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Tom Patrick/Yukon News

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F.H. numbers don’t add up PAGE 3 “Fiscally responsible”

VOLUME 53 • NUMBER 84

www.yukon-news.com


2

Yukon News

N.W.T. MP wades into Peel debate

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Ian Stewart/Yukon News

The Bonnet Plume River in the Peel Watershed. Western Arctic MP Dennis Bevington, representing NWT, has introduced a bill to protect the Peel.

Jacqueline Ronson

“The navigable waters act is purely, and has always been, an act designed to deal with ennis Bevington, MP for obstructions to navigation in Western Arctic, has called respect to particular classes of on the federal government to vehicles. It never was, nor is, put the Peel River back under a body of legislation designed the Navigation Protection Act. to protect the environment, That act used to be called habitat or water in a lake or the Navigable Waters Protecriver system. He is misleading tion Act, before the federal Canadians, as the Opposition government made sweeping has done on this issue, that changes to it as part of the somehow not having certain C-45 omnibus bill in 2012. rivers or lakes listed under this While the act previously act is an environmental issue. covered all bodies of water in It’s not.” Canada that could be considThe act, originally from the ered navigable, the government 19th century, called for federal has added a list of applicable assessments when a developwaters, exempting all others. ment project could interfere Just 67 rivers across Canada with someone’s right to navimade the cut, said Bevington. gate on the river, he said. The Peel was not among them. But the act had been adding months or years of delays “After consulting with people in the Mackenzie Delta and to projects that clearly would have no impact on navigation, in Whitehorse I knew there said Leef. was a need to undo the Con“It got to the point where servative mistake of removing projects and important comprotection from the Peel. By removing the Peel from protec- munity infrastructure investments were being obstructed tion, the Conservatives gave a green light to any construction because it was starting to be on the river without any review applied to small streams, small waterways, creeks, flooded or licence required from the ditches, anything that you federal government.” could essentially float a canoe But the act was never inon, would trigger an assesstended as a measure of enviment under the navigable ronmental protection, said waters act.” Yukon MP Ryan Leef. There are other mechanisms designed to deal with enviAdvertising ronmental protection, such as the Yukon Environmental and It’s good Socio-economic Assessment Board, said Leef. for you. While the intention of the act was never to protect the environment, it does offer a measure of de facto protecNews Reporter

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tion simply by adding another bureaucratic hurdle to any development on a body of water covered under the act. Bevington picked the Peel because of the current political controversy surrounding it, he said. “This bill that I’m putting forward is to try to bring attention to the fact that the Peel River is not being recognized.” The Peel crosses the border from the Yukon into the N.W.T. The debate over its protection is most heated in Yukon, where the territorial government is working to finalize a land use plan for the region, but a number of downstream N.W.T. communities are directly affected as well. Leef said that Bevington should respect the jurisdictions of the territories over their land and water. Bevington said that there must be federal oversight for bodies of water that cross borders. “By tossing it into the hands of the provinces and territories, it may create divisive action between the two.” But existing environmental review processes take inter-jurisdictional issues into account already, said Leef. The navigation act is simply not intended or designed to fill that purpose, he said. “At the end of the day, it’s just a poor effort at scoring cheap political points, and along with that he’s attempting to mislead Canadians.” Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com


Friday, October 25, 2013

3

Yukon News

Government low-balled F.H. Collins estimates Jesse Winter

showing a likely increase of $5.1 million to the project. But when the bids came back, he Yukon government knew the department was told to use that the original design for the original $38.6 million budget the F.H. Collins school replaceto evaluate them, Black said. ment project was likely to cost “The direction at the time was $43.7 million, not the $38.6 that we have no more money. As million budget it used to justify long as it can be managed within cancelling the project. the original budget, we would go When construction companies forward,” she said. bid on the project last winter, When asked why the Educathe lowest bid – a joint venture tion Department would promise between Whitehorse-based Ketza to build a temporary gym that Construction and Ontario’s Elthe government had no intention lisDon Corp. – was $47.78 milof actually paying for, Schiman lion. At the time, Premier Darrell replied: “Because we are a fiscallyPasloski said that was almost $10 responsible government, operatmillion over budget. The goving within a budget for the F.H. ernment cancelled the project Collins replacement project. We and decided instead to import a are focused on building a school previously constructed “campusthat meets the needs of Yukon style” design from Alberta to save students and families within our money. approved budget.” “We can do a lot with $10 milIn March, when news of the lion,” Pasloski said in March. Ian Stewart/Yukon News high bids and the project canBut the Ketza/EllisDon bid Premier Darrell Pasloski, right, and Patrick Rouble, the education minister at the time, at the cellation broke, EllisDon vicewasn’t $10 million over budget, at groundbreaking ceremony for the new F.H. Collins Secondary School in August 2011. president Michael Kazda said the least not according to the profesproject could have been saved if sional estimator the government the territory had been willing to ministers or the premier to com- cost estimate. Highways and Pub- negotiate. government had signed a confihired to evaluate the project. lic Works hired its own estimator ment. dentiality agreement with BTY. Information obtained by the “Several million could be saved – BTY – to do the same. She instead emailed written Yukon News through an access-to- The total project estimates were simply by deleting the geothermal In the spring of 2012, responses to questions Thursday released only after the privacy information request shows that system and changing the school Hanscomb said the school would layout to avoid the requirement afternoon. commissioner brought the issue BTY Group told Highways and cost $38.6 million. BTY said it “The budget for the F.H. to mediation. Public Works in December 2012 for a temporary gym,” Kazda told would cost $40.1 million. The Collins construction was $38.6 The NDP’s education critic, that the project was likely to cost the Whitehorse Star in March. government approved the lower million, an amount approved by $43.7 million. That price includes Jim Tredger, said this is another Under Yukon contracting law, number as the budget for conmanagement board,” the statecase of the Yukon Party cona temporary gym, a geothermal the government is only able to struction and put the project heating system, and a five per cent tinually moving the goal posts on ment read. renegotiate the price of bids up to out to tender in November 2012, 10 per cent. The bid from Ketza “This government is commitmajor construction jobs. contingency buffer. Black said. ted to bringing the F.H. Collins “The government continues “I’m beside myself. This is a and EllisDon was within 10 per But that tender didn’t include project in on budget because we to make promises that they can’t cover-up,” said interim Liberal cent the most up-to-date estimate. a temporary gym or geothermal are a fiscally-responsible governkeep, or that they don’t keep, or Leader Sandy Silver. Neither Ketza nor EllisDon heating. Under the original plans, returned the News’ calls for comment … We weren’t prepared, in that they change,” Tredger said. “The premier has misled the school’s gym would be torn principle, to go back to manage“Everything is shrouded in a Yukoners when he said that the ment by press time. ment board, to ask for additional down during construction and lack of transparency. The plans government had two separate What is the plan now? When change, the numbers shift. I know dollars, especially when the lowest the students would spend two independent estimators tell him the decision was made to scrap bid came in at $47.78 million,” the years being bused to various that the project could be built for the contracting community and the original design, the governWhitehorse locations for phys. ed. ment announced it would import statement read. the construction industry are $38.6 million. He knew that the classes. So how did the government statement was false when he made very frustrated dealing with the a previously constructed design A public outcry ensued, and arrive at $38.6 million? Public government on this,” he said. it in March. from Alberta. To do it required in December former Education Works spokeswoman Kendra Over the past week the News “We’ve been asking questions paying Barr Ryder Architects Minister Scott Kent relented, Black explained that when the made repeated requests to speak about this for six months. Now $900,000 to adapt the design to promising to build a temporary project was being developed, with Education Minister Elaine he needs to explain to Yukoners Yukon climate standards. gym. Whitehorse-based architecture why he wasn’t honest about these Taylor, Public Works Minister The new project has yet to go The tenders were called back firm Stantec was commissioned to numbers in the first place,” Silver Wade Istchenko and Premier to tender, but Schiman said that Darrell Pasloski. Cabinet spokes- design the building based on years and the gym was included, along said. should happen soon. The project of public input and consultation. with a request for geothermal woman Elaine Schiman said that When the News first filed a is now expected to be completed heat. Highways and Public Works by the 2015/16 school year. it was a departmental matter and Stantec then hired Hanscomb request for this information in Contact Jesse Winter at got another estimate from BTY it would be inappropriate for the Limited to come up with a total May, it was denied because the News Reporter

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Assessment planned for Community Wellness Court Ashley Joannou

Once someone has pleaded guilty and been accepted into the court, an individual “wellness plan” he Yukon government will be is created. They usually spend the completing one final evaluation next year and a half getting various on the effectiveness of the Comtypes of counselling and other supmunity Wellness Court, before its port. They check in with the court funding is scheduled to run out. on a regular basis. The court is a long-running Sentencing takes place after that pilot project that was planned is complete or the person has left until the end of next year. Then the program. the government will have to decide The goal is to address the unwhether it should continue to be derlying, root causes of a person’s regularly funded. behaviour. The court was first announced “This is an avenue for trying to in 2007. It targets offenders who decrease the rates of recidivism – of struggle with drug and alcohol reoffending,” said Justice Minisaddictions, mental health problems ter Mike Nixon. “If we can prove or cognitive disabilities such as fetal through this program that we’re in fact doing that, then ultimately alcohol spectrum disorder. News Reporter

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what we’re doing is decreasing the rates that people are being victimized. That’s something that’s important to me from where I sit.” The program gets reviewed every two years, but until recently there have not been enough participants to get a good overview of whether it is effective, Nixon said. The minister estimates about 72 people have completed the court’s programming. About 102 have started the process, but not everyone has made it all the way through. There are about 30 people involved with the court right now, Nixon said. Conceptually it is easy to see the benefits of the court, he said, but having concrete data will help the

government make a decision. The latest government budget earmarks $473,000 for the program. Nils Clarke, executive director of Yukon’s legal aid, said he believes the wellness court has been a “qualified success” and should continue to be funded. “If the right resources are brought to bear, then people can stop the descent,” he said. Nixon added that an effective community wellness court helps more than the people who appear before the judge. “The review and the program will help people be healthier. It will promote healthier communities and perhaps more productive

citizens and at the end of the day eventually reducing costs for the taxpayers,” he said. Clarke said some people can struggle with the length of commitment that is required, but the clients he deals with appreciate the opportunities the wellness court provided. “Our clients are human beings, and I think that for the most part human beings don’t want to live in despair or with addictions and this is a way to help that.” The plan is to have the evaluation completed by March – the end of the fiscal year. A final report will be completed a month or two after that, Nixon said. Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com


4

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‘It’s not all about risk, it’s about economic opportunity.’ Jacqueline Ronson

read in the headlines.” And the headlines, when it comes to fracking, are not he Yukon Chamber of good, said Heffernan. Commerce is bringing “If you read the headlines an Alberta fracking expert to today, it’s that hydraulic fracspeak in Whitehorse and Wat- turing is evil and it’ll be the son Lake. end of the planet. And in fact, Kevin Heffernan is the presi- that’s not the case. It has been dent of the Canadian Society done well over a million times for Unconventional Resources. in the U.S. and probably a couHe is coming to explain the ple of hundred thousand times complicated and controversial in western Canada. If it was as process of extracting natural dangerous as some would have gas from tight shale rock deep you believe, there’d be no place underground. in western Canada where you “My intention is to explain could drink the water.” the actual processes that are The Canadian Society for used, why they are used, and Unconventional Resources take questions from the audihas its roots in the 1990s as ence,” said Heffernan. a group of geologists and Hydraulic fracturing, or engineers looking for better fracking, involves pumping technologies to get at hard-toa pressurized slurry of water, reach oil and gas deposits, said sand and chemicals into wells Heffernan. in order to break apart rocks The association was formaland release gas trapped inside. ized in 2002. About half of its But most people do not have work now is communicating a good understanding of the complex technologies to the process, he said. general public, he said. “A big part of what our Fracking has never been organization does is to take used in the Yukon, and the really complicated technologovernment has committed to gies and translate them for the a review of the process before layman. Understanding this the technology is allowed to be stuff, it’s hard work, and that’s used here. one of the communications Many Yukon groups and challenges for any discipline First Nations have come out – it doesn’t matter if its denin opposition to hydraulic tistry or hydraulic fracturing. fracturing. It’s easy to get the headline Most recently, the Yukon understanding of a science or a River Inter-Tribal Watershed technical discipline, but there’s Council has called for a fracka lot more to it than what you ing ban in Yukon and Alaska until it is proven to the satisursd Fri, Oct 25 to faction of First Nations to be Thurs, Oct 31 safe. In southwest Yukon, The Whitehorse Yukon Cinema Whi8thorse 304 Wood Street Ph: 668-6644 Liard First Nation has announced a full ban on all oil and gas development. (14A) Nightly at 6:45 & 9:15 PM And in the north, the other Sat & Sun Matinees at 12:45 PM & 3:15 PM region affected by oil and gas development, the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation has said that it will oppose fracking until it can be proven safe. News Reporter

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Heffernan acknowledges that hydraulic fracturing, like any industrial process, involves risk. But those major areas have been clearly identified, and can be minimized under proper regulation, he said. One risk area is the design and construction of wells, he said. If wells are not made correctly, it can result in methane seeping through the concrete and contaminating groundwater. It happens, but it’s uncommon, said Heffernan. And that risk is exactly the same for a conventional well or a fracked well, he said. The other risk has to do with the handling and transport of the fluid pumped back out of the well after fracking. That risk, too, can be minimized with proper attention and regulation, he said. Getting First Nations and communities on board with hydraulic fracturing takes time, consultation and understanding on both sides, said Heffernan. “Operators that I’ve seen work very hard with First Nations to help them understand the processes and the technologies and the risk areas, and how those risk areas are addressed. And it’s not all about risk, it’s about economic opportunity. Where you have some First Nations concerned or worried about development, there are many other examples of First Nations who have embraced the technology and have embraced the oil and gas industry and the work that it does because it does deliver economic opportunity for communities.” Heffernan will speak at a Monday luncheon in Whitehorse. Tickets are $30 and seats are limited. He will also speak Tuesday in Watson Lake. Contact the Yukon Chamber of Commerce for details. Contact Jacqueline Ronson at jronson@yukon-news.com

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Yukon seeking affordable housing solutions ‘When we are not meeting their needs, they consume a great deal of services, medical services in particular. When their needs are met, they become very much like the rest of us. The cost savings are shown immediately in the medical system.’ Jesse Winter News Reporter

Y

ukon Housing is looking for ways to spend $13 million on affordable housing. The government released a request for qualifications on Wednesday, asking for proposals to construct and operate new affordable rental housing in the territory. “We’re looking to leverage the $13 million into $26 million in actual investment,” said Michael Hale, Yukon Housing Corp’s vice president of operations. “We’re not talking social housing and we’re not talking condos. We’re talking affordable housing.” Whitehorse’s current vacancy rate is hovering around one per cent, which makes finding rental housing for single people, young families and lower income Yukoners very difficult, Hale said. The plan is to have organizations pitch ideas and for Yukon Housing to bring 50 per cent of the cost to the table. The organizations, whether they be interested First Nations, nongovernment organizations or private business, must bring 50 per cent as well, but it doesn’t have to be in cash. “It could be a First Nation with a stake in a construction company, or someone wanting to contribute land to the project. It’s got to be 50 per cent, but the equity need not be in cash,” Hale said. It also has to be targeted at affordable housing. The Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation defines “affordable” as a

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Homeless advocate Judy Graves said the territory’s most at-risk people could benefit from $13.5 million in housing money.

rental rate no higher than 95 per cent of the median rent in the area. The median rental rate in Whitehorse was $875 in June. “We all know there’s a gap in affordable rental,” Hale said, “and we know this isn’t going to answer all the questions. But this is something that we can move on quickly. We can’t afford to wait until the housing action plan is finished,” Hale said. By partnering with local groups, Hale said he hopes that some projects could be ready very quickly, depending on the idea. If a proponent wants to

repurpose an existing building, something like that could happen within about a year, Hale said. The money is coming from the leftovers of the $50-million Northern Housing Trust, which the federal government gave to the territory to address housing needs here in 2006. Most of the money – $32.5 million – was given to Yukon First Nations to address their most pressing housing needs, and $4.5 million was used to construct the new Betty’s Haven, a 10-suite transition home for women fleeing

violence. But one expert on housing issues thinks the government is putting the focus in the wrong place. Judy Graves, the recently retired homelessness advocate for Vancouver, was in Whitehorse this week for a number of public talks about ending street homelessness in the territory. If she had $13 million to spend, she’d use it to help the most vulnerable, she said. “I would want to spend first on the people who are most disabled, the people who really have

such complex disabilities that they become homeless because they are simply not able to fend for themselves,” Graves said. “They are not able to go back to work, they are past the employment part of their lives. A surprising number of them are older, and it really is for the rest of their lives going to be a full-time job to cope with their disabilities,” she said. Based on her work with local anti-poverty workers, Graves estimates that there are perhaps 100 people in Whitehorse who are in desperate need of housing, and for whom targeted “affordable” rentals will always remain out of reach. And while Graves built her career being compassionate towards the most vulnerable, she has a much more pragmatic reason for pushing to help solve their challenges. It’s cheaper than the alternative. “When we are not meeting their needs, they consume a great deal of services, medical services in particular. When their needs are met, they become very much like the rest of us. The cost savings are shown immediately in the medical system,” she says. In the Yukon, social assistance pays a living allowance of up to $881 per month for single people, but they often end up spending that money on inadequate motel rooms or even campground plots in the summer. That kind of inefficiency could be stemmed if the territory focused on real solutions for its hardest to house, Graves said. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

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anada’s Arctic Council minister, Leona Aglukkaq, says the government needs to do a better job of including northern business and aboriginal knowledge in its study of climate change. “Over the last 16 years there has been a lot of scientific work conducted through the Arctic Council on climate change. The evidence is there. It is happening,” Aglukkaq said. “We need to work on incorporating traditional Inuit knowledge with science,” she said. Aglukkaq was in Whitehorse this week for the first summit of the Arctic Council, which Canada now chairs. She said discussion focused on establishing the council’s priorities for Canada’s term at the helm. “Arctic states operate on a consensus basis. The ideas were presented to the Arctic states and based on that, our priorities from the consultation were approved,” Aglukkaq said. “Canada’s priorities are responsible Arctic resource development, safe Arctic shipping and a circumpolar business community,” she said. The council will establish a circumpolar business forum in January to help northern business across the Arctic communicate with each other and give their feedback on issues like the impacts of climate change. “We need to continue to monitor what’s happening in the North and the science behind that is very important. We can’t stop. We have to continue

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Leona Aglukkaq in Whitehorse in 2012. Aglukkaq, the minister for the Arctic Council, was in Whitehorse this week discussing northern issues.

to assess what’s going on on the ground,” she said. But that means including what business and industry are seeing on the ground, she said, especially when it comes to the effectiveness of environmental monitoring. Industry should have a way of telling Canadians whether they are doing a good job of safeguarding the North, she said. “From the business community side of things, what they said is that we do all this research and mitigation measures are put forward by environmental assessment groups

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subject like polar bears without talking to the people on the ground, there’s a bit of a conflict. That’s not necessarily correct.” Aglukkaq spoke at length about the importance of scientific research in the North, and studying how climate change is affecting the environment north of 60. Earlier this week, a report released by the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada said that hundreds of federal scientists have been asked to exclude or alter technical information in government reports for non-scientific reasons. Thousands of scientists say they’ve been muzzled from speaking to the media or the public. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Automobile tire stores swamped as snow flies ‘Seven centimetres is a lot to melt. Some of it is probably here for good.’ Ashley Joannou News Reporter

N

ow that the first heavy snowfall is here, people are coming to terms with the fact that the beautiful weather we have been enjoying wasn’t going to last forever. That and they should have gotten their snow tires put on earlier. The wait for an appointment to swap out your treads is 12 days. Before the snow fell this week, that number was four to five days, said Canadian Tire’s Dale Johnson. At Kal Tire, where appointments are not possible, you’ll have to leave your car for at least 24 hours to get the other set of tires on. “We’re insanely busy,” said manager Rick Copes, adding that staff are staying late to get as many cars through as possible. On Thursday morning there was seven centimetres of snow on the ground outside Environment Canada’s station at the top of Two Mile Hill, said meteorologist Doug Lundquist. Looking out the window

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

City worker Josh Nichols leans into it while clearing wet, heavy snow from the cenotaph in front of Whitehorse city hall on Wednesday after the first big dump of the season.

Friday morning, much of the white stuff had already melted. But Lundquist warned it’s unlikely to disappear completely. “Seven centimetres is a lot to melt. Some of it is probably here for good,” he said.

It is expected to warm up a little – the high for Monday and Tuesday is four degrees. This year’s snow came a little bit later than last year. In 2012 the first day snow stayed on the ground was Oct. 10, Lundquist said.

It’s difficult to say when the territory had its earliest snowfall ever. “Historically speaking, there’s probably been snow at some point in every month of the year in Yukon,” he said. Whitehorse RCMP re-

sponded to 13 weather-related traffic calls between 5 a.m. Wednesday morning and 3 p.m. Thursday afternoon. Two were collisions and 11 were for vehicles that had ended up in the ditch. “Basically be attentive all the time, leave early if you need to and adjust your speed according to the weather,” said Const. Dean Hoogland. The city operations department is responsible for snow and ice control on approximately 300 kilometres of roads in the city. That includes everything except the Alaska Highway, which is maintained by the territorial government. The snow began at 5 a.m. Wednesday and the government’s plows and sanders were off and running by 6 a.m., said Doris Wurfbaum with the Department of Highways and Public Works. The Yukon government plows and sands 4,100 kilometres of highways and roads across the territory, she said. Sand is used unless conditions change to freezing rain. At the point crews switch to salt. Contact Ashley Joannou at ashleyj@yukon-news.com


8

Opinion

Yukon News

EDITORIAL

Friday, October 25, 2013

INSIGHT

LETTERS

COMMENTARY

Yukon Energy is unaccountable? Nothing could be further from the truth Piers McDonald

The Yukon Utilities Board then decides how much Yukon ecent open letters to the Energy can charge ratepayers Yukon Energy Corporato supply electricity. tion have suggested that there It is well known that last are “insufficient controls” on year 99 per cent of Yukon’s spending within the corpora- electricity was supplied by the tion. hydro system. It is also known In particular, investments that the demand for electriin assessing the viability of city, even excluding indusnext-generation electrical trial demand, is beginning to supply options and the proexceed the existing capacity of posed investment in liquefied the hydro system. natural gas (LNG) back-up Yukon Energy is examining generators have been cited as the source of the next generaexamples of profligate spend- tion of electrical supply and ing. Nothing could be further has been investing in technical from the truth. studies to assess the viability Yukon Energy is the most of various options throughscrutinized company, public out the territory: small hydro, or private, in the territory, geothermal, bio-mass, waste starting with detailed interto energy, wind, etc. This work nal board of director reviews is not an “extra-curricular” of budgets. The business activity, as described by some, plans which outline company but rather the corporation’s spending practices are posted core business. Yukon Energy publicly on the web, audited needs to plan and build new annually by the auditor genelectrical supply before the eral of Canada and reported current system runs out. It is to the legislature. the prudent and responsible There are also regular apthing to do and has been suppearances before the inported by the utilities board at dependent Yukon Utilities previous public hearings. Board, which regulates the When Yukon Energy seeks activities of the corporation. It to have costs covered relatassesses, in as much detail as ing to the assessment of new it wishes, the reasonableness supply options and the buildof the corporation’s spending ing of new electrical supply practices. projects, it will apply to the For example, the most independent Yukon Utilities recent rate hearing before Board. It is this board, not the board saw Yukon Energy Yukon Energy, that will deteranswer over 1,000 written mine what costs are reasonquestions and participate able and what will be charged in three full days of detailed to ratepayers. verbal questioning – all done It has been noted that, in in public with interveners hearings before the board, Yukon Energy does not have joining in. all of its requests approved. In Yukon Energy’s obligation is to answer as many questions particular, some of the expenses incurred in order to file as are put forward and to do so as fully and fairly as it can. rate requests and participate

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in hearings are not approved, requiring the company to absorb them. This is not an uncommon occurrence and Yukon Energy does not take such approval by the regulator for granted. Neither should interveners who appear at public hearings. They, in fact, have had their expense claims significantly modified by the board as well. Yukon Energy does not take for granted the approval of the Yukon Utilities Board on any matter and consequently reviews its practices, rate requests and expense claims to try to reflect what is reasonable and, in particular, what the board considers reasonable. The other example of supposedly “unreasonable spending” by Yukon Energy is the proposed expenditure to replace backup diesel generators that have seriously exceeded their useful life. Yukon Energy operates an isolated electrical transmission grid without connection to the south and needs a reliable back up service in the event of a system failure. This backup service needs to be reliable. Yukon Energy’s board of directors has carefully assessed the options and has determined that the one that best meets the test of reliReporters

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ability and also meets the cost expectations of Yukon ratepayers is to install new LNGfired generators to replace the old diesel generators. While the suggestion has been made to replace the “end of life” diesel generators with used diesel generators once located at the Minto mine site, the board has concluded that this option does not meet the test of reliability and would be more costly than the LNG option in the long term. Yukon Energy, of course, knows that it must, as usual, seek approvals from a number of regulatory agencies, including the Yukon Utilities Board, in order to see this project through to completion. It takes nothing for granted but

believes that it has a compelling case to present and is hopeful that approvals will be granted and electrical ratepayers will benefit from the effort. I would conclude by saying that Yukon Energy operates as a fully accountable corporation providing an essential public service. It is continually looking for ways to operate as cost effectively as possible and strives to provide electricity in an environmentally sensitive way. Balancing these objectives is often a challenge, and we welcome suggestions from anyone and everyone as we work to meet the current and future needs of Yukon people. Piers McDonald is chair of the board of the Yukon Energy Corporation.

Quote of the Day “If you read the headlines today, it’s that hydraulic fracturing is evil and it’ll be the end of the planet. And in fact, that’s not the case. It has been done well over a million times in the U.S. and probably a couple of hundred thousand times in western Canada. If it was as dangerous as some would have you believe, there’d be no place in western Canada where you could drink the water.” Kevin Heffernan, president of the Canadian Society for Unconventional Resources. Page 4

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

INSIGHT

Have a couple brews beer also contains alcohol, which has been found if overdone to contribute to the very ailments by AL POPE humulones protect against. The latter study was commissioned by Guinness and other beer makers in an effort to counteract reports by beer drinkers’ spouses that too many pub nights have a negative effect on domestic harmony. The question for Canadians is, what role did beer bro nights, or the lack thereof, play in the Senate his just in: beer is good for expenses scandal? Having attended you. A study published in one or two single-gendered pub the journal Angewandte Chemie nights in the past, I’m able to say International Edition has found that, at least in my experience, two that humulones, the compounds things are expected of the attendee in hops that give beer its bitter fla- that seem to be missing from the vour, may have a positive effect on Conservative playbook: plausibilsuch ailments as cancer, diabetes, ity, and discretion. and inflammation. After a couple of pints, the gang In a separate study, Robin down at the pub are likely to greet Dunbar, director of Oxford Uniany dubious statement with loud versity’s social and evolutionary references to cattle excrement. neuroscience research group, has Similarly, when the suds flow, it’s found – this is true – that men’s assumed that what is said in the health is dependent on getting pub stays in the pub, even when together with the guys for a beer delivered at full volume. Failure at least twice a week. to observe this rule can result The first report cautions that in summary expulsion from the

NORDICITY

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group. So the question is, when Stephen Harper, Nigel Wright, and Mike Duffy discussed the question of Duffy’s Senate expenses, were they drinking beer? Did the PM pop the top on his third brew and shout, “Mike, shut up and pay the 90K. Our base are too dumb to understand the truth, go with the optics”? Did his chief of staff chime in with an expansive sweep of the arm and slur, “No prob, Duff. I’ll write you a cheque right blanking now”? Because if so, that’s privileged information. It’s very bad form to be talking about it outside the pub. Harper once insisted that no one else in his office, himself included, knew that Wright cut Duffy that infamous cheque. Now that the RCMP reports the PMO is crawling with people who knew all about it, informed observers are suggesting that the PM was simply observing the code of pub night. If all of this information was exchanged under dim light around a wooden table and a jug of draught, it would be dishonor-

able to divulge it to anyone, let alone the Canadian public. Plausibility is not the same as truth, and let it be said that throughout history the pub night has seen its share of untruths. But whether it is the size of a fish, the length of a putt, or the provenance of a cheque, the bar is no place for the bad liar. The pub night fabulist quickly learns to tell it well, or stay home. There is no better training ground for a storyteller than a gathering of friends who have been conscientiously attending to their humulone count. If you’re making it up, make it good, or the boys, or girls, will catch you out. Someone will push their chair back, make the traditional reference to bovine manure, your friends will laugh at you, and attention will turn to a new storyteller. Picture Harper down at the local on Friday night telling the gang, “I obviously would have never approved such a scheme.” No claque of 163 trained seals behind him to thump their desks

and bark every time his lips move, just a bunch of tipsy friends, all with their own stories to tell, ready to take over as soon as someone drops the ball. How far do you think he’d get? This is not to suggest the prime minister is departing from the truth when he claims to have known nothing about a transaction that was common knowledge among senior members of his staff. With the evidence available at present, who’s to say? It’s just that whether he’s telling the truth or doing the opposite, he’s not doing a convincing job of it. What Canada needs is a constitutional amendment making twice-weekly pub nights mandatory for the prime ministerial inner circle. The benefits are clear. It would help protect the country’s most powerful people from disease, promote their overall good health, and most important of all, it would help to keep them honest.

Al Pope won the Canadian Community Newspaper Award for best columnist in 2013. He also won the Ma Murray Award for Best Columnist in B.C./Yukon in 2010 and 2002.

From Beirut to Washington crops died but the polyculture prairie, with its diverse ecosystem, survived. What is going on in the Arab world today, by THOMAS L. I argued, is a relentless push, also funded by fossil fuels, for more monocultures. It’s FRIEDMAN al-Qaida trying to “purify” the Arabian Peninsula. It’s Shiites and Sunnis, each funded by oil money, trying to purge the other in Iraq, Syria and Lebanon. The more these societies become monocultures, the less they spark new ideas and the more susceptible they are to diseased ’ve spent most of my career covering conspiracy theories and extreme ideologies. Middle East politics. I always thought it It is no accident that the Golden Age of the was its own unique field. But, in the last few Arab/Muslim world was when it was a thrivweeks, I’ve felt myself to be at a real advaning polyculture between the 8th and 13th tage trying to explain American politics. centuries. You see, it turns out that all those years The same is true of the Republican Party covering Sunnis and Shiites, Israelis and in America today. Tea Party conservatives Palestinians, tribal conflicts and “Parties of funded by the Koch brothers and other God” have been the best preparation for covering today’s Washington, D.C., and par- fossil-fuel donors are trying to wipe out whatever is left of the Republican Party’s ticularly the Tea Party. Seriously, you’d get polyculture and turn it into a monoculture. a much better feel for Washington politics today by reading Lawrence of Arabia than the When Senate Republicans last week first offered their compromise proposal to end Federalist Papers. This is not good news. the shutdown, Rep. Tim Huelskamp, a Tea Let me start by recalling a column I Party congressman from Kansas, warned recently wrote from Kansas that noted the parallel between monocultures and polycul- that “anybody who would vote for that in the House as a Republican would virtually tures in nature and politics. It began with guarantee a primary challenger” from the the scientist Wes Jackson, the president of The Land Institute, explaining that the prai- Tea Party. In short: They’d be purged in rie was a diverse wilderness, with a complex favor of a monoculture. When the GOP was more of a polyculecosystem that naturally supported all kinds of wildlife, until European settlers plowed it ture, it gave us ideas as diverse as the Clean Air Act (Richard Nixon), daring nuclear up and covered it with single-species crop arms control (Ronald Reagan), cap-andfarms, mostly wheat, corn or soybeans. trade to curb acid rain (George H.W. Bush) Today, noted Jackson, we now use highdensity fossil fuels – in the form of gasoline- and a market-based health care plan (“Romneycare” in Massachusetts). The purge being powered tractors, pesticides and fertilizers mounted by the ultraconservative, oil– to sustain these single-species, annual funded monoculturalists in the GOP today monoculture crops, which are much more susceptible to disease and are exhausting the will kill the Republican Party if continued. nutrient-rich topsoil that is the source of all They will wipe out “all of its topsoil,” all of its rich nutrients, said the environmentalist prairie life. During the Dust Bowl years of the ‘30s, Jackson reminded, the monoculture Hal Harvey.

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That is, unless the GOP can avoid another lesson of Mideast politics: Extremists go all the way and moderates tend to just go away. With the feeble House speaker, John Boehner, and majority leader, Eric Cantor, consistently appeasing the Tea Party extremists, it is no wonder the party went over a cliff and almost took the country with it. But here’s another lesson I learned in the Middle East: It is not enough to just stop extremists from acting extreme. You have to take on and take down their ideas. After 9/11, Arab governments were more willing to arrest their violent fundamentalists, but few, if any, were willing to really take on and take down their ideas in public and offer moderate alternatives. Only Muslim moderates can take down Muslim extremists; only mainstream conservatives can take down Tea Party extremists. It’s striking how much the Tea Party wing of the GOP has adopted the tactics of the POG – “Party of God” – better known as Hezbollah. For years, Lebanese Shiites were represented by the mainstream Amal party. But in the 1980s, a more radical Shiite militia emerged from the war with Israel: Hezbollah. Under the leadership of Hassan Nasrallah, Hezbollah began to run for seats in the Lebanese Parliament in 1992 to change its brand. But it still refused to give up its weapons to the Lebanese army, arguing that they were needed for “resistance” against Israel. Ultimately, Hezbollah could only win a minority of seats, but today it uses its arms and pro-Syrian allies in Parliament to block any policy it doesn’t like. As Hanin Ghaddar, the Lebanese Shiite writer who edits NowLebanon.com put it to me: “Hezbollah’s rule is: If we win, we rule, but if you win, you’ll think you rule, but we will do anything and everything to hinder you, and then we rule.” The Tea Party is not a terrorist group. It has legitimate concerns about debt, jobs and

Obamacare. But what was not legitimate was the line it crossed. Rather than persuading a majority of Americans that its policies were right, and winning elections to enact the changes it sought – the essence of our democratic system – the Tea Party threatened to undermine our nation’s credit rating if the Democrats would not agree to defund Obamacare. Had such strong-arm tactics worked, it would have meant that constitutionally enacted laws could be nullified if determined minorities opposed them. It would have meant Lebanon on the Potomac. Which brings up one last parallel: Hezbollah started a war against Israel in 2006, without knowing how to end it. It didn’t matter whether it won or lost. All that mattered was that it “resisted the Zionists.” Hezbollah’s tacit motto was: “I resist, therefore I am.” Early in that 2006 war, Nasrallah boasted of Hezbollah’s “strategic and historical victory,” by holding Israel to a draw. But, in the end, the Israeli army dealt a devastating blow to Hezbollah’s neighborhoods and Lebanon’s infrastructure. After the smoke cleared, Nasrallah admitted that it was a mistake. The Tea Party started this war on Obamacare with no chance of success and no idea how to end it – similarly intoxicated by a self-image of heroic “resistance.” And just like Nasrallah, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas engaged in magical thinking, declaring that the House vote to defund Obamacare – although rejected by the Senate – was “a remarkable victory.” But most of his Republican colleagues aren’t buying it. They see only ruin. If nothing else comes out of this crisis than the fact that such Hezbollah-like tactics have been discredited in our politics, then the pain of the last few weeks will have been worth it. Thomas L. Friedman writes on international affairs for the New York Times.


10

Yukon News

In praise of the pooch playground

that this is the best option to follow, an increasing number of citizens are losing confidence in this task force form of consultation. I would like to thank the City of We have an alternative: The city Whitehorse for building the new informs its citizens through the off-leash dog area at the end of Main media that it is going to review the Street. When I have to bring our dogs to Protected Area Bylaw and indicates its reasons for doing so. Whitehorse, it’s often hard to find a A public meeting is held to arouse place and the time to get them out for interest in the review, and to provide a stretch. The new fenced-in area is citizens with the city’s list of concerns perfect for this. Thank you. with the present bylaw. Citizens are told how the city might address these Mark O’Donoghue concerns in the new Protected Area Mayo Bylaw. It asks interested citizens and City should revamp special interest groups to consult its public consultations the city’s website and do the following: Read the bylaw and consult the The city is planning to review the relevant maps, and then read what Protected Area Bylaw. As part of this city administrators feel should be process city administrators want to changed in the bylaw. Comment in establish yet another task force domi- writing on the concerns and on the nated by special interest groups. Alpossible solutions to these problems though administrators often suggest suggested by administrators, and

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LETTERS then add concerns of their own and suggest possible ways in which these could be addressed. Special interest groups (including community associations) along with individual citizens would submit their comments in writing if interested in the subject. (People are more responsible and thoughtful concerning their comments when forced to put their ideas in writing.) The name of the person or organization making the submission must be included. All submissions would be placed on the city’s website for public review. City administrators would review all submissions. The city would solicit the advice of its own experts (employees) found in applicable city departments, and perhaps in other municipalities. It might then call another public meeting in order to present its findings and receive comments from those in attendance. Administrators would prepare a draft bylaw which would be reviewed by city council and citizens during the normal bylaw approval process. This process would put all citizens and special interest groups on an equal footing. Only stakeholder organizations and individuals that are truly interested in the bylaw and have worthwhile comments would bother to make submissions. In addition, it might well save the city the time and money involved in establishing and running a stakeholder-dominated task force, eliminate the frustration experienced by special

interest groups not chosen to sit on a particular task force, remove the almost impossible job of coming up with a truly balanced task force, give hope to those not represented by special interest groups that their concerns will be given equal weight, and increase confidence in the public consultation process.

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Tragically, abusive relationships happen, sometimes at home, sometimes at work. Victims react differently. Keith Lay Some immediately realize that the Director, Active Trails Whitehorse situation is unhealthy and get away Association from it. Some stay, hoping for improvement, hoping that the positive Defending Little Dreamers will outweigh the negative. But when ugliness escalates, and We would like to speak in defence of the physical and emotional wounds Little Dreamers Daycare. become more serious, almost everyWhen our oldest child needed one reaches a point where enough is daycare we looked into many dayenough. Then they say, “This has got cares and picked one we thought was to stop.” great. It was not. Abuse doesn’t just affect indiWe pulled her out of that one viduals and doesn’t just pertain to and tried a second daycare that had humans. On a much larger scale, a waiting list. That one also was not the resource extraction industry is, acceptable. in many cases, abusive to the earth By that time we had a second – bulldozing, dynamiting, drilling, child and were very frustrated and shattering, poisoning, trampling, concerned about the welfare of our creating desolation. kids as the first two experiences were Some of us realized the unhealthiterrible. ness of the situation decades ago. Then we found Little Dreamers During my university years in West Daycare and could not have been Virginia, I was saddened by the damhappier. Lori and the staff were very age done by strip mining for coal. patient with our children, who loved These days, it is the damage done by the fracking process that is pushgoing to daycare. ing people to the point of saying, They luckily did not have to go “Enough is enough. This has got to every day but they missed it on the stop.” off days. I cannot say enough good Government leaders in the Yukon, things about this daycare and the care in other provinces and territories, in they took of our children. Ottawa and beyond need to realize Both did exceptionally well in Kindergarten in large part because of that a tipping point has been reached the work the staff did with them. Our in terms of awareness. The abuse of kids do not go to daycare now, but if the Earth, of our life-support system, they did Little Dreamers would be the can no longer be sugar-coated or explained away.

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Government scientists feel muzzled, advice ignored, according to union survey Bruce Cheadle Canadian Press

OTTAWA large survey of science professionals in the federal public service has found that almost 25 per cent of respondents say they have been directly asked to exclude or alter information for “non-scientific reasons.” Some 71 per cent of those surveyed said political interference is compromising policy development based on scientific evidence, and almost half of those who took part said they were aware of cases in which their department or agency suppressed information. The study, entitled “The Big Chill,” was commissioned by the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, and paints a disturbing picture of government scientists who feel they are being muzzled. More than 4,000 federal scientists – out of more than 15,000 who were invited –responded to the union-commissioned, online survey handled by the polling firm Environics. “A chill has settled on federal government science that is even greater than that suggested by the cases so far reported by the media,” Gary Corbett, the president of PIPSC, said Monday. Federal Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault is already conducting a study of how communications policy changes under the Harper government have clamped down on the sharing of government science with the public. Legault was spurred to investigate

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the environment. Corbett noted the 2006 Government of Canada communications policy states it must provide the public with “timely, accurate, clear, objective and complete information” about its policies, services and programs. “Whether by implicit policy or explicit action, there has been silencing and it continues,” Corbett said. But the survey was equally damning in its assessment of the government’s use of scientific research. Just 21 per cent of respondents said Environment Canada uses the best climate change evidence available to make policy, while only 29 per cent agreed Natural Resources Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press Canada does so. Scientists rally on Parliament Hill in Ottawa in September. A survey of scientists in the Over at Fisheries and Oceans, 86 federal public service finds a quarter say they’ve been directly asked to exclude or alter per cent of respondents said they information for non-scientific reasons. felt changes to the Fisheries Act will the issue by a lengthy report from ture Canada and Natural Resources conferences in 2011, published 600 hamper Canada’s ability to protect articles and participated in some the Environmental Law Centre at the Canada. fish and their habitat. Greg Rickford, the Conserva1,200 interviews. University of Victoria and the ethics Peter Bleyer of PIPSC said that tive minister of state for science and The exchange with Rickford’s when the 55,000-member union advocacy group Democracy Watch, ad 1 for Yukon News technology, said in an email that the office may help to illustrate the vast does broader membership surveys, which included a score of anecdotes 3 columns (6 inches) by 3 inches Conservatives have made “record chasm between the perspective of they typically get a fraction of the from six different government deto run Friday, 25 public and Friday, November 1 rate the science survey investments in science.” elected October officials and servants. response partments or agencies. “Science can power commerce, The Conservative government, achieved. The PIPSC survey, which was and billitto: FOYAS, c/o Patricia Halladay, phoneAnecdotally, 667-6089 respondents said create jobs, and improvecontact the quality appears, believes communication conducted June 5-19 and surveyed needs are easily met with carefully the muzzling of science has become 4,069 of the union’s 15,398 members, of life for all Canadians,” said the scripted and vetted talking points, worse or was never as bad before the adds statistical heft to that anecdotal junior minister’s email. Through his office, however, even if off topic. Federal scientists, on Conservatives came to power. But evidence. Rickford did not respond to questhe other hand, may feel differently. that’s really not the issue, said Bleyer. The responses came from across tions about the issue at hand: the Fully 90 per cent of respondents, “Whether or not this problem more than 40 government departhowever, said they don’t feel they’re existed before, it is a problem,” said ments and agencies and included 670 alleged muzzling of scientists and the suppression of science in policy Bleyer. “It’s a potential threat to all allowed to speak freely about their Environment Canada scientists, 651 development. Canadians. We need to fix it.” work in the media, and 86 per cent from Health Canada, 427 Defence A government official, speaking Treasury Board President Tony believe they would face retaliation if department employees, 343 from Clement’s office did not respond to a on background, said Environment they went public with information Fisheries and Oceans, 335 from the request for comment. Canada scientists alone attended 300 about harm to public health, safety or Canadian Food Inspection Agency and almost 300 each from Agricul-

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Evening ESL Classes to Improve Your Academic Reading, Writing and Speaking Skills Do you need to improve your skills to take academic courses at Yukon College?

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This is a 6-week program from November 4 to December 11, 2013 Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm Students need a Canadian Language Benchmark of 5 and above to qualify. For more information and to register please contact: School of Academic and Skill Development 867-668-8850 or Cathy Borsa at 867-668-5260

Hougen Heritage Gallery, Arts Underground Tuesday to Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exhibit runs until January 25, 2014 Come and see a 3D version of this glass plate stereoscopic slide. Yukon Archives, Louis Jacquot fonds, 89/42 #17

Tourism Culture Tourismand and Culture Yukon YukonArchives Archives

Tourisme et Culture Archives du Yukon

Friday

Nov. 01

2013

5-7pm

VegetAriAN style bAked beANs AlsO AVAilAble at Whitehorse United Church 6th & Main street (downtown) (elevator access) 667-2989 Adults $10 | seniors $7 | Children 12 & under $5 | Maximum family price $25

Doors open at 5pm

Proceeds go towards the NOAH fund


New Projects for Comment Yukon NewsOpen

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Victoria

Edmonton Calgary Toronto

Yellowknife

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PROJECT #

DEADLINE FOR COMMENTS

Placer Mine at Goring Creek

Dawson City (Dawson City)

Mining- Placer

2013-0135

November 8, 2013

Placer Mine- Indian River Near Ruby Creek

Dawson City (Dawson City)

Mining- Placer

2013-0078

November 4, 2013

Casino Project

Pelly (Mayo)

Mining - Quartz

2013-0127

EXTENTSION November 8, 2013

To moreinformation informationand/or and/or submit submit comments on any project To Visit getget more comments on any project – www.yesab.ca/registry OR Call Toll Free 1-866-322-4040 Visit - www.yesab.ca/registry or Call Toll Free 1-866-322-4040

North of 60° Agriculture Conference and Banquet “Germinate your Thinking” Conference - Friday and Saturday Join the Agriculture Branch in partnership with the Yukon Young Farmers and the Yukon Agricultural Association for this year’s conference. We’re featuring a wide range of agricultural related topics. All conference sessions are free and open to everyone. Friday November 1 - Gold Rush Inn, 411 Main Street 1:00 p.m. - Agricultural business coach Cedric MacLeod will be conducting a professional development session. This interactive workshop highlights and explores the nine business best management practices used by leading farmers across North America. This session is targeted at Young Farmers, but is open to all and can benefit experienced producers. Saturday, November 2 - Yukon Convention Centre, (Next to Coast High Country Inn) 4051 4th Ave. Sessions run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. • Cedric MacLeod on Farm Management Excellence. Cedric will be using a “Work in Process Manual” designed to get people thinking about how they run their farms. The presentation will highlight opportunities that arise from establishing a well-structured agricultural business.

Banquet - Saturday, Nov. 2 - Doors open at 6 p.m. with dinner at 7 p.m. featuring local food

WATSON LAKE

Skagway Juneau

Grande Prairie Fort Nelson Smithers

For the complete agenda please visit www.agriculture.gov.yk.ca

2/1

caNaDa/Us

Vancouver

(Assessment Office)

SECTOR

• Caitlin Dorward from Kwantlen Polytechnic University will be on hand to provide an update on the Yukon Food System Design and Planning Project, as well as results from her research.

ROSS RIVER

CARMACKS

4/-1

CLOSEST COMMUNITY

• Soil expert Jeff Lowenfels, co-author of Teaming with Microbes, The Organic Gardener’s Guide to the Soil Food Web. Jeff hails from Alaska, and is considered a very entertaining and knowledgeable speaker. Jeff is also a lawyer and the combination of garden writing and law have earned him the moniker of “America’s Dirtiest Lawyer”.

MAYO

BEAVER CREEK

PROJECT TITLE

• Gene Hachey from the Northwest Territories will be presenting a perspective on agriculture north of 60° and the NWT Small Scale Food program that helps grow food in communities across the territory.

-3/-10

DAWSON

New New Projects Open forPublic Public Comment Projects Open for Comment

Friday, November 1, and Saturday, November 2 Gold Rush Inn & Yukon Convention Centre, Whitehorse

r e w q z

OLD CROW

Friday, October 25, 2013

Dawson Creek

8°C 8°C -2°C -1°C -1°C -2°C

For out-of-town folks attending the conference and banquet the hotels have a Yukon rate. For more information or to buy banquet tickets, please contact the Agriculture Branch. Agriculture Branch Room 320 Elijah Smith Building, 300 Main Street, Whitehorse Phone: 867-667-5838 • Toll Free: 1-800-661-0408 ext. 5838 • Fax: 867-393-6222 • Email: agriculture@gov.yk.ca

Feel like a small fish in a big pond?

Stand out from the crowd and be seen! Advertise your business in the Yukon News. Phone: 867-667-6283 • Fax: 867-667-3755


13

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Jesse Winter/Yukon News

Firefighters douse a burning truck behind Yukon College on Thursday morning. The truck caught fire because of an electrical problem and isn’t considered suspicious, said the fire department’s platoon chief Don McKnight. The owner had only purchased the vehicle days before the fire, and it wasn’t insured yet, McKnight said.

Once school starts, the action never stops! That’s why we’re getting the flu shot — and not missing a moment. Teens who don’t like needles can get the flu mist vaccine this year, available in limited quantities.

BEAVER CREEK Oct 25 CARMACKS Oct 29, Nov 6 & 13 CARCROSS M–Th: from Oct 21 Oct 29 Oct 30 DESTRUCTION BAY M, W, F: from Oct 21 – Nov 29 KENO CITY Oct 25 OLD CROW M–Th: from Oct 21 F: from Oct 25

9am – 12noon, 2pm – 4pm

Beaver Creek Health Centre

TBD

Carmacks Health Centre

9am – 11am, 1:30pm – 3pm 1:30pm – 3pm 2pm – 3:30pm

Carcross Health Centre CTFN – main entrance Tagish Community Hall

1:30pm – 3:30pm

Destruction Bay Health Centre

10am – 11:30am

Post Office

9am – 12noon, 1pm – 4pm 9am – 12noon

Old Crow Health Centre Old Crow Health Centre

TESLIN Oct 25 WATSON LAKE Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 WHITEHORSE M–F: from Oct 21 Oct 25 Oct 26 Oct 28–30 Oct 29 Oct 29 Oct 31–Nov1

1:30pm – 4pm

VOT Council Chambers

1pm – 4pm 11am – 3pm 11am – 3pm 9am – 12noon, 1pm – 3pm

Health Centre Drop-in Clinic Signpost Seniors Hall Upper Liard Learning Centre Liard First Nation Office

9am – 11:30am, 1pm – 4pm 8:30am – 4pm 10am – 4pm 8:30am – 4pm 2pm – 3:30pm 9am – 11:30am, 1pm – 7pm 10am – 6pm

Kwanlin Dün Health Centre Whitehorse Health Centre Whitehorse Health Centre Whitehorse Health Centre Marsh Lake Community Centre Kwanlin Dün Health Centre Canada Games Centre Board Room

PELLY CROSSING T–F: from Oct 22 9am – 11am, 2pm – 4pm Pelly Crossing Health Centre ROSS RIVER Oct 25 8:30am – 11:30am Walk-in Clinic During usual AM and PM Walk-in Clinics – M–F: 8:30am – 11:30am and M–Th: 3pm – 4pm; and Wednesdays from 1pm – 3pm

For a complete schedule, dates and times of other community clinics, or for more information, please contact your local community health centre or visit yukonflushot.ca NOTE: A bilingual nurse will be on duty at most Whitehorse flu clinics.

YUKON NEWS: 25 October


14

Yukon News

r u o Y t r o p p u S Local s e s s e Busin

Shop Loca l

Dawson City Chamber of Commerce

The Whitehorse Chamber of Commerce – Working for Business and our Community In support of all Whitehorse and Yukon residents,

Annual General Meeting October 30, 2013 Downtown Hotel Conference Room 12 p.m. TEL: (867) 993-5274 RSVP: office@dawsoncitychamberofcommerce.ca

A. Business Support Programs:

GCDS We’ve got the right stuff for…

HALLOWEEN Spooky, gory, make-up fun Costumes, accessories, and more… Your one stop, Halloween Shop!

Yukon Inn Plaza 393-3984

MON-THUR & SAT 9:30 - 6, FRI 9:30-9, SUN 10-6

HAVE YOUR NEXT MEETING IN A ROOM WITH A VIEW AT THE WHITEHORSE CURLING CLUB. • Lounge area available for rent seven days a week. • Great for wedding receptions, meetings, birthday and retirement parties. • Large dry surface available for rent from mid April to mid September. For more information on booking this wonderful space Call: 667-2875 or email events@whitehorsecurlingclub.com

Prepay your funeral expenses. Preplanning and funding your funeral can give you Peace of Mind.

For more information or an appointment please call Heritage North Funeral Home: 867-668-4484

G-P Distributing Inc. Food Service Wholesaler

Local Warehouse Personalized Service Full Product Line Operated Year Round

Now Selling Kitchen Equipment. Large & Small – call for a Quote.

1.888.211.5368 P: 867.667.4500 F: 867.667.4501 29 MacDonald Road Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 4L1

Need Help Getting Employment? We can help with: We now have an • Resume writing office in Dawson! • Interview skills 867-993-2372 • Computer training • Job coaching • Applying for funding to go back to school or for self-employment

If you self-identify as having a disability, we are here to help, we do not require a diagnosis!

Yukon Council on disABILITY Come visit us in our office at Suite 2 – 211 Wood Street Next to the Yukon News Monday to Friday 9am—4:30pm

or call to make an appointment

867-668-6703 Government Education Advanced Education

Friday, October 25, 2013

• • • • • • •

Business Training Fund Yukon Business Development Program Partnering For Success SME Training Fund Business After Hours Ongoing Business Services Business Seminars, Round Tables & Workshops

B. Advocacy:

• Land Titles Office • Landlord and Tenant Act • Condominium Act • Bylaw Regulations • Taxation Rates • City of Whitehorse Budget …to name a few

C. Community Involvement • Community Policing Issues • Zero waste strategy with the City of Whitehorse • Housing - Affordable Rentals • Golden Host Awards And much more! Visit us at www.whitehorsechamber.ca The Whitehorse Chamber of Commerce... Proudly Supporting our Community Follow us on Twitter and Facebook! @Whitehorsecham1 Keep up to date on our current events, projects and other information that may be useful to the business community.

Tina Harris PFP Financial Planner 867-393-6055 tina.d.harris@rbc.com

Need financial advice? Give yourself every advantage, including convenience.

Financial planning services and investment advice are provided by Royal Mutual Funds Inc. (RMFI). RMFI, RBC Global Asset Management Inc., Royal Bank of Canada, Royal Trust Corporation of Canada and The Royal Trust Company are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. RMFI is licensed as a financial services firm in the province of Quebec.

NORTHERN VISION NOW HAS

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Northern Vision proudly welcomes the Edgewater Hotel to our family. We invite you to experience great things from the

Cellar Chop House & Martini Bar with the largest martini selection in the Yukon! Visit us on Main Street today! 667-2572 www.yukonhotels.com


15

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Harper fires back at Duffy: ‘darn right’ he asked senator to repay expenses Bruce Cheadle The Canadian Press

Ottawa rime Minister Stephen Harper has mounted his most spirited defence in months on the Senate spending scandal, accusing Sen. Mike Duffy of playing the victim card because he was ordered to refund inappropriate expense claims. “Mr. Duffy now says he is a victim because I told him he should repay his expenses,” Harper told a high-octane House of Commons on Wednesday. “Darn right I told him he should repay his expenses.” With his Conservative caucus enthusiastically hooting and banging their desks, Harper took the offensive in the daily question period, repeatedly rising to his feet to respond with vigour, if not always clarity. His performance – which lasted all of 19 minutes, including opposition questions – served as an antidote for Duffy’s toxic accusations levelled the previous afternoon in the Senate chamber. Duffy claimed all his expenses were cleared by the Prime Minister’s Office and Senate leadership, but that he was thrown under the bus when news reports began undermining party popularity. It was a scenario largely reiterated Wednesday by Sen. Pamela Wallin, another apostate

P

Tory. “’It’s not about what you did,”’ Duffy quoted Harper telling him. “’It’s about the perception of what you did that’s been created in the media. The rules are inexplicable to our base.”’ Harper denied making any such statement Wednesday. Instead, he dished up a bumpersticker-simple response for the Conservative Party base that has the benefit of being true, as far as it goes. Yes, Harper agreed, he did order Duffy to repay the expense claims. As for the rest of the saga, the prime minister artfully managed to take none of the responsibility but all of the credit. Did he threaten Duffy with reprisals if he wouldn’t go along with the scheme to repay his expenses? No, said Harper. “However, when inappropriate expense claims are made I expect corrective action to be taken,” Harper added, to roars of approval from his MPs. “If it is not taken, a person who does not take corrective action could not expect to continue to sit as a member of the Conservative Party.” Did he order the Senate to expel, without pay, Duffy and former Conservatives Pamela Wallin and Patrick Brazeau? That was a Senate decision, said the prime minister, before adding that he wanted to “be

nothing of Wright’s $90,000 cheque, and did so again Wednesday. It won’t satisfy his harshest critics, but Harper has mollified a Conservative caucus that has seemed mortified by the Senate expense scandal. MPs emerged from Wednesday morning’s caucus meeting all singing variations on the same tune, the same message Harper and his MPs will no doubt take to the Conservative Party policy convention in less than two weeks in Calgary. A far more complicated story was being told down the hall Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press from the Commons in the Senate chamber on Wednesday. Prime Minister Stephen Harper during Question Period Wallin, like Duffy before her, on Wednesday. ripped into a Conservative mounequivocal for the record: I is that Mr. Duffy and I were tion to expel her without pay in fully support that motion. I in Ottawa on the same day,” the absence of police charges or do not believe that, under the quipped Harper, who by now even evidence of wrongdoing. circumstances, these individuals was having fun batting away the The issue is no longer exshould be on the public payopposition questions. penses but instead “political exroll.” The prime minister even pediency” and “abuse of power,” Would he testify under oath? managed to impugn Duffy’s said Wallin. She accused the Conserva“I have been crystal clear credibility, saying that “when tive Senate leadership of “taking about this,” Harper responded, Mr. Duffy went on national direction from the PMO” in a before sliding off onto another television (last March) to say process that is “designed to apsubject. that he had repaid his own pease the party faithful before a Was his lawyer involved in expenses by taking out a loan the repayment negotiations? against his assets, that is exactly Conservative party convention at the end of the month.” Harper dissembled. what he should have done.” Why was Duffy called to the It was only weeks later that Prime Minister’s Office two CTV revealed Harper’s chief of team logo apparel days before the Feb. 13 meeting staff, Nigel Wright, had in fact where Harper told him to repay paid Duffy’s bill. 207 main Street his expenses? The prime minister has tel: 633-4842 “I think the allegation here steadfastly maintained he knew

w

PRESENTS

Margaret Atwood Schwatka Lake Area Plan (West Shore) Online Survey: whitehorse.ca/ schwatkalake Available now until November 5. Respond for your chance to win a 10-admission pass to the Canada Games Centre!

Book Launch and Signing at the

Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre Saturday, November 23 – 7:30 PM $12/Adults – $8/Students Books available at the event Tickets available at Mac’s Fireweed

Public and Stakeholder Meeting: Thursday November 7, 7-9 pm at Mount McIntyre (venue change). RSVP to erica.beasley@ whitehorse.ca

www.whitehorse.ca

ON MAIN STREET • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK UNTIL 9 PM

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16

Yukon News

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17

Yukon News

All photos: www.archbould.com

Friday, October 25, 2013

OPEN ALL YEAR Winter Hours Tuesday to Saturday 10am - 4pm

MacBride Museum would like to thank our members, funders and supporters! MacBride Museum has been protecting, preserving, and illustrating Yukon’s history for more than 60 years. We are a non-profit society with charitable status. In 2013, MacBride Museum has: • Welcomed more than 22,000 visitors • Created new exhibits that reflect the history of our community • Presented more than 100 public lectures on a variety of topics, from Yukon birds to the Chilkoot Trail • Offered Yukon-themed educational programs for schools and preschool activities • Provided daily guided tours of the S.S. Klondike, National Historic Site during the summer These activities are made possible because of support from our financial and in-kind donors, exhibit partners, program volunteers and more than 400 MacBride Museum members. Would you like to help? Donate online at www.macbridemuseum.com, call 667-2709, or stop by the museum at 1124 Front Street. Your tax-deductible contributions provide the vital support we need to continue collecting, preserving and exhibiting Yukon’s history.

Yukoner Appreciation Day! Friday, November 1, 12-8pm Stop by your community museum for a drink and a snack, and check out these new products in the Gift Shop! The beloved novel for young readers is now an audio book!

50% OFF

Set in the historic Klondike Gold Rush, and inspired by a real girl’s story, Aurore of the Yukon is an exciting adventure novel for the whole family.

Unique Yukon gifts for the whole family! MacBride Museum’s products are based on our collection. We have T-shirts, hats and sweaters. We also have a new calendar of images from historical postcards, and holiday cards.

1124 Front Street in downtown Whitehorse • Phone: 867-667-2709 • www.macbridemuseum.com


18

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

A selection of quotes from key players in the Senate expense scandal Canadian Press

OTTAWA en. Pamela Wallin told her side of the story Wednesday as the Senate debated motions to suspend her and colleagues Mike Duffy and Patrick Brazeau without pay. Here’s some of what’s been said by key players in the Senate expense scandal: “In terms of Sen. Wallin, I have looked at the numbers. Her travel costs are comparable to any parliamentarian travelling from that particular area of the country over that period of time. For instance, last year Sen. Wallin spent almost half of her time in the province she represents in the Senate. The costs are to travel to and from that province, as any similar parliamentarian would do.” – Prime Minister Stephen Harper, question period, Feb. 13. Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press --Senator Pamela Wallin is escorted by assistant Mark Fisher as she arrives at the Senate “By throwing a member on Parliament Hill on Wednesday. of this Senate under the bus,

S

finding her guilty without a fair hearing such as any other Canadian could expect – a right guaranteed us by the char-

Enter at yk.tobaccofreetuesdays.com

ter – to proceed without the evidence having been adduced and considered on which the charge in the motion is based, is a fundamental affront to Canadian democracy and makes a mockery of this chamber. This charade is supposedly about preserving the reputation of this place, but the real intent is to remove a perceived liability – namely, me.” – Wallin speaking Wednesday in her own defence. --“The senator and all other senators and members of the House are fully prepared and committed to have an examination of expenses to ensure that

they are appropriate. That is the commitment the government has made in both chambers, a commitment we will keep.” – Harper on Wallin’s expenses, question period, Feb. 14. --“Mr. Speaker, I have been very clear on this question. This matter came to my attention two weeks ago, after speculation appeared in the media. On Wednesday, May 15, I was told about it. At that very moment, I demanded that my office ensure that the public was informed, and it was informed appropriately.” – Harper in question period May 28 on when he learned that former chief of staff Nigel Wright personally wrote a $90,000 cheque to cover Sen. Mike Duffy’s expenses. --“I made one last effort. I said: ‘I don’t believe I owe anything, and besides which, I don’t have $90,000.’ ‘Don’t worry,’ Nigel said. ‘I’ll write the cheque.”’ – Duffy in the Senate Oct. 22. --“As I have said repeatedly, my first knowledge of this was on the date and at the time indicated. Prior to that point in time, it was my understanding that Mr. Duffy had paid back his own expenses.” – Harper, question period, May 28. --“If the leader of the NDP is suggesting I had any information to the contrary from Mr. Wright prior to this, that is completely false. I learned of this on May 15 and immediately made this information public, as I have said many times.” – Harper, question period, May 28.

Prevention of Violence Against Aboriginal Women Fund (2014-15) The Women’s Directorate invites applications to the Prevention of Violence Against Aboriginal Women Project Funding. The fund provides assistance to community based violence prevention projects, designed and developed by and for Aboriginal women. The deadline for applications is Friday, November 15, 2013 by 5:00 pm. Projects may apply for up to $25,000 for one-year projects or $50,000 for two-year projects. Please contact Amanda Mudry (667-8675 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 8675), or Lorie Larose (667-3026 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3026) if you would like help or support in developing ideas for your proposal.

Women’s Directorate

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19

Yukon News present throughout, just the three of us.” Duffy to the Senate Oct. 22. --“I have made it very clear what my views were to all my staff and to our caucus. We expect inappropriate expenses to be reimbursed and I would expect they would be reimbursed by the person who incurred them. I would certainly not expect them to be reimbursed by somebody else.” – Harper, question period June 5. --“Mr. Speaker, as I have indicated, Mr. Wright informed me of his personal cheque on May 15. This was an error in judgment. He indicated he did this because he believed that taxpayers should be reimbursed and he was prepared to ensure that happened, as in fact it did hap-

of this year, I met the prime minister and Nigel Wright, just the three of us. I said that despite the smear in the papers, I had not broken the rules, but the prime minister wasn’t interested in explanations or the truth. It’s not about what you did; it’s about the perception of what you did that has been created in the media.” Duffy in the Senate Oct. 22. --“No, Mr. Speaker I absolutely did not say that.” Harper in question period Oct. 23, referring to Duffy’s account of the Feb. 13 meeting. --“I argued: I’m just following the rules like all of the others. But it didn’t work. I was ordered by the prime minister: Pay the money back, end of discussion. Nigel Wright was

this year?” – NDP Leader Tom Mulcair, question period June 4. --“Mr. Speaker, it was my view from the beginning that any inappropriate expenses by any senator should be repaid by the senator, not by somebody else. That was very clear. Those are the facts obviously before us. As I say, my statements on this matter have been very clear and very consistent.” – Harper, in reply to Mulcair. --“Mr. Duffy was seeking clarification on remarks I had made to this effect in caucus and I was adamant that any inappropriate expenses had to be reimbursed by him.” – Harper in question period June 5 explaining his meeting with Duffy. --“So after caucus on Feb. 13

“Mr. Speaker, that information was already made public on Feb. 13, and I have been very clear about this. Mr. Duffy approached me after a caucus meeting to discuss this matter. From the beginning, my position has been clear: any inappropriate expenses should be refunded to taxpayers by the senators concerned.” – Harper, question period, June 4. --“I’ve violated no laws, I’ve followed the rules.” Duffy in his Oct. 22 Senate speech. --“Mr. Speaker, why then did the Prime Minister, last week, deny instructing any members of his personnel to settle the Mike Duffy matter when he gave that order with that personnel present in the room at a caucus meeting in February of

pen. However, obviously this was an error in judgment for many reasons that have already been outlined and for that reason, I accepted his resignation.” – Harper, question period June 5. --“I think if you read the affidavit it makes very clear that the decision to pay money to Mr. Duffy out of Mr Wright’s personal funds was made solely by Mr. Wright and was his responsibility. Obviously, had I known about this earlier I would never have allowed this to take place. When I answered questions about this in the House of Commons I answered questions to the best of my knowledge.” – Harper at a news conference July 6 in Calgary.

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Friday, October 25, 2013

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

A selection of quotes from key players in the Senate expense scandal Canadian Press

OTTAWA en. Pamela Wallin told her side of the story Wednesday as the Senate debated motions to suspend her and colleagues Mike Duffy and Patrick Brazeau without pay. Here’s some of what’s been said by key players in the Senate expense scandal: “In terms of Sen. Wallin, I have looked at the numbers. Her travel costs are comparable to any parliamentarian travelling from that particular area of the country over that period of time. For instance, last year Sen. Wallin spent almost half of her time in the province she represents in the Senate. The costs are to travel to and from that province, as any similar parliamentarian would do.” – Prime Minister Stephen Harper, question period, Feb. 13. Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press --Senator Pamela Wallin is escorted by assistant Mark Fisher as she arrives at the Senate “By throwing a member on Parliament Hill on Wednesday. of this Senate under the bus,

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ter – to proceed without the evidence having been adduced and considered on which the charge in the motion is based, is a fundamental affront to Canadian democracy and makes a mockery of this chamber. This charade is supposedly about preserving the reputation of this place, but the real intent is to remove a perceived liability – namely, me.” – Wallin speaking Wednesday in her own defence. --“The senator and all other senators and members of the House are fully prepared and committed to have an examination of expenses to ensure that

they are appropriate. That is the commitment the government has made in both chambers, a commitment we will keep.” – Harper on Wallin’s expenses, question period, Feb. 14. --“Mr. Speaker, I have been very clear on this question. This matter came to my attention two weeks ago, after speculation appeared in the media. On Wednesday, May 15, I was told about it. At that very moment, I demanded that my office ensure that the public was informed, and it was informed appropriately.” – Harper in question period May 28 on when he learned that former chief of staff Nigel Wright personally wrote a $90,000 cheque to cover Sen. Mike Duffy’s expenses. --“I made one last effort. I said: ‘I don’t believe I owe anything, and besides which, I don’t have $90,000.’ ‘Don’t worry,’ Nigel said. ‘I’ll write the cheque.”’ – Duffy in the Senate Oct. 22. --“As I have said repeatedly, my first knowledge of this was on the date and at the time indicated. Prior to that point in time, it was my understanding that Mr. Duffy had paid back his own expenses.” – Harper, question period, May 28. --“If the leader of the NDP is suggesting I had any information to the contrary from Mr. Wright prior to this, that is completely false. I learned of this on May 15 and immediately made this information public, as I have said many times.” – Harper, question period, May 28.

Prevention of Violence Against Aboriginal Women Fund (2014-15) The Women’s Directorate invites applications to the Prevention of Violence Against Aboriginal Women Project Funding. The fund provides assistance to community based violence prevention projects, designed and developed by and for Aboriginal women. The deadline for applications is Friday, November 15, 2013 by 5:00 pm. Projects may apply for up to $25,000 for one-year projects or $50,000 for two-year projects. Please contact Amanda Mudry (667-8675 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 8675), or Lorie Larose (667-3026 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3026) if you would like help or support in developing ideas for your proposal.

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Yukon News present throughout, just the three of us.” Duffy to the Senate Oct. 22. --“I have made it very clear what my views were to all my staff and to our caucus. We expect inappropriate expenses to be reimbursed and I would expect they would be reimbursed by the person who incurred them. I would certainly not expect them to be reimbursed by somebody else.” – Harper, question period June 5. --“Mr. Speaker, as I have indicated, Mr. Wright informed me of his personal cheque on May 15. This was an error in judgment. He indicated he did this because he believed that taxpayers should be reimbursed and he was prepared to ensure that happened, as in fact it did hap-

of this year, I met the prime minister and Nigel Wright, just the three of us. I said that despite the smear in the papers, I had not broken the rules, but the prime minister wasn’t interested in explanations or the truth. It’s not about what you did; it’s about the perception of what you did that has been created in the media.” Duffy in the Senate Oct. 22. --“No, Mr. Speaker I absolutely did not say that.” Harper in question period Oct. 23, referring to Duffy’s account of the Feb. 13 meeting. --“I argued: I’m just following the rules like all of the others. But it didn’t work. I was ordered by the prime minister: Pay the money back, end of discussion. Nigel Wright was

this year?” – NDP Leader Tom Mulcair, question period June 4. --“Mr. Speaker, it was my view from the beginning that any inappropriate expenses by any senator should be repaid by the senator, not by somebody else. That was very clear. Those are the facts obviously before us. As I say, my statements on this matter have been very clear and very consistent.” – Harper, in reply to Mulcair. --“Mr. Duffy was seeking clarification on remarks I had made to this effect in caucus and I was adamant that any inappropriate expenses had to be reimbursed by him.” – Harper in question period June 5 explaining his meeting with Duffy. --“So after caucus on Feb. 13

“Mr. Speaker, that information was already made public on Feb. 13, and I have been very clear about this. Mr. Duffy approached me after a caucus meeting to discuss this matter. From the beginning, my position has been clear: any inappropriate expenses should be refunded to taxpayers by the senators concerned.” – Harper, question period, June 4. --“I’ve violated no laws, I’ve followed the rules.” Duffy in his Oct. 22 Senate speech. --“Mr. Speaker, why then did the Prime Minister, last week, deny instructing any members of his personnel to settle the Mike Duffy matter when he gave that order with that personnel present in the room at a caucus meeting in February of

pen. However, obviously this was an error in judgment for many reasons that have already been outlined and for that reason, I accepted his resignation.” – Harper, question period June 5. --“I think if you read the affidavit it makes very clear that the decision to pay money to Mr. Duffy out of Mr Wright’s personal funds was made solely by Mr. Wright and was his responsibility. Obviously, had I known about this earlier I would never have allowed this to take place. When I answered questions about this in the House of Commons I answered questions to the best of my knowledge.” – Harper at a news conference July 6 in Calgary.

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Friday, October 25, 2013

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Court gives thumbs down to Harper government’s Senate reform plan The court even refers to Canada’s first prime minister, John A. MONTREAL Macdonald, being dead-set against he Harper government’s most the idea of elected senators to recent attempt at Senate reavoid having the new parliament form has been declared unconsti- resemble the Legislative Council of tutional in a stinging court ruling the old parliament of pre-Confedrendered Thursday. eration Canada. The Quebec Court of Appeal Now if the Harper government has released an opinion that the wants to reform the Senate, the federal government had no right, court says, it needs to get approval under Bill C-7, to create Senate from at least seven provinces holdelections and set term limits with- ing half the country’s population. The government’s Bill C-7 out seeking provincial approval. It says the fathers of Confedera- would have set nine-year term tion considered the role and func- limits for senators, and created elections in provinces that wanted tion of the Senate in great detail, them. and the conditions they drew up The court said such a patchwere essential to uniting the provwork approach to elections was inces under one country. “The transcript of the pre-con- also in contradiction to the desires federation conferences shows that of Canada’s constitutional framers. In any case, the federal reform the founding fathers discussed the role and composition of the Senate is already on hold amid intense deat length,” the 20-page ruling said. bate over the nature of the upper chamber, which is currently being “There is no doubt that this rocked by a spending scandal. institution was a fundamental The Conservatives have drawn component of the federal comup a reference of their own – this promise in 1867.” one to the Supreme Court of Canada, which will hold hearings on the Senate later this year. The provincial-court battle, which ended with today’s 20-page ruling, began when the previous Charest government filed a reference motion in May 2012 with the The Canadian Press

a simple piece of legislation. Senate elections would create a new dynamic in Canada’s Parliament, where two chambers could suddenly compete over legislation and each claim democratic legitimacy. The Supreme Court of Canada is to hold hearings on the proposed reforms in mid-November. A written opinion could take months. The Quebec government has said it hopes the appeal court ruling could be used during this exercise. If so, opponents of Harper’s reform plan will now be armed with lines from the Quebec legal opinion, such as the following: “Bill C-7, if it had been adoptJacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press ed, would have been unconstiQuebec Justice Minister Bertrand St-Arnaud reacts to a tutional without the agreement Quebec Court of Appeal’s decision to call a future Senate of the majority of the provinces reform unconstitutional. pursuant to subsection 38(1) of the Constitution Act, 1982, since Quebec Court of Appeal, seeking “It follows from the principle its true nature was to amend the an opinion on the legality of C-7. of supremacy of the Constitution method of selection of senators It argued that the bill was unthat political actors must comply and the powers of the Senate constitutional, that it threatened to with its text and its spirit. They without having respected the affect the functioning of Canadian cannot circumvent it on the preapplicable amending procedure. federalism, and that it would harm text that the constitutional amendIn reality, Bill C-7 attempted to certain regions of the country. ing process is complex or demand- circumvent that procedure.” The court replied, in its verdict, ing,” Thursday’s ruling said. Quebec’s Marois government is that it’s in no position to comment “To do so otherwise would dis- pleased with the court finding. on the usefulness of Senate reform, regard the principles of federalism, Justice Minister Bertrand or abolition – which are political constitutionalism and the suprem- St-Arnaud said the province will matters. acy of law.” continue to oppose federal governIt said it’s only responding to Quebec said it cannot support ment attempts to act unilaterally questions about the constitutional Senate reform unless the provin this matter. rules for amending it. And under inces are consulted, because such “Ottawa cannot act alone in those rules, the federal reforms profound changes to the country’s reforming the Senate,” St-Arnaud were a no-go. institutions shouldn’t happen with said.

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22

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Ottawa aims to take control of failing First Nation schools “Our government firmly believes that all First Nation students across Canada deserve access to a school system that meets provincial and territorial standards, while respecting First Nation culture, language, rights and treaties,” Lee-Anne Goodman

in a statement. “The draft legislative proposal for First Nation education would OTTAWA put in place a system that is he federal government is accountable to students, and enproposing a sweeping educa- sures that First Nation students tion overhaul on First Nations have access, like all Canadians, to reserves to bring aboriginal a good education.” schools up to provincial stanThe government has long dards in a purported attempt held that substandard schoolto put the brakes to a cycle of ing and academic performance poverty among aboriginals. has played a significant role in The Conservatives tabled a impoverishing native Canadians. draft of the First Nations Educa- The First Nations Education Act tion Act late Tuesday that would is the centrepiece of Prime Minsee Ottawa set and enforce stan- ister Stephen Harper’s aboriginal dards for schools on aboriginal affairs agenda. reserves, and wrest temporary A recent C.D. Howe Institute control of those that fail to make report determined that almost the grade. half of aboriginal students na“Our government firmly tionwide fail to get to Grade 12. believes that all First Nation The study found Manitoba had students across Canada deserve the worst record of six provaccess to a school system that inces with substantial aboriginal meets provincial and territorial populations, with 63 per cent of standards, while respecting First natives failing to graduate high Nation culture, language, rights school. “First Nation youth represent and treaties,” Aboriginal Affairs the fastest growing segment of Minister Bernard Valcourt said Canadian Press

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his statement. the population in Canada yet “Our government has listened they have one of the lowest gradto the calls from First Nation uation rates,” Valcourt added in leadership, educators, technicians and youth who are unhapThe new Yukon home of py with the current ‘non-system’ that has been failing First Nation students for years. This draft legislative proposal is a significant step forward.”

The government’s 32-page draft bill, arriving as major unrest and discontent continues to simmer among First Nations communities, calls for an outside inspector to review school standards and performance every year on native reserves, and to make suggestions for improvement when necessary.

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If the inspector finds that “major and persistent problems” aren’t being dealt with by First Nations, Ottawa can then appoint a temporary official to manage schools, particularly if there are “major risks to students’ safety and outcomes.” Leading up to the unveiling of the legislation, aboriginal leaders cautioned the government against exerting too much control over First Nations. Tyrone McNeil, president of the Vancouver-based First Nations Education Steering Committee, said a federal cash infusion for First Nations schools is the most critical issue at hand, and accused the government of treating funding “only as an after-thought” in its draft legislation. “It’s really upsetting and disconcerting … the funding is missing, and adequately investing in First Nations education is in the interest of all Canadians,” he said Tuesday night. “The really hurtful piece of this is that the federal government is going to be more demanding, yet we’ll be funded less and expected to do more, and then be held accountable for that. And there’s very little accountability to parents and communities; all the accountability goes back to the minister. It’s ludicrous.” Other aboriginal groups and education advocates have warned that the Harper government risks repeating the paternalistic mistakes of the

23

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013 past in its proposals. The Conservatives, meantime, say the legislation is ultimately aimed at giving First Nations control over their own education. Carolyn Bennett, the Liberals’ aboriginal affairs critic, urged the government to rethink its strategy. “The Conservatives should push pause on this flawed, topdown strategy, sit down with First Nations communities and build a workable, fully funded plan that respects, supports and empowers First Nations to control their own education systems,” she said in a statement. First Nations are pressing for more say over everything from education to local governance and resource development. The so-called Idle No More movement has also been demanding a dialogue between Ottawa and First Nations about how their communities are funded and accountability for the money that’s spent. There have also been tensions over resource development projects that have spilled over political lines. Members of New Brunswick’s Elsipogtog First Nation celebrated Monday after a judge in that province lifted an injunction that ordered them to end their blockade outside a compound owned by SWN Resources. They oppose a shale gas development due to environmental concerns, fearing the impact on local drinking water supplies.

The Harper government released a so-called blueprint document this summer that promised to give First Nations authority over and accountability for their education programs. But since then, several groups have urged Ottawa to abandon the blueprint, saying it doesn’t meet standards set out by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The UN, meantime, an-

nounced earlier this month that it’s launching a probe into Canada’s human rights record with its aboriginal people. The government is calling for feedback on its draft legislation before introducing it in the House of Commons. Under the legislation, aboriginal councils remain responsible for schools on their reserves with the option to contract out work to provincial school boards or private educators if

they’d prefer. The bill also allows native councils to form First Nations education authorities that could control all the aboriginal schools in various regions of the country. Those authorities could hire teachers and principals, manage budgets and develop curricula that meets provincial standards while focusing on aboriginal culture and language. S TA R S P O N S O R S

Alkan Air Grand Ball

A course leader for the American Management Association (AMA) and Canadian Management Centre (CMC) in leadership, management and communication, Frank Byrnes will be in Whitehorse conducting the following courses.

The Fundamentals of Administrative Investigation and Interview ADMN 023

Participants in this two-day workshop will learn and apply skills and strategies used in conducting administrative investigations and interviews. Investigation steps covered will include: receiving a complaint, developing the investigative framework, gathering the evidence, and storing and recording data. Skills for conducting successful interviews will include: planning and preparation, making a strong human connection, establishing rapport and trust, active listening, reading people, persuasion, developing a questioning strategy, note taking, and evaluating data. Nov. 7-8 | Thursday - Friday | 9:00am-4:00pm $595.00 + GST| CRN 10695 | Frank Byrnes

Who should attend? HR personnel, Managers, and Supervisors. Individuals, government departments, and agencies who investigate administrative procedures and abuses that may even lead to submission to a court .

Making and Working in a Productive and Healthy Workplace ADMN 022

Yukon Convention Centre Saturday, November 30 at 6 pm Enjoy a magical evening featuring a champagne reception, dinner, dance & charity auction. Individual tickets $275. Corporate tables of 8 available. Partial tax receipt as per CRA guidelines.

For tickets please call Krista at 393-8930

This is an excellent course for any employee-frontline or management- to take the time to assess their workplace and ensure productivity, employee/ employment longevity, and to adopt techniques to create an ideal working atmosphere. Using Gallup’s 12 Point Questionnaire and drawing on current research and strategies, participants in this one-day workshop will evaluate their own workplaces for both stress and satisfaction. Methods and skills will be explored that can maximize productive behaviour and minimize negative influences (within participants’ spheres of influence). Nov. 6 | Wednesday | 9:00am-4:00pm $395.00 + GST | CRN 10692 | Instructor Frank Byrnes

Looking for updates about what is going on each month? Sign up for our monthly newsletter at www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/ce/!

Continuing Education and Training REGISTRATION: 867.668.8710 INFORMATION: 867.668.5200 ce@yukoncollege.yk.ca

www.yhf.ca

ADAMS FAMILY


22

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Ottawa aims to take control of failing First Nation schools “Our government firmly believes that all First Nation students across Canada deserve access to a school system that meets provincial and territorial standards, while respecting First Nation culture, language, rights and treaties,” Lee-Anne Goodman

in a statement. “The draft legislative proposal for First Nation education would OTTAWA put in place a system that is he federal government is accountable to students, and enproposing a sweeping educa- sures that First Nation students tion overhaul on First Nations have access, like all Canadians, to reserves to bring aboriginal a good education.” schools up to provincial stanThe government has long dards in a purported attempt held that substandard schoolto put the brakes to a cycle of ing and academic performance poverty among aboriginals. has played a significant role in The Conservatives tabled a impoverishing native Canadians. draft of the First Nations Educa- The First Nations Education Act tion Act late Tuesday that would is the centrepiece of Prime Minsee Ottawa set and enforce stan- ister Stephen Harper’s aboriginal dards for schools on aboriginal affairs agenda. reserves, and wrest temporary A recent C.D. Howe Institute control of those that fail to make report determined that almost the grade. half of aboriginal students na“Our government firmly tionwide fail to get to Grade 12. believes that all First Nation The study found Manitoba had students across Canada deserve the worst record of six provaccess to a school system that inces with substantial aboriginal meets provincial and territorial populations, with 63 per cent of standards, while respecting First natives failing to graduate high Nation culture, language, rights school. “First Nation youth represent and treaties,” Aboriginal Affairs the fastest growing segment of Minister Bernard Valcourt said Canadian Press

T

Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

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The government’s 32-page draft bill, arriving as major unrest and discontent continues to simmer among First Nations communities, calls for an outside inspector to review school standards and performance every year on native reserves, and to make suggestions for improvement when necessary.

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If the inspector finds that “major and persistent problems” aren’t being dealt with by First Nations, Ottawa can then appoint a temporary official to manage schools, particularly if there are “major risks to students’ safety and outcomes.” Leading up to the unveiling of the legislation, aboriginal leaders cautioned the government against exerting too much control over First Nations. Tyrone McNeil, president of the Vancouver-based First Nations Education Steering Committee, said a federal cash infusion for First Nations schools is the most critical issue at hand, and accused the government of treating funding “only as an after-thought” in its draft legislation. “It’s really upsetting and disconcerting … the funding is missing, and adequately investing in First Nations education is in the interest of all Canadians,” he said Tuesday night. “The really hurtful piece of this is that the federal government is going to be more demanding, yet we’ll be funded less and expected to do more, and then be held accountable for that. And there’s very little accountability to parents and communities; all the accountability goes back to the minister. It’s ludicrous.” Other aboriginal groups and education advocates have warned that the Harper government risks repeating the paternalistic mistakes of the

23

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013 past in its proposals. The Conservatives, meantime, say the legislation is ultimately aimed at giving First Nations control over their own education. Carolyn Bennett, the Liberals’ aboriginal affairs critic, urged the government to rethink its strategy. “The Conservatives should push pause on this flawed, topdown strategy, sit down with First Nations communities and build a workable, fully funded plan that respects, supports and empowers First Nations to control their own education systems,” she said in a statement. First Nations are pressing for more say over everything from education to local governance and resource development. The so-called Idle No More movement has also been demanding a dialogue between Ottawa and First Nations about how their communities are funded and accountability for the money that’s spent. There have also been tensions over resource development projects that have spilled over political lines. Members of New Brunswick’s Elsipogtog First Nation celebrated Monday after a judge in that province lifted an injunction that ordered them to end their blockade outside a compound owned by SWN Resources. They oppose a shale gas development due to environmental concerns, fearing the impact on local drinking water supplies.

The Harper government released a so-called blueprint document this summer that promised to give First Nations authority over and accountability for their education programs. But since then, several groups have urged Ottawa to abandon the blueprint, saying it doesn’t meet standards set out by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The UN, meantime, an-

nounced earlier this month that it’s launching a probe into Canada’s human rights record with its aboriginal people. The government is calling for feedback on its draft legislation before introducing it in the House of Commons. Under the legislation, aboriginal councils remain responsible for schools on their reserves with the option to contract out work to provincial school boards or private educators if

they’d prefer. The bill also allows native councils to form First Nations education authorities that could control all the aboriginal schools in various regions of the country. Those authorities could hire teachers and principals, manage budgets and develop curricula that meets provincial standards while focusing on aboriginal culture and language. S TA R S P O N S O R S

Alkan Air Grand Ball

A course leader for the American Management Association (AMA) and Canadian Management Centre (CMC) in leadership, management and communication, Frank Byrnes will be in Whitehorse conducting the following courses.

The Fundamentals of Administrative Investigation and Interview ADMN 023

Participants in this two-day workshop will learn and apply skills and strategies used in conducting administrative investigations and interviews. Investigation steps covered will include: receiving a complaint, developing the investigative framework, gathering the evidence, and storing and recording data. Skills for conducting successful interviews will include: planning and preparation, making a strong human connection, establishing rapport and trust, active listening, reading people, persuasion, developing a questioning strategy, note taking, and evaluating data. Nov. 7-8 | Thursday - Friday | 9:00am-4:00pm $595.00 + GST| CRN 10695 | Frank Byrnes

Who should attend? HR personnel, Managers, and Supervisors. Individuals, government departments, and agencies who investigate administrative procedures and abuses that may even lead to submission to a court .

Making and Working in a Productive and Healthy Workplace ADMN 022

Yukon Convention Centre Saturday, November 30 at 6 pm Enjoy a magical evening featuring a champagne reception, dinner, dance & charity auction. Individual tickets $275. Corporate tables of 8 available. Partial tax receipt as per CRA guidelines.

For tickets please call Krista at 393-8930

This is an excellent course for any employee-frontline or management- to take the time to assess their workplace and ensure productivity, employee/ employment longevity, and to adopt techniques to create an ideal working atmosphere. Using Gallup’s 12 Point Questionnaire and drawing on current research and strategies, participants in this one-day workshop will evaluate their own workplaces for both stress and satisfaction. Methods and skills will be explored that can maximize productive behaviour and minimize negative influences (within participants’ spheres of influence). Nov. 6 | Wednesday | 9:00am-4:00pm $395.00 + GST | CRN 10692 | Instructor Frank Byrnes

Looking for updates about what is going on each month? Sign up for our monthly newsletter at www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/ce/!

Continuing Education and Training REGISTRATION: 867.668.8710 INFORMATION: 867.668.5200 ce@yukoncollege.yk.ca

www.yhf.ca

ADAMS FAMILY


24

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Back up that castle: Digital preservation group makes 3D copies of world’s landmarks Raphael Satter

“There is never going to be enough time or money to preserve everything,” CyArk co-founder BarLONDON bara Kacyra said Monday at a launch e all know to back up our files event at the Tower of London. and photos, but what about “If you can’t physically save our castles and churches? something, your next best thing is to A non-profit named CyArk has digitally preserve it.” created digital copies of more than Oakland, California-based CyArk 100 of the world’s best-known works by using 3D laser scanners, monuments, mapping Roman ruins, radar, and a host of other techancient statues, and even an entire nologies to create detailed maps island. Now it plans 400 more, with of famous monuments – from Mt. the goal of preserving the world’s Rushmore to the Leaning Tower of most important sites against war, Pisa – measuring nooks and nicks wear, and the impact of climate with millimeter precision. change. Not only do the lasers capture Associated Press

W

minute damage invisible to most cameras, the 3D data can be used to create hyper-realistic models and flyover programs used by tourists and educators. Master copies of the measurements are kept by Iron Mountain Inc., which stores some 2 petabytes’ worth of data on magnetic tape in its secure underground archive at the bottom of a former limestone mine in Pennsylvania. Kacyra said the project was born out of the heartbreak of seeing the Taliban pulverize the Afghan Buddha statues in 2001, but Gustavo Araoz, a senior preservationist who’s CyArk/AP Photo

An image generated by 3D laser scan data shows a perspective of Chichen Itza, in Mexico. helping CyArk draw up a list of its next 400 sites, says similar destruction is playing out in slow motion across the globe. “This happens every day at a smaller and much less dramatic scale,” he said. There’s already some evidence that the preservation project is pay-

ing dividends. Ugandan diplomat Sam Muhwezi told The Associated Press that the 3D model drawn up by CyArk was being used to help restore a fire-damaged tomb complex in his country. “It’s the perfect example of why this kind of project is important,” he said.

What’s New? October 28 Regular Council Meeting

outside inside Yukoners value fresh air both inside and outside their homes. If you depend on an oil-fired appliance in your home, make sure your indoor air stays healthy by doing these three things: 1. ensure all installations are by certified technicians 2. have all oil-fired appliances serviced annually 3. install a carbon monoxide detector and replace the batteries every year For more information on safe furnaces and carbon monoxide detection call Yukon Housing Corporation, 1-800-661-0408, ext. 5759.

City Council will meet at 5:30pm to discuss: Festivals and Special Events Fund Recommendations; CCMARD Terms of Reference; Christmas Food for Fines Promotion; Public Input Report – 3 Glacier Road; Lease Agreement – Yukon Humane Society; Land Disposition – Driving Force (Range Rd); Zoning Amendment – Sportees (6th Ave); Heritage Restoration Incentive Application – Hulland House; Solid Waste Action Plan Implementation – Cardboard; Annual Appointments; Various Bylaw Readings. Agenda packages are available at whitehorse.ca/agendas

Council & Senior Management (CASM) For a complete meeting list please visit whitehorse.ca/CASM

Fuel Abatement Project in MacRae The Whitehorse Fire Department will be cleaning up material that was previously stacked, by burning and/or chipping. Burning will commence on or around November 1 and will continue daily until complete. A contractor will be on-site during the burning to ensure that all fires are controlled. Please direct any questions to the Acting Fire Chief at 668-2462.

Pioneer Cemetery Public Meeting

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The City is hosting a meeting on the proposed improvements to Pioneer Cemetery on Thursday November 7 from 7 pm – 8:30 pm at Whitehorse United Church (601 Main Street). Please call 668-8325 for more information.

www.whitehorse.ca


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Friday, October 25, 2013

25


26

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Canadian weed finds market in Asia, reversing years of East to West trade Chris Brummitt

and smuggling it to Vietnam an easier proposition than it might be otherwise. HANOI, Vietnam The characteristics of canor the young Vietnamese nabis use in the country also dope smokers rolling up drive the trade. The drug is outside a smart Hanoi cafe, used mostly by foreigners and local cannabis is just not good well-heeled Vietnamese, who enough. As with their Adidas are prepared to pay for quality. caps, iPhones and Sanskrit Vietnamese have long shown tattoos, so with their choice of preferences for imported goods bud: only foreign will do. of all kinds – and it appears Potent marijuana grown cannabis is no exception. indoors in Canada and the Regardless of the reasons, United States is easy to buy in its availability in Vietnam is a Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, sign of how hydroponic growsay regular smokers, and sells ing techniques have shaken up for up to 10 times the price the global marijuana business. of locally grown weed. That’s In the 1960s and 70s, mariperhaps surprising given that juana went from plantations marijuana is easy to cultivate in countries such as Thailand, regionally, and bringing drugs India and Morocco to wealthy across continents is expensive consumer markets in the West. and risky. Now, many western countries Some experts say the trade are self-sufficient in the weed can be explained by the domibecause of indoor cultivation, Lampe PARIS ... an unrivalled purifying and fragrancing POWER ! nant role Vietnamese diaspora and export is on Berger the agenda. gangs play in cultivating the Western-grown cannabis is THE ORIGINAL SINCE 1898 also appearing in Japan and drug in western countries, South Korea. Unlike Vietnam, making sourcing the product Associated Press

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A man smokes Canadian-grown marijuana in Hanoi, Vietnam. Western-grown marijuana is popular, through Vietnamese gangs involved in cultivation of marijuana in North America and Europe.

both are wealthy, developed countries with climates illsuited to cultivation. They too have seen a shift in supply from countries in the region such as India and Thailand to North America and Europe, law enforcement authorities there say. The smokers sitting outside the Hanoi cafe, a short walk from the city’s famed Frenchera Opera House, seemed proud they were able to buy

foreign, expensive buds, boasting their city was like a “mini Amsterdam.” But as the tightly rolled joints went round, they struggled to explain why western weed was available. “Some people raise cows,” said one, a tattoo shop owner with a passion for big bikes and Facebook. “Other people prefer to buy steak at the market.” Like other smokers interviewed for this story, he declined to

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AGEndA ItEMS: 1) Settlement Lands 2) AHOP Appeal 3) Peel Watershed For Rides, please call: 332-1244. Refreshments will be provided. Citizens unable to participate in person can join the meeting via the Big Blue Button. Please contact Curtis Lafreniere at (867) 996-2265 ext. 124 for more information.

~All Citizens are Welcome to Attend~ For more information, please contact Ellenise Profeit at 867-996-2265 Ext. 213


give his name because cannabis is illegal in Vietnam. Vietnamese diaspora criminal gangs got into the marijuana cultivation business in North America in the 1980s. Having found a niche, they expanded and now account for much of the business across Europe also. Martin Bouchard, a professor in criminology at Canada’s Simon Fraser University and expert in the cannabis trade, said he was unaware that Canadian-grown weed was showing up in Vietnam but that it could be explained. “The quality and reputation of the Canadian cannabis is such that it could be worth the trouble and cost of importing,” he said. “The diaspora connections probably make this easier and cheaper than it normally would.” Smokers said one gram of Canadian weed retails for anything up to $45, the average weekly wage in the country. Mid-quality hydroponically grown marijuana sells for about $10 a gram in Canada and the United States. Smokers, quoting dealers, said some of the weed comes into the country via the northern port in Haiphong, a city that has a reputation for the import and export of illegal goods as well as the laundering of drug profits by diaspora growing gangs. Other channels included smuggling by flight crew in liquor boxes or the

27

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013 postal service. “They charge a ridiculous premium, but the quality compared to the local stuff is ridiculously different,” said one expatriate English teacher who before arriving in Vietnam had worked for seven months on a farm for medical marijuana in California. “It’s good for special occasions.” There are no public statistics on cannabis use in Vietnam, but it is a niche product without a long history of use like say in India. The drug’s well documented use by American soldiers during the Vietnam War is credited by some for introducing or popularizing it. Speaking after a UN-organized media conference on drug use in Vietnam and elsewhere in Asia, Lt.-Gen. Do Kim Tuyen, a deputy director general at the Ministry of Public Security, said he was unaware of details of the cannabis trade in Vietnam. Canadian police didn’t directly answer questions on the flow into Vietnam, but said in a statement they were committed to “directing attention and resources to combating the illegal drug trade both domestically and internationally.” Tun Nay Soe, an expert at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in Thailand, put the business down to the social cachet of using imported, better quality product. He said a similar pattern could be detected with ecstasy use in

Information Session for

Kwanlin Dün Beneficiaries The Trust Working Group of Kwanlin Dün First Nation is holding an information session to provide an overview of the Administrative Trust Model for Beneficiary Compensation Funds and a review of the Protector Model. Input gathered at the meeting will help inform the Trust Working Group and Council in moving forward with selecting a trust model for KDFN Beneficiaries that will meet the need of the community.

Asia, where tablets imported from Europe are more expensive than regionally produced ones. “On the one hand, there is enough supply is here, so we really don’t need things coming from other parts of the world,” he said. “But when we talk about high potency cannabis, then it is a different story. Among the elite and rich kids, this is like a trend: ‘let’s not use local stuff, it is rubbish.”’ A U.S. State Department

report on drugs in Vietnam in 2012 said that there was little cultivation or production of illicit drugs in Vietnam, but noted that it was becoming a transshipment destination for amphetamine in part because of corruption at border points. “A certain level of corruption, both among lower-level enforcement personnel and higher-level officials, is consistent with the fairly large-scale movement of narcotics into and out of Vietnam,” it said.

While smokers say those who sell and use cannabis face arrest, cracking down on the use of the drug is a not a priority for Vietnamese authorities, which are more concerned with heroin and amphetamine. Some users thought many officers didn’t know what it was. Those smoking outside the cafe were not worried about being caught. “We are nice boys, sitting in a nice place,” one said. “There is no problem.” S TA R S P O N S O R S

Seniors’ Soirée Enjoy a sumptious buffet dinner, silent auction and dance the night away to Hank Karr and Company

Yukon Convention Centre Friday, November 29 - 6 pm Individual tickets $30.00 Tickets on sale October 24 Transportation provided by Takhini Transport

For tickets please call Harmony at 393-8931

Representatives from Deloitte and Boughton Law will be available at the meeting. Date: November 4, 2013 Time: 5:00 p.m. Location: Nàkwät’à Kü Potlatch House Light snacks and refreshments will be served. For further information, call 633-7811.

www.yhf.ca

ADAMS FAMILY


26

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Canadian weed finds market in Asia, reversing years of East to West trade Chris Brummitt

and smuggling it to Vietnam an easier proposition than it might be otherwise. HANOI, Vietnam The characteristics of canor the young Vietnamese nabis use in the country also dope smokers rolling up drive the trade. The drug is outside a smart Hanoi cafe, used mostly by foreigners and local cannabis is just not good well-heeled Vietnamese, who enough. As with their Adidas are prepared to pay for quality. caps, iPhones and Sanskrit Vietnamese have long shown tattoos, so with their choice of preferences for imported goods bud: only foreign will do. of all kinds – and it appears Potent marijuana grown cannabis is no exception. indoors in Canada and the Regardless of the reasons, United States is easy to buy in its availability in Vietnam is a Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, sign of how hydroponic growsay regular smokers, and sells ing techniques have shaken up for up to 10 times the price the global marijuana business. of locally grown weed. That’s In the 1960s and 70s, mariperhaps surprising given that juana went from plantations marijuana is easy to cultivate in countries such as Thailand, regionally, and bringing drugs India and Morocco to wealthy across continents is expensive consumer markets in the West. and risky. Now, many western countries Some experts say the trade are self-sufficient in the weed can be explained by the domibecause of indoor cultivation, Lampe PARIS ... an unrivalled purifying and fragrancing POWER ! nant role Vietnamese diaspora and export is on Berger the agenda. gangs play in cultivating the Western-grown cannabis is THE ORIGINAL SINCE 1898 also appearing in Japan and drug in western countries, South Korea. Unlike Vietnam, making sourcing the product Associated Press

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A man smokes Canadian-grown marijuana in Hanoi, Vietnam. Western-grown marijuana is popular, through Vietnamese gangs involved in cultivation of marijuana in North America and Europe.

both are wealthy, developed countries with climates illsuited to cultivation. They too have seen a shift in supply from countries in the region such as India and Thailand to North America and Europe, law enforcement authorities there say. The smokers sitting outside the Hanoi cafe, a short walk from the city’s famed Frenchera Opera House, seemed proud they were able to buy

foreign, expensive buds, boasting their city was like a “mini Amsterdam.” But as the tightly rolled joints went round, they struggled to explain why western weed was available. “Some people raise cows,” said one, a tattoo shop owner with a passion for big bikes and Facebook. “Other people prefer to buy steak at the market.” Like other smokers interviewed for this story, he declined to

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AGEndA ItEMS: 1) Settlement Lands 2) AHOP Appeal 3) Peel Watershed For Rides, please call: 332-1244. Refreshments will be provided. Citizens unable to participate in person can join the meeting via the Big Blue Button. Please contact Curtis Lafreniere at (867) 996-2265 ext. 124 for more information.

~All Citizens are Welcome to Attend~ For more information, please contact Ellenise Profeit at 867-996-2265 Ext. 213


give his name because cannabis is illegal in Vietnam. Vietnamese diaspora criminal gangs got into the marijuana cultivation business in North America in the 1980s. Having found a niche, they expanded and now account for much of the business across Europe also. Martin Bouchard, a professor in criminology at Canada’s Simon Fraser University and expert in the cannabis trade, said he was unaware that Canadian-grown weed was showing up in Vietnam but that it could be explained. “The quality and reputation of the Canadian cannabis is such that it could be worth the trouble and cost of importing,” he said. “The diaspora connections probably make this easier and cheaper than it normally would.” Smokers said one gram of Canadian weed retails for anything up to $45, the average weekly wage in the country. Mid-quality hydroponically grown marijuana sells for about $10 a gram in Canada and the United States. Smokers, quoting dealers, said some of the weed comes into the country via the northern port in Haiphong, a city that has a reputation for the import and export of illegal goods as well as the laundering of drug profits by diaspora growing gangs. Other channels included smuggling by flight crew in liquor boxes or the

27

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013 postal service. “They charge a ridiculous premium, but the quality compared to the local stuff is ridiculously different,” said one expatriate English teacher who before arriving in Vietnam had worked for seven months on a farm for medical marijuana in California. “It’s good for special occasions.” There are no public statistics on cannabis use in Vietnam, but it is a niche product without a long history of use like say in India. The drug’s well documented use by American soldiers during the Vietnam War is credited by some for introducing or popularizing it. Speaking after a UN-organized media conference on drug use in Vietnam and elsewhere in Asia, Lt.-Gen. Do Kim Tuyen, a deputy director general at the Ministry of Public Security, said he was unaware of details of the cannabis trade in Vietnam. Canadian police didn’t directly answer questions on the flow into Vietnam, but said in a statement they were committed to “directing attention and resources to combating the illegal drug trade both domestically and internationally.” Tun Nay Soe, an expert at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in Thailand, put the business down to the social cachet of using imported, better quality product. He said a similar pattern could be detected with ecstasy use in

Information Session for

Kwanlin Dün Beneficiaries The Trust Working Group of Kwanlin Dün First Nation is holding an information session to provide an overview of the Administrative Trust Model for Beneficiary Compensation Funds and a review of the Protector Model. Input gathered at the meeting will help inform the Trust Working Group and Council in moving forward with selecting a trust model for KDFN Beneficiaries that will meet the need of the community.

Asia, where tablets imported from Europe are more expensive than regionally produced ones. “On the one hand, there is enough supply is here, so we really don’t need things coming from other parts of the world,” he said. “But when we talk about high potency cannabis, then it is a different story. Among the elite and rich kids, this is like a trend: ‘let’s not use local stuff, it is rubbish.”’ A U.S. State Department

report on drugs in Vietnam in 2012 said that there was little cultivation or production of illicit drugs in Vietnam, but noted that it was becoming a transshipment destination for amphetamine in part because of corruption at border points. “A certain level of corruption, both among lower-level enforcement personnel and higher-level officials, is consistent with the fairly large-scale movement of narcotics into and out of Vietnam,” it said.

While smokers say those who sell and use cannabis face arrest, cracking down on the use of the drug is a not a priority for Vietnamese authorities, which are more concerned with heroin and amphetamine. Some users thought many officers didn’t know what it was. Those smoking outside the cafe were not worried about being caught. “We are nice boys, sitting in a nice place,” one said. “There is no problem.” S TA R S P O N S O R S

Seniors’ Soirée Enjoy a sumptious buffet dinner, silent auction and dance the night away to Hank Karr and Company

Yukon Convention Centre Friday, November 29 - 6 pm Individual tickets $30.00 Tickets on sale October 24 Transportation provided by Takhini Transport

For tickets please call Harmony at 393-8931

Representatives from Deloitte and Boughton Law will be available at the meeting. Date: November 4, 2013 Time: 5:00 p.m. Location: Nàkwät’à Kü Potlatch House Light snacks and refreshments will be served. For further information, call 633-7811.

www.yhf.ca

ADAMS FAMILY


28

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Gaps persist in managing mentally ill prisoners, top official admits Colin Perkel

given staff shortages. He did agree that failure to provide proper training played TORONTO a role in the problems frontignificant gaps remain in line staff had in dealing with dealing with mentally ill the mentally ill teenager. prisoners, Canada’s top corSmith’s family lawyer Julian rectional official admitted last Roy noted the Office of the week even as he urged jurors Correctional Investigator has to refrain from making costly for years been fiercely critical recommendations to address of the prison system’s dealings the problem. with the mentally ill. Don Head, commissioner Several of the investigator’s of Correctional Service of reports have cited an overCanada, told the Ashley Smith reliance on control measures inquest that expensive recomand segregation to manage mendations would be rejected. self-injurious inmates. “There is no free pocket “I agree with what is being money that we can go to to said here,” Head said. implement some of those Smith was also transferred things,” he said. frequently from segregation As an example, he cited the in one institution to isolation difficulty in providing training in another in what one guard The Canadian Press

S

Northern Institute of Social Justice Training Programs Core Competencies for FASD — Awareness to Understanding Completion of this course is required for entry into further training in the

dubbed “a see Canada tour.” By doing so, prison staff avoided reviewing Smith’s segregation status – a breach of the law. “The clock should not have stopped and reset the way that it was,” Head said. Still, he took issue with suggestions that nothing has improved in the six years since Smith strangled herself in her cell. Information sharing between health professionals and prison staff is better now than before Smith killed herself, he said. “One thing that Ashley Smith showed to us was how various parts of the organization were working in silos,” Head said. Head was senior deputy commissioner during Smith’s year in federal custody, although he was away for six of those months. Nevertheless, as many as 22

reports crossed his desk referencing Smith’s self-harming behaviour, mostly tying ligatures around her neck. Head said he expected the situation was being dealt with. “Did I do any follow-up? No, I did not,” he said. “There was nothing at that time that was coming to my office that required any additional attention to Ashley’s file.” Smith’s sentence, initially one month for throwing crab apples at a postal worker, ballooned to more than six years for numerous in-custody incidents in which guards called in police. Asked if a more strategic approach to avoid criminal prosecution of the mentally ill would be appropriate, Head said it “definitely would be something that we want to consider.” The inquest also heard about the 2002 case of an inmate in Quebec who died

after an epileptic seizure as guards videotaped but did not intervene – as happened with Smith. Smith’s guards were under orders to stay out of her segregation cell unless she was in medical distress. They were frequently disciplined for intervening too quickly to save her in the weeks before she died. Smith, of Moncton, N.B., 19, choked to death in her segregation cell at Grand Valley Institution in Kitchener, Ont., on Oct. 19, 2007. Head said correctional authorities are still trying to find regionally based community solutions for offenders in the most severe of cases. The Smith case, he said, raised the issue of how the criminal justice system as a whole deals with mental-health issues and concerns. For example, he said, judges should consider mental-health history before jailing people.

“Accommodating for the Challenges of FASD” series 9:00 am to 4:00 pm $80+gst More Info : Call FAssY @ 393-4948

This training is co-developed and delivered in partnership with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Society Yukon (FASSY).

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) AsIst provides practical help for caregivers seeking to prevent the immediate risk of suicide. November 13-14, 2013 8:30 am to 5:00 pm CRN: 10579 $400+gst Yukon College — Room: t1023 More Info: Call Angela @ 668.8854 Registration: Please call Admissions at 668-8710 and quote the Course Registration For more information on the Northern Institute of Social Justice and courses offered: Visit our website: http://www.yukoncollege.yk.ca/programs/info/nisj Call: (867) 456.8589 Email: nisj@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Northern Institute of Social Justice

start here. go anywhere. 1.800.661.0504 | www. yukoncollege.yk.ca

“Listen to the Stories”

Fritz Mueller

October 28, 2013 CRN: 10578 Yukon College — Room: C1440

CE LE B R AT I O N FE A S T A N D BO O K L AU N CH G A L A

Friday, November 1st, 2013 Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre An evening of good food, vibrant storytelling and performances bringing the journey of Kwanlin Dün to life.

Yukon Soccer Association will be holding trials for the

2014 Arctic Winter Games

Indoor Soccer Teams

Join us as we celebrate the launch of our new 87-page book — “Listen to the Stories: A History of the Kwanlin Dün People”

in the following age categories:

Intermediate Female: born in 1994 or later Junior Male: born in 1996 or later Junior Female: born in 1996 or later Juvenile Male: born in 1998 or later Juvenile Female: born in 1998 or later

Note: to be considered, players MUST attend trials unless you receive an exemption from Sport Yukon Games Committee by November 18th, 2013.

FEATURING ~ Diyet ~ Dakka Kwann Dancers ~ Elijah Smith Dancers ~ Kwanlin Dün Dancers Creation Story by Sharon Shorty ~ Emcee Victoria Fred ~ Tribute to past leaders by Elder Judy Gingell Documentaries by Doris Bill and Mike Rudyk ~ “Back to the River” song by the late Johnnie Smith

Fritz Mueller

Yukon Archives

Fritz Mueller

For more information contact Yukon Soccer Association at 633-4625.

Yukon Archives

Participants must be members in good standing with Yukon Soccer Association (registered and currently playing indoor soccer with any YSA Affiliate).

Traditional Regalia is encouraged. Copies of the book will be available at the event. Please RSVP to communications@kwanlindun.com or by calling 633 -7835.

Jennifer Ellis

Participants are asked to register no later than 5:00pm on November 12th, 2013 at Sport Yukon. Fee: $40

Doors open, 5:00 pm ~ Welcome Remarks & Feast, 5:45 pm Gala Storytelling Presentation, 7:00 to 9:00 pm

Yukon Archives

The trials will be held on November 23rd - November 24th, 2013 at the Canada Games Centre, in Whitehorse. Please note: the time schedule for the trials will be posted on the YSA website (www.yukonsoccer.yk.ca) on November 18th.

with a potlatch-style celebration feast followed by a gala production of the history of the Kwanlin Dün people from pre-contact to current times.

Kelly Wroot

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏


29

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Caimans thrive in sewage-filled waters amid Rio de Janeiro’s urban sprawl Jenny Barchfield Associated Press

RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil h, the glories of Rio that await spectators and athletes at the 2016 Olympics: those beaches, that music, the dramatic mountains. And then there are a few thousand alligator-like creatures slithering through sewage-like lagoons. Some 5,000 to 6,000 broadsnouted caimans live in fetid lagoon systems of western Rio de Janeiro, conservationists say, and there’s a chance that visitors could have an encounter with one, though experts hasten to add that the caimans, smaller and less aggressive than alligators or crocodiles, are not considered a threat to humans. Some of the animals have already taken refuge in ponds being built inside the Olympic golf course, which abuts a once pristine mangrove-filled lagoon that’s now thick with tons of raw sewage pumped from nearby high-end condominiums. In fact, with two decades of anarchic growth decimating natural habitats, the hardy caimans have become an increasingly common sight in the urban heart of western Rio, drawn in part by the scraps tossed to them by humans. The district is the main hub for 2016 Games and site of the Olympic village, though most events will take place in indoor facilities. One exception is the golf course, where some caimans have taken up residence in lakes. Wildlife on golf courses isn’t uncommon, with alligators spotted on greens in Florida and kangaroos bounding around courses in Australia. “When you have a natural green

O

space like this it attracts the wildlife, which is what you want,” said Antony Scanlon, executive director of the International Golf Federation. He said the risk to Olympic players and spectators is minimal and added that the construction company building the course has hired a reptile specialist to help manage the animals. The caimans congregate in a canal in the affluent Recreio dos Bandeirantes suburb that’s sandwiched between two busy thoroughfares. Beach-bound mothers with toddlers in strollers, neighbours out to walk the dog and pizza delivery boys pause on a narrow wooden footbridge over the canal to observe the caimans, whose brown colour camouflages them in the brackish, sulfuric waters. With few fish surviving in the polluted waters, caiman increasingly rely on handouts from humans, which can range from raw chicken to crackers, sometimes still in their plastic packages. They also feed on birds and the sewer rats that emerge from the culverts. “Caimans are like tanks, a very old species with a remarkable capacity for renovation that allows them to survive under extreme conditions where others couldn’t,” said Ricardo Freitas, an ecology professor who runs the Instituto Jacare, or the Caiman Institute, which aims to protect the reptiles. “But the fact of the matter is that their days are numbered if things don’t change drastically.” With a population that’s 85 per cent male, a serious demographic problem is looming for Rio’s caimans, said Freitas, who suspects that the uncontrolled release of raw sewage is behind the gender imbalance. Organic matter raises water warmer

and among caimans, high temperatures during a certain stage of incubation result in male offspring. While a few caimans wander from the canal, sometimes getting hit by cars, Freitas said he is aware of only one other person attacked by a caiman, a fisherman who was superficially bitten after he stepped on one.

Freitas himself has grabbed and tagged 400 of the reptiles over the past decade. He wades into the toxic sludge, slips a metal lasso around their heads and taps expertly on their snapping jaws until he’s able to tape them shut. While local caimans average about 1.5 metres (4.9 feet) long and weigh about 10 kilograms

(22 pounds), older males can be up to twice as long and much heavier. Still, Freitas has been known to dive into the water to catch some with his bare hands. “I was only bitten once, on the hand,” he said. “It was fine, although it got super infected because of the state of the water.”

Yukon Order of Pioneers

Scholarships 23, 2011

Each year the Yukon Order of Pioneers awards scholarships to graduates of Yukon schools doing post graduate work at Canadian Universities. This year the recipients are …

PaUla MOwat, Sara PYkE & tannEr CaSSidY.

Yukon order of Pioneers

Paula MOwat grew up in Whitehorse, and graduated from Vanier Catholic Secondary School. She went on to earn her BAH in Political Science and History at the University of King’s College in Halifax. Paula is in her first year of the Master of Public Health program, at the University of Saskatchewan. She looks forward to returning to work and adventure in the Yukon after graduation.

Sara PYke

Attention Attention

Southern LakesLakes Residents Southern and Property Owners Residents PUBLiC MeetinG #3

Southern Lakes Water Level Committee Yukon energy’s Southern Lakes is holding a public presentation:

enhanced Storage Concept Meeting #2 –erosion, Visions of Water Discussion of shoreline sediment transport and concerns about potential flooding Perspectives on the Southern Lakes Facilitated by the SLWLC’s independent geoscientist, Thursday July 25, 2013 Mike Miles, M.Sc., P.Geo. 7:00 pm Marsh Lake Centre 7:00 p.m., Community november 7, 2013 tagish Community Centre

Hydrology: Richard Janowicz, You are invited to a slide show and community discussion Yukon on Government, Water Resources Yukon Energy’s concept to increase its licensed Full Supply Level by up to 30 cm. This would mean holding Storytelling Water: Eleanor Hayman, back more water in the fall and early winter months.

PhD student, Ludwig Maximillian This is an opportunity to share your observations, University, Germany concerns or comments.

Provide photos with details now and we will prepare For more information: and present these for Nov 7th. Southern Lakes Water Level Committee: more information: (867) 660-5611, For deborah.fulmer@gmail.com SLWLC Sue Greetham 660-4106 (867) 667-7670, ramal64@gmail.com greetham@northwestel.net

was born and raised in Whitehorse. She graduated from F.H. Collins and then from the University of Northern BC with a bachelor’s degree in Nursing. Sara has worked as a Registered Nurse in northern BC, and most recently at Whitehorse Health Centre. She has returned to the University of Northern BC to pursue her Master of Science in Nursing Degree, focusing on primary health care integration and plans to return to the Yukon upon completion of this program.

tanner CaSSidY

was born and raised in the Yukon and graduated from Vanier Catholic Secondary. He earned a BSc with Honours in Kinesiology from Queen’s University. Currently, he is in his first year of the Masters of Physical Therapy program at the University of Saskatchewan. Following the completion of his studies, Tanner hopes to return to live and work in the Yukon.


30

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

‘Black Pete’ isn’t racist, Dutch say in online campaign Toby Sterling

The mushrooming popularity of the “Pete-ition” page reflects the depth of emotional attachment most AMSTERDAM, Netherlands Dutch people – 90 per cent of whom Facebook page seeking to have European ancestry – feel to a figpreserve the “Black Pete” clowns ure that helped launch the tradition in blackface who accompany St. of Santa Claus. Nicholas to the Netherlands during It also reflects their anger at critthe holidays has become the fastestics who call it racist. Those critics growing Dutch-language page ever, include foreigners who they feel don’t receiving 1 million “likes” in a single understand the tradition. They also day. include many of the country’s most Associated Press

A

prominent blacks. “Don’t let the Netherlands’ most beautiful tradition disappear,” the page says. On Tuesday, the chairwoman of a U.N. Human Rights Commission panel looking into the festival condemned it flatly. “The working group does not understand why it is that people in the Netherlands cannot see that this is a throwback to slavery, and that in Margriet Faber/AP Photo

A person dressed as “Zwarte Piet” or “Black Pete” attends a parade in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2013 RemembRance activities Poppy Campaign StartS on Friday 1St, november 2013 Please wear a poppy in memory of those who died for our freedom, our liberty, our democracy and our present way of life.

Flag Raising Ceremony noon on monday 28th, october 2013 at Veteran’s Square by City Hall.

Businesses Businesses that wish to display a wreath should contact the Legion at 667-2802.

Remembrance Dinner Friday 8th, november 2013.

Remembrance Ceremony monday 11, november 2013. Starting at 10am at the Canada Games Center. The public is strongly encouraged to use the shuttle service from the Takhini Arena offered by Whitehorse Transit.

the 21st century this practice should stop,” Verene Shepherd told television program EenVandaag. In stories told to children, St. Nicholas – Sinterklaas in Dutch – arrives by steamboat from Spain in mid-November accompanied by a horde of helpers: “Zwarte Pieten,” or Black Petes, who have black faces, red lips and curly hair. A public broadcaster produces a daily fictional news program about the doings of Sinterklaas and the Petes that is shown in public elementary schools for several weeks. On the evening of Dec. 5, families read poems and exchange presents to cap the Dutch-Belgian festival that is one of the main sources of the Santa Claus traditions. Opponents of the tradition say Pete is an offensive caricature of black people. Supporters say Pete is a positive figure whose appearance is harmless. The traditional song refers to Pete as a “servant” to the elderly saint, but in recent years those references have largely been replaced with the idea that he is black from chimney soot as he scrambles down to deliver toys and sweets for children who leave their shoes out overnight. Discussion about Zwarte Piet has escalated since 2011, when a prominent opponent was thrown to the ground, handcuffed by police and dragged away for wearing a T-shirt reading “Black Pete is Racism” where children might see. Opposition has been centred in Amsterdam, home to the Netherlands’ largest black community.

Mayor Eberhard van der Laan this month said he would support changing Pete’s appearance – but only gradually, as it has changed over time in the past. “If it appears that Amsterdammers feel pain as a result of this tradition, that’s a good reason for new development,” he said. Organizers of the festival and the broadcaster also said they would be open to changes if people want them. The latest public figure to speak out against the tradition was none other than the (white) man who has played the part of “Head Pete” on the Sinterklaas news program for more than a decade. His commentary appeared in a top Dutch newspaper Tuesday, entitled “Make me less black and less a servant.” Others to question the tradition include Victoria’s Secret model Doutzen Kroes and many of the country’s prominent thinkers and black celebrities. But their campaign has failed to draw widespread support and the overwhelming majority of Dutch people don’t want change. “Message for the U.N.: Isn’t there a war somewhere, starvation or genocide going on that you could better be concerned about?” Dutchman Peter Udo commented on the Facebook page, drawing more than 2,000 likes. Asked about the issue at his weekly press conference, Prime Minister Mark Rutte said it isn’t his place to intervene in a folk tradition. “Black Pete: The name says it already. He’s black,” he said. “I can’t change much about it.”

e ! acted

Spmi Li

BIG GAME

ROUND-UP December 7th Banquet, Dinner, Silent Auction and Dancing to Live Country Music @ Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centure ntre

Freedom is not free, never has been, never will be. Thank you to the Veterans who brought us our freedom and our present way of life. Thank you to those who are presently protecting that freedom. We Will Remember Them!

Tickets available at: For Tickets available at:

$50

Cash or Credit Card: Yukon Outfitters 668-4118 Arts Underground Box Office Cash Only: C & D Feeds 633-4620

featuring Lee Dinwoodie, from B.C.


31

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

New Zealand moves to 3-day mail service as smartphones replace letters Nick Perry

Mail volumes in the nation “Thirty years ago there were just telephones and letters. of 4.5 million people have Then came faxes, emails, and dropped by a quarter in the WELLINGTON, New Zealand smartphones, and they all last decade and the decline apallow people to bypass our ail will soon be delivpears to be accelerating. network,” said Brian Roche, ered to suburban New “Around the world postal Zealand homes just three days chief executive of New Zealand volumes are declining,” said Post. “People just don’t look a week as the country’s postal Communications Minister at their letterbox anymore as service responds to the rise of Amy Adams. “In New Zealand, their principal form of comsmartphones and the decline this is at a rate of about 8 per munication.” of letters. cent per annum.” Roche said mail delivery On Wednesday, the governIn the U.S., the Postal is barely breaking even and ment agreed to a steep reducService has struggled for years would begin losing money if tion in the six day a week with declining mail volumes. not for the cutbacks, which he service from 2015 following The service has tried to end its hopes will enable the service lobbying from New Zealand Saturday mail delivery but has to remain viable for years Post. The company said rebeen met with resistance from duced delivery days will result to come. He said customers federal lawmakers. wanting daily mail deliveries in significant job losses. In a contentious move in will be able to sign up for a The move could foreshadow Britain, the coalition governnew courier-type service – at a similar changes in other develment this month privatized oped nations as businesses and premium. the country’s 500-year-old He said the changes will residents increasingly move Royal Mail. It promised six result in significant job losses online to communicate and days a week service would among the country’s 2,000 or pay bills. continue. so postal delivery workers. From June 2015, New Zealand Post will be required to deliver mail just three days a Whitehorse Cross Country Ski Club week in urban areas and five The best ski trails in the Yukon. days a week in rural areas. About 12 per cent of customers live in rural areas. Associated Press

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Yukoners helping local Yukoners The United Way is the only worldwide charity organization that is actively involved in the Yukon. The United Way is involved in many parts of the world including Nigeria, Haiti, the United States and all across Canada. The goal of the United Way is to provide assistance to local residence. The chapter of the United Way in the Yukon is funded 100% by Yukoners. All funds go to organization in our region to help Yukoners. One way in which the United Way helps is through organizations such as the Learning Disabilities Association of Yukon (IDAY). “LDAY camps provide the opportunity for children and youth with learning disabilities to improve their social skills, build their selfesteem, and make new friends while having fun in the outdoors, playing games, learning new skills and expressing their creativity.” Stephanie Hammond told me “ The funding provided by United Way Yukon allows us to support campers from low-income families though summer camp bursaries. This allows all children and youth the opportunity to have a fantastic summer camp experience.” Stephanie Hammond lives in Whitehorse and is the Executive Director of the nonprofit society LDAY. With your help we can continue to help the disadvantaged in the Yukon. Please consider making a payroll or a onetime donation to the United Way. The financial contribution you make will help IDAY continue to provide assistance to people with learning disabilities. Remember, October is United Way month. By Chris Pinter


32

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

BUSINESS

ENVIRONMENT

Frozen-isle food without the isle Jesse Winter News Reporter

I

t’s a quarter past five. You’re still at the office. It’s snowing outside, you worked through lunch and you know your freezer at home is near empty. Like many working professionals these days, you don’t have the time or the energy to cook a full meal at home, but you also don’t want to eat a box full of preservatives from the grocery store freezer isle. Now, you don’t have to, thanks to Cozy Foods’ Amy O’Rourke. “It’s freezer-isle food that’s homemade,” she says. O’Rourke’s new business, barely three months old and already simmering, provides home-cooked frozen meals that are delivered to the doors to busy Yukoners. She rents kitchen space from L’Association Franco-Yukonnaise and runs a sort of phantom restaurant. She has a set menu posted on her website and Facebook page and offers same-day service on her frozen food creations whenever she can. “It started when I was working my first nine-to-five, and found that there wasn’t enough time in the day to cook for myself, especially with Whitehorse being such an active community. Trying to get out and do something active and be social and eat well was just too much to fit in,” she says. “I looked for the service, because I know that it exists down south. When I found that it didn’t exist here, I decided that within the year I would go for it,” she says. Just over a year ago she left her jobs and set out to build Cozy Foods. Now she spends about 20 hours in the kitchen every week, chopping, slicing, and sauteing. In three months, she’s already amassed around 40 repeat customers plus others who place orders here and there. She’s also taken on menu planning and food expediting for a local contractor in town. Most of her customers are younger, busier professionals or new families. “Once moms find out about me, they know how valuable the service is. I had a couple wonderful days where I just delivered gift certificates to families. “There’s a need for this,” she says. “When I started this business, it was because I wanted the service. It’s hard to cook a home-cooked meal every day. By the time you’re done, it’s 9 o’clock and then you don’t get any personal time. I think it’s very valuable for people. Once they’ve ordered, they always come back.” It’s a challenge figuring out exactly which dishes freeze and keep the best. Most of her menu is comfort food like chicken pot pie or bison stew. She goes through about 10 pounds of carrots, the same amount of bison and about eight pounds of chicken every week,

Jesse Winter/Yukon News

Cozy Foods owner Amy O’Rourke cooks up dinners, freezes them and delivers them to your doorstep Mondays to Thursdays.

O’Rourke says. “They’re very traditional, soulwarming kind of dishes. I do a lot of chicken pot pies, bison stew, mac ‘n cheese. I try and make sure that I have a bit for everyone. I really like curries, so I always have a couple of dishes just dedicated to curries,” O’Rourke says. O’Rourke focuses on the most time-consuming food like soups and stews that most people don’t have the time to make themselves. “Anything that’s cozy,” she says, laughing. On average the meals cost about $8 a portion, and come in singles, couples or family portions. A family-sized order is twice as large as a couple’s and feeds about four people, she says. “I try to offer same-day service whenever possible. I’m a small business and I’m just one person, but I really try to fill whatever has been ordered that day, every day.” People tend to order in bulk, and keep a stock in their home freezers for last-minute meals, she says. But if quitting time hits and you completely forgot to figure out dinner, O’Rourke also keeps a supply of single portions on hand herself. “I keep an inventory of everything. I don’t cook-to-order because I’m just renting this kitchen and I’m not exactly a factory,” she said. Along with the convenience, O’Rourke also places a lot of importance on cooking healthy meals without all the grocery-store junk. “I think the market has changed in terms of what people desire. You

Jesse Winter/Yukon News

don’t feel great about walking down the freezer isle in the grocery store. We’re educated consumers, and we know that along with buying a convenient meal you’re also buying lots of preservatives and additives and high sodium. “I’m just simply offering a frozen-isle alternative. My meals go straight from your freezer to your oven or your microwave. You can feel good about eating it because it’s a home-cooked meal and doesn’t have all that crap in it,” she says.

Five years down the road, O’Rourke wants to open a location of her own and have a staff of one or two people who love to cook. “It’s important now, because I don’t have a location, to stick to a set menu. But it’d be great if somebody could come in and sort of just riffle through the freezer and fine whatever suits their fancy,” she says. “It would kind of be like mom’s cooking. Whatever we are cooking that day you could get warm for lunch.”

She’s even thinking about holding cooking classes, and opening her future kitchen up to cooking with other people. “We could each cook five-dozen perogies and take them home. I could have a garden and do those sort of master gardener programs that are offered by Yukon College, and then make our food together,” she says. Contact Jesse Winter at jessew@yukon-news.com


33

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Fog sits along the Yukon River in Whitehorse’s Riverdale neighbourhood this week.

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ExcEllEncE in EMS

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Dave Weir George Kontogonis

Mike Perry Janice Rose

Rick Staley Darlene Hutton

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A Skills Competition was held that presented each team with 5 stations designed to test different assessment and treatment skills required as an Emergency Medical Responder or Primary Care Paramedic.

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34

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

B.C. overhauls its water use rules Dene Moore

Minister Mary Polak unveiled new water use legislation to replace a statute introduced prior VANCOUVER to the Cariboo Gold Rush and rought due to climate the First World War. change, shale gas “fracking,” The new Water Sustainability commercial water sales. Act will replace the 1909 Water British Columbia’s water Act, and it will mean B.C. will systems are under increasing no longer be the only province pressure, and the provincial gov- in the country not regulating ernment introduced some major groundwater use. changes Friday as Environment “The (Water Sustainability Canadian Press

D

In 1952, Parky arrived in the Yukon. In 1953, he began working for Yukon Motors, which was owned by Bill Drury and Al Clark. In December of 1965, he earned his Automotive Mechanic Journey Level Certification and in April of 1968 he earned his Heavy Equipment Mechanic Certification.

Act) will update and replace the existing water act, which we know is well over 100 years old,” Polak said in Victoria. Over four years of consultations, industry, communities and First Nations said the priority should be to ensure enough water in streams and rivers to sustain fish, Polak said. “There’s no question that this act will not cover off every single

In 1987, he completed a course in New Model Automatic Transmissions, and in 1989 he completed a course in Automotive Wheel Alignment. Some of his other accomplishments included: • Member of the Motor Vehicle Mechanic Trade Advisory Committee (1978-1989) • Recognition by Yukon Apprenticeship for his contributions, in 1989 • Certificate of Achievement by General Motors

In 1986, Parky attended Yukon College and successfully completed Automotive Mechanics updating in:Computer Controlled Ignition and Fuel Systems • Automotive Fuel Injection Gas/Diesel • Advanced Engine Tune-Up

aspect of water protection and water use,” the minister said in a telephone interview. “It’s not intended to. It’s intended to govern the allocation of water – who gets how much, who gets to use what and when and the powers of government to deal with issues of scarcity, drought, etc.” Under the new rules, largescale users now able to use water without limit and without cost will pay an annual fee and 85 cents for every 1,000 cubic metres of groundwater used. For example, a Nestle Canada plant in Hope, B.C., that bottles an estimated 71 million imperial gallons – 319.5 million litres – of water for sale annually, would pay about $265, Polak said. Overall, the new fees for groundwater are expected to put $5 million annually into the provincial coffers. By comparison, the fee regime for surface water that has been in place for many years, generated about $7 million a year. Polak said the fees and the legislation have not been finalized. The province is seeking public comment until Nov. 15. The new rules also attempt to prepare for the changing weather patterns and increased risk of drought in B.C. brought on by climate change. “Being prepared for climate change means being able to adapt to changes in the water supply and demand over time,” said the report released Friday by Polak. By mid-century B.C. is expected to be warmer and wetter, the report said, with higher annual average temperatures and precipitation. “While B.C. will become wetter overall, precipitation will not occur evenly throughout the year. Fall, winter and spring are projected to be warmer and wet-

ter with more rain and less snow, particularly at lower elevations. Summers will be hotter with reduced precipitation in most areas.” The proposed legislation would also exempt saline aquifers buried more than 600 metres below the surface. Polak said the decision not to charge fees is an incentive to avoid fresh water for use in shale gas “fracking.” “When you consider the potential impacts of creating an incentive for the industry to avoid fresh water use in favour of saline use, that can have a significant impact on what we’re currently seeing in behaviour of oil and gas companies in the northeast,” she said in a telephone interview. Polak said the new act is not the only statute governing water use in B.C. The Water Protection Act, the Fish Protection Act and the Drinking Water Protection Act remain in place. The conservation group West Coast Environmental Law said it was pleased that the province is committed to new legislation. But in some ways the proposed rules enshrine mistakes past in water management, said Andrew Gage, a staff lawyer for the association. “They need to hear loud and clearly from British Columbians that this is our environment and our water and it needs to be protected fully,” Gage said. Spencer Chandra-Hebert, the environment critic for the provincial New Democrats, said anything would be an improvement but the legislation proposed is “fairly weak.” “Climate change is going to impact us and is impacting us in ways that we don’t understand,” he said. “It acknowledges it but it does very little to change…. It leaves a lot of discretion and a lot of potential for inaction.”

For their outstanding effort and achievements, the following apprentice Automotive Service Technicians were awarded the John (Parky) Parkinson Award on on Friday, October 18, 2013.

Request for Board Members

MArcven MAbilOg Outstanding achievement in attaining the highest 2012/2013 Yukon Exam score for Automotive Service Technician Level I. Klondike Motors

brendAn reeSe

Outstanding achievement in attaining the highest 2012/2013 Yukon Exam score for Automotive Service Technician Level 2. Advance North Mechanical, Dawson City

JOShuA FiScher

Outstanding achievement in attaining the highest 2012/13 Yukon Exam Score for Automotive Service Technician Level 4. Whitehorse Motors

JOShuA FiScher

Outstanding achievement in attaining the highest 2012/13 Yukon Exam Score for Automotive Service Technician Inter Provincial Level. Whitehorse Motors

Carcare Motors

Mic Mac Toyota

Klondike Motors

The Council of Yukon First Nations is requesting applications from Yukon First Nation Citizens for nominations on the following Boards and Committees: • Gas Tax Review Committee (2 alternate seats) • Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board (1 executive committee seat) • Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board (2 seats) DEADLINE for applications is November 8, 2013, at 4:30 PM. For application forms and, or, for more information, please visit our website at www.cyfn.ca or contact Jennifer Ward at (867) 393-9236 or by e-mail at jennifer.ward@cyfn.net


35

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Bank of Canada opens door to interest rate cuts, downgrades growth Julian Beltrame

receive more data flow that was more negative for that inflation outlook, then we would need to OTTAWA rethink that balance.” he Bank of Canada has However, most analysts doubt pointedly dropped its the bank will cut the overnight warning about the potential for rate below its already historically higher interest rates, triggering low setting – where it’s been for a sell-off in Canadian dollars more than three years – unless that pushed the loonie almost conditions deteriorate materone cent lower Wednesday and ially. raised speculation that rates But David Madani of Capital could actually fall further. Economics, among the most In a more predictable move, dovish of private sector econothe bank also lowered the mists, says the bank’s new tune anticipated growth path for the “supports our view that if there economy, shaving the projected is any change in monetary policy pace of expansion for this year over the near term, it would be as well as in 2014 and 2015. to provide more policy support, The central bank, by jetnot less.” tisoning the now familiar At the very least, the bank is tightening bias that it has used sending a strong signal that it is since April 2012 to caution con- prepared to stay low for much sumers about over-borrowing, longer, likely into 2015. suggests that it is just as likely to And the bank is suggesting cut the one per cent overnight it is prepared to risk reignitrate as to raise it in future. ing the housing market and the And at a news conference fol- increased borrowing that might lowing the release of the bank’s entail if that is what it takes to monetary policy report and rate light a fire under the economy, announcement, bank governor particularly the critical export Stephen Poloz made no effort sector through dollar-deflating to dissuade markets from that policies. assumption. “The Canadian economy “The statement is making has struggled, struggled with a growth rate that is below two it clear we have balanced the per cent, so I think the bank is risks,” Poloz said. “If we were to The Canadian Press

T

Bites Into Winter Not Your Wallet.

Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz.

prepared to throw down the gauntlet to support growth and exports,” said Bank of Montreal senior economist Michael Gregory. TD Bank chief economist Craig Alexander says he still believes the governor’s next move is a hike, but says that at the very least he has put some doubt into markets. “Personally I think the balance of risk is for the next move to be up but I also think the bank was right to drop the forward guidance,” he said, adding that persistent slack in the economy and the low inflation outlook make the threat of higher rates not credible. The shift in tone is already altering some thinking about the path of interest rates. The Bank of Montreal sent out a note Wednesday that it has changed its predictions for interest rate increases in both Canada and the United States. It also pushed back its prediction for when the U.S. will start phasing out its quantitative easing program, known as tapering. That could lead to higher bond yields and the shaving of a

few decimal points off five-year mortgages, although the more likely outcome is that the already low interest rate environment will stay around longer. Still, Gregory said the government will need to keep a close eye on the housing market for signs of overheating. If that happens, federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty may need to tighten mortgage rules once more, he said. The key explanation given by the central bank for its switch is continued weakness in the country’s export sector, which has restrained business spending on machinery and equipment, and persistent slack in the economy, which has kept inflation below target. The bank had expected exports to show a bounce in the third quarter, but that did not occur due to the fiscal turbulence in the U.S. and continued weak global demand, it said. Non-commodity exports have been basically flat for some time, noted Tiff Macklem, the bank’s second in command. What’s more, the bank is not certain why exports have under-

performed as much as they have, citing potential competitive pressures. Poloz said the higher dollar, which remains only a few cents below parity with the U.S. greenback, is a factor but not the main one. “The main thing is (exporters) lost a lost of sales during the downturn, (when) their biggest market, the U.S., slowed down very dramatically,” Poloz said. “Many of those companies were forced to become smaller ... and there is something like 9,000 fewer exporting firms now than there were prior to the crisis. That’s a lot.” The loonie itself fell 0.89 of a cent to 96.3 cents US Wednesday after having gone as low as 96.18 cents US. Meanwhile, Poloz and Macklem say they see signs of a recovery in the economy, but the so-called “rotation” to exportbased growth will take longer than the bank had anticipated. In essence, the central bank has not changed its view on how and if the Canadian economy will come out of its current slow-growth predicament, but it has pushed back the timing for when it will happen. The bank now predicts the economy won’t return to full potential until the end of 2015, about six months later than it thought in July. And the path to there will be slower. Following a disappointing third quarter, this year’s growth will likely only average 1.6 per cent, two-tenths of a point lower than the previous forecast. Next year’s projection has also been lowered by fourtenths to 2.3 and even 2015 will see growth one notch below the July estimate at 2.6 per cent.

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36

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Internal audit finds Bank of Canada’s economists write poorly, need help Dean Beeby

Auditors examined an elite group of bank economists, most of them with graduate degrees, who regularly OTTAWA dissect the current state of the Canan internal report card says the dian and international economies. Bank of Canada’s economists The group’s advice is in high dedon’t write too good. mand by Stephen Poloz, the governor, “Economists’ writing skills were and his five deputies, who together identified by many as an area for must set Canada’s monetary policy in improvement,” says an audit ordered a volatile financial climate. by the central bank. The workload of the group has “This includes difficulties being grown tremendously since the global succinct, grammatically correct, meltdown of 2008, the audit notes. and prioritizing the data into useful “The number of requests for analysis coming from the Governing information.” Canadian Press

A

CARCROSS/TAGISH FIRST NATION

CTFN POST-SECONDARY DEADLINES Deadlines to apply for funding are: Winter Semester November 15th Spring/Summer Semester March 15th Fall Semester May 15th

Any late applications will automatically be deferred to the next deadline for the Education Advisory Committee to review. Applications can be sent to: C/O CTFN Education Advisory Committee Box 130 Carcross, Y.T. Y0B 1B0 erika.whelan@ctfn.ca Ph: (867) 821-4251 ext 8257 Fax: (867) 821-8214

and the direction of monetary policy, or about anything else that could be considered relevant to economic outlook and their interest rate decision.” Vardy said the economists who were reviewed by the auditors take part in the process by which the bank determines its monetary policy. “Given that your questions pertain to the economic staff and departments that are involved in formulating the economic outlook, we consider the (blackout) guidelines to apply,” she said in an email. Economics, by its very nature, is a discipline dense in jargon. The last monetary policy report, issued by the central bank in July, for Jimmy Jeong/The Canadian Press example, offered sentences such as: Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz. The Bank of “Financial fragmentation continues to Canada’s workers need help with their writing skills. A impair the transmission of monetary review of economists who advise the governor finds policy, however, as reflected in the them ungrammatical and wordy. divergence between lending rates in the peripheral and core economies.” Council members has increased as mation Act. Federal government policy rethey seek to understand the impact Last year, the central bank proquires bureaucrats to speak plainly to of a growing number of factors vided only a redacted copy, in which the public. impacting the economy, respond to all references to the economists’ weak “Messages should convey inforquestions concerning short-term writing were deleted. mation relevant to public needs, use forecasting, and prepare for public But after a complaint to the plain language and be expressed in appearances,” says the internal report. information commissioner of Canada a clear and consistent style,” says a Ad-hoc demands by the governor and a subsequent year-long investiga- policy document from the Treasury and others for quick analysis, which tion, the Bank of Canada relented and Board. now absorb up to half the time of delivered a mostly intact copy of the Public servants are also urged these economists, also appear to have March 2012 document. to speak to one another using plain created a paper jam as managers must The audit otherwise praises the language. then edit the below-standard English work of the so-called “Current AnalyOver the years, various departor French. sis” section of the central bank. ments have launched plain-language “The cause for lengthy review was Spokeswoman Jill Vardy declined initiatives for the benefit of bureauin part attributed to writing skills, to respond immediately to quescrats or the public, including the both in terms of basic communications, saying the Bank of Canada Canada Revenue Agency, Public tion, as well as how to convey an apwas currently in a communications Works, and Human Resources and propriate level of detail in telling ‘the “blackout” ahead of Wednesday’s key Skills Development. story,”’ says the audit. policy announcement, when the bank Health Canada is the latest, with a The group clearly needs training announces the overnight rate that project to compel drug manufacturers in writing skills, the report concludes, influences general interest rates. and health products firms to use plain and the bank’s management agreed to The “blackout” policy in the days language in labelling. provide it. leading to the announcement forbids New regulations were announced The Canadian Press recently senior bank officials from “speaking in June aimed at requiring “health obtained a largely uncensored copy of to the news media or other outside product labels to be more clear, accurate and easier to understand.” the audit under the Access to Inforparties about the economic outlook

Celebrate our Foster Families October 20 to 26 is National Foster Family Appreciation Week. As Minister of Health and Social Services, I take this opportunity to extend a heartfelt thank-you to all of Yukon’s foster families for opening your hearts and your homes to Yukon children and families needing support. Your desire to provide safety and stability to Yukon children in need is truly appreciated.

Notice to all Selkirk FirSt NatioN PoSt-SecoNdary StudeNtS The deadline for application for PSE funding for the Winter 2014 Semester is November 15, 2013. All funding ApplicAtions must be received by this dAte

Doug Graham

Health and Social Services

Foster Families Make a Difference!

For information about becoming a foster parent, please contact us at 867- 667-3002 or visit www.hss.gov.yk.ca/foster_care.

NOTE* Applications received after November 15th will be deferred to The next intake date of July 15, 2014. please contact selkirk first nation Manager of education at education2@selkirkfn.com for application forms and a checklist of required documents.


37

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Company completes filing on proposal to run broadband line through Arctic communities include just over half of Nunavut’s population. The cable could also connect TORONTO with Kugluktuk, but that hasn’t Toronto company filed its final been decided yet. regulatory documents this Cunningham said Arctic Fibre week and expects speedy approval also has a $240-million proposal for a proposal to run a fibre-optic before the federal government for line through the Northwest Passpur lines off the main trunk that sage. would connect to communities “We’re pretty well assured along the east and west sides of that that is going to happen fairly Hudson Bay as well as up Baffin quickly,” said Doug Cunningham, Island’s west coast. That would president of Arctic Fibre. include about 98 per cent of “Not that it’s rubber-stamped, Nunavummiut, as well as several but we’re very confident that we locations in Arctic Quebec. will be getting a licence forthwith.” “We haven’t had any formal Arctic Fibre has asked the response to the proposal,” CunNunavut Impact Review Board ningham said. and Industry Canada for submaIf all goes well, the line could be rine cable landing licences that operational by 2016, he added. would serve seven communities in Internet service to the Arctic is a Nunavut and just over half the ter- subject of growing concern. ritory’s population. A recent Conference Board of The plans are part of a Canada report called the current $600-million proposal to stretch a situation an impediment to growth. 15,700- kilometre-long cable from “The most modern standard Japan to Newfoundland, where it of service continues to elude most would connect to the northeastern northern communities,” said the United States. report. “This limits the ability of Running fibre-optic lines regional economies to diversify.” through the Northwest Passage A 2011 government report instead of to the U.S. coast, across noted the same problem. the country, then back under water “The Arctic must have reliagain would shave 29 milliseconds able communication networks to off data transmission time between establish and maintain Canada’s Tokyo and London, the company sovereignty, and to meet internasays. That’s a significant edge for tional obligations for ensuring safe high-speed financial traders. passage for road, sea and air traffic,” As well, the line would add stasaid the Arctic Communications bility to global information flows Infrastructure Assessment Report. by adding another physical route. Cunningham said lack of bandCunningham said current lines width also contributes to the cost run through regions with either of development and government geological or political instability. in the North. He said his company Arctic Fibre’s plan would also had to courier its applications to bring “virtually unlimited” bandthe review board because Internet width to Cambridge Bay, Gjoa Ha- service to Cambridge Bay couldn’t ven, Taloyoak, Igloolik, Hall Beach, handle the entire document. Cape Dorset and Iqaluit. Those Arctic Fibre isn’t the only comBob Weber

Canadian Press

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pany competing to improve the situation. Satellite services company Telesat has promised to spend $40 million to expand and modernize its broadband equipment and infrastructure serving Nunavut,

the Northwest Territories and the Yukon. The Ottawa-based company has said it would cost about $160 million over the next decade to provide additional communications infrastructure and said it is

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38

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Cellphones are shackles at Bell Prison by Andrew Robulack

GEEK

LIFE I

f you’re a Bell customer, the company will make you its prisoner next month when it

turns your mobile phone into the equivalent of an ankle bracelet that tracks your every move. And your contract with Bell will become your prison sentence that indentures you to suffer an nighescapable term of information servitude to the company. Starting November 16, Bell will collect data about where you go, who you phone, what apps you use, what web sites you visit, along with many others details about how, when, and where you use your mobile device.

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With this data, Bell will build a detailed, highly personal profile of you that it will use widely within Bell and its affiliate companies – including its retail presence, The Source. This profile will be unprecedented in its scale and scope. Even Google doesn’t know as much about you as Bell soon will. Then, periodically, Bell will strip away the personal details and melt a copy of your data down into a pot with similar inmates’. It’ll sell that to advertisers for what will certainly be a tremendous profit. It’s a lucrative new revenue stream for the company. And, frankly, it’s surprising the company didn’t do it a long time ago. U.S. mobile behemoth Verizon has been at it for a couple of years now. Other companies track our online exploits too, of course. Facebook and Google spring to mind as two companies that make their livings from it. But we willingly entered into agreements with those companies, permitting them to track what we do online. We understand that they resell our data for profit because, in exchange, we get free services. So there shouldn’t be much of a problem with what Bell’s doing. And, truly, there isn’t. The real issue is the way the company is doing it. Bell’s actions and behaviours are, to put it bluntly, immoral and unethical, if not illegal (our federal privacy commission has launched an investigation into that last question). Consider that Bell didn’t even ask us if it’s OK to collect, analyze, store and resell the most intimate details of our daily lives. Instead, the company just took its customers for granted. I signed a contract with Bell for mobile telecommunications services, period. I’ve never authorized or agreed to expansive personal tracking. No Bell customer ever has. Activities that involve private information gathering in Canada are governed by federal regulations that generally require an “opt-in” mechanism – a technical way of asking permission. Bell appears to consider itself above such paltry niceties and, instead, it’s just flipping an “on” switch as it flips us

Nominations

for Yukon Farmer or Farm Family of the Year

the bird. As a result, Bell has effectively altered the legal and ethical relationship it has with customers, without our consent. Then there’s an issue of compensation. Make no mistake, Bell’s core motive here is money, and the company should have considered cutting us in on the action. Google alone made over $3 billion in profit from July to September this year, much of which came from selling information to advertisers. Bell will introduce tens, if not hundreds, of millions of new dollars into its revenue stream by reselling customer activity data. But, wait: we actually pay Bell, through our monthly service fees, to collect, manage, and resell that data. We’re basically financing Bell’s new business endeavour, with no promise of any return on our personal information investment. So Bell should have also offered us a tangible benefit like, say, a steep discount on our bill each month in exchange for making our information available to sell. Possibly the most heinous aspect of Bell’s approach is the fact that there is no way for us to prevent the company from tracking us and reselling information about us. There is no “opt-out” mechanism. We’re trapped. Finally, Bell should have shared. I’d love to see any profile Bell builds about me that’s based on how I use my mobile device. I’m sure a lot of people would. There’s nothing wrong with the basic premise of Bell’s new venture. Collecting and reselling customer data is par for the course these days in terms of a business model. But Bell has just gone about introducing it as a business practice in the worst way possible. The company disrespected its customers and, in my view, breached our privacy rights and interests by introducing extreme new service terms that took advantage of the fact we’re all trapped in a binding contract. The company should have invited us to participate by politely requesting our permission. It should have provided us with an

opportunity to deliberately “optin” to having our mobile activities and behaviours tracked, collected, and resold. Bell should have offered us a share of the spoils. It’s our information for sale, after all, and we already cover the cost of collecting it. Most importantly, we should have been allowed to deny Bell access to this information, to maintain our privacy. We should have been allowed to “opt-out” and keep information about ourselves to ourselves. Finally, Bell should share the information with us that it collects about us. Even credit agencies do that. Honestly, if Bell had taken this approach I would have willingly signed on. Instead, I’m resigned to the fact that the only way to effectively opt-out of Bell’s egregious new terms is to end my seven-year relationship with the company. So, yeah, I’m paying my Bell bail early and heading over to Telus where they actually respect your privacy. I’d recommend you consider doing the same if you have the opportunity.

Mea culpa

In my last column I suggested that NorthwesTel hadn’t apologized to its customers for the outage of its internet usage notification tool. In fact, the company had, and so it’s my turn to apologize to NorthwesTel. The company wrote in an email, “We apologize for the inconvenience.” When I wrote that the company hadn’t apologized, I was including reference to the customers who had suffered extra monetary penalties as a result of the outage of the tool. I think we all can agree that unexpected sums on a bill qualify as slightly more than an “inconvenience,” so it’s arguable that the company hadn’t fully apologized. But maybe I was splitting hairs. So I’d like to offer a heartfelt apology to NorthwesTel for the, um, inconvenience. Andrew Robulack is an award-winning entrepreneur, writer and consultant specializing in using technology and the internet to communicate. Read his blog at www.geeklife.ca.

Who should be the 2013 Farmer of the Year? Is there a farmer, farm family, or farm advocate in your community that has shown the kind of commitment and passion for agriculture that you feel should be recognized? This is your opportunity to nominate Yukon’s producers or others who have substantially contributed to agriculture this year. Submit your nomination(s) in writing to the Agriculture Branch with a brief explanation of why the candidate(s) are worthy of the award. All nominations must be received by Wednesday, October 30, 2013, at 4:00 p.m. Submit nominations to: Agriculture Branch Room 320, Elijah Smith Building, 300 Main Street, Whitehorse Fax: (867) 393-6222 Email: agriculture@gov.yk.ca For more information, please contact Yukon’s Agriculture Branch at (867) 667-5838 or toll free at 1-800-661-0408 ext. 5838


39

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Self driving cars could transform driving, produce billions of dollars in benefits Joan Lowy Associated Press

WASHINGTON n some ways, computers make ideal drivers: They don’t drink and then climb behind the wheel. They don’t do drugs, get distracted, fall asleep, run red lights or tailgate. And their reaction times are quicker. They do such a good job, in fact, that a new study says selfdriving cars and trucks hold the potential to transform driving by eliminating the majority of traffic deaths, significantly reducing congestion and providing tens of billions of dollars in economic benefits. But significant hurdles to widespread use of self-driving cars remain, the most important of which is likely to be cost. Added sensors, software, engineering and power and computing requirements currently tally over $100,000 per vehicle, clearly unaffordable for most people, the study said. But large-scale production “promises greater affordability over time,” it concluded. Questions also remain about public acceptance, liability in event of an accident, and the ability of automakers to prevent car computers from being hacked. Nevertheless, the advantages of self-driving cars are such that if only 10 per cent of cars and trucks on the road were selfdriving, they could reduce traffic deaths by 1,000 per year and produce nearly $38 billion in economic and other savings, said the study by the Eno Center for Transportation, a foundation dedicated to improving transportation. If 90 per cent of vehicles were self-driving, as many as 21,700 lives per year could be saved, and economic and other benefits could reach a staggering $447 billion, said the study, a copy of which was provided to The Associated Press. “There will be many steps before we get to that, but it does feel like there is a whole new world that completely changes everything in terms of our perspective on driving that could emerge eventually,” said Joshua Schank, Eno’s president and CEO. For example, the passenger compartment may be transformed as former drivers safely work on laptops, eat meals, read books, watch movies and call friends. And cars that can be programmed to pick up people, drive them to their destination and then park by themselves may change the lives of the elderly and disabled by providing critical mobility. Once a critical mass of selfdriving cars is on the road, they can start “platooning” – driving

I

closely together but keeping a steady distance between each other without the fuel-burning, time-wasting, stop-and-go typical of traffic congestion. That could smooth traffic flows, reduce commute times and increase highway capacity. Government research indicates driver error is likely the main reason behind over 90 per cent of all crashes. Over 40 per cent of fatal traffic crashes involve alcohol, distraction, drugs or fatigue. But self-driven vehicles wouldn’t fall prey to such human failings, suggesting the potential for at least a 40 per cent reduction in fatal crashes, the study said. Crashes can also be due to speeding, aggressive driving, over-compensation, inexperience, slow reaction times, inattention and various other human driver shortcomings, the report noted, suggesting that computers could also reduce those. But Clarence Ditlow, executive director of the consumer advocacy group Center for Auto Safety, cautioned that while selfdriving cars hold great promise for reducing accidents caused by driver error, much will depend upon the safety standards the government sets for the vehicles and how well manufacturers make them. Otherwise, he said, “you could be substituting computer errors for human errors.” Spurred by what some see as the future direction of the auto industry, carmakers are stepping up their research. General Motor and Nissan are furthest along, but Audi, BMW, Ford, MercedesBenz, Toyota, Volkswagen and Volvo have also begun testing driverless systems. Google’s self-driving cars have clocked over 400,000 miles on California public roads. Many of the features that go into creating a self-driving car are already available, especially in high-end cars. Adaptive cruise control adjusts speed faster or slower in response to traffic. Lane departure systems warn drivers when they’re drifting out of their lane, and some can even automatically steer the car back. Collision avoidance systems automatically brake to prevent front-to-rear crashes. And parking assist systems range from rearview cameras that show drivers what is behind them to vehicles that can actually park themselves. The hardest part will likely be making self-driving cars “cost effective to the point where this is not just a gadget that some people enjoy, but becomes mainstream,” Schank said. For example, hybrid and electric vehicles still haven’t overcome their price gap with conventional vehicles, and so remain at a smaller share of the

auto market than people had anticipated they would be at this point, he said. States are already seeking to prepare the way for self-driving cars to join other vehicles on the road. California, Florida and Ne-

vada have passed laws to regulate the licensing and operation of self-driving cars. California has directed that licensing requirements be ready by 2015. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has urged

states to establish procedures for testing self-driving cars on public roads, but has also cautioned states against licensing sales of the vehicles to the general public. The agency is also conducting research on the vehicles.

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40

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Dog of War: Meet the new breakout star of the video game Call of Duty: Ghosts Derrik J. Lang Associated Press

LOS ANGELES is name is Riley. Unlike his squad mates in the next installment of the rabidly popular Call of Duty series, he’s not adept at sniping enemy combatants or piloting drones. He can’t even pick up a gun. Yet even though Call of Duty: Ghosts isn’t due until November, Riley has already become the breakout star of the military shoot-’em-up. He even has a Twitter account – (at)CollarDuty. Yup, Riley is a dog – probably the first canine action hero to star in a mainstream video game. After footage released earlier this year revealed that Ghosts would feature a four-legged soldier, the Internet uniformly wagged its tail in anticipation. The mere tease of a canine character inspired fan art, doggy cosplay and the unofficial Twitter account, which has attracted over 28,000 followers. Ghosts executive producer Mark Rubin said during a recent visit to developer Infinity Ward’s offices that the German Shepherd originated as an idea on a notecard during a brainstorming session. The developers didn’t actually know anything about military service dogs, just that unleashing one on the Activision Blizzard Inc. franchise was “a cool idea.” Call of Duty fans drooled over Riley again last month when a new trailer released for Ghosts featured him lunging at a helicopter, taking a bite out of the human pilot and bringing the chopper whirling down to the ground. As Riley’s fame unexpectedly surged online, Rubin said the developers’

H

made from form-fitting suits intended for dogs with skin conditions. Neversoft mo-cap supervisor Kristina Adelmeyer said they originally wore special booties on their paws so dozens of cameras could film their range of motion. However, they didn’t act natural in their fancy footwear. “We ended up using these pieces of tape that the mo-cap system could see as markers,” said Adelmeyer. Rico provided the biting and tackling, while Ruger performed the movements. Chris Connell, Ruger’s trainer, said during a demonstration of his abilities at Neversoft earlier this month that the biggest challenge for the Schutzhund competition champion – that’s German for “protection dog” – was playing makebelieve. “In this environment, we didn’t Activision/AP Photo have trees or grass,” said Connell. “It was like, ‘OK, Ruger. Pretend Riley, the canine star of the video game, Call of Duty: Ghosts. The new video game isn’t we’re in a desert area and act due until November 2013, but Riley has already become the breakout star of the military accordingly.’ Ruger is like, ‘Dude, shoot-’em-up. this is a studio with mats like people do exercises on at the gym, inclination was to let the game go players but could be commanded and hounds work together. They and there’s white lines on the later cast a pair of pooches, a Gerat certain points throughout to the dog. “There was a risk of shoehorn- both the single- and multi-player man Shepherd named Ruger and ground.’ Just trying to get him to act as if it was a real environment a smaller Belgian Malinois called modes. ing the dog into scenes where he was the hardest thing.” Rico, to be digitally captured for In the game, Riley is outfitwasn’t originally going to be,” he The inclusion of a dog in the the game. said. “Fortunately, that only lasted ted with several gadgets based violent, mature series begs the “We had several mo-cap for a few weeks and everybody got on technology employed by his question: Will Ghosts have an Old back to concentrating on making real-world counterparts. For play- (motion-capture) shoots, and some of them we just had to write Yeller moment? ers, Riley’s battlefield perspective the game. It’s great that Riley is “Everybody thinks we’re gocan be glimpsed through a camera off as learning experiences,” said so popular, but let’s focus on the Ghosts lead animator Zach Volker, ing to kill the dog,” said Rubin. game. Let’s have Riley make sense mounted to the back of his tacti“Maybe that’s the expected thing cal suit, and he can receive orders, who noted that if players look and not just put him in space or we would do, so maybe it’s not close enough, they’ll be able to such as creating distractions or in a scuba suit.” what we’ll do? We’ll see. People While canine companions have taking down enemies, issued from spot the differences between the two dogs portraying Riley. “Once around here didn’t know, and afar by players. been featured in many games – they had that same sentiment: ‘We we got a better idea of how to To make Riley as believable from Fable II to Grand Theft Auto work with the dogs, we all became better not kill the dog.’ The emoas possible, the gamemakers first V – the developers of Ghosts set tional investment for the dog here met with a retired Navy SEAL and more efficient.” out to create more than another Ruger and Rico were outfitted has been just as strong as what’s his former military service dog best friend. They wanted a hero, to learn more about how soldiers with custom motion-capture gear happening out in the public.” a dog that would not only assist

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41

Yukon News

Shatner recalls his ‘magical’ Stratford days as he accepts legacy award To what?” Although he knew the lines cold, he had never spoken them out loud, and he joked that he barely knew the names of the other actors. “What in heaven’s name was I thinking?” Shatner said of his decision to go on stage, which nevertheless made him a theatre sensation. “It was a magical time. I look back on that and I think I would never do that now. Are you kidding me?” In the ensuing years, Shatner would go on to conquer the worlds of television and film, as well as become an author, record-

ing artist, philanthropist and accomplished horseman. Aside from playing Kirk in Star Trek, his indelible TV roles included the titular cop hero in T.J. Hooker, as Denny Crane on The Practice and Boston Legal, the Big Giant Head on 3rd Rock From the Sun, and his corny pitchman alteregos for Priceline and All-Bran. Shatner’s accolades include a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and an honorary degree from Montreal’s McGill University, where he graduated in 1952 with a Bachelor of Commerce. He was bestowed with the Governor General’s performing arts award for lifetime achievement in 2011.

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When he becomes a legend, then sor and Oedipus Rex. you applaud. So it’s great that His fellow actors during those you’re giving it to me. Because early seasons included Douglas TORONTO Chris Plummer is a legend. What Campbell, Lorne Greene, Don reshly bestowed with the an actor, what a man, what a Harron, William Hutt, Frances Stratford Festival’s prestigious buddy, he’s fantastic. And Dame Hyland, James Mason, William legacy award, stage and screen ac- Maggie Smith, come on … These Needles and, of course, Plummer. tor William Shatner is demurring are legends.” At Monday’s awards gala, any suggestion he’s reached the Shatner’s tenure at Stratford Shatner recalled being asked to pinnacle of show business, slyly included roles in Measure for step in for Plummer a mere week insisting he’s merely “a legend in Measure, The Taming of the Shrew, after Henry V had opened. When the making.” Julius Caesar, The Merchant of asked if he would go on that The Star Trek hero regaled a Venice, The Merry Wives of Wind- night, he says he thought: “Go on? Toronto audience with tales of his early acting days at the southern Ontario theatre company as he accepted the annual honour from actor Colm Feore. Before Shatner became known as Captain James T. Kirk, the Montreal-born performer was a member of the Stratford Festival company for three seasons, beginning in 1954. His tenure included a celebrated turn as understudy for Christopher Plummer in Henry V in 1956. Despite the glowing reception, Shatner says he was foolhardy to walk onto the stage when he was suddenly called upon to replace an ill Plummer. But he calls it “a magical time.” Last year, the award was presented to Dame Maggie Smith, who was a festival company member for four seasons between All In-Store Items 1976 and 1980. The first recipient, Excluding special orders. in 2011, was Plummer, a member of the company for 12 seasons, beginning in 1956. “This is really good, giving awards to living legends but there’s a problem, there’s a problem – I’m a legend in the making, OK?” the 82-year-old Shatner said to applause from a crowd includAUTO PARTS & ACCESSORIES ing filmmaker Barry Avrich and 4141 - 4TH AVENUE • 667-7231 Stratford staple Cynthia Dale. Monday-Friday 8-5:30 “You don’t applaud for a legend in the making, maybe one clap. Canadian Press

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William Shatner receives a standing ovation during the 2013 Stratford Festival’s Legacy Award Gala in Toronto on Monday.


42

Yukon News

Notorious bank robber, B.C. writer wins non-fiction book award

Marianne ThoMpson of Whitehorse General Hospital retired from her position as Food Service Supervisor after 34 years of service in Nutrition and Food Services. Marianne managed the production and delivery of 37,230 patient meals during her career –a commendable accomplishment. We would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge Marianne for providing excellent service and meals to WGH patients. Marianne also led many key strategic initiatives within the Nutrition and Food Services department. Marianne’s depth of knowledge, experience, but more importantly her presence, including her contagious smile, will be dearly missed by her employees and colleagues. The Yukon Hospital Corporation would like to wish Marianne all the best in her retirement.

Thank You

Yukon Legislative Assembly Notice of Sitting Take notice that pursuant to Standing Order 73 of the Yukon Legislative Assembly and being satisfied pursuant to the said Standing Order that the public interest requires that the House shall meet, I appoint 1:00 p.m., Thursday, October 31, 2013, as the time for such meeting in the Yukon Legislative Assembly Chamber, Whitehorse, Yukon, for the purpose of transacting its business as if it had been duly adjourned to that time. Dated this 17th day of October, 2013. David Laxton, MLA Speaker Yukon Legislative Assembly

Assemblée législative du Yukon Avis des séances Veuillez prendre note que, conformément à l’article 73 du Règlement de l’Assemblée législative du Yukon et étant convaincu que, conformément au Règlement, l’intérêt public commande que la Chambre se réunisse, je désigne la journée du jeudi 31 octobre 2013, à 13 h 00, dans la Chambre de l’Assemblée législative du Yukon, à Whitehorse, au Yukon, pour la tenue d’une telle réunion, afin que celle-ci poursuive ses travaux comme si elle avait été dûment ajournée à ce moment. Le 17 octobre 2013. David Laxton, membre de l’Assemblée législative Président Assemblée législative du Yukon

Friday, October 25, 2013

Keven Drews Canadian Press VICTORIA is tales of battling addiction, the painful struggle of prison life and the separation from friends and family have earned one of Canada’s most notorious bank robbers a literary prize worth $5,000. Stephen Reid was a member of the so-called Stopwatch Gang, which hauled in $15 million while robbing some 100 banks in Canada and the United States during the 1970s and 80s. He is currently serving an 18-year sentence at the William Head Institution on southern Vancouver Island for a 1999 bank robbery and shootout with police in Victoria. But the spotlight was on Reid, once again, Wednesday night, when he was awarded the 2013 City of Victoria Butler Book Prize for his collection of essays, A Crowbar in the Buddhist Garden: Writing from Prison. “When he called me tonight, he said ‘it was my best jury decision ever,”’ said Susan Musgrave,

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an acclaimed Canadian writer and Reid’s wife of 27 years. “Of course the prize is decided by a jury.” “He always has the best oneliners.” In fact, the three-member jury praised Reid’s work as a “prison ethnography taut with wit and humanity.” Musgrave said Reid told her that he learned of the award Thursday at noon when he visited the William Head library and read a newspaper. She said she was actually surprised he won – noting all the books up for consideration were deserving of the award – but added Reid’s collection of essays will help people better understand addiction, a problem he’s been battling since the age of 11. Al Forrie, owner of the Saskatchewan-based company, Thistledown Press, which published the book, accepted the award for Reid, calling him a keen observer of the human condition who had the language set and vision to produce the essays. “It goes beyond the intent of

prison memoir and exploitation and Hollywood movie kind off stuff,” said Forrie. “I mean this is a book of deepness, of darkness, of kind of an unbalanced grace, and very few people could have written this, except somebody who has this experience, and has the skills set to be able to transfer it.” Reid, of course, is no literary freshman. He wrote the semi-autobiographical novel, Jack Rabbit Parole, which was published in 1987. He’s also written articles and essays, and according to a statement from the City of Victoria, taught creative writing, worked as a youth counsellor and served on several boards, including the John Howard Society. Last March the Parole Board of Canada granted him day parole, allowing him to attend a substance-abuse program. Musgrave said Reid was issued an eight-week pass but is now back in custody and must re-apply for parole. While a member of the Stopwatch Gang, so named because they used stopwatches to ensure their robberies were committed in less than 90 seconds, Reid was on the FBI’s most wanted list. The FBI arrested him in Arizona in 1980, and he was later returned to Canada to serve his sentence for an Ottawa gold robbery worth $750,000. Reid was paroled in 1987, but he was back behind bars after being handed an 18-yearsentence for the 1999 Victoria bank robbery. Wearing a police uniform, Reid and an accomplice walked into a Victoria bank. Reid pointed a loaded shotgun at employees and customers, and the pair fled with $97,000. During the getaway Reid opened fire with a .44 Magnum handgun on pursuing police officers, including one who was giving chase on a motorcycle. He also shot at an innocent woman bystander, knocking a paint tray from her hand, in an attempt to create a diversion. Reid was granted day parole in January 2008 but it was revoked Nov. 6, 2010, after he was caught driving an uninsured vehicle with 18 plastic bags full of contraband U.S. cigarettes. “This is a man who has lived an extraordinarily, spectacularly dangerous life, and he’s been looking at the darkness for so long,” said Forrie. “I mean most of his life has been inside of prisons, and yet he hasn’t been consumed by it. He has found something within himself to keep himself from just being absorbed by it all and giving it up.”


Friday, October 25, 2013

Yukon News

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LIFE One fluffy therapist Meet Magnus, the cutest new hire at Yukon College Ashley Joannou

she once considered being a veterinarian. Working alongside Magnus gives her the best t only five months old, of both worlds. Magnus strutted down “I was thinking about how the halls of Yukon College could I integrate what I love with ease. into my work. I knew other Covered from tail to snout people were doing this kind in golden puppy fluff, he was of work with animals, like more than willing to stop and horses,” she said. greet anyone walking nearby. “It just seemed like a good His gentle nature and way to bring something I am general all around puppypassionate about into my ness make the British golden work.” retriever the ideal fit for his He’s made friends both new job. with students and staff. Magnus is the school’s “I’ve gotten emails from newest faculty member, offerstaff saying, ‘I was having a reing students animal-assisted ally crappy day and you came therapy when they come in by with Magnus. Thanks so for counselling sessions. much,” Neufeld said. He’s “the quintessential The college is also contherapy dog,” said Magnus’s sidering expanding the pilot two-legged partner, Angela project to include visits to Neufeld, a registered psythe residence to interact with chologist who works at the students who are missing pets college. they had to leave behind at Students can book an aphome. pointment to see Neufeld and Neufeld spent time this Magnus when he is on camsummer training for this new pus every Thursday. therapy option at Healing “That is the hope, that Hooves, a program in Cremaybe this might attract some mona, Alberta. people to counselling who The program works mostly could have been more apprewith horses, but it also offers hensive or nervous about it,” visitors a chance to work with Neufeld said. dogs and other small animals. According to the college, Founder Sue McIntosh said the 84 students who sought she’s seen people make major counselling for personal or improvements around the mental health reasons in the animals in the 13 years since 2012/2013 year was an inthe program started. crease of 15 per cent from the “The presence of the aniyear before. mal helps them feel safe and Magnus started working at connected,” she said. the college in late September. The program also puts a lot Once a week he sprawls out of emphasis on keeping the on a large blue cushion in animals themselves happy and Neufeld’s office, meeting with stress-free. students who make an apNeufeld was originally pointment. planning on bringing two Starting a therapy session dogs to work with her: Magby talking about the dog – his nus and Ky, a 12-year-old new favourite toy or how his retired sled dog. training is coming along – can But the older dog was findIan Stewart/Yukon News be easier than diving right ing the environment a little Magnus, a British golden retriever puppy, belongs to Yukon College counsellor Angela in to the situation that led a too stressful, she said. Neufeld. Animals can help people open up during counselling session. student to counselling. So far Magnus has fit “You can start by talkinto his new role well, she ing about the animal and reduce loneliness. many other places. that feels for them. Are they said, especially considering what’s going on with them. But Neufeld warns it’s not a how young he is. People are The animals have been feeling rejected by Magnus? Is You might be able to gradumagic solution. that disappointing? And then shown to reduce anxiety in already making appointments ally start to relate it to what’s “It’s a little bit like watchhospital patients with psymaybe how that relates to specifically for when the going on in the person’s life. other experiences in their life chotic disorders or mood dis- ing paint dry. It’s not like puppy is in session. It makes it a little less scary,” where they haven’t felt includ- orders, according to an article there’s a big show where the “He’s flexible, he’s adaptNeufeld said. dog is jumping around in published by the American ed or been treated well.” able, he really just goes with She uses the example of a Psychiatric Association. Other hoops. It’s really about inteAnimal-assisted therapy is the flow. He’s so far doing student who comes in and grating the animal into how not a new concept. It has been research has found animals really well.” finds Magnus sleeping. you engage with the client.” lower blood pressure, cause used in hospitals, nursing Contact Ashley Joannou at Growing up, Neufeld said endorphins to be released and “Maybe we talk about how homes and schools, among ashleyj@yukon-news.com News Reporter

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Study with National Ballet School aims to see if dance can help Parkinson’s patients of dramatic expression.” Bar has teamed up with Joseph DeSouza, a neuroscientist at York TORONTO University, to study how learning n a large, mirror-walled and and executing dance steps over the sun-filled practice studio at 12-week course affects particiCanada’s National Ballet School, pants’ physical symptoms as well more than a dozen dancers are as their brains. stretching out their arms as they Half of the 20 registered class step across the floor in time to members volunteered to take the piano, following the moves part in the pilot study, undergoof their instructors with earnest ing MRI brain scans about two concentration. weeks after the program began in But this isn’t a class of young September, which will be repeated ballet students decked out in when it ends in December. tights and ballet slippers perform“We have them visualize their ing pirouettes and plies, but a dance while in the scan,” said DeSgroup of adults with Parkinson’s ouza, explaining that researchers disease engaged in a study to dewill look for both anatomical and termine how dance might allevifunctional changes in the brain ate their symptoms and alter the during the imaging. course of their disease. “By the time we’re finished the Often joined by their care partclasses in early December, they ners, the 15 participants mimic would have danced this dance at the moves of instructors leading least 10 times if they came to every the 75-minute weekly class, first class,” he said of the “Showdown while sitting, then standing, and Hoedown.” finally by adding choreographed “So we’re going to look at this steps that take them across the progression over 10 weeks of what floor. happens in their brain in this auTheir final “number” has the ditory-to-movement network that dancers as would-be sheriffs they obviously have an issue with Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press in their movement disorder, and moseying into an Old West saloon Researchers have teamed up with Canada’s National Ballet School to provide classes for to shoot off a few rounds in a see if it’s comparable to controls people with Parkinson’s to determine if learning and executing dance steps may help showdown, their feet moving to (volunteers without Parkinson’s).” relieve symptoms and alter the course of the disease. the strains of a musical arrangeBar said researchers hope the ment that includes bars from “Oh! brain scans will provide hard slowed or frozen movements. is a graduate student in clinical life, in the form of jazz, mostly,” Susanna.” scientific evidence of neurological Bar said there seems to be psychology at Ryerson University, said Ferguson, who also exercises They end with a celebration, and physical benefits of dance to something about dancing that pitched the idea of a dance class at the gym every other day to try a hoedown that has the dancers people with Parkinson’s, a disease goes beyond simply exercising or that affects more than 100,000 Cathrow up their arms with an exu- to keep his muscles from stiffening for people with Parkinson’s. having physiotherapy. Her former school, she said, up, a symptom of the Parkinson’s. nadians and seven million people berant “yee-haw.” “If you think about dance, “Going to the gym and coming jumped at the chance to offer worldwide. “My wife talked me into it,” dance to people with Parkinson’s, it’s not just exercise. It’s cued by to the ballet program is so difIn the meantime, though, it is 72-year-old Bill Ferguson of music, so there’s a rhythmic cue. bringing on board the Mark gratifying to see the enjoyment Toronto said Tuesday after joining ferent. It’s nice to get a different There’s usually a narrative, a story that participants are getting from Morris Group’s Dance for PD kind of movement and to enjoy his fellow classmates for a snack and Sarah Robichaud, founder of that goes behind, so there’s a linthe opportunity to step out on a and a bit of socializing in a lounge ourselves more,” added Steer, 68, guistic level to it,” she said. who also takes part in the class as a program called Dancing with dance floor. area on the school’s main floor. “There’s also an emotional level Parkinson’s to help design and “I know the benefits of dance,” his care partner. Ferguson was diagnosed with – the joy of just dancing – and implement the course. said Bar. “I know the benefits for “I come for the enjoyment of Parkinson’s about six years ago, also if you’re getting into a certain the body, the mind, for the spirit. Anecdotally, at least, dance and while he isn’t sure if the danc- it because I know we both need character, there’s an emotional “The biggest goal and the biging is easing his symptoms, he and the movement and the socializing, has been found to temporargest joy for me in this study is to value there. wife Pat Steer say they both enjoy and it’s a lot of fun,” she said, add- ily alleviate some symptoms of “So really when you’re thinking see that we’re bringing dance to Parkinson’s, or PD, a progressively the recreational aspect of the class ing that dancing proves a moodpeople who can benefit from it in of dance, you’re not just thinkdebilitating neurological disorbooster for both of them. and getting together with others so many ways and the joy that it is ing of exercise, you’re thinking of der that can cause tremors, rigid Rachel Bar, who attended the who have the disorder. bringing to their lives.” movement along with some type muscles, balance problems and National Ballet School and now “Music was always part of my Sheryl Ubelacker Canadian Press

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Friday, October 25, 2013

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Smithsonian’s first yoga exhibition explores 2,000 plus years of visual history Brett Zongker

about the visual history and art of yoga, its origins and evolution over time. WASHINGTON The Smithsonian’s Sackoga is moving from the ler Gallery will showcase the studio mat to the museum exhibit, Yoga: The Art of Transgallery. formation, through January. The Smithsonian Institution Later, it will travel to the Asian has organized what curators Art Museum of San Francisco and to the Cleveland Museum believe is the first exhibition Associated Press

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Attention

Selkirk First Nation Citizens The Selkirk First Nation Annual General Assembly will be held on November 15, 16 and 17, 2013 at the Pelly Crossing Link Building For more information please contact: April Baker, Communications Officer (867) 537-3331, extension 263 communications@selkirkfn.com

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and “understand yoga’s transformative potential,” Diamond said. Three life-size sculptures of yogini goddesses from Hindu temples illustrate the belief that female powers could be used to allow practitioners to achieve divine powers and enlightenment. Later galleries examine how the idea of yoga was circulated worldwide, Diamond said. Early American posters depict yogis as magicians or “fakirs” performing acts, along with a 1902 film by Thomas Edison. Perceptions of yoga helped determine how the tradition Evan Vucci/AP Photo developed, and knowing that The Smithsonian Institution’s first exhibition of the background is important for 2,000 year visual history and art of yoga includes how Americans think about sculpture, manuscripts and paintings, as well as yoga today, Diamond said. posters, illustrations, photographs and films. “There are so many debates and contestations about what Guest teachers will lead yoga yoga is in America,” she said. of Art. classes in the museum’s galleries “Is it a profound individual Curators brought together Indian sculptures, manuscripts on Wednesdays and Sundays. embodied system of transforand paintings, as well as posters, The museum also will host a mation? Or is it the thing that symposium for scholars and illustrations, photographs and spawned a $5 billion industry in films to showcase yoga’s history enthusiasts on yoga’s visual which yoga is used to sell cars?” culture. over 2,000 years. The exhibit is funded in part Curator Debra Diamond Museum Director Julian by the Smithsonian’s first major said the Smithsonian borrowed crowd-funding campaign, Raby said years of research some of the greatest masterbehind the exhibit shed new which raised $174,000 in six pieces in Indian art as well as light on yoga’s meanings and weeks. The Alec Baldwin Founpieces that have never been dation also is a notable sponsor. histories. shown before. Last year, Baldwin married a “It examines for the first First the exhibit examines the yoga instructor. time a spectacular, but until concepts and practices of yoga John Schumacher, a 40-year now largely ignored, archive,” he said. “That archive is India’s traditions, including meditation yoga practitioner and teacher and postures found in Indian in Washington who advised on visual culture of extraordinary art dating back hundreds of the exhibit, said visitors will yoga-related artworks created, years. The first piece is an 11th see there is much more to yoga as you will see, over some two century sculpture representing than postures and breathing. millennia.” a yoga teacher, seated in the “It teaches where yoga comes posture with legs crossed from,” he said. “You see there is Good Night! lotus to signify enlightenment. a deep, philosophical underpinWind up your day with everything you need. Such sculptures were disning to all of these practices played in Hindu temples so and a variety of different phi867-667-6283 losophies.” people could see the teacher

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Quebec measles outbreak raise questions about timing of measles vaccine Helen Branswell

and spread the virus than public health officials think are out there would make it much more difficult to contain and eventually wipe out measles. Both De Serres and Griffin said

Canadian Press

TORONTO large measles outbreak that occurred in Quebec a couple of years ago is raising more questions about whether babies are getting their first dose of measles vaccine at too young an age. A new analysis of the 2011 outbreak, which involved a surprising number of children who should have been protected against the virus, suggests giving the first dose of measles vaccine at 12 months may be undermining the efficacy of the vaccination program. And it raises the possibility that a growing pool of vaccinated children may still be vulnerable to infection – which, if true, could put in jeopardy efforts to eliminate and eventually eradicate measles, one of the authors of the study said in an interview. “This study shows that there is vulnerability in children who receive two doses and we should not overlook that. The reason for that is still unknown. But it is important to dig into this question further,” said Dr. Gaston de Serres, an infectious diseases specialist with Quebec’s provincial public health agency. “If we create a vast pool of susceptibles, one day or another it won’t be an outbreak of 700 cases like we had in Quebec, but it may be thousands of cases, if not more.” The new study was published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. De Serres and colleagues have been mining data from the 2011 high school outbreak to try to figure out why at 102 of the 725 children infected caught the disease at all. They had received the recommended two doses of measles vaccine when they were young children. An earlier study by the same researchers showed that in the outbreak, teens who got their first dose at 12 months – the time that is recommended across Canada – were six times more likely to be infected than those who got their first shot at 15 months of age. When they published that study, one of the suggestions was that a phenomenon known as “maternal antibody” may have been responsible. It takes time for the human immune system to develop. But babies survive infancy because they receive antibodies to diseases their mothers have either experienced through infection or been introduced to through vaccination. Maternal antibodies wane over time. But while they are present, if a baby is given a vaccine made from a live but weakened virus, the maternal antibodies may quell the vaccine virus before it has a chance to induce a strong immune response. Measles vaccine is a live-virus serum. So immunization programs are planned to try to hit the sweet spot, giving vaccines in time to protect toddlers against threats but not so soon that the vaccines won’t be fully effective.

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data from the Quebec outbreak cannot answer the question of whether this phenomenon was triggered by giving the first vaccine too soon. But both said it’s important to try to find an answer to the question.

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Pine Dental Handout/The Canadian Press

A large measles outbreak that occurred in Quebec a couple of years ago is raising more questions about whether babies are getting their first dose of measles vaccine at too young an age.

It’s thought that women who had measles would have higher levels of maternal antibodies than women whose immunity was due to vaccination. Most people born before measles vaccination programs began in Canada in the early 1970s would have been infected with the highly contagious virus. If maternal antibody was behind the inadequate protection, some argue this is a problem that will simply melt away. That’s because in parts of the world where measles vaccine coverage is high, women who were infected with measles are moving out of their child-bearing years. Twelve months for the first shot might be just fine for the children of women whose antibodies were generated by vaccination, the thinking goes. But this new work suggests that theory may be optimistic. Though the numbers in this study are small, there were fully vaccinated children of vaccinated mothers among the measles cases. And other studies have shown that when you compare the antibody responses of children who get their first dose of measles vaccine at six months, nine months or 12 months, the quantity and durability of the antibodies differs markedly. De Serres said this suggests that the immune system needs to have reached a certain point of matura-

tion before measles vaccine will really take well. And even if second – or third, or fourth – doses are given, children whose first dose was given too early do not get as much protection from the vaccine as children who got their initial dose at 15 months. Dr. Diane Griffin is a measles expert at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Md. She said the work on the Quebec outbreak raises serious questions about whether measles vaccine campaigns that start at 12 months are adequately protecting children. She said she would probably recommend giving the first shot later – especially given that in current day North America, the risk of being exposed to measles in infancy is low. “I would say that 15 months is probably a better time to vaccinate,” Griffin said. She shares the concern that there may be a growing pool of children who could be infected if the virus is imported from parts of the world where measles still circulates widely. “I think that’s clearly a possibility,” Griffin said. She noted that children who have been vaccinated but go on to be infected generally have a milder disease, so on an individual level the risk wouldn’t be great. But having many more children who can catch

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for more information contact : 668-8845 or djennejohn@yukoncollege.yk.ca


48

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Supreme Court rules Ontario doctors can’t unilaterally end life support Bruce Cheadle

either doctors or patient’s families. Those independent tribunals may take into account non-medical OTTAWA factors, including the moral, ethical octors cannot unilaterally de- and religious views of the patient cide to withdraw life support and their family. without the consent of the patient, Justice Andromache Karakattheir family members or a substisanis, in a dissenting opinion, tute decision maker, the Supreme argued that Ontario’s Health Care Court of Canada has ruled. Consent Act does not “give paThe highly anticipated decitients, or their substitute decisionsion, hailed as a victory by some makers, the right to insist on the religious groups, upholds existing continuation of treatment that legislation in Ontario and several is futile, harmful, or contrary to other provinces. medical standards of care.” But it does little to resolve some The case involves 61-year-old of the more intractable ethical Hassan Rasouli, who has been kept dilemmas posed by advances in alive on a ventilator and feeding modern medicine that allow patube since brain surgery in 2010 tients in vegetative states to be kept went wrong. alive for years. Doctors at Toronto’s SunnyIn a 5-2 split decision on what brook hospital have determined the top court called a “tragic, yet there is no therapeutic hope of increasingly common conflict,” recovery and that keeping Rasouli Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin on life support will result in a series wrote for the majority that, in of progressively worse medical provinces where such laws excomplications. ist, disputes over end-of-life care However, Rasouli’s wife, Parichehr Salasel, refused consent, decisions must go to independent citing the couple’s Shia Muslim tribunals or courts for resolution religion and a belief that her hus– and are not the sole purview of Canadian Press

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Applications can be sent to Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in C/O The Education Committee Box 599, Dawson City, YT Y0B 1G0 Phone: (867) 993-7111 Fax: (867) 993-6553 Email: melissa.atkinson@trondek.ca

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“While the end-of-life context poses difficult ethical dilemmas for physicians, this does not alter the conclusion that withdrawal of life support constitutes treatment requiring consent under the HCCA,” McLachlin wrote. “If death is considered harmful or a manifestation of ill health, then life support serves a preventive purpose so long as it is effective in preventing death,” the court dryly observed. The ruling revolves around a statutory interpretation of Ontario’s consent act. Similar legislation exists in five Canadian provinces. “All the Supreme Court decided Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press is that if you two disagree, please The Supreme Court of Canada in Ottawa. follow the procedures that are in place already,” professor Udo band’s movements indicated some to wade into the intersection of Schuklenk, the Ontario Research science and faith, ruling simply that level of minimal consciousness. Chair in Bioethics at Queen’s UniRasouli’s doctors couldn’t do an Salasel screamed in approval versity, said in interview. end run around the Ontario Health Friday when the decision came Erica Baron at McCarthy TetCare Consent Act. down, saying she was “happy for rault, a lawyer for one of the two The “treatment” provisions of all humans because we are, as a doctors in the Rasouli case, said Ontario’s law cannot be confined human, on top of the creation of the court had provided “clarity” on God.” She maintains her husband is to something that doctors say is of when Ontario’s law applies. therapeutic benefit to the patient, responsive. “Before this, our doctors were The Supreme Court elected not said the court. guided by the medical standard of care as well as well as College (of Physicians and Surgeons) and hospital policies,” said Baron. The ruling highlights a murky Tuesday, October 29th, 2013 area for doctors and patients in Come and tour around the museum. provinces that do not have patient The Yukon Transportation Museum For one day only come spend consent laws. will be open to the public once a some time with the ghosts of Jocelyn Downie, a bioethicist at week for Transportation history! Dalhousie University in Halifax, Next to the Airport. said other jurisdictions should take TransporTaTion Regular admission rates apply. note and introduce a statutory reFor more information contact gime that can both enhance patient Tuesdays! (867) 668-4792 autonomy and ensure proper care. Beginning October 8th, 2013, McLachlin, in her ruling, noted the museum will be open every the judgment does not resolve who should have the ultimate say in Tuesday from 1-5pm end-of-life decisions in the absence of such legislation. “Nor does the case require us to resolve the philosophical debate over whether a next-of-kin’s decision should trump the physician’s interest in not being forced to provide non-beneficial treatment and the public interest in not funding treatment deemed of little or no value,” McLachlin cautioned. That didn’t stop Rasouli’s family and some faith groups, including the Evangelical Fellowship of Canada, from claiming the ruling as a victory for religious rights. Dahne Jarvis, who specializes in litigating health law with the Toronto firm Borden Ladner Gervais, said religious groups are reading too much into the judgment. Experience shows that Ontario’s All in-stock Sewing consent and capacity board, which off Machines & Sergers ................................................ adjudicates consent disputes, has “not allowed religious beliefs to Selected Fabrics (min cut 1m) .................. off trump any of the considerations Selected Lace & Trim (over $10) ........................ off and factors that are brought to bear on what is considered to be in a Quilt Batting (soft landing)............................................ off patients’ best interests,” Jarvis said. The high court has not decided All Patterns (in-stock) ..................................................... off “that everyone has the right to ...And much, much more on Special! whatever treatment they choose at Sale endS november 2, 2013 the end of life,” Jarvis added. 102-4133 4th Avenue At the corner of Wood Street • 667-6760 “All they’ve decided is what process should be engaged.”

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Tarantulas are hairy, scary and pack a venomous bite, but they stir fervour in loyal owners and some have really bristly hairs, Reynolds said. But there’s no handling her 8-inch bird-eater. “My girl happens to be wild. You can look, but don’t touch. She has a nasty attitude.” Many tarantulas are docile, however. Macneil has a 9-inch spider named Tess who is “extremely docile and loves you to hold her. They don’t like to be petted. Their barbs or hair would come out and make you itch,” he said. All tarantulas can bite, but most owners say it’s no worse than a bee sting, unless you are allergic. If you are, it can be fatal, Reynolds said. Although there is no documented case of a fatal bite, some of the spiders have more potent venom than others, and there is no anti-venom, so you treat the symptoms and hope for the best, she said. Reynolds has never been bitten, but Macneil said he’s been bitten five

or six times. He said it hurts for a few minutes, then goes numb. So why do people keep and study tarantulas? For expert Stan Schultz, it’s about the exotic. The 70-year-old from Calgary, Alberta, said he got interested in the critters when he was young because normal pets became boring. Schultz has spent more than 45 years keeping, catching, importing, breeding, selling, writing and lecturing about tarantulas. His book, “The Tarantula Keeper’s Guide,” is in its third edition and headed to its fourth. At one time, Schultz had 1,300 tarantulas – all with names. When asked to describe the most interesting thing about the spider, Schultz said recognizing the “basic aspects of learning and, dare I say it, intelligence in tarantulas. But, before you get your hopes up, they’re still closer to a cabbage than the family dog in smarts.”

Damian Dovarganes/AP Photo

Dee Reynolds cares for one of her 50 tarantulas at her home in Los Angeles.

Sue Manning

ers and up to an estimated 20,000 pet The tarantula starts life as a sling owners and hobby enthusiasts. – short for spiderling – so they can be A metallic blue tarantula is one of as small as a fingernail and grow as LOS ANGELES the most sought after, with females large as a dinner plate. It eats mostly arantulas are the heaviest, hairiselling for about $400 this year. They live crickets, cockroaches and some est, scariest spiders on the planet. were $700 last year, he said, because mice. The spider turns prey into stew They have fangs, claws and barbs. there was a shortage. “But so many by pumping in venom through its They can regrow body parts and be as were bred that the price dropped to fangs. big as dinner plates, and the females $400. Babies were $200 last year, and When you hold a tarantula, some eat the males after mating. But there this year, they are $100.” feel like velvet, some like pipe cleaners are many people who call these creepy critters a pet or a passion and insist their beauty is worth the risk of a bite. “They are fascinating to watch. Try our premium Mat Rental They have (eight) beautiful slender Service that keeps 80% of the legs; you look at how they are put together and how they dig and burrow,” mud, salt and snow on our mat... said Dee Reynolds, a 36-year-old nurse who has more than 50 tarantuso it’s our problem, not yours! las at her Los Angeles home. Serving Yukoners since 1979 Reynolds doesn’t consider her www.matcleanyukon.com tarantulas pets in the traditional sense, but she says a lot of people do info@matcleanyukon.com and will name them, talk to them and Tel: (867) 668-5702 show them off. Plus, in terms of being pets, they Proud sponsor of the have lots of benefits, she said. “They Whitehorse Food Bank don’t need daily walks, they don’t have to be fed special diets, they don’t claw furniture or bark, and you don’t have to find somebody to take care of Ta’an Kwäch’än council them when you go on vacation,” said Reynolds. invites TKc citizens to attend a: But, unlike Fido or Whiskers, you can’t cuddle with them, dress them for Halloween or play catch. They can cost hundreds of dollars, but they can also live for 30 years. Ken Macneil, 38, known as “Ken the Bug Guy,” has about 7,000 tarantulas at his exotic pet shop in Tucson, th Ariz., which he claims is one of the largest in the country. He sells everything from scorpions and cockroaches to ferrets, lizards and snakes, but nothing is as popular as the tarantula, Please join us for supper and discussions. and not just around Halloween. His biggest tarantula is a mature For more information contact: Communications male Goliath bird-eater that measures Coordinator Samantha Dawson at the TKC 10 inches long from front leg to back leg. The most expensive one Macneil administration office: (867) 668-3613 ext. 253 has ever sold went for $900. or by email: sdawson@taan.ca Macneil said his customers include museums, scientists and teach-

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

One year after Cohen report, salmon still face an upstream battle recommendations to rebuild Pacific salmon? What will happen to the by DAVID industry and communities that SUZUKI depend on them? The Cohen Commission took three years, 2,145 exhibits, 892 public submissions and 138 days of hearings with 180 witnesses to create its report. The David Suzuki Foundation worked with lawyers at Ecojustice to provide research and s the days get cooler and shorter, testimony to help ensure the inquiry millions of salmon are making looked into problems within the the arduous journey up the rivers current management system. With and streams of British Columbia optimism that the federal governto the spawning grounds where ment was taking the decline of wild they were born. Waiting for this salmon seriously, this independent rich pulse of life from the Pacific and thorough review created a blueOcean are bears, gulls, wolves, eagles, print for action. What had become a ospreys, crows, pine martins and contentious and polarizing issue had dozens of other species. Communi- a direction forward. ties and businesses wait, too. It’s fitThat clear direction, however, has ting that this time of year also marks been followed with near silence and the first anniversary of the final little effort from the government. report of the Cohen Commission of Although politicians say they’re Inquiry into the Decline of Sockeye reviewing the report and taking Salmon in the Fraser River. actions “consistent with the recomThe record decline in sockeye mendations,” the few steps they have returning to the Fraser River in 2009 taken, such as providing grants for provided the initial push for a fedresearch projects, miss the mark and eral judicial inquiry. Now, four years don’t address the significant issues later, the offspring of those salmon and opportunities raised by Justice are returning to spawning grounds Cohen. in dismally low numbers – so low The government’s own Wild that sockeye salmon fishery closures Salmon Policy, released in 2005, are widespread. provides a strong template for What happened to Justice salmon conservation and formed a Bruce Cohen’s 75 carefully crafted

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key plank of Cohen’s recommendations. It’s time to bring this policy to life with a cost-itemized plan for determining tasks, delegated responsibility for carrying them out and defined timelines. The government hasn’t even appointed a champion to navigate the complex social, economic, ecological and political world of wild Pacific salmon. The commission concluded that climate change is one of most troubling stressors for the fish. Salmon are sensitive to water temperature changes and Fraser River waters are projected to warm. Canada must do its part to address climate change if fisheries management is to have any influence on the future of these amazing creatures and all those that depend on them. Impacts from open net-pen salmon farming also came under the inquiry’s scrutiny. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans continues to both promote and regulate the salmon farming industry. Justice Cohen recommended DFO separate these conflicting mandates and end its responsibility to promote farmed salmon. DFO should return to what it did well: gathering relevant scientific data, applying it and making it available to the public. Justice Cohen called for a freeze on fish farm expansion in the Discovery Islands, along an import-

ant salmon migratory route, and removal of farms if impacts aren’t addressed by 2020. The commission interviewed British Columbians and received a clear message: don’t risk the future of wild salmon and their important contribution to the fabric of First Nations culture, coastal communities and the whole of Canadian life. A year has passed, the testimony is in, the evidence heard and $26 million spent. It’s time for action to rebuild wild Pacific salmon runs, so this iconic fish can be shared and enjoyed for generations to come. The fate of wild salmon is too

important to be left to languish in government offices. We can’t go on setting up inquiries to review problems and then ignore their recommendations. This is a serious report with a clear blueprint to address problems. It deserves a serious response. As the salmon struggle to make their miraculous journey up B.C.’s wild rivers, we have to tell Prime Minster Stephen Harper and Fisheries Minister Gail Shea it’s time for the government to get moving too. With contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Communications Specialist Theresa Beer.

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52

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Biologist sees value in unchanged landscape

MAKE Yukon History Contribute to the Yukon College Diversity Mural. Paint a little corner. Even if you can’t paint…you can do this. This mural will feature prominently in the Yukon College, Ayamdigut campus for decades to come. You’ll be able to point out your contribution to your friends and family. Don’t miss this chance! Tuesday and Thursday – 2:00-6:00 pm Wednesday – 11:00-3:00 pm Until November 20

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Biologist George Schaller on a 2006 visit to Fairbanks.

whole are extremely rare.” Schaller, possibly the most recognized biologist in the by Ned world, traveled to Alaska Rozell seven summers ago from his home in Connecticut for a trip through the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge with author Jon Waterman, University of Alaska Fairbanks students Betsy Young and eorge Schaller has studMartin Robards, Forrest Mcied gorillas in Rwanda, Carthy from the University of lions on the Serengeti, pandas Wyoming, and Gary Kofinas in China, antelope in Tibet, of UAF. Most of the group and many other animals in drove the Dalton Highway to wild places around the planet, Deadhorse, took a trip down but he thinks the Arctic the Canning River by raft, National Wildlife Refuge is and then flew to Arctic Village unique among them. He visand the upper Sheenjek River. ited there in 2006 for the first Schaller had not been to the time in half a century. latter two places in 50 years, “On the Sheenjek (River), since he joined biologists and we climbed the same cliff I naturalists Olaus and Mardy climbed in 1956, and looking Murie and others on a trip out there was no difference there that resulted in the cre– no roads, no buildings, no ation of the Arctic National garbage dumps. Wildlife Refuge. “I’m sure there are rain for“We went almost to the ests in Brazil where you can same spot as 50 years ago,” he walk for a few days without said while in Fairbanks after seeing people or big changes his trip. He began his academto the landscape, but sites like ic career at UAF in the 1950s, (the Arctic National Wildlife studying biology and living in Refuge) that are ecologically a tent on campus, a pet raven his occasional companion. Advertising Schaller carried photos from his 1956 trip with him on his 2006 Alaska journey. It’s good “The wonderful part was for you. the timelessness of the landscape,” he said. “I identified spruce trees that were the same, and an eagle’s nest at a limestone cliff was still there.”

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After his wilderness trip, Schaller, now 80, headed from Fairbanks back to the East Coast for a few days at home with his wife Kay. From there he would fly to Iran, where he has tracked the rare Asian cheetah. Before he left Fairbanks, he said the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should remain untouched. “As a naturalist, it’s important from a scientific point of view to have an area that hasn’t been degraded, where all parts of the ecosystem are still there,” he said. “If you don’t have a place to compare things to, you don’t know what it used to be like. “Also, it’s nice to have a place that lets you feel like what it was like to live in the past, as if you’re Lewis and Clark,” he said. “A lot of people in this hectic world need silence on a spiritual level. Most religious prophets would seek out the wilderness ... “Animals and plants have a right to exist, too,” he said. “We don’t have to destroy them for short-term goals. Ultimately, our quality of life depends on a healthy environment, and for a healthy environment we need open space.”

Since the late 1970s, the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute has provided this column free in co-operation with the UAF research community. Ned Rozell is a science writer for the Geophysical Institute. A version of this column first appeared in 2006.


53

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Yukon History to be revealed in 3-D or stereopticon was a popular feature in Victorian parlours. It is estimated that as many as a million commercial images were rendered on stereo cards for public consumption. by Michael Gates When conducting research on the Commissioner’s Residence in new historical exhibit is about Dawson City, for example, I found a to open at the Hougen Heritage photo of the drawing room in which Gallery in the Arts Underground, and it presents Yukon history from a a stereopticon featured prominently. new perspective. In the exhibit, titled A quick scan of my library yielded YT in 3D: Stereo Photos in Yukon, the articles about stereo views taken in the Aleutian Islands in the 1860s photos will have the added dimenusing the tedious wet-plate process, sion of depth that will make them and another set documenting the appear to reach out to you from the visit of U.S. president Warren Hargallery walls. The principles of the stereograph- ding to Alaska in 1922, but I found no images featuring Yukon images. ic imagery precede the advent of the According to David Schlosser, camera, but really took on new life as digital archivist at the Yukon Archives photographic technology advanced and mastermind behind this new during the 18th century. The trick exhibit, there are approximately 300 is to take advantage of how our two of these images among the more eyes process slightly different views than 100,000 images in the territorial of the world, producing a threecollection. Included among this small dimensional image. To do so, special cameras with two segment of the collection are stereo lenses positioned side by side capture cards of standard views of the Klondike Gold Rush, gathered together by slightly different views of the same Robert Coutts. Another collection, subject on film. When seen through a special viewing device, this allows assembled by Helen Horback, conthe two pictures to be processed into tained stereo negatives taken during a three dimensional image in the the 1920s, through the 1940s. A third viewer’s brain. When I was young, the collection, from the Jacquot family, same principle applied to the Viewcontains a selection of glass slides of master through which I could see hunting and winter images taken in images of faraway places, including the Kluane region. the fabled Disneyland. Commercial photographers were In recent times, these 3-D viewers sent out on assignment to document have declined in popularity but are places and events like the Klondike still marketed to children. At the turn Gold Rush using stereo photography. of the 20th century, the stereo viewer I even have a couple of these com-

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A view of a bird’s nest was so compelling that it literally leaped out from the photo and made me want to reach out and touch it. Another showed a dog team pulling a small wagon down the dirt-surfaced Front Street in Dawson City in 1898. These photographs come alive through the magic of modern digital photography. Anaglyphs are two views, one scanned in red, the other in magenta, that are superimposed upon a single frame. When viewing these images through coloured filters Yukon Archives, Robert Coutts fonds, 78/69 #93 mounted in special cardboard glasses, Man with a dog team in Dawson City, 1898. Stereo views the viewer’s brain reassembles the imlike these were viewed by tens of thousands of people in ages into a three dimensional image. parlours throughout the continent at the turn of the 20th I believe that viewers will have a century. real treat viewing our already fascinating history through this unconvening, was rejected because the sense mercial views in my own collection. tional medium. The photographs will In their time, these stereo views were of depth in the image simply wasn’t be displayed both as anaglyphs, and there. As Schlosser pointed out, that tremendously popular and transas the original paired images. doesn’t take away from its historic ported viewers to exotic places that YT in 3D, which was funded by importance. Many of these images they would never see in person. It the Friends of the Yukon Archives takes some imagination and creative will be examined by researchers Society, will be launched with because of their historical content skill to select images with the right an opening reception at the Arts rather than the 3-D effect they create. composition and perspective lines Underground at 302 Main Street I had the opportunity of a sneak to create a strong sense of depth and on Friday, Nov. 1st, from 5 p.m. to 7 preview recently. One panel showed form. a glass plate stereographic view taken p.m. It will remain on display until Schlosser went through the small by Louis Jacquot of the hunting guide the last Saturday in January, so there selection from the Yukon Archives will be excellent opportunity to see Field Johnson and a hunter with a holdings looking for those with this display during the Christmas Yukon content, diversity of viewpoint Dall sheep, high up on a mountain holidays. Special 3-D glasses will be and strong sense of depth. Many were side near the Donjek River, circa rejected because they simply did not 1920. Another image depicts doctors, provided for viewing the anaglyphs seem to jump off the plane of the im- patients and nuns inside a ward of St. in the exhibit. Michael Gates is a Yukon historian Mary’s Hospital, Dawson City, over age, while others gave a strong sense and sometimes adventurer based in 100 years ago. Yet another presents that you could reach out and touch Whitehorse. His latest book, Dalfox pens at Carcross; a fourth shows them. A rare view of the steamer ton’s Gold Rush Trail, is available in Columbian, a Yukon sternwheel river miners working their claim on a Yukon stores. You can contact him at creek near Dawson City. boat, though historically interestmsgates@northwestel.net

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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Casino logic sees everyone losing trying to win ing table looked particularly lonesome. by MICHAEL Conversation always makes DOUGHERTY any trip go faster. Once he realized I had no intention of putting money down on his table, the croupier and I settled into an easy banter. He gave me a basic education on the reality of the casino-style gambling the ferry company offered to travelers on its Irish Sea crossings. he ferry across St. George’s One simple reality could not Channel from Rosslare, Ire- be denied: the house always land to Pembroke, Wales takes wins. Any game, my instructor about four hours on a good day. noted, has an edge built in that On the weekday morning I took insures a percentage for the the trip some three decades ago house no matter what. While the few other passengers along the allure of winning attracts for the ride focused on their the gambler, the only thing for coffee and paper or just sleepsure remains the house walking ing. The croupier at the gamaway with a cut of every euro,

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pound or dollar wagered. An economic system that tolerates or even fosters growing inequality, high unemployment particularly among our youth and “acceptable” rates of poverty and homelessness seems to be based on the same casino logic. Everyone tries to win but ends up losing. If the cards are stacked against us, why do we continue to play the game? Mark Kingwell, a professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto, noted in a Harper’s Magazine interview with Gabriel Santos-Neves last November that “most citizens value everything as means rather than an end. This is partly baseline human behaviour and partly a hyped-up version of instrumentality, which currently functions as the operating system of everything from technology itself through to creativity, education, and public discourse, and even to friendship and family life. The triumph of economic thinking is that it has become the invisible presumption of everything; there is nothing, or almost nothing, that cannot be reduced to a transaction.” In our iPod buffered world where we increasingly insulate ourselves from one another in pursuit of our own goals, it not hard to see the truth of Dr. Kingwell’s argument. We

have been taught to value our individual winnings over any collective aspiration towards building a just, equitable and environmental sustainable global society. Kingwell writes in his 2012 book Unruly Voices: Essays on Democracy, Civility and Human Imagination that the current system “is evidently (we might say literally) coming apart in our hands. That is, the more we try to mirror the self in devices and desires, replacing ethical reflection with multiple reflected images of our ‘likes’ and ‘friends,’ the more we consume the modern conception of the individual, in effect eating its brains.” Zombie-like we unthinkingly seem compelled to join a “danse macabre” of a system hell bent on destruction. In Ottawa, Washington, even here in the Yukon we should see as Professor Kingwell does that “underneath the road-rage politics and bratty teenage campaign rhetoric there is actually a creeping nihilism here, a disregard for the very idea of reason.” We keep, however, accepting the treats from our political and economic leaders. They make illusory promises of greater prosperity for all while never having to take responsibility for the consequences of the rapacious development they

demand. This marks our Faustian bargain with them. It can’t mask the devastating reality of the tricks in our collective future if we continue accepting this masquerade. Trick or treat? Think about it. Michael Dougherty is co-chair of the social justice committee of Sacred Heart Cathedral of Whitehorse. Contact pazypan@yukon. net.

Namaste notes

Sunday, Oct. 27 – Reformation Day commemorates the foundational moment of the Protestant tradition on the Sunday closest to Oct. 31 the day in 1517 when Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses statement on Wittenberg Castle Church door. Sunday, Oct. 28 – Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time. A suggested reading is Luke 18:914. Tuesday, Oct. 29 – Dutch colonists believe they bought the island of Manhattan from its indigenous residents in 1626 for $24 worth of trinkets. Thursday, Oct. 31 – All Hallow’s Eve with deep Christian roots is a non-liturgical celebration of mystery through prayer and merriment. Friday, Nov. 1 – All Saints Day is the Christian time for honouring every saint, known and unknown.

Religious Organizations & Services Whitehorse United Church

Yukon Bible Fellowship

(Union of Methodist, Presbyterian & Congregational Churches) 10:30 a.m. - Sunday School & Worship Service Rev. Beverly C.S. Brazier

160 hillcrest Drive 668-5689 Sunday Service 10:00 a.m. Pre-Service Prayer 9:00 a.m. Family Worship & K.I.D.S. Church

Grace Community Church

Church Of The Nazarene

601 Main Street 667-2989

8th & Wheeler Street

668-2003

10:30 aM FaMILY WoRShIP Because He Cares, We Care.

The Salvation Army

311-B Black Street • 668-2327

Sunday Church Services: 11 am & 7 pm eveRYoNe WeLCoMe

Our Lady of Victory (Roman Catholic)

1607 Birch St. 633-2647

Saturday evening Mass: 7:30 p.m.

Confessions before Mass & by appointment. Monday 7:00 PM Novena Prayers & adoration Tuesday through Friday: Mass 11:30 a.m.

ALL WeLCOMe

TRINITY LUTHeRAN 4th Avenue & Strickland Street

668-4079 tlc@polarcom.com Sunday worship at 10:00 am Sunday school at 10:00 am Pastor Deborah Moroz eVeRYONe WeLCOMe!

Riverdale

Baptist Church

Canadian Baptist Ministries

15 Duke Road, Whse • 667-6620 Sunday Worship Service: 10:30 AM ReV. GReG ANDeRSON

www.rbchurch.ca

FoURSqUaRe ChURCh

PaSToR RICK TURNeR

2111 Centennial St. (Porter Creek) Sunday School & Morning Worship - 10:45 am

Call for Bible Study & Youth Group details

PaSToR NoRaYR (Norman) haJIaN

www.whitehorsenazarene.org 633-4903

First Pentecostal Church 149 Wilson Drive 668-5727

Sunday 10:00am Prayer / Sunday School 11:00 am Worship Wednesday Praise & Celebration 7:30 pm Pastor Roger Yadon

Whitehorse

Baptist Church 2060 2nD AvEnuE • 667-4889

Pastor Mark Carroll Family Worship at 11:00 am Sunday School 9:45 am

St. Nikolai Orthodox

Christian Mission

Reader Service Sundays 10:30 am 332-4171 for information

www.orthodoxwhitehorse.org

Quaker Worship Group ReLIGIoUS SoCIeTY oF FRIeNDS Meets regularly for Silent Worship. For information, call 667-4615 email: whitehorse-contact@quaker.ca

website: quaker.ca

Seventh Day Adventist Church

Rigdrol Dechen Ling,

Vajra North Buddhist Meditation Society Meditation Drop-in • Everyone Welcome!

403 Lowe Street

Mondays 5:15 to 6:15 PM

www.vajranorth.org • 667-6951

Christ Church Cathedral Anglican 4Th aveNUe & eLLIoTT STReeT

Services Sunday 8:30 aM & 10:00 aM Thursday Service 12:10 PM (with lunch) historical evening Prayer, Wed & Sun 7:00 PM, the old Log Church Museum, June 9 to aug 25.

eCKANKAR

Religion of the Light and Sound of God

For more information on monthly activities, call (867) 633-6594 or visit www.eckankar-yt.ca www.eckankar.org ALL ARe WeLCOMe.

Church of the Northern Apostles

An Anglican/episcopal Church Sunday Worship 10:00 aM

1609 Birch St. (Porter Creek) 633-5385 “We’re open Saturdays!” Worship Service 11:00 am Wednesday 7:00 pm - Prayer Meeting All are welcome.

oFFICe hoURS: Mon-Fri 9:00 aM to 12 Noon

Sacred Heart Cathedral

TAGISH Community Church

Box 31419, Whitehorse, YT Y1a 6K8 For information on regular community activities in Whitehorse contact:

www.tagishcc.com

The Church of Jesus Christ of

(Roman Catholic)

4th Avenue & Steele Street • 667-2437 Masses: Weekdays: 12:10 pm. Saturday 5 pm Sunday: 9 am - english; 10:10 am - French; 11:30 am english

Bethany Church

Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada early Service 9:00 - 10:00 am Family Service 10:30 am - Noon Filipino Service 4:00 - 5:00 pm Sunday School ages 0-12

91806 alaska highway

Ph: 668-4877 • www.bethanychurch.ca

The Temple of Set

The World’s Premier Left hand Path Religion

a not-for-prophet society. www.xeper.org

canadian affiliation information: northstarpylon@gmail.com

668-5530

Meeting First Sunday each Month Details, map and information at:

867-633-4903

Calvary Baptist

1301 FIR STReeT 633-2886

Sunday School during Service, Sept to May

THe ReV. ROB LANGMAID

45 Boxwood Crescent • Porter Creek 633-4032 • All Are Welcome

Bahá’í Faith

whitehorselsa@gmail.com

Latter Day Saints

108 WICKSTROM ROAD, WHITeHORSe

1-867-667-2353

Sunday Sacrament Service starts at 10:00 AM Sunday School at 11:00 AM and Priesthood hour will be from 12:00 to 1:00 PM

Northern Light Ministries Dale & Rena Mae McDonald Word of Faith Ministers & Teachers. check out our website!

Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor L.e. harrison 633-4089

www.northernlightministries.ca

St. Saviour’s

1154c 1st Ave • Entrance from Strickland

Regular Monthly Service: 1st and 3rd Sundays of the Month 11:00 AM • All are welcome. Rev. David Pritchard 668-5530

For further information about, and to discover Islam, please contact: Javed Muhammad (867) 332-8116 or Adil Khalik (867) 633-4078 or send an e-mail to info@yukonmuslims.ca

Anglican Church in Carcross

or call 456-7131

Yukon Muslim Association www.yukonmuslims.ca


55

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Relatives who don’t like kids can be struck from guest list suppressing a sarcastic tone duce a couple as “John Smith will come if this couple should, and his wife, Mary Jones,” or indeed, become parents. “Mary Johnson and her husband, William Johnson.” DEAR MISS MANNERS: If However, with the advent of I am paying for my daughter’s same-sex marriages, I someby Judith wedding, do I have input on times find myself at a loss as to Martin the guest list? the correct form of introducGENTLE READER: That tion. Is each gentleman in a privilege is not for sale, as Miss same-sex marriage the “husManners gathers you seem to band” of the other, with each believe. However, it does come lady in a similar relationship free with the position of being the “wife” of her spouse? DEAR MISS MANNERS: Or alternately, is a gentleMy sister in-law is newly mar- your daughter’s parent. man’s spouse his “wife” regardried to a man who doesn’t DEAR MISS MANNERS: I less of the spouse’s gender, and want kids. She seems to be undecided; however, this does attended a baby shower a few a lady’s spouse likewise her months ago for a co-worker not stop her from joining in “husband”? and spent $50 on a gift. Anon the constant comments of I recognize that the equalother colleague and I are plan- ity or inequality of forms has how children misbehave and are awful. ning to meet up with the new taken on substantial symbolic I realize that since they are mom since she’s had the baby. importance these days. I would newly married, they are often My colleague was in a panic like to treat all couples with bombarded with the “So, when about what to get her and said equal courtesy, but our tradiare you going to have kids?” that it would be rude to show tional language creates ambiquestion. Perhaps they are an- up without a gift when seeing guities when applied to our noyed by it and are expressing the baby for the first time. new circumstances. their frustrations. Are we really expected to GENTLE READER: No, it However, I find it very rude give two gifts to a new mom?! doesn’t. A married male is a that at every family gathering, GENTLE READER: At least. husband and a married female they glare at the children and You got off easy. Nowadays, is a wife, just as two male parmake sarcastic remarks about anyone within a 50-yard radius ents are both fathers and two how they are are hyper and of a new baby is “expected” to female parents both mothers. messy. My son just celebrated give gifts for four baby showPlease don’t make trouble. his third birthday, and their ers, three religious ceremonies, Miss Manners is still weary constant comments offended two first-time calls, and heaven from the emotion-laden most of my guests with chilhelp you if your partridge in a battles over designations for dren. They tried whispering pear tree isn’t on their registry. couples who are not married. many of their opinions, but it However, these expectations Perhaps “partner” is not the was obvious what is was about. are rude, no matter how many best solution (because it also Their expectations of young baby stores and mothers-to-be describes a business relationchildren are unrealistic. They think otherwise. Miss Manship), but it is better than the even make comments like, ners suggests calming your explicit, overly cute or puz“We don’t want any, but if we colleague by suggesting that as zling terms that were being did have children, they would you already gave a present, it suggested. never eat sugar, and we would would be gracious to bring a At any rate, it is now genernever bring them to a place small token, such as flowers. By ally understood: “partners,” with so many bad children to that time, the new mother is unmarried; “husband” and influence them.” likely to be too sleep-deprived “wife,” married. Using any I want to tell them that if and grateful for adult company other terms for legally marthey have such strong ill feelto remain expectant. ried same-sex couples would ings toward little ones, then appear to cast doubt on their they should know they are not DEAR MISS MANNERS: status and throw them back obligated to come to any of my Not so long ago, when only into the partner category. children’s celebrations. They heterosexual marriages were can have their opinion, but publicly recognized, society DEAR MISS MANNERS: Is they make such gatherings so had easily understood terms it appropriate for my boymiserable. Is it my place to ap- for a person’s spouse. A lady’s friend to attend adult chilproach them about this? spouse was her “husband,” dren’s and grandchildren’s GENTLE READER: No, but while a gentleman’s spouse was birthdays, Thanksgiving, Miss Manners would consider his “wife.” Christmas, etc., events that it a favour to your childless Thus, I could easily introtake place at his ex-wife’s relatives and friends to omit them from the birthday invitaGirl Greatness tion list. Your son will soon Starts here be eager to have parties that are designed expressly for his friends — with adults present only as needed to supervise behaviour and remove food from the rug before it is ground in by little feet. Saturday, Oct. 26 and Sunday, Oct. 27 As for family celebrations available at: • Big Way • Super A - Porter Creek and other gatherings, you can • Super A - Riverdale – $5 per box. tell your sister-in-law that you know that her children 102-302 Steele St., 667-2455 — if she has them — will be Mon, Thurs, Fri; 12-5pm under more control, but that meanwhile you hope she will Join now! girlguides.ca indulge parents who are learn1-800-565-8111 ing as they go. Your reward for

MISS

MANNERS

It’s Cookie Time!

Girl Guide Chocolatey Mint Cookies!

house? The child with the grandchild lives there, and all events seem to be there. I don’t feel comfortable with him always going over there and do not think it is normal. He won’t say anything. GENTLE READER: Not normal? To want to see his children and grandchildren, wherever it is that makes that possible? You could argue, Miss Manners supposes, that your discomfort — or, should we say bluntly, jealousy — is also normal. However, there is a difference between openhearted normal and begrudging normal. The former is to be encouraged; the latter is to be decently hidden, if not suppressed. DEAR MISS MANNERS: My sister is in her second week of recovering from a double mastectomy for breast cancer. Her husband is asking her if she has responded to well wishes and flowers, meals, etc.

Of course, she has thanked those who personally delivered these things, but has not gotten around to writing thank-you notes. I believe she needs to concentrate on getting well right now, and that most people will understand the delay. Her husband is making her feel negligent about this; is he wrong? I love my brotherin-law, but am a little put out with him right now! GENTLE READER: Making people feel negligent for neglecting their etiquette duties is a major part of Miss Manners’ job. In this case, she would direct it at the husband, who could have written those letters, saying, “Natasha asked me to tell you how touched and grateful she is ...”

(Please send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, www. missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners(at)gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.)

A Christmas Bazaar will be held in the

Gold Rush Inn

Saturday, November 2nd from 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

This annual event features many great gift ideas from Yukon crafters and home businesses. FoR InFoRmatIon call 667-6772 oR 667-7629 (aFteR 6:00 Pm)

The Ladies Auxiliary to the Royal Canadian Legion

Yukon Inn

Christmas Bazaar nov. 2nd SaturdaY 9 aM to 3 PM

First nations and Yukon made arts and crafts Bake table, raffles and much more For information on tables Please call Lillian @

633-4583

YUKON

SHOOTING FEDERATION

AGM

Sunday, November 10, 2013 at 1:00 PM at the Whitehorse Rifle & Pistol Club on Grey Mountain Road


56

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Business&Professional D I R E C T O R Y

mackay.ca

MacKay LLP *chartered accountants* Suite 200 - 303 Strickland (upstairs) Whitehorse, Y.T., 667-7651

MARILYN SMITH, (867) 633-2476

M.A. Licensed Psychologist

PERSONAL COUNSELLING • CONFIDENTIALITY ENSURED

MP COMPUTING

*computerized accounting service* Suite 200 – 303 Strickland (upstairs), Whitehorse, Y.T. 667-7651

Hellaby Hall Organizations & businesses:

$100 morning, afternoon, evening $250 all day kitchen available $75 extra 4TH & ELLIOTT

We have a medium-sized hall available.

Call 668-5530 for bookings

Celtic Harp Counselling holistic mental health nursing services

Sean Hopkins RN BHScN CPMHN(C) Whitehorse: (867) 668 CELT (2358) Toll Free: 1 (877) 668 CELT (2358)

24 hours a day 365 days a year

867-335-3698

n

co Your Health Bea

Bonded Residential and Commercial Alarm Response

Kim Beacon

Holistic Health Coach, AADP

Food sensitivities / weight / fatigue / cravings / stress One-on-one coaching, workshops and more.

867.333.9001 Free health strategy session!

www.yourhealthbeacon

.co

ROLFING

®

Reg. Massage Therapist NORMAN HOLLER Certified Advanced Rolfer 804 Black St., • Whitehorse • 333-1492 • abraxas@klondiker.com BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

lorraine stick

owner t. 867 633.3177 f. 867 633.3176 c. 867 333.0579 a. 124 -1116 1st avenue, whitehorse, yukon Y1A 1A3 w. www.climateclothing.ca | e.lorraine@climateclothing.ca

Salivary Hormone Testing and Balancing

Janice Millington,

Naturopathic Doctor

(867) 456-4151 www.janicemillington.com

carpets clean enough TO LIVE ON Carpet • Upholstery • Tile/Grout • Residential & Commercial/Industrial Fire & Flood • Restoration • Mould Remediation

Phone: (867) 668-5702 | www.carpetcleanyukon.com

Gray Management Services Residential & Condo management Professional, Efficient, Affordable

GrayManagementServices.com Martin poirier, rMt osteo-thai Massage & Cranio-Sacral therapy Service en français

(867) 333-0005

p: 867.335.2666 e: martinauyukon@gmail.com 303B Hawkins, Whitehorse, Yukon

Leslie Knight Conversations MSW, RSW (B.C.) Counselling 334-6246 303 Hawkins Street Consultation Whitehorse, YT

WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY

trying to find a great local deal? You can find all the display ads in this newspaper online at our website:

www.yukon-news.com Just click on the Marketplace tab and all the ads will be sorted and categorized for easy viewing. Hassle free shopping, so you can find what you need fast!


57

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

SPORTS AND

RECREATION Arctic Edge skaters grab silver at Autumn Leaves ‘In my long, I had some good fight in there. I struggled near the beginning and I pulled it together.’

Tom Patrick News Reporter

Y

ukon’s Arctic Edge Skating Club didn’t have the largest team of skaters at the 2013 Autumn Leaves competition in Chiliwack, B.C. over the weekend. But the two club skaters had big results. Whitehorse’s Rachel Pettitt and Mikayla Kramer each skated to silver in their respective divisions. Pettitt leapt to silver in novice ladies and Kramer landed silver in pre-juvenile ladies under-11. “I’m happy with it,” said Pettitt. “They went pretty good. I had a good short. I attempted all my triples and got credit for them. “In my long, I had some good fight in there. I struggled near the beginning and I pulled it together.” Pettitt moved up from pre-novice to novice following outstanding results last season. She placed fourth in pre-novice at the Skate Canada Challenge – the division’s national championship – last season in Regina, Sask. Her result marked the highest placement by a Yukoner at the event. Pettitt qualified for the Challenge nationals after becoming the first Yukoner to win gold at the Skate Canada’s BC/YT Sectional Championships. She also was the first Yukon skater to win B.C.’s Super Series, a season-long competition that includes Autumn Leaves. “It really pushed me,” said Petitt, of moving to novice. “I added some harder jumps which are helping.” Pettitt placed third in the short program and second in the long for an overall score

FreezeFrame photo

Arctic Edge skater Rachel Pettitt competes at the Autumn Leaves Super Series event in Chilliwack, B.C. on Friday. Pettitt won silver in the novice ladies division.

of 90.88 points over the weekend. The 14-year-old, who won silver at the event last year as well, finished behind Vancouver’s Megan Ym. Kramer went on the ice for her skate as cool as a cucum-

ber, she said. “I think I had a good skate because I wasn’t really nervous,” said the 10-year-old. “Usually I’m nervous or excited. But I was in the perfect stage. I think it was because I

was really confident. I knew I could do it. And also I prepared well. “I had almost a clean skate. I landed all my jumps except one. And that was my combo jump, so I lost a couple

points. But I was still very happy with my skate. “I basically had all my doubles, except my doublelutz.” Kramer placed second out of 13 skaters with a score of 24.62, placing behind Kelowna’s Maya Rose. Kramer’s routine had three spins, including a flying spin, that went smoothly. It was the doublelutz that gave her trouble. “I was really happy. It was a really good skate,” said Kramer. “I was a little disappointed with my double-lutz because they were fairly consistent, but I wasn’t patient enough and I fell. I could have landed it, but I sat down on it.” Both skaters have been raking in strong results so far this season. Kramer took third place at B.C.’s Summer Skate in August and fourth at the Vancouver Island Skate International (VISI) in April. “I think I’ve made a lot of improvement since VISI,” said Kramer. Pettitt, who trains at the Kelowna Figure Skating Club in B.C., won bronze at Summer Skate and at the Sask Skate Invitational in Regina at the start of the month. She also won gold at a competition in Washington State. She opened the season with a fifth place finish at the Super Series Victoria Day competition in May. “That was not a good competition for me,” said Pettitt. “It was the beginning of the year and it was a new program.” Both skaters are now gearing up for the Skate Canada’s BC/YT Sectional Championships next month in Richmond. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com


58

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

First off-leash dog park opens in downtown Whitehorse Tom Patrick

be dogs and behave like dogs and this is the place that they can do that.” t’s a good time to be a dog owner The park is located at the west in downtown Whitehorse. It’s a end of Main Street on the south fantastic time to be a dog. part of the Teegatha’ Oh Zheh The first-ever off-leash dog park Park. It covers approximately 2,000 is now open in downtown Whitesquare metres and cost the City of horse. Whitehorse $55,000. The Canine Bluffs Off Leash “It came out of an idea the Park opened its gate at the end of Downtown Residents AssociaSeptember. tion brought forward along with Erika Rozsa-Atkinson, who runs dog-handling groups in WhiteCanines & Company Dog Obedihorse for an off-leash dog park ence School, has been pushing for area in the downtown core,” said the creation of an off-leash park Douglas Hnatiuk, supervisor of downtown for more than two outreach and events with the City decades. of Whitehorse. “It was recognized “It took over two decades to that a large number of downtown get it across to the city that it’s something that would really benefit residents do own a dog and they people,” said Rozsa-Atkinson. “The wanted a green space available to go off-leash. Current bylaws don’t dogs need an open space, a safe allow that in the downtown area.” place to run and sprint, and get “We canvassed other municipalrid of that initial burst of energy ities that have similar types of dog dogs have. So their nerves can calm down and they can start to interact parks and spoke to practitioners there about what works well, what with other dogs. doesn’t work – if you were to build “In North America dogs’ lives are very similar to human lives and it again, what would you do?” he dogs are not people. Dogs need to added. “The dog park we built here News Reporter

I

is definitely first class and certainly one we’re extremely proud of.” It is the first park of its kind

Gathering of the River People “Celebrating our Stories”

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

A woman plays with her dog at the Canine Bluffs Off Leash Park in Whitehorse last weekend. The first dog park in downtown Whitehorse will host its grand opening on November 2.

in downtown and is completely fenced in. It includes a hilly forest area as well as a segregated “puppy play pen” for dogs four months

old or younger. It has a separate fenced-in area at the entrance specifically for putting dogs on and off their leashes.

2013 General Assembly - October 25-26th Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre

Friday, October 25th:

Program Open House

2:00-6:00p.m. - Multi-Purpose Room - Learn about KDFN’s programs and services - Pick up a copy of our Annual Report for 2012-13 - Meet our staff and share your ideas and feedback

“Listen to the Stories” Book Launch and Celebration Feast

D E N O OSTP

5:00-9:00p.m. - Longhouse An evening of good food and vibrant storytelling bringing the journey of the Kwanlin Dün people to life as we celebrate the release of Kwanlin Dün’s new book — “Listen to the Stories – A History of the Kwanlin Dun People.”

P

*Please call ahead iflyou we can ensure seating for: to attendhso e. for all. u edplan C : laisunwelcomed. ural Centr k lt o *The R wearing regalia u o eschofedtraditional C b n / ü t D s

kwanlin ion Fea Celebrat from 5-9pm at the t : Saturday, 26th: ov. 1s entre. ssembly Fri., nOctober eneral a nlin Dün Cultural C G l l a F n kDF e kwa -16th at th lindun.com for details. nov. 15th w k sit an

Annual-7General Assembly 800 or vi

D E N O OSTP

community workshop Create resiliency in your community A highly experiential and deeply inspiring personal growth workshop designed for individuals who are interested in growing, changing and creating relationships based on compassion, respect and mutual understanding. Especially valuable for educators, counsellors, youth workers, or anyone interested in restorative practices and resiliency in their community.

33

Call 6 8:00a.m. Meeting: 9:30a.m.-4:30p.m. - Longhouse Breakfast: - Presentation of audited financials for fiscal year 2012-13 - Resolutions and Citizen’s Open Forum - Fun trivia, games and door prizes - Breakfast and lunch included

P

* Visit kwanlindun.com/employment for GA positions. * Advance resolutions encouraged. * Agenda & binders available Oct. 18th. * Ride service available throughout.

Questions? *Call 633-7800 or visit kwanlindun.com Photos: Fritz Mueller Photography / Kwanlin Dün

November 1–3 Whitehorse November 8–10 Haines Junction Hosted by Rich and Yvonne Dutra-St. John, co-founders of ChallengeDay.org For information and to register, contact: Christine.Klaassenstpierre@gov.yk.ca (867) 667-8665

yukoncircleofchange.com


The park is a great place for both dogs and owners to socialize, says Rozsa-Atkinson. “It’s not only for dogs to socialize, it’s for people to socialize. They can exchange dog-training information, they can get to know each other, create friendships. It’s somewhere they can find help, support for questions they might have. “It’s part of having a healthy community and it promotes for people to have responsible ownership. “It’s about safety. You don’t want anything to get in and you don’t want anything to get out,” she added. “There’s danger about wildlife, like porcupines, that can cause a lot of trouble for pet owners.” The Teegatha’ Oh Zheh Park has developed a bad reputation over the years. It has been a hotspot for drinking and drug use and has often been littered with beer cans and broken glass. Some trees in the dog area still bear spray-paint tattoos. “It’s a beautiful park, they put a lot of money in it, it has a nice design, it’s gorgeous, yet it was used for drinking and doing drugs and partying and littering,” said RozsaAtkinson. “I would come here to teach some of my classes and that’s what we saw. The dogs were walking on broken glass.” The Teegatha’ Oh Zheh Park’s dubious past actually helped convince city council to vote in favour of the dog park. The idea was people and their dogs could keep shady characters from frequenting the grounds.

59

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

would provide illumination so people feel safe when they go to the park. “We still encourage people to go in groups. But … we’ve cleared some of the underbrush to make visibility a little bit better in that area so there aren’t blind spots.” An official grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the park has been scheduled for Nov. 2 at 2 p.m., said Rozsa-Atkinson. “I think it’s great. The Yukon and Whitehorse has never had one before and I think people will get a ton of use out of it,” said dogowner Laura Priestley, who takes her three-year-old German Sheppard Ally to the park. “I’ll bring my dogs here all the time. “This is our third visit, actually, and it hasn’t even officially opened yet.” Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Simba, right, plays with an adult dog from inside the puppy area at the park.

“The Teegatha’ Oh Zheh Park had some instances where it was misused or misrepresented over the years,” said Hnatiuk. “It’s unfortunate because it’s such a beautiful park … There have been some nefarious activities that have occurred in that park over the years that have given it a little bit of a bad name. “We were hoping with the implementation of the dog park it would breathe a new life into the park and provide a space for legitimate users.” “The topography was such that it would provide the dogs with a

fairly rigorous workout and provide an opportunity for residents to access that area fairly easily, coupled with the newly paved trail that goes along the lower escarpment from Black Street all the way down to Hanson.” The new park also includes picnic tables and a kiosk near the entrance with brochures on the handling of dogs. There also is a plastic bag dispenser to aid in the clean up of droppings. A large sign introduces patrons to the rules of the park, which include: no dog toys, no food

or drink, all dogs must have the proper licence and vaccination tags, and no more than three dogs per handler. There is also a new lamppost to help illuminate the year-round park. “We wanted to insure that whatever we did was going to be safe for the public,” said Hnatiuk. “So we put a yard light in to enable us to have lighting in the dark periods because obviously for five months a year we have quite a bit of darkness in the North. “So we wanted something that

HOCKEY Complete equipment

Skate Sharpening you can trust

305 Main St. 668-6848 The Hougen Centre, Whitehorse, Yukon

/SportslifeYukon


58

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

First off-leash dog park opens in downtown Whitehorse Tom Patrick

be dogs and behave like dogs and this is the place that they can do that.” t’s a good time to be a dog owner The park is located at the west in downtown Whitehorse. It’s a end of Main Street on the south fantastic time to be a dog. part of the Teegatha’ Oh Zheh The first-ever off-leash dog park Park. It covers approximately 2,000 is now open in downtown Whitesquare metres and cost the City of horse. Whitehorse $55,000. The Canine Bluffs Off Leash “It came out of an idea the Park opened its gate at the end of Downtown Residents AssociaSeptember. tion brought forward along with Erika Rozsa-Atkinson, who runs dog-handling groups in WhiteCanines & Company Dog Obedihorse for an off-leash dog park ence School, has been pushing for area in the downtown core,” said the creation of an off-leash park Douglas Hnatiuk, supervisor of downtown for more than two outreach and events with the City decades. of Whitehorse. “It was recognized “It took over two decades to that a large number of downtown get it across to the city that it’s something that would really benefit residents do own a dog and they people,” said Rozsa-Atkinson. “The wanted a green space available to go off-leash. Current bylaws don’t dogs need an open space, a safe allow that in the downtown area.” place to run and sprint, and get “We canvassed other municipalrid of that initial burst of energy ities that have similar types of dog dogs have. So their nerves can calm down and they can start to interact parks and spoke to practitioners there about what works well, what with other dogs. doesn’t work – if you were to build “In North America dogs’ lives are very similar to human lives and it again, what would you do?” he dogs are not people. Dogs need to added. “The dog park we built here News Reporter

I

is definitely first class and certainly one we’re extremely proud of.” It is the first park of its kind

Gathering of the River People “Celebrating our Stories”

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

A woman plays with her dog at the Canine Bluffs Off Leash Park in Whitehorse last weekend. The first dog park in downtown Whitehorse will host its grand opening on November 2.

in downtown and is completely fenced in. It includes a hilly forest area as well as a segregated “puppy play pen” for dogs four months

old or younger. It has a separate fenced-in area at the entrance specifically for putting dogs on and off their leashes.

2013 General Assembly - October 25-26th Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre

Friday, October 25th:

Program Open House

2:00-6:00p.m. - Multi-Purpose Room - Learn about KDFN’s programs and services - Pick up a copy of our Annual Report for 2012-13 - Meet our staff and share your ideas and feedback

“Listen to the Stories” Book Launch and Celebration Feast

D E N O OSTP

5:00-9:00p.m. - Longhouse An evening of good food and vibrant storytelling bringing the journey of the Kwanlin Dün people to life as we celebrate the release of Kwanlin Dün’s new book — “Listen to the Stories – A History of the Kwanlin Dun People.”

P

*Please call ahead iflyou we can ensure seating for: to attendhso e. for all. u edplan C : laisunwelcomed. ural Centr k lt o *The R wearing regalia u o eschofedtraditional C b n / ü t D s

kwanlin ion Fea Celebrat from 5-9pm at the t : Saturday, 26th: ov. 1s entre. ssembly Fri., nOctober eneral a nlin Dün Cultural C G l l a F n kDF e kwa -16th at th lindun.com for details. nov. 15th w k sit an

Annual-7General Assembly 800 or vi

D E N O OSTP

community workshop Create resiliency in your community A highly experiential and deeply inspiring personal growth workshop designed for individuals who are interested in growing, changing and creating relationships based on compassion, respect and mutual understanding. Especially valuable for educators, counsellors, youth workers, or anyone interested in restorative practices and resiliency in their community.

33

Call 6 8:00a.m. Meeting: 9:30a.m.-4:30p.m. - Longhouse Breakfast: - Presentation of audited financials for fiscal year 2012-13 - Resolutions and Citizen’s Open Forum - Fun trivia, games and door prizes - Breakfast and lunch included

P

* Visit kwanlindun.com/employment for GA positions. * Advance resolutions encouraged. * Agenda & binders available Oct. 18th. * Ride service available throughout.

Questions? *Call 633-7800 or visit kwanlindun.com Photos: Fritz Mueller Photography / Kwanlin Dün

November 1–3 Whitehorse November 8–10 Haines Junction Hosted by Rich and Yvonne Dutra-St. John, co-founders of ChallengeDay.org For information and to register, contact: Christine.Klaassenstpierre@gov.yk.ca (867) 667-8665

yukoncircleofchange.com


The park is a great place for both dogs and owners to socialize, says Rozsa-Atkinson. “It’s not only for dogs to socialize, it’s for people to socialize. They can exchange dog-training information, they can get to know each other, create friendships. It’s somewhere they can find help, support for questions they might have. “It’s part of having a healthy community and it promotes for people to have responsible ownership. “It’s about safety. You don’t want anything to get in and you don’t want anything to get out,” she added. “There’s danger about wildlife, like porcupines, that can cause a lot of trouble for pet owners.” The Teegatha’ Oh Zheh Park has developed a bad reputation over the years. It has been a hotspot for drinking and drug use and has often been littered with beer cans and broken glass. Some trees in the dog area still bear spray-paint tattoos. “It’s a beautiful park, they put a lot of money in it, it has a nice design, it’s gorgeous, yet it was used for drinking and doing drugs and partying and littering,” said RozsaAtkinson. “I would come here to teach some of my classes and that’s what we saw. The dogs were walking on broken glass.” The Teegatha’ Oh Zheh Park’s dubious past actually helped convince city council to vote in favour of the dog park. The idea was people and their dogs could keep shady characters from frequenting the grounds.

59

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

would provide illumination so people feel safe when they go to the park. “We still encourage people to go in groups. But … we’ve cleared some of the underbrush to make visibility a little bit better in that area so there aren’t blind spots.” An official grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the park has been scheduled for Nov. 2 at 2 p.m., said Rozsa-Atkinson. “I think it’s great. The Yukon and Whitehorse has never had one before and I think people will get a ton of use out of it,” said dogowner Laura Priestley, who takes her three-year-old German Sheppard Ally to the park. “I’ll bring my dogs here all the time. “This is our third visit, actually, and it hasn’t even officially opened yet.” Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Simba, right, plays with an adult dog from inside the puppy area at the park.

“The Teegatha’ Oh Zheh Park had some instances where it was misused or misrepresented over the years,” said Hnatiuk. “It’s unfortunate because it’s such a beautiful park … There have been some nefarious activities that have occurred in that park over the years that have given it a little bit of a bad name. “We were hoping with the implementation of the dog park it would breathe a new life into the park and provide a space for legitimate users.” “The topography was such that it would provide the dogs with a

fairly rigorous workout and provide an opportunity for residents to access that area fairly easily, coupled with the newly paved trail that goes along the lower escarpment from Black Street all the way down to Hanson.” The new park also includes picnic tables and a kiosk near the entrance with brochures on the handling of dogs. There also is a plastic bag dispenser to aid in the clean up of droppings. A large sign introduces patrons to the rules of the park, which include: no dog toys, no food

or drink, all dogs must have the proper licence and vaccination tags, and no more than three dogs per handler. There is also a new lamppost to help illuminate the year-round park. “We wanted to insure that whatever we did was going to be safe for the public,” said Hnatiuk. “So we put a yard light in to enable us to have lighting in the dark periods because obviously for five months a year we have quite a bit of darkness in the North. “So we wanted something that

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60

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

Nesta Leduc: Yukon’s golden girl of orienteering Tom Patrick

at the championship. When she took up the sport, she didn’t foresee it leading to hitehorse’s Nesta Leduc international competition and orienteers for the fun of it. trips around the world. The medals are just icing on the “I don’t suppose so,” said cake, she says. Leduc. “I just started for fun and “Winning is nice, but it’s not as I get older I have more time so everything. I go out there not to I’ve been getting out a bit more.” win, I go out to have fun. If I win, “You’re out there in the woods, yeah, it’s a bonus.” you’re on your own, you have to Leduc had another great make your own decisions. A lot of summer searching the woods for people think it’s scary, but I don’t “control points” (check-points for think it’s scary at all. If you don’t orienteering). get back, someone is always going The 80-year-old won three to come and get you.” gold medals at the Canadian Leduc moved to the territory Orienteering Championships in from Great Britain in 1961 and Hamilton, Ont., two weeks ago. was a doctor before retiring 15 She quickly points out she was years ago. She took up orienteerthe only one in the women’s 80ing 20 years ago in Whitehorse. 84 division. But you can’t win if “Orienteering is a lot of the you don’t compete – or reach the same skills you have as a docfinish, for that matter. tor, having to make decisions “The first medal I ever got and having to stay on the ball, at nationals, I was the only one and having to stay focused,” said in my age category,” said Leduc. Leduc. “That’s usually what happens, “I’ve always enjoyed walking there’s not a lot of people in my and being in the outdoors and age category. If there’s only three, I’ve always enjoyed maps,” she as long as you finish you’re going added. “I think when (Whiteto get a medal. So I have a box full horse’s) Ross Burnett came he of medals. started the club and I thought, “It’s not what keeps me going. ‘That sounds pretty interesting. What keeps me going is the sport. It’s two of the things I like doing.’” It’s a lot of fun.” Leduc even achieved world Leduc had plenty of competichampion status a few years back. tion at the World Masters Orien- She won a gold and a silver at the teering Championships in Italy 2009 World Masters Orienteerthis past August. She beat a dozen ing Championships in Sydney, others to win two bronze medals Australia. News Reporter

W

Ian Stewart/Yukon News

Whitehorse’s Nesta Leduc recently won three gold medals at the Canadian Orienteering Championships in Hamilton, Ontario, and two bronze at the World Masters Orienteering Championships in Italy.

She also competed at world masters championships in Norway and Edmonton earlier on, but “at the first one I didn’t even make any finals,” said Leduc. “I had no idea what I was doing.” The Yukon is a good place to learn the sport. The Yukon Orienteering Association hosts biweekly meets during the summer, organizes the territorial championship and has a great junior program. (Four of the seven national team members at the Junior World Orienteering Championship this summer were Yukoners.) “It’s fantastic, it’s very well

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organized,” said Leduc, who is ubiquitous at YOA events. “I just enjoy it. I go out and practise with the younger guys.” When she’s not orienteering, Leduc is active in other sports. She swims five times a week, cross-country skis during the winter and spends a lot of time walking. “I usually ski five or six times a week,” said Leduc. “I walk in the summer probably seven times a week, usually for an hour, but sometimes for two or three. “I’m addicted to exercise.” The humble octogenarian

sees nothing special about being so active at her age. She seemed a little baffled that a reporter wanted to ask her about her recent competitions. Staying active in a person’s 80s and beyond is becoming more common, she said. “This is going to be the norm. I think health care has generally gotten so much better. I think the reason I do alright is because I get out there a lot and I get out there because I enjoy it.” More recently Leduc has added a new sport to her list of activities. She’s into geocaching, a relatively new pastime in which people use Global Positioning System devices to find registered containers called “geocaches” hidden around the world. Typically, within the container is a logbook for the finder to register their name and the date they found it. Sometimes the containers, which can be Tupperware or ammunition boxes, contain small items for trading, such as toys or trinkets. “My new passion is geocaching,” said Leduc. “It’s almost electronic orienteering. “You can do it anywhere in the world now. That’s one of the things I was doing on this trip. I found some in Toronto, some in Hamilton, some in Ottawa.” Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com

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Friday, October 25, 2013

61

Yukon News

Sport Yukon begins YouTube broadcasts `Tom Patrick News Reporter

Y

Tom Patrick/Yukon News

Tim Hortons player Daniel Phillips, right, chases the ball with Creative Works’ Antione Krahn in U9 soccer at the Canada Games Centre on Wednesday. Creative works won the match 5-1.

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GENtlE DENtAl CArE

ukon sports fans now have a new outlet for local sports news. Sport Yukon has launched a YouTube channel, the association announced Wednesday. “I was thinking about how we could increase our pull on social media and make sure our messages are being distributed to the right audiences,” said Kevin Patterson, Sport Yukon’s communications coordinator. “So we did a social marketing plan, and the YouTube channel is at the head of that marketing plan.” The non-profit society, which oversees sport clubs and governing bodies in the territory, posted its first video on Wednesday. The launch coincided nicely with Tuesday’s announcement that Whitehorse’s Mount Sima will open for this ski/snowboard season. The Sima announcement was the topic of the channel’s first video, which runs one minute and 22 seconds. “We were hoping the (press conference) was going to be positive,” said Patterson with a laugh. “It was good news, so it was good timing.” Sport Yukon hopes to post new videos every week. The organization, which organizes the Klondike Road of ’98 International Road Relay, oversees the territory’s sport Hall of Fame and hosts an annual sports awards banquet, among other things, has a lot to draw from. The videos could include athlete and team profiles, especially on those compet-

ing at major Games, such as the 2014 Arctic Winter Games this March in Fairbanks, Alaska, said Patterson. “There is a lot of content we can draw from,” said Patterson. “From our Kids Recreation Fund, from our physical literacy program, from the Klondike Road Relay, from the Arctic Winter Games, the Canada Games – any of the different Games we have going on.” Wednesday’s premier broadcast was hosted by Patterson and included a short clip from the Mount Sima press conference. The video had a bit of an exposure problem. Some over-exposed filming could be a little distracting as the outline of Patterson’s head was hard to detect over the background. But the “floating head” situation, as described by Patterson, was just a small bump in the road, he said. “It was a very bright day … but the message was clear,” he explained “We’re trying to make it a main resource for our member organizations in Sport Yukon so they can get out their messages and we can grow sport in the Yukon by getting that information out.” The channel and the first video, “Mt. Sima to Open,” can be found at www.youtube. com/sportyukon. Sport Yukon will post links to upcoming videos on Facebook, Twitter and on its website. Contact Tom Patrick at tomp@yukon-news.com

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62

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

COMICS ADAM

P C B O C O U L T H R E E G O P R E L L E S E Y R S L S W A A W A I F A I R T N T R E E K A E R I E O N A V Y E S S P A C T A M A E L A P R I N S

DILBERT

A R D T E R E C A R W O I M P M A J E M C A O E W E R D L T S M A M O U L A N N H I D A L C O Y E E R A G B U E J A M L E B S E O E R S

Kakuro

Sudoku

A N G E R S

T E A S E T

C S A O R N T Y H M B O O E S A L H Y L E

C A M P U T E R R A G E W P O W E P I Y E E O N C R T S E E S T H A R M A T I I R E E A T S O W I D E S M E E B A L L E T S E A H E T S

S E M R I E X E X E T L O O L A S N B N E F R L Y L E L I A D L O

A N O N L I E I S A O A O K I P M S

L A N G

A M I D S A T S P U S P H M E I R N E K C N O A N P G P E I R E S

D E C R E E

S L A Y E D

M E A N E R

P E S T S

S W E A R A T

I N S S L O

Answers to Friday’s New York Times Crossword puzzle.

By The Mepham Group

Level: Moderate

By The Mepham Group Level: 1

2

3

4

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Wednesday’s puzzle

Solution to Wednesday’s puzzle

© 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

No digit can be repeated in a solution, so a 4 can only produce 1 and 3, never 2 and 2. Solution published tomorrow. 11/7/13

11/7/13

To solve Kakuro, you must enter a number between 1 and 9 in the empty squares. The clues are the numbers in the white circles that give the sum of the solution numbers: above the line are across clues and below the line are down clues. Thus, a clue of 3 will produce a solution of 2 and 1 and a 5 will produce 4 and 1, or 2 and 3, but, of course, which squares they go in will depend on the solution of a clue in the other direction.

© 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.


63

Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

COMICS

DEAR MARGO

BOUND AND GAGGED

Dear Margo: I recently went on a trip with several friends for a “guys only” weekend. Since we were staying overnight, I shared a room with one of these friends, “Bob.” He and I and our wives are very close friends, having vacationed together. I decided to bring some very personal pictures of my wife with me. For me, two days away from my wife is a very long time. The plan was to make sure the pictures were in a safe place at all times. Unfortunately, I consumed more alcohol than I should have and left the pictures out. Before I woke up and realized what I had done, my friend had already seen the pictures. Initially, I was in a state of shock — I couldn’t believe I had exposed my wife like this. Eventually, my friend and I got into a pretty detailed discussion of our wives. At some point I realized that I actually liked that he saw my wife like that. Several months have gone by, and I can’t stop thinking about it. I’m not sure why, but I want my friend to see my wife like that again. I’ve come close to asking him if he wants to see more pictures of her, but I stop myself. He seems to be uncomfortable with the situation — maybe even a little remorseful that he told me so much about his own wife. My question is this: Is it normal that I want to “show off ” my wife? What is it that makes me want to do it? — Exhibitionist? Dear Ex: Let us call what is behind your new urge a kink. Different things turn different people on. Your newfound interest in show and tell sounds a little regressive, but there you are. I will tell you this, however: Should your wife ever get wind of this, your life wouldn’t be worth a plug nickel. — Margo, psychically

T h e N e w Yo r k T i m e s M a g a z i n e C r o s s w o r d P u z z l e No. 1027 WHO’S LEFT? By Brendan Emmett Quigley / Edited by Will Shortz

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RELEASE DATE: 11/3/2013

43 B rief letter s ign-o ff 44 ___ Nas hville R ecords 45 “___-haw!” 47 Greek characters 48 “C amelot” co-wri t e r 50 Piece of roadcons truction equipment

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1 4 Hard -t o -t u rn v eh i cl e

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1 6 Des i g n er Hel mu t

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1 5 Befo re y o u k n o w i t

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64 Vodka w i t h a Choc ol a t Ra z be r i f l a vor 66 K e e ps 67 L ot

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98 Video-gam e losses 99 88-Down, e. g. 106 P en parts

118 Afts and eves


64

Yukon News

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

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Approx. 900 sq ft

of high-end rental space with fantastic view available immediately. Elevator accessible, excellent soundproofing, large windows, lots of natural light.

Available Now Newly renovated OFFICE SPACE & RETAIL SPACE Close to Library & City Hall A short walk to Main Street Phone 633-6396 RENDEZVOUS PLAZA on Lewes Blvd, Riverdale Lots of parking 4,000 sq ft (previously child care centre) 1,100 sq ft (previously flower shop, studio) 7,000 sq ft (previously Frazerʼs) Call 667-7370 ROOM IN Northland, run of the house, w/d, no drinking or drugs in house. $600/mon. 668-4776

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE For Rent Location: 129 Copper Road. Approx. 850 sq ft. $500 per month includes utilities. Call 667-2614 ask for Brenda or Michelle or Email: totalfire@northwestel.net 2 BED, 1 bath unfurnished condo for rent in Hillcrest. Balcony, great view, 1-car parking. N/S, N/P, refs. required. $1,400/mon., 1st month and DD. Leave msg 633-3453 COMMERCIAL UNIT, located on main floor, 3151A 3rd Ave, 850 sqft, bathroom & kitchen facility, incls heat. Unit can be leased for $1,491/mon + utils. Month to month rent. 667-2090 2-BDRM. SUITE in Takhini, new, main floor, sunny & bright, near College, school, Games Centre, prefer mature person. Avail. Nov. 1. $1,250/mon. plus utils. 336-0444 CABIN, 2 bdrm. incl. elec., phone, Internet, no water. N/S, N/P. Refs. & dd required. $800/mon. 660-5545 DOWNTOWN, 1 bdrm. bsmt. suite c/w office & util. room, bright, spacious, sep. entrance, w/d. NS/, NP. $1,100/mon. plus utils. 667-2255 2-3 BDRM apt. Riverdale, upper level, bright & clean, c/w sundeck, carport, fireplace. Heat incl. Mature tenants. Avail. Nov. 1. $1,650/mon. 334-5448 ONE BDRM. apt. Crestview, bright & clean, wood heat, ptly. furn., pet ok. N/S. Quiet place for 1 person. $800/mon. 633-2455

3-BDRM. FULLY furnished house, Takhini West, very nice. N/S, no cats. $1,800/mon. plus utilities. 334-2777 LG. 5-BDRM. house in Porter Creek, quiet, close to schools & bus. Avail. immed. $1,800/mon. plus utils. 334-3546 PORTER CREEK - 1 and 2 bdrm. suites in my home, sep. entrance, use of w/d, N/S, no parties, avail. immed. Responsible tenants. $950/$1,050. 633-2046 ROOM FOR rent, Riverdale, 3 bdrm. condo. incl. cable, internet, utils, laundry. N/S, responsible tenant. $850/mon. 333-0490 after 6 pm. SHARED APT. in Riverdale, totally furnished. N/P, N/S, female only. $600 all inclusive. 668-7323 after 5:30 pm. CABIN FOR rent, Ibex Valley. Has elec. & water tank, must haul water. Indoor plumb. & wood heat. N/P, dd required. $800/mon. 668-6885 or 1275woodland@gmail.com 2-BDRM. TRAILER, KK, includes wood stove. $1,280/mon. plus elec. 334-7872 SMALL SPACE in the Sportees building, just under 300 sq ft. Stop in to Sportees 6098 6th Ave. or call Andrea 668-2691 CABIN MT. Lorne, 400ʼ new, energy-efficient, 300ʼ deck/stunning views. C/w private drive, power, phone, internet, EPA woodstove, outhouse. Water/showers 1 mile away. Pet considered. Long-term rental. $775/mon. 668-2849 QUIET, RESPECTFUL, female roommate wanted for November 1st, downtown 3 bdrm. upper level apt. No parties. $600/month. Call or text Nikki 334-6198 NICE PERSON to share March Lake waterfront home, close to Comm. Centre & ski trails. N/S, animals welcome. $500/mon. & shared utils. 660-4321 FINE COUNTRY living. Two bedroom, one full bath, fully detached house. New construction, hardwood floors, travertine tile, new stainless appliances. John, 334-4644. YUKON APARTMENTS now accepting applications for 1-bdrm. furnished & 2-bdrm. unfurnished apts. Refs. reqʼd. 667-4076 2-BDRM. APT. downtown, newly renoʼd. Incls. on-site laundry, parking. N/P, N/S. $1,100/mon. incl. heat. Avail. Nov. 1. 336-0444 FULLY FURNISHED room for rent in Copper Ridge home. Inclusive of all utilities.  Prefer female roommate, N/S N/P $635/mon. 456-7855 LARGE FURNISHED room on acreage south of Whitehorse, avail. immed., c/w Internet, cable TV, private bathroom, own separate entrance.  One pet possible if house broken; 336-1621

FOR LEASE:

Brand new storage Bay

25 x 65 x 18’ with washroom and 16’ elecric garage door, radiant heat $2,000.00 + Utilities

Brand new office space

25 x 32’ with washroom, electric heat $1,000.00 + Utilities Both located @ 53 Macdonald road

RIVERDALE CONDO for rent. 3 bedrooms. 1 & 1/2 bath. Non-smoking. Quiet neighbourhood. $1,600. plus utilities. Yukonnights@gmail.com FOX LAKE Great, cozy cabin for your next getaway Soak in the wonderful scenery and lose yourself in serenity Completely furnished and equipped Located 40 minutes from Whitehorse Beautiful trails at your door for hiking, skiing, bicycling Good lake for fishing Accommodates 2-6 people Call for rate, 633-2156 MAIN ST. 2 Bdrm. 1 bath apt. c/w appliances on greenbelt. Available Nov. 1, 2013 References req'd. $1,575.00/m + utilities.  1st + security. 667-7462 Email nsevergreenoffice@gmail.com. ROOMMATE WANTED, Granger area. 1 bdrm., private bathroom, shared kitchen & laundry, parking. DD reqʼd. N/S, N/P. Avail. Nov. 1. $200/mon., utilities incl. 335-1786 CABIN FOR rent, Fox Lake. Nicely furnished, incl. small fridge, wood stove. 40 mins. from town. $450/mon. 633-2156 D/T LEGAL suite, secure access, parking, all included, can be furnished. N/P, N/D, no parties. $1,100. Avail. Nov. 1. 336-0112 for appt. 2 BDRM. house at  Deep Creek, Lake Laberge. Washer/dryer. Waterfront. Oil and electric heat.  $1,000.00 a month plus utils. 30 minutes from town. Pets considered. 332-4835 CHARMING 3-BDRM. country residential, 35 mins. south of downtown Whitehorse. Wood stove, W/D, hardwood floors, storage space, views, pet friendly. $1,300/mon. incl. utils. 334-8271 CABIN FOR rent in Judas Creek (Marsh Lake), lake view, sunny Hill, with outhouse, wood heat. $450/mon. plus power. 660-4813 FULLY FURNISHED 1 bdrm. suite, Valleyview, incl. dishes and linens.  Private entrance, parking, appliances and laundry. Max 2 people. N/P.  Avail Dec 1st. $1,350/month + elec.   633-4778. 3-BDRM. APT, P.C., close to school & Super A, nice & clean. No dogs. $1,100/mon. 332-8801 CABIN FOR rent in Judas Creek (Marsh Lake), lake view, sunny hill, with outhouse, wood heat. 450/mon. + power. 660-4813 2 BDRM with den, Porter Creek. Quiet upper level, very bright, 3 appliances, coin laundry on premises.  N/S, N/P, no pets. Refs & dd required. $1,250/mon. + utils. 334 9402 PRIVATE, 3 bedroom bungalow, 1 bath, in Marwell area. Smokers and/or pets welcome. Partially fenced back yard. Prefer long term lease. Available immed. $1,600/mon. + util. 333-0709 or kelsax@hotmail.com ONE BDRM. apt., Porter Creek. Clean, quite building, close to bus stop, looking for long term tenants.  $975 + utilities and sec deposit. 334 9402 3-BDRM TOP floor of house, Riverdale, avail Nov 1st, c/w laundry, heat, electric, tv and internet. N/S, no parties. $1,575/mon. 333-9000 2-BDRM, 2-BATH condo, Waterfront bldg across from SS Klondike, wonderful views. $1,600/mon. 668-7090

Call 633-2907 or 633-2035

ROOM, LARGE 12x24 in Porter Creek, private entrance. Avail. Nov. 1. $750/mon. + dd. 668-7213

CABIN WITH Loft, 16x24. Furnished, wood heat, propane lights, no electric. Phone and internet, 50 km from Whitehorse, $600/mon. 633-4667 8 -10 p.m.

FURNISHED BEDROOM for one person in new home in Ingrid SD, incl. heat , elec, access to kitchen, bathroom, w/d, TV/internet. N/S, no pets, dd reqʼd. $700/mon. 334-3186


HOT SPRINGS Road, 2-bdrm cottage, c/w oil heat, water delivery, power, $1,000 + utils. 633-6178

LONG-TERM HOUSESITTER available for winter months, gd w/pets & plants. No criminal record, 30 yr. Yukon resident. 335-0009

2-BDRM. UNIT in Granger, self contained, above ground, c/w separate entrance, laundry, gas fireplace, bright, responsible tenant(s), refs. & dd required. $1,250/mon. utils incl. 3324426

Real Estate

3-BDRM, 2-BATH, upper level in Copper Ridge, bright, clean, N/S, no parties. Avail. Nov. 1. $1,700/mon. BACHELOR SUITE, downtown, furnished, no pets, avail. Nov. 1. $900/mon. all incl. 668-4321 RENT ONE of our cozy cabins with sauna for a weekend getaway. Relax and enjoy the winter wonderland on the S. Canol Road. 332- 3824 or info@breathofwilderness.com. 2-BDRM MAIN flr suite, redec, new floors/kit/appl & htng system, carport, partly furn, responsible tenants. Refs. reqʼd. N/S, dog ok. $1,600/mon. & utils & dep. 334-9351 or 334-2747

Help Wanted

®

A Professional at Your Side

Envirolube

867.334.1111 vivianetessier@remax.net

Full-time Positions Available

667-2514

RE/MAX Action REAlty • WhitEhoRsE yukon

2-BDRM. HOUSE in Copper Ridge, ensuite, laundry & all appl, carport + RV prkg, resp tenants/refs, N/S, avail Nov 1, $1,650/mon +util. & dep, 334-9351 or 393-2747

CABIN FOR sale, new, 10ʼx14ʼ, wired, insulated, c/w propane stove, fridge, heater. Can be moved. $15,000. 660-5545

HOUSESITTER AVAILABLE Mature, responsible person Call Suat at 668-6871

NEW PRICE  81 -100 Lewes Blvd. 3 bedroom 1.5 bath. Newly renovated, efficient oil monitor. Ready for you to move in. $225,000, open to offers.  668-6081

action realty realtor®

LARGE 1-BDRM suite, furnished, main floor of house, avail. Nov 1. Separate entrance, small desk, w/d, heat, electricity incl. Ref required, dd,, N/P, no parties, $1,300/mon. 668-4966

Wanted to Rent

65

Yukon News

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

®

Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

TRAILER IN KK, 2 bdrm., new roof, new furnace, new flooring, incl. wood stove. $49,000 obo. 334-7872 PRIME REAL estate. 30 acres between Mayo Village and Band for sale $250,000.00. 333-9627

• Women welcome to apply • Must be energetic and able to work in fast paced environment • Work efficiently and unsupervised • Competitive wages • Must have a valid driver’s licence • Experience welcome, but not necessary

Please drop resume off to Leroy at 411 ogilvie Street

LOOKING FOR experienced housekeepers/front desk persons to work. Please apply with resume to Bonny, Stratford Motel, 401 Jarvis Street. No phone calls, please.

TRAIN TO BE AN Apartment/Condominium Manager ONLINE! Graduates get access to all jobs posted with us. 33 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-665-8339, 604-681-5456. WANT to work as a part-time tour guide? Do you speak Spanish? We are a local tour company looking for Spanish-speaking tour guides for this winter. Call 667-2209

Dayhiking Backpacking Snowshoeing Guide

DOWNTOWN RESTAURANT Seeking Cooks, Kitchen Helpers & Servers Spanish speaking an asset Competitive wages Please send info to: patronamexfood@gmail.com 668-7372

Year around position is available. Wage: $18.95 / hr Full time position offering a min. of 35 hrs / week Job Location: Whitehorse, Yukon

JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages from $30/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrylser.ca. Fax 403-854-2845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

Skills and certification requirements: • Must speak and write in English • ACMG Hiking certification or equivalent • Valid wilderness First Aid (70 to 80 hrs)

Assets that we consider: • Previous experience in Yukon remote area • Japanese speaking skill

AUTOMATED TANK Manufacturing Inc. is looking for experienced welders. Competitive wages, profit sharing bonus plus manufacturing bonus incentive. Full insurance package 100% paid by company. Good working environment. Keep your feet on the ground in a safe welding environment through in hole manufacturing process. No scaffolding or elevated work platform. Call Cindy for an appointment or send resume to: cindy@autotanks.ca. 780-846-2231 (Office); 780-846-2241 (Fax).

YM Tours Ltd.

Box 31112 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A5P7 job1@yamnuskaguides.com

House Hunters

HOUSE HUNTERS

InSite

Home Inspections Buying or Selling? Good information ensures a smooth transaction.

business opportunity

HoUSe HUNTerS

No SurpriSeS = peace of MiNd

B&B for Sale in Watson Lake

• Pre-Sale or Purchase visual inspections of structure and systems • Commercial Maintenance Inventory Inspections • W.E.T.T. Inspections of Wood and Pellet burning stoves / fireplaces

Call Kevin Neufeld, Inspector at

867-667-7674 • 867-334-8106

BRaNd NEw

2-bedroom upscale mobile home.

124,000

$ Reduced to For Quick Sale

KevinNeufeld@hotmail.com

Call 334-6094 for more information.

RARE COUNTRY RESIDENTIAL

certified green, 4-bdrm & den

www.InsIteHomeInspectIons.ca

outside of Watson Lake by the ski hill and airport. It is an income property and has a partially furnished 3 bedroom Bed and Breakfast set up and ready on the upstairs floor. The main house has a renovated kitchen and new flooring in most of the house. 2 bedrooms, a bathroom, and the laundry room on the main floor. Finished full basement. Wood boiler heats the house with an oil back up. There is a greenhouse, small garage and one storage building. Wrap around driveway.

Copper ridge

$359.900

Price reduced to $269,000 for quick sale

780-632-2506 www.propertysold.ca

A Better Built Home... in Less Time

11 grizzly Circle

2 bed, 2 bath, big corner lot, fully landscaped, fenced yard. garage and partially finished basement. priced to sell below it’s appraised value.

Call realtor Mike racz ®

333-6410

Mobile & Modular Homes Serving Yukon, NWT & Alaska

the Victory - 2021 sq. ft.

Property Guys.com™

SIGN # 703075

$678,000 11 Canyon Cresent Whitehorse

Property Guys.com™

SIGN # 703063 10 Carlisle Place Whitehorse

867-332-6074

teslin 4-bedroom lakeside

central park - only 4 units left!

SIGN # 700376

E HOUS M OPENt & Sun 1:00 to 4:00 P d Sa en k ee W is h T Property Guys.com™

SIGN # 702831

$375,500

$379,000

867-633-4778

867-335-7029

17 Jackson Avenue, TESLIN

Your Local Authorized Dealer

667-7681 or cell 334-4994

$515,000

867-333-0262

Property Guys.com™

• Nelson Homes’ famous panelized • Option to be your own system ensures your home will builder or manage the go up quickly and efficiently. construction. Building guide provided. • Finest quality Canadian kiln-dried lumber. • Choose a beautiful, proven plan or we will custom design • Delivered to your site within 6 - 8 weeks of order date.

35 Normandy Road Whitehorse

View plans at: www.nelson-homes.com

Tel: 867-667-6376 Email: horses@exploreyukon.com

23 Lorne Rd. in McCrae

clivemdrummond@gmail.com

ANNOUNCEMENT Dawn initially trained as a realtor and buyers agent in BC and then worked as a licensed agent for Century 21, in BC. In 1996 she returned to the Yukon to work with Coldwell Banker. In 2002 and 2003 she listed the “town” of Faro, and was awarded one of her most treasured possessions, a plaque that initiated her into the town of Faro as an honorary citizen. The award from the town of Faro states that she “Far exceeded their expectations”. The people of Faro far exceeded hers. Dawn is excited to be part of this Yukon based company that intends to move forward with fresh new ideas and professional concepts. Contact Dawn for any of your real estate needs, or simply to catch up. P.S. From Dawn - “Hello everyone, it’s great to be back, I look forward to working with old friends and invite friends that I have not yet met, to call to discuss their real estate needs. To hire me to work for you call: 393-3407 or 334-3401 or dawn@thewhitegirl.ca”.


66

Yukon News Leadership OppOrtunity

Coordinator of Regulatory Programs This is an exciting and transformational time for self-regulation in nursing The Yukon Registered Nurses Association (YRNA) is the regulatory body and professional association for registered nurses in the Yukon. YRNA is responsible for establishing and promoting standards of practice for registered nurses, for regulating nursing practice and for advancing professional excellence in the interest of the public. YRNA advocates for nursing and health policies and practices which support safe and ethical care and promotes healthy public policy. STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS • A good understanding of legislative and regulatory issues • Knowledge of nursing and health policy • A demonstrated ability in leadership, communication, interpersonal and critical thinking skills • An ability to manage competing priorities • Considerable independent judgment and decision-making skills • Ability to understand broad policy implications, yet ensure attention to detail • Experience working with governing bodies and committees • Administrative experience is desirable • Minimum of five years nursing practice • Practicing registration with YRNA For more information, please contact the YRNA office. Please note this position is half-time. Please address your résumé to Joy Peacock, RN, MSc, Executive Director of YRNA. Applications may be submitted in person, by mail, email or fax and will be accepted until noon, 28 October 2013. Yukon Registered Nurses Association 204 – 4133 – 4th Avenue Whitehorse, YT Y1A 1H8 Phone: 867-667-4062 Fax: 867-668-5123 Email: exec.director@yrna.ca Website: www.yrna.ca

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Expression of Interest for: Casual Instructor(s)

Skills for Employment - Esthetics School of Academic & Skill Development January 6, 2014 to April 25, 2014 Hourly Rate: $31.67 to $35.62 Competition No.: 13.138 Initial Review Date: November 04, 2013 Yukon College offers project based learning through the Skills for Employment program. We are looking for an interested, qualified candidate with relevant education and experience to teach on a casual basis in our entry level Esthetics Career Exploration program. Certification in Esthetics, from a recognized institution, and experience with Yukon First Nations are required. Teaching experience would be considered an asset. For additional information please contact: Colleen Stevenson, Chair, School of Academic and Skill Development Email: cstevenson@yukoncollege.yk.ca Phone: (867) 456-8608 If you are interested, please send your resume to: Human Resource Services Yukon College, Box 2799 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax #: (867) 668-8896 e-mail: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Expression of Interest for: Sessional Instructor School of Liberal Arts For the Winter 2014 Academic Term (January 6 to May 2, 2014) Hourly Rate: $31.67 to $35.62 Initial Review Date: November 8, 2013 Competition No.: 13.136

Yukon College is looking for a qualified person to teach:

Multimedia 121: Digital Video & Audio The successful candidate will have related postsecondary education and professional experience in digital video and audio editing and/or a related multimedia field (e.g., graphic design, digital illustration, web design, etc.). Consideration may be given to candidates with the appropriate blend of education and experience.

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Administrative Assistant

School of Health, Education, & Human Services Applied Arts Division Permanent Position from: November 18, 2013 Salary: $51,537 to $61,359 per annum (based on 75 hours bi-weekly) Initial Review Date: October 30, 2013 Competition No.: 13.133

Reporting to the Chair, School of Health, Education & Human Services, this position is responsible for assisting and providing a broad range of support services to the division, primarily administrative in nature. This will include acting as a resource person for students, clients and instructors by providing accurate and timely information on programs and services.

If you have the relevant education and are interested in teaching in a post-secondary setting, please send us your resume.

The ideal applicant will have office administrative certification and/or related post-secondary coursework and considerable experience working in administrative positions combined with excellent problem-solving and multi-tasking skills. Applicants must have advanced computer and bookkeeping skills and provide excellent customer service in a multi-cultural environment.

Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

For additional information please contact: Dr. Victoria Castillo, Chair, Liberal Arts vcastillo@yukoncollege.yk.ca

Miscellaneous for Sale BETTER BID NORTH AUCTIONS Foreclosure, bankruptcy De-junking, down-sizing Estate sales. Specializing in estate clean-up & buy-outs. The best way to deal with your concerns. Free, no obligation consultation. 333-0717 We will pay CASH for anything of value Tools, electronics, gold & jewelry, cameras, furniture, antiques, artwork, chainsaws, camping & outdoor gear, hunting & fishing supplies, vehicles & ATVs. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS FURNACE BURNER, fully reconditioned, new motor, transformer & pump, $200. 633-3053 OSBORNE WOOD-BURNING fireplace insert in gd cond, $350. 633-6238 aft 6pm TELESCOPIC ALUMINUM plank ladder, new, $60. 335-8964

DISCONNECTED PHONE? National Teleconnect Home Phone Service. No One Refused! Low Monthly Rate! Calling Features and Unlimited Long Distance Available. Call National Teleconnect Today! 1-866-443-4408. www.nationalteleconnect.com. INVERSION BALANCING back board stretcher, relieves disks & pinched nerves, $200 obo. 2 hanging lights, 5 bulb, nickel finish, $100 obo. Diesel generator, air cooled, 4 stroke, $1,200 obo. 667-7107 FOR SALE, Geographique National collection, 1967 to 1997, perfect shape. Offers. 332-5192

LOG SPLITTER, 4-ton, Yardworks, used 2 seasons. $150. 668-7584 PANASONIC FAX machine, $40 obo. Living Well Montel Healthmaster machine, $120. 633-6208 FOOT SURGERY? HAVE clean AIRCAST pneumatic SP Walker Boot sz 5-8 F or 4-7 M, gently used twice. New liner $45, will sell boot & del to WH $45. 633-5774 DOUBLE SHEET set, never out of package. Smoky/steele blue colour. Linen by Martex, 420 thread count per square inch. $100 retail asking $40. 633-3810 HAND-COLORED MAP of North America. 18” x 14”, from 1800ʼs Dominion of Canada. $300 obo. 332-7879 BOSCH 12" DUAL BEVEL MITRE SAW with Bosch T4B Stand. One owner/operator, regular maintenance, c/w 60 tooth extra blade. Mint condition, $670. 334-1013. KING OF QUEENS complete series (9 seasons-27 DVDs); viewed once. Asking $60. 667-2196

ALBUMS FOR scrapbooking - cid-free Black color measures 13” high x 1.75” deep x 12.5“ wide. $30 for both. 667-4527

FOR SALE roll-top desk, teak veneer; room divider, steel, 3 sections, gold/off-white; art, original and prints, all framed; sheepskin rug, new, white. 667-2583 FREE - baseboard radiators, hot water, 15 pcs., 3ʼ to 8ʼ lengths. 456-7852 WOODWORKING PROFESSIONAL Vaccu press system and poly bag. For veneerings 4x8' sheets, curved forms, c/w 2 curved forms & bending plywood. $1,300 new. $850 obo. 668-7361 GIRLS CLOTHES and shoes sz. 6-10, $60 for the bag. 668-3924 HOUSE PLANTS, spider plants, Norfolk pine, umbrella plants, 4ʼ lipstick vine. $5 to $45. 660-4321 SNOWBLOWER, OLDER Sears model, 24” wide. $200 obo. 633-4215 ELECTRIC SNOWTHROWER, 20” wide, used twice, works well. $150. 633-4215 FRAMING COIL air gun Stanley Bostitch. $80. 633-4302 KENMORE ELEGANCE Canister Vacuum, $20.00, 668-5882 8 GALLON compressor, Campbell & Hausfeld; with all attachments. $125.00. 393-2545 TEMRO IN-LINE engine water-heater. New $20. 633-4302 KEROSENE MASTER heater, 150,000 BTUs, $200. Two 20-litre pails #1 kerosene. $60. 633-2212 BLAZE KING wood heater, 11 years old, perfect shape with new catalytic combustor. $1,000 obo. Call 335-2223, no texts. HANDMADE, COLOURFUL Oriental carpets, new. $230-$330. 335-8964


FULL LENGTH coat, down, Landʼs End. Wmnʼs med., $125. Menʼs med. down jacket, $30. 311B Hanson St. SNOW JOE electric snow thrower, 17”, 13 amp. Like new. $120.00. 668-6079 SAMSUNG GALAXY GT155i0M, slider cell phone, unlocked, good for pay as you go, 1 year old, hardly used ,excellent condition. Only want unlocking fee of $80.00. 333-0019 250 GAL. water tank in new condit. $450. 633-2156 DOUGLAS FIR bridge timbers, reclaimed, recently cut to 4.5”18”x20ʼ, $700 ea. or $1,300 for both. 334-2121 TO GIVE away, karate books, including Beat Karate series and more. Jeanne, 668- 2506

KINDLE DX international version with 9.7-inch E Ink screen. Has support for International 3G Wireless c/w 300 books. Includes Kindle DX Leather Cover. $350.  667-4527 M-AUDIO FIREWIRE 18/14 Professional Computer Recording Interface, 8x4 analog I/O, up to 24-bit/96kHz. Check features on Internet. Paid $650, asking $200. 667-2196

Musical Instruments We will buy your musical instrument or lend you money against it. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS

À LA RECHERCHE D’UN EMPLOI?

EXPRESSO MACHINE, Nueva Simonelli, Optima, 2 group, in excellent working condition, coffee shop size. Asking $600. 335-0448 METAL DOME garage 16ʼ x 20ʼ. Currently erect but will be taken down. For viewing contact 334-4134

SPILSBURY & Tindall 2-way radio SBX 11 with aerial, exc. shape. $600. 332-6565

Des professionnels engagés Conseils en développement de carrière Création, amélioration et traduction de CV

Des services personnalisés et des ressources utiles.

Electrical Appliances KENMORE DRYER, front loader, works great, $300. Also nw pump out of Kenmore washer, $40. 332-7797 SEARS BEST refrigerator, $200. 633-2580 eves FREE WASHER, 1998 Maytag Neptune, front-loading washing machine, works but door doesn't lock so no spin cycle. Perhaps new mother board required at cost of $300. 333-0510. KENMORE AUTOMATIC front load washing machine, 1 yr. old, & old commercial clothes dryer - both for $400, can be split up. 633-2837 40 GAL. hot water tank, working condit. 633-2837. LAUNDRY PAIR. Regular, top loading washer and propane dryer. Both work fine. Kenmore brand. $100. Call 393-2929 STAINLESS STEEL fridge, $350. 633-5283 KENMORE DRYER, extra capacity, $100. 633-2837

TVs & Stereos Paying cash for good quality modern electronics. G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS 55” SAMSUNG color TV c/w Panasonic DVD & Sound Surround. $250 obo. 668-7848

Computers & Accessories 2 COMPUTER desks, new. 668-7848.

$25 ea.

P53 500 GB HDD (hard drive) with GTA 5, $150. 334-0586 HP PAVILION ZE2000 14.3" x 11.2" x 1.2" Excellent condition.  $150.  667- 4527 OKIDATA MICROLINE 390 Plus 24 pin printer. $50.00. 668-6079

WOOD FOR sale. Call 334-8999.

Selkirk First Nation

P.O. Box 40, Pelly Crossing, YT Y0B 1P0 Phone: 867-537-3060 Fax: 867-537-3075

Closing Date: November 5, 2013 Éducation

Direction de l’enseignement postsecondaire

CENTRE DE LA FRANCOPHONIE 302, rue Strickland, Whitehorse (Yukon) 867.668.2663 poste 223 www.sofa-yukon.ca

79 ACTION DVDs, twice played. $75 firm. 668-2011

SENTINEL WOOD stove chimney pipe, 7 lengths like-new 36", for 6" stovepipe; for 10" opening. Very good condition; original boxes. 668-3441.

ANTIQUE ORGAN to give away. For more info 335-0566.

Qualifications • Accounting or Finance Diploma or successful completion of a minimum four years Post-Secondary education in Accounting. Equivalencies may be accepted at the recommendation of the Director of Finance. • Knowledge of accounting principles and practices in relationship to internal auditing, annual external auditing, financial reporting and financial controls. • Must be willing to enroll in the CAFM program. • Knowledge of QuickBooks will be considered an asset.

Simulation d’entrevue

CIVIL WAR Trading Cards: 4 complete sets of unique trading cards commemorating the U.S. Civil War, including the 1962 Topps set. $750 firm. Call 633-3154

WALL TENT, 14ʼx16ʼ, new with poles and tarp, $1,950. 456-7112

FIREWOOD $250 per cord Cut to length 4-cord load 667-6185

VIOLIN - brand new, full sized. C/w case and rosin - bow not included - $150. 393-4355

Job Summary Reporting to the Director of Finance, the Finance Manager is responsible for the management of the day to day monitoring and internal auditing functions of all accounting operations, functions, records and transactions relating to all Selkirk First Nation Departments and Programs.

100ʼ OF 3/4” cable with end loops. $300. 332-6565

JAZZY WHEEL Chair, electric, not used in 4 years, serviced before stored, might need battery. $10,000 new, asking $1,200 obo. 667-4395

Firewood

Finance Manager

ONE PAIR of menʼs dark brown Carhart overalls, size 36. $50. 335 -  6314

ANTIQUE ROUND wooden butter churn, as is, $95. 668-7839

PIANO TUNING & REPAIR by certified piano technician Call Barry Kitchen @ 633-5191 email:bfkitchen@hotmail.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

ARCTIC HOT TUB cover for large hot tub. Blue, 7'4" x 7'4". Used 1 yr. Mint condition. $500.00 obo. 667-4910 STEEL BUILDING - THE GREAT SUPER SALE! 20X20 $4,070. 25X26 $4,879. 30X32 $6,695. 32X40 $8,374. 35X38 $9,540. 40X50 $12,900. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

67

Yukon News

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Instructor, Skills for Employment Ecotourism Program

School of Academic and Skill Development Ayamdigut (Whitehorse) Campus Term Position from: January 20, 2014 to May 30, 2014 Hourly Rate: $36.40 to $43.33 (Based on 75 hours bi-weekly) Initial Review Date: November 4, 2013 Competition No.: 13.139 Yukon College is seeking an innovative individual to join the School of Academic and Skill Development (ASD) to instruct in the Skills for Employment program. The successful candidate will be responsible for planning, organizing, and instructing an introduction to Ecotourism program. The ideal candidate will have an education degree or a related post-secondary degree, preferably at the graduate level with experience in program development and extensive instructional experience in teaching essential and employability skills in an adult education environment. The successful candidate will also have knowledge of the ecotourism industry in the Yukon, experience working with Yukon First Nation, and be comfortable teaching and working in the outdoors. We are looking for applicants who enjoy working in a student-centered environment and being part of a dynamic team. Candidates with an acceptable combination of education, training and experience may also be considered. For additional information please contact: Colleen Stevenson, Chair, School of Academic and Skill Development Email:cstevenson@yukoncollege.yk.ca Phone: (867)456-8608 If you are interested, please send your resume to: Human Resource Services Yukon College, Box 2799 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax #: (867) 668-8896 e-mail: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon,Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

For additional information please contact John Igbokwe provide your resume and cover letter in confidence to: John Igbokwe by Email: financedirector@selkirkfn.com

EmploymEnt opportunity

Utilities Manager Capital Department Permanent – Full Time Salary range: $60,656 -$72,787 Qualifications: High school graduation followed by several years’ postsecondary education in water distribution, waste water collection and treatment systems; Certification in the operation of water distribution, water treatment and waste water treatment systems; Certification in gas chlorination is desirable; Training and/or experience in staff supervision and general management; Experience in participating in negotiations; WHIMIS; Valid Class 3 Yukon Driver’s License; Criminal Record Check. Main Duties: Reporting to Capital Director, this position will be responsible for the following: • Manages the Utilities unit of the Little Salmon Carmacks First Nation • Oversees and/or leads the operation, monitoring and maintenance of water, sewage and electrical systems • Oversees the operation and maintenance of basic laboratory services for the testing and monitoring of environmental systems. • Provides technical support to the Capital Works department for environmental related tasks • Supervises the daily work of Utilities staff and other personnel assigned by the Capital Director including preparation of work plans, supervision of work, resolving performance issues and on-going training of personnel. • Assist the Capital Director as needed: Keep daily record of Utilities employee time sheets; participate in department budget development and management • Perform other related duties such as: operate water truck and acts as back-up sewer truck operator when required; participate in meetings relevant to the operations of the department; attend training, and workshops to upgrade skills; respond to emergencies. LSCFN preferential hire will apply. If you are interested, please submit your expression of interest along with your resume by 4:30P.M. November 8, 2013 to: Doris Caouette, Human Resource Officer Little Salmon Carmacks First Nation PO Box 135, Carmacks Y.T. Y0B 1C0 Phone: (867)863-5576 ext 280 Fax: (867)863-5710 Email: resume@lscfn.ca WHILE LSCFN THANK ALL APPLICANTS, ONLY THOSE CANDIDATES SELECTED FOR AN INTERVIEW WILL bE CONTACTED. PLEASE CONTACT US IF YOU REqUIRE A jOb DESCRIPTION.


68

Yukon News

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

FIREWOOD FOR SALE 20-cord orders Big or small tree length Logging truck loads $150/cord Delivered to Whitehorse Call Clayton: 335-0894

Advertising Sales Representative The Yukon News, a twice-weekly award-winning newspaper has an outstanding opportunity for a full-time sales person. The successful candidate will have a university or college education or two years of sales experience – preferably in the advertising or retail industry. The ability to build relationships with clients and offer superior customer service is a must. The winning candidate will be a team player and will also be called upon to grow the account list with an aggressive cold calling mandate. The ability to work in an extremely fast paced environment with a positive attitude is a must. We offer a great working environment with a competitive base salary coupled with a strong benefit package. Black Press has more than 170 community newspapers across Canada and the United States and for the proven candidate the opportunities are endless. Please submit your resume with a cover letter by Friday, November 8, 2013 to: Mike Thomas Publisher, Yukon News, 211 Wood Street, Whitehorse, Y.T. Y1A 2E4 or email to mthomas@yukon-news.com No phone calls please.

www.blackpress.ca

EVF FUELWOOD ENT Year Round Delivery • Dry accurate cords • Clean shavings available • VISA/M.C. accepted Member of Yukon Wood Producers Association Costs will rise. ORDER NOW 456-7432

HURLBURT ENTERPRISES $250 per cord We have wood. You-cut available. Discount for larger quantities. PROMPT Scheduled Delivery Visa, M/C, Check, Cash Dev Hurlburt 335-5192 • 335-5193 FIREWOOD: $170.00 per cord 20 ft. logs 5 cord loads. Small delivery charge. 867-668-6564 Leave message

DIMOK TIMBER 6 cord or 22 cord loads of firewood logs. Call 634-2311 1ST QUALITY heating wood, season-dried over 3-yrs., to be picked up on Levich Drive in Mt. Sima industrial subdivision. Complete info at 335-0100.

Duke’s Firewood Standing dry Beetle Killed Spruce taKing orderS for fall deliverieS

This government’s bureaucratic overkill (3 public consultations to harvest dead trees) and the incompetency of the Forestry Management Board to administer the Forest Resources Act to issue an extension to a present permit (that I had applied for November, 2012 to give me a supply until freeze-up) pushes the price of firewood up. The price is so high, many Yukoners are choosing to burn fossil fuels instead. For every 4.7 cords of carbon-neutral wood burned, the equivalent fossil-fuel sourced heat adds 5.4 tonnes of CO2 to the atmosphere. YTG could reduce its carbon footprint by 50,000 tonnes per year by using the 100,000 m3 of dead trees for its energy needs from the Haines Junction area. History has proven time and again the area will burn up in wildfires. Harvesting these trees may save Haines Junction from burning up with the 350,000 hectares of dead trees.

Wood Prices are: $240/cord for a 6-cord load $260/cord for multiples of 2 cords • Cut your own at $95/cord 20-cord truckload logs $155/cord

caSh and deBit accepted

334-8122

www.yukonnews.com

www.yukoncollege.yk.ca

Employment Opportunity

Providing leadership through our strengths in programming, services and research, Yukon College’s main campus in Whitehorse and 12 community campuses cover the territory. A small college, YC provides a stimulating and collegial environment. We work with Yukon communities, Yukon First Nations, local governments, business and industry, to promote a community of learners within a vibrant organization. Come join us as we continue to enhance the Yukon’s capacity through education and training.

Be part of one of Canada’s most dynamic environmental and socioeconomic assessment processes and work with an energetic, progressive organization. We are committed to the well-being of our employees and encourage their personal and professional development. We are an impartial, effective and efficient organization that provides assistance to all involved in the assessment process.

ASSESSMENT OFFICER Mayo Designated Office Full-time, Permanent

Located in Mayo, this position reports to the Manager, Designated Office and is responsible for assisting in conducting environmental and socio-economic assessment of projects. This includes identifying project effects and mitigation measures for adverse effects, determining the significance of any residual effects and developing recommendations. The annual salary range for this position is $64,540 - $74,410 based on 75 hours biweekly. If you feel you have the qualifications and desire to meet the challenges of this position please forward a cover letter and resume outlining how your experience and qualifications relate directly to the position. A job description is available at the Mayo Designated Office, 308 – 1st Avenue in Mayo, YESAB Head Office, Suite 200 – 309 Strickland Street in Whitehorse or on our website at www.yesab.ca. Please submit applications to: Finance and Administration Manager, YESAB Suite 200 – 309 Strickland Street, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2J9 Ph: 867.668.6420 Fax: 867.668.6425 or email to yesab@yesab.ca Toll free: 1.866.322.4040 Resumes must be received by November 3, 2013.

Executive Assistant

Confidential Excluded Position

Term Position From: January 02, 2014 to March 13, 2015 Salary: $49,111 to $61,379 per annum (Based on 75 hours bi-weekly) Competition No.: 13.143 Initial Review Date: November 8, 2013 This position is responsible for assisting the President’s Executive Assistant in providing and monitoring a broad range of support services, primarily administrative and often of a confidential nature for the President’s office. Duties include the following: greeting, assisting and directing enquiries, arranging and attending meetings, preparing minutes, distributing mail; word-processing a variety of reports and correspondence, and performing duties in support of the President’s Executive Assistant. We are looking for an individual who has completed administrative courses at a post-secondary level and has related front-line office experience. Applicants must clearly demonstrate their ability to multi-task various office procedures including: word-processing, desktop publishing (using Microsoft Word, Excel and Adobe Pro); minute taking; basic bookkeeping skills; and the ability to provide quality front-line customer service in a cross-cultural environment. If you are interested, please send your resume to: Human Resource Services Yukon College, Box 2799 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax #: (867) 668-8896 e-mail: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca Go to: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/about/employment for more information on all job competitions. Quoting the competition number, please submit your resume and cover letter to: Yukon College, Human Resources Services, Box 2799, 500 College Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5K4 Fax: 867-668-8896 Email: hr@yukoncollege.yk.ca

DONʼS FIREWOOD Prompt daily deliveries Commercially harvested beetle kill Social Services & Kwanlin Dun Price as of October 1st: $265 per cord 393-4397

2013-2014 winter’s Coming!

Do you have your

FirewooD? $280/cord delivered. Rounds cut to stove length. Prompt, timely Deliveries. Emergency Orders.

667-7674 or 334-8106 10 cords 3ʼ furnace wood, $1,350 picked up. 16” firewood delivered in Haines Jct, $160/cord “The Tree Huggers Woodchopper” “Earth first, weʼll FireSmart the other planets later” 336-4976 WOODPILE, 15”X19” bucked up, $40 face cord, $150 full cord. Wolf Creek. You pick up. 335-2921 FIREWOOD FOR SALE Donʼt delay - Get your wood today $250/16” cord $220/4ʼ cord $200/8ʼ cord Large dry timber from Haines Junction Delivered 336-2013

Guns & Bows Case cutlery, high quality hand-crafted pocket and hunting knives available at G&R Pawnbrokers 1612-D Centennial St. 393-2274 BUY • SELL • LOANS SKULL CLEANING European mounts using Dismasted beetles From a mouse to a moose Very reasonable rates 335-2034 LEE ENFIELD No 1 Mk 3, 303 British, 10-rd mag, sporterized wood, vg bore, military sights, steel scope rings mounted, $300,or $360 with 3-9x40mm scope mounted. PAL req'd, 667-2276 WINCHESTER MODEL 70 rifle, good condit. Cal. .375 HH Mag., 24” bbl., Weaver 6X scope, sling, 9 boxes ammo. Reloading dies. Some brass & bullets. $800. 821-3431 WINCHESTER MODEL 61 in .22 mag. cal., 24” round bbl., 4X scope, good condit. 4 boxes ammo. High collector interest, great gun. 821-3431 BRAZILIAN MAUSER in 8mm Mauser, hand made hardwood stock, bedded and floated, recent refinish of whole rifle, inexpensive scope already mounted, $350, PAL req'd, 667-2276 FIREARMS SAFETY course, Nov. 2 & 3, non-restricted course at Whitehorse Gun Club. 633-2488 or 333-5640 for more info. STOCK AND barreled action of a Cooey model 710 (exact copy of a Winchester model 70). Both for $65.00. 393-2545 ROSSI .22 pump, breaks down for trapline, with custom case. $200. Remington Nylon 77 semi-auto .22 in great shape, accurate. $150. Licence must be presented. 667-6563. WANTED, RUGER 10/22 and/or Ruger .223 (Mini 14). Have the licence. George, 667-6563 RUGER M77 Hawkeye, 300 Win. Mag. All Weather, mint condition, incl. mounted 3-9x40mm VX-1Leupold scope, Plano Gun Boot, cleaning kit, Nosler Custom ammo. Firearm license required. $1,000. 335-1093 1000FPS AIRGUN - Ruger Blackhawk, .177 caliber, mint condition, incl. mounted 4x32 Walther – scope, pellet trap, targets and pellets. Firearm license required. $80. 335 1093

Wanted WANTED - free meat, bones suitable for dogs. 399-3920 WANTED: FREIGHTER Canoe. 633-4322.


WANTED AT least 15 feet of snow fence phone 334-6265 BEADED 633-3392.

CURTAIN in good condition.

PARENTS IN Haines Junction: interested in French immersion family day home for your kids? emitwed@hotmail.com HOTWHEELS TRACK FOR 3 year old. Has lots of cars but no track.  Any condition is fine. Email bvj003@gmail.com WANTED, ELECTRIC stove in good working order for house, cheap would be good, free would be better. Will pick up.  Christina @ 633-6060 WANTED: NON-WORKING bar refrigerator approx 36" H  X 23" D  X 24" W. 633-5575 MID-90S DODGE Caravan. 633-2837

2006 INFINITI G35X Luxury Sport sedan V6 AWD, sporty handling, great safety features, 143,000 km., silver, fully loaded power everything, sun roof, all-leather interior, two sets tires. $14,900, 668-5790. 2004 HONDA CR-V for sale, silver. 140,000kms, auto. C/w command start, power windows, power locks. Removable roof rack, new windshield. Seats five. Asking $8,500. 333-0503 2004 VOLKSWAGEN Jetta, low kms., winter tires & rims, heated seats, good condit. $7,900 obo. 335-0022 2002 CAMRY SE, 4 dr, manual trans, 4 cyl, $6,250. 334-3160 or 633-3116 2002 CHRYSLER Concorde 117,000 km., all options, leather, cd, runs great, just serviced. $4,200 obo. 335-2387

Cars

2002 PONTIAC Sunfire, clean, new Michelin tires, c/w mehanical inspection, super sound system, 60,000 kms. 660-5545

Certified

2002 SATURN Ion. Transmission needs work. Brand nw studded tires used 3 mos. New motor. Low mileage. $800 obo. 336-1966

used vehicles

1990 CADILLAC Eldorado Biarritz (2-dr. sports), 50,000 miles, all options, loaded. $6,600. 667-7777.

2008 FORD Superduty diesel quad cab, headache rack, driving lights, 169,000 km., good condit. $21,900 obo. 335-9596

2007 CHEV LS 2500 HD Crew Cab 4X4. Many options, trailer tow, fully serviced, new brakes & battery. $16,500 obo. 633-4311

1986 TOYOTA Camry, 205,000kms, owner, $450 obo. 668-2857

2008 GMC 2500 HD Duramax diesel. 4WD. Fully loaded, gd tires, headache rack, dry box. $18,000 obo or trades considered. 399-3014

2006 DODGE Dakota 4x4 w/160,000km. Great condition. Moving, must sell. $8,500 obo. 334-8549

1998 TOYOTA Corolla VE, 185,000kms, good condition, newly inspected. $1,800. Downtown Whitehorse. Call 335-1081

www.drivingforce.ca

2012 CHEVROLET Orlando, 4D wagon, excellent condition, 11,000 km, asking $23,000. 907-973-2026 or 867-335-9522 2009 SUBARU Impreza sedan, std, 4-door, 65,000km, exc cond. $12,700 obo. 660-5212 2009 SUBARU Impreza WRX. High performance clutch, excellent condition only 26,000 kms. 2nd set of tires, sunroof, remote/keyless start.  $28,000. 660-5505. 2008 SUZUKI GSX-R 750, mint condit, 4,500 kms. Clean title, no accidents. $8,000 obo or trade for travel trailer or pick-up. 335-1106 2007 DODGE Caliber, like new, 126,000 km, standard. C/w extra tires, stereo system, tow pkg, garage door opener. $10,000 obo. 456-4112 or 333-0236 2007 HONDA Civic EX, 24,000 km. C/w power moonroof, A/C, telescopic steering wheel, power windows, 4-wheel disc brakes, excellent condition. $12,000. 335-0515 2007 NISSAN Versa SL hatchback, great condit, 85,000 kms, c/w remoter starter, winter rims & tires, alloy wheels & summer tires  $8,900. Matt  667-4394 or txt 332-8282 2007 SUBARU Forester; standard transmission; new struts this year; dealer-serviced; 134,000 km; in great condition.  $12,900. Call 660-5212 2007 TOYOTA Highlander SUV, AWD, command start, extra set winter tires, tow package, approx 128,000kms, $16,000. 332-4143

1994 DODGE Caravan, seats up to 7, nearly new all-season tires, rust on driver's door, burns some oil but runs fine. $1,200 obo. 334-4340 1992 CROWN Vic. LX 104,000 km., never winter driven, all power options, super clean car. $2,500 obo. 335-3868

1982 VW Rabbit, passed mechanical inspection. $1,800. 821-3364 1976 TRANS Am, 400 cu. “ motor, great. Taking bids. 334-3493 CLASSIC 1979 Cadillac Coupe De ville, V8,Auto Trans ,Sun Roof and much more, priced to sell, Call 668-1477 COLLECTOR. 1976 Mercedes Benz 300D, 214,000 Miles, all original and everything works incl. A/C. Small surface rust , perfect for restoration Is in Watson Lake. Call 778-212-0798

Trucks

We Sell Trucks! 1-866-269-2783 • 9039 Quartz Rd. • Fraserway.com

2011 CHEVY Silverado 1-ton diesel 40,000 km, crew cab, command start, still under warranty. Paid $59,000, asking $39,000. 456-7157 2011 TOYOTA Sienna Minivan, 21,000 km. 7-passenger. Bought new last yr. Excellent condit. $26,000 obo. 667-2715 2010 FORD Ranger Sport. 2WD. Extended Cab. Manual Transmission. Less than 13,000km. Redfire Metallic. Tonneau Cover. Perfect Condition. $12,000. 456-7830.

1991 SENTRA Classic . Still in use, selling for parts. 190,000 kms on engine, runs well. Can deliver. 821-2938

2009 FORD Ranger XCab 4x4, 6 cyl, 5-sp. std. power options, matching canopy, towing pkg., much more, 14,600 kms. $19,900. 668-1477

1988 TOYOTA Corolla SR5 for parts. Still runs well, body not good. $500. 668-6095

2007 NISSAN Titan, 160,000 km. $12,000 obo. Must sell ASAP. 780-222-2903

FOR SALE

online at

1994 BUICK Roadmaster Limited, all power options,148,000 km. Near spotless condition, nice cruising, auto. $3,500 obo. 335-3868

1

1983 TOYOTA Supra, 2 door, standard, rear wheel drive, newly re-built engine, c/w custom body kit and box of spare parts. $4,500 obo. 334-6816

2001 CHEV. Cavalier, auto, engine blown, new front tires, interior & body fine, many good parts. $500. Leave message 393-3165.

1991 FORD Escort for parts. 668-3924

69

Yukon News

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

2008 TOYOTA Tacoma 4x4, double cab, fully loaded, tow package, new times, brakes windshield, tinted windows, tonneau cover, exc. condit. $20,500 obo. 336-0569 2008 TOYOTA Tacoma TRD Sport, double cab, 4-W drive, air cond., 6 cyl, locks, AM/FM, custom canopy, mint condit. 98,000 km. $25,000 obo. 633-3939 2005 DODGE 1500 quad cab 4x4, v/8 auto, cruise tilt, a/c, p/s, p/b, $6,800. 667-7777

2006 F-250 Superduty 4X4, 5.4L, 147,000 kms, 8' box w/liner & canopy, tow pkg, summer/winter rims/tires, new windshield, extʼd warranty. $15,900. 335-0277 2006 FORD Ranger 4.0L V6, 4x4, extʼd cab, standard trans. Bed mat, front & rear receiver hitch, 105,000kms, $9,200 obo. 668-4836 2005 F150 Super Crew, loaded, leather int, FX4, sun roof, 135,000kms, black, $17,800. 334-3160 or 633-3116

Employment Central

“Your Job Search Headquarters”

Our knowledgeable staff staff will assist youyou with: Our knowledgeable will assist with: ✓ Job search —counselling, job board, referrals Job search — counselling, job board, referrals ✓ Interview practice Interview practice ✓ Resume and cover letter assistance Resume and letter phone assistance  ✓ Computer use,cover internet, and fax ✓ Ask about our Hire” program Computer use,“Ready internet,tophone and fax Suite202 202-204 -204Black Black Street Suite Street Whitehorse,Yukon YukonY1A Y1A 2M9 Whitehorse, 2M9 Website:www.employmentyukon.ca www.employmentyukon.ca Website:

Ph: (867) 393-8270 (867) 393 -8270 Facsimile: (867)393-8278 393-8278 Facsimile: (867) Email: ec@northwestel.net Email: ec@northwestel.net Education

Advanced Education

Sport Yukon invites applications for the volunteer position of

1999 GMC Sierra

½ Ton, 4x4, V/8, Auto, Cruise Tilt, A/C, Custom Bumper c/w Winch driving lights

$6,3000

2005 DoDGe 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 ,V/8, Auto, Cruise Tilt , A/C , P/S , P/B

$6,8000

667-7777

Fast, hassle-free

payday loans

Get up to $1,500 …in cash! Open 7 Days A Week Whitehorse Money Mart 2190 second avenue (867) 668-6930

MISSION STAFF

for Team Yukon aT The 2014 arcTic WinTer Games being held March 15-22, 2014 in Fairbanks, Alaska. As enthusiastic, experienced volunteers, you will help in leading Yukon athletes toward the experience of a lifetime at the circumpolar north’s premier multi-sport event. If you are interested in being considered for this special opportunity, please review the responsibilities and application process at www.sportyukon.com All applications and letters of support must be received by FridAY, NoveMber 8th, 2013 – 4:00 p.M. to Tracey Bilsky – Executive Director, at Sport Yukon, 4061-4th Ave, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 1H1, Fax 867-667-4237, email tbilsky@sportyukon.com

YUKON LEGAL SERVICES SOCIETY

STAFF LAWYER Poverty Law Services Yukon LegaL ServiceS SocietY (Legal aid) is seeking a lawyer to join our inhouse team of staff counsel. The ideal candidate will have experience in criminal law, matrimonial, child protection, and mental health law. The successful applicant will be responsible for providing representation to clients referred to them by Legal Aid with a focus on non-criminal matters. Applicants must be a member in good standing of a Bar in Canada and must be eligible for call to the Yukon Bar. Salary is commensurate with experience. An attractive benefits package and pension plan is offered. Yukon Legal Services Society reserves the right not to fill this posting if a suitable candidate is not identified by the Yukon Legal Services Society Personnel Committee. Please apply to: Yukon Legal Services Society Administration Office Attention: Shannon Rhames 203-2131 Second Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 1C3 Email: srhames@legalaid.yk.ca | Fax: (867) 667-8649 application Deadline: november 8, 2013 at 4:30 p.m.


70

Yukon News

2005 NISSAN Frontier, extʼd cab, 4WD, automatic, 159,000kms, new windshield, newer tires, brakes, wheel-bearings, serviced regularly, $8,000 obo. 667-2607

2003 DODGE Cummins 3/4 ton 4x4 long box roll. Over 130k, parting out or complete truck for $ 7,000. Ross 332-3293 or Ben 334-2992

2002 CHEVY 2500 HD. Great winter tires on, toolbox, winch, set of summer tires. $6,000 obo. 336-1022

2004 CHEV Silverado, 240,000 kms, rebuilt motor, 2x4, needs a starter and a bit of work, good runner. $2,700. 335-7556

2003 FORD Ranger p/u, 200,000kms, 1 cyl blown, gd set of winter tires, $1,000. 334-6092

2004 GMC 2500 HD 4x4 cab, long box, c/w remote start, trailer tow pkg, aluminum liner/toolbox, fully serviced, new battery & tires. 633-4311

2003 TOYOTA Tacoma. V6, standard, 161,000 km. Box liner/block heater/matching canopy/winter tires (1 season)/tow hitch. Nice truck, well maintained.  $12,500. 333-0346.

2002 F150 SuperCrew XLT 4x4 245K, great shape, runs perfect, c/w A/C, cruise, power windows, locks, auto, lifted, touchscreen stereo/DVD player. Must sell - leaving town. $8,500 obo. 335-0305

2003 CHEV extended cab, short box, 4WD, Durmax deisel, most options. 211,000 kms. $11,000 obo. 399-3014 1992 FORD F150 wood truck, short box, runs well, good rubber. $800. 821-3431

2002 CHEVROLET Venture mini van, seats 7, c/w auto start, keyless entry, tinted windows, recent new front tires. Good shape. $2,800 obo. 333-0747

Pet Report Hours of operation for tHe sHelter: Tues - Fri: 12:00pm-7:00pm • Sat 10:00am-6:00pm CloSed Sundays & Mondays

633-6019 FRiDay, oCtoBeR 25

2013

Help control the pet overpopulation problem

have your pets spayed or neutered. FoR inFoRmation CaLL

633-6019

lost/found lost • Barnoff trailer Ct, small black dog with white on the chest, male, no collar answers to Rowdy, contact Freda @3343288 (15/10/13). • Porter Creek black and brown shepherd, male answers to Kato, contact Ben @ 335-7241 (09/10/13). • marsh lake, neutered male, brown and white tabby, no collar, answers Gandalf contact Laurence @ 335-5255. (16/10/13). • mcintyre female blonde puppy bright green collar anwsers to Grizzly contact Deloris @ 335-7311. (19/10/13).

found • Found out at mcCrea a black and grey dog with boxer type face has a collar but no tags contact Lori @ 633-3218.(05/10/13) • Found in Riverdale area on grey mountain school road the dog is a medium size with brown head with white body and darker brown spots, contact Puneet @334-2955. ( 17/10/13) • Found on the millenium trail in Riverdale area GSDX male black collar no tags, contact alex @ 633-4774, 456-6197. ( 23/10/13).

RunninG At lARGE...If you have lost a pet, remember to check with City Bylaw: 668-8382

AVAilABlE foR Adoption in fostER HoMEs doGs • 11 mos old, spayed female, RetrieverX, tan (Jewel) • 1 yr old, neutered male, Husky, black and white (Copper) • 2 yr old, neutered male, Husky, grey and white (Jake)

• 2 yr old, neutered male, husky/GSDx, black and tan (Spaz) • 1.5yr old, neutered male, LabX, tan and white (Homer) CAts • 1.5yr old, DSH, grey and white, neutered male (Sappy)

At tHE sHEltER doGs • 5 yr old female, Lab/Pit Bull X (Gaia) • 3yr old, neutered male, akita, grey, white (a.J.) • 2 yr old, neutered male, GSDX, brown and black (muttley) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, white ( Happy) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, tan (Sleepy) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, tan (Bashful) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, white ( Grumpy) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, ( Rose) • 10 weeks old, female, Bear dog, black, (Lily) • 1 yr old, female, Bear dog, black, brown, ( Virgo) • 1 yr old, spayed female, GSDX, black, tan (Pices) • 1 yr old, female, LabX, black (Capicorn) • 1 yr old, neutered male, CorgiX brindle, (Scorpio) • 1 yr old, neutered male, Bear dog, blonde, (aries)

• 14 weeks old male, Bear dog, blonde, (Bambam) • 14 weeks old, female, Bear dog, blonde, ( annie) • 14 weeks old, female, Bear dog, blonde, (Jane) • 2 yr old male, Husky, grey white, (Jake) • 2 yr old female, LabX, blonde (Summer) • CAts • 6yr old, maine CoonX, neutered male, grey and white (tinker) • 11mos, DSH, white and black, neutered male (max)

1995 CHEV Astro van, AWD, 263,000 km, seats 8, bloc heater, battery blanket, oil pan heater, cruise, AC, trailer hitch, electric brake. Front brake issue, muffler noisy. $950. 668-5810 1995 CHEV K1500 Z71 (4x4), 5.7L v8, auto, ext cab, 225,000 kms - asking $2,200, call 393-4328, leave msg.

2002 MAZDA B-2300 pick-up truck, 4 cyl. 2.3L rear wheel drive. 150,000 km, new timing chain and set, c/w winter tires and canopy. $5,200 obo. 334-8287

1995 INTERNATIONAL bus for sale. Has Yukon and Quebec inspections. Diesel, 48 passenger, no seats, auto. Need your class 5. Winterized. $5,000 obo. (418) 560-0128

2002 Mazda B2300 p/u truck, 4 cyl., 2.3L Rear wheel drive, brand new timing chain/set & mechanical. C/w studded winter tires and canopy. $5,500 obo. 334-8287

1994 CHEV Silverado with metal Gemtop industrial canopy, auto, 2wd, 249,000 km, $3,200 obo. 334-2768

1999 GMC Sierra 1/2 ton 4/4, ext cab, v/8 auto, cruise tilt, a/c, custom bumper c/w winch, driving lights. $6,300. 667-7777. 1999 GMC Sierra 1/2 ton, 4-wheel drive. Needs approx. $500 work front end, good body condit., reliable. $4,800. 633-3860 or 336-3860. 1999 JEEP Grand Cherokee, very clean inside and out, driven daily, needs some minor repairs, good and reliable for winter, 27,0000km. 335-6648

1994 DODGE Caravan, seats up to 7, nearly new all-season tires, rust on driver's door, does burn some oil, but runs and drives fine. $1,200 obo, 334-4340 1990 FORD F250, 4-spd. manual. C/w canopy. $1,800. 456-4567 1987 TOYOTA 4Runner, 4 cyl., 4 x 4, 5-speed, A/C, BF Goodrich AT's, bush bar, trailer hitch, roof racks, good stereo. No rust. $3,750 obo. 633-4322.

1998 DODGE Dakota Sport, 4x4, std, candy apple red, new tires, front end & brakes, $6,500. 336-3566 or 393-3490

1984 FORD F250. Free. Good parts & it runs. A good fixer-upper for someone with skills. You haul it from Marsh Lake. Drew 660-4095

1995 BRONCO, 1 yr. old engine & trans, new tires, leather interior all power, remote start. $6,500 obo. 334-3582

1979 F250 4x4, reg cab, 4-spd,, 8ʼ box, body rust, engine needs rebuild, running gear & trans excel. shape. $600. 332-6565

Attention miners

Murdoch’s Gem Shop is now accepting mining gold for melt. Convenient Main Street Whitehorse drop-off location. Fast settlement - within 24 hours after receipt of goods by the refiner. Payment by direct deposit or cheque. Any lot size - small or large. CAll Troy AT

867-667-7403 for details. Gently Used

Inventory Atv’s:

2005 Arctic Cat 650 V2 Limited Edition ......................................$5,499 2009 Yamaha Big Bear 250 ..........................................................$3,499 2009 Yamaha Wolverine 450 .......................................................$4,999 2011 Yamaha Bruin 350 ...............................................................$5,499

snowmobiles: 2006 Yamaha Venture Tf 2up 2900km ........................................$3,999 2007 Yamaha Apex Gt 121" .........................................................$5,999 2007 Yamaha Vk Professional Widetrack ..................................$5,499 2008 Yamaha Phazer Mtx 144" Timbersled Suspension ..........$6,499 2009 Yamaha Phazer Rtx 121" sold ....................................................$5,499 2009 Yamaha Nytro Rtx Se 121" Sno X Edition 1275km ...........$7,999 2010 Yamaha Nytro Xtx 144" .......................................................$6,999 2010 Yamaha Nytro Mtx 162" 180hp Turbo 1800km ..................$8,999 2012 Yamaha Nytro Xtx 144" Speed Racer Edition ...................$9,999 2012 Yamaha Nytro Mtx 162" 270hp Turbo ..............................$15,999

YUKON

YAMAHA

(867) 668-2101 or 1-800-661-0430

You can also check out our award winning website at:

www.Humanesocietyyukon.ca

TRUCK BOX, black, for full-size truck, 70” length. 660-4321

Auto Parts & Accessories TRUCK CANOPIES - in stock * new Dodge long/short box * new GM long/short box * new Ford long/short box Hi-Rise & Cab Hi - several in stock View at centennialmotors.com 393-8100 TIRES! TIRES! TIRES! Seasonal Changeover Lots of good used tires–15”,16”,17”,18”,19” and 20”–lots to choose from. $25 to $150 a tire. $25 to mount and balance per tire. Call Art 334-4608 4-17” TIRES, Handkook dynaPRO ATm good shape, 265/70/17 $300. 633-4018 SEMI-RETIRED LICENSED mechanic looking for work. Gas - diesel. Have own shop. Willing to do mobile work. 456-9608 REAR DOOR hatch for 2004 Toyota Matrix, door is light grey. Surrounding parts also available. $400. 334-6087 FOUR SLIGHTLY used winter tires, 235 75 R16, c/w rims for 1991 1500 6 Bolt. $300 obo. 336-2013 2001 SUBARU Forester gas tank with all fuel lines/ pump, easy full swap, $150 obo. 334-6776 4 HANKOOK tires, P205/55 R16s. 4 tires, 1 on rim, 2 P175/70 R13s. 668-3924 4 NOKIAN 195-79/R14 snow tires for sale. $15/ea. Call 334-4625. SET OF 4 used black 16" winter rims, 5 bolt pattern,  $50 for the set    Matt 667-4394 or txt 332-8282 3 X LT235/85 R16, mud & snow 10 ply tires on 8 bolt rims - $200. 633-4311 FREE TIRES. 4 175/70R13 & 2 155/80R13, 90% tread, 2 185/60R13, summer, 70% tread. 668-3243 SET OF 4 Toyo Open Country winter tires, LT225/75R16. Excel condit, $600 obo. 668-4637 NOKIAN STUDDED 175/65R14. Brand new. 334-9406 (no text) or leave a message at 456-2239. 1 GOODYEAR Wrangler RT/S P265/75R16 tire, mounted & balanced on GM 6-bolt rim, never used. $100. 332-1670 TIRES AND Rims, 4 Tires, LT 245/70R17,  Firestone Transforce ATs 60-70% tread, 17” aluminum GMC Rims, 6 Bolt, Off of a 2008 GMC Sierra 1500, nice rims, $999. 335-0548

Pets

CLOSED FOR INVENTORY

TO GIVE away, 1 Pointer/Husky cross sled dog, dog house optional. 335-2675, no texts please.

and will re-open on Monday October 28th 2013.

Pets will be posted on the Pet Report for two weeks. Please let us know after that time if you need them re-posted.

Better Bid North Auction Vehicle Sales. 1987 Pontiac Tempest car $1,850. 2002 Pontiac Sunfire $2,750. 1997 Pontiac Grand Am $2,450. 1989 GMC 4x4 wood truck $995. 1987 Nissan Super Cab $1,800. 333-0717

CAT BED. 17 x 21 x 8 inches. Would suit small dog. New condition, not used. $15. 393-2929.

will be closed for inventory on Saturday October 26th 2013

• Homes needed for retired sled dogs. they would make excellent pets. Contact Sandra at 668-3647

1979 DODGE Power Wagon 200, PuRam, Clubcab, 4x4, V8, 6.3l, Automatic, 93,000Km, Black, Adventurer SE, tires like new, 2 Spares, 8ft Box, BC Plates. $ 2200. email: heidiwirth47@gmail.com, message: 250-483-1276.

1 KM south of Robert Service Way, Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, Y.T.

Whitehorse Motors Parts & Service Department

spECiAl

if your lost animal has been inadvertently left off the pet report or for more info on any of these animals, call 633-6019 or stop by 126 tlingit street.

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

WANTED. TWO kittens, preferably male and from the same litter. Call 633-4792. The Yukon Kennel Club is excited to announce our new course line up! We have a new Certified Training Director, Niomi Smith! Puppy Kindergarten November 2 – December 21 Tuesdays and Saturdays Building an obedience foundation, socialization, manners and more! Pre-Register for Novice Obedience starting in January 2014! Please contact Wendi @ 633-4952 www.Facebook.com/YukonKennelClub

Motorcycles & Snowmobiles TAITʼS CUSTOM TRAILER SALES 2-3-4- place snowmobile & ATV trailers Drive on Drive off 3500 lb axles by Trailtech - SWS & Featherlight CALL ANYTIME: 334-2194 www/taittrailers.com


1998 YAMAHA 600 Venture Triple, 2-up seat with handwarmers, comes with extra skis and track, trail machine, lots of power, electric & pull start, $3,200 obo. 633-4018 2005 700 Arctic Cat m7, excell cond, asking $4500, 2003 Skidoo Summit 800, good working cond, asking $3500, 1992 Skidoo Formula Plus MX, good working cond, asking $2000, 633-2602 1993 POLARIS Indy 440 snow machine, still runs, very used, to give away. Must have own way of transporting. Mike 667-4233 MID-80S POLARIS 250 Trail Boss. Runs, good tires. $350. 668-6943 TWO ARGO Conquests for sale. 863-5715 1983 GPZ 1100 parts bike, almost everything besides motor and electrical. 334-6776

TAITʼS TRAILERS www.taittrailers.com taits@northwestel.net Quality new and used Horse * Cargo * Equipment trailers For sale or rent Call Anytime 334-2194 Southern prices delivered to the Yukon UTILITY TRAILER, enclosed, 4x8. Lightweight, sturdy, 950 lb. capacity. 3 yrs. old, great shape. $2,200 obo. 333-0747 28' ENCLOSED cargo/car trailer, partly wired lights and power, ramp front and back, 200 kms. since purchased, c/w 5 mag wheels, perfect condition. $10,000 firm. 335-2223, no texts please

50" rear snowblade for 2005 and newer Polaris quad, c/w all controls and 2000lb Polaris winch quick mount and removal 700.00 obo. 633 2181

1977 TRAVEL trailer, 16ʼ, sleeps 4. C/w new tires, propane bottles, battery, water pump, vents in good shape for age. $1,800 firm. 335-7735

60” FACTORY Polaris ATV plow c/w Quick attachment. Vg shape. $400. 393-2234

TOYOTA DOLPHIN 21ʼ. C/w heat, water, stove, full bathroom. 90,000 miles. Runs great. $5,000 obo. 336-2724

3 DOUBLE-TRACK Skidoos, 2 run, 1 parts only. $1,000 for all three. 821-3001 2008 BAJA 250 Wilderness ATV for sale, ex. cond, 600 miles, camo colour. C/w owners and shop manuals. $2,600.00. 633-4656 2004 MXZ Rev 600, in awesome shape, c/w spare rebuilt 800 motor. $4,500. 335-7556 2005 POLARIS Sportsman EFI 800 four wheeler with snowplow, winch, and storage box. $5,000. 335-6314 HYDRAULIC PLOW kit for Polaris Ranger, new, $850. 633-4375

Marine

TITANIUM 5TH wheel, 24E19, new in 2004. C/w hitch, track, 2 batteries, 2x30 lb. propane, spare tire. Winterized. $20,000. 821-3431 BLUE BIRD buses. Can be driven or made into camper or storage. Has seats and storage compartment. $5,000 ea. 867-993-5937 2000 PROWLER 27.5ʼ 5th wheel, 14ʼ slide, truck & hitch pkg. avail, excellent condit. $14,200 obo. 335-0022

Coming Events ATLIN GUEST HOUSE Deluxe Lakeview Suites Sauna, Hot Tub, BBQ, Internet, Satellite TV Kayak Rentals In House Art Gallery 1-800-651-8882 Email: atlinart@yahoo.ca www.atlinguesthouse.com

2004 8ʼ Camperette, sleeps 2, inside fully renovated, not used since reno. Simple design, no plumbing or wiring, great for hunters. $1,700 obo. 335-1106 or 668-6405

ATLIN - GLACIER VIEW CABINS “your quiet get away” Cozy self contained log cabins canoes, kayaks for rent Fax/Phone 250-651-7691 e-mail sidkatours@ atlin.net www.glacierviewcabins.ca

2008 PASSPORT Ultralite trailer 28.5 ft. by Keystone. One slide, TVʼs, queen bed, all appliances. Great condition, very comfy. $18,000.00 667-2263

THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone with dementia. Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713

5TH WHEEL equipment, trailer with Beaver Tail. $3,500 obo. 336-2724

HOSPICE YUKON: Free, confidential services offering compassionate support to those facing advanced illness, death and bereavement. Visit our lending library @ 409 Jarvis M-F 11:30-3, 667-7429 www.hospiceyukon.net

CLOSED-IN CARGO trailer w/big fold-down back door & single side door. 24ʼx8.5ʼ. Like new. $4,500. 867-993-5937

PROFESSIONAL BOAT REPAIR Fiberglass Supplies Marine Accessories FAR NORTH FIBERGLASS 49D MacDonald Rd Whitehorse, Yukon 393-2467 2012 HEWESCRAFT 22ʼ hardtop, twin 115 Yamahas, used 85 hrs. 4G radar, Lowrance HD8, Garmin GPS, downriggers, Sirius stereo, life raft, Wallas heater, Rocna anchor. Asking $73,500 w/options. 668-2255

NADEN 18ʼ aluminum boat, 25 hp. Yamaha L.S. elec. start & battery, spare new prop, remote steering, EZ load trailer. $4,000. 821-3431

Heavy Equipment

9-20ʼ SEA Cans Upgrading. Various conditions. Some leakers, some in good condition. Prices range from $1,800 up to $3,000. Cans can be delivered in city limits for $150 333-0717 1998 PETERBILT HIGHWAY tractor, ready to work, $14,900. 1989 Freightliner parting out at $6,900. 30ʼ Jeep trailer $7,900. Estate sale. Sell all for $25,000 package deal. 333-0717 2002 KOBELCO 330 Excavator, 8,000 hrs, 2 buckets and ripper shank, $63,000 with the shank, 333-0192 D7E CAT dozer. Good condition with angle-tilt-blade, winch and also ripper and spare parts. $29,000,  333-0192 PORTABLE GAS powered welder/gen set. 225 amp Hobart, 17 hp. gas powered Kohler engine, excellent shape. $2,000.00 obo. 633-6502 1996 CASE 821B loader, 6,500 hrs., excellent cond, $45,000. (250) 651-7773 2 REBUILT 6” Flight pumps, $10,000 ea., 1 10” flight pump, $20,000, misc. fittings and lay flat. (250) 651-7773. R520 KUBOTA loader with bucket, forks & canopy. $50,000. 456-7112 2002 CAT 315 CL Excavator, 5,000 hrs., quick change, dig bucket, thumb, $55,000. (250) 651-7773. TECH ARMORED underground electrical cable  #000/3 wire,   $7/ft. 867-863-5715

Campers & Trailers NEW OR USED TRAILERS For Sale or Rent MACPHERSON RENTALS 117 Copper Road 633-4426

Canines & Company Puppy fundamentals & obedience Level 1 Nov. 5, Nov. 9 Canine good neighbour course Nov. 13 Professional, effective, high quality training 333-0505, 668-4368 www.facebook.com/caninesandcompany HULLANDʼS HAUNTS & Holly Craft Fair, Oct 26, 10am-3pm @ Jack Hulland Elementary School, Porter Crk. Doors open @ 9:30 for srs. with mobility issues. To book your table. 667-8496 MENTAL HEALTH Caregivers Support Group meets the third Thursday of every month, 7-9 pm, #4 Hospital Rd, main floor resource room, in Whitehorse. 667-8346. STORYTIME: AGES: 6 - 24 months & caregiver(s) until Wed Nov 27, 10:30 a.m. Whitehorse Library. Free registration necessary. Space is limited. 667-5239 LADIES AUXILIARY, R.C. Legion, Yukon Inn, Christmas Craft Fair, Nov. 2nd Saturday, 9 AM - 3 PM. First Nations and Yukon -made  arts and crafts. Bake table , raffles. info 633-4583 MAIN STREET Society Annual General Meeting to take place Tuesday November 5th at noon at the T.C. Richards Building. SNOWBOARD YUKON AGM, Thurs Nov 14, 7pm at Sport Yukon

THE FRIENDS of the Gallery AGM will be held Wednesday, November 13th, 7-8pm in the Yukon Arts Centre Green Room. New & current members welcome. Refreshments provided. IRIS FOLDED Christmas Card Classes every Thursday In October, 7-9:30pm. Contact Shannon @ 633-3883 SKI SWAP and Winter gear sale October 26, 9am-noon, Mt McIntyre Rec Centre. Winter Fair downstairs 9am-noon. Information & displays to get ready for winter. Info: 668-4477 FAMILY FUN Nights, October 25 & November 22, 6-8pm. Yukon College gym, drop-in tennis. All welcome. Free. 393-2621 LATIN DANCE classes are every Friday night. Latin Fiesta October 19th at Antoinette's restaurant. 335-0909 or salsayukon@gmail.com for info KLUANE QUILTER'S Guild, AGM, Monday, November 4th following the Pine Tree Meeting. Members welcome. WHITEHORSE S T R I N G Ensemble AGM  8pm   Thursday, November 14. (Following the weekly practice)  Hellaby Hall at Christ Church Cathedral, 4th Ave & Elliott St. (Across from RCMP). Everyone welcome. 667-4630 COFFEE HOUSE! Sat. Nov 2. Featuring: Dan Halen + Chic Callas + the Open Stage! Help set up 6pm, 7pm Open stage sign-up, 730pm show! $5 United Church Bsmt, 6th+Main, 633-4255

Earl Vincent

Young

passed away October 9, 2013 at Whitehorse General Hospital. He is survived by his two sisters and four brothers, their spouses, as well as many nieces and nephews. Most well known for his refrigeration and insulation businesses, he also touched lives through his generous support of many church projects. A Memorial Service will be held November 2, at the Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre (corner of 1st Ave. & Black St.) at 2 pm. Forms will be available at the back for donations in Vince’s honour to the Gideons or the Yukon Hospital Foundation.

PAIR OF twin 100 HP outboard motors. 821-3001.

NEW & USED EQUIPMENT For Sale Come see MACPHERSON RENTALS @ 117 Copper Rd or call 633-4426

71

Yukon News

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

13 Denver roaD in McCrae • 668-6639

Custom-cut Stone Products

HEADSTONES • KITCHENS • BUILDING STONE • AND MORE...

sid@sidrock.com

Susan Thompson Oct 1st , 1960 – Oct 25th, 2012

If tears could build a stairway And heartaches make a lane, We’d walk the path to Heaven And bring you back again. A heart of gold stopped beating, A shining smile at rest, God broke our hearts to prove He only takes the best. Our family chain is broken And nothing seems the same, But God will call us one by one and the chain will link again.

Love you forever and miss you each and every day. Love Mom and Dad, Cheryl and Wayne, Rick and Diane, Karly and Emily and all your family and friends worldwide.

Friends and customers are cordially invited to join the family in celebrating Vince’s life with refreshments following the service. We will also be showing some of his Yukon pictures from the 50s and 60s. Vince will be missed by all who knew him.

Bruce Douglas

MCLennAn Bruce McLennan born March 9 1951, died peacefully at 1pm on October 15, 2013 at the age of 62 years. Bruce battled with COPD for 6 years, living long past the doctor’s initial expectations. His distinctive laughter and friendship will be missed by all who knew him. He is survived by his long time companion Annie Remple, Ian(brother), Patricia(daughter), Jaime(nephew), Danny, Dennis, Richard, Rowena, and many other good friends who are too numerous to mention. The family would like to thank the wonderful staff at Copper Ridge, and all the other caregivers who made such a difference in Bruce’s final years. A special thanks to the Rowlands family who have been so supportive to Bruce’s family during this difficult time. No formal service will be held, but those wishiNg to remember bruce caN meet at the casaloma bar oN october 26, saturday at 2pm. a celebratioN of his life aNd scatteriNg of his ashes will be doNe iN summer 2014. all those wishiNg to atteNd the summer party should call 250-514-2757 (9-5pm) or email: trishmcleNNaN951@gmail.com


72

Yukon News

Celebration of Life

Virginia Sue Vallevand (Joe) September 16th, 1934 ~ OctOber 22nd, 2013

Service

AnglicAn church MondAy, october 28th, 2013 At 1:00pM Final resting place will be at the new Kwanlin dun First nation tágà Kwädän tth’än K’è (“river people gravesite”) on the long lake road

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013 WHITEHORSE MINOR Soccer AGM, Saturday, October 26th, 1:00 pm, Boardroom, Sport Yukon. New members welcome! Player numbers are strong, volunteer numbers not so much! Please come and help. Information 667-2445

With great sadness, we announce the passing of Barry James MacDonald on October 11, 2013 at Whitehorse General Hospital.

NEW YORK jazz duo. Alto sax & piano. Sun, Oct 27, 7:30 pm cabaret. Arts Centre. Tix yukontickets.com. YAC Box Office, Arts Underground or door.

Thank you to Dr. Larry Brehmer, Dr. Kanachowski, Dr. Majid Bakri, Linda Heasley, all the nurses and the First Nations health program staff at the Whitehorse General Hospital.

ART CONTEST. The Rotary Music Festival invites Yukon youth aged 5 to 18 to create an artwork for its program cover. Check the rules at www.rmfestival.ca. Deadline: January 15, 2014. WILDERNESS TOURISM Workshop. Business Interest? Expand opportunities? Nov. 16-17, 8:30-5:00. Vista Outdoor Learning Centre. $25. Prereg. by Nov. 8 at www.tc.gov.yk.ca/tourism. Space limited. More info rjantzen@shaw.ca

A Funeral service will be held November 1st at 2:00 pm in Whitehorse at Christ Church Cathedral Anglican, 4th Avenue & Elliott Street. Refreshments will be served after in the Hellaby Hall.

VELONORTH CYCLING CLUB'S AGM will be on November 14, 2013 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at Sport Yukon. Latin Dance - Classes are every Friday Nights at Leaping Feats Studio. Latin Fiesta October 19th at Antoinette's restaurant 8:30pm. 335-0909 or salsayukon@gmail.com for info.

A celebration of life will be held in Mayo, June of 2014, as per his request.

HILLCREST COMMUNITY Association AGM Wednesday Nov. 6, 7-9 pm at Yukon Transportation Museum. For more info call 668-2233.

Helge

please bring your favorite dish to share & join Jenny’s family & friends for a potluck reception following the internment ~ 4:00pm at the Kwanlin dün cultural centre long house.

Valdemar

Engren

For more information, please contact charlene burns at 334-4575.

March 03,1926 - October 06,2013

“Memories keep those we love close to us forever” Helge’s legacy will carry on through his 6 children, 10 grandchildren, 10 great grandchildren and his many relatives in Finland and Sweden. A private Celebration of Life was held on October 16,2013.

Heartfelt thanks to the Thomson Centre staff and Dr. Sally MacDonald for their excellent care.

Thank-you to Heritage North Funeral Home for their kind and professional service.

In Loving Memory Moved to heaven, not gone away Thoughts of you I have each day. Gone to God in that silent land, You walk with angels hand in hand.

Natasha

All our dreams and all our plans No more to do, I understand. Memories now rush my mind Up in heaven I know you are doing fine.

Tizya-Jones (Campbell)

On with life, I pray each day Some sweet time, I'll be on my way. I'll join you in heaven's land Where eternal life will be so grand!

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Mary Natasha Tizya-Jones (Campbell) known as Natasha on Tuesday October 15/13. Natasha was born May 1981 in Whitehorse, Yukon.

From your loving family... till we meet again Vern Norby October 25, 1932 – December 15, 2011 Thelma Norby August 28, 1928 – October 25, 2003 Married on December 28, 1961... now they live together forever

A beloved wife to David Jones and mother to daughters Isabella and Ava. Natasha is survived by her mother Deneen Tizya, Step-father Mark Tizya, Father Curtis Beloud along with her sisters Courtney and Brandi Tizya. Grandparents Eileen Beloud, Ethel Tizya, Marlene and Gordon Koppang, David and Eileen Beloud. Uncle Rick Campbell and Aunt Patty Campbell, cousins Dustin and Darren, Uncle Curt Campbell, Aunt Donna Chambers, cousin Rachele, Uncle Silvano Beltrame and Aunt Arla Beltrame, cousins Mia and Lucia, Uncle Gerald Lafleur and Aunt Charlene Lafleur and cousin Chanel, Aunt Fawn Lafleur along with cousins Landon, Shayna and Justin. Natasha was passionate about sports & dance particularly Salsa dancing while actively pursuing her modeling career. She would brighten any room she walked into. She had a beautiful smile along with a wonderful sense of humour. In lIeu of flowers we ask that you make a donatIon CanadIan dIabetes assoCIatIon on behalf of natasha.

to the

ONDE DE choc: a new surprise-filled evening combo concept. November 1, 7pm, at the Yukon Arts Centre: a multidisciplinary show, visual arts exhibition and culinary tasting await you. GRANDPARENTS AND extended family: Having problems with access or custody? Contact Grandparents Rights Assoc. of Yukon, meetings as needed. 821-3821 ATLIN MASQUERADE Ball (2013 Fundraiser for Atlin Volunteer Fire Department), 26 October, Rec. Centre, 7:30 pm, dance to Fishhead Stew live music tickets $18.00, reservation/info (250) 651-7669, or 2427 YUKON HEALTH Care Workers will not be having October luncheon. FREE TENNIS Family Fun Nights. Oct. 25 & Nov 22, 6-8 pm.  Yukon College gym. Bring a friend/parent/kid, have fun playing tennis. Coach and assistance available. No registration required. F.H. COLLINS School Council Regular meeting @ 6:30 p.m November 6, 2013, in the Fine Dining Room at the school. Everyone Welcome. HOSPICE WORKSHOP "LIVING with Loss" Thurs. Nov. 7, 6:30-8:30pm for anyone living with personal loss or supporting others who are grieving. Register: 667-7429, administrator@hospiceyukon.net CHRIST THE king ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Christmas Craft Fair, Saturday, November 9th, 10:00am-3:00pm. 20 Nisutlin Drive, Riverdale. Call Paula at 633-2724 to book a table or for more information. WHITEHORSE CROSS Country Ski Clubʼs annual ski swap Saturday, October 26th 9am-12pm. Equipment you want to sell can be dropped off Wednesday, Thursday or Friday evening from 6pm - 8pm.  Call 668-4477 for info. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS Craft Fair, December 8th at Lorne Mountain Community Center, reserve a table now. 667 7083 GOSPEL BRUNCH with Nicole Edwards and New Orleans buffet at LMCC, November 10th. Tickets $25.00 by reservation 667 7083, www.mountlorne.yk.net TAGISH HALLOWEEN. Family friendly party, 6:00 - 10:00 pm, Oct. 31st, Tagish Community Centre. Pumpkin carving, games, snacks, prizes, DJ, laser show by Robert Vallee! Free admission! Everyone welcome. BARA AGM - Yukon River Trail Marathon organizing committee annual meeting on Wed. Nov 6th at 5pm at Sport Yukon. New board members welcome. Snacks provided. Info yukonmarathon@gmail.com. LAKE LABERGE Lions Christmas cakes and cookies are here now.  Get yours early, please call Ann at 633-5493. COPPER RIDGE Place is looking for volunteers to share time with seniors. Please phone Catherine Chenier 393-7508. PRESENTATION/DISCUSSION: SHORELINE Erosion, Tagish Community Centre, November 7 @ 7:00 pm. Sediment Transport & potential flooding in the Southern Lakes System. Something to offer in advance? 660-4106 WRITERʼS ROUNDTABLE:  Special Guest Laurel Parry will do presentation on arts funding programs for Yukon writers & groups, Oct 29, 7:30 p.m. Whitehorse Public Library. Hosted by Yukon Public Libraries & Friends of the Library. SUZUKI STRINGS Association Yukon AGM, Nov. 18 at Riverdale Baptist Church, 4:30 pm onward. More info: Lise at 668-7659


MC RENOVATION Construction & Renovations Laminated floor, siding, decks, tiles Kitchen, Bathroom, Doors, Windows Framing, Board, Drywall, Painting Drop Ceiling, Fences No job too small Free estimates Michael 336-0468 yt.mcr@hotmail.com

THE ALZHEIMER/DEMENTIA Family Caregiver Support Group meets monthly. Group for family/friends caring for someone with Dementia. Info call Cathy 633-7337 or Joanne 668-7713.

CAROLING CHORISTERS, singers from the Whitehorse Community Choir will come to YOUR Christmas party and sing carols for 20 minutes. Nov 29, Dec 13, 14 & 20. Fundraiser. 633-4786

THOMAS FINE CARPENTRY • construction • renovation • finishing • cabinets • tiling • flooring • repairs • specialty woodwork • custom kitchens 867-633-3878 or cell 867-332-5531 thomasfinecarpentry@northwestel.net

HAMLET OF Mt. Lorne Local Advisory Council - next meeting Tuesday November 5, 7pm, LMCC. All welcome.

Services - INSULATION Upgrade your insulation & reduce your heating bills Energy North Construction Inc. (1994) for all your insulation & coating needs Cellulose & polyurethane spray foam Free estimate: 667-7414 BACKHAULS, WHITEHORSE to Alberta. Vehicles, Furniture, Personal effects etc. Daily departures, safe secure dependable transportation at affordable rates. Please call Pacific Northwest Freight Systems @ 667-2050 SHARPENING SERVICES. For all your sharpening needs - quality sharpening, fair price & good service. At corner of 6th & Strickland. 667-2988 Full Dimensional Rough Lumber Cabin Logs Staking Posts & Timbers ARCTIC INLAND BUILDING PRODUCTS Serving the Yukon for 30 years Whitehorse 668-5991 Dawson 867-993-5240 TITAN DRYWALL Taping & Textured Ceilings 27 years experience Residential or Commercial No job too small Call Dave 336-3865

ANGYʼS MASSAGE Mobile Service. Therapeutic Massage & Reflexology. Angelica Ramirez Licensed Massage Therapist. 867-335-3592 or 867-668-7724 angysmassage@hotmail.com 200-26 Azure Rd Whitehorse YT, Y1A 6E1

IF YOU own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS can lend you money: It's That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

456-4567 NEED UNDERGROUND WIRE?

NORTHRIDGE BOBCAT SERVICES • Snow Plowing • Site Prep & Backfills • Driveways • Post Hole Augering • Light Land Clearing • General Bobcat Work Fast, Friendly Service 867-335-1106

S.V.P. CARPENTRY Journey Woman Carpenter Interior/Exterior Finishing/Framing Small & Medium Jobs “Make it work and look good.” Call Susana (867) 335-5957 susanavalerap@live.com

1 2 3

Excellent friendly customer service 24-7. Located only 3 mins from downtown. Easy 24 hour access.

Call 334-3216

info@titaniumstorage.ca

railings, gates and much more

www.ironworkyukon.com call mike morrow at 335-1888

LOW COST MINI STORAGE n n n

Now 2 locations: Porter Creek & Kulan. Onsite & offsite steel containers available for rent or sale. Now an authorized UhaUl dealership for trucks, trailers, dollies & Uboxes.

Phone 633-2594 Fax 633-3915

OFFICE LOCATED BESIDE KLONDIKE WELDING, 15 MacDONALD RD., PORTER CREEK, info@lowcostministorage.ca

60 Below Snow Management

Happy 30 Wedding Anniversary to

Commercial & Residential

Stephen and Irene Kwok

Snow Removal

October 28th, 1983

Love, Your FamiLY and Friends

3 reasons why you should call

Ironwork

th

“You know you’re in love when you can’t fall asleep because reality is finally better than your dreams.” -Dr. Seuss

Do you neeD storage?

CUSTOM To make your ideas a reality.

BUSY BEAVERS Painting, Pruning Hauling, Snow Shovelling and General Labour Call Francois & Katherine 456-4755 LOG CABINS & LOG HOMES Quality custom craftsmanship Using only standing dead local timber For free estimate & consultation contact: Eldorado Log Builders Inc. phone: 867.393.2452 website: www.ykloghomes.com

BLUE HILL MASONRY • Cultured Stone • Ceramic Tile • Brick Andre Jobin 633-2286

IBEX BOBCAT SERVICES “Country Residential Snow Plowing” •Post hole augering •Light landscaping •Preps & Backfills Honest & Prompt Service Amy Iles Call 667-4981 or 334-6369

(867) 336-3570

Oct. 30 through dec. 11, 7 - 9pm Christ Church Cathedral A 7 week program through the Gospel of Mark Dessert and Coffee, DVD, Discussion,

COursE is FrEE. Phone Office to Register:

668-5530

Anonymous

MEETINGS:

Wednesdays 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. <BYTE> Fridays 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm 4071 - 4th Ave. <Many Rivers>

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Yukon Communities & Atlin, B.C.

Beaver Creek Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Carcross Y.T. Wednesday - 7:30 p.m. Library Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Carmacks Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Dawson City Y.T.

Thursday - 8:00 p.m. New Beginners Group Richard Martin Chapel Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Saturday 7:00 p.m. Community Support Centre 1233 2nd Ave.

Destruction Bay Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Faro Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Haines Junction Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Mayo Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Old Crow Y.T.

AL-ANON

Pelly Crossing Y.T.

contact 667-7142

WEdnEsday nights

Narcotics

For all your snow removal needs. No jobs too small.

MEETINGS

Christianity Explored

DRUG PROBLEM?

THE CARDBOARD Crush Scavenger Hunt is on! Find all 5 bales of cardboard, collect the facts and enter in the draw for a prize. www.ravenrecycling.org/crush. 

TAGISH CHRISTMAS Craft Sale: Call for vendors! Nov. 17th, 9:30am-12:30pm, Tagish Community Centre. $10/table. Sale during monthly Pancake Breakfast. Info: 867-399-3407

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Yukon News

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

Has your life been affected by someone’s drinking ???

WEDNESDAY

Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Ross River Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre

Tagish Y.T. Monday 7:30pm Lightwalkers Group Bishop’s Cabin, end of road along California Beach

12:00 noon Hellaby Hall, 4th & Elliott

Telegraph Creek B.C.

FRIDAY

Teslin Y.T. Wednesday - 7:00pm Wellness Centre #4 McLeary Friday - 1:30p.m. Health Centre

7:00 pm Lutheran Church Basement Beginners Mtg ( 4th & Strickland ) 8:00 pm Lutheran Church Basment Regular Mtg ( 4th & Strickland )

Tuesday - 8:00 p.m. Soaring Eagles Sewing Centre

Watson Lake Y.T. Friday - 1:30 p.m. Health Centre


74

Yukon News

HOUSECLEANER AVAILABLE Fast and thorough No criminal record 30-year Yukon resident $30/hr 335-0009

LOG CABINS: Professional Scribe Fit log buildings at affordable rates. Contact: PF Watson, Box 40187, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 6M9 668-3632

TCM MAID SERVICE Reliable, Thorough & Professional Reasonable Rates References available 335-4421or 393-3868

DROWNING IN DEBT? Cut debts more than 50% & DEBT FREE in half the time! AVOID BANKRUPTCY! Free Consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1-877-556-3500 BBB Rated A+

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS in Whitehorse

MONDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 8:00 pm New Beginnings Group (OM,NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. TUESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 7:00 pm Juste Pour Aujourd’hui 4141B - 4th Avenue. 8:00 pm Ugly Duckling Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. WEDNESDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St.. 8:00 pm Porter Crk Step Meeting (CM) Our Lady of Victory, 1607 Birch St. 8:00 pm No Puffin (CM,NS) Big Book Study Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. THURSDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Grapevine Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 6:00 pm Young People’s Meeting BYTE Office, 2-407 Ogilvie Street 7:30 pm Polar Group (OM) Seventh Day Adventist Church 1609 Birch Street (Porter Creek) FRIDAY: 12 noon Joy of Living (OM, NS) Big Book Discussion Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. 1:30 pm #4 Hospital Rd. (Resource Room) 9:00 pm Whitehorse Group (CM, NS) Maryhouse, 504 Cook St. SATURDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 2:30 pm Women’s Meeting (OM) Whitehorse General Hospital (room across from Emergency) 7:00 pm Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS) SUNDAY: 1:00 pm Sunshine Group (OM, NS) DETOX Building, 6118-6th Ave. 7:00 pm Marble Group Hospital Boardroom (OM, NS)

NS - No Smoking OM - open mixed, includes anyone CM - closed mixed, includes anyone with a desire to stop drinking

PUbLIC TENDER PRODUCE, HAUL AND STOCKPILE RIP RAP, KM 381.5 KLONDIKE HIGHWAY #2, YUKON 2013-2014

Project Description: The project consists of producing, hauling and stockpiling 1,900m³ of class II riprap plus 1,800m³ of class III riprap. The 1,800 m³ of Class III and 1,800 m³ of the Class II will be stockpiled at km 381.5 of the Klondike Highway. 100m³ of class II riprap will be stockpiled at km 342.8 Klondike Highway. This work consists of but is not limited to: drilling and blasting, excavation, producing and stockpiling 3,700 m³ of riprap and 550 m³ Filter Media Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 5, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Amin Abdullah at (867) 633-7942. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

bcyukonaa.org

PASCAL PAINTING CONTRACTOR PASCAL AND REGINE Residential - Commercial Ceilings, Walls Textures, Floors Spray work Excellent quality workmanship Free estimates pascalreginepainting@northwestel.net 633-6368 KLASSIC HANDYMAN SERVICES “HOME RENOVATION SPECIALIST” “SPECIALIZING IN BATHROOMS” Start to Finish • FLOORING • TILE • CARPENTRY • PAINTING • FENCING • DECKS “ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!! DON: 334-2699 don.brook@hotmail.com TOMBSTONE CONTRACTING Loader and dump truck services    Driveways, parking lots, concrete driveways, sidewalks and pads.    Fork lift, lifting boom    Snow haul and removal     Free quotes Call  334 2142

CITYLIGHT RENOS Flooring, tiling, custom closets Painting & trim, kitchens & bathrooms Fences & gates Landscaping & gardening Quality work at reasonable rates Free estimates Sean 867-332-1659 citylightrenos@gmail.com BOBCAT AND BACKHOE SERVICES in Whitehorse, Marsh Lake, Tagish area Call Andreas 660-4813 JOURNEYMAN CARPENTER/PAINTER 35 years experience For house repairs Renovations • Kitchens • Bathrooms Flooring • Drywall • Etc References Available Honest • Reliable • Meticulous Call Brad 335-8924 SUBARU GURU Fix•Buy•Sell Used Subarus 30 year Journeyman Mechanic Towing available Mario 333-4585

CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION Licensed, insured, WCB certified Small or big contracting Specialize in new or tiled bathroom renovation Phone David: 333-0772

ELECTRICIAN FOR all your jobs Large or small Licensed Electrician Call MACK N MACK ELECTRIC for a competitive quote! 867-332-7879

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of

VINCE YOuNg,

(Earl Vincent Young) of Whitehorse, Yukon, Deceased who died on October 9, 2013, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor at the address shown below, before the 15th day of November, 2013, after which date the Executor will distribute the Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which they have notice. AND FURTHER, all persons who are indebted to the Estate are required to make payment to the Estate at the address below. BY: Stirling Young c/o Lackowicz & Hoffman Suite 300, 204 Black Street Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2M9 Tel: (867) 668-5252 Fax: (867) 668-5251

SNOW CLEARING Sidewalks, Driveways, Commercial, Residential Call Francis at Speedy Sparkle 668-6481 or cell 334-8480 HOUSE CLEANING Services offered: 2 reliable & hard working house cleaners for hire Do floors, bathrooms, dusting, kitchens, and any extra cleaning you want done! 456-4888 or anna.r@northwestel.net SMALL ELECTRICAL JOBS Light fixtures & lamp repairs Painting in and out Basic plumbing Window washing, Yard clean-up. Small furniture repairs 393-2275 or 1-604-989-5110 ZEN SALON & SPA Menʼs, Ladies, Childrenʼs Hairstyling & Esthetics on the corner of 4th and Strickland 667-7936 Open 8am-7pm EXPERIENCED CARPENTER OFFERING: - Siding - Roofing - Framing and Renovations Free estimates and competitive rates. Call Adam 334-3416

Kitchen or Restaurant for Lease

www.aa.org

AA 867-668-5878 24 HRS A DAY

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

Highways and Public Works

PUBLIC NOTICE Yukon government gives notice of the following application to amend the Interim Whitehorse Periphery Development Area Regulations (O.I.C 1978/110):

Town and Mountain Hotel 401 Main Street Apply to Kayle Tel: 668-7644 Fax: 668-5822 Email: info@townmountain.com

EstatE salE

ARMOUR-ALL DETAILING Reliable, Professional Service 633-6855

Lost & Found FOUND: LOST Chukar Partridge in Takhini. It's safe and being fed and watered. 335-6526 FOUND: IPHONE on Schwatka Lake Rd, Oct 15. 335-4823 LOST: 1 bag with 8 rolls of 1/4” Styrofoam, 4ʼx4ʼx1ʼ btwn. Wood St. & Centennial St. 334-9872. LOST, BLUE cooler and camping gear, fell off truck on Alaska Highway btwn. Whitehorse & Rancheria. Reward for contents. Mike, 633-6603 MISSING FROM Taye Lake cabins, sheep horn on wooden plaque & small radio. 334-7671 (cell).

Business Opportunities

Looking for New Business / Clients? Advertise in The Yukon News Classifieds!

Take Advantage of our 6 month Deal... Advertise for 5 Months and

Get 1 MONTH OF FREE ADVERTISING Book Your Ad Today! T: 667-6285 • F: 668-3755 E: wordads@yukon-news.com

Sports Equipment

CERTIFIED TECH SHOP

Heat moulded skates Skate sharpening Downhill, X-ski and Snowboard repairs and maintenance Bike maintenance and repairs Fast, thorough service

The Hougen Centre, Whitehorse, Yukon

in the Hougen Centre, 305 Main St. 668-6848

2013 NEVER Summer SL 154, ridden once, c/w medium Burton Co2 bindings. Willing to sell separately. $300 obo. Call/text 867-334-3021 POWERTECH HOME gym equipment. Work bench multi system with accessories incl. leg press, curl, and dip machine. Will assist with set-up.  View equipment visit, powertech site: powertecfitness.com. $2,200. 336-1019 XC POLES, $15 pr. XC skis 160/167 $25 pr. XC boots. sz. 7/37 $25 pr. 311B Hanson Street. EXERCISE BIKE for sale. New $240. Sale $125. 456-4459

Amend the zoning to allow for construction of a guest cabin on Rural Residential (RR) parcel, Lot 1060 Quad 105D/07, LTO Plan 90-56, CLSR Plan 72810, located near Km 21 on the Carcross Road.

2008 CRF Honda 70F kidʼs dirt bike. Great condition. 456-7112

Livestock

Comments on the proposed amendment will be accepted until November 27, 2013. Comments can be mailed to EMR Land Planning Branch (K-320LP), Box 2703 Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6 or faxed to (867) 393-6340. For more information please visit online: www.emr.gov.yk.ca/lands or contact the EMR Land Planning Branch at (867) 667-3179, or toll-free 1-800-661-0408 ext. 3179.

Residential Snow Removal Competitive Rates 633-6855 Armour Lawn Care, Design & Snow Removal Reliable, Professional Service

1974 Bellanca Scout on WheelS

Skiis Available. TTAE 471 hrs. on 0-360 C2A Lycoming (180hp). Prop TTSN 109.7. TTAF 3334 Hrs. New Seats and glass 2011. Mogas STC, VGs. Useful load 830 lbs on wheels 700 lbs on floats. Great performer. View or call Justin at rodan air 667-7573 or call marilyn 333-0609.

$67,500

QUALITY YUKON MEAT Dev & Louise Hurlburt Grain-finished Hereford beef Domestic wild boar Order now for full delivery Payment plan available Samples on request 668-7218 335-5192 HORSE HAVEN HAY RANCH Dev & Louise Hurlburt Irrigated Timothy/Brome mix Small square & round bales Discounts for field pick up or delivery Straw bales also for sale 335-5192 • 668-7218 HAY FOR SALE Dry bales kept under a shelter. $12/bale astra@northwestel.net 633-4496


FARM RAISED pork available. Sold by whole pig or half. $4 per pound. 332-8996

70ʼS MAPLE swivel rocker $40. Duncan Pfife table,, $225. 311B Hanson St. after 5:00 p.m.

RIVENDELL FARM LOCAL ORGANIC VEGETABLES Beets, turnips, 5 types of potato, & rutabaga Km 6.5 Hot Springs Rd www.rivendellfarm.ca 633-6178

2 GIRLS oak desks (white) with matching bookcases for sale. $40 each obo. Call 334-4625.

PORK MEAT For Sale Sold by the half or cut & wrapped All animals are raised naturally No hormones/antibiotics YUKON VALLEY FARM 334-5384 1 12-YEAR-OLD quarter horse mare and 1 5-year-old mare, both well broke and quiet. Both are good with their feet and easy to trailer.  Asking $1,500 each.   Mandy 633-3659 FREE RANGE pork, Yukon grown, no hormones, no antibiotics, government inspected. Taking orders. 393-1939

CHILD'S DESK (pine) for sale. $30 obo. Call 334-4625 DOUBLE BOXSPRING, mattress and frame, very clean, great shape. $150.00. 334-9873 CORNER OAK entertainment stand, 32” w. 27.5” l., 2 cupboards, 2 drawers. $75 obo. 633-5324 SOLID BAMBOO counter height dining table, gently used, easy to clean, in fantastic shape. C/w 5 chairs, perfect condition. Great for adults and kids . $400 obo. 334-7306 DOUBLE FUTON in excellent condition. Pine Frame, includes mattress and cover. Asking $150 obo. 668-6904 METAL FULL size rocking chair, red, in excellent condition. $30. 668-6904

Baby & Child Items

Personals

CHILDRENʼS CLOTHING in excellent condition, given freely the first & third Saturday monthly at the Church of the Nazarene, 2111 Centennial. 633-4903

HEPATITIS C or HIV Positive? Counseling, support, advocacy, nursing & naturopathic services available free of charge at Blood Ties Four Directions Centre. 633-2437 or 1-877-333-2437. All calls confidential

INFANT CAR seat, 0-12 mon., $40. Baby swing, like new, $60. 334-7061 LARGE COSCO stroller w/canopy, $50. White Ikea baby crib, $50. 633-5427

Childcare LITTLE MUNCHKINS DAYCARE New - has openings for children ages 6-months to 4-years Great downtown location! 7:30am - 6:00pm French introduction for pre-schoolers, specialized infant room, loving & nurturing 668-2075

Furniture COUCH AND Loveseat, Green. Glass coffee and end tables.  $400 obo. Craig 633-6760. BED FRAME only, $100, with 2 mattresses, ivory, $250, coffee table with 2 matching side tables, metal frame with glass tops, $120 for set, 2 Ikea lamps, $10 ea. 393-2275 SINGLE PINE bed, 2 drawers under bed c/w bookcase, headboard, $300. 2 bedside tables, one armoire, one dresser w. mirror, solid wood. Best offer. 667-6630

CITIZENS ON PATROL. Do you have concerns in your neighborhood & community? Be part of the solution! Volunteer valuable time to the C.O.P.S. program. With your eyes & ears we can help stomp out crime. Info: RCMP 867-667-5555 ARE YOU MÉTIS? Are you registered? Would you like to be involved? There is a Yukon Metis Nation that needs your support Contact 668-6845 DRUG PROBLEM? Narcotics Anonymous meetings Wed. 7pm-8pm #2 - 407 Ogilvie St. BYTE Office FRI. 7pm-8:30pm 4071 - 4th Ave Many Rivers Office THANK YOU for saving my Doberman pup. I have your blanket. Phone me when you come to get it. Thank you again. 668-4026 MATURE GENTLEMAN, N/S, very clean, seeks N/S female for possible permanent relationship. 393-2545 or email ceberus44@yahoo.ca

23 BEECH St., Porter Creek, Saturday Oct. 26, 10am. to Noon, lots of furniture.

REqUEST FOR PROPOSALS

REqUEST fOR PROPOSAlS

SUMMATIVE EVALUATION OF COMMUNITY WELLNESS COURT

HAINES JUNCTION YUKON VEGETATION INTERPRETATION & MAPPING

Justice

48 LAZULITE, Copper Ridge, Saturday, Oct. 26, 11:00 a.m., area rug, sewing station, cabinet, bath, electronic and misc. items. 332-4455 1605 BIRCH St., Porter Creek, Saturday Oct 26, 10am - noon. Estate/garage sale. Furniture, tools, books, appliances, garden tiller, canopy, everything must be sold!!

Announcements

Whitehorse Duplicate

Bridge Club October 15, 2013

1. Mark Davey Chris Bookless

2. Andrzej JablonskiNick Smart 3. Chic Callas Noreen McGowan

Feel like a small fish in a big pond?

Project Description: To create a vegetation inventory for 1.473 million ha in the Haines Junction region and provide information in spatial digital format. Submissions clearly marked with the above project title, will be received up to and including 4:00 PM local time, November 12, 2013, at Contract Services, (867) 667-5385. Documents may be obtained from Contract Services, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6. Technical questions may be directed to Kirk Price at (867) 633-7914. Submissions will be evaluated in accordance with the criteria indicated in the documents. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission is not necessarily accepted. Visit our web site www.gov.yk.ca/tenders

Energy, Mines and Resources

REqUEST FOR PROPOSAL

PUBLIC TENDER

MAYO RIVER FLOOD CONTROL INFRASTRUCTURE - PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING SERVICES

FIRE ALARM UPGRADE ANDREW A. PHILIPSEN LAW CENTRE - BLDG.#1262 WHITEHORSE, YUKON 2013

Project Description: Provision of services for preliminary engineering design for a long-term flood control solution with supporting infrastructure at the Mayo River in Yukon Territory. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 20, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Kirn Dhillon at (867) 667-5194. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 19, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Anton Pertschy at (867) 667-3651. Site Visit October 31, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. The Yukon Business Incentive Policy will apply to this project. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Stand out from the crowd and be seen!

Advertise your business in the Yukon News.

Community Services Highways and Public Works

Phone: 867-667-6283 • Fax: 867-667-3755

Garage Sales

BUNKBEDS, NICE solid pine c/w drawers, desk, 2 clean mattresses, in great condit. $1,200 new, asking $500. 333-9966

Project Description: The Yukon Government is looking for a Contractor to develop and implement a program measurement framework and an evaluation for the Community Wellness Court. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 7, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Tanya Mackenzie at (867) 393-6229. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

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Yukon News

Friday, Ocober 25, 2013

REquEST fOR PROPOSAL ASSORTED REMEDIAL WORKS - KLONDIKE RIVER HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE CAMP

Notice of Intention The council of the Town of Faro intends to adopt a new Official Community Plan. As required by section 280 of the Municipal Act, this is notice that: A public hearing will be held on November 27, 2013 at 7:00 PM at the Town of Faro office Council Chamber respecting the adoption of the new Official Community Plan. A copy of the proposed Official Community Plan can be picked up at the Town of Faro Administration office or you can find a copy on our website: www.faroyukon.ca A copy of this notice and the proposed official community plan has been given to the Minister of Community Services and the Yukon Municipal Board.

Project Description: Planning and implementation of assorted remedial works including: drinking water well design and install, contaminated soil excavation, groundwater monitoring and other related remedial works at the Klondike River Highway Maintenance Camp. Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 19, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. Documents may be obtained from the Procurement Support Centre, Department of Highways and Public Works, Second Floor, 9010 Quartz Road, P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon (867) 667-5385. Technical questions may be directed to Ruth Hall at (867) 668-5851. The highest ranked or lowest priced submission may not necessarily be accepted. This tender is subject to Chapter Five of the Agreement on Internal Trade. Bidders are advised to review documents to determine Certificate of Recognition (COR) requirements for this project. View or download documents at: www.gov.yk.ca/tenders/tms.html

Environment

REqUEST FOR qUALIFICATIONS NORTHERN HOUSING TRUST AFFORDABLE RENTAL ACCOMMODATION YUKON Submissions must be clearly marked with the above project title. The closing date for submissions is November 19, 2013. Please refer to the procurement documents for the closing time and location. The Request for Qualifications (RFQ) is stage one of a two-stage Procurement Process. The purpose of this RFQ is to provide a fair and open process for interested parties to have their qualifications evaluated using pre-determined criteria For technical questions you may call Mary Cameron at 867-6673773. For questions regarding the proposal submission process, you may contact Sharon McCreadie, Contract Administrator at (867) 667-5796. Packages may be obtained from the Yukon Housing Corporation offices at 410 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon or by calling (867) 667-5759. The highest ranked or any submission may not necessarily be accepted. Yukon Housing Corporation now has all public tenders listed on our website at www.housing.yk.ca/tenders


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Yukon News

Friday, October 25, 2013

TRUCK SALE Virtually all mileage is “low wear” highway mileage

Most vacation rentals are for 2 people... so the back cab seats are virtually unused

All our trucks have been regularly and professionally maintained

Absolutely no previous industrial use

None of our trucks have ever been driven “off road”

All our trucks are 1-ton 4x4 Gas and Diesel

THE MOST GENTLY USED TRUCKS in the North! *Truck Model Abbreviations: CC = Crew Cab / LB = Long Box / SB = Short Box / QC = Quad Cab

Yr.

Make

Model

2013 2011 2011 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012

FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD

LARIAT F-450 XLT F-350 LARIAT F-350 XLT F-350 XLT F-350 XLT F-350 XLT F-350 LARIAT F-350 LARIAT F-350 LARIAT F-350

Type 4x4 Diesel 4x4 Gas 4x4 Diesel 4x4 Gas 4x4 Diesel 4x4 Diesel 4x4 Diesel 4x4 Diesel 4x4 Diesel 4x4 Diesel

Stk. # Mileage *CC / LB *CC / LB *CC / LB *CC / LB *CC / LB *CC / LB *CC / LB *CC / LB *CC / LB *CC / LB

35906 31866 31910 33819 33846 33834 33844 33879 33892 33883

26,276 kms. 73,642 kms. 61,066 kms. 42,928 kms. 50,479 kms. 50,655 kms. 41,595 kms. 46,583 kms. 50,591 kms. 54,906 kms.

Features 6.7L V8-D, power Moon roof, step tailgate, SYNC system, power heated air conditioned seats, Sat radio. 6.2L V8-G, 3.73e locking diff., 6-speed auto, 6-way driver-side power seat, camper package. 6.7L V8-D, power heated/air conditioned seats, sync system, step gate, camper package. 6.2L V8-G, 40/20/40 cloth seats w/ pwr driverside, 6-spd auto, security group,12.5k trailer hitch. 6.7L V8-D, 6-spd auto, security grp, reverse sensing, 6-way driver side power seat, rapid cab heat. 6.7L V8-D, 6-way pwr seat, sat radio, electronic shift on the fly, 11,500 GVWR package, rear defog. 6.7 V8-D, 6-spd auto, 3.55 rear end, shift on the fly 4x4, camper package, step gate, rapid cab heat. 6.7 V8-D, camper package, 3.55 rear end, sat radio, step gate, rapid cab heat, sync system. Leather 40/20/40 power seats, sat radio, 3.55 e locking rear diff, 6 spd, camper package, step gate. 6.7 V8-D, Prefered equipment package, sat radio, 3.55e locking diff, step gate, two tone paint.

MORE trucks arriving daily.

ur o l l a w e Vi line n o y r o t n inve AT

FRASERWAY.com

9039 Quartz Road (across the road from Kal-Tire)

Mon Mon -- Fri Fri 8:30 8:30 -- 5:00 5:00 // Sat Sat 9:00 9:00 -- 4:00 4:00 // Closed Closed Sundays Sundays

Toll Free: 1-866-269-2783

Yukon News, October 25, 2013  

October 25, 2013 edition of the Yukon News

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