Issuu on Google+

MIRROR | 13

Homefinder es o er H COMING FROM PRODUCTION 2014 drveway 7x14

Supplement to

View our eEditions

at sea ’ seat ver’s rive dri the driver’s Wellcome to the We Welcome

homefinder PROCESS remday drive

at drivewayBC.ca model photo gallery Visit the 2014 new

truck choice Spoiled for car and up with his tire market to come attention choices availtips, paying particular With more than 250 selection of to the booming SUV/Crossover able to Canadians, the picks some be somewhat segment. Yours truly cars and trucks can while premium brand offerings overwhelming. sporty cars team hopes Alexandra spots the Today, the Driveway you under $30,000. to steer you in the direction New on hybrid 2014 Bob McHugh focuses may want to go in this vehicles and we welcome Model Preview edition. a who lives and but list Harwood, Ian It’s not a comprehensive utility segKeith Morgan breathes trucks be they look at some key market or pickups. Driveway Editor featured vehicles, off roaders ments, from which our five picks. keith.morgan@drivewaybc.ca Okay, before you turn the writers have each made purchase mean you twitter.com/ChangeGears page here are some Of course, that doesn’t a top-price budget and other vehipreparation tips. Fix shouldn’t consider any figure out what have picked examples if financing will be required cles. The team members in monthly payments. eye this year to help you can truly afford that have caught their are major costs in at home. Insurance and maintenance you start the car conversation scanned the enSpencer Head test driver Zack

have a vehicle in mind, owning a car. Once you Regular maintenance get an insurance quote. but some cars can be costs are easily figured in have to be brought very expensive if parts from around the world. on the above, you can Once you have a handle the It is important you like narrow your choice. most expensive purchase looks of the second its make sure it serves of your life. However, answering some quesintended purpose by people do you need many how tions. Typically, far? Is there enough to transport and how or cabin and the trunk stowage space in the power Do you need V8 luggage compartment? four-cylinder suffice? or will an economical tires at a variety of Now go and kick some multiple brands dealerships and consider much to offer. because they all have

A13

www.campbellriverm

1211 Cypress St.

B1

Question of the week to buy a How likely are you car in the hybrid or electric next year? Go to drivewayBC.ca

2013 Remembrance Day

irror.com

PREVIEW ca | C.c BC.ca drivewayB

R 8, 2013

FRIDAY, NOVEMBE

online

to submit your answer.

Safety Tip

See page 16 for Remembrance Day event schedule

reduce visibility and Heavy rain can seriously difficult to stop on. make road surfaces more wipers are in good Please make sure your your following condition and increase seconds. distance to at least four

Come see the sisters for

Find more online at

drivewayBC.ca

Realty & Property Management Inc. Professional Service,

Helpful Staff.

Realty & Property 962 Shoppers Row

Specialists

• 250-286-0110

ement.ca iverpropertymanag

campbellr Campbell River 1710 Island Hwy, 250-286-6132 ndauto.ca www.associatedtirea

250-287-2000

ter

A Home with Charac MLS # 363011

$224,900

built in main level entry homegrowing A bright cheerful a fashion, perfect for the post and beam up and 2 bathrooms. family with 4 bedrooms area, a well-established Hills a Situated in the Holly d, this home has many and desirable neighbourhoo by. The home boasts this roof bus stop very close including membrane covered recent upgrades There is even spring and sundeck. toys. New low price of big parking for your at 250-287-2000. $224,900. Call Harry

quality rentals . . .

oj home solutions 7x3.25 O.J. proc gratitude, we express our

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Harry Hemphill hill.com email: homehunt@harryhemp Help, “Have Harry HemphillHunt” Have a Happy Home

Classified pages 21-24

benette benette 2X1.5 2X1.5

Natural Gas hi-efficieNcy

Mon. - Fri. 9am - 4:30pm www.regency-fire.com 1721–14th Ave, Campbell River250-287-3108

PROCESS PROCESS

urnaces • PaTIO HeaTers • HOT WaTer

Look for these special features in today’s Mirror

NEW MODEL

I N S I D E

ers • HOT WaTer TanKs • BBQs • InserTs • serVIce • naTuraL Gas • ParTs • f

rs and the Find the Best Realto ell River Best Homes in Campb

Honouring our

furnaces • naTuraL Gas • PaTIO HeaT

RIVER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL

741 McPhee,fireplace Courtenayproduc Lower your heating bill by zone heating with a Regency www.bennettsheetmetal.com 250-334-3621 efficient, comfortable, controllable heat to the rooms you spend the most ti “Your Indoor Comfort Specialist since 1961” and save your money! Visit our showroom today and speak with a home he TanKs • BBQs • InserTs •

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER

om

www.CampbellRiverMirror.c

ring DOWS Floo FLOORING ✒ WIN CANADA DS 904 Ironwood, DOORS ✒ BLIN Island. Campbell River largest on Vancouver

Ann

- one of the • 8,000 sq ft showroom s. ble sales professional • Friendly, knowledgea advice. designer for expert design • In-house interior budget. • Solutions to fit any s in home consultation • Free estimates &

“As highest forget that the we must never words, not to utter the appreciation is but to live by them.” Kennedy -John Fitzgerald

250.287.3279 creating a future without

breast cancer

Monday to Friday 8:30am–5:00pm Closed • Sunday & Holidays Saturday 10:00am–5:00pm

www.campbellrivermirror.c

om

PROCESS

www.regency-fire.com

View our eEditions online FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

Newsstand 85¢

www.campbellrivermirror.com

Red and White flies over veterans’ graves Paul Rudan Campbell RiveR miRRoR

L

ichen in hues of green and white grow in petal-like blotches across the modest gravestone. At first glance, you can barely make out a name or any dates on the marker. Look closer though, and you can pick out a clue that this is the final resting place of a First World War veteran – the poppy in the stone’s top right hand corner. Here lies Acting Corporal Horace McNutt. Born Oct 10, 1891 in Truro, Colchester County, Nova Scotia; died 1940 and buried at the Campbell River Cemetery. There are no flowers or adornments beside McNutt’s grave, and whatever relations he had in Camp-

Special of the

Week

bell River are long gone too. It almost seemed inevitable the memory of this vet would be forgotten as the lichen inched its way across the face of the chiseled granite. But as Remembrance Day approaches, it’s easy to identify Corporal McNutt’s grave stone as a burial site of a Canadian military veteran. Beside his grave flies a little Canadian flag. Look around the cemetery and you’ll see quite a few more red and white flags marking the final resting places of other vets. And there are still more at the other city plot on General Hill. “As of Monday we have 75, but

THEY SAID IT: “We just love the research and to have it used for such a worthy thing like this is awesome.”

– Janice Wilken, Campbell River Genealogy Sciety

we found five more this morning! It’s ongoing,” says Janice Wilken, a director with the Campbell River Genealogy Society. Thanks to the society, the memory of these interred vets are also being honoured on Monday, and will be on every November 11th. “We hope to have bigger flags next year,” Wilken says on a cool Wednesday afternoon, as she watches a fellow society member place a Canadian flag at another grave marker. Pat Goddard is one of the founders of the Campbell River Genealogy Society and she’s here today flagging the burial site of Sgt. Erling T. Wolner, a Second World War vet who died Dec. 22, 1982 at age 73. “There, that’s better,” she says with satisfaction. The flag project was the idea of another shy society member who wanted to commemorate the grave site of a relative, but doesn’t want to be identified. The irony of a researcher who

Pat Goddard, one of the founders of the Campbell River Genealogy Society, places a Canadian flag beside the grave of Sgt. Erling T. Wolner, a veteran of the Second World War. The society is placing flags at the grave sites of all known vets for Remembrance Day.

Continued on Pg. 3

tyee chev 2007 DODGE RAM 3500 SLT 7x2.5WAS $32,995 PROCESS NOW ONLY

29,995

$

STK#T8030A

P Paul aul R Rudan udan/T /The he M MiRRoR iRRoR

FOR MORE GREAT DEALS VISIT: TYEECHEV.CA

CAMPBELL RIVER’S PRE OWNED VEHICLE DESTINATION

TYEE CHEVROLET BUICK GMC *See dealer for details.

Genealogy society honours interred vets for Remembrance Day

570 – 13th Avenue 250.287.9511

tyeechev.ca

scan here to go to www.tyeechev.ca

DL#10790


2 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

7x14

QUALITY FOODS

PROCESS

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Flags: Project has personal meaning Other Flags

Continued from Pg. 1

doesn’t want be part of the historic record isn’t lost on Wilken. “We’re not quite reclusive, but we’re not so much social,” she says laughing, as she stops to rephrase, “A lot of us are very social! We just love the research and to have it used for such a worthy thing like this is awesome.” The project means a lot to Wilken who “comes from a long line of military men.” Her great grandfather served in the First World War, her uncle in the Second, and both men spent time as prisoners of war. Along with the bigger flags, the genealogy society also plans to produce laminated information sheets that will be placed at each veteran’s grave. The sheets will provide background on the vets which will benefit those on self-guided tours. The society also hosts its own cemetery tours. “Next year we want to combine our research with the Legion Ladies Auxiliary and hopefully we can come up with as a complete list as possible,” says Wilken. “And, with the city’s blessing, we’d like to hold a candlelight vigil.” If you look even closer at Horace McNutt’s grave stone, you can spot the second poppy in the top left corner.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 8, 8,2013 2013 || CAMPBELL CAMPBELLRIVER RIVERMIRROR MIRROR | | 33 FRIDAY,

Paul Rudan/The MiRRoR

The Campbell River Genealogy Society is honouring the memories of Canada’s war veterans interred at city cemeteries this Remembrance Day by marking each one with a small Canadian flag.

A rubbing impression would reveal the rest, but it’s easier if you just ask the good folks from the genealogy society. They’ll tell you McNutt was the seventh of eight children. According to census records, he lived in North River, Nova Scotia (1901) and later moved to Salmon River, N.S. (1911), earning a living as a butcher.

In 1915 he enlisted with the 106th Nova Scotia Rifles, and today he rests in the Campbell River Cemetery.

n Harry Thorne Vanstone - A Second World War vet and the son of an original nonnative Campbell River settler. His father, David Vanstone, donated the property for the cemetery with the condition that the front row be reserved for the Vanstone family. n Lt. Norman Neil McPhedran – A First World War veteran. McPhedran Road is named after him. His grandson, James McPhedran, is an executive vice-president with the Bank of Nova Scotia and reportedly visited Campbell River last week to commemorate his grandfather. n John Perkins – Served in both World Wars and was one of the original non-native settlers of Campbell River. n Edward Harold Masters – A decorated Army sergeant in the First World War and an early settler. n Learn more about the Campbell River Genealogy Society at www.rootsweb.ancestry. com/~bccrgc/

With Purchase of 2X4 Complete Eyewear Get the 2nd Pair Free

MAYCOCK

For Progressives receive computer or reading frame and lenses FREE

For Single Vision prescriptions receive 2nd pair of single vision frame and lenses FREE

(some conditions apply) Paul Rudan/The MiRRoR

Look closely. Can you spot the poppy on the grave marker of Horace McNutt?

Serving Vancouver Island since 1949. Helping you keep sight of what’s important.

Discovery Harbour Shopping Centre, Campbell River • 250-850-2020

3x6 BUSINESS PROTECTION 24/7

CAMPBELL RIVER • COURTENAY • DUNCAN NANAIMO • PORT ALBERNI

Full Service Fire Protection Announcement

We would like to welcome Adam, Chris, Nadine and Cam to the Caledonia family. As former employees of Torry & Sons they bring a wealth of knowledge, Experience and Technical Expertise to Us.

caledonia caledonia

NADINE

PROCESS ADAM

INSPECTION

CHRIS

INSTALLATION

SERVICE

CAM REPAIR

Phone 250.244.6303 • Email christina@caledoniafireprotection.com

www.caledoniafireprotection.com

Visit us online:

www.campbellrivermirror.com

MYTHBUSTERS 3x7

t Learning More Abou Newcomers

“Welcoming newcomers, valuing and enjoying diversity, fostering inclusiveness, being open-minded, being kind and caring.... all are vital to a community with a bright future.” - Brenda Wagman, Owner of Brenda Wagman Consulting

cr area multi cultural cultural

4x3 THRIVE

PROCESS

MEET OUR TEAM

For more information and local stories

Kim Forsyth

Illiana Small

Kathryn Kirkwood

Tiffany McFadden

Colleen Hartwick

Registered Massage Therapist

Registered Massage Therapist

Registered Massage Therapist

Registered Dietitian

Naturopathic Doctor

Call for an appointment at 778.346.3446 or book online at www.thrive-therapeutics.ca

www.ImmigrantWelcome.ca


Memories of a bad night rekindled six years later 4 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

and tried to tell police he was someone else. Since then, Scott has abided by his bail conditions as he continues an ongoing battle with cancer. On Monday, he was sentenced after pleading guilty to assaulting a police officer and obstruction. As a result of his illness, Judge Ted Gouge declined to send Scott to jail and instead placed him on a seven-month conditional sentence order to be served at home. “That one incident basically ruined me,” Scott told the judge. In early March 2007,

Paul Rudan

CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR

Michael Scott isn’t proud of his behaviour that drunken night when the RCMP constable offered him a ride home and he responded by punching the officer. That was more than six years ago, but it took until Monday for the 42-year-old to be sentenced. Scott was arrested that night, but later released from custody, and then moved from Campbell River. Authorities didn’t catch up to him until last January when he was back in Campbell River

RCMP Const. John Clemens was called to a disturbance at a 4th Avenue apartment complex. There, around 4:30 a.m., he found a highlyintoxicated Scott banging on doors. Const. Clemens told him to stop and leave, but once outside the apartment, Scott started ringing buzzers. Again the officer told him to stop and even offered Scott a ride home. Scott responded by punching Const. Clemens. A struggle ensued and witnesses reported hearing and seeing the officer tell Scott several times to lie down.

Scott, however, continued to battle the officer who twice used pepper spray on his attacker and then his baton. Scott was finally subdued when two other officers arrived on scene. Scott was charged with assaulting a police officer, but the case came to a halt when he left Campbell River. Then, on Jan. 25, 2013, another RCMP officer spotted a green van parked outside the 7-Eleven store in Willow Point. The officer noticed the driver wince as he looked his way and decided to investigate further.

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

A check of the licence plate indicated the vehicle should be impounded, so the officer approached the driver and asked for his information. It was Scott behind the wheel, but he gave the officer a fake name. He also told the officer that Michael Scott had loaned him the van, but was in hospital. Further checks could not turn up the identity of the fictional name and it turned out that no one named Michael Scott was in hospital. However, as Scott was arrested, the officer noticed that he made sure to grab medication he required from

the van. The name on the prescription medication was Michael Scott. As well, at the detachment, a photograph of the detainee was shown to Const. Clemens who identified Scott. According to defence lawyer Brian Dybawd, Scott made a poor decision to try and fool the officer and did so after taking some cancer medication. Venturini told Judge Gouge that Campbell River RCMP want Scott jailed. However, given his medical condition, she suggested a conditional sentence. Dybawd suggested

Gateway to Campbell River

Visit this Willow Pont Business

WILLOW POINT BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Auto Service

7x10

ding Gifts & Numbers Jerseys

the same, adding that Scott’s health could deteriorate if he was jailed. The lawyer added that Scott’s health appears to be improving – he’s also “clean and sober” – and is working towards setting up his own marine engine repair business. Scott said he’s tried to apologize to Const. Clemens, but understands the officer didn’t want to meet with him. After receiving the seven-month conditional sentence, Scott offered to pay for Const. Clemens’ watch which broke during the scuffle. Venturini said she would pass along the information.

Over 85 Businesses to Serve You

2244 S. Island Hwy. 250-923-4421

Uniforms

morials

mtech ributor

Custom Embroidery on Jackets, Caps, Golf Shirts & More Custom Embroidery on Trophies & Awards - Sandblasting & Engraving Jackets, Caps, Golf Shirts & More phies & Awards Sandblasting & Engraving Promotional Products - Photo Mugs Promotional Products Personalized Giftware Photo Mugs - Personalized Giftware “No job is too small”

Unique Baby & Toddler Clothing

Willow Point BIA

80C Westgate Rd., Campbell River

250-923-3333 250-923-3333

badges@periscopepromotions.com

www.periscopepromotions.com

Willow Point Our talented team of experienced ad and marketing professionals are at your service to help your business stand out & attract more customers.

2116F South Island Hwy, Sunrise Square (Across from the Carvings) Tuesday-Saturday 10-5 778-418-1814

80C Westgate Rd, Campbell River

ww.periscopepromotions.com

Burp It Up Boutique

badges@periscopepromotions.com

Call today to advertise in this great feature 250-287-9227

Bonnie’s Alterations

presents

Karaoke Thursdays 8pm to midnight

Inside Little Hart Sewing School

littlehartsewingschool@shaw.ca

Host: Lizzy Franklin

2116F S. Island Hwy,

Friday Night Jam 8pm to midnight

Sunrise Square, Willow Point

778-418-4222

Bonnie Hart

Full safety check on all vehicles.

King of Cars Dean King

No bull, just reliable cars.

250-923-8866

2234 South Island Hwy. Visit our website for more cars autokingmotors.ca

photo by Grinz photography

The Flower Shop at Willow Point Campbell River Florists 250-923-3122

Elegant Floral Decor

Spruce up the season with a bouquet or centerpiece arrangement

Toll Free 1-800-338-6580 Willow Point Village Plaza #4-2231 S. Island Hwy. email Fran Jones: franj@shaw.ca www.campbellriverflorist.com

#5-2253 S. Island Hwy. 250-926-0606

jonnysbarandlounge

Burp It Up Boutique Unique Baby & Toddler Clothing 2116F South Island Hwy, Sunrise Square (Across from the Carvings) Tuesday-Saturday 10-5 778-418-1814

photo by Grinz photography


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRivermirror.com

More beds, say MLA and docs Paul ruDan

Campbell RiveR miRRoR

It’s not too late to get the hospital built right, according to North Island MLA Claire Trevena. The NDP member was joined by Dr. Deke Botsford and at least two other Campbell River doctors at a press conference Thursday afternoon to lobby government to

increase the number of beds for the new hospital. “Just the other day we had 100 people in the hospital and the new hospital is being built for 95. It makes no sense,” Trevena said earlier Thursday. Construction on the new $266-million Campbell River hospital is expected to begin next spring. For sev-

eral months now, Trevena has been calling on Island Health (formerly Vancouver Island Health Authority) to increase the number of beds and, now, at a least a few doctors want to be heard as well. “We need to get this on the record,” she said. “Let’s not spend all this money and not get this right.” In September, in a let-

ter to the Minister of Health, Trevena suggested using part of the current hospital to provide some extra space. The plan is to demolish the old hospital once the new one is completed. “There is no question we need our new hospital, but everyone is concerned that it will be overcrowded as soon as it opens its doors,” said Trevena.

Developer bemoans sprinkler costs Kristen Douglas

Campbell RiveR miRRoR

Developer Jared Welychko says dealing with city hall has been frustrating. Welychko wants to build a triplex on Alder Street, but scolded council Tuesday night. “Developing a threeplex has been an exercise in frustration,” said Welychko. “Our development permit was met with resistance and multiple changes in the design layout and landscaping were made to accommodate the recommendations of the building permit.” To make things worse for Welychko, his building permit was recently denied by the planning department because his plans don’t include a fire suppression sprinkler system. Though the sprinkler system is not mandated by the B.C.

Building Code, it is a requirement for multiple-unit developments in Campbell River. Welychko said he’s been given an estimate of $9,000 to install the system, but compounding the problem is the the water line going into 741 Alder St. does not support a fire suppression system. “The property doesn’t even have a storm sewer,” Welychko said. “So we’re told from city employees that in order to install a fire suppression system we’re responsible for the costs related to the excavation of Alder Street and the installation of a two- to two-and-a-halfinch water main bringing water from the other side of Alder Street.” Welychko said that’s expected to set him back $25,000 more. “It’s reasonable if we’re building an apartment building and the cost can

be spread out over multiple units, but there are only three units and the cost makes this project uneconomical to continue with,” he said. The developer said he could legally build a duplex without fire suppression, but he figures a duplex would not compliment the neighbourhood in the same way a triplex would. However, some residents who live near the property disagree that even a triplex fits in with the neighbourhood. At a public hearing in July, several neighbours spoke in opposition. Rob Archer was concerned about the noise with having the parking right

Friday, Nov. 15 • 4 - 9pm Saturday, Nov. 16 10am - 3pm

Fun, festive atmosphere, delicious food, local artisans.

quadra xmas fair

Santa Arrives at Noon on Saturday.

Enrich Someone’s Life

3x4

Enrich the life of an adult learner, become a tutor. The experience will change your life!

14 in

More than half of working age people in BC have difficulty reading or writing, which makes it difficult for them to be a part of our changing economy. Be a part of the solution! The CR Literacy Association has students who need volunteer tutors. Volunteer tutors work one-on-one with adults and youth wanting to improve their English skills. Everyone is welcome!

2x4 Units from 5 x 5 ft. to 12 x 30 ft.

NEED MORE SPACE?

Training for volunteer tutors Nov. 12, 13, 19 & 20 5:30pm until 8:30pm at Robron Centre

If you are interested in becoming a tutor for either program, phone 250 923 1275 or email Julina Spetch at info@literacyforall.ca for more information.

National Child Day ...because we love our kids!

national child day cr city When: Friday, November 22nd 10am ‐ 1pm Where: Campbell River Community Centre

Family Gym snacks by donation crafts music and stories face painting ...and much more!!

ironwood

The above programs are free of charge, thanks to funding from the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.

3x7

Cardboard Village

Open 7 Days a Week • Electronic Gate Security Cameras • Affordable

More tutors are needed for these programs: Adult Literacy tutors work with learners whose skills in reading, writing, and math are at a low level. ESL tutors work with youth and adults who are learning English as their second language, (reading, writing, and pronunciation).

Celebrate

What’s Happening?

If so, store your keepsakes and furniture in a safe and secure place. Our storage units are spacious, safe, convenient and affordable.

British Columbians cannot read this sentence.

cr lit

STORE UNTIL LATER

QUADRA’S CHRISTMAS

2x3 FAIR CRAFT

behind his house while Tyson Mielke, who lives next door to the site, said the height of the structure would allow the residents to peer unimpeded into his backyard and deck. Lorne Harron, who spoke on behalf of resident Gladys Derraugh said Derraugh was concerned her property would be de-valued and that the development would add to the high volume of traffic in the area. Welychko told council he is in the process of submitting a variance application to remove the sprinkler requirement and hoped council would make a reasonable decision.

FRIDAY, NovembeR NOVEMBER 8, 8, 2013 2013 || Campbell CAMPBELL RiveR RIVER miRRoR MIRROR || 55 FRiDaY,

It’s al A gre l FREE!! at day

presch f oolers or their big pe and ople!

Insulated Steel Construction - Centrally Located 10’ High Ceilings in All Units Heated Units Available - Onsite Manager Long Term and Non Profit Group Discounts Outdoor Fenced Storage

For More Information Please Call: Campbell River Recreation & Culture

Quadra Island Community Centre 970 West Road 250-285-3243

286.1161/923.7911

250-287-2248

950 Ironwood St. (next to Shar-Kare) www.ironwoodstorage.ca

OVER 24,0007x2.5 PIECES OF DECORATIVE TILE We Handle ALL Insurance Claims

1690C Maple St., Campbell River

250-286-7229

☛ PRICED FOR QUICK SALE!

cr floors

Some Very Unique Pieces with Limited Quantities ☞ Variety of Sizes ~ Cash & Carry ~


6 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 Around The World with

Brought to you by Uniglobe Travel

for a chance to win a

Gift Basket!

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Pool & Darts: Eagles Lounge 250th Tues, Nov. 19 » 7pm @ Misty Fins 2874990 WIN a $250 Travel Voucher! RSVP 250-287-7715 Weight Appies! • Prizes! Watchers Mtg: Quadra Community Centre, 6-7pm. mondays Archery Range Open Fish & Wildlife 6:30-8pm. FMI 250-9231838. http://www.crfw.net CLOSED NOV. 11 Babytime - CR. Library. 10:3011pm. Register at the library, call 250-287-3655 or just drop in! Oct. 28- Dec.2. CANCELLED NOV. 11 C.R. Healing Rooms 11a.m.1p.m. 684 Isl. Hwy 250-923-2312. CLOSED NOV. 11 Taking Off Pounds Sensibly – TOPS BC #3671 1441 Ironwood Street Weigh-In 8:30 to 9:35 am Meeting 9:50 to 11:00am. Family Gym-Walking-7yrs. 10:30-11:30am. Community Centre Gym. Drop in. Free. CANCELLED NOV. 11 Family Place Drop In 8:30-11am Willow Pt. Neighbourhood(corner of Eardley & Larwood. AND Robron Cenre. 1-3pm. Free. CANCELLED NOV. 11 Lost Families Found 7-9p.m. CR Genealogy Society Library hours. Help avail. Maritime Museum. Janice: 250-203-0585 Campbell River Library Hours: 10am-8pm CLOSED NOV.11 Texas Hold’Em: Willows Neighborhood Pub. 250-923-8311 Open Mic: 6-9p.m. Serious Coffee. 250-923-1312. CANCELLED NOV. 11 Crib: CR Legion. Registration 6:30pm. Game 7pm. 250-2866831

tuesdays BPWN - Business and Professional Women’s Network 5:30-8:30pm. Carriage Room - Royal Coachman. 4th Tues. of the month. RSVP@ bpwn.org Discovery Toastmasters 12-1:00p.m.CommunityCentre-Rm 1. Contact Lorraine: 250-286-4273 Family Place Drop In 8:3011am Discovery Passage, 2050 Pengelly Rd. Free. Campbell River Library Hours: 10am-8pm CR Art Gallery hours: 12-5pm. crartgallery.ca Lost Families Found: 10a.m.3p.m. CR Genealogy Society Library hours. Help avail. Maritime Museum. 250-203-0585 Weight Watchers Mtg: Maritime Heritage Museum. 11:30am & 6:30pm Al-Anon on Quadra 7-8p.m. 972 West Road Quadra Island Children’s Centre OPT(Options for Sexual Health) Drop In Clinic 7-9pm. At the Health Unit in Tyee Plaza. 250-830-7603. Education & Information Low cost birth control. All ages welcome. Drop-In Meditation-All

A NIGHT for

BOB-O

An East Coast Celtic Fundraiser

Levels 7-8p.m. Ocean Resort, 4384 Island Hwy. Lucas@ oceanresort.ca. 250-792-3165 TOPS #BC 4935 Bethany Lutheran Church. Weigh-In 7:45am-8:50am. Meeting 9:05 to 10:00am. Campbell River Newcomer’s Meeting. 7pm. Ironwood Centre, 1351 Ironwood St. Social group for women new to the area. Sandy 250-923-7471. 1st Tues each month. NOV. 5. Acoustic Jam CR Lodge, 7pm. 250-287-7446 Weight Watchers Mtg: Maritime Heritage Centre 11am & 6pm, 250-286-3161

Library hours. Help avail. Maritime Museum. 250-203-0585 Therapeutic Relaxation Skills 3:30-5:30p.m. CR Hospice Society, #104 - 301. Dogwood St. 250-286-1121 www.crhospice.org Diabetic Drop In 3-4p.m. CR Hospital, Sunshine Wellness Centre Jam Night 6:30-8:30p.m. Serious Coffee 250-923-1312 Meaningful Media 3:308:30pm. Robron Centre. 3rd Mon. each month. Movie, discussion & meal. Debbie 250830-0171 ext.812 Al-Anon 12-1pm St. Patrick’s Church, 34 S Alder St. Barb: 250923-5537 or Judy: 250-923-1653

7x14

wednesdays Family Gym-Walking-7yrs. 10:30-11:30am. Community Centre Gym. $3 Drop in. Family Place Drop In 9-11:30am. 1048 A Hemlock St. Free. 250-286-1161 Sing For Pure Joy! 6:30-8pm. The Lions Den (across from Thrifty’s). All voices welcome. Mary 250-285-3764 Campbell River Friendship Quilters’ Guild meeting. 7:00pm. Community Centre Lounge. 2nd Wed of mnth. Everyone welcome. NOV 13. Preschool Storytime Vancouver Island Regional Library 10:30-11am. Register at the library, call 250-287-3655 or just drop in. Midnight Shuttles, guild of spinners and weavers meeting. 1st Wed. each mnth. 7:30-9:30pm. Sybil Andrews Cottage, 2131 S. Isl. Hwy. NOV. 6 CR Parkinson self help support group 1:30 pm. Room 201, CR Baptist Church Newcomers always welcome. Contact Pat at 250 286 1354.2nd Wed of the month. NOV. 13. Campbell River Library Hours: 10am-8pm CR Toastmasters 7-8:30pm. Community Centre, Rm 1. Chris: 923-4162. chriskoz@shaw.ca Family Place Drop In 1-3pm. Community Centre. Free. 250286-1161 CR Art Gallery: 12-5pm Lost Families Found: 1:304p.m. CR Genealogy Society

thursdays Tidemark Lounge-7pm Featuring local musical artists. Adm. $10 at the door. tidemarktheatre.com CR Ultimate 6:00pm Sportsplex, 1800 South Alder. Under lights. campbellriverultimate.com CR Art Gallery hours: 12-5pm Campbell River Library Hours: 10am-8pm Weight Watchers Meeting Maritime Heritage Museum 11:30am CR Networking 12pm. Royal Coachman www. campbellrivernetworking.ca Alzheimer’s & Dementia Caregivers’ Support Group 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. Mitlenatch Room - CR Hospital. First Thurs. of the month. NOV. 7. Jane Hope: 1-800-462-2833. C.R. Healing Room-11a.m.1p.m. & 7-9p.m. 684 Isl. Hwy. Confidential prayer. No charge or appt. 250-923-2312 Al-Anon- 1pm & 7:30pm 7th Day Adventist Church Barb 250-9235537 or Judy 250-923-1653 Open Mic: Misty Fins 6:30pm. 250-287-4320 www.mistyfins.com Campbell River Auction 1358 Marwalk Cres, 6pm. 250-2873939. www.crauctions.ca In the Know Sessions & Parent Networking 7-9pm. Robron Centre. 3rd Thurs. every month. FMI: colleen@

forcesociety.com. 1-855-8878004. www.forcesociety.com Lost Families Found: 1:304p.m. CR Genealogy Society Library hours. Help avail. Maritime Museum. 250-203-0585

FrIdays Family Place Drop In 1-3pm. Community Centre. Free. 250286-1161 CR Storm Hockey Team Home Games Nov. 15, 22. 7:30pm. Strathcona Gardens. 250830-0979. Family Gym-Walking-7yrs. 10:30-11:30am. Sportsplex. Free. Drop In. Archery Range Hours 6:308pm. FMI 250-923-1838. CR. Fish & Wildlife.http://www.crfw.net Open Mic Nite: Serious Coffee 7-10pm. 923-1312 CR Art Gallery hours: 12-5pm. crartgallery. Campbell River Library hours: 10am-8pm Gamblers Anonymous 7-9pm, St.Patrick’s Church, 34 S. Alder St. Meat Draws Eagles Hall, 199914th Ave 250-287-4990 Family & Teen Centre Drop In Program 7-10:30pm Community Centre. New “Youth Zone” for 11-18 year olds. 250286-1161. FREE. Live Music 9:30p.m.2a.m. Quinsam Hotel www. quinsamhotel.com

communty calendar 7x14

NOW PLAYING:

Billy Wiseman & John Reynolds

Jackass Presents Bad Grandpa (14A) Nightly 7:20 & 9:30; Sat & Sun Matinees 1:20 & 3:30

with Bruce Gardiner & Friends

Ender’s Game (PG) Nightly 7:10 & 9:40; Sat & Sun Matinees 1:10 & 3:40

Saturday, November 9th 8:00pm Cover by Donation / Silent Auction

Last Vegas (PG) Nightly 7:00 & 9:25; Sat & Sun Matinees 1:00 & 3:25 Free Birds 3D (G) Nightly 7:00 & 9:10; Sat & Sun Matinees 1:00

Free Birds 2D (G) Sat & Sun Matinees 3:10

saturdays

CR Art Gallery hours 12-5pm. crartgallery.ca Campbell River Library hours: 10am-5pm Weight Watchers Mtg 9:30am Maritime Heritage Museum Rock n’ Bowl 9p.m.-12a.m. CR Bowling Centre. 250-286-1177

sundays Al-Anon 7:30p.m. 7th Day Adventist Church, 300 Thulin St. Barb 250-923-5537 or Judy 250-923-1653 Center for Spiritual Living Meditation: 10:00am & Celebration: at 10:30am. Willow

Nov. 1 - 7 2013

Captain Phillips (PG) Fri & Sat 6:45 & 9:40, Sun to Wed 7:30; Sat & Sun Matinees 12:45 & 3:40 Thor Dark World 3D (PG) Advance Screening Thursday Nov. 7th 8:00PM (No Passes)

Dogwood and Merecroft, Campbell River

250-287-3233

landmarkcinemas.ca

communitycalendar@ campbellrivermirror.com

UPCOMING

Interested in downloading eBooks for free? Sat. Nov. 9. 11am-12 pm. CR Library. Learn to download eBooks from the regional library website, www.virl.bc.ca. Bring your device if you like. Please pre-register at the CR Library at 250-2873655. A Night for Bob-O - An East Coast Celtic Fundraiser. Sat. Nov. 9. 8pm. Riptide Marine Pub. By donation. Silent Auction. Remembrance Day Parade & Ceremony Mon. Nov. 11. 10:45am. Spirit Square. Skate and Pond Hockey Mon. Nov. 11. 1-4pm. Strathcona Gardens. 250-287-9234 International Potluck Celebration Wed. Nov. 13. 5:30pm. Robron Centre GymPotluck at 6pm. Art, cultural music, dancing & food. No registartion required. Campbell River Friendship Quilters’ Guild meeting. Nov. 13. 7:00pm. Community Centre Lounge. Everyone welcome. CR Parkinson self help support group Wed. Nov. 13. 1:30 pm. Room 201, CR Baptist Church Learn about water exercise programs offered at the pool and their benefits. Newcomers always welcome. Pat at 250286-1354. Compassionate Friends Monthly Meetingsupporting family after a child dies. Wed. Nov. 13. Robron Centre, 740 Robron Road. Doors open 6.45pm. Meeting at 7:00 pm. For info or to talk please call Eileen 250-285- 2434 or Judy at 250-923-2485. All bereaved parents are warmly welcome. World Diabetes Day Thurs. Nov. 14. 10am-1pm. Strathcona Gardens foyer. Learn more about Diabetes from professional educators, ask questions, sample foods.. 250-287-9234. Christmas Gift Tour Fri. Nov. 15 • 12 Noon - 5pm. Sat. Nov. 16 • 10am - 5pm.Sun. Nov. 17.• 10am - 4pm. Crafters, Artisans & Home Based Businesses (Self Guided) 60 Vendors at 12 locations! Discover Old Time Gospel Singing Sat. Nov. 16. 7pm. Discovery Community Church, 250-10th Ave. All are welcome! A Ministry of Discovery Community Church. Free Community Meal Sat. Nov. 16. Doors open @4pm. Meal served @ 4:30pm. CR Vineyard Church, 2215 Campbell River Rd.(near Haig-Brown House) 250286-3372. All ages. Everyone welcome. Linda Tillery and the Cultural Heritage Choir Nov. 16. 8-10pm. Quadra Community Centre African-American roots music. Advance tix avail, @ Music Plant in C. R., Hummingbird Office & Art Supply and Works of H’Art on Quadra. Quadra Christmas Craft Fair Fri. Nov. 15. 4-9pm and Sat. Nov. 16. 10am-3pm. Quadra Island Community Centre, 970 West Rd. Louis Riel Day Potluck & Fundraiser Sun. Nov. 17. 1-6pm. Robron Centre. Music, games and some jigging. Dinner @ 4pm. For more info contact the N.I. Metis Nation: 250-287-7417 or nimetis88@gmail.com DATE CORRECTION “Around the World” with G Adventures & Uniglobe Travel Tues. Nov. 19. 7pm. An info night focussing on Socially Conscious Travel around the globe. @ Misty Finns Pub. Win a $250 Travel Voucher! Appies! Prizes! FREE. RSVP to Uniglobe Travel. 250-287-7715.

Your first job...

is waiting for you!

Marine Pub, Grill, Catering & Liquor Store

Discovery Harbour Shopping Centre 250-830-0044 » www.riptidepub.ca

Frankie

Campbell River Mirror Carrier

Now hiring newspaper carriers. – call Becky for details 250-287-9227


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

City to install lighting at new Extreme Weather Shelter Kristen Douglas

CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR

The city’s new Extreme Weather Shelter will be safer and more secure for the homeless after council approved a couple of improvements to the shelter at Tuesday night’s council meeting. Along with a storage unit, council approved supplying two lamps to brighten up the area next to the downtown fire hall. The city already had a number of lamp standards in storage and the city’s electrical contractor offered to donate materials and labour valued at $1,600 if the city provided the lamps. Dave Morris, the city’s general manager of facilities and supply management, and Ross Blackwell, the city’s land use manager, wrote in a joint report to council that the required infrastructure was also readily available. “When Fire Hall No.

1 parking lot was refurbished two years ago, two lamp standard bases were installed at the southern edge of the lot along with conduit to the fire hall building, with a view to installing lighting sometime in the future,” Morris and Blackwell wrote. Council gave the goahed to hooking up the lighting system and installing 30 amp ancillary power in one of the lamp standards to allow the shelter’s batteries to be re-charged on a weekly basis. As for the storage shed, council agreed to allow Radiant Life Church, which operates the shelter, to place a storage unit nearby to store the client’s personal belongings for the night. The only stipulation being that the shed sit on the east side of the fenced property. “The rationale…in seeing the fenced area, I’m assuming the stor-

age shed will be within the fenced area and not external to it,” said Coun. Andy Adams. “By putting it on the east side, is to have the shed where people would come and enter (the Dogwood Street entrance) and not on the back side of the property.” The Extreme Weather Shelter is a low-barrier shelter for the homeless who may be under the influence of drugs and/ or alcohol. The shelter, which is a heated trailer made from a steel shipping container, houses up to 16 people with two people per one unit. Clients using the shelter are given sandwiches and coffee in the evening, a pair of warm pyjamas, and a warm breakfast in the morning served at Radiant Life Church. The shelter is open every night from 7 p.m.-7 a.m. until March 31, 2014 and is staffed throughout the night.

Did You Know...

3x4

Following a rehabilitation program is very important to your legal case. In law, the plaintiff (injured party) has an obligation to mitigate his or her losses. This means the plaintiff must take reasonable steps to minimize the losses he or she suffers by following the doctor’s advice regarding treatment and getting back to work as quickly as possible. By following a coordinated rehabilitation program, the client will be able to show the court he or she has made best efforts to improve injuries and function. Rehabilitation programs often involve the input of your family doctor, an occupational therapist or physiotherapist. Your personal injury lawyer must work with your doctor or physiotherapist (as well as other medical treators) to identify a reasonable rehabilitation program for your situation.

awg cv rv

To learn more go to www.awslaw.ca

250-338-6747 or 1-800-214-4520 www.awslaw.ca

FREE Initial Consultation • We’ll come to you! SMALL TOWN SERVICE

512 Fourth Street, Courtenay, BC

BIG CITY EXPERTISE

FRIDAY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 8, 8, 2013 2013 || CAMPBELL CAMPBELL RIVER RIVER MIRROR MIRROR || 77

More red tape to be removed at city hall Kristen Douglas CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR

Council Tuesday took steps towards peeling off the red tape facing business owners at city hall. Council approved an amendment to its business licensing bylaw which will allow business owners to purchase one business licence that will be valid in 12 different Island communities. The inter-municipal business licence will allow mobile business owners such as photographers and landscapers to expand their

client base with little hassle. Colleen Evans, president of the Chamber of Commerce which worked closely with the city on the program, said it will make life a lot easier for the city’s business operators and expand their opportunities. “This bylaw will not only reduce red tape but it will streamline the process for businesses,” Evans told council Tuesday evening. “This is going to enable our businesses to look at regional growth opportunities. A lot of our contractors have been restricted to only oper-

301 St. Ann’s Road, Campbell River, BC V9W 4C7 Telephone: 250-286-5700 info@campbellriver.ca www.campbellriver.ca

COMMUNITY UPDATE NOV 8, 2013

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION OPPORTUNITY

DID YOU KNOW?

DOWNTOWN WATERFRONT CHARRETTE

NEW WITH THE CITY’S NEW WEBSITE

The next step in the City’s downtown waterfront charrette re: vacant land near Roberts Reach Road and Highway #19A takes place this month.

4x11 Members of the public are invited to observe and share their feedback. CITY CURRENTS DATE: November 12 (kick-off) 4x11

You can subscribe to a news feed from the City’s new website to have news sent directly to your email account. Subscribe to the news feed by clicking on the orange NewsFeed button under your-city-hall/news/news-releases. You can also subscribe to employment opportunities under: your-city-hall/careers-volunteering/ employment-opportunities.

And you can share events and news from the new website through Facebook. Here’s how to share with your Facebook friends. 1. From the home page, click on What’s New or Upcoming Events. 2. Click on any item posted. 3. Click on Like, Share or both!

Check it out at www.campbellriver.ca.

WATER DAMAGE ROT REPAIR 3x4

TIME:

6:30 to 8 PM each evening

facing the highway) Key background information and the “realtime” efforts of the charrette participants will be shared, including results from the recent “pre-charrette” open houses and ideas from the Youth Action Committee. Help fine-tune the community vision for this area that was established through the Sustainable Official Community Plan process. A charrette is a collaborative design and planning session that combines the interests of a diverse group of people to generate a land use and urban design concept that serves a range of community interests. Questions? Contact Land Use Services Manager Ross Blackwell at 250-203-1144.

OPEN HOUSE SEEKS FEEDBACK ON SHIPPING CONTAINER USE

10

% OFF Book Your Repair cv awg rv by November 30th

to save 10% off Labour and Materials

November 13 (view the progress) November 14 (see the results)

WHERE: Discovery Harbour Shopping CITY CURRENTS Centre, unit 84 (next to Subway,

And remember to give us your feedback through the community opinion poll on the homepage!

In Association with

ating in this geographical location and having this new bylaw passed will enable them to look at regional growth opportunities for their business.” Evans said the special licence was requested by several contractors. The single $150 licence will now enable local businesses to be covered with a business licence in Campbell River, Comox, Courtenay, Cumberland, Duncan, Ladysmith, Lake Cowichan, Nanaimo, North Cowichan, Parksville, Port Alberni and Qualicum Beach.

Members of the business community are invited to provide their input on the use of shipping containers in the community. DATE: November 13 TIME: 6:30 to 8 PM WHERE: Enterprise Center (next to City Hall)

Chris Charko RV Tech, 25 Years

Trust your trailer to Chris Charko and the staff at Comox Valley RV ICBC Approved Facility

250.871.4700 • Toll Free 1.877.730.3416

1355 Comox Rd, Courtenay • www.comoxvalleyrv.com

Unable to attend? Share your opinion via email to ross.blackwell@campbellriver.ca.

WHY AN OPEN HOUSE? . In response to an increasing number of community complaints about the look of the shipping containers, Council is considering a proposed bylaw to restrict their use in certain parts of the community, particularly in residential and more prominent commercial areas such as the downtown core. . The City’s proposed bylaw restricts the use of containers to industrial zones, with exceptions in some instances. With a written request, the proposed bylaw would allow temporary use for between 30 and 90 days to accommodate construction or for stores bringing in stock, for example. . The proposed bylaw also includes an opportunity for exemptions for future installations through the City’s variance application process. Exemptions for existing containers would also be considered on a case-by-case basis through a formal variance application to the City.


8 || CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR MIRROR || FRIDAY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 8, 8, 2013 2013 CAMPBELL RIVER

Opinion

Member of of BC BC Press Press Council Council Member

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

The Campbell Campbell River River Mirror Mirror isis published published every everyWednesday Wednesdayand andFriday Fridayby byBlack BlackPress PressLtd. Ltd. The 104-250 Dogwood St., Campbell River, B.C. V9W 2X9 104-250 Dogwood St., Campbell River, B.C. V9W 2X9

Telephone: 250-287-9227 250-287-9227 •• Fax: Fax: 250-287-3238 250-287-3238 Telephone:

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Our View

Campbell River will never forget It seems Campbell River will never forget, given the way the community continues to honour our veterans. Each year, Remembrance Day rolls around and regardless of the weather, Campbell Riverites turn out in big numbers to We say: This attend the Remembrance Day services at the cenotaph. community It reflects well on our community always honours that we hold this day in such high regard across all age groups. Schools Nov. 11 and youth organizations in the area keep the spirit of remembrance alive by participating in the Remembrance Day services at the cenotaph or by

teaching the value of remembering those who gave their lives for the service of their country and the needs of other countries engulfed in war. At this time of remembrance it is moving and refreshing to acknowledge the work of so many people who work to keep the memory of our veterans’ sacrifices. Just last month, for example, we lost Peter Kay, a local veteran and mainstay of the Remembrance Day ceremonies in Campbell River. We won’t forget his service to his country nor will we ever forget all the years his sharp voice barked over the Nov. 11 services, “Colour party! Present...arms!” He and many others in the Legion work to give Nov. 11

the poignancy it deserves. Kudos also to other organizations like the Campbell River Genealogical Society who, we learn from today’s front page, make a special effort to use their knowledge and skills to commemorate Campbell Riverites who served in war and now rest in our cemeteries. How moving is their tribute of gravestone flags. Monday is Remembrance Day and in this community it is more than just a day off. It is an important part of the collective memory of this community when its residents and those who settled here later, stood on guard for their country. That we shall never forget.

Letters

Ban red light right turns

I sent emails to the minister of transportation and to our MLA who happens to be the transportation critic about pedestrian safety. After a couple of close calls, I wanted statistics on how many pedestrians are injured by cars in B.C. yearly.  I also had some suggestions on what should be done to improve pedestrian safety.  The minister at least acknowledged my message but didn’t answer my questions so I’ve done some research on line. I learned that walking is considerably more dangerous than cycling per distance. In the USA, pedestrians are killed at a rate 3 to 5 times higher than in the Netherlands and that in the city of Freiburg in Germany the most desirable neighborhoods have a speed limit of seven kilometers per hour. It’s doubtful we will ever be as progressive but there are things we can improve. My suggestion to the minister is to ban right turns on a red light.  Perhaps a yellow arrow light could come on if the pedestrian signal is not activated. It is unacceptable that we do nothing about this. One letter is easily ignored but 10 or 100 e-mails to the minister are not. This is a simple measure that may save your life or the life of your child. Norm Babin Campbell River

We welcome your opinions on stories and issues published in our pages as well as issues of broader concern encountered elsewhere. Please keep your letters brief. We reser ve the right to edit for length and liability. E-mail them to editor@ campbellrivermirror.com

Help the hospital, get a flu shot Tom Fletcher B.C. Views

I got my influenza shot this week, paid for out of pocket since I don’t qualify for any of the higher-risk groups provided with free immunization. A reminder to take this simple health precaution came in October when a labour arbitrator ruled that it is a reasonable employment requirement for health care workers to either get the current immunization or mask up in patient care areas. Quiet advocacy by Provincial Health Officer Dr. Perry Kendall has paid off. Staff, doctors, outside contractors and visitors will have to put patients first. Health care unions pressed a grievance on behalf of members who insist they have a right to refuse immunization and increase exposure to patients. They have

apparently run up the white flag. “We will be telling our members to comply with the new policy, or risk being fired,” said an overly dramatic Val Avery, president of the Health Sciences Association. HSA lawyers led the grievance, supported by the Hospital Employees’ Union and the B.C. Nurses’ Union. Avery said the union will continue to urge its members to take advantage of on-site flu shot clinics. That’s right, like most provincial employees, they all get immunization that is not only free but administered at work. Kendall announced the regulation last year, after finding that 40 per cent of employees in long-term care were not getting the current influenza vac-

cine, and the rate of immunization was declining. Their objections make no sense. Aside from the self-serving “rights” argument, they complain that the annual flu vaccine isn’t effective enough. The formula is developed by international effort to track the dominant strains that emerge as winter rolls around the world. Kendall says a poor match results in about 40 per cent immunity, and a good match reaches 90 per cent. At the risk of stating the obvious, he notes that even 40 per cent is better than nothing. After two weeks of expert testimony, arbitrator Robert Diebolt, a retired UBC law professor, wrote as follows: “It is indisputable that influenza can be

a serious, even fatal, disease. Immunization also indisputably provides a measure of protection to health care workers and I have found that their immunization reduces influenza transmission to patients. “I have also concluded that there is a real and serious patient safety issue and the policy is a helpful program to reduce patient risk.” The B.C. Centre for Disease Control calculates that if all health care workers would get immunized, the risk to patients would be reduced nearly 50 per cent. The Ministry of Health warns: “you can spread influenza for 24 hours before you have any symptoms.” What would cause educated health

Continued on Pg. 9


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

FRIDAY,NOVEMBER NOVEMBER8, 8,2013 2013 | | CAMPBELL CAMPBELLRIVER RIVERMIRROR MIRROR | | 99 FRIDAY,

Your Your community community news news team: team:

Dave DaveHamilton Hamilton Publisher Publisher

Alistair AlistairTaylor Taylor

Paul Paul Rudan Rudan

Editor Editor

Reporter Reporter

Kristen Kristen Douglas Douglas Reporter Reporter

Dean Taylor Taylor Dean Sales Rep Rep Sales

Debbie Baker Baker Debbie Sales Rep Rep Sales

Don Daniels Daniels Don Sales Rep Rep Sales

KimCook Cook Kim SalesRep Rep Sales

MichelleHueller Hueller Kristi AmyVeloso Veloso Rachael RachaelBeckley Beckley Michelle KristiPellegrin Pellegrin Marnie MarnieNeaves Neaves Becky BeckyMerrick Merrick Marianne MarianneGraham Graham Darcey DarceyWood Wood Tanya TanyaGraham Graham Amy

GraphicDesigner Designer Graphic usedcampbellriver.com Graphic GraphicDesigner Designer Graphic GraphicDesigner Designer Graphic GraphicDesigner Designer Circulation CirculationMgr. Mgr. usedcampbellriver.com

Local taxpayers shouldn’t have to foot part of the bill

Fletcher: Perhaps the chaos could be prevented Continued from Pg. 8

care workers to defy common sense? A hint is provided by professional union promoter and publicist Bill Tieleman, who railed about the decision on his blog. This regulation is inspired by big bad U.S. health care corporations that would rather impose immunization than pay for sick days, Tieleman asserts. Ah, so an infected health care employee should wander the wards until symptoms emerge, and then go home for a few days of paid rest. What a perfectly stupid idea! Last week BCNU president Debra McPherson was warning about “chaos” at the new Surrey Memorial emergency ward, her latest of a career of media protests. The big new facility is already overflowing, and more beds and more staff are needed, stat! Perhaps if better preventive measures were taken by nurses, doctors and other staff, this chronic “chaos” would be reduced and these unions would have more credibility.

Back in the good old days when BC Hydro was in charge of its own business – that is before cash strapped governments started dipping into their net revenues – things were much better organized. I was an employee of BC Hydro that saw good proposals to communities affected by the corporation’s operations offered reasonable and well-thoughtout options. BC Hydro for example, to reduce objection to their projects, would offer adjacent cities an opportunity to request associative conveniences or services

they may need. One community I lived in was offered a complete water intake, storage and transport conduit to the community which BC Hydro would fund 100 per cent. As the project got deferred, the community never got its new water supply. This community in later years had to build its own intake system, transport water over a 15-mile corridor with a vertical lift of over 400 feet – a no small cost feature that taxpayers had to cover due to lost opportunity. Campbell River should have and could have had BC Hydro foot the total

bill with a system that gave independent primary service to the community as well as a secondary backup system that is already in place. The red herring about earthquake susceptability is a load of cannon fodder. All structures are prone to quakes not just existing infrastructures but new ones as well. A new independent supply line could be interrupted the same as any existing service that exists now. If Campbell River had demanded BC Hydro supply an independent system as any socio/ economic review would

OfficeManager Manager Office

Classifieds Classifieds

Classifieds Classifieds

2x1.75

expose, Campbell River taxpayers wouldn’t be on the hook for 20 per cent of the cost of a new line. Secondly, the three existing penstocks aren’t ideal but any one of the three are more than adequate as a backup system with minimal costs to upgrade and capital maintenance costs to be provided by BC Hydro. It is BC Hydro’s project that has hatched all these extraneous costs and as such should be managed and rectified by the corporation without need to involve taxpayers to foot part of the bill. Ray Fortier Campbell River

john duncan HOMESHARE PROVIDER - INFORMATION SESSION Reach out to others by sharing your home

Communitas Supportive Care Society is having an Information Session to talk about what is involved with being a Homeshare provider for adult men and women who have developmental disabilities.

2x3

When: November 13, 2013 from 4:00 – 6:00pm Where: Communitas Supportive Care Society 1250–D Cedar Street (Across from the Rosebowl Restaurant) Campbell River, BC Homeshare providers welcome an individual into their home, providing them with living space, a regular, structured routine and support in daily life skills. Consider this opportunity to open your home, model life skills and provide support to your community.

homeshare provider

For more information, contact: Kathy Saunders Phone: 250.286.1487 Email: kathy@CommunitasCare.com www.CommunitasCare.com

Submissions to the Mirror

Photographs: Digital images are preferred. Please send large file size JPEGs as a separate attachment, do not embed them in a document file; Written submissions: E-mail rtf or text only formats preferred; Comments or enquiries about news and event coverage: Call Alistair Taylor, editor, at 250-287-9227.

3x4

nic

Classifieds: 1-855-310-3535

Contractors 3x7 3x7 Directory AFC

contractors contractors page page

AND GAS • • • • •

Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalNews.com Twitter:@tomfletcherbc E-mail: tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Servicing Campbell River since 1993

Safe Showers Gas Fireplaces Bathroom Remodelling Tub Replacement Alterations & Renovations

• Carpentry • Drywall • Flooring

FOR ALL YOUR PLUMBING & GAS SERVICE INSTALLATIONS

FASHION SHOW & DESIGNER LUNCH Brought to you 4x3 by Georgies Fashion

Senior Discounts ~ Free Estimates Call Anders 250-830-8939 or 250-923-9905

WHEN: Thursday November 14th 11:30 am to 2 pm WHERE: Quay West Restaurant 921 Island Hwy Campbell River ($15.00 for lunch soup salad sandwich tea/coffee and dessert)

goorgies goorgies RESERVATIONS 250-286-9988

DESIGNERS: Joseph Ribkoff - Jag - Liverpool | Gilmore - Parkhurst | Kut from the Kloth

Beauty in Store at

All in one location

250-287-9577 581A-11th Avenue, Campbell River georgies.ca Open Tues. - Sat.

LAWN & GARDEN MAINTENANCE Lawn & Yard Maintenance • Lawn Aerating Hedge & Shrub Trimming CALL Fruit Tree Pruning • Patio Blocks • Fences

250-830-3735

23 Years in Business • Licensed • Insured • WCB


10 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

meet the PROFESSIONALS FOR THE BEST IN QUALITY, SERVICE & PRODUCTS PRODUCTS CALL CALL OR OR VISIT VISITTHESE THESEFINE FINEBUSINESSES! BUSINESSES!

Beyond Beautiful Smiles Dental Centre We’ve got great news! Dr. Seebach & his team at Beyond Beautiful Smiles are now Invisalign Certified

Now you can go wireless. www.beyondbeautifulsmiles.ca

For more information call us today at 250-923-GRIN (4746) ©

invisalign LEARN HOW TO SMILE AGAIN.

2410 South Island Hwy., Campbell River

Computer & Support LAWNService & GARDEN 7x14 MAINTENANCE Sakas Pier

RIPPLE ROCK R e sR ESTORATIONS ta u R a n t

• Sushi • Fish &|Chips & Salad FLOOD FIRE• |Soup WIND

• Wraps/Sandwiches/Burgers HELPING YOU PUT THE PIECES BACK TOGETHER

& Much More 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICES IICRC ComeCERTIFIED enjoy the SPECIALISTS Central show and Northern July Serving 1st Fireworks Vancouver and Surrounding & DinnerIsland with us. Islands Since 1996 Book now!

250-850-1168 Hours: 11:30 to Close 7 Days A Week 1671 Petersen Road | Campbell River 250-914-4997 #203-871-Island Hwy, Campbell River www.restorationsbc.ca

MILLSTREAM

• Virus Removal • Hardware Repair • Data Recovery • Wireless Solutions •Hedge Network Troubleshooting Security & Shrub Trimming • Fruit• Tree Pruning

FALL CLEANUP

CampbellSnow River 250 286 0624 Removal Courtenay 250250-830-3735 337 2064 CALL 25 Years Experience • Licensed Insured • WCB www.islandmicro.com

Business of the Week

REFRIGERATION & SURPLUS

River City Foot Care

Office Equipment & More

250-923-8870

51C Colorado Drive, Campbell River Hours: Wed – Sat, 10 – 5

Gabriela Eikeland STRESS MANAGEMENT COACHING LIFE COACHING

Above &MEDITATION beyond CLASSES TRee SeRvICe CHAIR YOGA CLASSES

Complete Tree Care Stump Grinding HOLISTIC BODYWORK Bucket Truck & Chipper 27 Years of Holistic Healing Insured & licensed Free Quotes and Bodywork! Valley Owned & Operated A Better Business Bureau Accredited Business Prompt, Friendly Service Gabriela: I.S.A. CertifiedCall Arborist 250.923.1773

Call Chad 1-250-703-0371 250.203.4195

or 1-250-897-5254 • Merville www.womynspathofhealing.com

Campbell River Mirror

D.J. To advertise Furnace here Marianne: ExpressCallLtd.

250-287-9227

Heat Pumps • Furnace Replacements New Construction • Air Conditioning • HRV Gas Fitting • Fireplaces

Traveling? INSURED & BONDED Tune into the local news while you are away call Dave Manser campbellrivermirror.com

250-287-6811

ABOVE &

▲ Complete Tree Care ▲ Stump Grinding ▲ Truck & Chipper ▲ Mini Excavator TREE ▲ 14’ Dump Trailer

BEYOND SERVICE

Chad 250-703-0371

or 250-897-5254 www.aboveandbeyondtreeservice.ca

is around the corner! Book Your Staff Parties PickToday! up from TAKE ADVANTAGE OF 10% OFF the Pros MMeet ONDAY - T HURSDAY PARTIES

meet the proffessionals

1920 Island Hwy., Campbell River (250) 287-2282

LIVING SERVICES FOR THE ELDERLY & HOUSEBOUND

Happy • Personal Care Birthday Bathing, Dressing, Canada Shaving

• Housekeeping It’s time Meal Preparation to have your • Driving to Hospital Phantom Screen or GP Appointments Installed call us today . . . • Shopping

Josie Coak • 778-346-4446 www.PhantomScreens.com 286-3210 charcare@shaw.ca

Featured Artists WALTER And SANDRA MOSES

Open Monday-Friday 9:30- 5:30 Saturday 9:30-5pm

ASSISTED LIVING SERVICES FOR THE ELDERLY & HOUSEBOUND

• Personal Care Bathing, Dressing, Shaving • Housekeeping Meal Preparation • Driving to Hospital or GP Appointments • Shopping

250-286-1612

Activate your body’s self-healing abilities Kim’s Acupuncture & Acupressure Clinic "We Guarantee Your Satisfaction"

RETRACTABLETony Kim Registered Acupuncturist in BC Screen Solutions 29 Year Experience for doors, windows, (Japan, , Canada) outdoor livingKorea spaces & more .. 20 South. Birch Street

(Across From Alder Medical Centre)

Bill Suffill Campbell River Russ & Winifred McKinnon

Some extended medical: ICBC & WCB 250-286-3210

250-203-3131

www.PhantomScreen.ca

Campbell River Mirror To advertise here Call Marianne: Located inside the Real Canadian Superstore

We’re still here

250-287-9227

Traveling? www.sussexinsurance.com

Tune into the local news while you are away campbellrivermirror.com

Prepare for the Road Ahead

ICBC - approved Program • Easy Payment Options

Campbell River Course Dates Tue. & Wed. Evenings – 6 to 8:45 pm • Nov. 5, 6, 12, 13 Nov. 19, 20, 26, 27 • Dec. 3, 4, 10, 11 Double Weekend Classes – 9 am - 3 pm Nov. 23, 24, 30 • Dec. 1 4–Day Winter Break– 10 am to 4 pm Dec. 30, 31 • Jan. 2, 3

Follow Impressions On Facebook impressionsartgallery@yahoo.ca 990B Shoppers Row, Campbell River Call if you have any questions

CATERING AVAILABLE FOR MORE INFO, CALL 250-287-2282

An invitation to savour our fine Greek & Italian cuisine.

for doors, windows, outdoor living spaces ASSISTED & more ...

IMPRESSIONS CUSTOM FRAMING AND ART SUPPLIES

BUFFET AVAILABLE FOR 24/11 PARTIES OF 30 OR MORE June VARIOUS MENUS OFFERED TO SUIT YOUR BUDGET

White Tower Restaurant

RETRACTABLE 7x14 Screen Solutions

ABLAZE Metal Art and Design

Insured & Licensed ▲ Free Quotes I.S.A. Certified Arborist ▲ Valley Owned & Operated

December

Labour Unlimited

Restaurant & Food Service Equipment

Pick up from Meet the Pros June 24/11 Government Surplus Outlet

QUALITY CABINETRY • WALL BED SYSTEMS We ser vice from Parksville to Campbell River 250-338-5885 • oakhillswoodcraft@shaw.ca 2754 O’Brien Road, Courtenay (1km north of CV Dodge)

Josie Coak • 778-346-4446 charcare@shaw.ca

www.yd.com 778-420-2266 jjohnson@youngdrivers.com


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

FRIDAY, 8, 2013 2013 || CAMPBELL CAMPBELL RIVER RIVER MIRROR MIRROR || 11 11 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 8,

Campbell Campbell River Living Living

jims closet We’ve got your man covered this christmas. 3x1.5

CLOTHES CLOSET

#230 1400 DOGWOOD STREET, CAMPBELL RIVER (Across from Starbucks in Mariner Square)

778-346-3332 • www.jimsclothescloset.com

The journey of a shoe box W ith the Christmas season fast approaching, it’s time to grab a shoe box and bring a smile to the face of a child who is less fortunate. Operation Christmas Child, an initiative of the Christian humanitarian organization Samaritan’s Purse, is officially underway in Campbell River and other communities around the world. To take part, simply fill a shoe box with small gifts such as school supplies, hygiene items, toys, and a personal note and photo from the giver which will be delivered to a needy child. The boxes are then dropped off at Campbell River’s collection centre, located in the Discovery

Community Church (former Galaxy movie theatre). From the collection centre, the shoe box is trucked to the Calgary processing centre, where it is inspected and prepared for shipping by trained volunteers. The shoe box is loaded into a sea container, along with thousands of others, and shipped overseas where it is received in the destination country by a team of Operation Christmas Child volunteers called a National Leadership Team. From the port of entry, many methods of transportation, such as airplane, canoe, helicopter, truck, donkey, camel, etc., may be used to get the shoe box to its final destination. Shoe boxes are distributed in more than

100 countries. This year, Canadian shoe boxes from Calgary will go to children in Haiti, Ivory Coast, Argentina, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Venezuela and El Salvador. Deana Longland, Campbell River’s longtime shoe box collection co-ordinator, will be hand delivering shoe boxes to children in Costa Rica this year with her daughter, Rhiaanah Villalobos and her friend Jake Johnson. “We’ll be able to see first-hand the excitement the kids get and we get to deliver our own shoe boxes,” says Longland, who will be in Cost Rica between Christmas and New Year’s. Every child receives a shoe box as an unconditional gift regardless of

race, religion, or gender. A child is not required to accept anything or make a confession of faith to receive a shoe box. Many of the children who receive a shoe box are being given the first gift they have ever received. Last year Campbell Riverites packed 1, 404 shoe boxes. Longland is hoping the community will give generously again. Each shoe box given represents love, joy and hope to children living in desperate situations around the world. For those not able to get out and pack a shoe box the traditional way, there is an online participation option at PackABox.ca. Choose shoe box gift items, write a personal note, add a photo and make a

Operation Christmas Child is officially underway again in Campbell River. The program collects donated gifts, school supplies, toys and more for children in developing countries.

donation, all online. All shoe boxes must come in to the Discovery Church Collection Centre between Tuesday, Nov. 19 and Sunday, Nov. 24. The church is open Monday to Friday between 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., on Saturday

from 10 a.m. - 2p.m. and on Sunday 12 a.m.-1 p.m. Shoe boxes are available at the Discovery Church, the Willow Point dollar store, Thomas Cook the Travel Place on Shoppers Row, the Baptist Church, Christian Life Fellowship church, Vineyard

Christian Fellowship church, Ocean Crest Salvation Army church and Periscope Promotions in Willow Point. For more information call Discovery Community Church at 250287-8786 or visit www. SamaritansPurse.ca/ OCC.

Feel good, take part – diabetes care from head to toe on World Diabetes Day, Nov. 14

Discovery grad

Tidemark Theatre was full with friends and relatives celebrating Discovery Community College’s graduation recently. Mayor Jakeway opened the celebration wishing the students great success in their chosen careers.

Come and talk to your community wellness team at Strathcona Gardnes on Nov. 14 from 10 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. and celebrate World Diabetes Day, a United Nations Day that is observed in more than 80 countries in the world. Nov. 14 is the birthday of Canadian Sir Frederick Banting, who discovered insulin. That discovery has saved the lives of millions of diabetics around the

world. The schedule of events will be: 10:30 a.m. – Sonya Hartz – foot care 11:00 a.m. – Jacki Price – Diabetes Education Nurse 11:30 a.m. – Dr. Kim Tsang – Coastal Eye Care – “Diabetes eyecare and prevention” 12 pm – Tina Radar and Sheila MacKenzie – Stress Management 12:30-1 p.m. – Snack attack - Jennifer Myles-Ingersoll –

healthy snacks including free deluxe snack container; Every Step Counts – Debra Wilson – exercise tips and free pedometers. There will also be coffee, snacks, door prizes, free gifts at presentations and a table for crafts. Bring your questions and feel free to stop by. There will be staff from the Integrated Health Network and Diabetes Education on hand to answer your questions.

7x3.5

EVERYONE WELCOME SKATING Saturdays 1:30-4:30 pm • Sundays 3:00-5:30 pm

strathconaDROP regional INdistrict LAZER TAG ON ICE

Strathcona Gardens Recreation Complex • 225 S.D ogwood St., Campbell R iver, BC • Tel: 250-287-9234 • w w w.strathconard.c a

Wednesdays 6:30-8:00 pm • Skate Rentals - $2.75 www.strathconard.ca for schedule information.

Strathcona Gardens Recreation Complex • 225 S. Dogwood St., Campbell River, BC • Tel: 250-287-9234 • www.strathconard.ca Strathcona Gardens Recreation Complex • 2 2 5 S .D o g wo o d S t., Ca mp b el l R i ver, B C • Tel : 2 5 0 - 2 87-9234 • w w w. s trathconard. c a


12 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

7x14

merit

PROCESS

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

drivewayBC.ca drivewayB BC.c ca |

Welcome Wel We lcome to the the d driver’s rive ri ver’s ’ sea seat at

NEW MODEL

2014 PREVIEW

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | 13

drveway 7x14

PROCESS

Visit the 2014 new model photo gallery at drivewayBC.ca

Spoiled for car and truck choice With more than 250 choices availtire market to come up with his able to Canadians, the selection of tips, paying particular attention cars and trucks can be somewhat to the booming SUV/Crossover overwhelming. segment. Yours truly picks some Today, the Driveway team hopes premium brand offerings while to steer you in the direction you Alexandra spots the sporty cars may want to go in this 2014 New under $30,000. Model Preview edition. Bob McHugh focuses on hybrid It’s not a comprehensive list but a vehicles and we welcome look at some key market segIan Harwood, who lives and Keith Morgan ments, from which our featured breathes trucks be they utility Driveway Editor writers have each made five picks. keith.morgan@drivewaybc.ca vehicles, off roaders or pickups. Of course, that doesn’t mean you twitter.com/ChangeGears Okay, before you turn the shouldn’t consider any other vehipage here are some purchase cles. The team members have picked examples preparation tips. Fix a top-price budget and that have caught their eye this year to help if financing will be required figure out what you start the car conversation at home. you can truly afford in monthly payments. Head test driver Zack Spencer scanned the enInsurance and maintenance are major costs in

1710 Island Hwy, Campbell River 250-286-6132 www.associatedtireandauto.ca

owning a car. Once you have a vehicle in mind, get an insurance quote. Regular maintenance costs are easily figured but some cars can be very expensive if parts have to be brought in from around the world. Once you have a handle on the above, you can narrow your choice. It is important you like the looks of the second most expensive purchase of your life. However, make sure it serves its intended purpose by answering some questions. Typically, how many people do you need to transport and how far? Is there enough stowage space in the cabin and the trunk or luggage compartment? Do you need V8 power or will an economical four-cylinder suffice? Now go and kick some tires at a variety of dealerships and consider multiple brands because they all have much to offer.

Question of the week How likely are you to buy a hybrid or electric car in the next year? Go to drivewayBC.ca to submit your answer.

Safety Tip Heavy rain can seriously reduce visibility and make road surfaces more difficult to stop on. Please make sure your wipers are in good condition and increase your following distance to at least four seconds.

Find more online at

drivewayBC.ca


PL US

Toyota believes this new Corolla can take the overall sales crown away from the Honda Civic.

‘‘

Zack Spencer

’’

LEASE PAYMENT

$ 189

$ 159

$ 129

$ 84

AT AT

BI-WEEKLY FOR 36 MONTHS† BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $33,817 (1WT MODEL)

LEASE PAYMENT

AT

LEASE PAYMENT

AT

1.5%

BI-WEEKLY FOR 48 MONTHS† BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $27,775

0%

BI-WEEKLY FOR 48 MONTHS† BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $20,295

1.9% WITH

WITH

WITH

TO GUARANTEE OUR QUALITY, WE BACK IT

^Whichever comes first. See dealer for limited warranty details.

160,000 KM/5 YEAR

POWERTRAIN WARRANTY

$ 0 DOWN

drivewayBC.ca

The Canadian choice: compact cars and compact SUVs drveway

So many cars to choose from, so few words available in this tight space! Yes, I know that’s the complaint of every writer but we truly do have a lot of choice today. And the quality of vehicles is so much higher than it ever was so there is much to celebrate. In the run-up to 2014, I will be testing a lot of what’s new and improved. Today, I’ll just offer you five models to consider adding to your shopping list.

2014 Mazda3 The compact car segment in Canada is the

$

ALL NEW 2014 SILVERADO 1500 CREW CAB 4X4

biggest by far, with over 20 percent of all vehicles sold. So, the introduction of the Mazda3 is important because it is currently the fourth best seller in this class. The outgoing car was already one of the best handling cars and now with a lighter and sexier looking body, this new car is both eye catching and solid on the road. The base engine is a 2.0L 4-cylinder with 155hp, thanks to direct injection. The larger 2.5L engine puts out a healthy 184hp. It is the interior buyers will care most about, and the Mazda3 is a nice surprise, due to class leading available options and a high

0

7x14

FIRST MONTH’S LEASE PAYMENT ≠

PLUS GET UP TO

ELIGIBLE OWNERS

ONLY UNTIL DEC 2 ND

0 0 0 $2 ,000 PROCESS $

7x10.35 DOWN

• MOST AVAILABLE POWER IN A PICKUP: 420 HP, 460 LB-FT TORQUE • THE 2014 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 CREW CAB RECEIVED THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE OVERALL VEHICLE SCORE FOR SAFETY, 5-STARS - FROM NHTSAX • BEST AVAILABLE MAXIMUM TOWING IN ITS CLASS: UP TO 12,000LBS††

• A CONSUMERS DIGEST BEST BUY FOR 4 YEARS+ • STANDARD BLUETOOTH® • MULTI-FLEX™ SLIDING AND RECLINING REAR SEAT, OFFERING CLASS-LEADING LEGROOM*† • SIRIUS XM™ SATELLITE RADIO WITH 3 MONTHS FREE TRIAL**

• TURBOCHARGED 1.4L ECOTEC ENGINE WITH 6-SPEED TRANSMISSION • STABILITRAK, TRACTION CONTROL AND 4-WHEEL ANTILOCK BRAKES • ONSTAR® INCLUDING 6 MONTH SUBSCRIPTION AND REMOTELINK MOBILE APP~

• 10 STANDARD AIR BAGS • 16” WHEELS • STABILITRAK, TRACTION CONTROL AND 4-WHEEL ANTILOCK BRAKES • POWER WINDOWS, DOOR LOCKS AND KEYLESS ENTRY • SIRIUS XM™ SATELLITE RADIO WITH 3 MONTH FREE TRIAL**

level of finish. Starting at $15,995 and running up to $29,895, there is a Mazda3 for all budgets.

2014 Toyota Corolla Continuing with the compact car theme, the Toyota Corolla is the third best selling car in Canada but Toyota believes this new model can take the overall sales crown away from the Honda Civic. This new 2014 model is made, and partly designed, right here in Canada with our needs in mind. The Corolla now has a longer wheelbase for amazing interior space, especially in

$

2014 EQUINOX LS

2014 CRUZE 1LS

LEASE PAYMENT

BI-WEEKLY FOR 60 MONTHS† BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $17,595

0% WITH $ 0 DOWN

CRUZE LTZ SHOWN

SECURITY DEPOSIT ≠

GMC

*≠

+

$ 0 DOWN

EQUINOX FWD LTZ SHOWN

$ 0 DOWN

TRAX LTZ SHOWN

$

PROCESS

$

CHOOSE YOUR PAYMENT

0

PAYMENT

LEASE

$

SILVERADO LTZ SHOWN

’

$

PAYMENT

LEASE

$

$

2014 TRAX LS

$

PAYMENT

LEASE

$

’

$

PAYMENT

LEASE

$

$ WITH

$

163 $

136 $

CHOOSE YOUR PAYMENT

0

WITH

140 $

121 $

0

$

WITH

114

$

99

$

0

WITH

72

$

65

$

DUE AT SIGNING ≠

BONUS ON SELECT 2014 CHEVROLET MODELS^

FIRST MONTH’S LEASE † PAYMENT

(OR EQUIVALENT TRADE)

DOWN PAYMENT

2,000 4,000

FIRST MONTH’S LEASE PAYMENT †

(OR EQUIVALENT TRADE)

DOWN PAYMENT

2,000 4,000

FIRST MONTH’S LEASE PAYMENT †

CHOOSE YOUR PAYMENT

(OR EQUIVALENT TRADE)

DOWN PAYMENT

1,500 3,000

FIRST MONTH’S LEASE PAYMENT †

CHOOSE YOUR PAYMENT

(OR EQUIVALENT TRADE)

DOWN PAYMENT

1,500 2,500

2 YEARS/40,000 KM COMPLIMENTARY OIL CHANGES ON ALL 2014 MODELS¥

VEHICLE PRICING IS NOW EASIER TO UNDERSTAND BECAUSE ALL OUR PRICES INCLUDE FREIGHT, PDI AND PPSA.

CHEVROLET.CA

Call Tyee Chevrolet Buick GMC at 250-287-9511, or visit us at 570 - 13th Avenue, Campbell River. [License #10780]

ON NOW AT YOUR BC CHEVROLET DEALERS. Chevrolet.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. Chevrolet is a brand of General Motors of Canada. ‡/†/**/*/¥ Offers apply to the purchase of a 2014 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew Cab 4X4 1WT, 2014 Chevrolet Cruze LS 1SA, 2014 Chevrolet Trax LS FWD, 2014 Chevrolet Equinox LS FWD equipped as described. Freight & PPSA included ($1,650/$1,600). License, insurance, registration, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in BC Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer trade may be required. GMCL, RBC Royal Bank, TD Auto Financing Services or Scotiabank may modify, extend or terminate this offer in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See Chevrolet dealer for details. *Some features advertised are available features and not standard on all models. See your Chevrolet dealer for details. ‡2014 Silverado 1500 with the available 5.3L EcoTec3 V8 engine equipped with a 6-speed automatic transmission has a fuel-consumption rating of 13.0L/100 km city and 8.7L/100 km hwy 2WD and 13.3L/100 km city and 9.0L/100 km hwy 4WD. Ford F-150 with the 3.5L EcoBoost V6 engine has a fuel-consumption rating of 12.9L/100 km city and 9.0L/100 km hwy 2WD and 14.1L/100 km city and 9.6L/100 km hwy 4WD. Fuel consumption based on GM testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. Competitive fuel consumption ratings based on Natural Resources Canada’s 2013 Fuel Consumption Guide for WardsAuto.com 2013 Large Pickup segment and latest available information at the time of posting. *≠When equipped with available 6.2L EcoTec3 V8. Class is light-duty full-size pickups. ††Requires 2WD Double or Crew Cab with the available 6.2L EcoTec3 V8 engine and Max Trailering Package. Maximum trailer weight ratings are calculated assuming a base vehicle, except for any option(s) necessary to achieve the rating, plus driver. The weight of other optional equipment, passengers and cargo will reduce the maximum trailer weight your vehicle can tow. Comparison based on wardsauto.com 2013 Light-Duty Large Pickup segment and latest competitive data available. Excludes other GM vehicles. Class is light-duty full-size pickups. †0%/0.9%/1.5%/2.9% lease APR available for 60/48/36/48 months on a new or demonstrator 2014 Cruze LS/ 2014 Equinox LS FWD/ 2014 Chevrolet Silverado Crew Cab 4X4 1WT/ 2014 Trax FWD, O.A.C by GM Financial. Applies only to qualified retail customers in BC Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only. Annual kilometre limit of 20,000 km, $0.16 per excess kilometre. Down payment or trade and/ or security deposit may be required. Monthly payments may vary depending on down payment/trade. Dealers are free to set individual prices. PPSA/RDPRM is not due. Insurance, license, dealer fees, and applicable taxes not included. Offer may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate offers in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See participating dealer for details. Truck Bucks offer only valid from October 1, 2013 to January 2, 2014 (the “Program Period”) to retail customers who own or are currently leasing (during the Program Period) a GM or competitor pickup truck to receive a $1,000 credit toward the purchase, finance or lease of an eligible new 2013 or 2014 Model Year GMC Sierra Light Duty, GMC Sierra Heavy Duty, Chevrolet Silverado Light Duty, Chevrolet Heavy Duty, or 2013 Chevrolet Avalanche. Only (1) credit may be applied per eligible vehicle sale. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. The $1,000 credit includes HST/GST/QST/PST as applicable by province. As part of the transaction, dealer will request current vehicle registration and/or insurance to prove ownership. GMCL reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. $3,500 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit has been applied to the purchase and lease offers of 2014 Silverado Crew Cab, and is applicable to retail customers only. Other credits available on select Silverado models. Offer ends October 31st. ¥The 2-Year Scheduled Lube-Oil-Filter LOF Maintenance Program provides eligible customers in Canada, who have purchased, leased or financed a new eligible 2014 MY Chevrolet, Buick, or GMC vehicle (excluding Spark EV), with an ACDelco oil and filter change, in accordance with the oil life monitoring system and the Owner’s Manual, for 2 years or 40,000 KMs, whichever occurs first, with a limit of four (4) Lube-Oil-Filter services in total, performed at participating GM Dealers. Fluid top offs, inspections, tire rotations, wheel alignments and balancing, etc. are not covered. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. General Motors of Canada Limited reserve the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See dealer or chevrolet.ca for details. ≠Offer valid only to eligible retail lessees in Canada who have obtained credit approval by GM Financial, have entered into a lease agreement with GM Financial and who accept delivery from October 11, 2013, through January 2, 2014, of a new eligible 2014 model. General Motors of Canada will pay the first month’s lease payment (inclusive of taxes and any applicable pro-rata amount normally due at lease delivery as defined on the lease agreement). $0 first month lease payment means no bi-weekly payments will be due in the first month of your lease agreement. After the first month, lessee will be required to make all remaining scheduled payments over the remaining term of the lease agreement. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. General Motors of Canada Limited reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. ~OnStar services require vehicle electrical system (including battery) wireless service and GPS satellite signals to be available and operating for features to function properly. OnStar acts as a link to existing emergency service providers. Subscription Service Agreement required. Visit onstar.ca for OnStar’s Terms and Conditions, Privacy Policy and details and system limitations. Additional information can be found in the OnStar Owner’s Guide. †*Comparison based on 2013 Polk segmentation: Compact SUV and latest competitive data available and based on the maximum legroom available. +The Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. **Available in select markets. Subscription sold separately after trial period. Visit siriusxm.ca for details.

14 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

the back seat. The dash is wide and flat for ample room and covered in nice looking and feeling materials, plus there is an available centre screen to use for the radio and backup camera. Powering the 2014 Corolla is the same 132hp 1.8L engine from the last model, with one exception. The LE Eco model has a modified valve system to improve fuel economy and pump the power to 140hp. The biggest change is the introduction of a continuously variable transmission continued on page A15


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | 15

drivewayBC.ca

The Canadian choice: compact cars and compact SUVs drveway continued from page A14

for a greater range of gears, improved economy, and a smooth drive. 2014 Volkswagen Golf This new Golf will be made in Mexico along side the Beetle and Jetta sedan and will go on sale in the spring of 2014. It is wider and longer than the last Golf but also significantly lighter and safer. The base engine will be a new turbocharged 1.8L engine with 170hp

but don’t worry the TDI diesel is carried over. The sportier GTI trim is fantastic, with an estimated 225hp, in the Canadian Model, thanks to a new 2.0L turbo engine. The interior materials used inside are almost Audi quality. No price yet but building these new cars inside the NAFTA zone will save money and that will be reflected in the price. 2014 Jeep Cherokee The Cherokee is back and it looks

nothing like the boxy truck of old. In fact, this new, small SUV is based on the same Alfa Romeo platform used in the Dodge Dart. It is smooth and quiet and a pleasure to drive. The Cherokee is also the first vehicle in the world to be equipped with a 9-speed automatic transmission. The base engine is a 2.4L 4-cylinder with 184hp or the optional 3.2L V6 with 271hp, for just $1,300 more, offering good value. Not to worry Jeep fans, this new Cherokee is available

7x14

with three AWD systems. 2014 Nissan Rogue You might notice a trend with my 2014 model choices are all compact cars or compact SUVs. This is the direction Canadians are heading when it comes to buying a new vehicle. With this in mind Nissan has an all-new Rogue compact SUV with enough room inside for three rows of seats and room for 7-passengers. This is practical for people

who require extra capacity but don’t want to buy a bigger or more expensive mid-sized or larger SUV. Under the hood is a 2.5L 4-cylinder used in other Nissan products and is matched to a new continually variable transmission featuring more available ratios and reduced friction. The interior is very well executed, with a dash that looks similar to the bigger Pathfinder. Goes on sale just before Christmas. zack.spencer@drivewaybc.ca

Spoiled for car and truck choice With more than 250 choices available to Canadians, the selection of cars and trucks can be somewhat overwhelming. Today, the Driveway team hopes to steer you in the direction you may want to go in this 2014 New Model Preview edition.

‘‘

Consider multiple brands because they all have much to offer.

’’

Keith Morgan

It’s not a comprehensive list but a look at some key market segments, from which our featured writers have each made five picks. Of course, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t consider any other vehicles. The team members have picked examples that have caught their eye this year to help you start the car conversation at home. Head test driver Zack Spencer scanned the entire market to come up with his tips, paying particular attention to the

booming SUV/Crossover segment. Your truly picks some premium brand offerings while Alexandra spots the sporty cars under $30,000.

Bob McHugh focuses on hybrid vehicles and we welcome Ian Harwood, who lives and breathes trucks be they utility vehicles, off roaders or pickups. Okay, before you turn the page here are some purchase preparation tips. Fix a top-price budget and if financing will be required figure out what you can truly afford in monthly payments. Insurance and maintenance are major costs in owning a car. Once you have a vehicle in mind, get an insurance quote. Regular maintenance costs are easily figured but some cars can be very expensive if parts have to

PROCESS

be brought in from around the world.

Once you have a handle on the above, you can narrow your choice. It is important you like the looks of the second most expensive purchase of your life. However, make sure it serves its intended purpose by answering some questions. Typically, how many people do you need to transport and how far? Is there enough stowage space in the cabin and the trunk or luggage compartment? Do you need V8 power or will an economical four-cylinder suffice? Now go and kick some tires at a variety of dealerships and consider multiple brands because they all have much to offer. keith.morgan@drivewaybc.ca ChangeGears/twitter.com

Five fun and sporty cars at the right price ‘‘

A few pocket rockets available on the market might not compete for the top power specs, but can certainly get the party started.

’’

Alexandra Straub

A vehicle doesn’t have to be exorbitantly expensive, have mega horsepower or a fancy Italian badge on it to be fun to drive. In fact, a lot of people seem to agree with that statement too since there are a few pocket rockets available on the market that might not compete for the top power specs, but can certainly get the party started. Ford Fiesta ST- $24,499 If its exterior colour, say the one clad in Green Envy, doesn’t catch your eye, perhaps its exhaust note will. When you rev 1.6L, 4-cylin-

FREE

19 Point Inspection

der, turbocharged, EcoBoost engine of the Fiesta ST, you’ll probably turn your head. Yes, it’s a subcompact but it doesn’t feel like it when you’re working through the gears of the 6-speed manual transmission. Ford’s newest mini powerhouse comes with a whopping 197 horsepower and 202 lb-ft of torque. It’s the same engine paired with the Focus ST, but in a smaller packaged. Its sport infused suspension, gearbox, phenomenal handling and host of creature comforts sound good to you, it’s even better to drive. You just might make

your friends green with envy because you’re having so much fun behind the wheel. Mazda3 Sport- starts at $15,995 For the 2014 model year, Mazda completely overhauls their number-one selling sedan and hatchback: the 3. Expect more mature (but not dated) styling, a driver-focussed cabin and a host of technological gadgetry that makes staying “connected” behind the wheel more user friendly. Of course, without trying to take away focus from the act of driving. Among its tweaked features,

It's Time For A

you’ll find brand new interior and exterior styling along with the implementation of their high compression ratio engines, better known as SKYACTIV. Two engines and transmissions are offered. There’s the 2.0L, 4-cylinder SKYACTIV engine with a 6-speed manual transmission or an available 6-speed automatic transmission-

available on either the base GX or mid-grade GS models. It produces 155 horsepower and 150 lb-ft of torque. Then there’s a 2.5L, 4-cylinder SKYACTIV engine for the GT trim, which only comes with a 6-speed automatic. It generates a healthy 184 horsepower and 185 lb-ft of torque. Either is a treat to drive with excellent urban or

extra urban characteristics. 2014 Fiat 500L- starts at $19,995 For Fiat fans, if the 500 was too small, here’s your answer: the 500L. The longer wheelbase cutie is more practical than the pint-sized version and has more room. And two more doors! continued on page A16

Drives

U

Crazy!

WINTER DRIVING

?

Check-Up!

Wayne

250-286-9994 1911 Island Hwy » Campbell River » Emergencies: 250-830-0615

Drives-U-Crazy… Intersection Idiots. A myth abounds among self-righteous, overcautious drivers that only one left-turning car at a time is permitted to enter an intersection on a green light. Those who adhere to this unwritten ‘rule’ annoy those behind and hold up the flow of traffic. It is especially annoying when so many larger BC centres have intersections large enough to accommodate two and often three vehicles. What drives-u-crazy. kmorgan@blackpress.ca


PURCHASE FINANCE FOR UPGRADE AVAILABLE

ECOBOOST

2014 FOCUS S SEDAN

$

99 0.99

**

@

%

CASH PURCHASE FOR ONLY

$

OR STEP UP TO A FOCUS SE SEDAN WITH SPORT PACKAGE FOR AN ADDITIONAL

Bi-weekly for 84 months with $0 down.

Offers include $1,650 freight and air tax.

17,449 $21

**

APR

*

BI-WEEKLY

$

a 6-speed Euro Twin Clutch automatic transmission. Toyota Corolla- starts at $15,995 No, you’re not reading that wrong. I did include the 2014 Toyota Corolla on my list. Yes, it’s like automotive bread and butter; you always know you’re getting and it’s very predictable. But with a complete overhaul for 2014, you could say the Japanese manufacturer has added some jam on top to make it sweeter. New styling on the inside and out makes it more desirable to the eyes. It’s still not as exciting as most of its competitors but the 1.8L, 4-cyinder does a bang up job of delivering 132 horsepower and 128

drveway 7x14

- WILL G.

MANCE. R O F R E P D N NCY A NTAGE. A FUEL EFFICIE V D A T S O ECOBO THAT’S THE

UPGRADE AVAILABLE

ECOBOOST

2014 ESCAPE S FWD 2.5L

154 2.49

**

@

CASH PURCHASE FOR ONLY

For a limited time, get a No Extra Charge

Winter Safety Package

%

Bi-weekly for 84 months with $0 down.

$

Offers include $500 in manufacturer rebates and $1,700 freight and air tax.

25,699

*

5.5L/100km 51MPG HWY / 7.8L/100km 36MPG CITY***

Hurry in and Swap Your Ride before December 2nd. Only at your BC Ford Store.

APR

lb-ft of torque. The cabin is quiet and I’ll hand it Toyota for matching it with a CVT transmission that is just fabulous. Kia Soul- starts at $16,995 Kia’s box-mobile continues to deliver strong sales despite angularly-shaped vehicles becoming a trend of the past. Why? Because it has personality. Describing it in one word, I’d

“ COMPARED TO MY TRUCK, THIS IS A

MAJOR UPGRADE.” 7x11.78

FORD PROCESS

UP TO

$

9, 250

$

CASH PURCHASE FOR ONLY

6.3L/100km 45MPG HWY / 9.5L/100km 30MPG CITY***

OR STEP UP TO A SUPER CREW FOR AN ADDITIONAL

212 4.49

Bi-weekly for 84 months with $0 down.

Offers include $9,250 in manufacturer rebates and $1,750 freight and air tax.

TIRES RIMS SENSORS

28,999 $18

**

E BAT ES CT U R E R RELS OD IN M A N U FA M W NE MOST SHOWN)

(2013 F-150 ON AMOUNT SUPER CREW

UPGRADE AVAILABLE

ECOBOOST

2013 F-150 SUPER CAB XLT 4X4 5.0L

**

@

%

$

†††

UP TO $1,800

(MSRP) VALUE

with the purchase or lease of select new 2013 and 2014 models.

bcford.ca

APR

*

BI-WEEKLY

10.6L/100km 27MPG HWY / 15.0L/100km 19MPG CITY***

WISE BUYERS READ THE LEGAL COPY: Vehicle(s) may be shown with optional equipment. Dealer may sell or lease for less. Limited time offers. Offers may be cancelled at any time without notice. Dealer order or transfer may be required as inventory may vary by dealer. See your Ford Dealer for complete details or call the Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. For factory orders, a customer may either take advantage of eligible Ford retail customer promotional incentives/offers available at the time of vehicle factory order or time of vehicle delivery, but not both or combinations thereof. †Until December 2, 2013, receive $500/ $750/ $1,000/ $1,250/ $1,500/ $1,750/ $2,000/ $2,250/ $2,500/ $2,750/ $3,000/ $3,500/ $3,750/ $4,000/ $4,250/ $4,500/ $4,750/ $5,500/ $5,750/ $6,500/ $6,750/ $8,000/ $8,250/ $8,500/ $9,250/ $10,500 in Manufacturer Rebates with the purchase or lease of a new 2014 [Escape (excluding 2.0L)]/ 2014 [Taurus SE, F-150 Regular Cab XL 4x2 (Value Leader)] / 2013 [Fiesta SE 5 Door], 2014[Focus BEV, Fiesta SE 5 Door, Escape 2.0L,Transit Connect (excluding Electric), E Series]/ 2013 C-Max/ 2013 [Focus S, Escape S, E Series]/ 2013 [Fusion S], 2014 [Mustang V6 Coupe] / 2013 [Fiesta S, Mustang V6 Coupe, Edge AWD (excluding SE), F-150 Regular Cab XL 4x2 (Value Leader), 2013 and 2014 F-350 to F-550 Chassis Cabs]/ 2013 [Explorer Base]/ 2014 [Taurus (excluding SE)]/ 2013 [Fiesta (excluding S), Fusion (excluding S) / 2013 [Edge FWD (excluding SE)]/ 2013 [Focus (excluding S and BEV), Flex]/ 2013 [Mustang V6 Premium, Explorer (excluding Base)], 2014 Mustang [V6 Premium]/ 2013 [Taurus SE, Escape 1.6L, Transit Connect (excluding Electric)]/ 2014 [Mustang GT]/ 2013 [Escape 2.0L]/ 2013 [Mustang GT]/ 2013 [Expedition]/ 2013 [Taurus (excluding SE)], 2014 [F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2)]/ 2014 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Gas Engine]/ 2014 [F-150 Super Cab and Super Crew]/ 2013 [Focus BEV]/ 2013 [F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2)]/ 2013 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Gas Engine], 2014 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Diesel Engine]/ 2013 [F-150 Super Cab and Super Crew]/ 2013 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Diesel Engine] - all Raptor, GT500, BOSS302, and Medium Truck models excluded. Manufacturer Rebates are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives. *Purchase a new 2014 Focus S Sedan/2014 Focus SE Sedan with Sport Appearance Package/2014 Escape S FWD with 2.5L engine/2013 F-150 Super Cab XLT 4x4 with 5.0L engine/2013 F-150 Super Crew XLT 4x4 with 5.0L engine for $17,449/$21,099/$25,699/$28,999/$31,449 after Manufacturer Rebate of $0/$0/$500/$9,250/$9,250 is deducted. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price after total Manufacturer Rebate has been deducted. Offers include freight and air tax of $1,650/$1,650/$1,700/$1,750/$ 1,750 but exclude variable charges of license, fuel fill charge, insurance, dealer PDI (if applicable), registration, PPSA, administration fees and charges, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. All prices are based on Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price. Manufacturer Rebates are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives. **Until December 2, 2013, receive 0.99%/0.99%/2.49%/4.49%/4.49% annual percentage rate (APR) purchase financing on a 2014 Focus S Sedan/2014 Focus SE Sedan with Sport Appearance Package/2014 Escape S FWD with 2.5L engine/2013 F-150 Super Cab XLT 4x4 with 5.0L engine/2013 F-150 Super Crew XLT 4x4 with 5.0L engine for a maximum of 84/84/84/72/72 months to qualified retail customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest APR payment. Purchase financing monthly payment is $215/$260/$334/$460/$499 (the sum of twelve (12) monthly payments divided by 26 periods gives payee a bi-weekly payment of $99/$120/$154/$212/$230 with a down payment of $0 or equivalent trade-in. Cost of borrowing is $618.78/$748.22/$2,331.28/$4,135.23/$4,484.60 or APR of 0.99%/0.99%/2.49%/4.49%/4.49% and total to be repaid is $18,067.78/ $20,967.08/$21,847.22/$33,134.23/$35,933.60. Offers include a Manufacturer Rebate of $0/$0/$500/$9,250/$9,250 and freight and air tax of $1,650/$1,650/$1,700/$1,750/$1,750 but exclude variable charges of license, fuel fill charge, insurance, dealer PDI (if applicable), registration, PPSA, administration fees and charges, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price after Manufacturer Rebate deducted. Bi-Weekly payments are only available using a customer initiated PC (Internet Banking) or Phone Pay system through the customer’s own bank (if offered by that financial institution). The customer is required to sign a monthly payment contract with a first payment date one month from the contract date and to ensure that the total monthly payment occurs by the payment due date. Bi-weekly payments can be made by making payments equivalent to the sum of 12 monthly payments divided by 26 bi-weekly periods every two weeks commencing on the contract date. Dealer may sell for less. Offers vary by model and not all combinations will apply. ***Estimated fuel consumption ratings for 2014 Focus 2.0L I4 5-speed manual transmission: [7.8L/100km (36MPG) City, 5.5L/100km (51MPG) Hwy] / 2014 Escape FWD 2.5L I4 6-speed automatic transmission: [9.5L/100km (30MPG) City, 6.3L/100km (45MPG) Hwy] / 2013 F-150 4X4 5.0L V8 6-speed automatic transmission: [15.0L/100km (19MPG) City, 10.6L/100km (27MPG) Hwy]. Fuel consumption ratings based on Transport Canada approved test methods. Actual fuel consumption will vary based on road conditions, vehicle loading, vehicle equipment, vehicle condition, and driving habits. †††Receive a winter safety package which includes: four (4) winter tires, four (4) steel wheels and four (4) tire pressure monitoring sensors when you purchase or lease any new 2013/2014 Ford Focus (excluding S and Focus Electric), Escape, Fusion, Edge (excluding Sport), Explorer, or Fiesta (excluding S) on or before December 2, 2013. This offer is not applicable to any Fleet (other than small fleets with an eligible FIN) or Government customers and not combinable with CPA, GPC, CFIP or Daily Rental incentives. Some conditions apply. See Dealer for details. Vehicle handling characteristics, tire load index and speed rating may not be the same as factory supplied all-season tires. Winter tires are meant to be operated during winter conditions and may require a higher cold inflation pressure than all-season tires. Consult your Ford of Canada dealer for details including applicable warranty coverage. ©2013 Sirius Canada Inc. “SiriusXM”, the SiriusXM logo, channel names and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc. and are used under licence. ©2013 Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. All rights reserved.

Powering it is a 1.4L, 4-cylinder, MultiAir turbo engine that pumps out 160 horsepower and 184 lb-ft of torque. Since it’s a bigger car, it feels bigger to drive. But visibility isn’t compromised and there are a couple of great gearboxes to choose from: a 6-speed manual or

PURCHASE FINANCE FOR

continued from page A15

PURCHASE FINANCE FOR

16 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Fun and sporty drivewayBC.ca

say it’s funky. And now, the all-new soul is built on a bigger platform, increasing legroom up front and in the rear. It’s also quieter on the road when revving its 1.6L, 4-cylinder engine. There’s also a 2.0L 4-cylinder available with 164 horsepower and 151 lb-ft of torque. alexandra.straub@drivewaybc.ca

Available in most new Ford vehicles with 6-month pre-paid subscription


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 8, 8, 2013 2013 || CAMPBELL CAMPBELL RIVER RIVER MIRROR MIRROR || 17 17 FRIDAY,

The amazing, extraordinary, stupefying intricacies of...your ears.

Photo by John Kerr

Grease is the word

MC Christine Knight (left) with Hudson Leroy (center) and Randi Lang (right), are getting ready to rock and roll at the Altrusa Club’s presentation of Grease, on Nov. 16 at the Tidemark Theatre. Tickets are available at the Tidemark.

Creighton to continue Spirit Square event planning and management The City of Campbell River has again awarded a three-year contract for Spirit Square event planning and management to local businessman Jim Creighton. “Since 2010, Jim has kept this venue a safe and secure cultural gathering place for our community,” says Ross Milnthorp, the City’s general manager of parks, recreation and culture. “Thanks to his dedication and expertise, Spirit Square is the place to be for a variety of activities that promote diversity, artistic expression, and help raise the profile of a number of community groups.” The contract is valued at up to $54,000 for the 2014 season and includes the costs of advertising, programming, rentals and managerial fee. For more information about activities in Spirit Square, check out the website at www.spiritsquare.ca, or contact Jim Creighton at 250-203-1399 or via e-mail at info@spiritsquare.ca.

2x5 save.ca Mauve Friday is Coming.

PROCESS

Black Friday will never be the same.

Mauve Friday is Coming. Black Friday will never be the same.

Really? You saw an article about ears and you’re actually reading it? Is it really such a slow news cycle this issue? Since you’re here, I promise to make it worth your while. You’ll learn some really cool things about hearing, and I’ll make sure there are enough surprises along the way to keep you entertained. First, though, let’s get one thing out in the open: I paid the newspaper to print this. It’s true. We could have plastered the page with a big ad about how fantastic our hearing aids are, but Jana and I would much rather provide you with some real information, and maybe even a chuckle or two. Speaking of my lovely wife Jana, we have a great relationship. We live together, we work together and we somehow manage to not want to kill each other. But I know most relationships have their ups and downs . . .

So what happens when your spouse nags you? You’ve done it again. You’ve done something completely ridiculous that you didn’t even realize was ridiculous until your spouse pointed it out, making you wonder how you managed through life all those years without her or his watchful eye (see how I covered myself there?). Words are spoken. Loud, heated words. Those words travel menacingly toward your ear in the form of sound waves, which are scooped up by your treasonous outer ear (or “pinna”) and ruthlessly amplified as they’re funneled about 2.5 centimeters down your ear canal toward your eardrum. Your eardrum (or “tympanic membrane”) vibrates and transmits the sound waves to your ossicular chain, comprised of a hammer (“malleus”), anvil

(“incus”) and stirrup (“stapes”). These, the three smallest bones in your body, further amplify the sound and transmit it to the cochlea – a pea-sized, fluid-filled, snailshaped (shall I go on?) cavity in your inner ear. As an aside, do you know what the smallest muscle in the human body is? It’s the stapedius, which is about a millimeter long and controls the movement of the stapes. See, I told you

excuse to ignore “honey-do” lists, workplace reprimands and conversations about Roberto Luongo. On the other hand, think of everything else you’d be missing. Here are a few of the ways sounds affect us every day: Physiologically: Hearing an alarming sound instantly triggers a shot of adrenaline and cortisol that evokes your “fight or flight” response. So really, your evolutionary survival depends on

avoidance of social situations.

cr hearing hearing facts to 5x14 Two impress and astound

your friends (Note: If your friends are actually impressed by “hearing facts” then you desperately need to expand your social circle – my mountain biking buddies notwithstanding.) 1. The smallest perceptible sound moves your eardrum only four atomic diameters; the loudest

PROCESS

you’d learn something. The cochlea is where the magic happens. Nestled within its fluid are about 15,000 microscopic hair cells, each tuned to a different frequency. (In Canadians, a full 78% are specifically tuned to conversations about hockey and the weather.) These hair cells are connected to the cochlea nerve, which sends your spouse’s colourful adjectives to be interpreted – and, in the case of most relationships, subsequently ignored – by your brain. And that’s how you hear. Why should you care if you’re losing your hearing? Sure, a decrease in hearing sensitivity gives you a perfect

good hearing. Psychologically: The melodic chirping of birdsong and the gentle lapping of waves on the shore are two of nature’s most calming sounds. (Pop quiz: Why are these sounds so relaxing? The answer is at the bottom of this page.) These sounds mostly occur, however, in the high frequencies, which are usually the first to go with hearing loss. Socially: Even with mild hearing loss, conversations take much more effort to understand. This can be extremely exhausting and eventually earn us nicknames like “Grumpy” or “Sourpuss.” And really, who wants to be the sourpuss? Undiagnosed hearing loss can quickly lead to social isolation, insecurity and, in some cases,

is a trillion times more powerful. If your eyesight had the same range, on a dark night you’d be able to see a candle flickering 48 trillion kilometres away! 2. Hearing is always on. Presuming one has “normal” hearing, it takes no effort to hear; you’re doing it every second of the day and night, even while you sleep. Listening, on the other hand, is a skill that requires active attention. In men, this skill is often lost with marriage. The take-away Hopefully you’ve learned something you didn’t know about hearing. If nothing else, I’ve thrown in some fancy words that may come in handy on trivia night. More importantly, I hope

I’ve given you a better understanding of the importance of good hearing. Effective communication, which is the basis for healthy relationships and pretty much everything else in our lives, depends on effective listening. And while perfect hearing doesn't guarantee you’ll be a good listener, I can guarantee you won’t be a good listener if your hearing is compromised. If you suspect your hearing, or that of someone you know, might be less than ideal, knowing where to turn for answers is more than half the battle. We’ve provided a few resources to get you started at www. tohear.ca, and we’d be happy to chat more about it if and when you’re ready. Simply call 250-9143200 or stop in at 780D 13th Avenue. No pressure. No judgment. Just honest answers. And don't forget... If you liked what you just read, or you found it beneficial in some way, please let us know. Pop into the clinic, give us a call or send a quick email to cr@tohear.ca. Jana and I love what we do, and we love sharing our knowledge with you in these pages. It would really make us happy to know you’re enjoying it too! Pop Quiz answer: Birds will cease chirping when danger is near; thus, when our prehistoric ancestors poked their heads out of their cave and heard birdsong, they knew there were no predators lurking nearby. Waves are relaxing for another reason: they lap the shore at approximately 12 cycles per minute, roughly the breathing frequency of a sleeping adult. Martin Jurek, Campbell River Hearing Clinic

PAID ADVERTISEMENT


18 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Join us on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube Email us questions@nic.bc.ca

Campbell River Edition

COLLEGE CONNECTION 7x14

NO V E MBE R 2013

Learn what you can do at your community college

Visit us online www.nic.bc.ca Call us for details 250-923-9700 V O L U ME 3 , I SSU E 5

START YOUR DEGREE, DEVELOP NEW INTERESTS Explore a wide range of university transfer, business, or upgrading courses this winter.

nic

INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: POETRY & DRAMA (ENG-121) Examine thematic patterns, style, and 20th century comedies and tragedies as you learn to analyze and write about poetry and drama this first-year course.

Opportunities for welders increasing New projects on Vancouver Island are creating job opportunities for welders in almost every industry. Whether you are just starting out or looking to specialize your skills and improve your job opportunities, you’ll get the support you need in Campbell River. For more information or to apply, visit www.nic.bc.ca/trades.

PO

PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT:

PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT:

HOSPITAL UNIT CLERK PROGRAM BEGINS Take evening classes and learn hands-on skills in Campbell River this January When Susan Stephan applied to enter North Island College’s Hospital Unit Clerk program last year, she already had years of experience working in health care. Stephan worked as a health care assistant, helping patients in care homes with daily activities. While she found the career and patients rewarding, Susan wanted to diversify her résumé and qualify for additional positions in health care. “Taking care of patients is fulfilling

and rewarding work, but I’m ready for my next step,” she said. “Hospital unit clerks are trained to manage the critical paperwork that goes with running a hospital unit or care home. It’s what I want to do next.”

NOW YOU’RE COOKING

Classes take place Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings to allow students to keep working while they attend class or care for families. Additional self-directed study is required. Students learn to transcribe physician’s orders while learning the medical terminology and management techniques to communicate effectively. Then, in September, students take their skills into hospitals and health centres, where they apply their knowledge, get practical experience, and make contacts with local employers. “Students graduate ready to work in a fast-paced health care setting,” said instructor Barb McPherson. “If you’re passionate about what you do, well organized, and a good communicator, you’ll do well in this field.” Find out more: www.nic.bc.ca/health

Hospital unit clerks are trained to manage the critical paperwork that goes with running a hospital unit or care home. It’s what I want to do next.” Susan Stephan, Hospital Unit Clerk program graduate

INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (CRM-131) Study the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analyze crime and victimization, study police discretion and decision making, sentencing, the youth justice system, and more.

Apply now for programs this January and April When Reah Horsley graduated from NIC’s Professional Cook 1 program last year, she joined a community of chefs on the North Island and started her path to a new career. “NIC’s instructors have developed a strong curriculum and are able to produce students with excellent knowledge,” said Locals Restaurant Chef Ronald St. Pierre, who is also the chair of the North Vancouver Island Chef’s Association. “I hire Professional Cook students every year.” Professional Cook 1 students learn the skills to prepare soups, cook meat, vegetables, and more in NIC’s fully equipped kitchens. Students can also keep learning by taking NIC’s upcoming Professional Cook 2 & 3 classes at the Campbell River campus. Find out more: www.nic.bc.ca/trades

TEACHING: MAKING AN INFORMED DECISION (EDU-102) Interested in becoming a teacher? Learn the skills necessary to positively interact in one-on-one and group settings. Develop the competencies to work effectively with children, youth, and adults. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY II (GEO-112) Explore urban and economic geography, while you examine the concepts used to analyze the patterns recognized in the distribution and structures of economic activities and urban settlements. INTRODUCTORY PHILOSOPHY: KNOWLEDGE & REALITY (PHI-100) Study modern understandings of knowledge and reality, as you question the existence of God, debate ideas of personal identity and mortality; computers and consciousness; freewill and determinism; and the justification of scientific beliefs. HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH, MATH, AND SCIENCE Upgrade your high school English, math, and science tuition free for entry into business, university studies, trades, and health careers next fall. You pay only for books and supplies. Choose from flexible, independent study with instructor support or classroom learning. More courses available at www.nic.bc.ca/programs

EVENTS & KEY DATES Nov 22

Third Course Wine Festival 2013 Sample over 200 BC and international wines from more than 20 wineries and taste studentmade hor d’oevres at a semi-formal event. Tickets available at NIC bookstores, Merecroft Village Liquor Store, the Royal Coachman, and Gourmet Essentials. Campbell River campus, 7 pm, $50.

Nov 25

Building Service Worker Program Begins Learn to provide quality cleaning service for future employment in the building service industry in this free employment skills training program. Find out more, email esa@nic.bc.ca

Find out more about NIC programs and events, visit www.nic.bc.ca.


Arts & Entertainment

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | 19 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | 19

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Send your arts and entertainment Send your arts and entertainment submissions to submissions to editor@campbellrivermirror.com editor@campbellrivermirror.com

ROAST BEEF3x1.5 & 3x1.5 YORKSHIRE BUFFET

16

$

95

POPSEYS POPSEYS

SENIORS

14

$

95

Sundays 4:30 - 7pm

1120 Ironwood St • 250-286-4828

Campbell River is alive with The Sound of Music H ow do you solve a problem like

Maria? Come and see for yourself, as Shoreline Musical Theatre Society presents The Sound of Music at the Tidemark Theatre. The production opens Thursday, Nov. 28, and is suitable for all ages. The Sound of Music is based on the true story of the von Trapp family singers. In the musical, Maria has been asked to leave the abbey where she is training to become a nun, and be governess for the seven children of widowed naval commander Georg von Trapp. Eventually, Maria and Georg fall in love and marry. The musical takes place just before World War II and explores the rising tensions between the Austrians and Germans. The music and lyrics were written by the wellknown team of Rodgers and Hammerstein. The stage version opened on Broadway in 1959 and won a Tony award for best musical. It was adapted into a movie in 1965, starring Julie Andrews and Christo-

The annual Holiday Pottery Show and Sale

It’s become a Campbell River tradition for so many – 27 local potters will sell works ranging from practical mugs, butter dishes, and dinner settings to beautiful wall

pher Plummer. The film version won five academy awards, including best picture. The music is very familiar, including such well known songs as Do Re Mi and Edelweiss. Heather Gordon Murphy, Ruth Nichol and Kristy Miller form the creative force which is guiding this production, and they are enjoying their collaboration. Gordon Murphy is working as artistic director, co-director and choreographer. She feels the heart of the play is beauty and love, and explains how the play starts out with a household that is stiff and strict, set in a beautiful place with beautiful surroundings, and slowly evolves into a household that is soft and beautiful, while the outside world, with its rising political tensions, becomes hard and ugly. One challenge she notes is the familiarity of the movie version. The stage version has some differences, and of course any stage production will have its own interpretations. Miller, who is the musical director, also finds love at the centre

hangings and sculptures. The show and sale takes place Saturday, Nov. 9 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Campbell River Sportsplex, 1800 S. Alder St. This is the largest show of pottery on Vancouver Island and the admission is free.

of the play, particularly the process of discovering love. She has been enjoying the challenge of working with a wonderful cast that ranges from trained voices to voices in training to those who have never sung publicly. “I love seeing the music and characters come alive,” she said, “and seeing people do what they didn’t think they could do, and when it’s not just a song anymore, it’s a part of them and a part of the story.” Nichol is co-directing the play, which she finds, as a true story, infinitely profound. She feels it explores a number of themes: war and the threat to families; family values within a broken family (which provides a relevancy to today); poverty and affluence; the role of servants and how they are treated. She explained that there is no chorus in the traditional manner of

The nuns practice their singing during Shoreline Music Theatre Society’s rehearsals of their production of The Sound of Music which opens at theTidemark Theatre Nov. 28-

Broadway musicals, and that the singing provides some of the text. She is enjoying finding the “little nuggets of comedy. You must always find the comedy,” she said,

“even in a Shakespearean tragedy like Romeo and Juliet”. The Sound of Music runs from Thursday, Nov. 28 to Saturday, Nov. 30, including a

3x3

matinee on the Saturday. Tickets are $27, and available at the Tide-

mark Box Office, or online at tidemarktheatre. com.

2013 Stand-Up Comedian of the Year!

2x3.5 Steve 2x3.5 Patterson “wickedly funny”

- Halifax Herald

Host of CBC Radio’s The Debaters

shantero shantero

THIS ! WEDNESDAY

quadra is pottery

atable

t Deb is Is No

Th

Tidemark Theatre Campbell River Wed, Nov 13 -7:30pm

Box Office: 250 287 7465 or 800 994 0555 tidemark-theatre.com

stevepatterson.ca

shantero.com

7x3 PARAMOUNT Thursday November 21st Doors at 10pm Tickets $20 in Advance ($25 at the door) Tix @ Best Buy Liquor Store & The Paramount Paramount Music Hall - 1140 Ironwood Rd., Campbell River


20 20 || CAMPBELL CAMPBELL RIVER RIVER MIRROR MIRROR || FRIDAY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 8, 8, 2013 2013

? w o n K u o Y d i D & SUN, NOV. 10 92x6

th on SAT., NOV. we’re having a

th

DOUBLE EVENT UBLE re on almost DOshoppers 5 or mo

d $7 When you spen ive a store, you’ll rece anything in the d

CARD an 10 SHOPPERS S Gift Card $ 0 TIM HORTON 1 th OV. 11 to Also MONDAY, N th t a ge FRIDAY, NOV. 15 Card when you FREE $10 Gift ore. spend $50 or m $

Iiona

Customer Service/Post Office

TYEE PLAZA - 1297 Shoppers Row | 250-286-1166 PHARMACIST ON DUTY DURING STORE HOURS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8AM - 10PM

SMALL BUSINESS BC AWA R D S

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Young pianist’s career reaches a crescendo

C

ampbell River’s Carter Johnson was recently chosen as one of the world’s top three young pianists. Johnson placed second in the Julia Crane International Piano Competition this fall at the Crane School of Music in New York. On Sept. 22, Johnson travelled to New York for the competition, which brought together 12 competitors from as far away as China. Johnson was one of four Canadians in the competition. Pianists from around the world sent in their best recordings, but only 12 were chosen to travel to New York. One of them was Johnson. Johnson practiced all summer — even on the neighbour’s piano while his family vacationed on Gabriola Island — so by the time of the New York competition, he was confident in the repertoire of pieces he had selected. Shortly after arriving,

KNOW A GREAT 3x8 BUSINESS SMALL IN BC?

small business bc

Maybe it’s a new gadget you can’t live without, your local watering hole or a website you’re obsessed with. If there’s a BC small business you love, now’s your chance to let them know! All award nominees get access to exclusive business tools, education and support to help them succeed. And if they win, they’ll receive the Premier’s Prize of $1500 cash, an All Access Pass to Small Business BC education and experts, and ongoing business mentorship. As well as the honour of being named a top BC business!

Carter Johnson performed at the Julia Crane International Piano Competition in New York in September.

Johnson met his competitors. Many of them had already studied at prestigious institutions such as the Juilliard school, one of them for six years. “It was a very warm atmosphere,” he says. “That was encouraging. It’s nice that I was able to meet and befriend lots of my future colleagues.” It was nothing like a reality TV show competition, he laughs. “Everyone here had competed enough that they were comfortable with the competition process,” he says. The competition spanned three days, and included several seminars. On the first day

of competition, all 12 pianists performed for the international jury. Six were supposed to be selected to continue on; however, the jurors were so impressed by the group’s skill that they allowed seven pianists to compete again on the second day. Round two was the most stressful, Johnson says, because the standard of playing was even higher than the first round. However, he played with confidence and was thrilled when he was selected as one of the three finalists. “My technique is to play as many different styles as possible,” he says, explaining how

he had a wide variety of shorter pieces in his repertoire instead of concentrating on a small number of longer pieces. During the final round, each of the competitors performed a concerto with the Orchestra of Northern New York, with maestro Kenneth Andrews at the baton, and Johnson was chosen as the second place winner. He says it was thrilling to make it to the final round, where all three competitors were so polished that dividing them into first, second and third was mostly a technical exercise. Johnson took home a $2,000 cash prize for his

4x5 4x5

If you find yourself thinking, “Why can’t every business be this amazing?” Let them know.

SHOW THEM YOU LOVE THEM

NOMINATE TODAY! www.sbbcawards.ca Presented by:

Awards Sponsors:

ENT

win, and also made some new friends. He still talks with some of the competitors and considers them his future colleagues in music. Johnson is currently preparing for conservatory auditions for the September 2014 year. The schools on his list have high standards, but so does he. He’s been playing piano since he was a child, studying for years with local teacher Shelley Roberts, and has several major competitions and performances already listed on his résumé. This summer, Johnson was chosen to perform as a soloist with the Victoria Symphony Orchestra for the Victoria Symphony Splash.He performed Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G with the orchestra, on a barge for an audience of over 40,000 that filled the harbour and surrounding area. “I have played for crowds that I thought were big, but nothing compares to that,” he says. “It was quite an honour, because I was the first soloist that was not a Victorian — the first person from the North Island — and it was great to represent Campbell River on the barge.” He is spending the winter season practicing and preparing, and looking for more competitions to keep his talent sharp. He’s not sure yet where he will end up, but one thing is certain: Johnson’s talent and drive has put Campbell River on the musical map.

IP!s R T EE test

a FirRror.com/con N I O W verm ER T mpbellri ca

www.

2,499 9 day all-inclusive

$

Your trip includes:

china April 2-10, 2014 china trip trip

• Roundtrip international airfare from Vancouver • Accommodation in four and five star hotels (based on double occupancy) • Three meals a day • All in country transportation • All gratuities, taxes, fees • Deluxe bus tours • Experienced and fluent English-speaking tour guides • Seven of China’s ten ‘wonders of the world’

Tours must be booked and paid for by January 1, 2014. There is a $300 non1 refundable deposit required; at time of reservation. Tours are organized by Citslinc, a Campbell River Chamber member. Spaces are limited.

5.83_x_5.indd

Local travel partner:

Licensed travel agent acting on our behalf:

Organized and hosted by:

Media Partner: 13-08-12

10:06 AM

Free information session in Parksville at the Parksville Community and Conference Centre on Wednesday, Nov. 13th from 1 – 2:30. For details on the itinerary and other tour information go to: www.CampbellRiverChamber.ca or call 250-287-4636 for more info.


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com Campbell River Mirror Fri, Nov 8, 2013

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | 21

www.campbellrivermirror.com A21

Your community. Your classifieds.

TOLL FREE

1-855-310-3535

fax 250.287.3238 email classified@campbellrivermirror.com

$2998 plus tax

SELL YOUR STUFF!

Choose any: Black Press Community Newspapers!

(99¢ extra lines) Runs till it sells, up to 8 weeks!

Add any other paper for only $9.99 each +tax

Private Party Merchandise Ad 1" PHOTO + 5 LINES

2

BONUS! We will upload your ad to FREE! Ask us for more info.

LEADER PICTORIAL C

O

W

I

C

H

A

N

N

E

W

S

#AMPBELLĂ–2IVERĂ–-IRROR $EADLINES ĂĽ7EDNESDAYĂĽ%DITIONĂĽ 8PSE"ET -ONDAYĂĽĂĽPM %JTQMBZ"ET -ONDAYĂĽĂĽAM &RIDAYĂĽ%DITION 8PSE"ET 7EDNESDAYĂĽĂĽPM %JTQMBZ"ET 7EDNESDAYĂĽĂĽPM

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FUNERAL HOMES

IN MEMORIAM

INFORMATION

AUTOMOTIVE

DID YOU KNOW? BBB Accredited Businesses must pass a comprehensive screening process. Look for the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory E-edition on your Black Press Community Newspaper website at www.blackpress.ca. You can also go to http://vi.bbb.org/directory/ and click on the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory

-!*/2ĂĽ#!4%'/2)%3ĂĽ).ĂĽ /2$%2ĂĽ/&ĂĽ!00%!2!.#% &!-),9x!../5.#%-%.43 #/--5.)49x!../5.#%-%.43 42!6%,x #(),$2%.x%-0,/9-%.4 0%23/.!,x3%26)#%3 "53).%33x3%26)#%3x 0%43xx,)6%34/#+ -%2#(!.$)3%x&/2x3!,% 2%!,x%34!4% 2%.4!,3 !54/-/4)6% -!2).%

PERSONALS AVALON RELAXATION Massage. Certified European Masseuse. An exquisite escape. 250-204-0956 By Appt.

In loving memory of

Trixie Elliott

!'2%%-%.4

August 14, 1946~ November 9, 2007

)Tx ISx AGREEDx BYx ANYx $ISPLAYx ORx #LASSIÙEDx !DVERTISERx REQUESTINGx SPACEx THATx THEx LIABILITYx OFx THEx PAPERx INx THEx EVENTx OFx FAILUREx TOx PUBLISHx ANx ADVERTISEMENTx SHALLx BExLIMITEDxTOxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxBYx THEx ADVERTISERx FORx THATx PORTIONx OFx THEx ADVERTISINGx OCCUPIEDx BYx THEx INCORRECTxITEMxONLYxANDxTHATxTHEREx SHALLx BEx NOx LIABILITYx INx ANYx EVENTx BEYONDxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxFORxSUCHx ADVERTISEMENTx 4HEx PUBLISHERx SHALLx NOTx BEx LIABLEx FORx SLIGHTx CHANGESx ORx TYPOGRAPHICALx ERRORSx THATxDOxNOTxLESSENxTHExVALUExOFxANx ADVERTISEMENT BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx CANNOTx BEx RESPONSIBLEx FORx ERRORSx AFTERx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx OFx PUBLICATIONx OFx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx.OTICExOFxERRORSxONx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx SHOULDx IMMEDIATELYx BEx CALLEDx TOx THEx ATTENTIONx OFx THEx #LASSIÙEDx $EPARTMENTx TOx BEx CORRECTEDx FORx THEx FOLLOWINGx EDITIONBCCLASSIÙEDCOMxRESERVESx THExRIGHTxTOxREVISE xEDIT xCLASSIFYxORx REJECTx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx TOx RETAINx ANYx ANSWERSx DIRECTEDx TOx THEx BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx "OXx 2EPLYx 3ERVICEx ANDx TOx REPAYx THEx CUSTOMERxFORxTHExSUMxPAIDxFORxTHEx ADVERTISEMENTxANDxBOXxRENTAL

It’s been 6 years since we lost you. We still miss you and think of you daily. With Love, Paul & The Family.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS CRAFT FAIRS

MASSAGE by Nicole. Evening incalls Comox Wed thru Sun. Book ahead! 250-248-8484 SEEKING A young mother of 4; your parents visited this Sept. from Jonkoping. I would like to keep up my Swedish. Call Helena (250)723-5169.

LOST AND FOUND FOUND: CAT Large, orange, neutered male. Ear tattoo. 2nd Ave/McPhedran area in CR. Dog friendly. 250-203-0809. LOST:PINK SCARF on Sat. Nov. 2 at the Quinnie. Reward offered to the person who finds it. 250-830-1776 LOST RING Gold/family. Possibly near CR Casino. Huge sentimental value. If found please call 250-286-6620.

Automotive Painter and/or Working Manager

Must be familiar with water bourne paint systems. ICBC experience an asset. Wages dependant on experience. Please forward resume to: admin@klassengm.com for inquiries contact Cory @ 1-877-371-0765

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES INDEPENDENT DISTRIBUTORSHIP Weston Bakeries is looking for an independent distributor for the Campbell River and Port Hardy regions. Must be physically fit with prior business experience. Contact Cory for more details, 1-250-580-0135 Asking price $99,500.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES COMPUTER TECHNICIAN Require three years’ exp, Preference to: CompTIA, A+, Network+, MCP, valid drivers license required. Competitive Salary. Resume to: careers@gcstech.ca

HELP WANTED GENERAL LABOURERS

TRAVEL GETAWAYS LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ. Fall Special. 2 nights $239 or 3 nights $299 Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

WE’RE ON THE WEB

$)3#2)-).!4/29 ,%')3,!4)/.

!DVERTISERSx AREx REMINDEDx THATx 0ROVINCIALx LEGISLATIONx FORBIDSx THEx PUBLICATIONxOFxANYxADVERTISEMENTx WHICHx DISCRIMINATESx AGAINSTx ANYx PERSONxBECAUSExOFxRACE xRELIGION x SEX x COLOUR x NATIONALITY x ANCESTRYx ORxPLACExOFxORIGIN xORxAGE xUNLESSx THEx CONDITIONx ISx JUSTIÙEDx BYx Ax BONAx ÙDEx REQUIREMENTx FORx THEx WORKxINVOLVED

COMING EVENTS BRAVEHEARTS. All Cancer Survivor Co-ed Dragon Boat Team invites all cancer survivors and supporters to join our team. For more info contact Suzanne at 250-202-6918 or info@braveheartsdragonboat.ca

#/092)'(4

#OPYRIGHTx ANDORx PROPERTIESx SUBSISTx INx ALLx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx INx ALLx OTHERx MATERIALx APPEARINGx INx THISx EDITIONx OFx BCCLASSIÙED COMx 0ERMISSIONx TOx REPRODUCEx WHOLLYxORxINxPARTxANDxINxANYxFORMx WHATSOEVER x PARTICULARLYx BYx Ax PHOTOGRAPHICx ORx OFFSETx PROCESSx INxAxPUBLICATIONxMUSTxBExOBTAINEDx INxWRITINGxFROMxTHExxPUBLISHERx!NYx UNAUTHORIZEDxREPRODUCTIONxWILLxBEx SUBJECTxTOxRECOURSExINxLAW

!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INFORMATION ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2014-2016 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

:PVS$PNNVOJUZ  :PVS$MBTTJmFET 

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@blackpress.ca Get a Free one-month trial membership at Curves! Call now, quantities are limited. Call 250-287-8379 for details.

GUARANTEED Job Placement Labourers, Tradesmen & Class 1 Drivers For Oil & Gas Industry.

Call 24Hr. Free Recorded Message 1-888-213-2854

An Alberta Oilfield Company is hiring dozer and excavator operators, Lodging and meals provided. Drug testing required. Call (780)723-5051 Edson,Alta.

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

IN MEMORIAM

IN MEMORIAM

In Memory

Robert Gustafson

Dearest Gusto It’s been 10 years, since our good Lord’s taken, Our “Gusto Angel� that he has awaken. Your smile, your laugh, we have not forgot, And were fine, and were healing, our little soft spot. We still hug, and we hold, the memories of you, It’s because of all this that helps us get through. Somedays dayswill willgo goby, by,and andwe’ll we’lllook lookat atold oldpicks, pics, Some with the stories a flying, as we get a quick fix. We miss yah Gusto, and the Canucks, still no cup! Can you put in a good word, to give them some luck? So bye for now, say “Hi� to the Clans, Cause after all, you are in great hands. We Love You Gusto P.S. Go Cunucks!

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Growing Logging Company looking for experienced logging operators, for Fernie B.C./Elk Valley area. Must be reliable and hardworking. Wages based on experience. Please email resume, with references and up-to-date contact information to logger51@live.com. Positions available immediately.

NANAIMO COMPANY looking to hire JOURNEYMEN and QUALIFIED APPRENTICES to work in mid island area. Experience in commercial work an asset. Driver’s license required. Please fax resumes to (250)756-2660 or email to nanaimoplumbingandheating @gmail.com

www.localwork.ca COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

LEGALS

LEGALS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of GORDON ALAN HAMBLY also known as GORDON HAMBLY, deceased, who died on August 2, 2013, in San Miguel, Chile, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor, c/o Shook Wickham Bishop & Field, Barristers and Solicitors, 906 Island Highway, Campbell River, British Columbia, V9W 2C3, before the 16th day of December, 2013, after which date the Executor will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which it has notice. Nieves del Pilar Rojas Gonzalez, Executor, c/o Shook Wickham Bishop & Field, Barristers and Solicitors, 906 Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C3.

Land Act: Notice of Intention to Apply for a Disposition of Crown Land

Take notice that Pacific Coast Tidal Energy Ltd., Campbell River, B.C. has applied to the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO), West Coast Region for a Investigative License – Tidal Energy situated on Provincial Crown land located at the vicinity of Discovery Passage. The Lands File Number that has been established for this application is File #1412938. Written comments concerning this application should be directed to the Section Head, Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations at 142 - 2080 Labieux Rd, Nanaimo, BC, V9T 6J9, or emailed to: AuthorizingAgency.Nanaimo@gov.bc.ca. Comments will be received by MFLNRO until December 12, 2013. MFLNRO may not be able to consider comments received after this date. Please visit our website: http://arfd.gov.bc.ca/ ApplicationPosting/index.jsp for more information. Be advised that any response to this advertisement will be considered part of the public record. For information, contact the Freedom of Information Advisor at the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operation’s office in Nanaimo.

Menzies Bay

Application Area DL 30

Sayward District Campbell River

Quadra Island


22 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 A22 www.campbellrivermirror.com

HELP WANTED

LABOURERS SEASONAL FARM WORKERS ARE NEEDED at Shelter Point Berries to start February, 2014. 40 - 60 hrs/wk $10.25/hr. Work includes planting, pruning, weeding, and harvesting fruit. Work is outdoors in all weather conditions & physically demanding. Fax resumes to: (250)752-7566.

TRADES, TECHNICAL

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS

FORESTRY TECHNICIANS, Layout Engineers and Timber Cruisers from $4000$7000/month plus bonus. Live Crown Forestry Ltd. is an established and growing forestry resource management consulting firm in Prince George providing multiphase timber development services since 1995. Send Cover Letter and Resume to Brian Telford: btelford@livecrown.com

www.localwork.ca

FRASER SHINGLING & EXTERIORS LTD. Wanted Aluminum and Vinyl siding installers. Full Crews with own equipment only. Contact Giselle at 780 962 1320, or at giselle@fraserexteriors.com

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

TRADES, TECHNICAL

TRADES, TECHNICAL

JOURNEYMAN HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC is required for coastal logging operations near Woss, BC. Year round employment with full benefits. Further details can be found at www.hdlogging.com Please fax resume to 250-287-9259.

• Millwrights • Electricians • Welders • Instrument Mechanics • Pipefitters Temporary Trade Opps. in Port Alberni & Crofton. Catalyst Paper, opps. are endless. Submit your résumé at www.catalyst paper.com/careers

LEVEL 1 First Aid, WCB accredited. Tuesday, Nov., 12th and Wed., Nov. 13th eves classes from 5-9pm. Contact (250)218-4568.

$ONkTÖFEAR ÖYOURÖ#!2%%2ÖISÖHERE

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Ticket Centre Clerks Custodial Staff Please submit your resumes to: humanresources@tidemarktheatre.com Our dynamic dental group is expanding. We are looking to recruit a full time experienced Treatment Coordinator to join our team at Dogwood Dental Health Centre.

Qualified candidates please submit cover letter and resume to: tara@dogwooddental.com CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

NOW HIRING Western Forest Products Inc. is an integrated Canadian forest products company located on Vancouver Island that is committed to the safety of our employees, the culture of performance and the discipline to achieve results. We currently have the following openings:

HD Mechanic (North Island) Sawmill Supervisor (GY Shift) (Chemainus) Grapple Yarder Hooktender (Port Alice) Certified Hand Faller (Woss) Detailed job postings can be viewed at

http://www.westernforest.com/business-value/our-people-employment/careers WFP offers a competitive salary and a comprehensive benefit package. If you believe that you have the skills and qualifications that we are looking for, please reply in confidence to: Human Resource Department Facsimile: 1.866.840.9611 Email: resumes@westernforest.com

TRADES, TECHNICAL

TRADES, TECHNICAL

TRADES, TECHNICAL

AKVA group is a technology partner and supplier of advanced equipment and services to the aquaculture industry worldwide. The North American division of AKVA group with its Canadian office located in Campbell River, British Columbia is seeking to fill the full-time position of:

Service Technician

HUSBANDRY TECHNICIANS We are currently seeking highly motivated and hard working team members to join Mainstream Canada. Our company is the Canadian division of the international aquaculture company Cermaq. We are a growth oriented company, focused on being one of the major global salmon farming companies. We strive for quality of our product, safe working environments and sustainable aquaculture.

The successful applicant will be responsible for a wide variety of duties related to the onsite installation, maintenance and repair of aquaculture technology products. The ideal candidate will possess the following: • Hands on team player • Mechanical aptitude and skills required to assess and complete repairs on automated and manual technical equipment • Ability to perform work required to troubleshoot, repair, maintain and calibrate instrumentation, electrical and electronic equipment; Knowledge of basic electrical and electronic and wireless communications equipment would be an asset • Proficient in standard software including Microsoft Excel, Word, etc. and aptitude to learn and work with various software products • Be committed and self-motivated, with very good organizational skills This position is ideally suited to someone with experience working on and repairing automated industrial machinery. Aquaculture industry experience would be considered an asset. The company offers competitive wages and a comprehensive benefit and retirement package. Interested applicants are requested to send their resume and cover letter in confidence by November 22, 2013 to:

As a Husbandry Technician you will be responsible for general farm operations including feeding and care of fish stocks. Duties would include operation and basic maintenance of auto feeders, boats and equipment in the marine environment.

AKVA group North America 1495 Baikie Road, Campbell River, BC V9W 0C2 Fax: (250) 286-8805 or e-mail: tcole@akvagroup.com

Familiarity of the concepts of fish growth and stock management would be an asset. The ability to understand and adhere to our Standard Operating Procedures is essential.

We thank all applicants for their interest in this position, however only those short listed will be contacted.

We offer camp-based positions operating 8 days on and 6 day off.

We are looking to recruit people interested in the following positions:

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Fri, Nov 8, 2013, Campbell River Mirror

Prerequisites to hiring are a fitness test and criminal record check. We offer competitive wages, a corporate bonus program, company paid benefits package, and a matching retirement fund plan. If you have the skills we are looking for, and you would like to become part of our team, please forward a resume, in person, by fax or e-mail to: Mainstream Canada Suite 203-916 Island Highway Campbell River, BC V9W 2C2 Fax: 250-725-1250 E-Mail: careers@mainstreamcanada.com Please state “Husbandry Technician” in subject line DEADLINE TO APPLY: November 8, 2013

EARN EXTRA $$

BE A MIRROR NEWSPAPER CARRIER!!!

Call Becky for details 250-287-9227 Available Routes

RTE#11-0160 – WESTMORE, BEAR PL & TREELANE RD RTE#11-0165 – PETERSEN RD, NORTHMORE, WATSON, MARGUERITE RTE#12-0370 – ISLAND HWY FROM 131 TO 592 RTE#12-0400 – THULIN ST FROM 201 TO 392 RTE#13-0490 – S. MCCARTHY ST & S. ALDER FROM 105 TO 396 RTE#13-0505 – EVERGREEN, BATHURST, S. ALDER, S. MCLEAN & S. THULIN RTE#14-0900 – APPLE DR & BRADFORD DR RTE#14-0910 – HARROGATE RD & LARWOOD RD RTE#14-0955 – S. ISLAND HWY FROM 2220 TO 2601 & ADAMS RD RTE#14-1010 – S. ISLAND HWY FROM 3380 TO 3414, MARYLAND, MONTANA & WORTHING PL RTE#17-1237 – GALERNO RD 2400 BLOCK & ALEXANDER RD RTE#17-1275 – PACIFIC VIEW TERR & MARINER DR RTE#19-1430 – FAIRWINDS, SKIPTON, LEEMING RTE#28-0612 – ROBRON 700 BLOCK, SPRINGBOK, ORIBI DR

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

PAYROLL ADMINISTRATOR Walcan Seafood Ltd. is a privately owned, family oriented business located on Quadra Island overlooking Discovery Passage. We are a seafood processing facility that produces a variety of custom products for international markets; and starting our 40th year of business. Our payroll is more than 100 people with seasonal peaks of 175. We now have an opening within our accounting department for a dynamic and energetic payroll professional. Walcan Seafood Ltd. is looking for a FULL-TIME PAYROLL AND BENEFITS ADMINISTRATOR to join our accounting team. Duties and Responsibilities: Responsible for the payroll and related duties including but not limited to: • Import daily time and attendance from time keeping system • Process bi-weekly payroll on time and accurately • Process payments for fishers • Respond to employee/fisher inquiries in a timely and professional manner • Administer employee benefits and liaise with benefit providers • Maintain current knowledge of payroll laws and regulations • Set-up and maintain employee payroll files • Prepare T4s for fishers and ROEs for all employees • Reconcile payroll accounts • Prepare job costing analysis for management • Assist in year-end processing and reconciliations • Assist in streamlining processes • First point of contact for employees, fishers, and customers • Answer telephone • Other administrative and office duties as required Qualifications: The candidate must be approachable, and able to work independently and as part of a team. Other requirements include: • Minimum 3 years of payroll processing experience • Canadian Payroll Association certification or willing to obtain • Knowledge of payroll laws and regulations • Financial and mathematical aptitude • Proficient in Microsoft Office (Excel/Access/Word) and ability to learn new software quickly • Ability to manage multiple tasks in a timely and organized manner with a focus on accuracy • Possess a great attitude and ability to deal with people in a sensitive, tactful and professional manner • Ability to maintain a high degree of confidentiality • Excellent verbal and written communication skills • Experience processing Fisher payroll would be considered an asset Walcan Seafood Ltd. offers a competitive salary and benefits package based on qualifications and experience. If you are interested in this career opportunity, submit your cover letter and resume to apply-admin@walcan.com, attention: Robert Eastland, by December 1, 2013. We thank all applicants for their interest; however, we will only contact those selected for an interview – no phone calls please.

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS www.localwork.ca


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com Campbell River Mirror Fri, Nov 8, 2013

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | 23

www.campbellrivermirror.com A23

PERSONAL SERVICES

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

TRADES, TECHNICAL

EDUCATION/TUTORING

FINANCIAL SERVICES

GARAGE SALES

DUPLEX/4-PLEX

HOUSES FOR SALE

APARTMENT/CONDO

Located 150km Northwest of Prince George, BC Mount Milligan is one of British Columbia’s first major metals mine of this century.

ORACLE TUTORING

250-830-0295.

Use Clutter Busters. Experts in downsizing & estates. We love garage sales, attics, crawl spaces & clutter. Please visit our new store Pier Street Trading Post. Featuring our VINYL Cafe. We buy coins,and all collectables. Welcome. Call Bill @ 250830-7118

FINANCIAL SERVICES

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

• Grades K - 12 & College. • All subjects.

www.oracletutoring.ca

We are currently recruiting for the following positions:

HAIRSTYLISTS

Chief Metallurgist

LICENSED HAIRDRESSER required for local family oriented salon. Apply in person with resume to Hair Squared in Discovery Harbour Mall.

Manager: Environment, Health & Safety

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

Mill Electrical / Instrumentation Supervisor

GARDENING

Please apply online at www.mtmilligan.com/ careers

TOTAL GARDEN CARE

Mill Operations Superintendent

PERSONAL SERVICES ASTROLOGY/PSYCHICS TAROT READINGS-�A Wider Perspective�.250-287-0765

COUNSELLING

Hypnotherapy & Counselling Brian E. Daly MH.CHt

250-205-0358

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

3-!,,Ă–!$3 Ă– #*(Ă–$%!,3 

Time for Fall Cleanup Gardening, pruning, Top dressing & rubbish removal Gabriele (250)205-0661

HANDYPERSONS Not Just another Handyman! 23 yrs experience. Specializing in roofs/repairs, drywall/repair, fencing/repair, door & window replacement, framing/rot repair, dump runs & carpet cleaning. Seniors Discount. Serving CR. RENO: 250-203-3315

HOME IMPROVEMENTS EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Air Brake Course November 16 & 17

• Class 1 & 3

Interior Renovations Professional Painting Drywall & Mudding Repair Finish Carpentry, Trimwork Custom Fir Kitchens, Fireplace Mantels Husband & Wife Team Free Estimates Design House 250-204-4417 www.DesignHouseBC.com

• ICBC Licensed

FLOORING SALE Over 300 Choices

1st Class Driving School

Courtenay 250-897-9875 • Campbell River 250-204-9875 www.instructordarryl.com

HELP WANTED

Finishing and Renovations

HELP WANTED

Freelancer wanted The Campbell River Mirror has an exciting opportunity for someone who loves hockey. We have an opening for a junior hockey columnist who is not only an engaging and knowledgeable sportswriter but also a savvy social media user. The columnist will be expected to attend and report on Campbell River Storm hockey games as well as tweet live game details and provide Facebook updates. Keeping on top of Storm and Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League happenings is required and used to inform the content of the column. Black Press community news media is an independent and international media group with more than 190 community, daily and urban publications, 14 press facilities and over 160 websites in BC, Alberta, Washington, Hawaii and Ohio. Candidates interested in this freelance position should send a covering letter, resume and writing samples to: Alistair Taylor, Editor, Campbell River Mirror, 104 - 250 Dogwood Street, Campbell River, B.C. V9W 2X9 or e-mail: editor@campbellrivermirror.com. If you have any questions, e-mail only to editor@campbellrivermirror.com

Lowest Prices Guaranteed! Laminates - $0.69/sq ft Engineered - $1.99/sq ft Hardwood - $2.79/sq ft

Overnight Delivery in most of BC!

www.kingofoors.com

1.877.835.6670 LANDSCAPING

CURT’S LANDSCAPING tree service, stump removal, pruning of fruit & ornmental trees, hedges,sprinkle, blowouts, aevating lawns. Free estimates. Insured. Call 250-830-8776

PAINTING EVELYN M. Interior Painting: Interior prep to completion. I always use low odour paint. Colour consulting available, free estimates. No muss,no fuss! 250-204-4417.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE AUCTIONS GROCERY STORE AUCTION November 16 @11am, Burnaby Hobart meat equipment & dishwashers, True coolers & freezers. View @www.KwikAuctions.com

FUEL/FIREWOOD #250-703-FIRE(3473) Est. in 2004. Custom cut, split, delivered, clean. Well seasoned.

FURNITURE ANTIQUE FURNITURE SALE - Many pieces. 916 Heritage Meadow Drive, Campbell River, Nov. 14, 15, 16 from 2pm to 5pm. Phone 250-286-3602 for details. SINGLE TWIN bed, new, complete with mattress & bedding $200. obo. Sofa & matching armchair, brown tones, good cond. $250. obo. Call 250339-6503, Comox.

HOSPITAL BED. Elec. Rotec. Multi-Positional. W/ 6� Invicare(waterproof covered) mattress. 4 dual pos. side rails. Head/ft boards. Only used 38 days. $1900 Firm. 250-2873930

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

2007 20’ Cargo Trailer 7,000lb GVW, blown insulation, moose/boat hangers, shelves + outboard rack, 8X20 inside. $6000 OBO. 250-650-0395 2 LEATHER armchairs with ottomans, 1 leather loveseat, 2 Greek style end tables w/ glass, 1 Greek style coffee table w/glass. All for $2,200. 250-338-2704. ASSORTED ROOKIE baseball cards. Dual cassette tape recorder and player (component - needs amplifier). Assorted VCR movies, assorted cassette tapes. Call for details (250)339-4038 or email: p.horgen@utoronto.ca ELEGANT MAHOGANY china cabinet Excellent condition $300. Beautiful custom made lined drapes with pelmets & swags - $200. 250-339-9124 ESTATE SALE of Construction quality brand name materials & tools. Call (250)3394970. HEINTZMAN PIANO - Upright for sale. Great condition. $1700. Please call to view this lovely piano. 250-338-6757

Turnkey Ocnfrt. 1 Bd. Avail. immed. N/S,N/P. $1,100-1,250 /mnth. Randy 250-830-4222

Under New Management

FULL DUPLEX-Oceanview, 2 bdrm, 1 bthm each side, extensively renovated, new just about everything, including metal roof. $320,000. 250850-0998

FOR SALE BY OWNER 3 BDRM Townhouse, corner unit, 772 Robron Rd, Campbell River. 1300 sq ft. Remote control garage. Patio. Mountain view. Close to shopping and recreation. $189,000. Please call (778)475-0902.

A lovely 1650 sq ft rancher on .46 acre corner lot in a quiet, friendly rural neighborhood, close to storries beach&oyster rv. nicely landscaped,fenced backyard,garden,dogpen,new flooring,countertops,updated fixtures,bright D/R 3 bdrms,1.5 bth+ fam rm,mud rm,attached 19x11 shop, forced air natural gas heat. $287,000. 250-9233150

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO

2 BDRM, 2BTHM ocean & mountain view. W/I walking distance to downtown, F/S, W/D/DW/Garburator. Ensuite has jetted tub/shower. Quiet secure building, parking. Recent updates. N/P, NS. $1000.250-926-0077 CAMPBELL RIVER- 2 bdrm Santa Barbara Apts. Near Merecroft Shopping Centre Quiet, clean, secure bldg. On site laundry, prking. $650./mo. NS/NP. Avail Dec. 1st. Call (250)923-4594.

HOUSES FOR SALE

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

PARK MODEL- Yuma, Arizon RV park. $17,000. Fully furnished, many extras. Call (250)923-5848 or 1-928-2571456.

SUNNY COOMBS field/treed acreage. Room for revenue development. Comfortable 2 floors of 1400 sq ft. Wood, hot water heat $745,000. Phone/Fax 250-248-4495.

SPORTING GOODS

WANTED- Are you using Vital 3 used for joint pain. 250-9260438

OTHER AREAS

1 & 2 BDRM Available Now. Orchard Park Apts. Secure building. Oversized suites. Large, quiet, private yard. New carpet. Indoor cat welcome. On-site laundry. References required. 250-202-2187. www.meicorproperty.com

SQUIRE BASS guitar includes stand and bag and a bass PV amp, 112 series. Excellent condition, $275. Call (250)9411401.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

C.R. near Bill Howich dealership: Bachelor cottage, full bath, F/S, W/D, furn’d $600. NS/NP. 250-287-7808.

STEVENSON PLACE, Comox- 1 bdrm unit, supportive living, 24hr responder on site, close to shopping, doctor’s, golf course. For more information, please phone, (250)339-0358 or email: pcalcutt@shaw.ca

TOWNHOUSE FOR Sale. #2-2697 Mine Road, Port McNeill. Quiet strata complex, convenient to schools and hospital. 3-bdrm, 1.5 bath home, approx. 1250 sq.ft. Open plan main floor. Kitchen with built-in dishwasher, fridge, stove. Upper level has master bedroom with walk-in closet, storage room, laundry alcove with full-sized washer/dryer. Electric baseboard heat. Single attached garage with remote controlled door opener. Tidy, fenced back yard with patio, greenhouse and tool shed. $149,000. Quick occupancy. Phone 250-956-9875 or email: windonthemoon3@hotmail.com for appointment to view.

WATERFRONT FURNISHED 1 bdrm condo. NS/NP. All amenities. Avail mid Nov-mid March. $1200. 250-286-4785.

COTTAGES

CUSTOM 5 Bedroom + Den, 3 bath, 2900 Sq Ft. with many extras! Amazing location with private, serene backyard & mountain views. $498,000. 2069 Varsity Drive. (250)926-0030. View photos on UsedCampbellRiver.com

SHOT SHELL RE-LOADER 12 Gauge. Size-O-Matic. (1-stroke, 1-shell). 20K primers + powder. $595. 250-2863308. WEDDING ORNAMENTS for Sale: 22 Garnier Vases, 16� feather balls, white, 22 sm reflective table mirrors, 66 tea lights, $1000. 9 Bride maids dresses starting at $80. Call (250)287-0081.

CUMBERLAND CHARACTER 4 bdrm/2 ba, 3 stories, over 2000 sq.ft. High ceilings, fir floors, stunning views. Great rental or renovate to meet your dreams. 2779 Maryport Ave. $239,000. (250) 702-7219.

BA, 1 & 2 BR spacious suites. Heat, hot water and parking included. On bus route, close to schools. $550 - $750. Move in incentives offered. Call 250-204-3342.

CAMPBELL RIVER. Quiet 2Bdrm near town (881 Greenwood St). No dogs. $655./mo. Dec. 1st. Call (250)923-3635. CAMPBELL RIVER- very nice studio apt, ocean front, fully furnished and equipped, utils incld. NP/NS. Refs req’d. (250)923-0860. LARGE, BRIGHT 1 & 2 bdrms, Rotary Beach, excellent location. Very reasonable rents. Views. 250-286 1175. SPACIOUS OCEAN VIEW Condo, 2 bdrms+ den, solarium, FP, appls. Over 1650 sq ft. Avail. immediately. 250914-0936 or 250-202-5803

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES 2 BDRM near all amen. $725 Cedar at 4th Avail now. 1-250889-9353.boarsnest@shaw.ca CAMPBELL RIVER: 2bdrm apt in centrally located 4-plex. Freshly painted. No Pets. N/S. Refs $700+util. 250-830-4686. VIEW. 4BDRM, 3bth, rec room, patio, large fenced yrd. Very clean. No pets. Ref’s required. $1100. 250-286-6672

HOMES FOR RENT 2 BDRM,1 bthrm,5 appl,large fenced yard,pets neg. $900. 250-286-0281 3 BDRM DUPLEX- Ocean views, garage, large yard, newly reno’d, close to dwntwn and parks. Available Now. $1000/mth. 250-287-0494 or message 250-286-3790 NEW- WILLOW PT- Fenced 3 bdrm rancher, $1250. Near ocean. NS/NP. (604)727-3141 WILLOW POINT: 2 bdrm, 2 full bath. Upper suite. 5 appl. Dble garage. Fully fenced. Soaker tub, gas fireplace. RV parking. $975. Avail. Now. Call 250-287-6992.

RV PADS YEAR round RV Site near Oyster River Trail & Salmon Point. Available immediately. $375/mth water, sewer, garbage incl, Metered Elec, laundry. Cable & phone avail, Not suitable for all units. References required. Resort amenities not incl. Contact Monica 250923-6605

SHARED ACCOMMODATION NORTH NANAIMO: Attention Students/Working Professionals: fully furnished room, nice, quiet area. Own bathroom, cable, FREE WiFi, shared kitchen and laundry. N/S, N/P, no partiers. $550/mo. Avail. immediately. 250-756-9746

SUITES, LOWER

ST. ANDREWS Village. 1 & 2 Bedroom apartments, updated recently,close to schools & buses, Non smoking,pets negotiable, near hospital. (250) 287-3556

1-BDRM FULLY Furnished suite. N/S, N/P. $1200. inclds internet, satellite TV, heat. Call (778)418-2199. 2-BDRM. NEAR school & hospital. W/D. $850. inclds hydro. Dec. 1st. Call (250)286-0959.

HOMES FOR RENT

HOMES FOR RENT

MARES DIVE gear and 2 tanks (aluminum 80). Call (250)339-5667.

REAL ESTATE APARTMENT/CONDOS NANAIMO WATERFRONT 2nd floor condo. 1500 sq.ft. LR/DR/2bdrms with view, den, gas FP, secure bldg. 2 underground parking spaces. Maintenance fee includes hot water/gas/landscaping. 1 pet OK. $339,900 (250)753-9123

#26-1120 Evergreen Road. 3 bdrms /2 bthrms. Dead end street. Backs onto forest land. 1312 sq ft. $234,900. 250-2869816

DUPLEX/4-PLEX FULL DUPLEX- Oceanview, 2 bdrm, 1 bath each side, extensively renovated, new just about everything, including metal roof. $320,000. 250850-0998.

"59).'Ă–/2Ă–3%,,).' 

2896 APPLE DR. Located in the heart of Willow Point, this 1478 sqft rancher offers 4bdrms, 2bths, newer kitchen, roof & flooring. Private fncd yard, RV parking. $259,000. http://sites.google.com/site/ 2896appledrive Kim: 250-923-6503.

Realty & Property Management Inc.

For more rentals call 250-286-0110

587 Alder - 2 bdrm, 1 bath oceanview house. $1200/mo 433 Candy Lane - 3 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath house. $1275/mo. 701 Hilchey – 3 bdrm, 2 bath $1150 108 Delvecchio - 3 bdrm, 1 bath suite incl. $1400/mo. 377 Dogwood - $725 & $750/mo. 4811 King Road- 3 bdrm, 1bath Trailer on 1/2 acre. Nov 1. $1050/mo. #293 501- 9th Ave - large 2 bdrm, 1 bath condo, oceanview. $800/mo. Dogwood Street -3 bdrm, 1 bath house, oceanview. $1250/mo. SAYWARD RENTALS - 2 bdrm, 1 bath condo, fully furnished w/cable & hydro. $895/mo. • 270 Kelsey Way - 4 bdrm, 2 bath, oceanview. Nov 1. $850/mo. • 1226 Sayward Rd. - 2 plus bdrm trailer, 4 appl. $575/mo. • • • • • • • • •

www.campbellriverpropertymanagement.ca


24 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 A24 www.campbellrivermirror.com

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Fri, Nov 8, 2013, Campbell River Mirror

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

SUITES, LOWER

AUTO ACCESSORIES/ PARTS

CARS

BLACK CREEK- 1 bdrm, lake front, $600 inclusive, except phone. Avail Now. Refs. Call (250)337-0030.

MAZDA 3- set of 4 used winter tires-mounted on Mazda rims. Good Year Ultra Grip Ice, size P205/55R16. Asking, $400. 250-850-9002.

TOWNHOUSES

Drive Smart BC Alcohol and the Learner Driver Supervisor

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 3 TO 9, 2013

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 10 TO 16, 2013

AUTO FINANCING

THE LUCKIEST SIGNS 2008 THIS HONDAWEEK: Civic

DX.

5-spd, well-mainPISCES, ARIES,65,000 AND km, TAURUS. tained. $9500. (250)203-0134.

CREEKSIDE VILLAGE

TOWNHOUSES 555 ROCKLAND RD. Quality, near new 2 bedroom townhouses in a quiet area. Units have fridge, stove, dishwasher, washer, dryer and 1 1/2 bathrooms. Close to schools, playground and N.Is College. 1 unit avail Nov 1 $805/month Small pets ok Phone Lorne

JETTA GLX 168000kms. A trip is in the1997 cards. Followwellyour heart Auto. trans., kept, runs well,and you’ll sun find roof,the way stereo, and your dreams excellent on gas. $3000. 250to treat yourself339-7483 to a fantastic vacation.

TAURUS

There’s a lot of emotion in the air, which

CARS is great for your creativity. Take care of

someone you love; it will lead to a better 2005 MAZDA 6, Red, excelrelationship with or her. 164,700 km, 4 lenthim condition,

250-203-7196 See us @

www.meicorproperty.com

CRIME-FREE MULTI-HOUSING

BIRCH MANOR Certified complex of CR Crime Free Multi-Housing Program. • Thorough & fair screening of all applicants. • 2 bedroom Townhouse • Laundry facilities on site • Close to Hospital • References Required • NO PETS

•Phone: 250-204-8118 CERTIFIED BUILDING

of the C.R.Crime Free Multi-Housing Program

GEMINI

Bachelor, 1 & 2 Bedroom *Thorough and fair screening of all applicants. * Secure building * Adult oriented * Laundry facilities * On bus route * On-site managers * Close to hospital * No PETS * No Smoking * References required We are committed to our tenants to provide a quiet, clean atmosphere.

Phone 250- 286-4838 250- 204-8118

DALMATION TOWERS One bdrm. Close to town, elevator, N/P, pay laundry, manager on site. Ref’s requ’rd $700/mnth. Avail Immed. Call Bill at 250914-0309

#,!33)&)%$3Ă–7/2+Ă–(!2$ 

cylinder 2.3 litre engine, 4 door, fully loaded, $8500 obo. 250-334-1676.

It’s always easier to get along with people RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE you’re not emotionally involved with. One 1965 MUSTANG Coupe. ReESTATE SALE. 1993 your children tries to pull your heartstored to stock of condition. Gulfstream Sun Voyager 34’ Healthy 200 cid., strings automatic, widebody deluxe model, Cumin order to obtain a favour. reliable daily driver. $9800. mins diesel auto. 4-speed. Allison transmission. Power jacks. Refurbished in & out. CANCER 1991 HONDA Civic hatchNew fridge 2012 Low miles. back, running cond., exc. discomfort in A274,000km. slight could TV. become Excellent more Flat-screen gas mileage, stereo. Awning with privacy $999.obo. Call (250)923-0027. serious, for one reason or another. Be curtain & window covers. $25,000. 250-335-1515. ready to take care of yourself by consul250-202-0442

ting the right specialists for the appropriate treatments. LEO

You accomplish something that you’re particularly proud of. It involves a situation 1996 FORD Taurus that willSeimprove your self-esteem, which dan,263,000kms,AC,Automator well-being. Full-time. Well ic, CruiseC, V6, is, Tow pack- so Snowbird of course, vital to your age,seats 6,lots of cargo space. 250-923-0849.$999.00

VIRGO

We offer:

SPORTS & IMPORTS

ARIES

cared for 33.5 ft Montana 5th, 3 slides, huge, bright living space, W/D, lots of storage, generator. (778)418-4000 or email: your goalsfsartor@shaw.ca much quicker byfor more info & photos

You’ll reach making a few changes to your diet. You are inspired to start a TRUCKS small business & VANS that you can run from your home. FX45- SUV,

2004 INFINITI 137,000 miles, black, 20� wheels, Bose, V8. $10,000. Call (250)897-0602.LIBRA

You have plenty to say for yourself. What’s more, the telephone won’t stop ringing, as several friends try to contact you to invite 2006 great NISSAN FRONTIER. you to join in some activities. King Cab. V-6. 2WD. 60,000km. $14900. 250-2877872

SCORPIO

At work, don’t be surprised if you receive 2006 MAZDA 3 in excellent MARINE condition, 84,000 km, 4 door, a raise. It will make you very happy, but 5 speed manual transmission, power locks, windows, sun- because be careful, it willACCESSORIES arouse some MARINE roof, CD player. Recent inin someone close to you. spection report jealousy provided. 100SQ FT storm sail, 11oz $8,900. Call 250-923-6461 or new. 45lb CQR anchor. Ample donyne@hotmail.com power smart charger controlSAGITTARIUS ler, new. Large Baja filter. 9.9 2008 COBALT 1 owner, low motor.You Call lots of Johnston action onoutboard the horizon! km, no accidents, There good ismile250)339-5667. age, 4 cylinder, excellent conare compelled to spend a lot of time with dition, 2 sets of tires. $6000 people you love. If you#(%#+Ö#,!33)&)%$3Ö can get organized, obo. 1(604)210-0466. $BMM charonrids@hotmail.com

 some of your chores you can transform into family fun.

CAPRICORN

You’re going through a period which requires a lot of reflection. You also feel extremely creative. Follow through on an urgent desire to spend some time out of the house. AQUARIUS

THE LUCKIEST SIGNS THIS WEEK: GEMINI, CANCER, AND LEO.

ARIES

The week starts with some confusion. You may need a second cup of coffee, because there’s a strong chance you’re just spinning your wheels! TAURUS

While you would definitely prefer to stay on the sidelines, your colleagues or friends want to put you in charge of all sorts of events. Say �yes� to whatever you think you might be able to handle. GEMINI

You feel a certain amount of stress about the restructuring going on in your professional life. Don’t worry too much; despite any changes, you will succeed in climbing further up the hierarchy. CANCER

You’re surrounded by talk of travelling. You might feel inspired by some kind of training that can lead you towards a more exciting career. LEO

There’s lots of emotion in the air and it’s easy for you to be deeply moved at the moment. You might find the necessary financing in order to start the process of buying a home. VIRGO

It’s important to gather all the pertinent information before making a choice, even if you’re feeling under pressure. Take the time to really think about your decision before telling anyone. LIBRA

You have a lot on your plate right now, and on top of that a cold is slowing you down. Get lots of sleep and take care of your health. SCORPIO

You’re the centre of attention because of your sense of humour. You successfully defuse a tense situation and someone reveals a well-kept secret to you. SAGITTARIUS

You’re the type of person who often rushes into things, and so you’re already in the Christmas spirit. Go ahead and start to make a few early preparations for the holidays. CAPRICORN

Don’t forget to take a map and a GPS when you’re driving anywhere if you don’t want to go around in circles. You succeed in obtaining some kind of confirmation from important people.

If you’re single, you receive several invitations to go out. If you give priority to your social circle, you’ll be very happy to realize that everyone wants to spend time with you.

AQUARIUS

PISCES

PISCES

You find yourself with rather a lot of duties and responsibilities to shoulder. Fortunately, your sense of organization allows you to deal with them very efficiently.

You should finally receive a sum of money that has been owed to you for some time. You win a case concerning a reimbursement or an insurance claim. You have front row seats for a panoply of events. You enjoy being the type of person who takes the initiative in making things proceed smoothly.

You may have seen last week’s minor media tempest a grandfather who had WEEKregarding OF NOVEMBER 17 TO 23, 2013 consumed a few drinks and then hopped into the THE passenger seat to supervise grandson, LUCKIEST SIGNS THIShis WEEK: the learner driver. They encountered VIRGO, LIBRA, AND SCORPIO.a police road check and grandpa found himself on the receiving end of an Immediate Roadside ProhibitionARIES (IRP) for blowing a fail. Who would have thought thata lot theof running supervisor oftoadonew You have around in driver needed to be with sober? connection your work, your health, or the health of one of your loved ones. Hello? What does a supervisor do? The verb There is also a lot of arguing going on. supervise may be defined as “to direct or Just keep your cool and you’ll be all right. oversee the performance or operation of.� This means that this grandpa had a responsibility TAURUS to both his grandson and other road users. His speaking, money hasoperated always job was toGenerally insure that the grandson been an important factor in your life. if the vehicle correctly and to intervene From now on you should be able to give necessary. There is no doubt in my mind that yourself some longer-term guarantees forof having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) your future. 100 mg% (.10) or more is an abdication of his responsibility. GEMINI The legal Your concept here young involved children don’t give isyouthat muchof being in care control a motor vehicle time and to relax, but thatofdoesn’t prevent you while impaired by alcohol or loving a drug. applies from spoiling them and themIt deeply. for both Criminal and Motorincrease. Vehicle Act You mightCode also get a salary offences. Grandpa could have been tried and convicted criminally CANCERfor his actions instead of being dealtTake withsome as an IRP. know, I investigated time to Ithink before saying or and prosecuted both an impaired beginner and doing anything. If you’re having doubts supervisor about out ofyour theprofessional same vehicle in the early life, you receive 1980’s. some inspiration about a more exciting career.to zero blood alcohol for the So, in addition new driver, the supervisor needs to have a BAC under 50 LEO mg% (.05). Ideally, the supervisor After being blood really stressed out, it is imporshould have a zero alcohol requirement tant imagine for you tothat rest and rechargebeyour too. I don’t it would too moreAct pas-to difficult tobatteries. amend Enjoy the some Motorgentle, Vehicle in order to recuperate a bit. include thissive, andactivities make the situation explicit. The authorVIRGO is a retired constable with many years of traffic You arelaw ableenforcement to widen your experience. network of To comment or learn more, please visit contacts. You make new friends whowww. are drivesmartbc.ca. fun to be with, even if they are work

colleagues. Cst. Tim Schewe (Rtd.) DriveSmartBC www.drivesmartbc.ca LIBRA Twitter: @drivesmartbc You may be considering going abroad to live for a while. At work you are put into contact with people of many different nationalities. This will be very advantageous for you.

~ Special ~

FALL CLEAN UP SCORPIO

Car or Truck Package

You might have to make a few adjustments if your life partner comes from a different background than your own. A more equitable sharing of household chores would be appreciated and helpful.

95 59 You are passionate by nature and you $

from SAGITTARIUS

includes: complete exterior wash, clean dash, may feel emotions. console, doorsome trim,very tiresintense and rims, This state of mind greatly benefits your clean windshield inside and out, interior artistic side. mats, seats and trunk vacuum-carpets,

BODY SHOP

CAPRICORN *Offer expires November 2013touches At work, be sure to put the30, finishing

on a negotiation — down to the very last detail — before concluding anything. Your soul mate will manifest him- or herself.

TYEE

CHEVROLET BUICK GMC

AQUARIUS

Your self-esteem is on the rise, which leads you to aspire to more prestigious responsibilities at work. Some effort is required to maintain an active social life.

PISCES 250-287-9511 You’re sure to win a popularity contest or

something of a similar nature. People tend 570 - 13th Avenue to gather around www.tyeechev.cayou and are very attentive to whatever you say, even if it’s nonsense! DL#10790


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | 25

www.downtowncampbellriver.com

7x14

CLASSIFIEDS

wa r

ST

WATCH FOR THE STARLIGHT SHOPPING EVENTS FLYER in the Wed. Nov. 27th edition of the

v

ment r tain

oco late |

PI

|e

NG

hot ch

S T H H O G I P L

day s

nte

R A

holi

e ing en

m

e h t by

| e r fi

er fect gif t | ha p t a h t pp y find


26 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 26 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

3x7 3x7

shawnigan shawnigan lake lake

PROCESS

D R I B Y L R EA AW! DR y by

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Get current at the Philosopher’s Cafe

F

or an informal evening of dialogue on current topics hosted by a facilitator, drop in to Campbell River’s new Philosophers’ Café. The cafe will be a friendly forum for reflection where you can join the conversation, or just sit back and listen. Each café offers a speaker who delivers a 10-minute talk on a provocative topic, then the floor is open for 50 minutes of discussion. Members of the public are welcome to propose topics and introduce them at future Cafés. Themes should be of broad interest and national significance, and have an element of controversy to them. The moderator for each evening is Greg Hill, executive director of the Campbell River Community Living Association. Philosopher’s Cafe will be held at Sybil Andrews Cottage, 2131 South Island Highway (Next to the Willow Point Hall) from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Admission is free and delicious cookies and coffee are available by

Greg Hill will moderate Campbell River’s new Philosopher’s Cafe, an open forum on provocative topics.

donation. n Nov. 20: What’s to be done about the Senate? Sev-

eral Canadian Senators are in the news for all the wrong reasons. Political parties are on

record as wishing to reform the Senate, elect it or abolish it. Many Canadians are unsure what should be done, but are pretty sure that tax dollars are being wasted. How do you feel about the Senate? Do you know why it exists? Do we still need it? If we do, should it be changed? Speaker: Peter Schwarzhoff, former Science Manager, Environment Canada, Pacific and Yukon Region. n Jan. 15: Tough on Crime or Smart on Crime? A person convicted is convicted of a crime. What shall we do with him/ her? We want to deter crime, protect citizens and rehabilitate the offender. How can that be done effectively and fairly for everyone. Is there a balance required between victim’s rights and the offender’s rights? Does a minimum sentence make sense, or should a judge be free to try to make the punishment fit the crime? Is there a place for restorative justice? Speaker: Sandra Harrison, former ADM Corrections Alberta.

Have Your Say 7x7 7x7

rve Complete su 1 of 10 in Nov. 15 to W Y

CER O R G 0 2 $ DS GIFT CAR

Complete the survey…

house house pulse pulse research research

WIN $1,000! PROCESS

…five $1,000 cash prizes! Enter at www.pulseresearch.com/VI


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 8, 8, 2013 2013 || CAMPBELL CAMPBELL RIVER RIVER MIRROR MIRROR || 27 27 FRIDAY,

ung!

Send Send your your results results to: to:

sports@campbellrivermirror.com sports@campbellrivermirror.com

Tyees remain undefeated Fresh off a 5-4 win against Oceanside and a 5-1 win versus Port Alberni the weekend prior, the undefeated Campbell River Booster Juice Bantam A Tyees came into their game last weekend against the Nanaimo Clippers with an extra kick in their stride. C ar s on B or g f j ord started this game in net for the Tyees and affiliate Drew Price remains on the blue line while Bryce Turko rehabilitates his knee.  The team had a strong start and generated several quality chances right from the opening faceoff. The Tyees lit the red light first as Lukas Lund worked the puck to Braydon Kratzmann for a shot on net. Owen Boyd was

Johnny-on-the-spot for the rebound, cleaning it up and putting the puck across the goal-line.  Damian Rennie returned to the line-up and was very effective at both ends of the ice. He fired a hard shot on goal that the Clipper goalie couldn’t control.  The rebound was scooped up by Jaxon Ward as he put it top shelf; 2-0 for the Tyees.  With less than twenty seconds remaining in the first period, Rennie wired another one on net.  This rebound was laying in the crease and Matthew Leard buried it to extend the Tyees’ lead to 3-0 at the end of the first period. Nanaimo started to let their frustration get the better of them as they

took a few penalties.  While on the powerplay, Will McLean fed the puck back to Liam Rivett at the point. Rivett put a hard, accurate shot on goal that Jacob Hartley deflected for a power-play marker; 4-0 Tyees. Rennie went in on a breakaway but the Clipper goalie smothered the puck as Ward hovered for a loose puck.  Nanaimo was called for a doubleminor at the ice-cleaning. When play resumed in the second period, Rennie put the biscuit in the basket for another power-play marker; 5-0 Tyees.  Nanaimo was able to convert a power-play of their own just before the end of the second period to make the score 5-1. With less than eight

yo ooking l r a c r u Keep yo

CRES

LTD.

cres 3x1.5

1033 Ironwood St. 250-287-7121

minutes remaining in the third period, the Clippers sprung a breakaway of their own.  The shooter was able to sneak the puck five-hole to make the score 5-2 for the Tyees.  However, the Clippers again let their emotions rule and took another doubleminor.  On the ensuing power-play, Tyler Dickson re-directed a shot five-hole for the Tyees’ third power-play goal of the game and a 6-2 lead. Final score was 6-2 for the Tyees as they are now 3-0 in the Division 2 regular season.  The Bantam A Tyees host a rematch against Nanaimo on Saturday, Nov. 16 at 4 p.m.   The Juan de Fuca Grizzlies come to town at 10:15 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 17. 

Kristen Douglas/the Mirror

Heads up Corson Arbour of Campbell River United U13 rep team jumps up for the ball during a match Sunday against Powell River at Cedar school field. Campbell River defeated Powell River by a score of 8-1 and the game allowed for several Campbell River players to notch their first goals of the season.

Kristen Douglas/the Mirror

Scramble The Tyees’ Bryce Idiens (centre) fights for the puck against two Juan de Fuca Grizzlies who were in town Sunday morning. The Tyees won the game 8-0.

Rage drop two games The U12 PeeWee Rage Lacrosse played two fast paced games on Sunday against Victoria’s Tier 1 Pac Rim team.  Although defeated in both games, Rage had goals by Noah Araki (2) and Blake Doherty.  The Rage travels to Richmond for a tournament this weekend from Friday-Monday. 

Winter Tire Sale

* tyee chev 7x2.5 BEST TIRE PRICES IN TOWN...GUARANTEED. PROCESS

TYEE CHEVROLET BUICK GMC

ON SELECT 2012 GMC & CHEVROLET VEHICLES

Stop in today for a FREE TIRE INSPECTION No appointment necessary HUGE TIRE SELECTION!

*While stock lasts.

SERVICE DEPT 570 – 13th Ave. 250.287.9511

DL#10790


28 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Autumn Flavours thrifties 7x14 Armstrong

Lest we forget.

Cheese

Double the Reward.

Cheddar, Mozzarella or Extra Aged White 500–700g Limit of 4

On Sale

7

88

Each

PROCESS

Charmin

Bathroom Tissue 12 Double Rolls or Bounty Paper Towels 6 Rolls Selected

On Sale

5

9Each9

2 Club Thrifty Foods Points for every dollar you spend!

500 Dempster’s

Whole Grains Bread

When you buy any 3 of these selected items Adams

Compliments

Assorted 500g

Creamed or Liquid Selected 500g

Peanut Butter

Selected 600g

Offer available November 6th - 12th, 2013 at all Thrifty Foods locations. Valid Club Thrifty Foods card must be presented at time of transaction. Excludes bonus points and purchases of prescriptions, lottery, tobacco, gift cards, Smile Cards and other goods and services as specified by Thrifty Foods. See program Terms and Conditions for complete details.

On Sale

3 $9 for

Specials in Effect until

On Sale

3 $9 for

November 12th, 2013 ONLY

Honey

On Sale

3 $9 for


Heroes

See page 16 for Remembrance Day event schedule

Remembrance Day 2013

Honouring our

Come see the sisters for quality rentals . . .

Realty & Property Management Inc. Professional Service, Helpful Staff.

Realty & Property Specialists 962 Shoppers Row • 250-286-0110

campbellriverpropertymanagement.ca

oj home solutions 7x3.25 proc

O.J.

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter the words, but to live by them.” -John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Ann


B2 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

It’s Important to us all... On October 8, at a general information meeting, our people were asked: “Should we close on Remembrance Day ?” The overwhelming response was “YES!” So, to recognize those who served in the cause of peace and freedom around the world over the years, and still today...

All Quality Foods stores will be closed Monday, November 11 Remembrance helps us understand the country we live in today and how we can build a better future together. Whether they served in distant lands or here at home, during the epic battles of last century or the strained conflicts of the last few years, we all owe these Canadians a debt of gratitude now and in the future. Quality Foods joins the nation in recognizing the sacrifices and achievements of those who have served in the cause of peace and freedom around the world over the years for the benefit all Canadians. Also important is the need to guard wisely against allowing history to repeat, while helping our young people to understand and to remember what these men and women have done during times of war, military conflict and peace.

“For the Fallen” They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old; Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them. www.qualityfoods.com


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Heroes

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B3

Aniela Plonka: Personal Experience during the second world war Story by Senior Connector I remember the last day of August 1939 when I said goodbye to my mother. She had tears in her eyes and asked when she would see me again. I said, “Mom, I’m going to Przemysl, only a few kilometers from home.” I was going to Przemysl to stay with my auntie who was expecting twins, and her husband was away in the army. Living with my aunt was closer to my school than travelling every day by train (I was a high school student). Since that goodbye, 32 years passed before I saw my mother again. On Aug. 28, 1939, the ten years treaty on non-aggression was signed in Moscow by German Joahim von Ribbentrop and Russian Vyacheslaw Molotow. On Sept. 1, the German army attacked Poland, bombarding cities, towns and villages, killing not

only soldiers but shooting civilians running starved, longing for a piece of bread. There in panic, women, children and whoever was was no place to wash either. After about in sight. Injured and dead people lay every- two weeks, they loaded us in the canwhere. It was a horrible thing to see and vas-covered trucks and took us to the rail live through. On Sept. station. I wanted to let 17, the Russian army my mother know what “Looking through the hole, had happened to me, invaded the eastern I saw someone pick up the so I wrote a note, tore a area of Poland. Then the note and run fast. Germans and Russians strip from my dress and divided Poland in half. tied it to the note. When He let my mother know The river San, which the truck was moving, I what happened to me.” flows through the middle cut a hole in the canvas of Prezemysl, was made with a razor and threw the German-Russian border. My mother’s out my note. Looking through the hole, I saw house was on the Russian side of the San. someone pick up the note and run fast. He My auntie’s house was on the German side. let my mother know what happened to me. I worried very much for my mother and my At the rail station, they loaded us in the family. I hadn’t heard from them since I left freight wagons, which were empty except to go to school. for some straw on the floor and a can I tried to get home but the Russians didn’t let people through their border. They dynamited the bridge so it was impossible to get to the other side. I decided to wait until the river froze. I hoped the Russians were human too and would let me go home. In the early morning of Jan. 19, 1940, I crossed the frozen river and two Russian soldiers grabbed me. They took me to their headquarters for questioning and kept me there all day. I pleaded with them to release me and let me go home to my mother. When night fell, they took me in a covered truck to prison. The prison cell was full of people, older ladies, school kids and young children. There was no room to sit down. When night came, we had to take turns to lie down on the floor. Once a day, we were given soup. We were

Aniela Pawliszak.

standing in the corner. We travelled like that for two days and nights. Our first stop was Nikolayew, Russia. They brought us to the prison door and gave us some water. I remember I drank at least three quarts of water at once. I was kept in Nikolayew prison for six months. Many times, and always after midnight, they called me for questioning. Again they put us in covered trucks, in separate partitions, and drove us far away to another prison.

before calling me for questioning. By then, I’d be totally exhausted; I just didn’t care anymore. Then the Russian commander insisted I admit I was an enemy of Soviet Russia. He would yell at me to scare me. “Why don’t you cry?” he yelled! “For Pilsudski you would cry, but you will not cry for me!” “Yes, for Pilsudski I would cry,” I answered. “But I will not cry to please you.” (Joseph Pilsudski was a Polish patriot and leader during the First World War.) The next prison they sent me to was in Kharkow, and I will never forget it as long as I live. They put me in a large cell with Russian women who were hardened criminals. They were in prison for murder, assault, theft and many other crimes. They swore and fought between themselves terribly. I was so scared. I thought I’d died and was in hell. Every night, two Russian guards came to the cell to count us. I kept asking them, “Please put me in with Polish women.” They asked, “Why?” “Because I can’t speak Russian,” I told them. “You have to learn,” they answered. “Learn from these women.”

POPPY MOBIL GIVING PROG E RAM

At that prison, they British Columbia ns can use their let us out of the mobile phones to Legion’s Poppy Fu text donations to nds. truck one at a time the “For many years then put us each , British Columbia ns have been pr poppies and show oudly wearing the in separate little ing they remembe ir r,” says Jim Howa Poppy Fund. “T rd of Vancouver’s his year we’ve ad cupboard-like ded a new and give.” easy way for yo boxes in the wall, u to “You simply text standing up. In the word POPPY to 20222, reply YE $5 donation will S to confirm, and front of me was be added to your a mobile phone bil “We receive 100% l,” explains Howa a door with a of the donation.” rd. The mobile giving few air holes so program, made popular by disas Haiti and Japan, I wouldn’t die in ter relief efforts is part of a bran in d revitalization proje Ca na dia n Legion BC/Yu there. If I faintct at The Royal kon Command. Director, Inga Kr Newly appointed use says the Legio ed, I couldn’t Executive n is giving their includes the int brand a facelift roduction of ne fall because that w technology an ways for supporter d new, more mo s to remember, joi there was no dern n and give. “We want people room to fall. The to know we’re mo re than a social clu “Any Canadian ov b,” explains Krus Russians were er the age of 18 e. can join the Legio to be ex-military n—you don’t ha .” very advanced ve The Legion in BC in their cruelty. has 65,000 memb ers, contributes munity programs Sometimes $6.5 million to co each year and Le mgion members vo hours annually. On lunteer over 600,0 they kept me e of the key prog 00 ram s that benefits fro raising is the Ve terans’ Transitio m poppy fundstanding there n Program at the Columbia, where University of Britis returning veteran for three to h s ca n and trauma relief receive free supp ort, counseling as they transition four hours home and back to civilian life .

Submitted photo

aclands grainger 8th B&W

Continued on page 4

Take a moment to remember ... Lestwestern We Forget bailey trucks

8th B&W Bailey Western Star & Freightliner Trucks

1620 Island Hwy, Campbell River • 250-287-9215

1440 Redwood Street, Campbell River • 250-286-1151


B4 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Continued from page 3

Heroes Heroes

Aniela Plonka: Personal Experience during the second world war

Every night they asked us what we did before we came The Germans didn’t keep their promise of non-agto prison. The Russian women answered that they were gression. In June 1941, the German army attacked thieves, stealing large items or picking pockets. One night, Russia and the two “partners in crime” were now at when they asked me again what I did before coming to war. Polish general, Wladyslaw Sikorski, tried to save prison, just to make fun of them, I said the Polish people from Russian I was a pickpocket. The guards looked prisons. The terms of agreement “Sometimes they kept me surprised and smiled. The next day they standing there for three to were signed in London on July put me in a cell with Polish women. 30, 1941, by the Sikorski and four hours before calling me the USSR. On Dec. 4, 1941, the For another six months I was in Kharkow for questioning. By then, I’d Declaration of Mutual Assistance prison. Then, one day they called me be totally exhausted; I just and Collaboration was signed in to the commander’s office and read my Moscow by Sikorski and Joseph didn’t care anymore.” sentence. Stalin. Stalin agreed to release They said, because I was an enemy the Polish people from Russian of Soviet Russia, they sentenced me to five years of hard prisons. The Polish army was organized in the labour in a camp for women. Soviet Union by General Wladyslaw Anders. This The place was called Akmolinsk. It was the winter of 1941. was possible because there were more than one We came to Akmolinsk by train, a prison train with bars on million Polish prisoners of war and many thousands the windows and guards with guns. They gave us very salty of civilian families deported from Poland to Russia. fish to eat but no water to drink. They tried to find some In May 1942, I was released from the Russian priswater but there was no place to get it. As far as we could on. I was released along with two Polish ladies. see, there was nothing but snow and more snow. Together, we decided to go to the southern part of Finally, they brought some snow for us to eat. We travelled part of Russia by train. Some female Russian prisoners asked us to find their families and give them like that for a week. messages that they were alive and healthy. When The camp was north of Akmolinsk, Siberia. There were no we got to the addresses we were given, their famrailroads, so we had to walk through the deep snow for ilies were so afraid they wouldn’t acknowledge they about ten hours to get there. Some people were so tired had relatives who were prisoners. They said, “No. they fell in the snow. The soldiers pushed them with the We don’t know anyone who is in prison.” When we butts of their rifles and swore and called us names. In this asked them if we could sleep in their yards, they transport were more than 300 Polish women. The camp was wouldn’t let us. full of Russian prisoners, wives and daughters of Tzar officers; their husbands and fathers were shot when the com- It was very difficult to get a seat on a train. There munists took over the Russian government and the women were a lot of people trying to get from place to place. The trains were full of Russian army personnel and children were sent off to prison for life. so civilians had a very slim chance to get on. The I was put to work digging frozen ground because they rail stations were full of Russian refugees running planned to build a railroad. The work was hard and the away from the front. Their homes were destroyed by Czeslaw (Chester) Plonka. Submitted photo hours long. We worked 14 to 16 hours every day. The tem- bombs and fire so they had to move on. Many nights perature was 45 degrees below zero, and still we worked we slept on the street waiting to get on a train. toes. After a few weeks, we tried to get to Alma-Ata. Some outside. To keep warm, we had to work fast; when you stand Russian men in the village were going to Alma-Ata, and up to rest for half a minute, your sweat would freeze on your After a long wait at the Akmolinsk rail station, my two said they had room for one of us, if we paid them. We had back. My feet were frozen so terribly that, for many years friends and I managed to get on the train, but we didn’t 50 rubles between us, so my friends decided I would take after, my feet were swollen and it was difficult for me to find have any money for tickets so the lady conductor threw us our belongings and the ride while they out. We held on the step rails while the soft shoes that wouldn’t hurt. would walk. train was moving. On the next car, some Every prisoner had to dig a “norm,” so many metres long Russian men were also hanging on the “I got sick with a severe case On the way to Alma-Ata, the men and so many wide. If somebody managed to dig the norm step rails. I had a little bag hanging on a stopped by some bars for drinks while I he or she received more bread the next day. I could never string on my arm. A man from the next of dysentery, and I thought I waited in the wagon. When they came wouldn’t survive.” make the norm. I was too weak so I received only small car tried to steal it. He pulled and jerked back, they yelled at me to give them portions of bread. Also, once a day we got soup, which was the bag but the string wouldn’t break, more money, but I didn’t have any. So made of some grain and fish heads. and I couldn’t release my grip on the rail to let go of the bag they started hitting me and tearing off my clothes. I was very For one and a half years I worked in that camp doing hard for fear of falling off the train. It was going very fast and I scared and didn’t know what to do. Thankfully, there was a work outside, building railroads and digging canals for irrig- would have been killed if I fell. The string of the bag cut my little Kozak man travelling with the Russians. He asked them to leave me alone, but they were drunk and wouldn’t stop. ation or something. Many of my friends didn’t make it, they arm, and for many years, I had a big scar from it. died of starvation and diseases. My brother also died or was When the train stopped, we walked to a village in Kozakstan When the wagon continued down a hill, the Kozak pushed killed somewhere in Siberia. (a Russian occupied country), and asked for jobs, any jobs, me off the wagon and I fell and rolled down the hill. Then he threw my bags down. He saved my life. I lost all hope of survival. But something happened to restore because we were very hungry. The Kozak people let us work on their farms and paid us with some flour and potaContinued on page 6 hope for the suffering Polish people in Russian prisons.

quinsam coal 16th In war, there are no B&W unwounded soldiers. – Jose Narosky

In memory of those who gave their lives so that we may live in peace.

claire trevena 16th Claire Trevena B&W MLA North Island 908 Island Highway Campbell River V9W 2C3 250.287.5100 or 866.387.5100 Fax: 250.287.5105 claire.trevena.mla@leg.bc.ca www.clairetrevena.ca

Thank-you for all those who fought for bruce our freedom.

carruthers 16th B&W

LEST WE FORGET

canadian tire 16th B&W

Check Realty

BRUCE CARRUTHERS 250-287-0151

brucec@remax-campbellriver.bc.ca

Discovery Harbour Shopping Centre 1444 Island Highway, Campbell River


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Heroes

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B5

Inventory of wars in contemporary history

Remembrance Day is an opportunity to reflect on the sacrifices that today’s soldiers make and on the sacrifices of all those who preceded them.

The deadliest war: The Great War of 1914-1918 is the greatest drama known to Europe in terms of the number of deaths. The totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century and the Second World War are the direct consequences of this war. But it was the Second World War that was the deadliest, with more than 55 million deaths, of which 30 million were civilian.

The most remembered war: This is the Second World War because of the atom bombs dropped on Japan and because it left its mark on three generations. Fortunately, those who remember it also remember the slogan “No more war!” The bloodiest battle in Canadian history: The Battle of the Somme took place from July 1 to the end of November, 1916. On the first day of this battle, the 1st Newfoundland Regiment was virtually annihilated in the village of Beaumont. Machine guns, barbed wire, trenches, and massive artillery shelling resulted in ferocious fighting marked by heavy losses. Some 24,713 Canadians and Newfoundlanders died in the battle. The largest naval battle: The greatest naval concentration of contemporary history was deployed in the Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean area on September 21, 2007. This unprecedented demonstration of power by the United States against Iran included three aircraft carriers supported by about 40 escort vessels and nearly 100 aircraft.

Take time to remember Throughout the year, and particularly during Veterans Week, Canadians come together as a nation to honour and remember Canada’s Veterans, war dead and all those who have made the ultimate sacrifice on our behalf in times of war, armed conflict and peace.

LEST WE FORGET REMEMBRANCE DAY

JB Radiator 16th B&W

• Your North Island Industrial Mon-Fri: 8-5pm Cooling Experts Sat by Appt. • Repair & Recore of Fax: 250-287-7038 Industrial Rads & Coolers 1501 A Willow Street, • All Auto, Industrial, and Campbell River Marine Applications

LEST WE FORGET

charcare 16th B&W

Assisted Living Services For The Elderly & Housebound Josie Coak 778-346-4446 • charcare@shaw.ca

IN MEMORY OF MY FAMILY MEMBERS WHOlynda SERVED IN WW1 AND WW2 baechlor

pharmasave 16th B&W

16th B&W

EVERGREEN

Lynda Baechler 250.923.6103

~ Located in Alder Medical Center ~ 277 Evergreen Road, Campbell River TM

250-287-3222


B6 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Heroes

Aniela Plonka: Personal Experience during the second world war Jangi-Jul. In August 1942, I enlisted in General Anders’ army on Soviet Union territory in Jangi-Jul. The army’s camp was full of Polish men and women just released from Russian prisons who had joined the army. There were also some Polish Catholic priests who’d joined the army.

army officer. He was also a former Russian prisoner of war.

In October 1942, I was transported with the Polish army to the Middle East. We travelled from Port Krasnowock through the Caspian Sea and arrived in Port Pahlevi in Iran.

we got there – nothing. The view had moved a little farther away. We travelled through a corner of Syria then through Jordan. Our transport stopped by the Jordan River and we went in the water for a splash.

He left for England to join the Royal Air Force (RAF) a few days after we met. I didn’t see him for a year but we kept in touch by writing letters. From England, the RAF sent him to Canada for navigation trainFor nearly three years, we had no chance ing for nine months. When he returned to to attend church or hear the Holy Mass. England he was stationed at Newcastle and The following Sunday, flew a two-person plane we gathered in an open called a Mosquito (they “In Iraq, I met the man field to hear the Holy were also called Night who became my husband; Mass for the first time Fighters). His duty was since our release from he was a Polish army officer. to spot German bombers Russian prisons. There flying towards England He was also a former were thousands of men and shoot them down. Russian prisoner of war.” and women, young and In July 1943, I was old. It was very emotransferred along with the 7th Division to tional; the tears were flowing as we prayed Palestine. While travelling to Palestine, we and sang, “Boze Cos Polske” (God save our saw a beautiful mirage. It looked like a big Poland). city and water lying ahead of us, but when

Iran was a nice place. I met many nice people there. For eight months, I worked in a Teheran hospital as a volunteer. I worked night shifts. Every night I started two hours earlier because I took nursing classes. It was a crash course, but it helped my work in the hospital. The hospital was a new building, not finished yet. There was no electricity, no telephones. We had to use lanterns. There was a shortage of doctors and nurses. Transports of Polish civilians came from Russia, filled with people with diseases like typhoid fever, tuberculosis and others. Most of the people died in that hospital.

Czeslaw (Chester) and Aniela Plonka’s wedding photo.

Submitted photo

Continued from page 4

I was in the middle of nowhere. I didn’t know ride and you are so late.” In Alma-Ata, we where I was or what to do. I sat on my bags worked in the cotton fields for a while. We and cried and prayed. After a long time, a lived in a small cottage built of clay and Kozak man came by and asked if he could straw. When we lay down at night, we could help. He was riding on a donkey and spoke see the stars shining through the holes in the only Kozak. But somehow we understood roof. There, I got sick with a severe case of each other. He let me borrow his donkey. I dysentery, and I thought I wouldn’t survive. put my bags on the donkey’s back and sat One morning, a Russian soldier came to our on it, then started off. The donkey walked door and said he was collecting all the Polish people he could find to steadily, until we came get them to one place “I was in the middle of to a creek. It sat down for a transport. The right in the middle of nowhere. I didn’t know place was near Tashkent. the creek, getting the where I was or what to do. He was sorry to see me flour in one of my bags I sat on my bags and cried so sick. He put us on all wet. I jumped off the a wagon and gave us and prayed.” donkey and started pullsome bread and boiled ing the rope, but the water to drink. donkey refused to move. She was just enjoying the cool water. I was so upset, I ran Gradually I got better. We called that solbehind the donkey and grabbed her tail dier an angel of mercy sent by God to and pulled it very hard. The donkey jumped help us. He was the first Russian I met who and started running fast. Finally, I got to the acted like a human being. From Alma-Ata, place I was supposed to meet my friends. we went to Tashkent, Uzbekistan, another They said, “We walked and we are waiting Russian-occupied country. The Polish army here for you for a long time. You had a was forming near Tashkent, in a town called

When I was transferred to Iraq, in the 7th Division, Polish army, I worked in the YMCA canteen. The 7th Division was stationed in Quizi-Ribat near Bagdad. Bagdad is a nice city. The Tigres River flows right through the middle of Bagdad, and palm trees grow there. Iraq has a very hot climate, no rain, not a cloud in the sky, only sun and sand. When the wind blew, the sand hung in the air like a cloud. In Iraq, we lived in tents. Big nets were tied around our beds to protect us from dangerous stings from scorpions, tarantulas and other poisonous creatures. Many Polish people got sick with malaria from mosquito and other insect bits. The Arabian people were used to their climate and their kind of living. The Polish army in Iraq didn’t have any entertainment. While working in the canteen, I was asked to sing for the soldiers. With another soldier, I was sent to many camps and divisions. We sang solos and duets. If we put on a play, I took part in it, too. In Iraq, I met the man who became my husband; he was a Polish

In Palestine, I continued working in the canteen. Our camp was located in Hajfa by the Mediterranean Sea. It was hot there so we would go to the sea to swim. We also took bus tours to Jerusalem and Tel-Aviv. It was Continued on page 7


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Heroes

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B7

Aniela Plonka: Personal Experience during Canada's Veterans, Brave and Proud the second world war Each year, from November 5 to 11, hundreds of commemorative cere-

Continued from page 6

just like Hawaii there. I went to Jerusalem four times. We visited the Holy Land and churches, and went to Bethlehem and Nazareth. I also took a tour to the Dead Sea. I enjoyed every minute of it. Because I wanted to do more than work in the canteen, I applied to join the air force and go to England. I was accepted. In December 1943, around Christmastime, our transport left for England. We travelled by train to Alexandrai, Egypt, and embarked on a big ship on the Mediterranean Sea. The ship had to go slowly and very carefully because there were mines in the water. We had to stop right by Gibraltar and wait there for a week until the navy fished out all the mines. The first week of January 1944, we arrived in Glasgow, Scotland. In February, I enlisted in the RAF with the WAAF. They sent me to the Halton station near London for a mechanics course. In eight months I finished the course, and was a flight mechanic E, working on engines on Lancaster bombers stationed at Sillloth (between England and Scotland). Living in England for four years, I visited many cities and made a lot of friends. It was there that I married and had my son George, who was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. Since August 1929, when I last saw my mother, I didn’t know what had happened to my family. It was useless to write because the Russians and Germans fought on Polish territory. The Polish army fought for freedom on many fronts; in Poland, the Battle of Britain, in Italy and Monte Cassino, Narvik, Norway and other areas. But it didn’t bring freedom for Poland.

Epilogue The Conference at Yalta Crimea, USSR,

was held Feb. 4 to 11, 1945, by American President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Russian Marshal Joseph Stalin. They decided the future of Poland. Stalin demanded the eastern part of Poland – Lwow, Wilno, and many other towns like the one my mother lived in. Stalin also demanded to take Poland under his wing and set up a communist government there. Poland was not very important to Roosevelt or Churchill so they agreed. The Polish army had fought and died for nothing. Poland did not regain her freedom! The Polish army that had fought with the Allies wanted to have an independent government elected by the people – not one ruled by the Soviets. That’s why, on return to Poland, the Polish soldiers were treated as enemies of Soviet Russia. When the war was over, my husband’s mother wrote us and told us not to come back home. “Stay where you are. If you come back, you will be sent back to Siberia,” she wrote. She also told us my mother was alive and had been ordered by the Russians to leave her home and go onto the Polish side of the border because her house was in the newly acquired Russian territory. She also said in her letter that my brother was taken by the Russians, beaten and sent to a prison somewhere in Siberia. My two younger sisters were also taken to Germany for hard labour. When I heard the news I cried so much I thought my heart would break. We knew it was too dangerous to return to Poland. When my husband had been in Canada for navigation school, he knew how it was there, so we decided to come and live in Canada. Aneila Plonka was born Sept. 18, 1919, in Poland and passed away at the age of 89 on Jan. 21, 2009, in Fernie, B.C.

Ways to share online Use Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Instagram and Flickr and show you remember Canada’s Veterans. Post photos, videos, and messages using the hashtags #ShowYouRemember and #ShowYourThanks. Thank you for all you have done to keep us safe, Thank you to those of you who are continuing to keep us safe.

CRES

LTD.

1033 Ironwood Street 250-287-7121

Yvonne Pelletier-Paul Travel with Yvonne 250 204 3332

Travelwithyvonne@uniserve.com

Licence 51523

Thank you for the contribution you have been Let us not forget.

monies and events will take place across the country to commemorate Veterans' week. These are opportunities for all Canadians to recognize the contribution our Veterans have made and to honour those who made the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of Canada.

There are so many ways to remember and honour our Veterans: • Wear a poppy. • Attend your local Remembrance Day ceremony on November 11th. • Thank a Veteran by sending a postcard for peace. • Teachers - order some of our free learning materials and use our Teacher's Guide to lead your classroom on a remembrance journey. • Students - read one of our remembrance newspapers written just for K-2, K-Grade 6 and for Grade 7 and above. • Talk to a friend or relative who served with the Canadian Armed Forces in Afghanistan or in other areas of conflict. • View our Heroes Remember videos and listen to Veterans talk about their experiences. • Plant your own Garden of Remembrance. • Visit the remembrance challenge page where you will find videos and images you can use to create a mashup, build a virtual scrapbook, a fan site or just decorate your own Web space. Share what you build with others and link back to our site.


B8 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

At Home Defence: Our region engaged in World War II Haig-Brown was referring to the start of World War II, and although Canada did not declare war against Germany until one week after his letter was written, he assumed rightly that our country would be involved in the European conflict. He also predicted in his letter that Canadians would be called upon to increase productivity in resource industries. In our region, many men were employed in the resource industries of logging, fishing and mining. These were deemed ‘necessary’ industries, and workers were exempt from active service abroad.

formed in 1939. The fishermen’s intimate knowledge of coastal waters and inlets made them ideal as watchmen for Japanese boats, planes and submarines and several were also employed in running supplies to coastal defence outposts such as Yorke Island, and serving in examination vessels. Boats such as the Van Isle, the Westcoast, the Moolock, the Stanpoint, the Allaverdy, the San Tomas and the Santa Maria, familiar to this coast, formed part of this unique fleet.

Haig-Brown himself served overseas, but many other British Columbians became involved in serving at home; especially as awareness increased of the threat that was posed by advancing Japanese forces.

On land, the Pacific Coast Militia Rangers (PCMR) was formed in March of 1942 and made use of men who had knowledge of local terrain like trappers and loggers, and it involved older men and youth. By 1943, 15,000 men in BC were organized into 126 companies.

Local fishermen were encouraged to join the Fisherman’s Reserve, or what affectionately became known as the ‘Gumboot Navy’,

In the Campbell River region, PCMR Companies 25, 26, 27 and 28 were active. One company occupied Camp 8 and had a

Recruits to be trained for the Signal Corps getting ready to depart Campbell River. Submitted by the CR Museum

~ Notary Public ~

discovery spe11 • 11 •13 cialty 16th B&W

850B - 12th Avenue Campbell River, BC V9W 6B5 Member

Ph: 250-286-3636 Fax: 250-286-6371

Women were challenged with feeding their families when basic items like sugar, butter, coffee and tea were rationed and difficult to obtain. Ramona Vanstone remembered that “you had to have a book of coupons and coupons had to be turned in for any of the rationed commodities… and there were many other things which were unobtainable or in short supply.”

The Columbia (Columbia Coast Mission ship), and three Fisherman’s Reserve boats, the Stanpoint, Santa Maria and San Tomas docked at Yorke Island. Submitted by the CR Museum

Lest We Forget JOanne Johnston 16th JOANNEB&W L. JOHNSON

30 man unit. The members of this volunteer organization were issued hats, badges, dog tags and rifles. They had weekly training under their unit commander where they learned to read maps and participate in drill sessions and gunnery practice. The Comox Argus reported on September 17, 1942 that “the gallant band [is] taking to the woods against the Japs, who have invaded the Island. They are doing some fancy shooting with bren and sten guns and other assorted weapons.”

250-286-3125 discoveryspecialty.com

associated tire 8th Lest We Forget B&W

1710 Island Hwy, Campbell River 250-286-6132

Heroes

By Catherine Gilbert Author of “Yorke Island and the Uncertain War” Museum at Campbell River

One of these items were stockings and this lead to the fashion of painting legs. “These were the first seamless stockings,” Ramona explained.

Organizations such as the Women’s Institute organized fund raising activities, and promoted Victory gardens and support for the Red Cross service. All citizens had to be conscious of black out regulations and everyone was on the lookout for Japanese fire balloons, which were seen over the Island, but fortunately posed a harmless threat.

Local groups might not have seen any action, but there was a strong spirit of communal effort towards a common end and a readiness to defend the homeland. When we remember past conflicts this November 11, and honour the many soldiers who fought overseas, we should also give thanks to those who contributed to the war effort on our own shores.

Troops arriving at Yorke Island. Submitted by the CR Museum


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring Honouring our our

Heroes

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B9

REMEMBRANCE DAY NOVEMBER 11

Each year, on the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month, we observe Remembrance Day across Canada. Every year we gather in community halls, memorial parks, schools, living rooms and more to observe a moment of silence and to mark the sacrifice and honour of so many.

intersport 16th Proc

cr common 16th We Remember Proc

We Shall Never Forget

iap supply 16th We are Proc proud to honour our Veterans.

In honour of those who saved the world In life one man can seldom see His impact in society Our soldiers fight to blinded eyes To allow us all to live our lives Taking up arms against a foe To save us from the pain they know To give us all out liberty They bear the brunt of misery No greater duty can one bear An act of courage few would dare Endless sacrifices for 4 years Keeping back our greatest fears November 11th is a day of love To remember those now up above Men and women far too great To be remembered upon one date No words bring justice to their fight But I will try with all my might To bring them honour for the days They fought to alay such evil ways No act of love could be so grand As one brave soldier’s final stand So now I will say at last We must remember what has past Those who have died and those who live And all the thanks to them we give They are all those who meet the call Preserving good for one and all So on this day I ask you pray For heroes of our memory Thank for your sacrifice It was this act that gave us life. A poem by Mike, www.remembranceday.com

Please take a moment to remember. IAP SUPPLY COMPLETE FLEET, MARINE & INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY

TYEE PLAZA 1245 SHOPPERS ROW • 250-286-1760

1400 Ironwood St. • 250-287-2557

john duncan 8th proc

1393 Spruce St., Campbell River BC V9W 3L6 Tel: 250-286-3225 Fax: 250-286-0233 Email: iapsupply@uniserve.com

toyota 16th Ve t e r a n s Proc r u o g

H o n o u ri n

2785 N. Island Hwy., Campbell River DL#7755 email: sales@strathconatoyota.com

250-287-9527 • TOLL FREE 1-877-777-9527

RON KERR 16th B&W Thank you Dad. 1924- 2001

Ron Kerr and Family


B10 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

2 Grandfathers, 2 Wars Both of my grandfathers served in WWI for the duration of the world. It’s hard to imagine the physical and mental trauma that they suffered. My maternal grandfather, Fred Grimshaw (right, private with the 53rd Bn, Canadian infantry, survived the war after being severely injured at Lens, France (near Vimy). Fred Grimshaw was born in Urmston near Manchester, England. He and his brother immigrated to Canada in the early 1900s and worked as farm labourers in southern Manitoba. Fred met my grandmother, Ethel Oles while working on their Wakopa, Manitoba farm. Fred spent two of the four war years hospitalized for various injuries. He was wounded by a bullet that went through his right arm and suffered shrapnel injuries to his legs and arm. He also suffered from keratitis, conjunctivitis, diphtheria, tonsillitis and the flu. According to his military medical records, a gangrene infection was discovered when a bomb casing was removed from his leg after an explosion at Lens. He was lame for the duration of his short life. When Fred returned home, he married my grandmother Ethel Oles and they had two children, Joyce and Brian. Unfortunately, tragedy struck in 1935 when Fred died from a blood clot following surgery for gallstones. It’s ironic that Fred survived the war and then died after having an operation in Canada. After serving his country, no war pension was granted to his widow who was left to support two children. Fred Grimshaw sent a postcard to Canada on June 27, 1918. He was writing to his future mother-inlaw. “My Dear Mrs. Oles, Many thanks for the parcel you sent me. I sent the tea and sugar home to mother (living in Urmston, England) as they need it worse than I do. It’s getting very scarce over there. I am getting on pretty well. My eyes are giving me a lot of bother though so I am wearing dark glasses now. I will write a letter in a few days when my eyes feel a little better. Hopefully, you are all well. Best of Love, Fred.” Sadly, I never met my grandfather, Fred Grimshaw due to his early and tragic demise. After enlisting for WWII on June 23rd, 1941, in Vancouver, my father, Robert

cr indian band 16th Proc Campbell River Indian Band 1400 Weiwaikum Rd., Campbell River 250-286-6949

Heroes

Beaton (left) was sent for training at Camp Vernon and then to Petawawa in Ontario. He began his military career in the first survey regiment as a recruit with artillery calibration. He was then transferred to the X troop, P battery, 2nd survey regiment. He served in France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. He doesn’t talk much about the war but did relate a story upon his return home. “At the end of the war, after being hospitalized with trench foot, I joined up with the 108th battery, 2nd anti-tank survey regiment. We had to wait until the end of December before we could return home. In the meantime, the military had us soldering tins for London’s Huntley & Palmer’s biscuit factory, to keep us busy. Finally, we came back to Halifax and took the train right across Canada, letting troops off as we went along. The unit was supposed to stay together but as soon as the train started Robert Beaton (left) & Fred Grimshaw (right) Submitted photos going across Canada, people would get off, some at Montreal, some at Winnipeg university education at U.B.C. was paid for because and some at Calgary and so on. By the time we got into B.C., there of his military service. Soldiers received one month were just two of us left. I was being sent to Trail because I had of education for every month of service. This includbecome a member of the 108 battery that had been recruited in ed tuition, and room and board which was $60.00 Trail so therefore the 108th battery would be disbanded in Trail. Of per month at the time. Dad obtained his degree course, I had never seen Trail before. The only other guy left on the in Geological Engineering at the age of thirty. He train, had never seen Trail either. Just two of us! The whole town is now ninety-one and lives in Vancouver with his turned out to greet the 108th battery and just two of us stepped devoted wife of sixty years, Joyce. off the train. As soon as they saw there were only two, they didn’t I’d like to take this opportunity to thank my grandstay long. It’s the way the army works. Ridiculous. I had to spend fathers and father for giving up four years of their the weekend in Trail and I was glad to get out of there on Monday lives to serve their country. Their lives were ever morning to get the train that took us back to Vancouver where I had changed from war and we are forever indebted as enlisted. I got to Vancouver about Dec. 20 almost four years to the our generation has greatly benefited from their sacday that I had originally arrived in England.” Dad was discharged in rifices. – Laurel Lahay January of 1946. One positive outcome of the war, was that Dad’s

tyee chev 16th Proc Lest We Forget

From caring comes courage – Lao Tzu

cr arts council 16th Proc

evergreen seniors home Lest we 16th Forget. Proc

TYEE CHEV CHEVROLET BUICK GMC 570 – 13th Avenue 250.287.9511

tyeechev.ca

walter jakeway Those who died, We Remember. 16th Those Injured and Scarred We now Serve. Proc Those still protecting, Thank-you for your Honour, Loyalty, and Sacrifice. – Walter Jakeway, Mayor

250-923-0213 www.arts.council@crarts.ca

www.evergreenseniors.com

LEST WE FORGET

In honour of our Veterans.

a&W 16th Proc

Merecoft Village Shopping Centre 250-286-4247 Discovery Harbour Shopping Centre 250-850-0040

a! radiator 16th Proc

A-1

RadiAtors Ltd. 1961 Island Highway, Campbell River 250-287-7344


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B11

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our Honouring our

Heroes

Give pause on Remembrance Day Throughout history, millions of soldiers have marched into wars to protect the freedoms of their countries. Remembrance Day is a solemn time to commemorate those soldiers’ achievements and sacrifices and to pay respects to soldiers who died in battle.

In Canada, Remembrance Day is a statutory holiday in many provinces and territories. Official national ceremonies are held at the National War Memorial in Ottawa. Events begin with the tolling of the Carillon in the Peace Tower, during which members of the Canadian Forces participate and congregate at Confederation Square. Similar ceremonies take place in provincial capitals across the country. Very often moments of silence are offered for lost lives.

In the United States, people honour their present and past military on Veterans’ Day. In British commonwealth countries and territories, including Canada, November 11 is known as Remembrance Day. Since the end of World War I, memorials to remember those of the armed forces who fought in battle and perished in the line of duty have been What about the poppies? dedicated on this day. One of the unifying symbols of Armistice Day origins Remembrance Day is the poppy Remembrance Day was once known that is worn to honour lost solas Armistice Day because it marks the diers. The bold, red color of the signing of the armistice that put an end flower has become an enduring to the hostilities of World War I. On symbol of those who died so that the 11th hour of the 11th day of the others may be free. 11th month of the year, guns fell silent after more than four years of continuous warfare between the Germans and Allied troops. The armistice agreement was signed in a French train carriage at 11 a.m. Later, the carriage where the historic event took place was placed in a specially constructed building to serve as a monument to the defeat of Germany. Although it was moved by German forces and later destroyed during World War II, after that war ended a replacement carriage, correct in every detail, was rededicated on Armistice Day in 1950.

Remembrance Day evolution Armistice Day was renamed Remembrance Day after World War II to commemorate soldiers from both world wars. It is now used as a way to pay homage to any fallen soldier. Each year a national ceremony takes place at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London, a monument erected as a memorial to soldiers buried elsewhere. The Queen will lay the first wreath at the Cenotaph, while others will leave wreaths and small wooden crosses.

Remembering

those who protected us;

hub burton 16th Proc Honouring

The poppy became a symbol for a specific reason. Some of the most concentrated and bloody fighting of World War I took place in Flanders, a region in western Belgium. As a result of the fighting, most signs of natural life had been obliterated from the region, leaving behind mud and not much else. The only

living thing to survive was the poppy flower, which bloomed with the coming of the warm weather the year after fighting in the region had ceased. Poppies grow in disturbed soil and can lie dormant in the ground without germinating. Without the war, they may have never come to the surface. John McCrae, a doctor serving with the Canadian Armed Forces, was moved by the vision of poppies flowering in Flanders and wrote a poem titled “In Flanders Fields.” After the poem was published, it received international acclaim, and the poppy became a popular symbol of those lost in battle. Men traditionally wear the poppy on the left side of the chest, where a military medal would be placed. Women wear it on the right side because that is where a widow would wear her husband’s medals.

A field of poppies has come to symbolize the soldiers who lost their lives while fighting in battle.

Remembrance Day is celebrated every year, providing people humbled by the sacrifices of soldiers an opportunity to remember those soldiers’ efforts to secure freedom.

london drugs 16th Lest We Proc Forget.

260-1400 Dogwood St. • 250-286-9917 www.londondrugs.com

Saluting Our north island Veterans glass 16th Proc

henry orthotics In honour 16th of our Proc Veterans Sutton’s Campbell River Funeral Home 250-287-4812

www.suttonsfuneralhome.com

Lest We Forget.

rotary daybreak 16th Proc

Suttons 16th “Lest we forget Proc our fallen comrades who gave their lives for our freedom!”

107-250 Dogwood St., Campbell River 250-287-3530 or Toll Free 1-888-766 Feet

For those lost but not forgotten.

cr hearing 16th Proc

those who continue to do so... 1241 Ironwood St Campbell River 250-287-8819

250-287-8396

17th & Tamarac, Campbellton

Rotary Club of Campbell River Daybreak

250-914-3200 • 780-D 13th Avenue

www.tohear.ca


B12 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

On November 11th, take time to honour

and remember those who have sacriďŹ ced so much for all of us. tUISJGUZGPPETDPN

Canadian Virtual War Memorial Thanks to the generosity of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, you can now search the Canadian Virtual War Memorial to find where a veteran is buried. This site is a registry of the graves and memorials of more than 116,000 Canadians who served valiantly and gave their lives for their country. The purpose of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial (CVWM) is to recognize and keep alive the memory of the achieve-

ments and sacrifices made by those who served Canada in the defence of freedom and so have contributed to the development of Canada as a nation. The virtual memorial also contains images of individual Canadians and their experiences. You are invited to send us digital images of photographs and memorabilia relevant to Canada’s war dead. To start, search the Canadian Virtual War

PHOTO Combat Camera

We will remember them.

Memorial by filling out the search form at www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/collections/ virtualmem

Tips for Searching • Only use information that you are sure about. • Searches are not case sensitive. Search criteria may be entered in upper, lower or mixed case. • A Surname or part of a Surname is required to successfully complete an inquiry. • If you are unsure of the exact spelling of the Surname, try using the first two or three letters of the Surname. • A maximum of 500 responses will be provided for each search. • Providing a Given Name or an Initial will help narrow down the number of search responses. • You can search by full Given Name or part of the Given Name. • Separate multiple Given Names by a space. Do not use commas or periods. • If you are unsure of the exact spelling of the Given Name, try using the first two or three letters of the Given Name or try using Initial. • At least one Initial should be used. Separate multiple Initials with a space. Do not use commas or periods. • Multiple Given Names or Initials in the wrong order will cause an inquiry

to miss the required record. • If the surname contains spaces (e.g. Le Blanc), it may appear in the database with or without the space (Le Blanc or LeBlanc). • If the surname contains a period as in St. Pierre, it will appear in the database as St(space)Pierre. • Try using Wild Cards. A Wild card is a term used to describe a search technique which enables a range of names to be matched from a fragment of a name. “%â€? can be used to replace a string of text within your search. This technique ensures that the widest range of records are searched in an attempt to find the correct one. Example: Entering a Surname as %donald will return the following search responses: DONALD DONALDSON MACDONALD MCDONALD

Estimated Veteran Population as of March 2013

**

Second World War 91,400; their average age is 89. Korean War 9,900; their average age is 81. CF Veterans 594,300; their average age is 56. (Regular Forces and Primary Reserves)

Lest we forget.

VOTE AND

WIN!

$500 gift card! GRAND PRIZE

$10,000!

to transform your space with natural gas...

**The total male Second World War and Korean War Veteran population is based on the 1971 Census which posed the following question to men 35 years and over: “Did you have any wartime service in the active military forces of Canada or allied countries?� This estimate included members of the allied forces residing in Canada. The estimates of the Veteran population that the Census provided were since supplemented with a 1988 Statistics Canada Labour Force survey that validated the estimated number of male Veterans in 1988 based on mortality rates applied to Census figures. The survey also captured female Veterans. The information provided by the Census and the Labour Force Survey along with methods to age the estimates forward and apply mortality rates produces the current estimates of the Veteran population. These estimates are updated when Statistics Canada produces revised life tables. The last life tables were published in August 2006 for 2000-02 and were applied to Veteran estimates from the Census starting with the year 2003.

ith FortisBC RENO ME! w7x3 Check out all of the great room, kitchen, and outdoor living areas that need a makeover! VOTE for the most deserving room for your chance to win a $500 gift card towards a natural gas purchase. (i.e. stove-top, ďŹ replace, grill)

KITCHEN

OUTDOOR LIVING

FORTIS GREAT ROOM

Go to campbellrivermirror.com/contests

‌click on RENO ME and VOTE NOW!

Contest open October 7th, 2013. Winners will be selected and contacted no later than Dec 15th, 2013. $10,000 cash and prizes must go towards renovation.

Presented by:


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Heroes

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B13

Please wear a poppy by Don Crawford, 1960s “Please wear a poppy," the lady said And held one forth, but I shook my head. Then I stopped and watched as she offered them there, Her face was old and lined with care; But beneath the scars the years had made There remained a smile that refused to fade.

LEST WE FORGET

A boy came whistling down the street, Bouncing along on care-free feet. His smile was full of joy and fun, "Lady," said he, "may I have one?" When she'd pinned it on he turned to say, "Why do we wear a poppy today?"

250-287-2909 | 1454 Ironwood St. (in the Campbell River Commons)

Honouring the Veterans who have served and those who continue to serve our country.

The lady smiled in her wistful way And answered, "This is Remembrance Day, And the poppy there is the symbol for The gallant men who died in war. And because they did, you and I are free That's why we wear a poppy, you see." "I had a boy about your size, With golden hair and big blue eyes. He loved to play and jump and shout, Free as a bird he would race about. As the years went by he learned and grew and became a man - as you will, too." "He was fine and strong, with a boyish smile, But he'd seemed with us such a little while When war broke out and he went away. I still remember his face that day When he smiled at me and said, Goodbye, I'll be back soon, Mom, so please don't cry." "But the war went on and he had to stay, And all I could do was wait and pray. His letters told of the awful fight, (I can see it still in my dreams at night), With the tanks and guns and cruel barbed wire, And the mines and bullets, the bombs and fire."

Roy Grant 250-287-2000 250-203-1574

Lest We Forget Peter E. Kay

Oct. 15th, 1928 – Oct. 10th, 2013

"Till at last, at last, the war was won And that's why we wear a poppy son." The small boy turned as if to go, Then said, "Thanks, lady, I'm glad to know. That sure did sound like an awful fight, But your son - did he come back all right?" A tear rolled down each faded check; She shook her head, but didn't speak. I slunk away in a sort of shame, And if you were me you'd have done the same; For our thanks, in giving, if oft delayed, Though our freedom was bought - and thousands paid! And so when we see a poppy worn, Let us reflect on the burden borne, By those who gave their very all When asked to answer their country's call That we at home in peace might live. Then wear a poppy! Remember - and give!

1860 Antonelli Road, Campbell River, BC V9W 4R6 Tel: (250) 287- 3505 Fax: (250) 287-3501

SEYMOUR SERVICES Serving Campbell River for over 25 Years


B14 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our Honouring our

Heroes

Government of Canada Building Partnerships to Prevent Homelessness Among Veterans Ottawa – The Honourable Julian Fantino, Minister of Veterans Affairs, today met with community, private and public sector leaders from across Canada at the inaugural National Conference on Ending Homelessness. The conference, hosted by the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness, brought together policy makers, funders, researchers, advocates, community leaders and front-line workers to address the issue of homelessness in Canada. “One homeless Veteran on the streets is one too many. That’s why the Government of Canada is working to prevent and

reduce homelessness among Veterans,” said Minister Fantino. “Our Government is working hard to build new partnerships to help ensure homeless Veterans and those who are at risk of becoming homeless are getting the care and support they need.” “Our Government is committed to working with our partners to address this complex issue,” said the Honourable Candice Bergen, Minister of State (Social Development). “We will work with Veterans Affairs to help provide our homeless Veterans with greater access to the assistance and services that they

Lest we forget...

our fallen comrades who gave their lives for our freedom.

R.H. Printing Ltd.

Printers, Designers & Publishers

250-287-2427 www.rhprinting.ca

Brian Shaw, Craig Cormier, Graham Kelly & Andy Leitch #1631 Island Hwy., Campbell River 250-287-8807 www.mackieresearch.com

require.”

that are needed by homeless Veterans.

Over the past several years, Veterans Affairs Canada has provided information on its programs and services to approximately 200 community organizations that support homeless and at-risk Veterans in more than 50 cities across the country. Veterans Affairs Canada is also involved with outreach initiatives in Vancouver, Halifax, Calgary, Montréal, Toronto and Ottawa in partnership with Veterans’ and community organizations.

Minister Fantino took the opportunity at the conference to launch the new Veterans Affairs Canada web section devoted to homelessness. The page provides a one-stop hub for all of Veterans Affairs Canada’s homelessness related information, making it easier for front-line workers to find information they need to help homeless Veterans.

Veterans Affairs Canada has an emergency fund to assist Veterans in meeting urgent needs for which there are no other income sources available. Veterans in crisis can also access emergency funds from other sources, including the Royal Canadian Naval Benevolent Fund and the Canadian Forces Personnel Assistance Fund. In 2012, Employment and Social Development Canada and Veterans Affairs Canada undertook a two-year pilot project on transitional housing and support for homeless Veterans, including assistance with reintegration into the community, in four locations: Victoria, Calgary, Toronto and London. The goal of the pilot project is to help homeless Veterans live independently in their communities. The findings of the pilot project will help Veterans Affairs Canada inform direction on the services and benefits

“Through strong partnerships with community organizations, provinces, territories and other Government of Canada departments, we can give the Veterans who have always taken such great care of Canadians the support they need when they need it,” said Minister Fantino. The Speech from the Throne reaffirmed the Government of Canada’s commitment to continue helping Veterans re-establish themselves, including through outreach and support to homeless Veterans. Community leaders and organizations who support the homeless can find more information on the benefits and services Veterans Affairs Canada provides to homeless Veterans or those at risk of becoming homeless at veterans.gc.ca. Veterans Affairs Canada’s support and services offer the right care at the right time to achieve the best results for Veterans and their families. Find out more at veterans.gc.ca.

boyle Lest autobody We 8th Forget B&W

3692 South Island Hwy, Campbell River, BC


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B15

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our our Honouring

Heroes

In Flanders Fields by John McCrae, May 1915

Flt/Lt. John Lukey Flt/Lt. John Lukey RCAF died April 3, 1945 in his country’s service. Dad, you live forever in our hearts. Love Susan and Family.

Kenneth W. Ballard This is my father Kenneth W Ballard, deceased, he served overseas with Smokey Smith. He was a real good man and an excellent father The family misses him a lot. Thanks Dad for everything!

In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.

Lest we forget. Windsor Plywood 14th Ave. at Petersen, Campbell River • 287-8012


B16 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Heroes

Monday, November 11 6:30am 8:00am 9:15am 9:45am 11:00am 11:30am 12:30am 5:00am 1:00am 6:00am

HAPPY HOUR (COMRADESHIP) BREAKFAST PARADE ANNOUNCEMENTS MARSHALL FOR PARADE BEHIND CASINO PARKING LOT CEREMONY AT THE CENOTAPH RETURN TO THE LEGION FOR COMRADESHIP LUNCH PREPARED BY THE LADIES AUXILIARY DINNER BY THE BRANCH DANCE Music by THE IMPALAS KARAKOE SING A LONG

William Douglas Anderson

David M. Blackburn

My dad, William Douglas Anderson was a Flight Sergeant who trained at Number 3 Bombing and Gunnery School – MacDonald, Manitoba. He didn’t talk about the war much. He was an active legion member running the meat draw and solicited businesses for Remembrance Day wreaths for years. He passed away November 23, 1991. We donated his uniform to the Vancouver Island Military Museum in Nanaimo.

David M. Blackburn saw action in France, Belgium, and Holland during WWII. He belonged to the XII Manitoba Dragoons, 18th Armoured Car Regiment. He drove an armoured car and was one of the first to reach the Seine River in France. He has many stories to tell. He returned to Canada at New Years, 1945. This photo was taken Nov 11th, 2012. Now at 91, he resides in Evergreen Seniors Home.

Veterans Affairs Canada Assistance Service The VAC Assistance Service has been developed to assist you in overcoming almost every problem that can affect your personal or professional life. Call our Assistance Service Operators at: 1-800-268-7708 TDD 1-800-567-5803


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B17

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Heroes

Honouring our

At the 11th Hour, on the 11th day, of the 11th month,

WE WILL REMEMBER

FOR THE FALLEN With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children, England mourns for her dead across the sea. Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of spirit, Fallen in the cause of the free. Solemn the drums thrill: Death August and royal Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres. There is music in the midst of desolation And a glory that shines upon our tears. They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted, They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old; Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them. They mingle not with laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond England’s foam. But where our desires are and our hopes profound, Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight, To the innermost heart of their own land they are known As the stars are known to the Night; As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust, Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain, As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness, To the end, to the end, they remain. – Laurence Binyon

David Dyck 1916-2012

Text-to-Donate

For years, you’ve supported the Legion. And proudly wore your poppy. This fall, a new generation of veterans are returning home, and your gift has never been so important. Veterans will turn to the Legion for affordable housing, career counseling & trauma relief. And we’ll be there with your support. Simply text the word “POPPY” to 20222 on your mobile phone and $5 will be sent directly to the Legion’s Poppy Funds.

legionbcyukon.ca R

BC/YUKON COMMAND

e

m

e

m

b

e

R.

J

o

i

Legion BC Text to Donate Ad Publication: the Province Size: 9 col x 50 lines - B/W

n.

G

i

v

e.


B18 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Heroes

Dean Thompson, 1990 My Name is Dean Thompson, I was born and raised in Campbell River, graduating from Southgate Secondary in July 1988, and leaving for the army in October 1988. I served with the Second Battalion of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) from 1989 to 1996, then transferred to the Air Force and posted to CFB Comox in November 1996, where I have served ever since. During my time with the PPCLI I was deployed on two peacekeeping operations, in 1990 to Cyprus and then in 1993 to Croatia during the civil war in the Balkans. In Croatia my platoon was part of the Medak Pocket operation in mid-September 1993, where we were engaged in multiple armed stand-offs and firefights with elements of the Croatian army. Retiring from the regular military in October 2008, I currently work on CFB Comox as a reserve aircraft structures technician and volunteer with the RCMP in Campbell River as an Auxiliary Constable.

windsor mill sales quarter B&W


www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

Honouring our

Heroes

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | B19

New Veterans Charter The Facts The New Veterans Charter is a more complete approach to helping our men and women injured in the line of duty. It is about providing Veterans with the help they need, for as long as they need it. And it is never too late for Veterans to get that help. No amount of money can compensate for a life-altering injury or illness; however, the New Veterans Charter offers real hope. It provides financial security for as long as Veterans are unable to be gainfully employed, and it offers the programs that injured and ill Veterans need to lead more healthy, rewarding and independent lives.

and ensure ill and injured Veterans have an adequate income. Under this new legislation, known as the Enhanced New Veterans Charter Act, Regular Force

Veterans in receipt of the Earnings Loss benefit are guaranteed a minimum of $40,000/year in pretax income for as long as they are in the Rehabilitation Program or,

if they are unable to work again, until age 65. Under the Enhanced New Veterans Charter Act, eligibility criteria for the Permanent

supplement. With these changes, Canada’s severely injured Veterans may be eligible for a minimum of $58,000 a year

Impairment Allowance (PIA) and the Exceptional Incapacity Allowance have been broadened. Recipients of the PIA may also be eligible for a new $1,000 monthly

TELUS STORE OR AUTHORIZED DEALER

Ta-da!

VANCOUVER ISLAND Victoria The Bay Centre Hillside Centre

Now you can save more when you bundle 6x12 mobile with your favourite home services.

Mayfair Shopping Centre Millstream Village Tillicum Centre

Those who are the most injured get the most help.

Tuscany Village

The key to the New Veterans Charter is that it shifts the focus from a lifetime of disability to encouraging “wellness” — which is what our men and women really want most.

Uptown Shopping Centre Westshore Town Centre 756 Fort St. 815 View St.

TELUS

It also breaks new ground by extending many programs to Veterans’ families.

1681 A Old Island Hwy. 3300 Tennyson Ave.

The Pension Act could not do these same things for our modern-day Veterans. Its focus was on being disabled forever.

Campbell River 561 11th Ave. 1436 Island Hwy.

Under the pension system, Veterans only receive a monthly cheque (at an average of $800/month) and some related health care. That is particularly unacceptable for increasingly younger Veterans, who are releasing from the Canadian Forces at an average age of 36 years old.

1437B 16th Ave. 1690 Island Hwy.

Courtenay Courtenay Crossing Shopping Centre Washington Park Shopping Centre

The Disability Award is only one important part of the financial support available to ill and injured Veterans. The sole intent of the Disability Award is to compensate for the pain and suffering of an injury or illness.

2885 Cliffe Ave.

Duncan Cowichan Commons 951A Canada Ave.

Mill Bay

Other ongoing monthly financial supports are available so that Veterans and their families can focus on what matters most: getting better. Seriously injured Veterans may receive financial support for the rest of their lives. The Government of Canada regards the NVC as a living document that will be amended and adjusted as circumstances require. In this respect, the Government recently implemented legislative and regulatory changes which total $2 billion over the life of the programs. Beginning with an immediate $189 million over the next five years, these changes increase support for severely injured Veterans and their families who face the greatest challenges making the transition to civilian life,

845 Deloume Rd.

Nanaimo Country Club Centre

Only TELUS lets you bundle TV, Internet or home phone with your mobile.

Save

Port Place Shopping Centre

60/year

$

Rock City Centre

when you bundle mobile

*

Nanaimo North Town Centre Woodgrove Centre 3300 Norwell Dr.

Parksville 281 East Island Hwy.

Port Alberni

Call 310-2121, go to telus.com/bundle or visit your TELUS Store or Authorized Dealer.

4006 Johnston Rd. ®

Sidney 9810 7th St.

*Offer available to TELUS residential customers who are mobility customers on a post-paid consumer or business personal account. The discount applied is $5/month for each of the four TELUS services on a customer’s account: TV, home phone, Internet and mobility. For mobility, a $5/month discount is applied to the whole account and not to each phone number or mobile service on the account. TELUS, the TELUS logo and the future is friendly are trademarks of TELUS Corporation, used under licence. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © 2013 TELUS.


B20 | CAMPBELL RIVER MIRROR | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

EN AY! P O EN W T NO OUR C IN

www.CampbellRiverMirror.com

THE SEASON’S BEST

Instant Rebate Event

Receive Instant Rebates up to $200!* $

1s0ta0nt

In te Reba LANDON 100% leather stationary sofa compare at $2499

$

now only

1599

After Instant Rebate!*

Available in Chocolate Leather Only · In Stock!

$

$

50nt

Insta te Reba

MASON fabric recliner compare at $739 · sale

$

50

t Instante Reba

$

Ins te Reba

VAIL fabric recliner

599

compare at $629 · sale

$

10ta0nt

LAUREL stationary sofa

449

compare at $1689 · sale

$

$

50

t Instante Reba

Canada’s Best Selling Leather Recliner!

PINNACLE leather recliner

1049

compare at $1259 · sale

$

949

After Instant Rebate!*

After Instant Rebate!*

After Instant Rebate!*

After Instant Rebate!*

5 Colours Available at the Sale Price Upgrade to Power XR +$350

6 Colours Available at the Sale Price Upgrade to Power XR +$350

6 Colours Available at the Sale Price

4 Leather Colours Available at the Sale Price Upgrade to Power XR +$350

Plus! Pay No Interest for 6 Months!* Island Owned & Operated · Visit us online at: www.la-z-boyvi.com Courtenay Victoria Nanaimo

2937 Kilpatrick Ave NOW OPEN! 3501 Saanich Road (at Blanshard) 3200 North Island Hwy (Country Club Mall)

MON - THURS 10 - 5:30

FRI 10 - 7

SAT 10 - 5:30

(250) 871-6074 (250) 382-5269 (250) 756-4114

SUN: 12 - 5

or Toll-Free 1-855-203-0857 or Toll-Free 1-877-452-5269 or Toll-Free 1-866-756-4114

REMEMBRANCE DAY, MONDAY NOV 11: 12 - 5

*See store for details. Financing on Approved Credit. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Hot Buys and Final Markdowns excluded. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price or specification may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct such errors. Not all items available at all locations. Offer ends November 25th, 2013.


Campbell River Mirror, November 08, 2013