t, Dec/13 to Apr/14, very clean, attached sunroom, $1,500/mon. incl. heat & elec. 334-1252 LARGE ROOM for 1 person, N/S, N/D, no pets, close to bus & shopping, share bath & kitchen, dd $375. Avail. Nov. 1. $750/mon. 335-1616 2-BDRM SUITE, Copper Ridge, sep. entrance, c/w heat, laundry, elec. & parking, N/S, N/P, avail Dec. 1. $1,300/mon. 334-6510 FURNISHED ROOM in beautiful house in Takhini North, sunny & clean, no TV, N/S, no pets. $715/mon. plus utils. gauthierjosianne@gmail.com

3-BDRM 1/2 duplex in Takhini on Range Road, fenced back yard, central location, nicely renovated, option to purchase, N/S. $1,600/mon + utils. 335-1260 ROOM IN Mountain View townhouse. $530/mth + utils. Lots of storage. Info 335-6462 ROOM IN comfortable home, TV, internet, cable, laundry facilities, parking, on bus route, fully furnished, N/S, N/P. 667-7733 after 5 pm 3/4 BDRM. country house on 2.8 acres 15 min from town, rent or lease 5-6 months. Double detached garage, hot tub, N/S, N/P. Refs. $1,600/mon + utils. 334-4384

Wanted to Rent

BACHELOR APT d/t, clean. private entrance. Utils + cable, wifi, phone, parking & plug-in incl. Available Nov 1-Apr 30. $900 mon. $450, dd/ref's required. N/P, no pets. 668-4321. 3-BDRM RIVERDALE, upper w/garage, avail Nov. 1, $1,700/mon. 332-5337 BACHELOR SUITE, lower, avail Dec. 1, N/S, N/P, 1st & last, $700/mon. incl utils.  332-5337 ROOM IN Riverdale, furnished, c/w Sat TV, small fridge, close to bus & amenities, kitchen/laundry privs, ref & dd reqʼd. $700/mon incl. utils. 335-2231 after 6pm. 3-BDRM HOUSE, Riverdale, fully renovated. N/S, N/P, refs & dd reqʼd.. Avail Dec 1st. $1,900/mon incl all utils. 334-9087 2 BDRM, 1-bath duplex, open kitchen, large yard, oil/wood heat, well insulated. Long term, N/S, no parties, pets neg, $1,100/mon. + util + dd. 667-7258 2-BDRM DUPLEX, PC, close to all amenities, wood/elec heat, private fenced back yard, storage & laundry, dd required, avail Nov. 4, $900 + utils. 633-2837

HOUSESITTER AVAILABLE Mature, responsible person   Call Suat at 668-6871

MATURE QUIET person seeking immediate affordable, pet friendly housing. Contact twiceshi404@gmail.com

Real Estate HAINES JUNCTION 2-storey house. Contemporary design, open concept on cul-de-sac, 10+ acres, Fire-smarted around house, lots of trees left, view of St. Elias Mtns, 1350 sq. ft. Rod 634-2240 5 ATLIN lake view town lots. Prime location, top of Discovery Ave & 3rd St. 1 double lot incls old log house, $165,000 takes all. Email: mjbhome14@live.co.uk or John 250-676-9597 NEW  PRICE  81 -100 Lewes Blvd. 3 bedroom 1.5 bath. Newly renovated, efficient oil monitor. Ready for you to move in. $225,000, open to offers.  668-6081

ESCAPE FROM the cold to sunny Arizona! Mobile home in Mesa, available weekly or monthly Nov. & Dec. Call 333-9966 (c.) or email: sandor@yukon.net

PRIME REAL estate. 30 acres between Mayo Village and Band for sale $250,000.00. 333-9627

2-BDRM 2-BATH house in PC, furnished, Dec. 22-June 22, N/S, refs. & dd reqʼd, $1,500/mon incl. utils. 668-6079 or 336-1763

3-BDRM, 1-BATH 2013 Mobile home in quiet park. 6 months free pad rent, no dogs. See Property Guys #143605. $154,900. 334-4174 .

Employment Opportunity

®

action realty realtor®

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

A Professional at Your Side 867.334.1111

Executive Assistant

vivianetessier@remax.net

Confidential Excluded Position 667-2514 ®

RE/MAX Action REAlty • WhitEhoRsE yukon Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

LONG-TERM HOUSESITTER available for winter months, gd w/pets & plants. No criminal record, 30 yr. Yukon resident. 335-0009

FURNISHED BEDROOM, Hot Springs Rd, incl access to kitchen/laundry, own fridge, cabinet, own bathroom, dd & refs, N/P, must like dogs, responsible tenant, $700/mon. 633-2119

3-BDRM BUNGALOW, 1 bath, Marwell area. Smokers & pets welcome, partially fenced back yard. Prefer long term lease, avail immed. $1400/mon + util. 333-0709 or kelsax@hotmail.com

Friday, November 1, 2013

Why are you reading this ad? It is not in colour. It is not very big. It has no artwork. It is also inexpensive. The point is: you are reading it right now in The Yukon News. You didn’t miss it. Put your message in this newspaper each week where it will get read, and re-read.

GRIZZLY VALLEY, 5 acres, 3-bdrm. 1993 mobile home, govʼt maintained road, school bus, septic tank, propane heat, great views, avail. immed. $380,000. Donna, 334-6010

Term Position From: January 02, 2014 to March 13, 2015 Salary: $49,111 to $61,379 per annum (Based on 75 hours bi-weekly) Competition No.: 13.143 Initial Review Date: November 8, 2013 This position is responsible for assisting the President’s Executive Assistant in providing and monitoring a broad range of support services, primarily administrative and often of a confidential nature for the President’s office. Duties include the following: greeting, assisting and directing enquiries, arranging and attending meetings, preparing minutes, distributing mail; word-processing a variety of reports and correspondence, and performing duties in support of the President’s Executive Assistant. We are looking for an individual who has completed administrative courses at a post-secondary level and has related front-line office experience. Applicants must clearly demonstrate their ability to multi-task various office procedures including: word-processing, desktop publishing (using Microsoft Word, Excel and Adobe Pro); minute taking; basic bookkeeping skills; and the ability to provide quality front-line customer service in a cross-cultural environment. If you are interested, please send your resume to: Human Resource Services Yukon College, Box 2799 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax #: (867) 668-8896 e-mail: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

House Hunters

HoUSe HUNTerS

HOUSE HUNTERS

RARE! GRD FlooR, 1 BDRm At thE RivER’s EDGE

BRAND NEW IN BENCHMARK: 3 BDRM

E HOUS OPENVEMBER 2, 2 - 4 PM NO SATURDAY,

Copper ridge

11 grizzly Circle

2 bed, 2 bath, big corner lot, fully landscaped, fenced yard. garage and partially finished basement. priced to sell below it’s appraised value.

$359.900

Call realtor® Mike racz

333-6410

Mobile & Modular Homes Serving Yukon, NWT & Alaska

BRaNd NEw

2-bedroom upscale mobile home.

124,000

$

Reduced to For Quick Sale

Call 334-6094 for more information.

central park - only 4 units left!

23 Lorne Rd. in McCrae

clivemdrummond@gmail.com

SIGN # 143606

SIGN # 702831

$379,000 35 Normandy Road Whitehorse

867-335-7029

Property Guys.com™

SIGN # 143605

$269,000

$154,900

867-668-4539

867-334-4174

4031 4 Ave Unit B Whitehorse

InSite Buying or Selling? Good information ensures a smooth transaction.

203 26 Azure Road Whitehorse

business opportunity

Home Inspections

Property Guys.com™

667-7681 or cell 334-4994

Property Guys.com™

No SurpriSeS = peace of MiNd

• Pre-Sale or Purchase visual inspections of structure and systems • Commercial Maintenance Inventory Inspections • W.E.T.T. Inspections of Wood and Pellet burning stoves / fireplaces

Call Kevin Neufeld, Inspector at

867-667-7674 • 867-334-8106 KevinNeufeld@hotmail.com

www.InsIteHomeInspectIons.ca

B&B for Sale in Watson Lake outside of Watson Lake by the ski hill and airport. It is an income property and has a partially furnished 3 bedroom Bed and Breakfast set up and ready on the upstairs floor. The main house has a renovated kitchen and new flooring in most of the house. 2 bedrooms, a bathroom, and the laundry room on the main floor. Finished full basement. Wood boiler heats the house with an oil back up. There is a greenhouse, small garage and one storage building. Wrap around driveway. Price reduced to $269,000 for quick sale

780-632-2506 www.propertysold.ca


57

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

JO B O PPO R T U N IT Y

Help Wanted DOWNTOWN RESTAURANT Seeking Cooks, Kitchen Helpers & Servers Spanish speaking an asset Competitive wages Please send info to: patronamexfood@gmail.com 668-7372

Envirolube Full-time Positions Available

H&R Block

is currently looking for an experienced

bookkeeper to run and manage the financial back end of three active businesses.

Must have experience in all aspects of proper accounting methods and be able to work independently and under pressure. Wages depending on experience. Please drop resume off at 211 Elliott Street, fax to 667-2509 or email carol.church@northwestel.net. No phone calls please.

EmploymEnt opportunity

Utilities Manager

• Women welcome to apply • Must be energetic and able to work in fast paced environment • Work efficiently and unsupervised • Competitive wages • Must have a valid driver’s licence • Experience welcome, but not necessary

Capital Department Permanent – Full Time Salary range: $60,656 -$72,787 Qualifications: High school graduation followed by several years’ postsecondary education in water distribution, waste water collection and treatment systems; Certification in the operation of water distribution, water treatment and waste water treatment systems; Certification in gas chlorination is desirable; Training and/or experience in staff supervision and general management; Experience in participating in negotiations; WHIMIS; Valid Class 3 Yukon Driver’s License; Criminal Record Check. Main Duties: Reporting to Capital Director, this position will be responsible for the following: • Manages the Utilities unit of the Little Salmon Carmacks First Nation • Oversees and/or leads the operation, monitoring and maintenance of water, sewage and electrical systems • Oversees the operation and maintenance of basic laboratory services for the testing and monitoring of environmental systems. • Provides technical support to the Capital Works department for environmental related tasks • Supervises the daily work of Utilities staff and other personnel assigned by the Capital Director including preparation of work plans, supervision of work, resolving performance issues and on-going training of personnel. • Assist the Capital Director as needed: Keep daily record of Utilities employee time sheets; participate in department budget development and management • Perform other related duties such as: operate water truck and acts as back-up sewer truck operator when required; participate in meetings relevant to the operations of the department; attend training, and workshops to upgrade skills; respond to emergencies.

Please drop resume off to Leroy at 411 ogilvie Street

Dayhiking Backpacking Snowshoeing Guide

Year around position is available. Wage: $18.95 / hr Full time position offering a min. of 35 hrs / week Job Location: Whitehorse, Yukon Skills and certification requirements: • Must speak and write in English • ACMG Hiking certification or equivalent • Valid wilderness First Aid (70 to 80 hrs)

Assets that we consider: • Previous experience in Yukon remote area • Japanese speaking skill

YM Tours Ltd.

Box 31112 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A5P7 job1@yamnuskaguides.com

LSCFN preferential hire will apply. If you are interested, please submit your expression of interest along with your resume by 4:30P.M. November 8, 2013 to: Doris Caouette, Human Resource Officer Little Salmon Carmacks First Nation PO Box 135, Carmacks Y.T. Y0B 1C0 Phone: (867)863-5576 ext 280 Fax: (867)863-5710 Email: resume@lscfn.ca

Miscellaneous for Sale BETTER BID NORTH AUCTIONS Foreclosure, bankruptcy De-junking, down-sizing Estate sales. Specializing in estate clean-up & buy-outs. The best way to deal with your concerns. Free, no obligation consultation. 333-0717

WHILE LSCFN THANK ALL APPLICANTS, ONLY THOSE CANDIDATES SELECTED FOR AN INTERVIEW WILL bE CONTACTED. PLEASE CONTACT US IF YOU REqUIRE A jOb DESCRIPTION.

ALEX COLVILLE framed print, “Dog, Boy & St. John River”. $75. Ross 633-3154

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Director, Staff Relations – Whitehorse (Permanent) Public Service Commission Salary: $105,091 to $144,248 per annum

Closing Date: November 22, 2013 Requisition: #4080

For viewing all jobs, please go to

www.employment.gov.yk.ca “Committed to employment equity” Public Service Commission (867) 667-5834

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Expression of Interest for: Casual Instructor(s)

Skills for Employment - Esthetics School of Academic & Skill Development January 6, 2014 to April 25, 2014 Hourly Rate: $31.67 to $35.62 Competition No.: 13.138 Initial Review Date: November 04, 2013 Yukon College offers project based learning through the Skills for Employment program. We are looking for an interested, qualified candidate with relevant education and experience to teach on a casual basis in our entry level Esthetics Career Exploration program. Certification in Esthetics, from a recognized institution, and experience with Yukon First Nations are required. Teaching experience would be considered an asset. For additional information please contact: Colleen Stevenson, Chair, School of Academic and Skill Development Email: cstevenson@yukoncollege.yk.ca Phone: (867) 456-8608 If you are interested, please send your resume to: Human Resource Services Yukon College, Box 2799 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax #: (867) 668-8896 e-mail: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Expression of Interest for: Sessional Instructor School of Liberal Arts For the Winter 2014 Academic Term (January 6 to May 2, 2014) Hourly Rate: $31.67 to $35.62 Initial Review Date: November 8, 2013 Competition No.: 13.136

Yukon College is looking for a qualified person to teach:

Multimedia 121: Digital Video & Audio The successful candidate will have related postsecondary education and professional experience in digital video and audio editing and/or a related multimedia field (e.g., graphic design, digital illustration, web design, etc.). Consideration may be given to candidates with the appropriate blend of education and experience. For additional information please contact: Dr. Victoria Castillo, Chair, Liberal Arts vcastillo@yukoncollege.yk.ca If you have the relevant education and are interested in teaching in a post-secondary setting, please send us your resume. Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca


58

Yukon News

We will pay CASH for anything of value Tools, electronics, gold & jewelry, cameras, furniture, antiques, artwork, chainsaws, camping & outdoor gear, hunting & fishing supplies, vehicles & ATVs. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS

WORLD HOCKEY Association – 5 complete hockey card sets from the 70s. Exc cond. $750. Ross 633-3154

OSBORNE WOOD-BURNING fireplace insert in gd cond, $300 obo. 633-6238 aft 6pm

HOCKEY CARD set: 1966-67 Parkhurst (printed 1995-96), set of 150 cards + 3 special inserts. $200. Ross @ 633-3154

HOCKEY CARD set: 1956-57 Parkhurst Missing Years set, printed 1993-94, set of 180 + Future Stars insert set of 6. $150. Ross 633-3154

FURNACE BURNER, fully reconditioned, new motor, transformer & pump, $200. 633-3053

WORLD HOCKEY Association – remember it? Two rare books, (history, statistics, photos). Exc. shape, $50. Ross 633-3154

Ta’an Kwäch’än Council 117 Industrial Road Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2T8 Telephone: 867.668.3613 Facsimile: 867.667.4295

E M P LOY M E N T O P P O R T U N I T Y

Education Support Worker Temporary Full Time (6 months with possibility of extension) Reporting to the Manager of Health and Education, you will be responsible for managing the education initiatives that relate specifically to TKC citizens who are involved in the public school system from K-12 inclusive, as well as, Post Secondary students. You will provide educational and personal support to TKC students and their families to ensure that learning outcomes are successful. As well, you will act as a liaison between the teachers, students, parents on educational and personal matters and will liaise with other governments and agencies regarding educational and tutoring needs. Ideally, we would like the successful applicant to start December 2nd. To access the job description go to our website at: www.taan.ca and then our Employment tab. Closing date: Tuesday, November 12, 2013 The TKC Preferential Hiring policy will apply which gives qualified TKC Citizens first preference. Please submit a cover letter and resume to: Pkimbley@taan.ca

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Friday, November 1, 2013 TRADING CARDS – binder full of non-sport trading cards (James Bond, X-men, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom). About 500 cards. $50. Ross 633-3154 THREE COMPLETE OPC hockey card sets (1999-00 to 2001-02 period) plus some short prints. Over 900 cards. $150. Ross 633-3154

HOCKEY CARD set, 1964-65 Parkhurst (Tall boys format; printed 1994-95), 180 cards + Future Stars insert, set of 6. $150. Ross 633-3154

BOXFUL OF 62 mysteries, mostly paperback, $25. Ross 633-3154

TELESCOPIC ALUMINUM plank ladder, new, $60. 335-8964

Selkirk First Nation

P.O. Box 40, Pelly Crossing, YT Y0B 1P0 Phone: 867-537-3060 Fax: 867-537-3075

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Finance Manager Job Summary Reporting to the Director of Finance, the Finance Manager is responsible for the management of the day to day monitoring and internal auditing functions of all accounting operations, functions, records and transactions relating to all Selkirk First Nation Departments and Programs. Qualifications • Accounting or Finance Diploma or successful completion of a minimum four years Post-Secondary education in Accounting. Equivalencies may be accepted at the recommendation of the Director of Finance. • Knowledge of accounting principles and practices in relationship to internal auditing, annual external auditing, financial reporting and financial controls. • Must be willing to enroll in the CAFM program. • Knowledge of QuickBooks will be considered an asset. Closing Date: November 5, 2013 For additional information please contact John Igbokwe provide your resume and cover letter in confidence to: John Igbokwe by Email: financedirector@selkirkfn.com

Instructor, Skills for Employment Ecotourism Program

School of Academic and Skill Development Ayamdigut (Whitehorse) Campus Term Position from: January 20, 2014 to May 30, 2014 Hourly Rate: $36.40 to $43.33 (Based on 75 hours bi-weekly) Initial Review Date: November 4, 2013 Competition No.: 13.139 Yukon College is seeking an innovative individual to join the School of Academic and Skill Development (ASD) to instruct in the Skills for Employment program. The successful candidate will be responsible for planning, organizing, and instructing an introduction to Ecotourism program. The ideal candidate will have an education degree or a related post-secondary degree, preferably at the graduate level with experience in program development and extensive instructional experience in teaching essential and employability skills in an adult education environment. The successful candidate will also have knowledge of the ecotourism industry in the Yukon, experience working with Yukon First Nation, and be comfortable teaching and working in the outdoors. We are looking for applicants who enjoy working in a student-centered environment and being part of a dynamic team. Candidates with an acceptable combination of education, training and experience may also be considered. For additional information please contact: Colleen Stevenson, Chair, School of Academic and Skill Development Email:cstevenson@yukoncollege.yk.ca Phone: (867)456-8608 If you are interested, please send your resume to: Human Resource Services Yukon College, Box 2799 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax #: (867) 668-8896 e-mail: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon,Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

FOR SALE roll-top desk, teak veneer; room divider, steel, 3 sections, gold/off-white; art, original and prints, all framed; sheepskin rug, new, white. 667-2583 SAMSUNG GALAXY GT155i0M, slider cell phone, unlocked, good for pay as you go, 1 year old, hardly used ,excellent condition. Only want unlocking fee of $80.00. 333-0019 DOUGLAS FIR bridge timbers, reclaimed, recently cut to 4.5”18”x20ʼ, $700 ea. or $1,300 for both. 334-2121 FULL LENGTH coat, down, Landʼs End. Wmnʼs med., $125. Menʼs med. down jacket, $30. 311B Hanson St. 250 GAL. water tank in new condit. $450. 633-2156 SNOW JOE electric snow thrower, 17”, 13 amp. Like new. $120.00. 668-6079 HANDMADE, COLOURFUL Oriental carpets, new. $230-$330. 335-8964 KEROSENE MASTER heater, 150,000 BTUs, $200. Two 20-litre pails #1 kerosene. $60. 633-2212 BLAZE KING wood heater, 11 years old, perfect shape with new catalytic combustor. $1,000 obo. Call 335-2223, no texts. ARCTIC HOT TUB cover for large hot tub. Blue, 7'4" x 7'4". Used 1 yr. Mint condition. $500.00 obo. 667-4910 TO GIVE away, karate books, including Beat Karate series and more.  Jeanne, 668- 2506 METAL DOME garage 16ʼ x 20ʼ. Currently erect but will be taken down. For viewing contact 334-4134 EXPRESSO MACHINE, Nueva Simonelli, Optima, 2 group, in excellent working condition, coffee shop size. Asking $600. 335-0448 79 ACTION DVDs, twice played. $75 firm. 668-2011

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

CFL FOOTBALL cards – 17 different complete sets of cards, including early OPC. Almost 2,600 cards. $1,500. Ross 633-3154

ANTIQUE ROUND wooden butter churn, as is, $95. 668-7839 SPILSBURY & Tindall 2-way radio SBX 11 with aerial, exc. shape. $600. 332-6565

is looking for

Human Resource & Staff Development Officer Reporting to the Workforce Development Director, the HR & Staff Development Officer is responsible for all aspects of recruitment, policy development and the development of a skilled workforce to meet Teslin Tlingit Council’s staffing requirements. Guided by the TTC strategic plan and each department’s current and future staffing requirements, the incumbent will develop and implement training and education plans for TTC staff.

Education & Experience • Diploma or Certificate in Human Resources Management or Business Administration and additional post-secondary training related to career counselling, counselling psychology, certification as a career practitioner or course work in counselling and several years experience in the area of counselling and training plan development and implementation; a minimum of five years experience in human resources positions or an equivalent combination of education and experience. • Excellent communication skills and strong organizational skills • Good work ethic, good attitude, team player, willing to learn • A class 5 Yukon driver’s license is required

Main Duties Responsible for recruitment including drafting job postings and advertising, in consultation with supervisors, and leading the recruitment committee through the selection and interview process Providing guidance and expertise to directors and managers in developing job descriptions that are reflective of the duties and responsibilities required of each of their departmental positions. Providing guidance and assistance to employees who require training or education to meet performance standards or prepare for advancement within TTC For more information or to obtain a copy of the Job Description please call 867.390.2532 ext 316 Please quote the job title in the subject line of your email, fax and/or cover letter: HR & Staff Development Officer Workforce Development Teslin Tlingit Council Box 133 Teslin, Yukon Y0A 1B0 f. 867.390.2176 humanresources@ttc-teslin.com

Closing Date: Friday, November 8th, 2013 **no later than 4pm**

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY www.ttc-teslin.com

CIVIL WAR Trading Cards: 4 complete sets of unique trading cards commemorating the U.S. Civil War, including the 1962 Topps set. $750 firm. Call 633-3154 ONE PAIR of menʼs dark brown Carhart overalls, size 36. $50. 335 -  6314 SENTINEL WOOD stove chimney pipe, 7 lengths like-new 36", for 6" stovepipe; for 10" opening. Very good condition; original boxes. 668-3441. WALL TENT, 14ʼx16ʼ, new with poles and tarp, $1,950. 456-7112 100ʼ OF 3/4” cable with end loops. $300. 332-6565 JAZZY WHEEL Chair, electric, not used in 4 years, serviced before stored, might need battery. $10,000 new, asking $1,200 obo. 667-4395 FENCE POSTS, 4 bundles 8ʼx5-6” treated blunt fence posts, 60/bundle, $2,200 for all. 335-2648 SCHLAGE COMMERCIAL door lock sets, new, polished chrome, 4 complete sets, $100 ea. 335-2648 2 WHITE lab coats for sale, size m/L and XL, like new. $15 ea. 333-9604 10 STEPHEN Booth mysteries, paperback, $15. 633-3154 SOLID CORE unfinished maple door, new, 1 3/4” door 32"x80"  with window 24"x30" and fire rated door frame. Complete, $250 obo. 335-2648 INDUSTRIAL REBAR, 30 pcs, 1/2" 40ʼ length, 20 pcs 1/2” 12ʼ length, 5 pcs 3/4” 60ʼ length, numerous 1/2” angle pieces. $1,300 takes all.  335-2648 ONE RIGID #300 power vise only. $1,500 obo. $1,500 obo. 633-8487 PROPANE FURNACE, Olssen Duomatic, 120,000 BTU, $250. 667-2317 after 5:30 PORTABLE GAS powered 225 amp HOBART welder/gen set. Excellent shape. $2,200 obo. 633-6502 CURTIS CAPPUCCINO machine, Model PCGT3, 3 -cup dispenser w. electric pump, extra products incl. $2,500. 993-5937 KENMORE STACKABLE w/d, Kenmore stove, Intertherm furnace, microwave. 667-6770 POLAR BEAR rug, 333-0319 SEVERAL ELDERLY cameras for sale. 633-5988


CAMO HOODED pullover, Cabela's wooltimate fleece, size L. Like new, never worn. Retail $170, asking $85.  633-3810 DALL SHEEP full cape head mount with left hand orientation. Incredible detail, displayed in smoke-free environment. $1,500.00. Email for pictures halendaniel@yahoo.ca 336-1412 BOX OF mixed dollhouse furniture, kitchen, childʼs room, etc, can be split up or $100 for all. 633-3664 WINTER JACKETS, youth, exc condit, Mec Freefall, sz. 12, $45, Patagonia XL, $40, Loki sz. 10, $30. 311B Hanson St. CONOVER WOOD lathe, 2.5hp motor, electronic variable speed, 8ʼ bed, turns 16” on center, cast iron head & tailstocks, complete set  faceplates, live centers, Sorbey turning tools.  $1,800, 668-4732 ELITE TRAVELLER scooter, 3-wheel, excellent for mobility problems, like new, open to offers. Richard, 667-7057. MCDONALDS H O C K E Y cards from 1991-92 to 2009/10. Almost every single card issued minus some short prints, incl. 27 unopened paks/yr. Over 1,200 cards, $1,000 firm. Ross at 633-3154. ORIGINAL SHEEPSKIN coat from New Zealand, good shape, sz. small, $150 obo. 335-2231 after 6pm. CALBERTA PARKA, good condit, sz. small, $75. 335-2231 after 6pm. BUILDING ON steel skids, 50ʼl x 10-11ʼw x 10ʼh. Very moveable. 668-2332 GENERATOR, 668-2332

110 volts, gas engine.

CANON VIXIA HF R300 HD camcorder, incl 32GB card, paid $350, asking $250. Call or text 334-2566 10 BOXES of laminate flooring, oak colored, $60/box new, asking $30/box. 633-5050 NEW PLASTIC mattress cover, still in pkg, new $100, asking $50. 335-2231 after 6pm. AREA RUG, 5ʼx7ʼ, gold-brown, sewing desk w. hutch, vanity cupboard (no sink), TV stand, standing lamp w. shelves, etc. 332-4455

Electrical Appliances KENMORE DRYER, front loader, works great, $300. Also nw pump out of Kenmore washer, $40. 332-7797 SEARS BEST refrigerator, $200. 633-2580 eves KENMORE DRYER, extra capacity, $100. 633-2837 STAINLESS STEEL fridge, $350. 633-5283 CROSLEY WASHING machine, works great, asking $75.00. 334-8554

TVs & Stereos Paying cash for good quality modern electronics. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS BELL EXPRESSVU 60 cm dish, qty 2, new, $20 ea. 667-8726

Computers & Accessories M-AUDIO FIREWIRE 18/14 Professional Computer Recording Interface, 8x4 analog I/O, up to 24-bit/96kHz. Check features on Internet. Paid $650, asking $200. 667-2196

FIREWOOD FOR SALE 20-cord orders Big or small tree length Logging truck loads $150/cord Delivered to Whitehorse Call Clayton: 335-0894

Firewood DIMOK TIMBER 6 cord or 22 cord loads of firewood logs. Call 634-2311

WOOD FOR sale. Call 334-8999.

Duke’s Firewood Standing dry Beetle Killed Spruce

taKing orderS for fall deliverieS This government’s bureaucratic overkill (3 public consultations to harvest dead trees) and the incompetency of the Forestry Management Board to administer the Forest Resources Act to issue an extension to a present permit (that I had applied for November, 2012 to give me a supply until freeze-up) pushes the price of firewood up. The price is so high, many Yukoners are choosing to burn fossil fuels instead.

Musical Instruments We will buy your musical instrument or lend you money against it. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS

Wood Prices are: $240/cord for a 6-cord load $260/cord for multiples of 2 cords • Cut your own at $95/cord 20-cord truckload logs $155/cord

caSh and deBit accepted

334-8122

YUKON LEGAL SERVICES SOCIETY

STAFF LAWYER Poverty Law Services Yukon LegaL ServiceS SocietY (Legal aid) is seeking a lawyer to join our inhouse team of staff counsel. The ideal candidate will have experience in criminal law, matrimonial, child protection, and mental health law. The successful applicant will be responsible for providing representation to clients referred to them by Legal Aid with a focus on non-criminal matters. Applicants must be a member in good standing of a Bar in Canada and must be eligible for call to the Yukon Bar. Salary is commensurate with experience. An attractive benefits package and pension plan is offered.

ANTIQUE ORGAN to give away. For more info 335-0566. 1967 GIBSON J50 acoustic guitar with B-Band pickup, hardshell case. Plays and sounds fabulous. $2,000.00. Email for pictures halendaniel@yahoo.ca  336-1412

has a vacancy for an:

AnimAl cAre worker (except farm) Aquarist for Arctic chArr fAcility (Noc 6563) Pay rate $16/hour, 40 hours per week. to assist Management in maintaining and improving husbandry practices in all aspects of the aquaculture facility; participate in vaccination and brood stock programs; undertake research including recirculation technology. the applicant should have at least 12 months experience of fish health, breeding and genetics issues. An understanding of hAccP both for internal and export use, is required. high School, and college vocational qualifications in fish or animal health are required.

Please email resume to Jlucas@icywaters.com ; cloSiNg dAte for APPlicAtioNS iS NoveMber 30th 2013.

Employment Central Employment Central “Your Job Search Headquarters” “Your Job Search Headquarters”

Our knowledgeable staffassist will assist with: Our knowledgeable staff will youyou with: ✓ Job search board,referrals referrals Job search—counselling, — counselling, job job board, ✓ Interview Interviewpractice practice ✓ Resume and cover letter assistance Resume and cover letter assistance  ✓ Computer use, internet, phone and fax Computer use,“Ready internet, and fax ✓ Ask about our tophone Hire” program Suite202 202-204 -204Black Black Street Suite Street Whitehorse,Yukon YukonY1A Y1A 2M9 Whitehorse, 2M9 Website:www.employmentyukon.ca www.employmentyukon.ca Website:

Ph: (867) 393-8270 (867) 393 -8270 Facsimile: (867)393-8278 393-8278 Facsimile: (867) Email: ec@northwestel.net Email: ec@northwestel.net Education

Advanced Education

Yukon Legal Services Society reserves the right not to fill this posting if a suitable candidate is not identified by the Yukon Legal Services Society Personnel Committee. Please apply to: Yukon Legal Services Society Administration Office Attention: Shannon Rhames 203-2131 Second Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 1C3 Email: srhames@legalaid.yk.ca | Fax: (867) 667-8649 application Deadline: november 8, 2013 at 4:30 p.m.

Advertising Sales Representative

À LA RECHERCHE D’UN EMPLOI?

Des professionnels engagés Conseils en développement de carrière Création, amélioration et traduction de CV

Des services personnalisés et des ressources utiles.

The Yukon News, a twice-weekly award-winning newspaper has an outstanding opportunity for a full-time sales person. The successful candidate will have sales experience – preferably in the advertising or retail industry. The ability to build relationships with clients and offer superior customer service is a must. The winning candidate will be a team player and will also be called upon to grow the account list with an aggressive cold calling mandate. The ability to work in an extremely fast paced environment with a positive attitude is a must. We offer a great working environment with a competitive base salary coupled with a strong benefit package. Black Press has more than 170 community newspapers across Canada and the United States and for the proven candidate the opportunities are endless. Please submit your resume with a cover letter by Friday, November 8, 2013 to: Mike Thomas Publisher, Yukon News, 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, Y.T. Y1A 2E4 or email to mthomas@yukon-news.com

Simulation d’entrevue

PIANO TUNING & REPAIR by certified piano technician Call Barry Kitchen @ 633-5191 email:bfkitchen@hotmail.com VIOLIN - brand new, full sized. C/w case and rosin - bow not included - $150. 393-4355

Icy Waters Ltd.

For every 4.7 cords of carbon-neutral wood burned, the equivalent fossil-fuel sourced heat adds 5.4 tonnes of CO2 to the atmosphere. YTG could reduce its carbon footprint by 50,000 tonnes per year by using the 100,000 m3 of dead trees for its energy needs from the Haines Junction area. History has proven time and again the area will burn up in wildfires. Harvesting these trees may save Haines Junction from burning up with the 350,000 hectares of dead trees.

OKIDATA MICROLINE 390 Plus 24 pin printer. $50.00. 668-6079 DELL DESKTOP comp P4@ 2.8GIG WinXP, MSOffice, 17” LCD monitor, speakers, 80 GIG HD, 768MB ram, $100. 332-1680 lv. msg.

59

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

No phone calls please. Éducation

Direction de l’enseignement postsecondaire

CENTRE DE LA FRANCOPHONIE 302, rue Strickland, Whitehorse (Yukon) 867.668.2663 poste 223 www.sofa-yukon.ca

www.blackpress.ca

www.yukonnews.com


60

Yukon News

HURLBURT ENTERPRISES $250 per cord We have wood. You-cut available. Discount for larger quantities. PROMPT Scheduled Delivery Visa, M/C, Check, Cash Dev Hurlburt 335-5192 • 335-5193 1ST QUALITY heating wood, season-dried over 3-yrs., to be picked up on Levich Drive in Mt. Sima industrial subdivision. Complete info at 335-0100.

10 cords 3ʼ furnace wood, $1,350 picked up. 16” firewood delivered in Haines Jct, $160/cord “The Tree Huggers Woodchopper” “Earth first, weʼll FireSmart the other planets later” 336-4976 FIREWOOD FOR SALE Donʼt delay - Get your wood today $250/16” cord $220/4ʼ cord $200/8ʼ cord Large dry timber from Haines Junction Delivered 336-2013

DONʼS FIREWOOD Prompt daily deliveries Commercially harvested beetle kill Social Services & Kwanlin Dun Price as of October 1st: $265 per cord 393-4397

Guns & Bows Case cutlery, high quality hand-crafted pocket and hunting knives available at G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS

Yukon Agricultural Association EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Executive Director

SKULL CLEANING European mounts using Dismasted beetles From a mouse to a moose Very reasonable rates 335-2034

Yukon agricultural association (Yaa)

Reporting to the association President, the Executive director is responsible for implementing the policies and direction of the Yaa board and for carrying out the full range of duties required to further the purposes and administer the services and affairs of the association, including the preparation and administration of contracts with people or organizations who may be engaged for certain tasks. The successful candidate will possess a relevant university degree or diploma, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. he or she will be a self-starter with strong planning, organizational and financial skills and significant administrative and/or management experience, preferably in a multidisciplinary environment. candidates must possess effective interpersonal communication, writing and leadership skills and be proficient with computers and their full range of applications, including developing and presenting power-point presentations and managing and maintaining the association’s website. Relevant experience in, and/or knowledge of, agriculture and the agri-food industry is a must. familiarity with Yukon’s ag industry and some key factors, which affect it, is desirable. candidates must be willing to work irregular hours which may occasionally include evenings and/or weekends. a valid Yukon driver’s licence and willingness to travel is required. salary range is $25-$32/hour commensurate with experience. Deadline for receipt of applications is November 29, 2013. send resumes to: Yukon agricultural association 203-302 steele street, whitehorse, Yukon, Y1a 2c5 faX: 393.3566; Email: admin@yukonag.ca for more information, contact Rick Tone at 867-668-6864.

ONLY ThOsE aPPLIcaNTs scREENEd fOR aN INTERvIEw wILL bE cONTacTEd.

WANTED, RUGER 10/22 and/or Ruger .223 (Mini 14). Have the licence. George, 667-6563 ROSSI .22 pump, breaks down for trapline, with custom case. $200. Remington Nylon 77 semi-auto .22 in great shape, accurate. $150.  Licence must be presented. 667-6563. RUGER M77 Hawkeye, 300 Win. Mag. All Weather, mint condition, incl. mounted 3-9x40mm VX-1Leupold scope, Plano Gun Boot, cleaning kit, Nosler Custom ammo. Firearm license required. $1,000. 335-1093 1000FPS AIRGUN - Ruger Blackhawk, .177 caliber, mint condition, incl. mounted 4x32 Walther – scope, pellet trap, targets and pellets. Firearm license required. $80. 335 1093

WANTED: FREIGHTER Canoe. 633-4322. HOTWHEELS TRACK FOR 3 year old. Has lots of cars but no track.  Any condition is fine. Email bvj003@gmail.com WANTED, ELECTRIC stove in good working order for house, cheap would be good, free would be better. Will pick up.  Christina @ 633-6060 WANTED: NON-WORKING bar refrigerator approx 36" H  X 23" D  X 24" W. 633-5575 MID-90S DODGE Caravan. 633-2837 THE CANADIAN Red Cross accepts donations of used medical equipment such as walkers, wheelchairs, etc for its Health Equipment Loan Program in Yukon. 456-7359 for more info. AIRLINE APPROVED XL dog crate, height 30-33”, reasonable condition. 332-5350 or 660-4723 LATE MODEL Ford Explorer or Ranger in running condit. 335-4419 or 821-4772 LOOKING FOR model electric trains G, O and HO gauge. 633-6310 PELICAN #1500 case (or similar), preferably with padded divider interior. 668 - 4732 10 GALLON insulated water jug (Igloo or Rubbermaid) 633-5575 or leave message. CLEARVIEW GARAGE shelter, 11ʼx20ʼ, would like to swap for Clearview shelter 11ʼx16ʼ. 668-5188 GOOD USED RV propane heater. 660-5545

Cars

2007 VW City Golf, red, 4-dr hatchback, 120,000km, Yakima roof rack, good condit. Winter/rims already on vehicle. $10,000 obo. 334-3363 2006 CHEVROLET Equinox AWD - Excellent condition, c/w new glass & front brakes, summer and winter tires, well-maintained, non-smoker. $7,900. 332-6861 2006 COBALT 4-door sedan, needs windshield, just over 90,000km. $6,000 obo. 333-0067 2006 HONDA Civic, 4dr, very clean, 82,000km, c/w winter tires, remote starter. $12,150. 334-9087 2006 INFINITI G35X Luxury Sport sedan V6 AWD, sporty handling, great safety features, 143,000 km., silver, fully loaded power everything, sun roof, all-leather interior, two sets tires. $14,900, 668-5790. 2005 KIA Sedona, low mileage, original owner, recent detailing, oil change etc, mechanical check, winter tires installed, extra set of tires, $6,500. 456-4976. 2004 HONDA CR-V for sale, silver. 140,000kms, auto. C/w command start, power windows, power locks. Removable roof rack, new windshield. Seats five. Asking $8,500. 333-0503 2004 VOLKSWAGEN Jetta, low kms., winter tires & rims, heated seats, good condit. $7,900 obo. 335-0022 2002 CHRYSLER Concorde 117,000 km., all options, leather, cd, runs great, just serviced. $4,200 obo. 335-2387 2002 SATURN Ion. Transmission needs work. Brand nw studded tires used 3 mos. New motor. Low mileage. $800 obo. 336-1966 2002 TOYOTA Corolla,, 4-cyl, auto, p/w, a/c, studded winter tires, 175,000km, runs great. $5,500. 332-0726 2000 CHEVY ASTRO VAN 2wd, 4.3L, very good condition, 166,000 kms, runs very well. $4,500.00 obo. 633-3371 or 335-1234

Certified

used vehicles

1999 SUBARU Legacy wagon, AWD,  green with grey interior, great mechanical shape, good tires, new parts & recent inspection. $3,200 obo. 335-5334

WEATHERBY VANGUARD  in 300 short mag, c/w 4 boxes of ammo & scope rings, had only 15 rounds shot, $450. 335-2125

1998 TOYOTA Corolla VE, 185,000kms, good condition, newly inspected.  $1,800. Downtown Whitehorse. Call 335-1081

.22 MOSSBERG SA model 152K, .22LR only, clip-fed. $50. 821-3431

1994 BUICK Roadmaster Limited,  all power options,148,000 km. Near spotless condition, nice cruising, auto. $3,500 obo. 335-3868

.308 WINCHESTER model 88 bbl 22ins, lever clip action, serial #64900, made in USA 1958, $500. 821-3431 30/30 CAL. Marlin lever action model 336, tube mag, serial #G35950, made in USA 1950. $300. 821-3431 CZ 223 semi-auto folding $800, 1911 Norinco 45 ACP semi-auto $250, Ruger Bearcat .22 revolver $500, Weatherby Vanguard 257 Magnum, 5x9 Zeiss scope custom 26” barrel, reloading dies $1,000. 335-1106

online at

www.drivingforce.ca

2009 PONTIAC G5 SE 4-dr sedan, like new, warranty, c/w power windows/locks, Pioneer stereo system, sunroof, $10,000 obo. 634-2157 2009 SUBARU Impreza sedan, std, 4-door, 65,000km, exc cond. $12,700 obo. 660-5212

PENTAX PF65 ED spotting scope with 10X60 zoom eyepiece, like new.  $600. 668-4634

2009 SUBARU Impreza WRX.  High performance clutch, excellent condition only 26,000 kms. 2nd set of tires, sunroof, remote/keyless start.  $28,000. 660-5505.

GUN CASE, hard shell, rectangular, great for airline baggage or general storage, $20. 660-4806

2007 DODGE Caliber, like new, 126,000 km, standard. C/w extra tires, stereo system, tow pkg, garage door opener. $10,000 obo. 456-4112 or 333-0236

INSTANT

CASH FOR GOLD Bring in Gold… Leave with CASH! Open 7 Days A Week WHiteHorSe Money MArt 2190 Second Avenue (867) 668-6930

Wanted

2007 HONDA Civic 4-door, 77,000 kms, c/w remote start, new battery, new windshield, 2 sets tires/rims, detailed, 5 spd, $12,500. 334-6605 2007 HONDA Civic EX, 24,000 km. C/w power moonroof, A/C, telescopic steering wheel, power windows, 4-wheel disc brakes, excellent condition. $12,000. 335-0515 2007 NISSAN Versa SL hatchback, great condit, 85,000 kms, c/w remoter starter, winter rims & tires, alloy wheels & summer tires  $8,900. Matt  667-4394 or txt 332-8282 2007 SUBARU Forester; standard transmission; new struts this year; dealer-serviced; 134,000 km; in great condition.  $12,900. Call 660-5212

FOR SALE

EVF FUELWOOD ENT Year Round Delivery • Dry accurate cords • Clean shavings available • VISA/M.C. accepted Member of Yukon Wood Producers Association Costs will rise. ORDER NOW 456-7432

Firewood

Friday, November 1, 2013

1999 GMC Sierra

½ Ton, 4x4, V/8, Auto, Cruise Tilt, A/C, Custom Bumper c/w Winch driving lights

$6,3000

1992 CROWN Vic. LX 104,000 km., never winter driven, all power options, super clean car. $2,500 obo. 335-3868 1990 CADILLAC Eldorado Biarritz (2-dr. sports), 50,000 miles, all options, loaded. $6,600. 667-7777. 1988 TOYOTA Corolla SR5 for parts. Still runs well, body not good. $500. 668-6095 1986 TOYOTA Camry, 205,000kms, owner, $450 obo. 668-2857

1

1978 CADILLAC Sedan Deville, good condit. 668-2332 CLASSIC 1979 Cadillac Coupe De ville, V8,Auto Trans ,Sun Roof and much more, priced to sell, Call 668-1477 COLLECTOR. 1976 Mercedes Benz 300D, 214,000 Miles, all original and everything works incl. A/C. Small surface rust , perfect for restoration  Is in Watson Lake. Call 778-212-0798

Trucks

We Sell Trucks! 1-866-269-2783 • 9039 Quartz Rd. • Fraserway.com

2007 NISSAN Titan, 160,000 km. $12,000 obo. Must sell ASAP. 780-222-2903

2005 DoDGe 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 ,V/8, Auto, Cruise Tilt , A/C , P/S , P/B

$6,8000

667-7777


1998 CHEVY 1500, extended cab, short box, 5.0 litre, auto, 2wd, runs good but tranny has shifting problem, as is where is. $1,500 335-1106

SALES • BODY SHOP • PARTS • SERVICE 2001 Dodge Dakota 4x4 Clubcab v8, white..................................... $5,500 2005 Honda Pilot EX black ...........................................................................$13,900 2005 Chev Colorado Ext v6, green .............................................................$7,595 2006 Ford Crown Victoria V8 ....................................................................... $4,995 2010 Kia Soul 4 door, auto, silver ............................................................$14,900 2007 Kia Spectra 5 5-speed, red .................................................................. $6,595 IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE!

2008 Toyota Corolla SE 4 door, auto white

2013 Hyundai Accent

1996 MITSUBISHI Delica L400 6-pass. van, 4 cyl diesel turbo inter cooled automatic trans 4x4, needs windshield, passenger door and body work on roof. Runs well. $2,500.00. 336-1412 1996 NISSAN Quest, minivan, V6, auto, c/w power mirrors, seats, windows, sunroof, CD-changer, winter/summer tires, block heater, new brakes, 255kms, runs well, $2,500, 633-6389 1995 FORD F350 Crew Cab, good shape, runs excellent. $1,200. 335-5789

10,550

$

1995 GMC Suburban 1500 4x4, shift on the fly, 350 auto, 3rd row seat, cruise, a/c, trailer hitch, clean. $3,400. 334-8604

NEW!

4-Wheel Drive 6 Speed, White

16,500

$

2014 RAM 1500 Crewcab 4x4 SXT

NEW! FOR LEASE

5.7 hemi 6’4” box, Red

29,995

$

2012 Chrysler 300 low Kms black

22,595

$

*VehicleS may not be exactly aS ShoWn

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK In-House Financing Available

For Quick Approval call: 668-5559 #4 Fraser Road, McCrae, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5S8

2011 CHEVY Silverado 1-ton diesel 40,000 km, crew cab, command start, still under warranty. Paid $59,000, asking $39,000. 456-7157 2011 TOYOTA Sienna Minivan, 21,000 km. 7-passenger. Bought new last yr. Excellent condit. $26,000 obo. 667-2715 2008 FORD F150 4x4 quad cab 5.4 l, c/w P/S, P/L, P/W, cruise, back-up camera, tow package, 3-pc. Tonneau, CD, new tires, etc., $120,000 km. $17,500. 660-4806 2008 TOYOTA Tacoma 4x4, double cab, fully loaded, tow package, new times, brakes windshield, tinted windows, tonneau cover, exc. condit. $20,500 obo. 336-0569 2008 TOYOTA Tacoma TRD Sport, double cab, 4-W drive, air cond., 6 cyl, locks, AM/FM, custom canopy, mint condit. 98,000 km. $25,000 obo. 633-3939

1995 INTERNATIONAL bus for sale.  Has Yukon and Quebec inspections. Diesel, 48 passenger, no seats, auto. Need your class 5. Winterized. $5,000 obo. (418) 560-0128

1993 CHEVY G20 good condit, 189,000km, auto, V8 5.7, c/w a/c, el seats, windows, central lock, new trans, water pump, $3,500. 334-0790 1992 DODGE W350 4x4 CUMMINS Diesel, dually, flatdeck, full-size sleeper, 5-spd manual, winch, lots of upgrades. Prime musher's rig!  $5,500. 333-0812 1992 FORD F150 wood truck, short box, runs well, good rubber. $800. 821-3431 1990 CHEVY 1-ton flat deck, 2 w/d, dual wheels, 350 auto, $750.00. 456-4088 1979 F250 4x4, reg cab, 4-spd,, 8ʼ box, body rust, engine needs rebuild, running gear & trans excel. shape. $600. 332-6565 HAYNES REDAIR manual for 1993-1999 Ford Ranger pick-up, $15. 660-4806 HEAVY DUTY truck hitch to fit 3/4 or 1-ton Ford, as new. 668-2332

Auto Parts & Accessories

Hi-Rise & Cab Hi - several in stock View at centennialmotors.com 393-8100

2005 DODGE 1500 quad cab 4x4, v/8 auto, cruise tilt, a/c, p/s, p/b, $6,800. 667-7777 2005 NISSAN Frontier, extʼd cab, 4WD, automatic, 159,000kms, new windshield, newer tires, brakes, wheel-bearings, serviced regularly, $8,000 obo. 667-2607 2004 CHEV Silverado, 240,000 kms, rebuilt motor, 2x4, needs a starter and a bit of work, good runner. $2,700. 335-7556 2004 GMC 2500 HD 4x4 cab, long box, c/w remote start, trailer tow pkg, aluminum liner/toolbox, fully serviced, new battery & tires. 633-4311 2003 HYUNDAI Santa Fe AWD V-6, 95,000 km, new tires, battery, remote start. Perfect condit in and out.  $6,950. 333-9993 2003 TOYOTA Tacoma.  V6, standard, 161,000 km. Box liner/block heater/matching canopy/winter tires (1 season)/tow hitch. Nice truck, well maintained.  $12,500. 333-0346. 2002 CHEVY 2500 HD. Great winter tires on, toolbox, winch, set of summer tires. $6,000 obo. 336-1022 2002 MAZDA B-2300 pick-up truck, 4 cyl. 2.3L rear wheel drive. 150,000 km, new timing chain and set, c/w winter tires and canopy. $5,200 obo. 334-8287 2001 FORD Windstar for parts, blown motor, new tranny, good tires. Taking offers. 332-6025 1999 GMC Sierra 1/2 ton 4/4, ext cab, v/8 auto, cruise tilt, a/c, custom bumper c/w winch, driving lights. $6,300. 667-7777. 1995 CHEV K1500 Z71 (4x4), 5.7L v8, auto, ext cab, 225,000 kms - asking $2,200, call 393-4328, leave msg.

NOKIAN STUDDED 175/65R14. Brand new. 334-9406 (no text) or leave a message at 456-2239. 1 GOODYEAR Wrangler RT/S P265/75R16 tire, mounted & balanced on GM 6-bolt rim, never used. $100. 332-1670 TIRES AND Rims, 4 Tires, LT 245/70R17,  Firestone Transforce ATs 60-70% tread, 17” aluminum GMC Rims, 6 Bolt, Off of a 2008 GMC Sierra 1500, nice rims, $999. 335-0548 TOYO WINTER tires 205/55R16 still 80% tread. $300 obo for set. 334-2472 lv. message.

WANTED TO buy: 205/55R16 winter tires for Mazda 3. Will pick up. 334-8271.

2007 CHEVROLET Uplander, 101,000kms, Silver FWD, $5,500.00, serious Inquiries only. 668-4787

2006 FORD Ranger 4.0L V6, 4x4, extʼd cab, standard trans. Bed mat, front & rear receiver hitch, 105,000kms, $9,200 obo. 668-4836

SET OF 4 Toyo Open Country winter tires, LT225/75R16. Excel condit, $600 obo. 668-4637

1994 CHEV Silverado with metal Gemtop industrial canopy, auto, 2wd, 249,000 km, $3,200 obo. 334-2768 1994 DODGE Caravan, seats up to 7, nearly new all-season tires, rust on driver's door, does burn some oil, but runs and drives fine. $1,200 obo, 334-4340

TIRES! TIRES! TIRES! Seasonal Changeover Lots of good used tires–15”,16”,17”,18”,19” and 20”–lots to choose from. $25 to $150 a tire. $25 to mount and balance per tire. Call Art 334-4608 SEMI-RETIRED LICENSED mechanic looking for work. Gas - diesel. Have own shop. Willing to do mobile work. 456-9608 4 NOKIAN 195-79/R14 snow tires for sale. $15/ea. Call 334-4625. SET OF 17” rims w. summer tires from Toyota Matrix, 633-3154.

Pet Report

FREE TIRES. 4 175/70R13 & 2 155/80R13, 90% tread, 2 185/60R13, summer, 70% tread. 668-3243

SLED DECK for p/u truck.  Aluminum, power tilting, LED lights, good cond. $1,500.  333 0117

2007 CHEV LS 2500 HD Crew Cab 4X4. Many options, trailer tow, fully serviced, new brakes & battery. $16,500 obo. 633-4311

2006 DODGE Dakota 4x4 w/160,000km. Great condition. Moving, must sell. $8,500 obo. 334-8549

SET OF 4 used black 16" winter rims, 5 bolt pattern,  $50 for the set    Matt 667-4394 or txt 332-8282

1995 NISSAN Pathfinder, V6 auto, command start, runs great, one owner, $1,500. 332-0726

TRUCK CANOPIES - in stock * new Dodge long/short box * new GM long/short box * new Ford long/short box

2006 DODGE 2500 pick-up, 180,000kms, $23,000 obo. 668-3975

61

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

SET OF 4 used Goodyear Nordic Tires P215/65R15. $150 obo. 456-7855 4 STEEL Winter Rims, 16”, 5-bolt to fit Honda Civic, c/w hubcaps, $300.00. 334-8554 O.E.M. ROOF rack cross rails for 2006 Nissan X-Trail, 668 - 4732 NOKIAN STUDDED on rims 155/80R13. 1/2 season. $400. 334-9406 (no text) or leave a message at 456-2239 LIGHT TRUCK tires, 2 of 205 70R 14, Nordic Winter, light use. 668-2513 3X MICHELIN LT265/70 R17, great tread, $375, 633-4311 SET OF tires, 16”, 50% wear, asking $200. 633-5050. GOODYEAR N O R D I C winter tires, P205/75R14 w. 5-hole rims, used 2 seasons, $200 for all. 667-8726 TRUCK C A N O P Y , white high rise, 80”lx60wx28”h, lots of windows, $200. 660-4806 4 WINTER tires w. studs and rims, almost new, R14, 4 summer tires. $350 obo. 633-4405

Pets Canines & Company Dog Obedience School All level training courses Private lessons FCI/WUSV/MEOE/Bronze Master Trainer and FCI certified training directors Serving the Yukon since 1992 333-0505, 668-4368 www.facebook.com/caninesandcompany TO GIVE away, 1 Pointer/Husky cross sled dog, dog house optional. 335-2675, no texts please. WANTED. TWO kittens, preferably male and from the same litter. Call 633-4792. 6 RACING sled dogs, 5-6 yr old, multiple championship wins. Proven, well trained, fit and ready to go racing for the 2013-14 race season.  Call 633-6502 for details. 2 BORDER Collie/lab puppies, both female, free to good homes. For info call Rob, 334-0911 after 6pm.

Hours of operation for tHe sHelter: Tues - Fri: 12:00pm-7:00pm • Sat 10:00am-6:00pm CloSed Sundays & Mondays

633-6019 FRiDaY, noVEmBER 1

2013

Help control the pet overpopulation problem

have your pets spayed or neutered. FoR inFoRmation call

633-6019

lost/found lost • mcintyre female blonde puppy bright green collar anwsers to Grizzly contact Deloris @ 335-7311. (19/10/13). • takhini trailer court, male, grey and white tabby, wearing a collar anwsers to Drogro contact Sean @ 335-8432. ( 26/10/13). • Porter creek, neutered male, black with white on chest and toes, no collar, contact Brent @ 633-5495. (29/10/13). • logan, female darker yellow lab, no collar, is microchipped contact allan @ 668-3575 (29/10/13). • Porter creek, male Schipperke, black, no tail, answers to Spud, no collar but is

microchipped, contact Bonita @ 335-8135 (10/31/2013) • Porter creek, female, GSDX, black and tan, no collar, 2years old answers to Kaluha, contact Kaitlyn @ 334-4343. (31/10/13). found • mccrea a black and grey dog with boxer type face has a collar but no tags contact lori @ 633-3218.(05/10/13) • Riverdale area on grey mountain school road the dog is a medium size with brown head with white body and darker brown spots, contact Puneet @334-2955. ( 17/10/13)

RunninG At lARGE...If you have lost a pet, remember to check with City Bylaw: 668-8382

AVAilABlE foR Adoption in fostER HoMEs doGs • 11 mos old, spayed female, RetrieverX, tan (Jewel)

CAts • 1.5yr old, DSH, grey and white, neutered male (Sappy)

At tHE sHEltER doGs • 5 yr old female, lab/Pit Bull X (Gaia) • 3yr old, neutered male, akita, grey, white (a.J.) • 2 yr old, neutered male, GSDX, brown and black (muttley) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, white (Happy) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, tan (Sleepy) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, tan (Bashful) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, (Rose) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, (lily) • 1 yr old, female, Bear dog, black, brown, (Virgo)

• 1 yr old, female, labX, black (capicorn) • 1 yr old, neutered male, corgiX brindle, (Scorpio) • 14 weeks old male, Bear dog, blonde, (Bambam) • 2 yr old male neutered, Husky, grey white, (Jake) • 2 yr old female, labX, blonde (Summer) • 1 yr old female, Husky, grey white, (chinook) • 12 weeks old, male, corgi, black brown, (Snickers) CAts • 6yr old, maine coonX, neutered male, grey 6yr old, maine coonX, neutered male, grey and white (tinker)

Pet of the Week!

S

appy

Hello, I’m Sappy. I’m a shy young guy. I do like to get attention when I want it. Contact the shelter for info on how to meet me!

spECiAl

• Homes needed for retired sled dogs. they would make excellent pets. contact Sandra at 668-3647

633-6019 126 Tlingit Street

www.humanesocietyyukon.ca

if your lost animal has been inadvertently left off the pet report or for more info on any of these animals, call 633-6019 or stop by 126 tlingit street.

Pets will be posted on the Pet Report for two weeks. Please let us know after that time if you need them re-posted.

You can also check out our award winning website at:

www.Humanesocietyyukon.ca


62

Yukon News

The Yukon Kennel Club is excited to announce our new course line up!  We have a new Certified Training Director, Niomi Smith! Puppy Kindergarten November 2 – December 21 Tuesdays and Saturdays Building an obedience foundation, socialization, manners and more! Pre-Register for Novice Obedience starting in January 2014! Please contact Wendi @ 633-4952 www.Facebook.com/YukonKennelClub WANTED - looking for a Pomeranian to be our well-loved family pet. 335-0659 2 PET carriers, small and med-small for cat or dog, plastic hard shell, $20 ea. 660-4806 WANTED, MALE kitten for companionship. Liz, 633-2760

Motorcycles & Snowmobiles 2004 MXZ Rev 600, in awesome shape, c/w spare rebuilt 800 motor. $4,500. 335-7556

TAITʼS CUSTOM TRAILER SALES 2-3-4- place snowmobile & ATV trailers Drive on Drive off 3500 lb axles by Trailtech - SWS & Featherlight CALL ANYTIME: 334-2194 www/taittrailers.com SKI-BOOSE TO tow behind double track on skis for cargo or passengers, gd cond. 668-2332 2005 700 Arctic Cat M7, excell cond, asking $4,500, 2003 Skidoo Summit 800, good working cond, asking $3,500, 1992 Skidoo Formula Plus MX, good working cond, asking $2,000, 633-2602 2005 POLARIS Sportsman EFI 800 four wheeler with snowplow, winch, and storage box. $5,000. 335-6314 HYDRAULIC PLOW kit for Polaris Ranger, new, $850. 633-4375 SUMMIT 800 Adrenaline, blue/yellow,  146", 3.800 km, exc. condit, elec reverse, hardly used the last 4 years.  $4.500 firm. 332-6025

Cheryl, Darryl and Darren are sad to announce the passing of their father

Friday, November 1, 2013

2000 BEAR Cat 440 Snowmobile, 120kms on new engine, new skis and track, c/w cover & new adult helmet.  $3,999. 335-2648 2002 ARCTIC Cat 500 4x4, $3,800 obo. 633-5791

Marine PROFESSIONAL BOAT REPAIR Fiberglass Supplies Marine Accessories FAR NORTH FIBERGLASS 49D MacDonald Rd Whitehorse, Yukon 393-2467

9-20ʼ SEA Cans Upgrading. Various conditions. Some leakers, some in good condition. Prices range from $1,800 up to $3,000. Cans can be delivered in city limits for $150 333-0717 1998 PETERBILT HIGHWAY tractor, ready to work, $14,900. 1989 Freightliner parting out at $6,900. 30ʼ Jeep trailer $7,900. Estate sale. Sell all for $25,000 package deal. 333-0717 2002 CAT 315 CL Excavator, 5,000 hrs., quick change, dig bucket, thumb, $55,000. (250) 651-7773.

NADEN 18ʼ aluminum boat, 25 hp. Yamaha L.S. elec. start & battery, spare new prop, remote steering, EZ load trailer. $4,000. 821-3431

Heavy Equipment

1996 CASE 821B loader, 6,500 hrs., excellent cond, $45,000. (250) 651-7773 2 REBUILT 6” Flight pumps, $10,000 ea., 1 10” flight pump, $20,000, misc. fittings and lay flat. (250) 651-7773. R520 KUBOTA loader with bucket, forks & canopy. $50,000. 456-7112 TECH ARMORED underground electrical cable  #000/3 wire,   $7/ft. 867-863-5715

NEW & USED EQUIPMENT For Sale Come see MACPHERSON RENTALS @ 117 Copper Rd or call 633-4426

Campers & Trailers

PORTABLE GAS powered welder/gen set. 225 amp Hobart, 17 hp. gas powered Kohler engine, excellent shape. $2,000.00 obo. 633-6502

NEW OR USED TRAILERS For Sale or Rent MACPHERSON RENTALS 117 Copper Road 633-4426

Toner

Celebration of Life to take place

Saturday November 9, 2013 1:00pm – 5:00pm at the Johnson Elementary School (gym)

CLOSED-IN CARGO trailer w/big fold-down back door & single side door. 24ʼx8.5ʼ. Like new. $4,500. 867-993-5937 TITANIUM 5TH wheel, 24E19, new in 2004. C/w hitch, track, 2 batteries, 2x30 lb. propane, spare tire. Winterized. $20,000. 821-3431 BLUE BIRD buses. Can be driven or made into camper or storage. Has seats and storage compartment. $5,000 ea. 867-993-5937 2000 PROWLER 27.5ʼ 5th wheel, 14ʼ slide, truck & hitch pkg. avail, excellent condit. $14,200 obo. 335-0022 INTERNATIONAL 1995 diesel school bus Was a 48 pass., now empty caravan,  exc condit, has Québec and Yukon inspection, auto, need Class 5 licence only. 418-560-0128 UTILITY TRAILER 1-ton p/u box, c/w good tires, space lights, trailer jack, all works. $600. 334-8604 2001 12ʼ gooseneck stock trailer, very good condition, hardly used. $4,500. 456-4088

Coming Events

Gerald (Gerry) october 28, 2013

TAITʼS TRAILERS www.taittrailers.com taits@northwestel.net Quality new and used Horse * Cargo * Equipment trailers For sale or rent Call Anytime 334-2194 Southern prices delivered to the Yukon

13 Denver roaD in McCrae • 668-6639

Custom-cut Stone Products

HEADSTONES • KITCHENS • BUILDING STONE • AND MORE...

sid@sidrock.com

ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com ATLIN - GLACIER VIEW CABINS “your quiet get away” Cozy self contained log cabins canoes, kayaks for rent Fax/Phone 250-651-7691 e-mail sidkatours@ atlin.net www.glacierviewcabins.ca THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone with dementia. Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713 MENTAL HEALTH Caregivers Support Group meets the third Thursday of every month, 7-9 pm, #4 Hospital Rd, main floor resource room, in Whitehorse.  667-8346.

Henk Waterreus 1931 – 2013

Surrounded by family, Hendrikus (Henk) Martinus Waterreus died peacefully in his home in Canmore, AB on October 24, 2013. As a former member of the Royal Netherlands Air Force, he came to Whitehorse, Yukon in 1957 to begin his life as a devoted husband and father. Here he discovered his love of cross-country skiing and the outdoors. His retirement years were spent in Canmore as a loving grandfather. Henk is survived by his wife Mimi, brother Bill, sister Toni, daughters Karin and Monique (husband Pierre), sons Marcus and Stephen, granddaughter Charlene (husband Riley), and grandsons Jeremy and Benjamin. An intimAte church service wAs held OctOber 29th in cAnmOre. “Only when you drink from the river of silence, shall you indeed sing. And when you have reached the mountain top, then you shall begin to climb. And when the earth shall claim your limbs, then you shall truly dance.” (KAhil GibrAn) We will miss your gentle heart forever and always. cOndOlences fOr the fAmily mAy be left At www.bOwriverfunerAl.cOm bOw river funerAl service AssistinG the fAmily. telephOne 403-678-4880 fOr further infOrmAtiOn.

STORYTIME: AGES: 6 - 24 months & caregiver(s) until Wed Nov 27, 10:30 a.m. Whitehorse Library. Free registration necessary. Space is limited. 667-5239 MAIN STREET Society Annual General Meeting to take place Tuesday November 5th at noon at the T.C. Richards Building.

In loving memory of

Ronald Ranson

OveRland Oct 6, 1947 - nov 1 2011

Forever loved and remembered Love Hazel and pooch Sandy

Toralee Jessie Jane

Williams

April 14, 1997 - November 1, 2012

Wow, one year has gone, woman. Momma misses you, along with many others... Tell stories about you always... the crazy little lady I remember... Your family and friends miss you a great deal, Toralee. Forever in our thoughts, minds, hearts, body and souls... Love you, Jess. Forever loved, Mom and Nicholas

THE FRIENDS of the Gallery AGM will be held Wednesday, November 13th, 7-8pm in the Yukon Arts Centre Green Room. New & current members welcome. Refreshments provided. FAMILY FUN Night, November 22, 6-8pm. Yukon College gym, drop-in tennis. All welcome. Free. 393-2621 KLUANE QUILTER'S Guild, AGM, Monday, November 4th following the Pine Tree Meeting. Members welcome. LATIN DANCE classes are every Friday night. Latin Fiesta October 19th at Antoinette's restaurant. 335-0909 or salsayukon@gmail.com for info ART CONTEST. The Rotary Music Festival invites Yukon youth aged 5 to 18 to create an artwork for its program cover. Check the rules at www.rmfestival.ca. Deadline: January 15, 2014. WHITEHORSE S T R I N G Ensemble AGM  8pm   Thursday, November 14. (Following the weekly practice)  Hellaby Hall at Christ Church Cathedral, 4th Ave & Elliott St. (Across from RCMP). Everyone welcome. 667-4630 WILDERNESS TOURISM Workshop. Business Interest? Expand opportunities? Nov. 16-17, 8:30-5:00. Vista Outdoor Learning Centre. $25. Prereg. by Nov. 8 at www.tc.gov.yk.ca/tourism. Space limited. More info rjantzen@shaw.ca COFFEE HOUSE! Sat. Nov 2. Featuring: Dan Halen + Chic Callas + the Open Stage! Help set up 6pm, 7pm Open stage sign-up, 730pm show! $5 United Church Bsmt, 6th+Main, 633-4255 SNOWBOARD YUKON AGM, Thurs Nov 14, 7pm at Sport Yukon VELONORTH CYCLING CLUB'S AGM will be on November 14, 2013 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at Sport Yukon. LAKE LABERGE Lions Christmas cakes and cookies are here now.  Get yours early, please call Ann at 633-5493.


HILLCREST COMMUNITY Association AGM Wednesday Nov. 6, 7-9 pm at Yukon Transportation Museum. For more info call 668-2233. GRANDPARENTS AND extended family: Having problems with access or custody? Contact Grandparents Rights Assoc. of Yukon, meetings as needed. 821-3821 FREE TENNIS Family Fun Nights.  Oct. 25 & Nov 22, 6-8 pm.  Yukon College gym. Bring a friend/parent/kid, have fun playing tennis. Coach and assistance available. No registration required. F.H. COLLINS School Council Regular meeting @ 6:30 p.m November 6, 2013, in the Fine Dining Room at the school. Everyone Welcome. GOSPEL BRUNCH with Nicole Edwards and New Orleans buffet at LMCC, November 10th. Tickets $25.00 by reservation 667 7083, www.mountlorne.yk.net HOSPICE WORKSHOP "LIVING with Loss" Thurs. Nov. 7, 6:30-8:30pm for anyone living with personal loss or supporting others who are grieving. Register: 667-7429, administrator@hospiceyukon.net BARA AGM - Yukon River Trail Marathon organizing committee annual meeting on Wed. Nov 6th at 5pm at Sport Yukon. New board members welcome. Snacks provided. Info yukonmarathon@gmail.com. COPPER RIDGE Place is looking for volunteers to share time with seniors. Please phone Catherine Chenier 393-7508. PRESENTATION/DISCUSSION: SHORELINE Erosion, Tagish Community Centre, November 7 @ 7:00 pm. Sediment Transport & potential flooding in the Southern Lakes System. Something to offer in advance? 660-4106 THE CARDBOARD Crush Scavenger Hunt is on!  Find all 5 bales of cardboard, collect the facts and enter in the draw for a prize. www.ravenrecycling.org/crush.  SUZUKI STRINGS Association Yukon AGM, Nov. 18 at Riverdale Baptist Church, 4:30 pm onward. More info: Lise at 668-7659 THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone with Dementia. Info call Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713. CAROLING CHORISTERS, singers from the Whitehorse Community Choir will come to YOUR Christmas party and sing carols for 20 minutes. Nov 29, Dec 13, 14 & 20. Fundraiser. 633-4786 HAMLET OF Mt. Lorne Local Advisory Council - next meeting Tuesday November 5, 7pm, LMCC. All welcome. PORTER CREEK Community Association meeting Monday, November 4th, 5:15 pm at the Guild Hall. . Everyone Welcome. Come show your support. For more info. call 633-4829

CLOTH LETTERS Exhibition: Hundreds of images of good wishes and thanks after Tsunami of 2011 made into large quilts.   On display until Nov. 5, Canada Games Centre, Yukon Arts Centre. JOIN SECOND Opinion Society in welcoming local writer Eleanor Millard for the launch of her new book Summer Snow, Thursday November 7th at 7:30pm at SOS, 304 Hawkins St. JAPANESE FILM Festival: Sunday, Nov. 3. "Brave Story", 1pm, "Always: Sunset on Third Street", 3:10pm, both rated PG, Japanese with English subtitles.  Old Fire Hall on 1st Ave.  Free admission, refreshments. YRTA (YUKON Retired Teachers) Breakfast Tues. Nov. 12th, 9:30 a.m. at Ricky's at The Ramada. All welcome! Info: 667-2644 24-HR PLAYWRITING Cabaret, Nov 9,  Yukon Inn. Record number of playwrights participated in the Playwriting Challenge. Witness excerpts from the plays created at the Challenge. Hosted by Anthony Trombetta. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Action Circle, letter writing to protect and promote human rights worldwide. Tuesday, November 26  at Whitehorse United Church, 7:00pm-9:00pm, www.amnesty.ca, 667-2389 WHITEHORSE G E N E R A L Hospital Women's Auxiliary monthly meeting, Mon. Nov. 4th,  7:30 p.m. at WGH. New members welcome! Info: Barb @ 667-2087

Services

Natasha

THOMAS FINE CARPENTRY • construction • renovation • finishing • cabinets • tiling • flooring • repairs • specialty woodwork • custom kitchens 867-633-3878 or cell 867-332-5531 thomasfinecarpentry@northwestel.net

Sunday November 3rd, 2013 @ 3pm Mt. McIntrye Recreation Centre in the Grey Mountain Banquet Room

ANGYʼS MASSAGE Mobile Service. Therapeutic Massage & Reflexology. Angelica Ramirez Licensed Massage Therapist. 867-335-3592 or 867-668-7724 angysmassage@hotmail.com 200-26 Azure Rd Whitehorse YT, Y1A 6E1 NORTHRIDGE BOBCAT SERVICES • Snow Plowing • Site Prep & Backfills • Driveways • Post Hole Augering • Light Land Clearing • General Bobcat Work Fast, Friendly Service 867-335-1106 BUSY BEAVERS Painting, Pruning Hauling, Snow Shovelling and General Labour Call Francois & Katherine 456-4755

- INSULATION Upgrade your insulation & reduce your heating bills Energy North Construction Inc. (1994) for all your insulation & coating needs Cellulose & polyurethane spray foam Free estimate: 667-7414

LOG CABINS & LOG HOMES Quality custom craftsmanship Using only standing dead local timber For free estimate & consultation contact: Eldorado Log Builders Inc. phone: 867.393.2452 website: www.ykloghomes.com

SHARPENING SERVICES. For all your sharpening needs - quality sharpening, fair price & good service. At corner of 6th & Strickland. 667-2988 BACKHAULS, WHITEHORSE to Alberta. Vehicles, Furniture, Personal effects etc. Daily departures, safe secure dependable transportation at affordable rates. Please call Pacific Northwest Freight Systems @ 667-2050 S.V.P. CARPENTRY Journey Woman Carpenter Interior/Exterior Finishing/Framing Small & Medium Jobs “Make it work and look good.” Call Susana (867) 335-5957 susanavalerap@live.com

MC RENOVATION Construction & Renovations Laminated floor, siding, decks, tiles Kitchen, Bathroom, Doors, Windows Framing, Board, Drywall, Painting Drop Ceiling, Fences No job too small Free estimates Michael 336-0468 yt.mcr@hotmail.com

IBEX BOBCAT SERVICES “Country Residential Snow Plowing” •Post hole augering •Light landscaping •Preps & Backfills Honest & Prompt Service Amy Iles Call 667-4981 or 334-6369 HOUSECLEANER AVAILABLE Fast and thorough No criminal record 30-year Yukon resident $30/hr 335-0009 ARMOUR-ALL DETAILING Reliable, Professional Service 633-6855

MARY LAKE Community Association AGM, 102 Fireweed, Thursday, Nov. 7 at 7 pm. Come and meet your neighbours!

Marsh Lake Transfer Station

JACK HULLAND SCHOOL Council, regular Council meeting November 6, 2013 at 7:00 pm in the school library, everyone is welcome

summer HOurs: FRI/SAT/SUN: 10:00 am to 6:00 pm • mON/Tues: 6:30 am to 2:30 pm

HU,  A spiritual love song to God, regain peace, love and comfort. Tuesday Nov 5 and Tuesday Dec 3 at 8:10 pm at Elijah Smith School.  633-6594 or www.eckankar-yt.ca YUKON'S WWII-ERA Art, music, entertainment and memories, public presentation. Thurs, Nov. 7, 7-9pm at MacBride Museum. Free, reserve your seat 667-2709 xt 3. www.macbridemuseum.com. LATIN DANCE Classes, beginner 2 Salsa and Merengue classes, intermediate 2 Rueda de Casino (Salsa), every Friday night, 335-0909 or salsayukon@gmail.com for info CRANBERRY MARKET Saturday November 9th, 9-3pm Mt McIntyre-Grey Mountain room. Snacks, draws and free parking. LONG AGO Yukon Archeological and Paleontological Society fall meeting Wednesday, November 6, 7:30 p.m. in meeting room of Whitehorse Library. For info. call Michael, 633-6579. YUKON CIRCLE of Change: Be the Change, Community workshops in Whitehorse Nov 1-3, Haines Junction Nov 8-10. Tools  for people who want to build resilience in families and communities. WOLF CREEK Community Association AGM - Wednesday, Nov 27th, 7pm at Golden Horn School. Info: wolfcreekca@gmail.com FIRST NATIONS Craft Fair at Elijah Smith School Nov. 30th. Book your tables now! Call the school at 667-5992. JAZZ IN the Hall, Thurs, Nov 7. Steve Gedrose educational vignette. Vocalist Dave Haddock jazz project. Jazz jam. Old Fire Hall, 7:00 pm. $5 at door.

63

Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

Celebration of life for

Tizya-Jones (Campbell)

In lieu of flowers, we ask that you make a donation to the Canadian Diabetes Association on behalf of Natasha.

Tora-Lee Williams

April 14,1997 - November 1, 2012

I thought of you with love today But that is nothing new. I thought of you yesterday and All the days before that too. I think of you in silence As I often speak your name All I have are memories and Your pictures in a frame Your memory is my keepsake Dear With which I’ll never Part You will always be with me Tora-Lee Always in my Heart

Love Dad, Nicholas, Casey, Grandma and Grandpa & All Your Hume/Williams Family

& Recycling Depot gOiNg TO wiNTer HOurs Friday, NOv 1, 2013: FRI/SAT/SUN: 10:00 am to 5:00 pm • MON/TUES: 6:30 am to 2:00 pm CLOsed wed/THurs winter and summer The recycling depot accepts clean & sorted tin, glass, plastic and paper product. Bring in your refundable beverage containers for a refund.

Carole Ann

Hunt

Easier than ever

to donate to the Humane Society! Paypal is a quick, easy and safe method of supporting the Shelter. You can make a one-time donation or you can donate a set monthly amount, all with one simple click of the mouse! Go online today. A printable receipt is provided at time of donation.

www.humanesocietyyukon.ca Click “Donate” then “Charitable Gifts”. Or enter the link below: http://www.humanesocietyyukon.ca/charitablegifts.html The Shelter relies heavily on the donations of generous Yukoners. Over 60% of our annual budget is made up of donations and fundraising. Without YOU, the Shelter would not be able to run. Let’s help those who can’t help themselves! Our furry, four-legged friends thank you!

For more info, please call 633-6019.

The family of Carole Ann Hunt (Scott) is saddened by her recent passing on October 23, 2013 at Whitehorse General Hospital. Carole Ann was born on July 2, 1947 at Twillingate Newfoundland to Lloyd and Emily Scott of Terra Nova, Newfoundland. Carole Ann is pre-deceased by her parents and her loving husband James Hunt. She is survived by her sister Alice Budden and her brother Robert Scott (Verna), her three children; Patrick McCarthy (Tracey), Lori Muir and Scott McCarthy (Cheri) and 8 grandchildren; Matthew, Jake, Tijana, Meghan, Josh, Ben, Quinn and baby Rylan. During her illness she was given a quilt from the Chemo Clinic which she treasured, made and donated by volunteers. In lieu of flowers if you would like to make a donation to this invaluable group please contact “Bears Paw Quilts” of Whitehorse and make a donation in Carole Ann’s name. Carole Ann was well-known for her amazing cross-stitching and her love of watching the game of Curling she will be missed by all who knew her. Special thanks to Dr. Avery and Nurse Kristy from the Chemo Clinic for such great care and concern.


64

DRUG PROBLEM?

Yukon News

Narcotics

Anonymous

MEETINGS:

Wednesdays 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. <BYTE> Fridays 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm 4071 - 4th Ave. <Many Rivers>

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Yukon Communities & Atlin, B.C.

TCM MAID SERVICE Reliable, Thorough & Professional Reasonable Rates References available 335-4421or 393-3868 LOG CABINS: Professional Scribe Fit log buildings at affordable rates. Contact: PF Watson, Box 40187, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 6M9 668-3632 PASCAL PAINTING CONTRACTOR PASCAL AND REGINE Residential - Commercial Ceilings, Walls Textures, Floors Spray work Excellent quality workmanship Free estimates pascalreginepainting@northwestel.net 633-6368 BLUE HILL MASONRY • Cultured Stone • Ceramic Tile • Brick Andre Jobin 633-2286

Carcross Y.T.

Wednesday - 7:30 p.m. Library Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Carmacks Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Dawson City Y.T.

Thursday - 8:00 p.m. New Beginners Group Richard Martin Chapel Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Saturday 7:00 p.m. Community Support Centre 1233 2nd Ave.

Destruction Bay Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Faro Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Haines Junction Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Mayo Y.T.

Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Old Crow Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Pelly Crossing Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Ross River Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Tagish Y.T. Monday 7:30pm Lightwalkers Group Bishop’s Cabin, end of road along California Beach Telegraph Creek B.C. Tuesday - 8:00 p.m. Soaring Eagles Sewing Centre

Teslin Y.T. Wednesday - 7:00pm Wellness Centre #4 McLeary Friday - 1:30p.m. Health Centre Watson Lake Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

“SPECIALIZING IN BATHROOMS” Start to Finish • FLOORING • TILE • CARPENTRY • PAINTING • FENCING • DECKS “ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!! DON: 334-2699 don.brook@hotmail.com TOMBSTONE CONTRACTING Loader and dump truck services     Driveways, parking lots, concrete driveways, sidewalks and pads.    Fork lift, lifting boom    Snow haul and removal     Free quotes Call  334 2142

3 reasons why you should call

1 2 3

Excellent friendly customer service 24-7. Located only 3 mins from downtown. Easy 24 hour access.

CITYLIGHT RENOS Flooring, tiling, custom closets Painting & trim, kitchens & bathrooms Fences & gates Landscaping & gardening Quality work at reasonable rates Free estimates Sean 867-332-1659 citylightrenos@gmail.com

JOURNEYMAN CARPENTER/PAINTER 35 years experience For house repairs Renovations • Kitchens • Bathrooms Flooring • Drywall • Etc References Available Honest • Reliable • Meticulous Call Brad 335-8924

BOBCAT AND BACKHOE SERVICES in Whitehorse, Marsh Lake, Tagish area Call Andreas 660-4813

SUBARU GURU Fix•Buy•Sell Used Subarus 30 year Journeyman Mechanic Towing available Mario 333-4585

CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION Licensed, insured, WCB certified Small or big contracting Specialize in new or tiled bathroom renovation Phone David: 333-0772

TITAN DRYWALL Taping & Textured Ceilings 27 years experience Residential or Commercial No job too small Call Dave 336-3865

Do you neeD storage?

Beaver Creek Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

KLASSIC HANDYMAN SERVICES “HOME RENOVATION SPECIALIST”

Friday, November 1, 2013

ELECTRICIAN FOR all your jobs Large or small Licensed Electrician Call MACK N MACK ELECTRIC for a competitive quote! 867-332-7879

Kitchen or Restaurant for Lease Town and Mountain Hotel 401 Main Street Apply to Kayle Tel: 668-7644 Fax: 668-5822 Email: info@townmountain.com

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS in Whitehorse

MONDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 8:00 pm New Beginnings Group (OM,NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. TUESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 7:00 pm Juste Pour Aujourd’hui 4141B - 4th Avenue. 8:00 pm Ugly Duckling Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. WEDNESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St.. 8:00 pm Porter Crk Step Meeting (CM) Our Lady of Victory, 1607 Birch St. 8:00 pm No Puffin (CM,NS) Big Book Study Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. THURSDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Grapevine Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 6:00 pm Young People’s Meeting BYTE Office, 2-407 Ogilvie Street 7:30 pm Polar Group (OM) Seventh Day Adventist Church 1609 Birch Street (Porter Creek) FRIDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Big Book Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 1:30 pm #4 Hospital Rd. (Resource Room) 9:00 pm Whitehorse Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. SATURDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 2:30 pm Women’s Meeting (OM) Whitehorse General Hospital (room across from Emergency) 7:00 pm Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS) SUNDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 7:00 pm Marble Group Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS)

NS - No Smoking OM - open mixed, includes anyone CM - closed mixed, includes anyone with a desire to stop drinking

www.aa.org

bcyukonaa.org

AA 867-668-5878 24 HRS A DAY

HOUSE CLEANING Services offered: 2 reliable & hard working house cleaners for hire Do floors, bathrooms, dusting, kitchens, and any extra cleaning you want done! 456-4888 or anna.r@northwestel.net Residential Snow Removal Competitive Rates 633-6855 Armour Lawn Care, Design & Snow Removal Reliable, Professional Service

Lost & Found LOST: 1 bag with 8 rolls of 1/4” Styrofoam, 4ʼx4ʼx1ʼ btwn. Wood St. & Centennial St. 334-9872. LOST, BLUE cooler and camping gear, fell off truck on Alaska Highway btwn. Whitehorse & Rancheria. Reward for contents. Mike, 633-6603 MISSING FROM Taye Lake cabins, sheep horn on wooden plaque & small radio. 334-7671 (cell).

Call 334-3216

info@titaniumstorage.ca

SNOW CLEARING Sidewalks, Driveways, Commercial, Residential Call Francis at Speedy Sparkle 668-6481 or cell 334-8480

CUSTOM To make your ideas a reality.

Ironwork railings, gates and much more

www.ironworkyukon.com call mike morrow at 335-1888

60 Below Snow Management Commercial & Residential

Snow Removal (867) 336-3570 For all your snow removal needs. No jobs too small.

FOUND - Radio Controlled model car found in parking lot of the First Pentecostal Church in Granger. 633-3485. FOUND: SUPER Cycle bicycle in Riverdale. 667-4589 LOST, SCHIPPERKE (small black tailless dog), Porter Creek/KK/Takhini/College sightings, answers to Spud. Call 335-8135, 668-3885, 633-3294

Business Opportunities

Looking for New Business / Clients? Advertise in The Yukon News Classifieds!

Take Advantage of our 6 month Deal... Advertise for 5 Months and

Get 1 MONTH OF FREE ADVERTISING Book Your Ad Today! T: 667-6285 • F: 668-3755 E: wordads@yukon-news.com

AL-ANON MEETINGS contact 667-7142

Has your life been affected by someone’s drinking ???

WEDNESDAY 12:00 noon Hellaby Hall, 4th & Elliott

FRIDAY

7:00 pm Lutheran Church Basement Beginners Mtg ( 4th & Strickland ) 8:00 pm Lutheran Church Basment Regular Mtg ( 4th & Strickland )

456-4567 NEED UNDERGROUND WIRE?


Sports Equipment

CERTIFIED TECH SHOP

Heat moulded skates Skate sharpening Downhill, X-ski and Snowboard repairs and maintenance Bike maintenance and repairs Fast, thorough service

The Hougen Centre, Whitehorse, Yukon

in the Hougen Centre, 305 Main St. 668-6848

POWERTECH HOME gym equipment. Work bench multi system with accessories incl. leg press, curl, and dip machine. Will assist with set-up.  View equipment visit, powertech site: powertecfitness.com. $2,200. 336-1019 XC POLES, $15 pr. XC skis 160/167 $25 pr. XC boots. sz. 7/37 $25 pr. 311B Hanson Street. EXERCISE BIKE for sale. New $240. Sale $125. 456-4459 2008 CRF Honda 70F kidʼs dirt bike. Great condition. 456-7112 DELUX STIGA Tennis Table, sturdy, folds up and on wheels.  Excellent condit. $125. 456-2162. MOUNTAIN BOY kicksled "Colorado" style, great condit, c/w nylon runners, new $370, asking $195. 456-2162. MOUNTAIN BOY "Ultimate Flyer" kids sled, Delux, c/w finished wood frame, nylon runners, new $170, asking $85.  456-2162 GIANT "AVAIL" womenʼs road bike, 5'7"-5'10". S105 brakes and derailleurs. Shimano Flight Deck brake/shifter combo. Carbon seat post. Mavic CXP 22 rims. $1,000. 336-2108. EXERCISE BIKE, new $240, asking $125. 456-4459 1 RIGHT-HAND hockey stick, Easton Ultra-Extreme, never used, $15. 660-4806

Livestock QUALITY YUKON MEAT Dev & Louise Hurlburt Grain-finished Hereford beef Domestic wild boar Order now for full delivery Payment plan available Samples on request 668-7218 335-5192 HORSE HAVEN HAY RANCH Dev & Louise Hurlburt Irrigated Timothy/Brome mix Small square & round bales Discounts for field pick up or delivery Straw bales also for sale 335-5192 • 668-7218 1 12-YEAR-OLD quarter horse mare and  1 5-year-old mare, both well broke and quiet. Both are good with their feet and easy to trailer.  Asking $1,500 each.   Mandy 633-3659

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013 RIVENDELL FARM LOCAL ORGANIC VEGETABLES Beets, turnips, 5 types of potato, & rutabaga Km 6.5 Hot Springs Rd www.rivendellfarm.ca 633-6178 FREE RANGE pork, Yukon grown, no hormones, no antibiotics, government inspected. Taking orders. 393-1939

Baby & Child Items CHILDRENʼS CLOTHING in excellent condition, given freely the first & third Saturday monthly at the Church of the Nazarene, 2111 Centennial. 633-4903 LARGE COSCO stroller w/canopy, $50. White Ikea baby crib, $50. 633-5427 BURLEY CHILD Trailer Encore, for 2 children, including ski, jogging and bike set, like new, paid $1,250, asking $950. 633-3399

WHERE DO I GET THE NEWS? The Yukon News is available at these wonderful stores in Whitehorse:

EVENFLO HAPPY Camper childʼs playpen, c/w storage/travel bag, $25, stroller, lightweight & compact, gd condit, $10. 667-8726

Childcare LOLAʼS DAYHOME Located downtown Has spaces available for children 12 months & older Fully licenced & ECD levels 12 years experience Enjoy a clean & learning environment Call 668-5185 LITTLE MUNCHKINS DAYCARE New - has openings for children ages 6-months to 4-years Great downtown location! 7:30am - 6:00pm French introduction for pre-schoolers, specialized infant room, loving & nurturing 668-2075

Furniture BUNKBEDS, NICE solid pine c/w drawers, desk, 2 clean mattresses, in great condit. $1,200 new, asking $500. 333-9966 2 GIRLS oak desks (white) with matching bookcases for sale. $40 each obo. Call 334-4625. 70ʼS MAPLE swivel rocker $40. Duncan Pfife table,, $225. 311B Hanson St. after 5:00 p.m. CHILD'S DESK (pine) for sale. $30 obo. Call 334-4625 DOUBLE BOXSPRING, mattress and frame, very clean, great shape. $150.00. 334-9873 DOUBLE FUTON in excellent condition.  Pine Frame, includes mattress and cover. Asking $150 obo. 668-6904 CORNER OAK entertainment stand, TV opening 32” w. 27.5” L., 2 cupboards, 2 drawers. $75 obo. 633-5324 SOLID BAMBOO counter height dining table, gently used, easy to clean, in fantastic shape. C/w 5 chairs, perfect condition. Great for adults and kids . $400 obo. 334-7306 METAL FULL size rocking chair, red, in excellent condition. $30. 668-6904

Congratulations to

Caroline (Drury) Markos

HILLCREST

PORTER CREEK

RIVERDALE:

Airport Chalet Airport Snacks & Gifts

Coyote Video Goody’s Gas Green Garden Restaurant Heather’s Haven Super A Porter Creek Trails North

38 Famous Video Super A Riverdale Tempo Gas Bar

GRANGER Bernie’s Race-Trac Gas Bigway Foods

DOWNTOWN: The Deli Extra Foods Fourth Avenue Petro Gold Rush Inn Cashplan Klondike Inn Mac’s Fireweed Books Ricky’s Restaurant Riverside Grocery Riverview Hotel Shoppers on Main Shoppers Qwanlin Mall Superstore Superstore Gas Bar Tags Well-Read Books Westmark Whitehorse Yukon Inn Yukon News Yukon Tire Edgewater Hotel

on achieving her degree in Master of Music – Voice Performance at the University of Manitoba. Proud of you! Love Mom & Dad

THE YuKoN NEWS IS AlSo AVAIlABlE AT No CHARGE IN All YuKoN CoMMuNITIES AND ATlIN, B.C.

It is our pleasure to announce the marriage of

Peggy Chippett and Luke Horrelt on

October 26, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada We wish you both a lifetime of happiness and a scrapbook full of good memories. Love Ted & Lisa

MONDAY • WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

“YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION” WEDNESDAY * FRIDAY

AND …

Kopper King Hi-Country RV Park McCrae Petro Takhini Gas Yukon College Bookstore


66

Yukon News 44” ROUND table, c/w blue, green & natural wood design, black base, 668-5188

PubLIc TENDER

REquEST FOR PROPOSALS

WATER DELIVERY, ROSS RIVER

BLACK SUEDE couch/bed (not futon). 668-5188

PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES FOR GROVE STREET SCHOOL Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 15, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Before November 14, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. On or after November 18, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101, 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Trish Smilie at (867) 667-5166. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Project Description: This tender is intended to procure water delivery services for the community of Ross River. Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, November 05, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Dwayne Muckosky at 867-456-6191. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

COUNTRY HOUSE dk. espresso parsonʼs bench w/storage, beige/tan microsuede seating, new, $325. 667-8726

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of

VINCE YOuNg,

(Earl Vincent Young) of Whitehorse, Yukon, Deceased who died on October 9, 2013, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor at the address shown below, before the 15th day of November, 2013, after which date the Executor will distribute the Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which they have notice. AND FURTHER, all persons who are indebted to the Estate are required to make payment to the Estate at the address below. BY: Stirling Young c/o Lackowicz & Hoffman Suite 300, 204 Black Street Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2M9 Tel: (867) 668-5252 Fax: (867) 668-5251

Education

Community Services

Friday, November 1, 2013 COUNTRY HOUSE 2-level coffee table 19”hx54”lx30”w, $300, matching 3-level end table 28”hx28”lx20”w, $200, or $450 for both. 667-8726 SOFA, OLIVE, w. chaise $450, Shaker-style wood & glass china cabinet 4'x5'x2' $650, blue chaise couch, curved back & 5 cushions $400, glass top coffee table $150, Lake Laberge. 456-2053

EstatE salE

Take noTice ThaT, Karina Lapointe of Box 20404, Whitehorse, in Yukon, is making application for a Food Primary - beer/wine and Off-premises Liquor Licence, in respect of the premises known as Café Balzam situated at Km 10 - Takhini Hot Springs Road, Whitehorse, Yukon.

FRI. 7pm-8:30pm 4071 - 4th Ave Many Rivers Office

ELECTRIC MATTRESS cover w. dual controls, fits king size mattress, great condit. $75, maple headboard/footboard and springs, dbl. size, $40. 660-4806 WHITE ARMOIRE $700, antique wash stand $250, antique dresser/mirror $350, semi-circular hall entry table w. drawer, $150, night stand w. drawer $50, bench w. lifting lid $60, 456-2053 Lk Laberge

Personals CITIZENS ON PATROL. Do you have concerns in your neighborhood & community? Be part of the solution! Volunteer valuable time to the C.O.P.S. program. With your eyes & ears we can help stomp out crime. Info: RCMP 867-667-5555

ARE YOU MÉTIS? Are you registered? Would you like to be involved? There is a Yukon Metis Nation that needs your support Contact 668-6845 HEPATITIS C or HIV Positive? Counseling, support, advocacy, nursing & naturopathic services available free of charge at Blood Ties Four Directions Centre. 633-2437 or 1-877-333-2437. All calls confidential MATURE GENTLEMAN, N/S, very clean, seeks N/S female for possible permanent relationship. 393-2545 or email ceberus44@yahoo.ca

Notification of Timber Harvest Plan for Review The following Timber Harvest Plan is available for public review and comment through the Yukon Forest Management Branch. Timber Harvest Plan

Geographic Location (District)

Deadline for Comments

Mackintosh East

Kluane District, Haines Junction

November 15, 2013

Liquor Corporation

LiQUoR acT

DRUG PROBLEM? Narcotics Anonymous meetings Wed. 7pm-8pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. BYTE Office

To view this plan and submit comments, or for a complete list of Timber Harvest Plans currently open for public review, please visit www.forestry.gov.yk.ca or phone 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3999.

any person who wishes to object to the granting of this application should file their objection in writing (with reasons) to: President, Yukon Liquor corporation 9031 Quartz Road Whitehorse, Yukon Y1a 4P9 not later than 4:30pm on the 20th day of November, 2013 and also serve a copy of the objection by registered mail upon the applicant.

1974 Bellanca Scout on WheelS

Skiis Available. TTAE 471 hrs. on 0-360 C2A Lycoming (180hp). Prop TTSN 109.7. TTAF 3334 Hrs. New Seats and glass 2011. Mogas STC, VGs. Useful load 830 lbs on wheels 700 lbs on floats. Great performer. View or call Justin at rodan air 667-7573 or call marilyn 333-0609.

$67,500

The first time of publication of notice is November 1, 2013. The second time of publication of notice is November 8, 2013. The third time of publication of notice is November 15, 2013. any questions concerning this specific noTice are to be directed to Licensing & Social Responsibility at 867-667-5245 or 1-800-661-0408, local 5245.

Yukon Water Notice Yukon WaterBoard Board– –Application Application Notice Office des dede demande Office des eaux eauxdu duYukon Yukon– –Avis Avis demande Application Number Numéro de la demande

PM07-567-2

Applicant/Licensee Demandeur/Titulaire

Assignment from Daryl Fry and Deryk Law to Lucky Strike Ventures

Water Source Location Point d’eau/Lieu

Dominion Creek and Jensen Creek

Any person may submit comments or recommendations, in writing, by the deadline for notice. Applications are available for viewing on the Yukon Water Board’s online registry, WATERLINE at http://www.yukonwaterboard.ca or in person at the Yukon Water Board office. For more information, contact the Yukon Water Board Secretariat at 867-456-3980.

Type of Undertaking Type d’entreprise

Placer Mining

Deadline for Comments 4:00pm Date limite pour commentaires, avant 16 h

November 12, 2013

Toute personne peut soumettre ses commentaires ou ses recommandations à l’Office avant la date limite indiquée sur le présent avis. Pour voir les demandes, consultez le registre en ligne WATERLINE au http://www.yukonwaterboard.ca ou rendez-vous au bureau de l’Office des eaux du Yukon. Pour de plus amples renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec le secrétariat de l’Office au 867-456-3980.

Notification of Timber Harvest Plan for Review The following Timber Harvest Plan is available for public review and comment through the Yukon Forest Management Branch. Timber Harvest Plan

Geographic Location (District)

Deadline for Comments

Little Fox Lake Fuel Wood II THP

Whitehorse

November 18, 2013

To view this plan and submit comments, or for a complete list of Timber Harvest Plans currently open for public review, please visit www.forestry.gov.yk.ca or phone 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3999.


Announcements

Whitehorse Duplicate

Bridge Club October 29, 2013

1. Lynn Daffe Bruce Beaton 2. Diane Emond Don Emond 3. Noreen McGowan - Lorraine Hoyt

Garage Sales 61 FINCH Cres, Logan, Saturday Nov. 2, 9am-noon, ladies winter clothing, Xmas decorations, misc. items, weather permitting. 183 FALCON Dr. Copper Ridge, Nov. 2 10am-2pm, fundraiser for Philippines earthquake victims, 5th wheel hitch, belly boat fishing set, etc., donations accepted. 334-4474

PUBLIC TENDER DESIGN - BUILD F.H. COLLINS SECONDARY SCHOOL REPLACEMENT F.H COLLINS SECONDARY SCHOOL - BLDG.#1221 WHITEHORSE YUKON 2013/2015

Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is December 12, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Before November 14, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. On or after November 18, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101, 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Philip Christensen at (867) 667-3543. Documents may be purchased for the non-refundable sum of $500.00 Cash or Cheque. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Highways and Public Works

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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

PUBLIC TENDER

PUbLIC TENDER

SUPPLY OF PORTABLE RADIOS AND ACCESSORIES FOR GOVERNMENT OF YUKON

HEATING FUEL FOR OLD CROW

Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 26, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Before November 14, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. On or after November 18, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101, 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Jenny Richards at (867) 393-6387. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Highways and Public Works

PUBLIC TENDER CUSTOM MANUFACTURED SCHOOL FURNITURE

Project Description: Deliver heating Fuel to Old Crow December 2013 and March 2014. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 21, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Before November 14, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. On or after November 18, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101, 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to David Knight at (867) 667-3114. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Highways and Public Works

REquEST fOR PROPOSAL ASSORTED REMEDIAL WORKS - KLONDIKE RIVER HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE CAMP

Project Description: This is a one (1) year Standing Offer Agreement for the supply of Custom Manufactured School Furniture. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 26, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Before November 14, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. On or after November 18, 2013, documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Suite 101, 104 Elliot Street, Whitehorse, Yukon. Technical questions may be directed to Sandy Brown at (867) 667-5108. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Project Description: Planning and implementation of assorted remedial works including: drinking water well design and install, contaminated soil excavation, groundwater monitoring and other related remedial works at the Klondike River Highway Maintenance Camp. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 19, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Ruth Hall at (867) 668-5851. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Highways and Public Works

Environment

Your Community Connection

LADIES AUXILIARY, R.C. Legion,

Yukon Inn, Christmas Craft Fair Nov. 2Nd Saturday, 9 aM - 3 PM. First Nations and Yukon-made arts and crafts. Bake table, raffles. info 633-4583

Christ The King Elementary School Christmas Craft Fair Saturday, NoveMber 9th 10:00aM-3:00PM. 20 Nisutlin Drive, Riverdale. Call Paula at 633-2724 to book a table or for more information.

Tagish Christmas Craft Sale Call for vendors! Nov. 17th, 9:30aM-12:30PM, tagiSh CoMMuNity CeNtre. $10/table. Sale during monthly Pancake Breakfast. Info: 867-399-3407

Lorne Mountain Country Christmas Craft Fair

deCeMber 8th LoRNE MoUNtAIN CoMMUNItY CENtER reserve a table now. 667-7083


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Yukon News

Friday, November 1, 2013

We Sell Trucks...

Really Nice Trucks.

So what are you waiting for

Christmas?

Virtually all mileage is “low wear” highway mileage All our trucks have been regularly and professionally maintained None of our trucks have ever been driven “off road”

Most vacation rentals are 2 people so the back seats are virtually unused Absolutely no previous industrial use All our trucks are 1-ton 4x4 Gas and Diesel

No S ticke Shoc r k ur o l l a w e Vi line n o y r o t n inve AT AT

FRASERWAY.com

9039 Quartz Road (across the road from Kal-Tire)

Mon Mon -- Fri Fri 8:30 8:30 -- 5:00 5:00 // Sat Sat 9:00 9:00 -- 4:00 4:00 // Closed Closed Sundays Sundays

Toll Free: 1-866-269-2783


Yukon News, November 01, 2013