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Tourism plan nixed with deal on the table

VOL. 47 ISSUE 92

11

Vees looking for payback against Clippers

23 page

FRIDAY, November 15, 2013

entertainment Matthew Good returns to rock roots

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business Federal funding program

helps diversify local economy

ELDERLY WOMAN DIES IN FIRE

NEWS Mark Brett

PENTICTON WESTERN Western News Staff

A fire which gutted a double-wide trailer at Figueira’s Mobile Home Park Thursday afternoon has claimed the life of an elderly Penticton woman. Deputy fire chief Dave Spalding confirmed the death of the female, who is believed to have been home alone at Unit 18 of the seniors park when the fire began. “Unfortunately there is one fatality we don’t know who, we don’t know anything about that right now,” said Spalding as fire crews were still busy extinguishing the hot spots inside the structure. “She was discovered in the back of the trailer but I don’t know what kind of a room it is yet, I haven’t been in myself yet but it’s pretty heavily damaged. Shortly after their arrival just before 3 p.m. firefighters received information there was believed to be a person still inside the home. While they were able to gain entry, with flames still visible from the windows, when they located the woman she had already died. Initially six firefighters were on the scene which allowed them to go inside immediately. “Anytime we make entry it’s extremely dangerous to firefighters, that’s why we have to have two guys outside for their safety,” said Spalding. “We have two guys outside and two guys inside, if we can’t have that we can’t make en- BC AMBULANCE personnel check over firefighters as another paramedic helps family members of the victim of Thursday’s mobile home try but today we had six guys on so we could fire to a waiting car. Cause of the fire is still under investigation. Mark Brett/Western News make a sustained attack so they didn’t have to Alexander, who lives across the road from the pouring from the roof of the building and sunk in, fatalities are often difficult for emercome back out. “If you don’t have enough guys they have residence, said the victim’s husband returned called 911. Shortly afterwards flames burst gency responders as well. from the structure, almost completely engulf“It’s (loss of life) very tough on firefightto come back out and the fire continues to shortly after the fire began. “I believe she was home because he came ing it. ers, I mean our whole object is the preservaburn but today we were able to keep that fire “Unfortunately with mobile homes when tion of life,” he said. This is believed to be attack sustained and keep the fire knocked home and parked at my other neighbours down which means less damage and usually house because he could see the smoke,” said they do catch fire they burn so rapidly,” said the second fire-related fatality in the last Spalding. three months. A woman’s body was found in preservation of life but in this case unfortu- Alexander. “I understand she was not well. They had The victim’s husband later returned briefly a room at the Jubilee Motel Aug. 16. When nately that wasn’t the case.” tm with a man believed to be the couple’s son firefighters arrived the fire had already burned Cause of the fire and where it began are lived there for years and years.” Alexander had just come home herself and and walked by the still smoking trailer with out. At the time Spalding indicated smoker’s still under investigation. As a result of the death the RCMP and B.C. Coroners Services had gone to the front of her trailer to pick up the help of BC Ambulance paramedic and on material may have been the cause of the fire. mail. to a waiting car. According to Spalding, alAn exact cause of death has not been reare also involved in the case. AThewhole new dimension inthehearing technology That’s when she noticed the heavy smoke though the full impact of the fire had not yet leased. deputy chief and neighbour Gladys

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Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

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PHA claims city walked away with deal on the table Steve Kidd

Western News Staff

The waters surrounding the dispute over tourism funding in Penticton keep getting muddier. The Penticton Hospitality Association contends the city should have been aware that they were close to a deal with Tourism Penticton to create a single organization, making city council’s decision to void the PHA’s contract to manage the approximate $400,000 collected through the two per cent additional hotel room tax especially ill-timed. Chuck Loewen, Penticton’s general manager for recreation services and the city’s representative on the Tourism Penticton board, maintains he had no information about the progress of talks. The executive itself was not involved in those negotiations,” said Loewen, explaining that the talks were being conducted by Tourism Penticton chair Miranda Halladay, vice chair Sally Pierce, their counterparts from the PHA and facilitator Ingrid Jarrett. “It was done that way

to keep it very close and concise and to ensure that things wouldn’t go off track and to keep the whole notion of mediation and working towards one organization,” said Loewen. “The rest of the executive and board actually were not privy to the conversations that were going on.” However a copy of the Oct. 16 minutes for Tourism Penticton show PHA chair Rob Appelman delivering a report to the board on the talks. “Director Rob Appelman overviewed that both the PHA and Tourism Penticton have agreed on a proposal from industry facilitator Ingrid Jarrett and that it will be paid for jointly,” reads the minutes. Appelman said at this point, the talks had been going on for months, and several models for the proposed organization had been brought up. The two sides had agreed, and Jarrett was being contracted to develop a “best practices” model for Penticton. “Ingrid’s role at this point was to really dot the i’s and cross the t’s. There was no doubt

There is no doubt whatsoever in this meeting that this was a green light. — Tim Hodgkinson

whatsoever in this meeting that this was a green light. This was an agreement to pay her for the final bit, where she was going to come back and present the final model to us and Tourism,” said PHA director Tim Hodgkinson. “His (Loewen’s) role as city representative is to report to the city on all issues relating to tourism. Particular things of such importance.” Loewen agreed everyone involved felt it would be better to have one unified marketing force rather two separate organizations, but that he had no information about how close an agreement was to pass back to the city in his role as it’s representative to the board. “We were nowhere near coming together as one force, my under-

standing was. Nowhere near it,” he said. He remembers the presentation differently and said it wasn’t clear what stage the negotiations were at. “What this was, if I recall, was a proposal from Ingrid (Jarrett, facilitator) for a financial contract to continue on with negotiations for one entity. There was no proposal on how it would look. It was just to continue on with Ingrid on a contractural basis,” said Loewen. “It was nowhere near coming to fruition.” The move to create one organization came out of talks between the two groups to work collaboratively on destination marketing programs into the fall of 2013 and 2014, which Loewen said led into talks and meditation about a po-

tential single organization. At the same time, the city was in ongoing discussions and eventual mediation with the PHA. “The city of Penticton had been asking the PHA for a number of months for the proper financials and the documentation to show what has been done with the monies and it hadn’t been forthcoming,” said Loewen. For their part, Appelman and Hodgkinson say the city has been trying to get the hotel room tax funding back for more than a year, calling their tactics harassing. The decision to strip the group of the hotel

Steve Kidd

On Nov. 16, 1885, Louis Riel was hung for treason. But the echoes of the Métis leader and the Northwest rebellion he led still linger 128 years later, though now he is regarded as one of Canada’s great heroes. Earlier this month, Mayor Garry Litke signed a proclamation declaring Nov. 16 Louis Riel day and tomorrow, the Métis flag will be flying above city hall. Marlene Cox-Bishop, president of the South Okanagan Similkameen Métis Association, said it is the first time it has happened, at least in her three years as president. The significance of honouring Riel, Cox-Bishop explains, is that he founded the Métis nation in Canada and as a result of his work, Manitoba was brought into being. She describes the flag as having a large infinity symbol at it’s centre representing the ongoing life of the Métis nation and the Métis people. “There is no end to it,” she said, explaining that the Métis are one of the first peoples of Canada,

coming into being after fur traders came in contact with First Nations. “It is the children of that union that founded, with the founding of Canada, the Métis Nation,” she said. “There are a lot of Métis families in the South Okanagan Similkameen.” “We walk in two worlds. In the world of the First Nations, we have some traditions there and we have some traditions that are European; not just European, but English, Irish, Scottish and French.” Local recognition of Louis Riel day is an important step forward, according to Cox-Bishop, especially in light of recent court decisions favouring the Métis, including the expansion of the courts’ definition of aboriginal to include Métis. “The Métis historically never had a land base. We were entrepreneurs and business people, so we always ended up on somebody’s territory. It’s easy to overlook us as a group of people,” said Cox-Bishop. “There is a huge other population of non-status First Nations, Inuit and Métis people who are often not recognized. “It is one more step in gaining that recognition.”

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was administered collaboratively through one organization.” Hodgkinson suggests the best thing for the city to do at this point would be to follow the public recommendation made by the Penticton and Wine Country Chamber of Commerce that the city reverse its decision. If the city continues on this track, Hodgkinson said the PHA is lining up their legal defense. “What the city is doing is flying in the face of opinion and that of the business community. We all just need to get on with what we are doing, which was successful,” said Hodgkinson.

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City raises flag in honour of Louis Riel Western News Staff

room tax funding, they say, was made just two weeks after the city received audited financial statements that showed the group was spending the funds in accordance with the agreement. “The city never wanted control of the money, they just wanted to make sure the money was spent in an appropriate fashion for destination marketing,” said Loewen, adding that it didn’t matter who was doing it. “Our goal, from the city standpoint, and from Tourism Penticton standpoint, was always to have it through one organization. It didn’t matter who controlled the dollars, as long as it

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Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

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Accused says RCMP used unnecessary force on June 11, 2012 is charged with impaired driving, flight from a peace officer, willfully resisting or obstructing a peace officer, failing to stop when requested by police and failure or refusal to provide a breath sample. His lawyer, Don Skogstad, said he would

Kristi Patton

Western News Staff

A South Okanagan man on trial for a number of charges is claiming the Osoyoos RCMP officer who arrested him did so with unnecessary force. Anthony Chester Bryant, 54, arrested

be calling evidence that shows Bryant was kicked and punched and witnesses told Const. Ian Patrick McNeil to stop. The trial started with evidence being heard in front of a judge alone under a voir dire, a trial within a trial. Judge Gregory Koturbash said

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he would hear all the evidence held by Crown and defence before deciding what would be admissible. Const. McNeil testified he heard two radio dispatches about a possibly impaired driver in a truck pulling a utility trailer when it drove past him. He said the driver of the truck, Bryant, did not comply when he activated his lights and siren to pull over, even though there was opportunity to do so in a safe manner. Bryant even did a u-turn to head back towards him and as the RCMP officers’ driversside window came in alignment with the truck McNeil said he yelled something to the effect of “stop the vehicle and pull over.” Bryant allegedly drove off with McNeil in pursuit and eventually came to a stop by pulling into a driveway. McNeil said when he pulled in behind the truck another officer arrived on scene. He said he viewed Bryant as “high-risk” because he was not complying so he approached the driver’s side with his service pistol drawn. McNeil said Bryant appeared impaired with glassy, blood-shot eyes and a strong odour of liquor was being emitted. The officer demanded the driver show his hands and alleged Bryant said “What are you going to do shoot me?” McNeil said Bryant did not exit the vehicle when asked and mumbled something in a slurred speech. He said Bryant then bent

Fiona Munro, shown in this picture with bruising to her face, is alleging an osoyoos rCMP officer used unnecessary force against her during a vehicle stop. The court heard she will be testifying in another case where a man facing charges and arrested by the same officer is alleging he also received rough treatment.

Submitted Photo

over and reached under his seat. “I placed my hands on his, grabbed his hand and sweatshirt and I pulled him out of the vehicle and onto the ground,” said McNeil. McNeil said he positioned himself on the driver’s back and there was a 20-30 second struggle where Bryant was trying to push up off the ground. The second officer, who was standing at the passenger side, then came around to help handcuff Bryant. McNeil said Bryant told RCMP he was “handcuffed and felt raped,” his handcuffs were too tight and he felt abused. The trial left off before defence council, Skogstad, could cross-examine McNeil. The trial continues Jan. 23, 2014. Skogstad told the judge he would be calling on evidence from a person who on another date alleges a “starkly similar” incident happened,

based on what he calls “similar fact evidence.” “What the other case is about is a very similar incident with the same officer, where this individual, a small female, said she was similarly pulled out of her car and in this case her head was pushed onto the hood of the car so hard that she had a concussion,” said Skogstad, during an interview outside of the courthouse. “We haven’t heard the evidence yet that we want to ask him about which is what happened on the ground?” Skogstad is calling for judicial stay by virtue of the breach of Bryant’s rights. The lawyer said it doesn’t happen that often but it has been allowed in the past and been recognized by the Supreme Court. Fiona Munro confirmed she is the woman who will be testifying at the trial. She alleges that on Sept. 28, after leaving

Sage Pub with a friend, an RCMP officer pulled her over. Due to previous dealings with McNeil, Munro asked to deal with another officer. She alleges McNeil grabbed her by the ankles and dragged her out while she was screamed and cried for help. She alleges she was then assaulted. “I don’t want this to happen to anyone else,” said Munro of why she decided to come forward with the allegations. An RCMP press release said on Sept. 28 a car was pulled over for suspected impaired driving and the driver became uncooperative and attempted to walk away. It states the woman driver fought with one officer and punched him in the ear and refused to provide a breath sample. Munro is charged with wilfully resisting or obstructing a peace officer and assault of a peace officer.

A place to stay forever PUBLIC NOTICE WEST OKANAGAN LAKE WATERFRONT

The West Okanagan Lake waterfront walkway project is nearing completion. Throughout the project, waterfront users have had beach access at pedestrian crossings along Lakeshore Drive; however, the final touches of the project will involve construction of the

walkway in the vicinity of these pedestrian crossings. In this final stage of construction, beach access will temporarily be limited to both ends of the construction areas, at the S.S. Sicamous and Churchill lane ends. Access in

the middle will be temporarily suspended at this time. Waterfront users are asked to please stay clear of the work areas, particularly near heavy equipment operating on the beach. We thank the public for their patience.

THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF

PENTICTON

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5

Petition nearing target Joe Fries

Western News Staff

Anyone heading in for an afternoon workout at the Penticton Community Centre last week also had a chance to lend strength to the campaign to decriminalize marijuana in B.C. Jo Ann Murphy, a registered canvasser for Sensible BC, was collecting signatures there on copies of the official petition to which she has devoted nearly all of her spare time for two months straight. The community health worker said she originally intended to collect a few dozen signatures from friends to show support for medical marijuana users, but the more she learned about the subject, the more she understood “the importance of putting my face to the issue.” “I don’t think people should be getting a criminal record for simple possession,” she said. “In my opinion, in what I’ve read and the information I’ve gathered, (marijuana) is less harmful than something like alcohol.” With the help of Murphy and about 30 other volunteers, Sensible BC has now collected close to 3,500 signatures in the Penticton riding, according to local organizer Amanda Stewart. The group’s aiming for 6,000 names here, which would provide a buffer over and above the 4,337 signatures required by Elections BC in this riding. The three-month campaign closes Dec. 5. Sensible BC needs 10 per cent of eligible voters in each of B.C.’s 85 ridings to sign the petition in order to trigger a referendum on its proposed legislation that would set the stage to decriminalize marijuana possession and tax the sale of weed. In the Penticton riding, Stewart has dispatched volunteers to staff tables at Cherry Lane Shopping Centre and the community centre, plus appear at public events like hockey games, farmers’ markets and flu clinics. Even still, “This is such a big riding, there’s a good chance we’ve missed huge pockets of people with our public activities,” said Stewart, who operates the Valley Hemp and Import Company, one of a handful of local businesses that also have copies of the petition. Sensible BC is hoping to decriminalize marijuana

Welcome Back to the Family Ed! Penticton Toyota is pleased to announce the return of ED MAURER product advisor. Please feel free to stop in and see Ed next time your by the dealership. Jo Ann Murphy was canvassing for Sensible BC last week at the penticton Community Centre. She was there collecting signatures on a petition to push for the decriminalization of marijuana in B.C.

Western News Staff

A Penticton resident did the right thing by calling 9-1-1 and leaving their home after a small kitchen fire on Wednesday. Deputy Fire Chief Dave Spalding said they responded to a fire at an Acacia Avenue residence at 4 p.m. that turned out to be inside an oven. The fire, he said, must have been from some overheated food or grease that had splashed over and was contained and there was

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in much the same way that Colorado and Washington states are now working towards. Last week, Colorado voters approved a plan to apply a 15 per cent excise tax plus a 10 per cent sales tax to marijuana that’s expected to raise $70 million annually when it goes into effect Jan. 1. Stewart said that’s a model her group would like to see replicated here. “It reminds us, too, how has the States gone ahead and done this before British Columbia?” she said. “A lot of people are scratching their heads.” For more information on signing the petition or volunteering, contact Stewart via email at a stewart@img.ca.

Call to fire department ends well Kristi Patton

PENTICTON TOYOTA

no damage to the house. “The homeowners noticed they had a problem, phoned 9-11 and exited the building, which is what they are supposed to do,” said Spalding. “When it is inside an oven the fire is contained in a vault because it is air tight and nothing will do much inside an oven and if it does it will use up all the oxygen pretty quick and die down.” Spalding said it is important to have an extinguisher nearby a kitchen in event of a fire on a stove top.

“If it is on top then you could use your extinguisher” said Spalding. “Or, if there is a grease fire on top you can use a pot lid to snuff it out. Things like that are always good for people to try but of course if the fire seems to not die down you have to get out. “Everyone should have an extinguisher close to their kitchen, in between the kitchen and exit door so that you can get it, and if you can’t get the fire out, your exit door is close and the fire isn’t between you and your way out.”

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www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

Published Wednesdays and Fridays in Penticton at: 2250 Camrose St., Penticton B.C. V2A 8R1 Phone: (250) 492-3636 • Fax: (250) 492-9843 • E-mail: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

EDITORIAL

opinion

Premier picks wrong issue To hear Premier Christy Clark, and her provincial Liberal government colleagues talk, the only issue that matters is getting natural gas out of the ground and selling it to Asian markets. Never mind the report released by Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, B.C.’s Representative for Children and Youth, documenting more than a decade of misguided spending by the Ministry of Children and Family Development to the tune of about $66 million. Turpel-Lafond referred to some of the Ministry’s initiatives as, “big, blue sky initiatives,” that cost a lot of money, but she could not find any evidence to suggest even a single penny from those initiatives was spent to help a single child. A week has passed since the report was released and the premier has not said a word. In defending her government’s push to advance the liquefied natural gas industry in B.C., Clark argued the industry could provide the province with a trillion dollars of revenue over the next several decades. The opposition NDP, environmental groups and climate scientists point out the current LNG proposals would push the province’s greenhouse gas emissions well off the legislated 2020 target. Undaunted, Clark said, by selling liquefied natural gas to Asian markets, B.C. would, “(be) ... doing the world a favour.” PENTICTON WESTERN How magnanimous of the premier to have the global environment at heart. Hopefully one day, she will have the same empathy for the impoverished children of British Columbia.

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The Penticton Western News is a member in good standing of the Canadian Community Newspapers Association and the British Columbia & Yukon Community Newspapers Association. The Penticton Western News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888687-2213 or go to <www. bcpresscouncil.org>. This publication reserves the right to refuse any material — advertising or editorial — submitted for publication and maintains the sole right to exercise discretion in these matters. Submissions by columnists and guest writers do not necessarily reflect the opinion of this newspaper. All material contained herein is copyright.

Iran nuclear deal: beware of the aftermath What will the Middle East look like after Iran and the great powers that are negotiating over Iran’s alleged nuclear weapons ambitions – the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany (P5+1) – sign a deal that ends the confrontation? It’s time to ask the question, because there is going to be a deal. It didn’t get signed in Geneva last weekend, but it came close. The only foreign minister at the Geneva talks on Friday was Mohammad Javad Zarif of Iran, but progress was so rapid that by Saturday almost all the foreign ministers of the “P5+1” – American, British, French, German and Russian – dropped whatever they were doing and flew in for the grand finale. Only the Chinese foreign minister was absent. The grand finale has been postponed. There were just too many details to clear up in a single weekend, and a couple of sticking points that have yet to be

resolved. But the date for the next meeting has already been set (Nov. 20), and nobody went away angry. “We are all on the same wavelength,” said Zarif. “There is a deal on the table and it can be done,” said British Foreign Secretary William Hague. There are “still some gaps” between Iran and some of the other countries present, Hague said, but “they are narrow gaps. “You asked what went wrong. I would say that a great deal went right.” Even French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, the one who apparently dropped a last-minute spanner in the works, said that “we are not far from a agreement with the Iranians, although we are not there yet.” One immediate consequence of the deal will be that Israel has to stop threatening to attack Iran. The threat was always 90 per cent bluff – Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s own military chiefs

Gwynne Dyer

Dyer Straits would probably refuse to obey him if he ordered such an attack without American support – but now it will be simply ridiculous. Which will swing the spotlight back to Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians. Iran’s economic isolation will also end, although it may take several years to unwind all the economic sanctions. The gradual return of prosperity in Iran will make the current Islamic regime more secure (which may be the main reason that the Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, authorised newly elected President Hassan Rouhani to

negotiate the nuclear deal and end the confrontation.) But the big question is whether a nuclear deal with Iran will cool the rapidly intensifying Sunni-Shia conflict that threatens to suck in the whole of the Fertile Crescent and the Arabian Peninsula. The answer, alas, is probably not. Iran is the sole Shia great power, so it is inevitably the focus of the fears of Sunni Arabs and the hopes of Shia Arabs. Moreover, given Turkey’s semi-detached relationship with the region, Iran is in practical terms the greatest power in the entire Middle East. For the past decade, Iran has been greatly weakened by the arms and trade embargoes that the West imposed because of the nuclear issue. Once those embargoes are removed Iran will regain much of its former strength. This is already causing great anxiety in the Sunni Arab countries, especially

those that face it across the Gulf. Even quite experienced people in Washington and other Western capitals don’t realize the extent to which the Sunni Arab countries of the Middle East thought that their close ties with the Western great powers gave them a kind of guarantee against Shia power – and how betrayed they feel now that they think that guarantee is being withdrawn. Sunnis outnumber Shias almost ten-to-one in the Islamic world as a whole, but in the smaller world that stretches from Iran and Turkey to Palestine and Yemen, the Middle East, Shias make up more than a third of the population. The war is already hot and quite openly sectarian in Syria and in Iraq. In many other places (Lebanon, Bahrain, Yemen) it is bubbling just underneath the surface. It will get worse before it gets better. Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.


Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

letters

7

Tourism dollars should stay with PHA Further to the recent furor over the city’s attempts to make claim to the hotel and motel industry’s money. I was struck by the difference in approach between the Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Penticton. Judging by their statement, the chamber has quite clearly looked at the facts and, having done so, committed themselves to support the Penticton Hospitality Association and its membership. They have even pointed out the single most important point that everyone seems to overlook, the PHA has increased visitor numbers since it took over, and in double quick time. This seems to be in sharp contrast to the statement made by Tourism Penticton, which struck me as being

extremely opportunistic. Something along the lines of, “we have always wanted the money anyway.” Having now heard that the PHA has been working collaboratively and amicably with them in order to unify tourism, why have Tourism Penticton failed to offer their active support for the PHA and process. I mean they have a vested interest in it working and the PHA have been nothing but gracious about them. Are they feeling threatened by the PHAs successes or are they working in cahoots with the city to get their hands on the PHAs money as has been suggested? Perhaps both? There seems to me to be something fishy here. Particularly as the city is cur-

City mishanlding tourism funds

I just wanted to comment on the completely illegal in-camera council meeting held and the ridiculous motion that was passed to redirect the administration of the hotel tax from the PHA to Penticton Tourism Society. I had a chance to watch the council session online and was appalled. Council is only authorized to hold incamera meetings under the circumstances set out in Section 90 of the Community Charter. Closed meetings are held to discuss and make decisions on matters pertaining to personnel, land, labour or employment negotiations. Secondly, I didn’t see the item on the agenda. Unbelievable. How can the city administrator allow such gross negligence amongst council? Based on the freedom of information act the PHA has the right to pressure council to release the in-camera meeting notes to the public domain. I’m sure council will be extremely embarrassed on just what was said in private? One leads to believe there is a personal vendetta here. Craig Brown Penticton

Details shed light on tourism squabble

The devil is in the details and what has been done to the accommodation industry in Penticton is wrong for at least two reasons. The first reason is that if you dig just a little into the facts that might make the Penticton’s accommodation industry at odds with Tourism Penticton it is that Tourism Penticton is advertising businesses external to the city. Penticton city council gave Tourism Penticton $354,000 in the 2013 budget process

I would never give my paycheque to someone who is so ungracious and seems to want nothing than my downfall. rently looking to plug fiscal holes for the imminent budget and far from being independent, Tourism Penticton is bankrolled by the city and even have a city representative on the board to keep them all in line.

which becomes a significant subsidy to the surrounding accommodation industry. Tourism Penticton lists as many hotels, motels, bed and breakfasts, vacation rentals and camping and hostel sites as they can that are not located in Penticton and as far away as Summerland. Check it out for yourself under the link at www.tourismpenticton.com/places-to-stay. Also, the citizens and businesses of Penticton paying $354,000 is the same as about $11 for every citizen which is excessive particularly when, as a matter of policy, the tourism industry should be self-funding. The second reason is that it is really too bad that council doesn’t focus on the right details needed to govern the city. Instead, at least one member likes to trivialize comments on their actions with references to citizens making mountains out of mole hills and referring to issues as red herrings. Council’s most recent action stands as another example of the difference between how the people that are supposed to be served by the municipality and those that serve them differ on how the vision for the community is to be achieved. Penticton’s future should not be primarily shaped by the whims of politicians, the dictates of senior staff or a letter from a lawyer that confirms council’s powers. Cities should develop based on exchanges of dialogue between government and residents to determine what residents want rather than something that a few self-appointed experts plan. Wayne Llewellyn Penticton

Boonstock a test for tourism

There is an opportunity to measure tourism effectiveness.

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It’s no wonder that the PHA is so frustrated. They deliver the goods and still get pilloried. If I were them I would not even consider dealing with either again. I would never give my paycheck to someone who is so ungracious and seems to want nothing more than my downfall. I would also like to know where the self proclaimed CEO, Jessie Campbell, has been? I heard she was on a business trip? This seems fishy too. Surely this was the single most important issue in her particular world and unless she was cutting a deal with Westjet or the City of Vancouver wouldn’t we expect her to be here? I mean, we are apparently paying her an executive salary, and her staff, to deal with tourism. The

I suggest tourism Penticton take on the task of bringing Boonfest to the area. Whatever your feelings on the actual festival, this challenge will spotlight the talents, abilities and capabilities of the tourism organization. The only condition for the event should be it happen before July 1, 2014 or after Sept. 15, 2014. By hosting the event outside the tourist season, as a stand alone event, all participants can be measured specifically on the outcome. Furthermore, there is very little need to utilize tourism dollars or talents for events over the tourist saturated summer months. I believe this scenario has the opportunity for many positive outcomes. This one task could show all citizens how well all stakeholders like tourism, the PHA, the city, and the Native band can work together. Tracey Bear-Burrows Penticton

Deer cull not right

I just can’t understand those citizens of Penticton that believe there should be a killing of the deer in our neighbourhood. Don’t they think at all about how they moved into deer country when they moved here. Why is it that they believe we humans should just kill off those animals that they don’t want in their neighbourhoods. For goodness sake, I have walked our streets and have more than once come upon one or more deer as close as 10 feet away and stopped and spoke to the deer and it just stood there looking at me then sauntered on off on it’s way. No attack and no fear on either of us. Why don’t you just move into a city that has no wildlife?

new line should be, “You are not here, but we are,” or better, “We are here, where are you.” The city gives them actual tax payers money ($350,000 a year I’ve heard.) whereas the PHA are being kind enough to use their own money for the benefit of all of us right! Is anyone auditing Tourism Penticton and if not, why not? It’s my money! Strike that, it’s our money. Finally, the truth seems to be coming out. Shocking treatment of the PHA, I hope they fight tooth and nail and win, and good on the Chamber of Commerce (as representatives of the business community) for showing some guts, standing up and being counted. D McDonald Penticton

I do believe most of us like to see the wildlife around. It seems for centuries back ... man seems to find the need to kill the wild life, unfortunately, most of the killing is done for the almighty dollar. Enjoy life, all life. There’s more to life than just you, and/or that almighty dollar. Stop and enjoy it, you’ll soon be long gone. J. Johnson Penticton

We want to hear from you The Penticton Western News welcomes letters to the editor for publication. We suggest a maximum length of 400 words and reserve the right to edit letters for length, brevity, clarity, legality, abusive language, accuracy and good taste. All published letters remain the property of the Penticton Western News, which is the sole judge of suitability for publication. Letters must include the writer’s address and daytime phone number, which will not be published. Letters should be signed with the writer’s full name and be sent by e-mail to letters@ pentictonwesternnews. com; mailed to the Penticton Western News, 2250 Camrose St., Penticton, B.C., V2A 8R1; or faxed to 250-492-9843.

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(re: Land deal not a good idea, Letters, Western News, Oct. 25) I am responding to Mr. Horejsi’s letter regarding the 600-house development on the west side of Okanagan Lake by the Penticton Indian Band and enthusiastically supported by Penticton city council, tourism and the Chamber of Commerce, as another example of constant mindless growth. Since Mr. Horejsi covered the negatives of irreversible destruction of native habitat, excessive future demand on our already finite water supply, urban sprawl, servicing and local job creation, I want to mention other dynamics to be considered. Given the current slowing of the world economy, including British Columbia and Canada, it is unsettling that some people continue to put the economic cart before the horse of fiscal and social responsibility. This proposed development will not increase the supply of much needed affordable housing in Penticton. Rather, as a recent public relations media statement noted, this development is aimed at high-end consumers, most of whom will not live here permanently as full-time residents. These homes will be summer cottages for foreign investors, oil-patch workers, overpaid professional athletes, CEOs, speculators and the like, not to mention the snowbirds. I can attest to the above right here in little Summerland. In fact, the snowbirds will be the only native species still living on that land. Young families, that are needed to keep the schools open and the economy growing, will not be able to get a piece of this pie in the sky, no matter how many low-paying local jobs are produced. Proposed developments like this when the world is on the verge of total collapse is irresponsible and short-sighted. It will borrow heavily on our natural resources and future generations, leaving them with few options for a healthy environment and livelihood. Despite the 20-year phase in development plan I am very concerned,based on what I have seen with other such developments, that large patches of native grassland will be destroyed in anticipation of the next phase of buyers who may never arrive, leaving a wasteland devoid of all but weeds and invasive plants. Laurie Rockwell Summerland

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letters Development project unsound on several fronts

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Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

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Council taking taxpayers for a ride

Penticton taxpayers, eight months ago I fought the reduction in the business multiplier or multiple from 1.75 to 1.5. Council backed down and reversed the proposed amendment. However, if you go to two hours and 45 minutes of the council video of the Nov. 4 meeting, you will see council discussing the reduction once again. I made a very angry call to Couns. Vassilaki and Konanz wanting to know why this reduction is back on the agenda. You will see that Mayor Litke is trying to hide from the proposed changes when he is questioned on the matter by other councillors. In my mind, Mayor Litke fails on honesty, transparency and accountability to the Penticton taxpayers on this matter. Mayor Litke how would the reduction in the multiple affect the Penticton residential taxpay-

ers over a five-year period, please prepare and present the schedules to show your calculations to the taxpayers. Mayor Litke, I have some concerns as to how the 2013 budget was allocated to the various groups of taxpayers. I may be wrong but my gut tells me that the amount charged to the business community was a fixed amount based on the fact that the tax rate for business did not change when the multiplier was re-stated to 1.75. Please publish the backup working papers that explain how council arrived at the tax rates for residential and business taxpayers (full calculations required). Mayor Litke, please inform me if you are going to force me to prepare and file a freedom of information request on the above in order to force you to provide the information. The Penticton residential taxpayers will probably be assessed with the majority of the costs on the proposed downtown revitalization that is currently on the council planning table. If my gut is correct, residential taxpayers could be charged with 100 per cent of the downtown revitalization, Mayor Litke will probably fail on the disclosures as to how the costs are to be allocated to residential and business taxpayers. Penticton taxpayers please do not go into hibernation for the winter, pay attention and demand honest explanations. Mayor Litke, I would be happy for you to respond to the Penticton taxpayers with a letter to the editor on the above matters. Ted Wiltse Penticton

Climate naysayers should have voice

(re: Naysayers should be silenced, Letters, Western News, Nov. 9) Well, do I have news for Mr. Martens, for more than a 100 years, news media have been doing this already. There are even laws, to protect the official truth. My success rate is less than 50 per cent, because I am too straight forward with the truth. You have to be quite smart to hide the truth in a pile of feathers, so that the editor will print it. If the media would not censor critics, the First and Second World Wars would not have taken place. There would have been no Remembrance Day, because all the soldiers killed would have died of natural causes or accidents. That the newspapers now print the critical stories of global warming is, because the editor knows that there are only Munchausens in East Anglia. These chaps were caught falsifying evidence to suit their purpose and that says it all. To learn the truth Mr. Martens, please check out the caricatures in the papers, because these come closest to the truth. I tune into the news in the morning on TV, for about 20 minutes, reading only the headlines at the bottom, the rest I leave to the uninformed. I then go on my computer and inform myself on alternate media. On these sites, I also get the sources of the news, original historic quotations from high ups, newspaper clippings and headlines from other countries. At present there is an information war going on between truth and lie. The alternative media people are confident they are going to win this war, because we now have computers, which we did not have before the First World War. The people, who run these alternative media outlets, are professors, doctors, teachers and other intellects.

Therefore Mr. Martens, you get your news from the best among the herd. By the way, there is not much left, from the official story. Otto Sturhahn Penticton

Silence not the way to go

No, the Penticton Herald and the Penticton Western News should not follow suit. Mr. Martens of Summerland would prefer you not read this. If I mention Phil Jones, the hockey-stick scam or conspiracy, I’d be muzzled. Point out David Suzuki’s wacky ways, his questionable ties to the CBC, his multimillion dollar beachfront properties, I’d be silenced. Tell the inconvenient truth about Al Gore‘s lies and shady past, especially with Enron’s scheming Ken Lay, I’d be banished. Cap and trade, derivatives and carbon offsets and taxes, they’re all questionable, and none is a solution. Debate verboten, Mr Martens? The IPCC is not a scientific panel. It is intergovernmental. It is Agenda 21, the plan for world government in this century. It is not pretty. Yes, there are many honest scientists doing good work, but speaking out against the panel’s policies and/or terms of reference can be a costly misstep in any good doctor’s career. Baby-boomers grew up believing the UN was a good idea. The 1992 Rio Summit seemed like a good idea, at the time, but it spawned Agenda21 and the whole, crazy idea about sustainability. In truth, nothing in this universe is sustainable for long, and everything is as changeable as the weather. That’s the trick. They’re forcing a lie upon us that enslaves us. Do the research, while we still can. Climate deniers? Another trick. It reminds us of holocaust deniers, doesn‘t it. Should GMO deniers also be removed? Should flu-shot deniers disappear? Smart-meters? Harper? These simplistic ideas are so toxic and way too reminiscent of memory-holes, thought-police and mass mind-control. Anyone supporting the LA Times’ censorship policy is no friend to freedom, transparency, and intellectual honesty. “Those who don’t remember history are condemned to repeat it.” Mr. Martens seems to have forgotten this, even at Remembrance Day. Geoff Burton Penticton

Senate scandal sickening

The Canadian Senate has become the latest edition to the sick bay of politics! Disgusting Pamela Wallin actually said about her suspension, “I think it’s an extremely sad day for democracy. If we can’t expect the rule of law in Canada. then where on earth can you expect it?” Wallin actually has me agreeing with her as the rule of law and true democracy applied to the three outcasts failed miserably, they admitted their guilt by paying back the stolen booty only when caught. . I know it won’t happen but after working for many years in a federal institution I feel strongly there is more than a cell or two that would gladly accommodate all senator’s and politicians who go astray. Yes Pamela Wallin — it is indeed a sad day for democracy when your kind of sickness can roam the halls and pad your bank accounts compliments of a useless Senate. Wallin, Brazeau and Duffy should have been terminated period. Tom Isherwood Olalla


Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 9

community

Sally Ann kicks off food drive

@pentictonnews

Mark Brett

Western News Staff

Registration is currently underway for those needing a Christmas hamper from the Salvation Army this year. So far over 200 people have already signed up and been interviewed for the annual program. The total number of hampers that will be given out on Dec. 19 at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre is again this year expected to surpass the 800 mark. “Basically what we provide is a Christmas dinner and toys for any children under the age of 16,” said Joey Cyr Penticton Salvation Army community and family services supervisor. “We planning on doing the registrations and interviews up until Dec. 6.” The hampers contain a turkey with all the fixings, including stuffing, potatoes, carrots, peas, eggs bread, milk and juice, usually enough food for at least a couple of days. “Anyone who is in need can register but we want people who are in need, we don’t discriminate if you say there is a need we’re going to try to do our best to help,” said Cyr who is organizing his first Christmas Hamper campaign after taking over from Christine Simmons. “We interview every person that comes just to make sure we have all of the information, we want to know if there are kids and how old they are so we can

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Eggs Benedict, French Toast, Bacon, Sausage, perogies, Roast Chicken, Lasagna, Salad Bar, Dessert Bar and Lots More. Joey Cyr of the PentiCton Salvation army with a bag full of food similar to the ones which will be used in the upcoming 10,000 tonight Christmas food Drive in support of the community food bank. the bags will be inserted in copies of the Penticton Western News and collected by local students. registration is also currently underway for those needing a Christmas hamper from the Salvation army.

mark Brett/Western news

get age-appropriate gifts.” Each hamper is individually put together to make sure larger families have enough. Organizers also want to make sure people receiving hampers have not registered with any other agencies to ensure there is no duplication. At last year’s distribution day there was a wide range of recipients from seniors to young families all of who were extremely grateful for any help they received. Many said without the help from the good

bank they would not have had Christmas. “I’m excited about the day we give the hampers out,” said Cyr. “From what I hear it’s a really neat day, you see a lot of people come in and it’s nice to be able to help a lot of people.” Among the dignitaries expected to be on hand to lend support are Mayor Garry Litke and Penticton MLA Dan Ashton. Other local groups and organizations will have members there to help with a range of duties. According to Cyr,

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more volunteers are needed to help packing and distributing the hampers as well as assisting people to their cars and driving them home. Usually about 50 volunteers help on the day of the disbursement and about 90 volunteer hours are put in prior to. Most of the food to fill the baskets is purchased from the larger, local grocery stores which often give the Salvation Army a break on costs. For more information or to register for a hamper or to volunteer call 250492-4788.

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Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

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Manager Shannon Carver (left) of the Penticton regional hospital digital imaging department shows (left to right) Stan Bobowski of the Peach City Beach Cruise, Janice Perrino of the South okanagan Similkameen Medical Foundation and Debbie Little of Beach Cruise some of the equipment needing to be replaced.

Mark Brett/Western news

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of being a not-for-profit organization, we put on the show, we do something for the city, we like cars and now we can share some of the proceeds from that with others,” said Muzzillo this week. Monies came from the beverage garden, merchandise, gate and vender-space sales. The board of directors determine who shares in the funds. “The decision about the dental (work) for the child was a personal thing,” said Muzzillo. “It was the child of someone who had done a lot for us at the Beach Cruise over the years and didn’t have a lot of funds so we just wanted to help out. “The directors make suggestions and it’s something we just feel good about, whether it’s the Salvation Army or Habitat for Humanity.” This year’s event was the 13th and attracted over 700 vehicles and thousands of spectators. “We get them (exhibitors) from as far south as Texas, Arizona and California and as far east as Saskatchewan and if you were to draw a circle around that, all points in between,” said Muzzillo. “One of the

every dollar is appreciated and well spent. — Joey Cyr

comments we’ve heard repeatedly is, ‘We love coming to your car show because most often shows are held in a field or parking lot and yours is against the backdrop of a lake (Okanagan).’” The Automobile Historic Society was founded by the late Ken Patton. In addition to the dental work for the child, the groups which received money included the South Okanagan Similkameen Medical Foundation (X-ray digital radiography equipment) the OSNS Child Development Centre (iPads for children’s treatment) Global Okanagan Television Good News Bears (fundraiser for food banks) Habitat for Humanity (building materials) Penticton Salvation

Army (food bank and local community assistance) and the B.C. Schizophrenia Society (support programs and services). According to Joey Cyr, community and family services supervisor for the Salvation Army the money is especially important now. “This is definitely our busy time,” said Cyr. “Last year we gave out over 800 Christmas hampers and we expect the demand to be as great this year. Every dollar is appreciated and well spent. “It’s the community helping the community and we have a great community helping us provide the services that we do.” Janice Perrino of the hospital foundation agreed: “Community groups and individual donations make all the difference in the world. “Deb Little of the Beach Cruise called us right away and said, ‘what do you need? How can we help?’ and they just did what they needed to do. “We were just so thrilled.” She hopes the badlyneeded equipment will be in place by summer 2014.


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Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

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A&E Editor: Kristi Patton • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 228 E-mail: kpatton@pentictonwesternnews.com

Matthew Good back to rock roots Kristi Patton

Western News Staff

time when I heard Regatta de Blanc by The Police and suddenly you can remember how something smells or where you were or the temperature. Those kinds of things that are intrinsically linked to our memory. I think that is vastly more important,” said Good. A fan of The Who’s Live At Leeds album and Johnny Cash’s Live at Folsom Prison, Good decided on this city tour, he would also record some live tunes and post them for everyone to hear. Good has recorded live from the concerts and posted them for everyone to hear. A blessing and a curse for a guy who is a self-proclaimed perfectionist. Listening to the recordings through tour bus speakers doesn’t provide the best playback and when some of his bandmates wanted to tweak the recordings, Good wasn’t having it. what man, it’s (expletive) live rock ‘n’ roll just let it be what it is going to be. If I am out of tune singing then I am out of tune,” said Good. “The thing is, I am a total perfectionist and the hardest person on myself.” Good has also kept fans up-to-date on his tour by post-

t.g.i.f. concerts

Matthew Good doesn’t like celebrity but is a rock star. He is a perfectionist, but released live songs from his current tour and isn’t a drinker, but will indulge when he plays acoustic. So when you read the track listings on his latest album, Arrows of Desire, all may not seem as they are, a little like Good himself. “Everything is interpretive right?,” said Good who is performing in Penticton on Nov. 22. “This record is lyrically ambiguous I think with regards to how people interpret it and I kind of meant it to be that way to be honest with you. I made some records in the past four or stances very literal, so I kind of wanted to get away from that.” With 13 albums under his belt, Good returns to deliver those hard driving rock songs of his earlier days, think Underdogs and Beautiful Midnight. Songs that get radio play, which many of his later albums did not. So if his latest title track and others like Letters of War and Guns of Carolina are interpreted not quite as he wrote it, that is ok. “I think for me, music has always been one of those things that is so universal and so personal to such an extent. I can

11

Nov. 16 — Coco Love Alcorn sings a combination of jazz, pop, R&B and folk at the Dream Café. Tickets are $18. Nov. 20 to 23 — Ben Waters brings his boogie woogie rock ‘n’ roll piano to the Dream Café. Nov. 22 — Matthew Good with special guests Gentlemen Husbands at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre for his Arrows of Desire tour. Nov. 22 — Music Intima performs at the Oliver Alliance Church as part of the South Okanagan Concert Society. Tickets are $20 at the door. Nov. 23 — Glass Tiger performing at the Barking Parrot. Opening act (TBA) starts at 8:30 p.m. and Glass Tiger at 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $38. Nov. 23 —Live music from Pistol Pete at the Barley Mill Brew Pub. Starts at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 24 — Canada Music Week student recital at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church at 2 p.m. Nov. 30 — Stephen Fearing accomplished folk and roots musician at the Dream Café. Nov. 30 — Honest Woods performs at the Barley Mill Brew Pub. Starts at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 1 cert at Our Redeemer Lutheran Church. Tracy Fehr with Dennis Nordlund on piano and Elizabeth Lupton on violin to support North African Women. Tickets $12 in advance at Penticton and District Community Arts Council, or $15 at door. Dec. 6 — A Gift of Song Christmas Concert at

CANADIAN ROCKER Matthew Good is performing at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre on Nov. 22 with special guest Gentlemen Husbands.

Submitted Photo

ing set lists that range from a good dose of Arrows of Desire to a taste of his older tunes like Apparitions and Weapon. All songs that have undergone transformations over the years. “Those songs are songs that I have to do. You have to play Apparitions and for me another song is Born Losers. Load Me Up is actually the one constant of all my old material that I perform all the time. If I have to choose a tune between Load Me Up, Time Bomb and (The Future Is) X-Rated, Load Me Up is going to win every time. I don’t know why, I just like it better really,” said Good, adding he has to watch his vocal pacing through a show. “I would rather make sure I can get into something like While We Were Hunting Rabbits and concentrate on that being a vocal performance that is memorable because for a lot of fans that is a far bigger deal than Load Me Up will ever be. Even though that is the song I am known for, something like Rabbits is for actual hard core fans and is a big deal.” Fame and celebrity are not the goal for the Canadian rocker, social activist, blogger and the man who didn’t turn up to accept the Juno Awards

he won. He transplanted himself out of Vancouver, a city he dearly called home for two decades, and opted for a plot of land with his wife and kids in Mission. Good said they actually were considering moving to Osoyoos at one point, but distance from his immediate family had them think twice. “It’s really funny. Jay Baruchel (actor from This Is the End, Tropic Thunder) is a friend of mine and Jay and me are totally the same. He lives in downtown Montreal, a couple of blocks from his mom where he grew up, then his sister lives a couple of blocks from there. We both lived in the city and don’t go anywhere, we just stay at home,” said Good. “Despite the Vancouver thing and living downtown for two decades, it’s just not for me. I just want to live in one place.” It’s not that Good has become complacent, he averages about one new album every year. On the cusp of wrapping up a cross-Canada tour he already has designs on what his next moves will be — perhaps an acoustic album. “I want to do it just for the banter,” he said. “When I play acoustically you get going with people in the audience and it

gets really funny. I love it.” A stickler for details, Good said he holds a couple of steadfast rules when on the stage with just a guitar and himself. “I never rehearse for an acoustic tour because anything that can and will go wrong will and if I pull out something and I don’t remember how to play it that is always a good time because it keeps you on your toes. I don’t drink, but for some strange reason when I play acoustically I always drink gin and tonics, my guitar tech started me on that. The problem is that I end up talking to him a lot and he becomes part of the show. By the end of the night of gin with ice. It’s pretty funny actually,” said Good. “It is every worst possible case scenario added together. How it all works, I don’t know.” Matthew Good is performing at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre with special guests Gentlemen Husbands on Nov. 22. Tickets are available online at www.ValleyFirstTix.com, by phone at 1-877-763-2849 or in person at the Valley First Box Events Centre and the Wine Country Visitor Centre.

Ryu Society. Tickets at Peach City Runners. Until Dec. 7 — Many Hats Theatre Company presents Jessie’s Landing, a play by John Spurway at the Cannery Theatre. Shows are Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. Tickets are $22/$19 at the wine info centre or reserve by phone at 250-276-2170. Nov. 15 — Activist Art exhibit opens at the Leir House Cultural Centre.

events Nov. 16 — Kinette Club of Penticton presents Le Moulin Rouge, an evening of Burlesque at St. Saviour’s Church. 10th annual Ladies Night and Fashion Show Fundraiser with door prizes, silent auction and more. Tickets are $25. Nov. 19 — Corporations In Our Heads by Theatre for Living at the Shatford Centre from 7 to 10 p.m. Admission by donation. Nov. 21 — Warren Miller Films presents Ticket To Ride at the Cleland Theatre. Doors open at 6 p.m. Show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12 and available at Pharmasave at City Centre. Nov. 21 — Thursday night art walk in downtown Penticton from 5 to 8 p.m. at Picture This Gallery, Tumbleweed Gallery, Saint-Germain Café, Kindrie Grove Studios, Ad Hoc, MGallery/Books and Caroline’s Boutique. Nov. 21 to 23 — Princess Margaret Secondary School Horsehoe Theatre presents the musical Grease at the Cleland Community Theatre. Nov. 23 and 24 — Authors & Artists Christmas Faire at the Shatford Centre. Red Tuque Books and the Shatford Centre presenting artists and writers from the Okanagan and beyond. Bon Jovi tribute artist performing at 2:30 and 4:30 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Doors open 10 a.m. Saturday and noon on Sunday until 5 p.m. Nov. 27- Dec. 1 — Pen Hi Arts Media Entertainment presents Jack and the Beanstalk at the Cleland Theatre. Tickets are $10 and available at the 1:15 p.m. and is for seniors only. All other showtimes are 7 p.m. with a matinee on Nov. 30 at 2 p.m.


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The Pink Ladies from the Princess Margaret secondary school production of Grease (left to right) Lauren Richards, Giorgia Ricciardi, sidne hack and sydney Wood share a laugh in the cafe. Below: Chris Zavazal will portray danny Zuko in the production running from nov. 21 to 23 at the Cleland Community Theatre.

Mark Brett/Western news

Grease is the word for theatre troupe Kristi Patton

Western News Staff

Princess Margaret Secondary School Horseshoe Theatre is taking on the timehonoured high school story Grease. “It’s the classic,” said show director Lori Grant. “It’s the one everyone wishes and hopes to get to be in and I probably thought I had done my last production of it before, but I thought this was a really good group and it was time to do Grease again.” With a cast of 30, the students will take on the musical incorporating the songs and scenes from the musical about high school life in the 1950s. Grant said casting the roles fell into place perfectly with Chris Zavazal playing the lead role of Danny Zuko and Samantha Schimmer playing Sandy Olsen. “The ensemble is also great. Without them you don’t get the full flavour of the big dance numbers and the scenes that require lots of people,” said Grant. “The younger students are doing a great job. They are the future for this program and they have such a bright spark in their eyes and they are looking forward to the day they get these roles. They have been really energetic, supportive and happy to be a part of this show.” Taking a “green” approach to creating the set, Grant borrowed from Summerland Secondary School who previously did their own production of the play two years ago. Grant also found the most important prop, the Greased Lightning car, to fit within her budget thanks to a theatre troupe in Spo-

kane, Washington who sold it for the right price. Zavazal, a Grade 12 student, said he is taking elements of the Danny Zuko that actor John Travolta made famous in the movies as well as incorporating his own style. “I was excited to get this role. I love everything about acting and this is beneficial to me because I am applying to Capilano College for acting for the screen and stage,” said Zavazal. The Grease lead actor said he is com-

fortable getting in front of an audience and has a bit of a singing background as he also is part of a band. He said it helps the actress playing Sandy is also his girlfriend off the stage. The transition from high school students to being The Pink Ladies, the popular clique of girls in Grease, was easy for the group of actresses. “It’s been great,” said Lauren Richards who is playing Marty, one of the Pink Ladies. “Three of us were really good friends before this and since we have been together all the time working on this we have all become best friends.” Sydney Wood is taking on the character of Rizzo, another of The Pink Ladies, and said this is the perfect way to finish off their senior year of high school. “We have some super talented people here and it is such a fun thing to do in our graduation year. Grease is so iconic and everyone has seen it or grew up watching it,” said Wood. The students said they follow the original musical but have added some elements of the movie, including the song You’re The One That I Want, because those are the things that people most remember about Grease. The show is running Nov. 21 to 23 with reserved seating tickets available for purchase at the Penticton Community Centre. Showtimes are at 7 p.m. with a 1 p.m. matinee on Nov. 23. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students (with identification).

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Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

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Two gleaming grand pianos were selections from Bernstein’s West Side gracing the stage at Cleland Commu- Story which I was looking forward to nity Theatre last Saturday night. hear. The hall filled up with music lovers The bold harmonics in Mambo, who had come to hear the Bergmann the romantic tenderness in Maria and Duo in this season’s third the witty cross-rhythms Community Concert. Elizain America came to life beth and Marcel Bergmann under the duo’s skilled took their seats at the pianos hands. and began to play Mozart’s The Blue Rondo a la Overture from Magic Flute. Turk by American comGentle opening chords poser Dave Brubeck made way for a bustling had quirky irregular motheme with an elegant ortives that lead to an imnament. It built up in a creprovised blues tune in scendo to a full orchestral Roswitha Masson straight time. Oblivion sound. Symphony Review and Michelangelo 70 by The Bergmann’s played Argentinean composer with ease. They smiled at Piazella combined eleeach other across their pianos, unob- ments of traditional Argentinean Tanstructed by sheet-music, which they go with contemporary classical music did not use. It was their ninth concert and jazz. Jazz pianist Chick Corea’s in nine days and they were in perfect Native Sense layered percussive jazz performing condition. riffs over an underlying bass theme. After a few words of introduction Corea’s Spain started with a sweeping they changed pianos and performed a introduction that led into an interesting technically demanding and musically fragmented theme and a spirited immultifaceted Piano Duo by Brahms: provised section by Marcel. the Haydn Variations Op. 56b. Op. The finale was Brazilian compos56a was Brahms’ orchestral version of er Gismati’s Infancia, an exuberant the same piece. colourful celebration with folkloric A slow paced, festive choral theme melodies, sparkling tremolos, plucked was developed with increasing com- strings and cascading arpeggios. plexity of rhythms and tonalities. The applause only stopped when Driving fast passages alternated with Elizabeth and Marcel sat down togethcontrasting, reflective variations and er at the handcrafted Italian Fazioli pidialogue passages. ano and played an encore, Hungarian The rest of the program was dedi- Dance No. 5 by Brahms. cated to contemporary music with a What a lovely, talented couple the jazz and Latin flavour. Bergmann’s were. It was a joy to hear Marcel is not only an amazing pia- them perform. nist; he is also a composer and arrangRoswitha Masson is a concert reer and he arranged most of the duo’s viewer living in Penticton. repertoire. His first arrangements were

Heather Allen is a writer and reader living in Penticton.

9th Ave.

Birch St.

Bergmann Piano Duo a joy

Gordon read from her new book at Hooked on Books on Nov. 19 at 7 p.m.

Tired of changing your eyeglasses to go outdoors?

Willow St.

Columbia by Harbour Publishing. This is one of the most notable books of the year, and one that I wish every British Columbian could read. Not only does it contain a compelling answer to the parent’s question, it explains why cultural heritage is important to First Nations’ well-being, and why the rest of society should share in that exploration of cultural heritage. Born with the Songs

Margaret High School, and at a separate event will speak to the School District’s Aboriginal Book Club. In addition, the public is invited to hear

Ash St.

On a recent sunny November day, my children’s school visited the En’owkin Centre. While one of the elders was drumming and telling the children a story, a parent leaned over and whispered to me: “How can he talk about caring for each other and lifting each other up when they get so many government handouts?” I wish I could have simply handed over Katherine Palmer Gordon’s new book: We are Born with the Songs Inside Us: Lives and Stories of First Nations People in British

plex issue, and give understanding in a very unique way.” Gordon will be visiting Penticton to speak to First Peoples English classes at Princess

100-Mile Book Club

“I wish I had this book when I was teaching students about treaty negotiation,” she continues. “These stories bring a personalized element to a com-

Heather Allen

Inside Us is a collection of stories profiling prominent First Nations people living in B.C. The features are full of hope and inspiration, and detail the great contributions each has made to our province. The broad range of profiles includes hockey player Gino Odjick, actor and medical doctor Evan Touchie, and treaty negotiator, Kim Baird. Also included in the book is Penticton’s District Principal of Aboriginal Education, Anne Tenning: “It was a real honour to be included in this compilation. It meant a lot to me,” she said. Tenning was impressed by the diversity of profiles, and by Gordon’s ability to reach deeply into each person’s story. “She is a very talented writer who has a very genuine way of representing individuals and telling their complex stories,” said Tenning.

7 DAYS A WEEK 9am-9pm 910 Main Street - Okanagan Falls, BC 250-497-5194


16

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

Business reporter: Steve Kidd • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 216 E-mail: skidd@pentictonwesternnews.com

Funding program a WINN Steve Kidd

Western News Staff

The business community just got an early Christmas present from the federal government, in the form of a $100 million funding program. WINN is a five-year federal initiative offering repayable funding for small- and medium-sized businesses in Western Canada, with the goal of moving new and innovative technologies from the later stages of research and development to the marketplace. The program, which is being run through Western Economic Diversification, is billed as supporting entrepreneurs in “bringing their ideas from the work bench and into the marketplace.” “The government is clearly hoping to kickstart some commercialization of products by bringing some additional financing options to the table,” said Colleen Pennington, Penticton’s Economic Development Officer. “Financing growth is tricky in these days anywhere. Having more options that give businesses a chance to borrow capital at a fa-

vourable rate and help them build their business and ultimately jobs, that’s really important.” Under WINN, eligible western Canadian businesses can apply for funding to support a wide range of commercialization activities. But there is a limited time frame for businesses to get their application in, if they hope to be included in the first round of funding. The intake period, which began on Nov. 9, ends at midnight on Dec. 8. “Hopefully a bunch of businesses have projects that are ready to go. They really only have a month to turn around and submit their business plans,” said Pennington. This is the time, she continued, for businesses that have a market opportunity they want to get to, but weren’t sure how to finance, to throw their hat in the ring “and see if we can capture a lot of that money for the Penticton area.” “That’s what I am hoping for,” said Pennington. The general business climate in Penticton, she said, is similar to a lot of communities, in terms of those serv-

ing the consumer market. But the community is seeing business growth in certain sectors, like custom manufacturing. “A lot of it comes down to the markets our businesses are competing in and the entrepreneurship of our business owners,” she said. You have to start innovating and addressing the digital world. And we have some great entrepreneurs that are doing that. I think we are going to have lots of areas of growth as we continue to attract people like that.” The new federal funding program should help business owners put their innovations and plans for growth into action, she explained. While there are standard funding sources available through bank loans and some other alternatives through groups like Community Futures, Pennington said a program like WINN, that can put capital at an affordable rate in front of small and medium size businesses is critical. More information about the WINN program is available online at http://www.wd-deo.gc.ca/ eng/14857.asp.

business

OWNERS SHARAT (LEFT) AND RAJ CHAWLA of Spice Magic Restaurant in downtown Penticton celebrated their grand opening on the weekend with a Bollywood-style party, which was attended by a number of local dignitaries, including Mayor Garry Litke. Serving Indian cuisine, the restaurant is located at 413 Main St. and is open for lunch and dinner.

Mark Brett/Western News

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Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

drivewayBC.ca |

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 17

Welcome to the driver’s seat

Established in 1902, Cadillac is one of the oldest luxury brands, and continues to be General Motors’ flagship in terms of refinement and technology. Zack Spencer

Visit the Cadillac CTS photo gallery at drivewayBC.ca

The CTS model is a lighter car, made of high tensile steel. It is stiffer, safer, handles better, and above all, is more efficient.

ZACK SPENCER

Question OF THE WEEK:

Cadillac in the rear-view mirror of the European premium brands 2014 Cadillac CTS One auto trend that shows little sign of waning is the move towards more luxury or premium cars by manufacturers and consumers alike. As baby boomers age, they have earned the nicer things in life, and the offspring of baby boomers are getting used to the finer things in life, so more automakers are moving upscale. The Europeans do luxury and performance better than most and the Japanese luxury brands have been putting in their time to becoming a real force. But long before the Japanese, there have always been the American luxury brands, with many firsts in features and technology. Established in 1902, Cadillac is one of the oldest, along with Mercedes-Benz, and continues to be General Motors’ flagship in terms of refinement and technology. Looks The smaller Cadillac ATS was released a year ago and went on to win the North American Car of the Year award. General Motors has taken that platform and elongated it to produce the lightest mid-sized car in its class. It’s a full 173kg lighter than the benchmark BMW 5-Series it competes against, and 34kg lighter than the outgoing car. A lighter car, made of

Drive With a lighter car high tensile steel, is stiffer, comes a better performsafer, handles better ing car, but the heart of and above all is more any luxury performance efficient. What Cadillac car is a solid engine. On didn’t change was the this front, Cadillac offers edgy design language three options and all they have become known three have more power for. The LED accent lights The longer and than the closest comare especially attractive lower stance of the CTS petitors. The first is the at night and run vertical makes it look athletic, same 2.0L turbocharged compared to most cars’ engine used by the ATS. horizontal approach. The yet elegant. With 272hp it is well longer and lower stance Zack Spencer above the 240hp offered of the CTS makes it look in the BMW 528i. The athletic, yet elegant. The carryover engine is the direct injection one weak area is the back. It lacks the 3.6L V6 with 321hp, again more than same visual punch as the impressive the 300hp in the 535i. The top of range front grille and headlamps. motor, for now, is the Vsport model Inside The new CTS is lighter than with a twin turbocharged version of the BMW but it is a bit smaller inside. the 3.6L engine, putting out 420hp. You It’s not as wide and the back seat is a guessed it, more power than the 400hp bit shorter. Front seat passengers are found in the V8 550i. The Vsport is only treated to plenty of room and a view sold as a rear wheel drive car (RWD) onto the dash is impressive. The centre where all the others are available with console has a touch-screen system all wheel drive (AWD). The catch is that called CUE, which has rich colours and AWD models come with an 8-speed striking graphics. The heat, volume and automatic transmission, but the AWD a few other controls are all touch-senversions are fitted with a 6-speed unit. sitive, meaning they have no dials The steering offers good feedback or switches. The problem is it shows to the driver and the suspension is fingerprints and dust against the shiny smooth, yet lively, and has a nearly black plastic. perfect 50/50 weight distribution.

‘‘

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Verdict The price of the CTS ranges from about $51,000 for the base model to $66,000 for the top premium trim level. The Vsport, high performance model is priced at almost $75,000. The Cadillac CTS is not an inexpensive car, but it offers many features like standard heated and vented leather seats, Bose stereo and push button start even on the base model. Compared to some of the other mid-sized luxury sedans it is less expensive, plus it is a worthy car for any driving enthusiast.

DOWN †

$

Please explain why you have made that decision.

?

QUESTION OF THE WEEK!

Go to drivewayBC.ca to submit your answer.

Safety Tip: Challenging fall and winter conditions can already be found in many parts of B.C. Please adjust your driving for the conditions you encounter. In poor weather, slow down, increase your following distance and give yourself plenty of time to get to your destination.

The Lowdown Power: 2.0L 4-cylinder with 155hp 3.6L V6 with 321hp or Turbo 3.6L with 420hp Fill-up: 10.5L/6.6L/100km (city/highway 2.0L turbo) Sticker price: $$50,895-$74,495

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ON NOW AT YOUR BC CHEVROLET DEALERS. Chevrolet.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. Chevrolet is a brand of General Motors of Canada†Offer valid only to eligible retail lessees in Canada who have obtained credit approval by GM Financial, have entered into a lease agreement with GM Financial, and who accept delivery from October 11, 2013 through January 2, 2014 of a new eligible 2014 model. General Motors of Canada will pay the first month’s lease payment (inclusive of taxes and any applicable pro-rata amount normally due at lease delivery as defined on the lease agreement). $0 first month lease payment means no bi-weekly payments will be due in the first month of your lease agreement. After the first month, lessee will be required to make all remaining scheduled payments over the remaining term of the lease agreement. PPSA/RDPRM is not due. Insurance, license, dealer fees, and applicable taxes not included. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. General Motors of Canada Limited reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. While we try to ensure accuracy, we reserve the right to correct any errors in pricing or descriptions, and to cancel or refuse to accept a purchase based on an incorrect price or description listed online. Please see your dealer for the most accurate and up-to-date product and pricing details. ^ Offer only valid from November 1, 2013 to December 2, 2013 (the “Program Period”) to retail customers resident in Canada who own or are currently leasing a Chevrolet Aveo, Cobalt, Caprice, Cavalier, Cruze, Epica, Impala, Lumina, Malibu, Metro, Monte Carlo, Optra Sonic, Spark, Volt, Saturn Ion, Aura, Astra, L-Series, S-Series, Sky, that has been registered and insured in Canada in the customer’s name for the previous consecutive six months, will receive a $2,000 credit towards the lease or a $1000 credit towards the purchase or finance of an eligible new 2014 Chevrolet Sonic, Cruze, Malibu or Impala delivered during the Program Period. Eligible retail customers resident in Canada who own or are currently leasing a Chevrolet HHR, Equinox, Tracker, Uplander, Venture, Astro, Lumina APV, Blazer, Traverse, Trailblazer; Saturn Vue, Relay, Outlook; Pontiac Montana/SV6, Transport, Torrent, Aztek, Sunrunner; Buick Rendezvous, Terraza, Enclave, Rainier; Oldsmobile Silhouette, Bravada; GMC Safari, Jimmy, Terrain, Acadia or Envoy, that has been registered and insured in Canada in the customer’s name for the previous consecutive six months, will receive a $2,000 credit towards the lease; or a $1000 credit towards the purchase or finance of an eligible new 2014 Chevrolet Trax, Equinox or Traverse delivered during the program period. Only one (1) credit may be applied per eligible vehicle sale. Offer is transferable to a family member living in the same household (proof of address required). This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. The $2,000/$1,000 credit includes HST/GST/QST/PST as applicable by province. As part of the transaction, dealer will request current vehicle registration and/or insurance to prove ownership for the previous consecutive six months. GMCL reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See your GM dealer for details.

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18 www.pentictonwesternnews.com 18 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, Friday,November November15, 15,2013 2013 Penticton Western News

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Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ‡, § The Dodge Number One Sales Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after November 1, 2013. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,595–$1,695) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees, other dealer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. •$19,998 Purchase Price applies to the new 2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F+CLE) only and includes $2,000 Consumer Cash Discount. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select new 2014 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. ‡4.29% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2014 Dodge Journey Ultimate Journey Package model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package with a Purchase Price of $19,998 (including applicable Consumer Cash Discounts discounts) financed at 4.29% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $114 with a cost of borrowing of $3,644 and a total obligation of $23,642. §2014 Dodge Journey R/T AWD shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $32,290. ^Based on 2013 Ward’s Middle Cross Utility segmentation. ❖Real Deals. Real Time. Use your mobile device to build and price any model. ¤Based on 2013 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. 2013 Dodge Journey SE 2.4 L 4-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.7 L/100 km (37 MPG) and City: 11.2 L/100 km (25 MPG). TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. DBC_131168_B2B_JOUR.indd 1

The temperature is starting to drop, the leaves are clogging up the streets and snow is beginning to fall in parts in parts of B.C. Driving in the winter season brings challenges no matter which part of the province you call home. My remarks are aimed chiefly at truck owners but the message is common for all: driver and vehicles must be equally prepared. In winter, braking and stopping vehicles of all kinds is perhaps where most of us get into trouble. The tires play a critical role in stopping the vehicle, and so they need even more care and attention than in the other seasons. Most SUVs have a passenger car tire classification with M+S stamped on the sidewall, for mud and snow and are considered allseason tires. If it is not, your vehicle must be fitted with tires suitable for any type of climate, even the most severe ones. In winter the pressure of the tire must also be controlled more frequently. This is because a reduction of the outside temperature causes a contraction of the air inside the tire, accelerating the normal and gradual

than the pavement. Do not use the cruise control in winter conditions. Even roads that appear clear can have sudden slippery spots and the short touch of your brakes to deactivate the cruise control Remember that feature can cause you to your four-wheel drive lose control of your vehicle. vehicle may help you Don’t get overconfident in your 4x4 vehicle. get going quicker Remember that your fourthan vehicles OHF other 100 Mile House Free Press wheel drive vehicle may but stopNews any help you get going quicker ABNit won’t Abbotsford than other vehicles but it faster.Abbotsford Mission Times MTN won’t help you stop any Ian faster. Besides, many 4x4 CVRHarwood Commox Valley Record pressure loss process by vehicles are heavier than FFP Fernie Free Press a value around 1-2 PSI passenger vehicles and KTW ThisinWeek actually may take longer for eachKamloops 5° C decrease temperature. to stop. KNA Kootenay West Advertiser Contrary to popular And don’t bank on your LNT Langley Times opinion, a lower inflation 4x4’s traction. Your 4x4 can pressureMaple than normal MRN Ridgedoes News lose traction as quickly as a not improve tire traction on two-wheel drive vehicle. NTC Northen Connector - Prince Rupert snow. It makes them much If your vehicle is equipped PVQ prone Parksville Qualicum with anti-lock brakes, do more to damage. Always remember that in not pump them in attemptPAN Peace Arch News any season and with any ing to stop. The right way is PWN Penticton News temperature, insufficient to steer into the skid while pressure is always the main PNV Prince Rupert N. Viewapplying the brake pedal cause of tire damage. evenly. QCObrakes Quesnel Cariboo Observer Use carefully. Look farther ahead in traffic Brake early. Brake correctly. than you normally do. RMD Richmond News It takes more time and Actions by cars and trucks LSN Salmon Arm Lakeshore News distance to stop in icy conwill alert you quicker to SMI Watch Smithers Interior News ditions. for slippery problems and give you a bridge decks, even when split second extra time to SND Surrey Now the rest of the pavement is react safely. Standard inTRS good Terrace condition. Bridge ian.harwood@drivewaydecks ice up News sooner bc.ca TCN will Tri-City

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MOS Vernon Morning Star

11/6/13 2:25 PM

WLT Williams Lake Tribune PRODUCTION NOTES

APPROVALS

BY

DATE

FINALS TO PRODUCTION


Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 19 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

drivewayBC.ca

Perpetual driving self-betterment:

Because you’re worth it Why should driving be any B.C. racecar driver Cherie different? Storms told me she was Why shouldn’t we actively taking an advanced driver engage in making ourselves training course to appease better drivers? her father’s wishes. Every time you get behind She’d been putting it off since the wheel of a vehicle, teenagedom. there’s a possibility you can That said, her father is an Every time you change your life or the lives accomplished racecar driver get behind the wheel of others. and a proficient motorist, so We might not think too much you could argue it was an of a vehicle, there’s inevitability. a possibility you can about it, but operating a vehicle is a huge responsibility. But she had to find the desire change your life or Poor driving habits, not in herself first. the lives of others. shoulder checking, not using What followed, even she your signals, driving in the didn’t think would happen. Alexandra Straub left lane when you’re not She recently took home the passing are minor details in championship title for the B the grand scheme of things, Spec series in her Mazda2 for but have a large impact. the 2013 race season. She grew up in a motorsports household but It’s never too late to refresh the basics and then pick up a few new good habits. it wasn’t until she actually got behind the wheel at the driving course that her mindset For example, if you look at any of the top athletes in their sport, they’re training most changed. of the time. “I was just overwhelmed with all of the They’re trying to perfect their craft, even technical aspects that it takes to be a good when they’re at the top of it. driver,” she stated. I doubt Sebastian Vettel slums around in his It’s like what my Grade 12 math teacher always said, “Math is not a spectator sport.” down time, even after winning his fourth consecutive Formula1 world championship. There was even a poster on the cubicle wall Sure, he gets a break, but he’s constantly to remind us. training to be faster and stronger. The same thing goes for driving. Except In another interview, I chatted with Izod there’s no poster in the cubicle for that! Indy racecar driver Simona de Silvestro. She We need to be an active participant, not a tells me that there’s really no such thing as wallflower. an “off-season.” Anyone who has taken advanced driving She says she trains all year long. In fact, courses will know exactly what Cherie is she trains harder when she’s not always talking about. It’s not just about knowing how to shift gears on a manual transmission behind the wheel of a car to prepare for the upcoming races. without jerking the car, or parallel parking your sedan without curbing the rims. Driving If the pros do it, we should to. Some of the most fun I’ve had behind the is so much more. wheel of a car has been at a driving school. I understand that this mode of transporWhether it was the three-day racing school tation is a necessity for many. And it’s at the Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca with something done out of convenience rather the Skip Barber program, or a track day than love. at the Mission Raceway with Morrisport Kind of like laundry or grouting the bathAdvanced Driving, or even a track program room floor tiles. close to you, it’s a win-win. Then again, for others, it’s a passion. Myself If we’re all safer drivers then the chances of included. accidents are minimized and we can keep Taking a specialized course, whether it’s a our vehicles dent-free longer. track day or a race school isn’t just for wannabe racers. It’s for everyone. And we can all And avoid going through insurance claims. The few hundred dollars it takes to enrol is learn if we have an open mind. of infinite worth in the long run. We read to keep our mind sharp. We walk/ Alexandra.straub@drivewaybc.ca run/work out to keep our bodies active. Twitter.com/cargirlsgarage We sleep to keep our bodies functioning.

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Driving is a skill that can always be improved. Alexandra Straub

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Rodney is a two-time winner Keith Morgan

Vernon resident Rodney Knopp is out first Question of the Week Winner. We asked readers to tell us about a favourite car from the past and Rodney had no hesitation in nominating his old Fiat. However, it wasn’t the car but the back-story that captured our hearts. “In 1978 when I was in high school in Kamloops I owned a 1972 Fiat 2-door sedan,” Rodney explained. “I was keen on a girl in school, and one day she asked me for a ride. While driving and chatting, the muffler fell off the car. She laughed and ducked down so as not to be seen by anyone. “I dropped her off and she laughed some more as I drove away, as loud as the car could be without a muffler.” Young Rodney figured that was that but . . . “Catherine and I are now in our 30th year of marriage and still love how the car connected us!” (We could only find a Fiat publicity photo of the four-door but there’s little difference.)

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20 www.pentictonwesternnews.com 20 www.pentictonwesternnews.com Friday, Friday,November November15, 15,2013 2013 Penticton Western News

drivewayBC.ca

A two-door version of this 1972 Fiat sedan helped Rodney Knopp of Kamloops find the love of his life.


Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 21 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Smart car a smart choice for rural living

‘‘

But cars like the Smart and i3 maybe have a role to play as a family’s second vehicle ...

’’

Keith Morgan

People point and laugh at Jim Knowles when he drives his Smart Fortwo Electric Drive through downtown Campbell River. But he and his wife Catherine have the last laugh when they open up their hydro bill. “I think the last bill was just a few dollars more than the one we got before we bought the car in July so that’s inexpensive driving,” said Knowles. “I work out at the airport and so I travel about 10 kilometres each way every day. I never let the battery go below 20 per cent but I still find I can sometimes go four days before I plug it in overnight.” In the summer, Knowles said he can easily get up to the 160 km range on a single charge but knows the Vancouver Island winter will take that down to around 120 as the wipers and heater take their energy toll. “We moved from Ladner three-and-half years ago with our Smart Diesel. I think people here thought we would buy something a little bigger – this is the truck capital of the Island after all.” But they came back from a car-shopping jaunt from Richmond with the little electric car, which set them back around $26,990 less a generous B.C. government rebate of $5,000. “We stopped in Qualicum Beach to charge it for a couple of hours and made it back here easily.” The car charges on what

For driving safety tips visit www. icbc.com

is called a level one (basic) charger but with rebates now offered on fast chargers, they are contemplating investing in one. Knowles got in touch with Driveway to tell of his experiences with the smart car, following our launch piece on the BMWi3 electric car a few weeks ago. We would like to hear from others, who are driving pure electric vehicles in rural areas. Electric vehicles are frequently dismissed as being good only for urban dwellers. The Knowles couple are demonstrating they

can serve people outside of major cities. Admittedly, they don’t travel far each day but then surely that’s the case for many rural residents. Yes, trucks, larger cars and SUVs will always dominate in parts of the province where harsh winters are commonplace and distances travelled are greater. But cars like the Smart and i3 maybe have a role to play as a family’s second vehicle in those locations. What do you think? keith.morgan@drivewaybc.ca

drivewayBC.ca

The Smart Fortwo electric drive has a range of up to 160 kilometres on a single charge. Keith Morgan

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22

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Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

Sports Editor: Emanuel Sequeira • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 224 E-mail: sports@pentictonwesternnews.com

sports

Admiring the islands Behind the Mask with Hunter Miska

Sports editors note: Throughout the season, Hunter Miska and Olivier Mantha will write a column for the Penticton Western News giving readers insight to their lives either on the ice or away from the rink.

BLAINE BLACK delivers his rock during the Pacific International Cup last year, which he and teammates Doug McCrae, left, Kim Dixon, right and Shaun Everest, not in the picture, won. The four are going to Thunder Bay, Ont., for the Dominion Curling Club Championship. Submitted photo

Black rink ready to rock Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

Blaine Black’s curling team is ready to duke it out with 14 other rinks for the fifth Dominion Curling Club Championship. Black, along with Shaun Everest, Doug McCrae and Kim Dixon head to Thunder Bay, Ont. Sunday for the event that concludes on Nov. 23. The extravaganza offers club curlers the ultimate experience of facing men’s and women’s teams from across the country. There are two pools of seven and the Penticton rink is sharing a pool with defending champions Alberta and runnersup Manitoba. Black said they know they are in tough and have to play at the top of their game if they expect to make the playoffs. When asked if he considers themselves underdogs, Black said he wasn’t sure. “I think if we play at the level that we can play at, we can compete with those guys,” said Black, who has competed at the provincial level four times. “I think we showed that when we were at the provincials. It’s going to come down to consistency. If we get good ice and we get a good read on the ice, we will be able to be consistent.” It’s the first time for the team at the Dominion Curling Club championship. In 2010, they lost in the provincial final. With Alberta and Manitoba in their pool, Black said it’s going to be important for them to be sharp. “I’m pretty confident,” said Black of their play. “I think we’re playing

The four of us get along well. Half the game is not just talent, it’s camaraderie and getting along. — Blaine Black

pretty well.” Black compared this championship to the Tim Horton’s Brier and it’s something he looks forward to. He admits there are some nerves they will have to shed. “We have a little bit of an advantage. Monday we have a bye. We don’t play Manitoba until Tuesday morning,” said Black. “So we get to see what is going on, watch the games.” With the other members of his team bringing experience from high-pressure situations, Black doesn’t think they will be overly nervous. It’s especially true with Dixon. He brings the experience of competitive golf and has won the Penticton Golf and Country Club title. “The one big thing I’ve noticed is the team aspect of it is a lot different,” he said. “When I’m on my own on the golf

course, it’s just me. I don’t really worry about that too much, it’s my result. With the team aspect, if I don’t play my best, there are four of us it affects. There is a bit more to think about. I play enough sports I don’t get too nervous.” While he hasn’t put too much thought into the championship, he’s looking forward to being there. “I enjoy the competitive atmosphere of it,” he said. “Just meeting all the other people from across the country and seeing how our game in B.C. stacks up against the provinces better known for curling, like the Prairies and out east where you see the teams on TV all the time.” Black is excited to wear the B.C. jacket and representing the province and the Penticton Curling Club. “It’s a challenge to go and do well,” said Black. There is one key, he pointed out. “The four of us get along well,” said Black, who has lots of confidence in his teammates. “Half the game is not just talent, it’s camaraderie and getting along.” Dominion notes: Since the championship’s inception five years ago in Toronto, more than $300,000 has been raised for Spinal Cord Injury chapters across Canada. Funds raised go towards peer supported programs and assistance for people experiencing the impact of spinal cord injuries. Last year the championship raised $68,000. For more info about the championship, visit thedominioncurls.ca.

Coming from the land of 10,000 lakes in Minnesota, to the mountains and valleys of B.C., the scenery here is a big difference from what I am used to. The area of Minnesota where I’m from is mostly farm fields, lakes and lots of woods. I was in awe the first time I came to British Columbia because it is so different from where I’m from. I really like the mountains because I’m not used to seeing that every day. When we travelled to the Sunshine Coast and Vancouver Island last weekend, I was a big fan of the area. I

loved seeing the open water with mountains in the background. It was also cool taking ferries to get to the places we had to go. This was a first for me. I was really hoping to see a whale on the way, but I wasn’t lucky enough to see one. Besides all that, it has been a great experience being able to travel around B.C. and seeing all the different areas. I have been very fortunate being able to see all these wonderful things with playing hockey.

sports

IN BRIEF Charity golf tourney raises $44,000

Penticton Golf and Country Club hosted its Penticton and Friends Charity Golf Classic and raised $44,000. In 27 years, the PGCC has now raised more than $990,000. This year’s event supported B.C. Special Olympics, Penticton and District Society for Community Living, Moog and Friends Hospice, O.S.N.S., Good Samaritan Village by the Station, Agur Lake Camp, MS Society, Salvation Army Food Bank, Alzheimer’s Society, Shriners Transportation Fund and the South Okanagan Boys and Girls Club.

Goaltending helps Vees in Abbotsford

Backed by the strong goaltending of Brandon Locket, the Penticton Quiznos midget Vees went 2-1-1 during the Abbotsford Memorial Midget Tournament on Nov. 8. The Vees picked up wins against the Juan de Fuca Grizzlies and Portland Winterhawks under-16 team. They earned a tie against the Abbotsford Hawks, then lost 3-2 to Calgary in the semifinal. Locket allowed seven goals in four games, while the team was led offensively by Justin Thornton and Myle Thibodeau each with three goals. Daylan Devlin scored twice with singles coming from Michael MacLean, Nick Graham, Liam Hutcheson and Dennis Zoeller.

Men’s rec hockey action

The Mule Broncos defeated the EcoDry Ice Dogs 6-2 thanks to a three-goal effort by Stuart Nisbet in Penticton Men’s Recreational Hockey League action.

See MENS REC - Page 23


Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

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23

sports

Vees bolster forward depth with deal Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

Brendan Lamont is excited to make his home debut for the Penticton Vees. Acquired Tuesday evening from the Trail Smoke Eaters for future considerations, Lamont has played in the South Okanagan Events Centre as a member of the Merritt Centennials, where he played for two seasons, scoring 12 goals and collecting 25 assists. “I always loved playing here. It was a cool atmosphere, always a lot of people,” said Lamont, who is from Langley. “Really looking forward The Vees picked up Lamont after losing Josh Blanchard to a lower body injury that has placed him on the 60-day injured reserve. Vees coachGM Fred Harbinson said in a team statement that line-up. “We have played a lot of hard fought battles against Brendan over the past few seasons; he brings experience, speed and a relentless work ethic.” “Brendan had asked to be a bit closer to home and we were willing to accommodate his request,” said Smoke Eaters coach-GM Nick Deschenes on the team’s website. Lamont said he enjoyed his time in Trail, calling the Smoke Eaters

a classy organization, but said it was far from home. “I’m really excited about the opportunity,” said Lamont, who learned of his trade Tuesday evening. Lamont hopes to contribute to the Vees with speed, energy and tenacity. He also said he hopes to contribute offensively. on Wednesday, he lined up with Cody DePourcq and Travis Blanleil. “I think we had some good chemistry early on,” said Lamont, who will against the Warriors in West Kelowna Friday night. “It’s going to be a good line.” In preparation for their tilt against the Warriors, one of the things the Vees worked on was shot blocking using sponge pucks. Forward Cam Amantea said it’s an area of their game they have kind of been lacking. During their last road trip that took them to Powell River, Nanaimo and Alberni Valley, Amantea said they had goals scored from shots getting through. “If we clean that up, our D-zone is going to be pretty good,” said Amantea. The team was using sponge pucks because as Amantea said, it’s easier dence. ously a huge thing,” he said. “Some guys are timid to get hit by the puck in

CAM AMANTEA (74) and the Penticton Vees lost to the Nanaimo Clippers 3-2 in overtime on Nov. 9. The Vees will get a second crack at the Clippers at the South Okanagan Events Centre on Saturday. Greg Sakaki/Black Press

certain spots. This helps up. Kind of teach you the fundamentals of getting in the lane.” When facing the Warriors, Vees defenceman Chris Rygus said they know each time they face a division rival, “ it’s going to be just like playoff hockey.” “We have to treat road games like we’re playing at home,” he said. The Vees’ rematch with the Nanaimo Clippers Saturday is about payback. The Vees weren’t happy

Mustangs confident heading into Okanagan Valley’s Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

The South Zone champion Princess Margaret Secondary Mustangs senior boys volleyball team is peaking at the right time. That’s the feeling that coach Bo Boxall has. “If we can continue to practice at the (Okanagan) Valleys, which should set us up nicely for the provincials,” he said. Currently ranked seventh in the province, Boxall said the Valley’s, scheduled for this weekend in Vernon, will provide great competition at the AA level. “If we play well, we should have a good shot at winning the Valleys,” he added. To accomplish that, the Mustangs must go through Okanagan Mis-

sion Huskies, ranked fourth, Vernon’s Fulton Secondary Maroons, ranked eighth and Lake C o u n t r y ’s George Elliot Coyotes,

ranked 10th. The region will also be represented by the South Okanagan Secondary Hornets, who will face the Mustangs on Friday in the championship opener. The Mustangs claimed the South Zone championship on Nov. 6 when they swept the Hornets 25-17, 25-11 and 25-9. The Mustangs were led by the middle hitter trio of Kohl Linder, Brett Lavigne and Duncan Woods. The group combined for 19 kills.

about losing 3-2 in overtime. served a win for 40 minutes of that game,” said Rygus. “We just didn’t bare down in the third period. The good thing about hockey is you get a chance to redeem yourself.” Vees notes: NHL Central Scouting released their preliminary player rankings ahead of the 2014 NHL Entry Draft and nine BCHL players are named among the 20 Canadian Junior Hockey

League players. All CJHL players were listed as C grade prospects, meaning they would likely be chosen in the fourth round or lower. The Vees have three in defenceman Alexadre Coulombe, forward Jack Ramsey and goalie Hunter Miska. Other BCHL players include, Vernon’s Mason Blacklock and Demico Hannoun, Salmon Arm’s Alex Gillies, Powell River’s Luke Ripley, Adam Rockwood of Coquitlam and Jeff Wight of Merritt.

MEN’S REC - Wolves score big

The Broncos received goals from Rob Burnett, Eric Cerutti and Andrew Pond. Mike Funk and Nick Riep scored for the Ice Dogs. The Broncos then defeated the Hitmen 6-3 on goals by Jordan Moss, Carl Walton, Taylor Cote, Matt Krause, Nisbet and Jamie Johnson. Scoring for the Hitmen, who are now 4-3-1, were Brett Van Riper, Chris Arlidge and Joel Post. The wins improved the Broncos to 5-2 putting them second in the standings. The Game Time Sports Wolverines, 1-6-0, exploded for a 15-5 win against the Cawston Cold Storage Best Damn Wings. Joel Marte led the way for the Wolverines with a hat-trick, while Ryan MacMurchy, Jack Strommen and Derek Grimm each scored two goals. Scoring for the Wings were Dylan Wilson with two, Travis Nelson, Cody Hantelman and Kenny Whitford each with one. The Wings are now 1-6-0.

Penticton 45-plus soccer

In 45 and over soccer, Penticton Lock and Key edged Rona 6-5 in round three action. Vlado Zamecnik led with three goals, while Roland Kruger scored twice and Daver Hewer with one. Scoring for Rona was Kevin Kothlow and Dave Killick with two, while Venna Veselka had one. Find full briefs at www.pentictonwesternnews.com. OK Awards Plus defeated TC Auto Sales 10-8.

Fast Facts 1 2 3

Playing with Brad McClure and Ben Dalpe, Cam Amantea registered two goals. The West Kelowna Warriors are 5-4-0 at home. The Clippers, who come to the SOEC on Saturday, are 5-4-0-1 on the road. Vees captain Brad McClure leads the team with three game winning goals

Scoring for OK Awards Plus was Andy Burt with with two. For TC Auto Sales, it was Mike Weckel and Rob Kroeker with three and Peter Toth and Mark McKinlay with one each. OK Awards Plus, TC Auto Sales and PE Lock and Key are in a three-way tie at 2-1. Rona is 0-3.

Team B.C. girls lose to Atlantic nal preliminary game during the 2013 Women’s under-18 national championship in Calgary Nov. 8. Scoring for B.C. was Okanagan Hockey Academy prep player Brie Bellerive and Penticton’s Jessie Olfert of the Thompson Okanagan Rockets. Alyssa Erickson led the team with one goal and four points in four games. Bellerive led the squad with three points. Team Ontario Red won gold over Ontario Blue 8-1. Alberta captured the bronze medal with a 6-5 win against Quebec.

Under-16 boys get silver

Team B.C. lost the Western Challenge under-16 Cup 4-2 to Alberta. Okanagan Hockey Academy player Beck Malenstyn of Delta scored for B.C. Also playing for B.C. from the OHA was Brody Wilms, The championship was held in Calgary Oct. 31 to Nov. 3


24

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Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

sports Do you know someone who should be nominated for

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK?

Email sports editor Emanuel Sequeira information and a photo to: sports@pentictonwesternnews.com Info should by sent by Monday at 5 p.m.

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LEARNING THE BASICS — Penticton Curling Club instructor Sherrie Burechailo (left) works with students Dee Redfern (middle) and Ron Lelievre (right) on the finer points of the game at Saturday’s learn-to-curl clinic. Joe Fries/Western News

Charitable donation receipts will be issued.

Soupateria Society

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Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

P e n t i c t o n Secondary School Lakers coach Paul Mend likes his team’s chances heading into the AAA Okanagan Valley Championship. The key is staying healthy leading up to Saturday and his players maintaining consistent play. The Lakers face the Mt. Boucherie Bears in the semifinal, while the other semifinal match features the Kelowna Secondary School Owls and NorKam Saints. The winners move on to the gold medal game, while the other two play for bronze and the third and final provincial spot. Kelowna is hosting the provincial championship from Nov. 27 to 30. “I think the guys are in a good state of mind right now,” said Mend, whose team is ranked sixth provincially. “We are continuing to get better in practice and that’s all a coach can ask.” The Lakers are familiar with the Bears and Mend said they need to slow them down in the middle. The key is playing well, but Mend

6/14/2013 10:27:03 AM

PENTICTON SECONDARY LAKERS teammates position themselves while Blair Anderson is flies through the air to smash this ball during a tournament in Kamloops. The Lakers will be in Mt. Boucherie this wekeend for the AAA Okangan Valley championship. Allen Douglas/Kamloops This Week

stressed the challenge is playing consistently. On Nov. 6, the Lakers finished league play against the Saints. The Lakers trav-

eled seven hours to win in 50 minutes as they swept the bestof-five match. Mend, who gave all his players court time, said it wasn’t their best per-

formance of the season. “A 3.5 hour bus ride can sometimes do that to a team. We controlled each set handily,” said Mend.


Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

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25

sports

Young driver recognized with award Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

Clayton Campbell was pleasantly surprised about being the recipient of the Bobbi Wilson Young Driver’s Award. “I was like, wow, nice,” said Campbell of his reaction. “I was really excited.” Campbell, who raced in the Hornet class at Penticton Speedway this season, is happy to win the award his brother Matthew won two years ago. Johnny Aantjes, owner of Penticton Speedway, said the Bobbi Wilson Award is for the young driver that best demonstrates enthusiasm, a willingness to learn, and is an overall good person in character and attitude. “Clayton is all of these,” said Aantjes. “An extension of his family that are great examples of the type of people that we need at Penticton Speedway.” Campbell finished fifth overall with 646 points, two spots behind his brother, in the overall standings. Aantjes described Campbell as a good driver, who possesses patience and doesn’t try to over drive the car. “This is always difficult for new drivers to learn,” he said. “This kid is a good driver now and will only get better with age.” Campbell said his season went well as he had no major problems with

his car. While the B class in the Hornets wasn’t overly challenging for the 15-year-old, it was different in the A class. “A class was really good,” said Campbell, adding that competing against A drivers helped him improve. “Some of them give you tips.” Campbell, who just finished his second season, was lured to the track by his family. They would go to watch the races, which included his grandfather. Then Campbell’s brother started racing. One day Campbell’s father asked him if he wanted to race and found him a car. Campbell is competitive with his brother, but was at a disadvantage because his car wasn’t as fast. What Campbell enjoyed most of the season was simply racing. “It’s fun, good adrenaline,” said Campbell.

CLAYTON CAMPBELL had a successful season racing in the Hornet class at Penticton Speedway finishing fifth overall in the standings. He was recognized for his accomplishments by earning the Bobbi Wilson Young Drivers Award. To the left, owner Johnny Aantjes presents a trophy to Campbell. Mark Brett/Western News

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Your community. Your classieds.

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INFO

Classified

• CHECK YOUR AD! Notice of error must be given in time for correction before the second insertion of any advertisement. The publisher will not be responsible for omissions or for more than one incorrect insertion, or for damages or costs beyond the cost of the space actually occupied by the error. • Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved. • Readers: In ads where ‘male’ is referred to, please read also as ‘female’ and where ‘female’ is used, read also as ‘male’.

Word Classified Advertising Deadlines: WEDNESDAY PAPER TUESDAY 10 A.M. FRIDAY PAPER THURSDAY 10 A.M. OPEN EARLY 8 AM MONDAY MORNINGS TO SERVE YOU BETTER!

250-492-0444

Regular office hours: Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Announcements

Announcements

Funeral Homes

Information

Credible Cremation

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

Services Ltd.

Lesley H. Luff Senior/Owner Licensed Director Sensible pricing for practical people.

$990 + taxes

Basic Cremation No hidden costs.

24 Hrs 250-493-3912 New Location 101-596 Martin St., Penticton V2A 5L4 (corner of Martin and White)

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca

www.crediblecremation.com

Ask Us Why

ONSITE CREMATION Is So Important...

Call Anytime

250-493-4112

www.everdenrust.com

The South Okanagan’s

LOWEST COST Direct Cremation

Cremations done locally

Licensed Staff

250-488-4004

FOUND: Women’s prescription sunglasses and case. Phone 250-770-7686 Lost: 7yr old white neutered male cat, tip of ears/tail orange, very friendly, lost in Braelyn Cres. He answers to the name Slash. Call 2504923564 Lost, bus pass, if anyone finds it please drop off at the Penticton Herald office. Lost, Ladies 21 speed Norco bike, Fuchsia and black, (250)492-0489

Travel

Exclusive Provider of

Coming Events CAFÉS-RENCONTRES EN FRANÇAIS Ateliers GRATUITS, pour 50 ans et plus, cet automne à Penticton, Kelowna et Vernon. Transport fourni. Rigolothérapie, photographie, IPADS, pâtisserie, musique. Info : 250. 860.4074 info@leccfo.org

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

HIGHWAY OWNER OPERATORS $3500 SIGNING BONUS Van Kam’s Group of Companies requires Highway linehaul Owner Operators based in our Kelowna terminal for runs throughout BC and Alberta. Applicants must have winter and mountain, driving experience/ training. We offer above average rates and an excellent employee benefits package.

To join our team of professional drivers, email a detailed resume, current driver’s abstract & details of your truck to: careers@vankam.com Call 604-968-5488 Fax: 604-587-9889

Van-Kam is committed to Employment Equity and Environmental Responsibility.

Vacation Spots

FIND EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

LIVE IN CAREGIVER Our family requires an energetic, caring, full-time, live-in Nanny to help care for 2 children (4 year old active boy and 13 year old girl) in a private home. Duties include: supervised care for children, transport when req., prepare meals & general housekeeping. You should have min. of 6 months care-giver training course or exp. in a similar role & a high school or equivalent education plus a valid Driver’s License. $10.25/hr, 5 days/week, 8 hrs/day, send resume to: m1980godfrey@hotmail.com

Found, hunting knife near Apex, appears to be a “going away present”, call (250)4935345 to identify

Mexican Beach Hideaway www.posadalasflores.com Special snowbird rates.

The Memorial Society of B.C.

Childcare

Only those of interest will be contacted.

#5-230A Martin St., Penticton

www.simplicitycare.com

Employment

Lost & Found

Lost, Paula Dean prescription glasses, maroon colour, call (778)476-0562 By Appointment

fax 250.492.9843 email classieds@pentictonwesternnews.com

Children Childcare Available Pam’s Family Daycare, licensed, 2 spaces 1 years & up, CCRR member, 492-0113

Farm Workers VINEYARD LABOURERS Required 30 full time workers from February to end of August for pruning and other vineyard tasks. Six days a week, 8-10 hours per day, $10.25/hr., Please fax resumes to Constellation Brands Canada Inc., 250498-4992 or Mail to: PO Box 1650, 7857 Tucelnuit Drive Oliver, BC, V0H 1T0

Obituaries

Obituaries

Help Wanted

RHEAUME

Relief is only a call away! Call 250-979-4357 to set up your FREE consultation in Penticton. Donna Mihalcheon CA, CIRP 33 years experience. BDO Canada Limited. Trustee in Bankruptcy. 200-1628 Dickson Avenue, Kelowna , BC V1Y 9X1

Cleaners required immediately in Osoyoos, Oliver, Penticton, Summerland, West Kelowna, call (250)490-1713

Be Part of Our Team.

Carriers Needed

2 Days a Week - Early Mornings

The Penticton Western News has Routes available in these areas for Wednesday & Friday:

• Penticton • Osoyoos • Oliver

Joseph Eugene (Gene)

December 3, 1932 - November 1, 2013 Humanitarian, Statesman “I strove with none, for none was worth my strife, Nature I loved, and next to nature art; I warmed both hands before the fire of life; It sinks and I am ready to depart.” Walter Savage Lander, 1853 Gene succumbed, after a valiant and courageous struggle from complications of cancer surgery, amid the loving presence of family. He leaves a tremendous sadness and loss to family and friends; long time friend and partner Margaret Jones and her children; David; daughter Bronwyn (Granddaughter) Felix Bailey-Jones, Daughter Lauri Megan (Rory) Gavin and Leah MacVicar, Son; Richard (Ricardo) Jones. And other relatives in Australia; Nina (Tony) Jesse, Gabriel and Mila Lamont. Brother; Jim (Adeline) and their children, James and Denise; son; Gene (Vicki) and their children, Amanda “Chile” and Thomas “Thomasino”, son; Ross (Althea), son; Steve (Cathy) and their son; Jeffy and the three “Instants”; daughter, Jocelyn “the son I never had” (Jimmy) Gillissie; son; Marc “Polo” (Kelley); son David (Nancy) and their children, Ross “Bist”, Alison “Owly” and Alan as well as many nieces and nephews. Gene lead a distinguished life in social service and politics (First Metis Member of Parliament since Riel). Gene also proposed the idea of “Canada’s Great Canoe Pageant”, which was presented and accepted in Parliament and went on to become the main Celebration during the 1967 Centennial. Special thanks to Dr. David Paisley and medical staff at Kelowna and Penticton Hospitals. Cremation by request. A private ceremony and Celebration of Life will be held at a later date in Ontario. Condolences may be shared by visiting www.everdenrust.com

Help Wanted ARE YOU EXPERIENCING FINANCIAL DISTRESS?

circulation@pentictonwesternnews.com

www.blackpress.ca

Be Part of Our Team. Sub-Contractor Driver Must have 3/4 ton or 1 ton Van 2 days a week - Wednesday & Friday Early morning deliveries For more info please call 250-492-0444 Ext: 219 or 205 or email: circulation@pentictonwesternnews.com

www.blackpress.ca

Be a part of your community paper. Comment online.

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

OIL & GAS INDUSTRY GUARANTEED Job Placement

• Labourers • Tradesmen • Class 1 Drivers

Business Opportunities

Call 24Hr. Free Recorded Message 1-888-213-2854

SERIOUS RETIREMENT IMPACT Do you want more in your retirement: Great income potential. FREE online training. Flx hrs. Health/Wellness. www.project4wellness.com

Gravel Truck Driver required for out of town full or part time. Must have valid Class 1 lic., & current safety tickets. 250-550-6208 Email bearpawearthworks@telus.net

• Summerland • Trout Creek

For more info please call 250-492-0444 Ext: 219 or 205 or email:

GENERAL LABOURERS

Employment

Help Wanted

voices W there’s more online »


Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

Employment

Employment

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 27

Employment

Services

Services

Services

Carpet Cleaning

Handypersons

Feed & Hay

Owner - Operator

Plumbing, taps, toilets, dishwashers, electrical, light fixtures, switches, plugs & many other services, call Gord, (250)328-2710

Good quality meadow hay, tarp covered, $150 per ton, (250)499-5407

Premium Wood Shavings New supplier of Animal bedding, starting at $250 for 54 cubic yards delivered, (250)770-0214

Home Care/Support

Trades, Technical

Trades, Technical

Counselling

Care-aid needed for quadriplegic, Dec. 1, training provided, $18/hour, 250-486-6787

B.C. Interiorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest RV dealer, is growing! Voyager RV is building a brand new RV Service shop, and need fulltime Apprentice and Journeyman RV technicians. If you are qualified, and have a passion to join a great service team, and work on the best RV brands, now is the time! Competitive wages, including bonus plans, plus benefits! Please send your resumes to parts@voyagerrv.ca (Attn: Logan) or call 1-800-668-1447.

LOUISIANA-PACIFIC Canada Ltd. requires an experienced Journeyman Electrician for our EWP Operation in Golden B.C. Email resume to: Audra.Stanton@LPCorp.com or fax to 250-344-8859.

T R A N S F O R M AT I O N A L SPIRITUAL Life Coach. Beliefs, behaviours, relationships, results! Morningstar, (250)6892297 by appt.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on the net at www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

Home Improvements

We are looking for an experienced Electrical/Estimator Manager to join our firm. The successful candidate must be skilled in electrical design, and be able to manage the day to day operations of a small to medium-sized firm, including dispatching, purchasing and cost accounting. Excellent benefit package including a vehicle. Please send resume to: sandrak@vip.net

Financial Services

HOME RENOVATIONS

NURSES, Care Aides, Home Cleaners - Bayshore Home Health is hiring casual, on-call RNs, certified care aides and experienced cleaners. If you are: personable; energetic; positive; possess an outstanding work ethic; a passion for superior client service, and a reliable vehicle, pls forward your resume c/w 2 references to shgeekie@bayshore.ca. Only those shortlisted will be contacted.

Trades, Technical Automotive Journeyman Mechanic required in Kamloops Mon-Fri Send resume to service@valleyviewauto motive.com (250) 372-7333

Career Opportunities

FRONTLINE is seeking certified electricians and millwrights with industrial experience for work in BC/Alberta. FEC offers competitive wages and benefits package. Forward resumes to: frontlinehuman resources@gmail.com.

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com Need Cash? Own A Vehicle? Borrow Up To $25,000 Snapcarcash.com

CALL 250-809-4965

1-855-653-5450

or visit:

www.greenvalleycarpetcare.ca

Services

Cleaning Services

Mind Body Spirit

Career Opportunities

VERNON SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 22 (VERNON)

For Men: Massage $95., also waxing, grooming and skin care. Winfield 9-9 Daily. Alan 250-766-2048

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

MANAGER OF MAINTENANCE School District No.22 (Vernon) invites applications for the position of Manager of Maintenance whose main focus will be planning and managing maintenance operations for district owned facilities. Reporting to the Director of Facilities, this position is responsible for the efficient implementation and management of maintenance programs and services, including coordinating and overseeing the activities of a variety of resources including unionized staff, contractors and consultants. Additionally, the Manager needs the vision to develop the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic and operational plans. The ideal candidate will have a diploma, trades qualification, or a degree related to construction or facilities management along with significant experience in facilities leadership, construction and maintenance management in a unionized environment. A complete job description is available on the district website www. sd22.bc.ca. Follow the links to Human Resources, Opportunities, Administrative positions. ResumĂŠs, including references and a statement of your leadership philosophy must be received by the undersigned by 2:00 pm Friday, November 22, 2013. Please include a reference from your current supervisor. Manager of Maintenance Job Search School District No. 22 (Vernon) 1401 - 15 Street Vernon, B.C. V1T 8S8 Email: ljameson@sd22.bc.ca



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While we thank all individuals who have submitted applications for this position, only those shortlisted will be contacted.

GREEN VALLEY CARPET CARE

Green - Clean - Thorough Environmentally Safe Dry in 2 hours only! Honest & Reliable Service.

                     

                 

Cleaning, house sitting, animal sitting avail. immed., refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s avail., call 250-492-5907 Housekeeping - not just the basics, anything you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t or donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to do, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do it for you. Move-inâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, move-outs, 18 yrs. in the businessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had an unhappy client. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had the rest, now try the best. (250)462-0644 MISS MOP Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TASKER. Licensed, bonded & insured professional house cleaning service. Contact 250-809-7522

Countertops REFACE DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T REPLACE 1/2 the Cost of Replacing

Corian & Granite Designs. The Green Alternative 10% off with this ad.

www.okanagancountertopsystem.com

250-470-2235

Handypersons G & S Hauling & Junk Removal, painting & small repairs, carpentry, fence repairs, house & garage cleaning, call Gary for a free estimate, cell 250-462-1165, Home 778476-4721 Yard work & painting, fences, deck repair or new, garbage hauling, plumbing, roofing, licensed, ins., 250-462-2146

Education/Trade Schools

HEALTH CARE ASSISTANT 110 -

Our HCA program is for students with strong wills and warm hearts. Learn how to work with a team of health care professionals to identify and address the unique needs of each unique client. Career Opportunities: Community Health Worker O Care Aide Home Support O Acute & Complex Care

CALL PENTICTON: 250.770.2277 OR VISIT SPROTTSHAW.COM

â&#x20AC;˘ Bathrooms â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchens â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Basements â&#x20AC;˘

250-488-5338 BELCAN

Painting & Renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

licensed, insured, WCB

painting, tiling, ď&#x192;&#x;ooring, kitchen/bath renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, carpentry ď&#x192;&#x17E;nishing,

Len (250)486-8800 www.belcan.ca lenmass@gmail.com

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to do those repairs and renos to your home? Need someone that is experienced, insured and reliable? Call Tony at 250492-1157 today.

Misc Services Massage for Men 9-9 daily Winfield - by Al. 250-766-2048

Moving & Storage FAMILY Movers. Moving? Anything, anywhere. Local and long distance trips. Packing service available, weekly trips to Vancouver, Alberta, full and partial loads. Cheapest rates in the valley. Free Estimates, 250-493-2687

Painting & Decorating HERE COME THE PAINTERS, 12 years experience, Interior/Exterior, 250-486-2331 WWW.PAINTSPECIAL.COM

(1) 250-899-3163

Pets & Livestock

Livestock

Merchandise for Sale

Building Supplies Natural Wood Products Log Homes & Sidings, Cedar & Pine T&G, Decorative Shingles, Wood Flooring, Timbers & Beams. RBS Lumby, BC. www.rouckbros.com 1-800960-3388

Free Items 6ft wall unit with desk light, use for student desk, home office, bar, craft center or ??? 250-497-7804 Free apple wood, you cut, you take, (250)487-9295, 1260 Broughton Ave. Free firewood, apple wood, you cut and haul away, 250809-5807, 250-493-3458

Firewood/Fuel A-1 Firewood, Full cords Fir, $275, mixed, $250, Pine, $200, split & delivered, 1/2 cords and 1/4 cords avail., free delivery, 250-770-0827, 250-809-0127 eves.

Furniture

NOW OPEN Shelleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vintage Inspirations

Browse our fine collection of Shabby Chic Home Decor and Antiques Open Wed to Sun 10-5:30pm

94 Ellis Street

3 Rooms For $299,

778-476-3200

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls. Cloverdale Premium Quality Paint. NO PAYMENT, until job is completed!

XMAS COMPANY COMING BRAND NEW QUEEN SET $200. Still in plastic, mfg. warranty. 250.870.2562

2 Coats Any Colour

Rubbish Removal PENTICTON Junk Removal! Anything goes! Household waste, furniture and appliances to the dump 250-770-0827

Tiling KALEDEN Tile - Professional installation of all types of tile and stone. Glass back splashes, tile floors, fireplaces, showers and pans. Free estimates, insured, references and pictures available. No Job to big or small. Glen 250-488-1985

Garage Sales Garage Sale, Sat., Nov.16, 9am-2pm, 196 Waterford, 1/2 price on all clothing, purses & shoes, various sizes, womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plus sizes, leather & wool coats, 1X-2X, some new jewelry & other household items,old sewing machine, held in garage at back of property INDOOR GARAGE SALE #30 - 471 Winnipeg St. Sat., Nov. 16, 10 am -2 pm Moving-Everything must go!

$59 single storey, cleaned inside & out, seniors discount, (250)488-1956

Indoor Garage Sale, Sat., Nov. 16, 7am-2pm, #6-3999 Skaha Lake Rd., Sun Leisure MHP, moving sale; bookshelves, dressers, scuba suits/tanks and lots more!

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Window Cleaning

l Like working close to home! www.localwork.ca blackpress.ca â&#x2014;ž metroland.com


28 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Real Estate

Garage Sales

Heavy Duty Machinery

Mobile Homes & Parks

MOVING OUT SALE 534 RED WING DR. Couch and chairs, 2 Lazy Boys, coffee table & 2 end tables, dishes, patio sets, cookware and more... Sat., Nov. 16/13 10 am -????? Oliver Indoor Flea Market Saturday, 8am-4pm Sunday, 9am-3pm 12,000 sqft of treasures Concession on site Turn downhill at Chevron New vendors welcome call Cory 250-408-4222

Heavy Duty Machinery A-STEEL SHIPPING DRY STORAGE CONTAINERS Used 20’40’45’53’and insulated containers all sizes in stock. SPECIAL Trades are welcome. 40’ Containers under $2500! Call Toll Free Also JD 544 & 644 wheel loaders JD 892D LC Excavator Ph 1-866-528-7108 Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

Auctions

SCRAP PAPPY Will pay cash for oversized scrap steel, cats, yarders, saw mill equipment, farm equipment, etc., All insurance in place to work on your property. www.scrappappy.ca 250-260-0217.

Misc. for Sale 2 sets of PVC vertical blinds, reasonable, phone for info, (250)492-0133 HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper?

Misc. Wanted Local Coin Collector Buying Collections, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins etc 250-499-0251

Sporting Goods Quality Firearms Buy & Sell. Weber & Markin Gunsmiths The Best Little Gunshop Around 4-1691 Powick Rd Kel 250-762-7575 Tue-Sat 10-6 facebook.com/WeberMarkin

Auctions

s Dodd

AUCTION ADVANCE NOTICE

CONSIGN YOUR ANTIQUES TODAY

ESTATE • ANTIQUE • COLLECTABLE SUN. NOV 17 • 1PM

Large Selection of Furniture Including Dining & Bedroom Suites, Settee Sets, Clocks, Lamps, Radios, China, Crystal, Sterling Silver, Gold & Silver Jewellery, Watches, Coins, Primitive Tools, Toys, Plus Much Much More. Check our website for a more detailed listing and photos

Date: Sunday, November 17 Time: 1:00 PM Place: Dodds Auction - 3311 - 28th Avenue, Vernon

+Viewing: Sat., Nov. 16 ~ 9am - 5pm and Sun., Nov. 17 ~ 9am - Sale Time

Sale conducted by Dodds Auction Vernon 250-545-3259 • 1-866-545-3259

View photos @ doddsauction.com (Specialty Auctions)

Apt/Condo for Rent

Rentals

4-BDRM, 1-bath, family park,fenced yard,completely reno’d, incl. all appl., lg shed, close to Skaha Lake & shopping, pets ok, $70,000 OBO, Call 250-770-2910

Open Houses Open House, Sat., Nov. 16, 10am-noon, awesome 1.5 year old home, 3bdrm, 2.5ba, great location, 2318 Baskin St., Penticton, $419,000

Rentals

Property Management

250-770-1948

101-3547 SKAHA LAKE RD.

1 & 2 bdrm, newly reno’d suites. Secured access, util incl, near hospital, bus route and close to all amenities, n/p, n/s 250-938-3626

Suites, Lower HIGHLAND motel suites avail now, no pets. 1140 Burnaby Ave 250-809-1253, 250-4882206 Summerland Large 2 bdrm bsmt suite. Recent reno, lg windows, W/D, new F/S, walk to downtown. NP, NS. $700/mo + util. Call (new number) 403-235-5507.

Renovated & Clean - 1 & 2 bedroom suites - 2 buildings to choose from - On bus route. Call Barb 778-476-0036

1bdrm 2nd floor in DT Penticton, ns, np, could be office/home space, mature tenant, ref req., $690/mo. (incl. util.) Vito (604)291-1059

Apartment Furnished

1bdrm, lakeview deck, quiet 8-plex, ns, np, $600+elec., 250-486-6930, 250-497-6369

For ski season, Dec. 1 to April 15, 1bdrm Condo in Clearview, Apex, $850/mo. includes utilities to max of $130/mo. (on average) contact Cheryl 250-492-7622

1bdrm unit, parking avail. great location, $700 heat/cable incl. n/s, cat ok w/deposit, 250-488-7902 2bdrm, $750, 1bdrm $650, adult/senior oriented, clean, quiet, cat ok, 250-492-7328

Commercial/ Industrial

2bdrm + den at Lakeshore towers, facing lake, pool, hottub, sauna, gym, $1600 Dennis 250-493-4372

1000sqft of Industrial/Commercial/Retail Space for lease compounded yard & overhead door. Warren Ave. 250-765-3295

2bdrm Exec. at Lakeshore Towers, 9th fl., furnished, pool, gym, sauna/hot tub, term lease now-June 30, Dennis at Realty Exec.’s, 250-493-4372

APPLE PLAZA, Prime Central location, 2300sqft. in busy plaza, ample parking, also 5821100 sqft. shared office space avail., call Barb 250-492-6319

Homes for Rent 3bdrm, 2bath, Sage Mesa, $1200+util., avail. immed., ns, ref’s req., (250)498-5439 4bdrm, 2.5ba, 2 large rooms, large deck, close to middle/high school, Walmart, avail after Nov. 16, $1300/mo., (250)490-4822 after 4:30 pm, or email: hsmpn@yahoo.com Beautiful new home for rent in the lakes in Winfield. Incl all appliances, f/p, a/c, 2 car garage, 4 brdms, 2 full baths, fully land scaped, $1675 incl until. 250-550-4096

Shared Accommodation Dorm style living at my ranch in Ok Falls, bedrooms to rent, must be clean, quiet, responsible & friendly, $400/mo., (250)460-1760

Suites, Lower

High visible high traffic location dense population area, very affordable rent, many upgrades to the building 3413 30th Ave. Ken 250-851-6240

Auto Financing

Auto Financing

Auto Financing

Apt/Condo for Rent

REALTY EXECUTIVES VANTAGE APARTMENTS: $635

Ground flr apartment, f,s, coin op laundry, includes heat and hot water. Avail. Dec. 1 (APA2) $635 1 and 2 bdrm, f,s, coin op laundry, balcony, elevator, Cat ok, $800 No-smoking, 6 month lease required. Avail. NOW (EFR108, 211, 215 ) $675 Grd flr 1 bdrm unit, with washer and dryer, quiet building, near library. Avail. NOW (ot593) $850 2 bdrm 3rd flr walk up fresh paint, some new flooring, Utilities included. Avail. NOW (WGA302) $1000 2 bdrm, 2 bath condo, sec’d parking, 5 appl, gas fp, Adult building, 1 year lease. Avail. NOW (A455) $1000 Alysen Place, 1 bdrm + den, 6 appl, 6th floor, elevator, sec’d parking, north facing. Avail. Dec. 1 (OT601) $1400 Lakeshore 3, 6th flr, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 6appl, fitness room, sec’d parking, pool, hot tub. Avail. NOW (OT592)

UNFURNISHED AND FURNISHED TERM RENTALS: $1900 Lakeview, furnished, top floor of house in Kaleden, Executive house, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage 2500 sq ft. Avail. NOW to June 2014 (OT591)

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Cars - Domestic

Cars - Domestic

$950

3 bdrm in four-plex, new kitchen and flooring, fresh paint. Avail. Jan. 15 (H691-3) $1000 3 bdrm half duplex, close to elementary school and bus. Avail. Dec. 1 (H702) $1100 4 bdrm 1 bath, f,s, hook up for washer and dryer, family room, ½ duplex. Avail. NOW (H615-4) $1300 3 + 1 bdrm, across the street from Cherry Lane, 2 bath, some new floors, carport. Avail. NOW (H774)

1998 Ford F-150

Prospective tenants must complete an application form at:

280 MAIN STREET, PENTICTON, B.C. V2A 5B2 PHONE: 250-493-4372 - www.rentalspenticton.com Only qualified applicants will be contacted.

1,500

2250 Camrose St., Penticton

250-492-0444

Scrap Car Removal AAA Scrap Removal,Will meet or beat all competitors pricing, 250-801-4199

Cars - Domestic

Scrap car removal, We are licensed & insured, more weight = more money, 250328-8697, Penticton

BAD CREDIT?

Adult

Sometimes bad things happen to good people. If you have been divorced, bankrupt, had collections or write off’s give us a call. We can help!

Escorts BEACH BUNNIES Upscale Men’s Spa #32-2789 Hwy 97 www.beachbunnies.ca 250-448-8854 MALE 4 Male Erotic Massage $95, waxing, intimate grooming & skin care. Winfield, 9-9 Daily 250-766-2048

997 Westminster Avenue 250-493-1966

www.mountainmotors.ca 1990 Dodge Acclaim, 1 driver, low mileage, $1000, 250-4925236 1998 Saturn, SL2, 4dr sdn, brand new winter tires, new brakes, $1400, 250-492-3566

SOOO SEXY SANDY The Original K-Town Girl. 38D, 29, 34. Let’s Play! 878-1514 Vernon’s Best! New Grand Location! Discrete, Upscale, Beautiful Attendants. In/out Spoil yourself! 250-307-8174. Hiring!

WHERE do you find the area’s best source for

JOB LISTINGS?

Licensed Dealer 31298

35,000

$

2004 Chrysler Intrepid

1998 Pontiac Grand Prix

$

Auto Financing

2002 Dutchstar Motorhome

3 Door Club Cab

5,000

Set of 4 Goodyear ultra grip winter tires, 275/65R18, only 4500km, $850 obo, New cost over $1300, 250-404-0587 Used Tires, Huge Selection of used tires and wheels in stock. We might have what you need. Prices vary according to size and quality. Starting at $25.00. Call us or drop in to Larsens Excel 555 Okanagan Ave East 250-492-5630 Penticton

Cars - Domestic

CAR - TRUCK’S R.V. SALES

$

HOUSES:

FOR SALE UNDER WAREHOUSE LIEN ACT 1995 Starcraft Tent Trailer Debtors; Craig and Jasmine Douglas Amount owing - $550 (plus processing fee) Located at 150 Parkway Pl., Penticton, B.C. Richard Fuhr Developments Ph: 250-276-2438 Sale ends Nov.29/13

Auto Accessories/Parts

Motel monthly rentals in Penticton & Oliver, Avail. until June 2014, LARGE 1bdrm suites & bachelor suites, Fully furnished, utilities/cable incl., quiet location, near Mall & bus route. Call Valley Star Motel 250-492-7205. Ext. 0 or Maple Leaf Motel Inn Towne, 250498-3497

2bdrm in 45+ building, quiet, n/p, n/s, a/c, f/s/dw, area for w/d, elevator, close to shopping & transit, $800/mo., call 250-487-2244

DT office, avail. Oct., 252 sqft, windows (both sides), new flooring, $300/mo., 190sqft, $235/mo., 416sqft, $320/mo., 250-492-8324, 778-931-0096

Transportation

Motels,Hotels

1000sqft. 2bd+ storage, large living room/kitchen, ns, np, $900 (incl. util.) 250-328-9078 1bd daylight basement, close to Wiltse Elem. Sch., N/S, N/P, prefer mature resp. person, ref’s req., $650 incl. util., avail. immed., 250-493-5630 2 bedroom suite, nice and private, NS, (250)492-4878 A must see! 2bdrm suite, immaculate, spacious & bright, with view, close to Walmart, avail. immed., $1000+ 1/2 util., 250-462-2472

2bdrm, great location, private parking, quiet, secure building, large storage room, laminate floors, $800, heat/cable incl., cat ok with dep., ns, 250-4887902

Recreational/Sale

Duplex / 4 Plex 2bdrm 2bath unit, laminate floors, central location, private parking, cat ok with deposit, $900/mo., 250-488-7902 2bdrm 50+ NS premises, large bright suite, private patio, near shopping/bus, $800+util., water incl., 250-492-0274 A.M.’s Large 4bdrm, 2bath, open concept kitchen, living rm w/vaulted ceilings, 1 den, laundry rm, garage, on bus route, near H & shopping, ns, np, $1300, 250-488-8121 Penticton, Birch Ave., avail Dec. 1, 2bdrm lower duplex, sep. entr., laundry, ns, np, $750/mo., (250)492-9866

NEW,2 bedrooms / 2 bathroom condos in downtown Summerland.Six appliances, fireplace, balcony, 1160 sf, gated parking, close to all amenities, on bus route. Nonsmoking, pet on approval. $ 1250 per month plus utilities. Available now! All prospective tenants must complete an application form. Valley Wide Property Mgt. Call Wayne 250-490-6938 #203-304 Martin St Pent, wayne@vwpm.ca , www.vwpm.ca

Waterford: 3 bdrm townhse, f/s, d/w, w/d hook ups, 1 1/2 baths, yard and pkg. $975.00 incl. water. Avail Nov. 1

Transportation

Apt/Condo for Rent

Large 2bdrm, Penticton Ave., close to schools/transit, $750, call Dennis at Realty Exec’s (250)493-4372

RENTALS

Rentals

2bdrm grnd. fl. corner unit condo facing garden, open living room/kitchen concept w/huge deck that continues on to common area, huge park/garden willow tree setting footsteps from sliding patio door, BBQ allowed secure video surveillanced u/g parking & elevator, gas f/p, w/d/dw/f/s, a/c in living room & master, master bdrm has walk in closet & full bath, walking distance to mall & amenities, Large In suite laundry (may be used as den) photos upon request, Avail. Dec. 1, $900, 250-809-4468 $875, large clean 2br character apt., lakeview, oak floors, on bus route, np, ns, quiet resp. person, 250-770-0536

Apt/Condo for Rent

Rentals

4,590

$

Available 7 days a week! 2 5 0 49 8 -5 443 JUST CALL

429 Hillcrest Avenue - Oliver, BC (corner of Hillcrest ave. and

Hwy. 97)

Anywhere you find p p . this newspaper “Your Community Newspaper”

Published every Wednesday and Friday Ph: (250) 492-3636 Fax: (250) 492-9843


Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

29

calendar Welcome to Friday Social Dances at South Main Drop-In Centre, 2965 South Main St. Join us for music by Glory Days starting at 7:30 p.m. $6 per person. the iode thriFt Shop is stocked with fall and winter clothing for all members of the family, including jackets, lingerie and accessories. Why not start your Christmas shopping now? We have toys and many gift items. Open Monday to Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m., 464 Main St. the Penticton hosPital Auxiliary is holding a raffle in support of new X-ray equipment at Penticton Regional Hospital. Tickets are $20 and available at the PRH gift shop. Grand prize of eight $100 gift certificates to eight local restaurants, plus an early bird draw for a $250 gift basket to be drawn on Nov. 30. Call June at 250-490-9786 or email junerq@shaw.ca for more information. okanagan Falls seniors’ Centre has music and coffee from 9 to 10:30 a.m. and crib at 1 p.m. elks club on Ellis Street has Tanya Roberts Dart Shoot. eagles have dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. and Karaoke at 7 p.m. royal canadian legion branch 40 has daily lunches from Monday to Thursday, with fish and chips on Friday at 11:30 a.m. and dinner at 5:30 p.m. Entertainment by Shindigger at 7 p.m. alcoholics anonymous has a group meet in Naramata at 8 p.m. at 3740 3rd St. in Community Church hall. In Summerland, the step study meeting is at 7:30 p.m. at 13204 Henry Ave. Friends Friday night at 6:30 p.m. at 2964 Skaha Lake Rd. at Oasis United Church. seniors Penticton comPuter Club dropin sessions Monday and Friday from 1 to 2:30 p.m. People may sign up for memberships, classes or have computer problems solved. Lectures on

Saturdays at 10 a.m. on a variety of computingrelated topics. al-anon meets at the Oasis United Church at 2964 Skaha Lake Rd. from 6 to 7 p.m. For info call 250-490-9272. 890 Wing oF South Okanagan Air Force Association meets at 4 p.m. in the clubhouse at 126 Dakota Ave. anavets has karaoke with Jack Ramsay, pool and potluck at 7 p.m.

SATURDAY

November 16 united church Women, 696 Main St., are having a Christmas tea and bazaar from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Bake, craft, jewellery tables. Free admission. Tea tickets are $6 each. christmas giFts galore from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Penticton Seniors’ DropIn Centre, 2965 South Main St. from a variety of community crafters. Come check out our unique handcrafted gifts. Baked goods and hot lunch available. charity bottle drive with all money going to the Penticton Regional Hospital pediatric ward, SPCA and Critteraid. Drop off from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Marketplace IGA on Government Street. alcoholics anonymous has its 12 bells group at noon at the Oasis United Church at 2964 Skaha Lake Rd. The Saturday night group meets at 8 p.m. at 150 Orchard Ave. and in Summerland, the Grapevine meeting is at 8 p.m. at 13204 Henry Ave. Call service 24 hours is 250-490-9216. christmas market on the SS Sicamous. The decks will be packed with hundreds of handmade, artisan and vintage goodies from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. Admission is $2, free for age 12 and under. Proceeds support ongoing restoration work. dance and silent auction, fundraiser for the Naramata Yacht Club at 7:30 p.m. in the Naramata Community Church with music by 3RM. Tickets are $15 at The Store.

SERVING THE SOUTH OKANAGAN

1-877-797-7766

www.ezbins.ca • ezbins@shaw.ca

elks club on Ellis Street has crib at 10 a.m., dropin darts at 4 p.m. and a meat draw at 4:30 p.m. Dinner at 5:30 p.m., Tanya Roberts Dart Shoot, music by Anita. anavets has Fun pool at noon, dinner by Stu at 5:30 p.m. and entertainment by Buzz Byer at 6:30 p.m. Fraternal order oF Eagles have hamburgers and fries from noon to 4 p.m. Beaver races at 4 p.m. royal canadian legion branch 40 has crib at 10 a.m., a meat draw at 2 p.m. and sing-along at 4 p.m. okanagan Falls seniors’ Centre has drop-in bingo at 1 p.m. PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until December 2, 2013. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2014 Corolla CE Manual BURCEM-A MSRP is 17,640 and includes $1,615 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. *Lease example: 2.9% Lease APR for 64 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $85 with $1,900 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $12,716. Lease 64 mos. based on 120,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. **Finance example: 1.9% finance for 60 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Corolla CE. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 Tacoma Access Cab V6 4x4 Automatic UU4ENA-A MSRP is $31,075 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. †Lease example: 4.9% Lease APR for 64 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $165 with $2,850 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $23,906. Lease 64 mos. based on 120,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ††Finance example: 0.9% finance for 36 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Tacoma. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 RAV4 Base FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A MSRP is $25,605 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Lease example: 3.6% Lease APR for 64 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $139 with $950 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $18,742. Lease 64 mos. based on 120,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ‡‡Finance example: 0.9% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 RAV4. Applicable taxes are extra. †††Semi-monthly lease offer available through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit to qualified retail customers on most 48 and 60 month leases (including Stretch leases) of new and demonstrator Toyota vehicles. First semi-monthly payment due at lease inception and next monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final payment. Semi-monthly lease offer can be combined with most other offers excluding the First Payment Free and Encore offers. First Payment Free offer is valid for eligible TFS Lease Renewal customers only. Not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Some conditions apply. See your Toyota dealer for complete details. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

FRIDAY

November 15

SUNDAY

November 17 the Penticton academy of Music presents a student recital at 2 p.m. in St. Saviour’s Anglican church, 150 Orchard Ave. Admission is by donation with all proceeds to support the student bursary fund. come dance to the greatest dance music ever made with D.J. Emil from 7 to 9 p.m., $3 per person. South Main Drop-In Centre, 2965 South Main St. All welcome. elks club on Ellis Street has dog races at 2:30 p.m. with an M&M food draw, door prizes, darts and pool. Al Shorrock Dart Shoot.

Fraternal order oF Eagles pool league, starts at noon sharp. royal canadian legion has a branch buffet breakfast at 8 a.m., Joseph’s perogies and sausages and a meat draw at 2 p.m. anavets have horse races and meat draws at 2 p.m. Hamburgers and hot dogs available 1 to 3 p.m. General meeting at 2 p.m. lakelands church holds Sunday services on the second floor of the Penticton Community Centre from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. For more info contact info@ lakelandschurch.com. alcoholics anonymous meets in OK Falls at 10:30 a.m. at 5328 Hawthorne St., then in

Penticton at 11 a.m. for the women’s group at the Lawn Bowling Club, 260 Brunswick St. The Sunday 123 group meets at 8 p.m. in the Education Room in the basement of the Penticton hospital. The closed men’s group meets at 11 a.m. at the Eagles hall at 1197 Main St., side door, upstairs.

MONDAY

November 18 the hümüh buddhist Centre is hosting a Satsang spiritual study group at 7 p.m. in the Community Services building, 6129 Kootenay St. (on the corner with Fairview) in Oliver. We will discuss a Wisdom Teaching on

learning to hear and trust intuition. Everyone is welcome. Donations are accepted. For more info, call 250-446-2022. Floor curling at 12:45 p.m. every Monday except holidays in the Leisure Centre, 439 Winnipeg St. okanagan Falls seniors’ Centre has carpet bowling at 1 p.m. Fraternal order oF Eagles has pub dart league every Monday. elks club on Ellis Street has Monday night pub league at 7:30 p.m. Nonmembers welcome to join. Fitness Friends meet in the Royal Canadian Legion, 502 Martin St. at 10 a.m. Get in shape. For info call Dot at 250-4925400.

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30 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

calendar Royal Canadian legion branch 40 has dart dolls at 11 a.m. and bridge at 1 p.m. Wings night and horse races start at 4 p.m. Darts at 7 p.m. Wellness Mental CentRe has Brown Bag family support group from noon to 1 p.m. weekly and individual support for family members from 2 to 4 p.m. weekly. Call 250493-7338 for more info.

south Main dRop-in Centre has improver line dance at 9 a.m., Scrabble at 10 a.m., carpet bowling at 10:45 a.m., easy to intermediate line dance at 1 p.m., and duplicate bridge at 1 p.m. CaRe Closet thRift Store at 574 Main St. has weekly specials and silent auctions. Open Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Donations are appre-

ciated and new volunteers are always welcome. All proceeds to the local hospital and hospice.

TUESDAY

November 19 the south okanagan Orchid Society meets at 7 p.m. in the Shatford Centre, showing an orchid movie for anyone interested in growing orchids.

Visitors welcome. Coffee and tea are served. Whole foods MaRket presents Food and Healing, a seminar at 7 p.m. with Lisa Kilgour RHN, nutritionist for Inspire Health, speaking on food choices, inflammation, and its role in chronic illnesses such as cancer. Everyone welcome to this free seminar.

Now is the

time to switch!

PLANS START FROM

pension MuniCipal RetiRees Assn., District 23, members general meeting at 11:30 a.m. in the Penticton Buffet meeting room, 2987 Skaha Lake Rd. undeRstanding WateR in the 21st Century: Are you ready? Join Bob Sanford and Scott Smith for a discussion about water science and management in the Okanagan Valley and beyond at 7 p.m. at Okanagan College, Penticton campus. pentiCton photogRaphy Club welcomes all photographers for slide shows, speakers, tips and networking every fourth Tuesday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Shatford Centre. More info at pentictonphotoclub@gmail.com. $5 drop-in, $50/year. pieCeful evening Quilt Guild meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Penticton Seniors Drop-in Centre on 2965 South Main St. For more info call Sue 250-4920890, Fran 250-497-7850 or Penny-April 250 4938183. yoga Meditation/vegetaRian suppeR is upstairs in the Elks Lodge at 344

Ellis St. in Penticton Tuesdays at 6 p.m. Donations accepted. tops b.C. 4454 has weekly meetings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at 445 Ellis St. Use back lane entrance. Meetings are downstairs. Phone Susan at 250-496-5931 or Sally at 250-492-6556. alCoholiCs anonyMous young person’s group at 7:30 p.m. at 150 Orchard Ave. in the Outreach Centre. Call/text Guy at 250-460-2466 or Niki at 250-460-0798. As well, the beginners’ meeting runs at 8 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church at 157 Wade Ave. bRoWn bag leCtuRes every Tuesday at the Penticton Museum from noon to 1 p.m. Join Rick McKelvey for a talk on Saving the Penticton Oxbows. Presentations are in the museum auditorium, 785 Main St. Admission by donation. okanagan falls senioRs’ Centre has bingo at 1 p.m., pool at 6:30 p.m. and music from 7 to 9 p.m. vispassana (insight) Meditation for beginners or mature practitioners every Tuesday evening from 6:45 to 8:45 p.m.

Please call Debora for details at 250-462-7340. All welcome, no charge. Royal Canadian legion has a service officer at 1 p.m. fRateRnal oRdeR of Eagles has drop-in euchre at 7 p.m. Guests welcome. elks on ellis Street has crib wars at 1 p.m., fun darts and 10-card crib at 7 p.m. al-anon for friends and family of alcoholics meets at 10:30 a.m. at 2800 South Main St. and 6:45 p.m. at 157 Wade Ave. at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian. Call 250490-9272 for info. ConCeRt pentiCton band rehearses at 7 p.m. New members welcome. Intermediate to advanced musicians. All band instruments. The band is available for performances. Phone 250-8092087 for info. 890 Wing of South Okanagan Air Force Association gets together for a gab and coffee every Tuesday at 9 a.m. at 126 Dakota Ave. Wellness Mental CentRe has individual support for family members in Summerland from 10 a.m. to noon at 13211 Henry St.

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Offer ends December 31, 2013 on $10 off for the first 6 months and applies on 4G Satellite Residential platform to new customers who agree to a 1 year term commitment on any Xplornet 4G Residential package. $99 Activation fee applies on a 1 year term commitment. Xplornet® is a trade-mark of Xplornet Communications Inc. © 2013 Xplornet Communications Inc. 1

NTL SAT 34.99 Admat Oct 2013 XPLO3065_1C_BC_Penticton Western News_5 13/16" x 11.429"_NTL_SAT.indd 1

10/3/13 4:17 PM

FortisBC uses the FortisBC name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (13-342.10 08/13)


555 OKANAGAN AVE. E.

Details online at: marketplaceiga.com/ igastoresbc.com

Locally owned and operated. PENTICTON SUMMERLAND OPEN DAILY 7519 Prairie Valley Rd. 1160 Government St. 8 am - 9 pm 250-493-1737 250-494-4376

EXCELTIRE.COM

ATLANTA FALCONS

Lee Smith

Unlicensed Assistant

DON’T FORGET TO ENTER OUR NFL CONTEST FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN $100.00! 2250 CAMROSE ST.

250-492-3636

960 Railway StReet

OFF! Lube OiL & FiLter Any make or model vehicle. Not valid with any other offer. Expires November 30, 2013.

Mon-Fri, 9:00am-8:00pm; Sat, 9:00am-6:30pm; Sun, 9:00am-5:30pm

1765 MAIN STREET • MONDAY-FRIDAY 7AM-6PM • SATURDAY 8AM-4PM TELEPHONE: 250-492-2839

HOUSTON TEXANS

Evening Features

250-492-3636 Sunday

Steak & Lobster

Date night

Prime Rib

2495

$

Two can dine for... 95 $

49

Adults....$2395 $

50+....

21

95

152 RIVERSIDE DRIVE • 250-276-2447

Get our never before offered

2 MONTH UNLIMITED SPECIAL PASS $155 (+tax)

Less expensive, better coffee. Many types of coffee or tea available.

Starting at 15.50 for box of 24 $

PROOF

www.bodiesonpower.com 102-500 Vees Drive, Penticton

250-770-8303

• Colts at Cardinals • Cowboys at Giants • Broncos at Patriots MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25th • 49ers at Redskins

OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM NAME OF ADVERTISER For November 21st, 24th & 25th

1.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

2.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

3.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

4.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

5.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

6.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

7.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

8.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

9.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

10.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

11.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

12.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

13.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

14.

Winner .................................................. Loser .....................................................

Total Points Both Teams ................................................................................................. ––––––––––––––––––------------------------------------–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Entry must be received at Western office by 5:00 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 21st, 2013. NAME: ............................................................................................................................ ADDRESS: ....................................................................................................................... PHONE: ........................................... E-MAIL: ................................................................. $100 cash will be given to the contestant who picks the most winners/losers. In the case of a tie, the person who guesses closest to the total points scored in the Monday night game wins. If still a tie, prize money will be split. Limit 3 entries per household. Decision of the judges will be final. All entries become the property of the Penticton Western News. REMEMBER: ENTRANTS MUST ENTER THE NAME OF THE ADVERTISER FOR BOTH WINNING AND LOSING TEAMS. ENTRIES CONTAINING TEAM NAMES WILL BE DISQUALIFIED. Mail your entry, fax it, or bring it in person to the Penticton Western News, 2250 Camrose Street, Penticton, B.C. V2A 8R1 before 5:00 p.m., Thursday, November 21st, 2013. Entries may receive promotional material from time to time.

Starting From

15,995

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*

The Evolution® HYBRID HEAT® system does more than just bring the heat. It can keep your heating costs down by selecting the most efficient heating source between the electric heat pump and the gas furnace based on the outdoor temperature. Plus, it can save you money on your summer cooling costs. Choose the Evolution® Extreme heat pump to enjoy even more heating savings along with the best cooling efficiencies, temperature control and comfort performance available from Bryant.

Lease for

99

$

** Semi

Monthly

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61 MPG HWY†

PENTICTON

www.pentictontoyota.com 2405 SKAHA LAKE ROAD 250-493-1107 • 1-888-493-1107

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

250-492-3677 154 Ellis Street, Penticton, B.C. V2A 4L5 NOTICE TO ALL VENDORS

Sentes Chevrolet Ltd has been sold effective June 4, 2012.

• RELIABLE • PROFESSIONAL • RESPONSIBLE

DON’T FORGET TO ENTER OUR NFL CONTEST FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN $100.00!

Tuesday, November 19 at 7:00pm

FREE LADIES CAR CLINIC

HUBER BANNISTER CHEVROLET LTD

933 Westminster Avenue West Send ALL invoices and correspondence to: 933 Westminster Avenue West Penticton BC, V2A 1L1

2250 CAMROSE ST.

Phone: 250-493-2333 www.huberbannister.com

250-492-3636

Fax: 250-492-7850 Email: accounts.payable@huberbannister.com

250-493-2333 Contacts: General Manager: Ken Huber Controller: Michelle Bush Accounts Payable: Patty Daechsel

Get ready for winter! This clinic will help you feel comfortable with all the basics of vehicle maintenance. Our service department will be on hand to answer questions and provide demonstrations. Space is limited. Call now to reserve.

Call Melanie or Jody at 1-800-529-2523

HST#: 842043689RT0001

Before you sign ANYTHING with your current waste services provider, call us! We’d love the opportunity to earn your business.

933 Westminster Avenue West, Penticton, BC V2A 1L1 phone: 250.493.2333 fax: 250.492.7850

CALL TO LEARN MORE:

WORRIED ABOUT CREDIT? GET DRIVING NOW! EASY AS 1.2.3.

GO

1 Go to go-credit.ca 2 Go to online credit app 3 Go to Parkers Chrysler

GO-CREDIT.CA 1-866-492-2839

800.663.5117

DON’T FORGET TO ENTER OUR NFL CONTEST FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN $100.00! 2250 CAMROSE ST.

250-492-3636

510 Main Street Penticton

Phone 778-476-5665 www.lachi.ca

DL#5523

1765 MAIN STREET • PENTICTON • CALL 1-877-863-4268 MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30 - 6:00 • SATURDAY 8:30 - 5:00

DON’T FORGET TO ENTER OUR NFL CONTEST FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN $100.00! 2250 CAMROSE ST.

250-492-3636

LUNCH SPECIAL ONLY

DINNER SPECIAL FOR 2

$7.95 $29.95

Mon-Thur, 11am-8pm • Fri, 11am-9pm • Sat, Noon-9pm • Sun, 4pm-9pm

PITTSBURG STEELERS

Available from Nov. 1 to Dec. 15, 2013

Jaguars at Texans Bears at Rams Panthers at Dolphins Steelers at Browns Buccaneers at Lions Titans at Raiders

The All-New 2014 Toyota Corolla has Arrived!

And will be....

FAX TO 250-492-9843 SEATTLE SEAHAWKS

Canadian Roasted Real Cups for use in Keur coffee machines.

BE YOUR BEST FOR THE HOLIDAYS AND ALREADY ON TRACK FOR JANUARY!!!

• • • • • •

See in-store for details.

(250) 493-3388

DETROIT LIONS

Friday

OAKLAND RAIDERS

Wednesday

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21st • Saints at Falcons SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24th • Vikings at Packers • Jets at Ravens • Chargers at Chiefs

In the Ramada Inn & Suites

ARIZONA CARDINALS

2250 CAMROSE ST.

JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS

DON’T FORGET TO ENTER OUR NFL CONTEST FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN $100.00!

NFL SCHEDULE FOR NOVEMBER 21ST, 24TH & 25TH

Good Food, Good Friends...Great Times at the Station!

WASHINGTON REDSKINS

Perfect weather to get out and decorate your house! We have everything you need!

$15.00

The Penticton Western News and the local businesses appearing on this page will sponsor this contest for 17 weeks. The winner each week will win $100! A total of $1,700 PRIZE MONEY TO BE WON. It's easy to enter and fun to play! HOW TO PLAY AND WIN... Select the teams from the schedule below that you think will win and lose. Enter the name of the advertiser sponsoring the team on the official entry form.

Rebates Available

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES

NEW YORK JETS

Ralph Webb REALTOR® 250-490-5521

This spacious 2 bed 2 bath, corner unit facing S/E adult oriented condo is bright, clean and quiet, secure underground parking, plus bonus RV parking, enclosed patio, gas fireplace, close to amenities, hospital, shopping, clinic and $189,900 transit. Conveniently located near the hospital and to Carmi Clinic. Separate storage room, and workshop as well as bike storage is available in the building. Wheel chair friendly adult oriented building . MLS®143782. NE

INDIANAPOLIS COLTS

NEW YORK GIANTS

Locations West Realty

484 Main St., Penticton info@pentictonhomes.com www.pentictonhomes.com 1-800-864-4567

106-1445 HALIFAX STREET

CE

RI WP

TEAMRAMS ST. LOUIS

MIAMI DOLPHINS

Terrific home nicely sited on 1.14 acres with 4 bedrooms. Moreover, you should look into the other intriguing features, such as 2 fireplaces, picture window with gorgeous lake view, garage and carport. $399,900 Comforts? Yes, indeed! Conveniences? Definitely! Extras? Come and see them. A little TLC is all that’s needed here! MLS® 141897 ED

DENVER BRONCOS

530 PINEVIEW DRIVE - KALEDEN

and the gas bill.

CAROLINA PANTHERS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURE PROPERTIES UC RED

SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS TENNESSEE TITANS

Winter is coming! Ask about the Hercules Avalanche Winter tires!

2012 Business of the Year!

KANSAS CITY CHIEFS

Each prize will include: 2 tickets to the Seahawks vs. Saints Monday Night Game

DEFEATING WINTER’S CHILL

TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS

presented by Campbell’s November 1 - November 28

GREEN BAY PACKERS

SPORTS MOM CONTEST

Catch all the action on wide-screen TVs at the Kettle Valley Station Pub

MINNESOTA VIKINGS

Seahawks ULTIMATE

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS

CONTEST 4

WIN 100 IN OUR 11th 10th ANNUAL

DALLAS COWBOYS

Phone: 250-493-4545 Fax: 250-493-8819 1698 Dartmounth Road Penticton, BC

SUMMERLAND

CLEVELAND BROWNS

We Make It Easier For You

$

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

BUFFALO BILLS

WE RENT Excavators, Mini’s, Skid Steers, Manlifts, Compaction

CINCINNATI BENGALS

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

www.pacificrimequipment.com

250-492-5630

Penticton Western News Friday, November 15, 2013

Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

CHICAGO BEARS

BALTIMORE RAVENS

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS

2

31


32

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, November 15, 2013 Penticton Western News

WWW.PARKERSCHRYSLER.COM • Family Owned for over 67 years

LAST CHANCE FOR A GREAT DEAL ON A REMAINING 2013 2013 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT

13008

6,400

$

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13036

WAS

60,877

$

7,500

$

35,888

$

8,888

$

FRONT WHEEL DRIVE!

6-Speed Automatic 4x4. 12223B

CUMMINS DIESEL!

2013 CHEVROLET CRUZ LT

29,888

$

2006 SUBARU OUTBACK

Only 9,000 Kms. 14041A

WELL EQUIPPED!

18,888

$

2.5L Flat 4 with 5-Speed Manual. 14055-DA

ALL WHEEL DRIVE!

14,888

$

Navigation and More! X5827

34,888

LUXURY LEATHER!

22,888

$

ASK ABOUT OUR

13,888

$

10,000

CASH BACK “PLASTIC PAYOFF”

IT HAS A HEMI!

15,888

$

14,888

$

2011 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN Power Sliding Door! 14049A

DVD PLAYER CREW!

24,888

$

2008 JEEP UNLIMITED RUBICON

2011 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

3.8L V6 with 6-Speed Manual. 14099-DA

4-Door Laredo. Vehicle not exactly as shown. 13341A

4-DOOR 4X4

23,888

$

2012 DODGE JOURNEY RT AWD

5-Speed Auto, 4x4. B2575A

4-DOOR LAREDO

63,285

DVD Player, Sunroof, Leather! 13380-DA

$

Great Value! B2539A

NICE CROSSOVER

2007 DODGE DURANGO SLT+ 4X4

3.6L V6 VVT, 8.4” Touch Screen Radio, 18” Alloys. P0027

2006 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

2009 KIA SPORTAGE

2012 RAM 1500 BIGHORN

$

2011 CHRYSLER 300 LTD.

2007 RAM 3500 LARAMIE

LX Model with a 4 Cylinder and a 4-Speed Automatic! 14030A

$

WAS

1 GO to go-credit.ca 2 GO to online credit app 3 GO to Parkers Chrysler

EASY AS ONE... TWO... THREE!

2009 CHRYSLER P/T CRUISER

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$

9,400

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Worried about Credit? Get Driving Now!

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2013 DODGE DURANGO CITADEL

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2013 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4X4

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28,888

$

2012 RAM 1500 LONGHORN

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23,888

$

The Ultimate Cowboy Truck! B2580

CREW CAB LARAMIE!

44,888

$

*ALL PRICES ARE PLUS $499 DOCUMENTATION FEE PLUS TAXES.

1765 MAIN STREET PENTICTON, B.C.

DL. #5523

1-250-492-2839 COLIN PARKER GENERAL MANAGER

RICK OLMSTEAD

GENERAL SALES MANAGER

JASON WANDLER SALES MANAGER

KAREN SOUZA

JENNY PACHOLZUK CHAD CAMPBELL

FINANCIAL SERVICES MANAGER FINANCIAL SERVICES MANAGER

SALES

TONY SLOBODA SALES

TOM DESJARDINS SALES

JOHN GIULIANO SALES

KEITH SCOTT SALES

OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30 - 6:00 AND SATURDAY 8:30 - 5:00


Penticton Western News, November 15, 2013