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NEWS: Problem gamblers in top B.C. doc’s sights /A5 ARTS: Museum offers Halloween event for adults /A12 SPORTS: Vikes soccer women aim for nationals /A14

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Laureate will focus on the arts New position will be created soon by mayor Christopher Sun News staff

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Oak Bay Mayor Nils Jensen pleads to Oak Bay Rotary past-president Joan Peggs from the back seat of a police cruiser as part of Rotary’s campaign to raise money tomorrow (Oct. 24) on World Polio Day. Jensen, an honourary Rotary member, will be “taken into custody” from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. with the goal of securing $1,500 in pledges for his “bail.”

Mayor behind bars for charity Oak Bay Mayor Nils Jensen will climb into the back seat of a police cruiser tomorrow (Oct. 24) as part of Oak Bay Rotary’s campaign to raise money on World Polio Day. Jensen, an honourary Rotary member, will be “taken into custody” from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. with the goal of securing $1,500 in pledges for his “bail.” Every dollar

raised will be matched two for one by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Donations can be made to Jensen’s bail campaign by calling 250-818-3134 or online at endpolio.org/#donate. Cheques should be made payable to Rotary Club of Oak Bay, Treasurer, 1155 St. Peter’s Close, Victoria, B.C., V8P 5T8. Helped by the efforts of local Rotary

clubs and Rotary International, the number of polio deaths or cases of paralysis has been reduced from 1,000 people a day in 125 countries in 1988 to just 223 cases in three countries worldwide in 2012. Tax receipts from Rotary International will be issued for donations of $50 or more. reporter@vicnews.com

Oak Bay will get its first arts laureate, now that council has approved contributing $2,500 towards the position. Mayor Nils Jensen will initially appoint a local artist to serve in the position until November 2014. From then on, a subcommittee will be formed to accept and screen applicants, and recommendations will be forwarded to council for final consideration. The appointment will be for three years, to coincide with municipal elections. “I know a number of people who are inter- Janet Rogers ested,” Jensen said, adding he will make a decision in the coming weeks. “I have spoken to a few different people in the last couple of months.” Last week, council gave Jensen the authority to appoint an arts laureate because of the abbreviated term the person will be serving. Janet Marie Rogers is the City of Victoria’s third poet laureate. She is paid a $2,500 annual honorarium over three years and has a budget of $1,000. Rogers is tasked by the city to produce a minimum of three new original works annually that reflect or represent ideas and issues of importance to Victorians.

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the helmet and tried to run away, the man reportedly grabbed the boy’s vest. The boy broke free and ran into the school. The student was unharmed. The suspect is described as age 20 to 30, approximately 6’5” and very thin, wearing a black hoodie, blue jeans and bright green runners. He had a black eye, along with bruises and scratches on his face. He may have been wearing an eye patch. The suspect is believed to have left on a bike and may

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Deer sign receives thumbs-down from council South section of Foul Bay Road a frequent crossing path for deer Christopher Sun News staff

Christopher Sun/News staff

Marion Cumming holds a sign she hopes the municipality will place along Foul Bay Road, which has a lot of deer crossings. She presented the sign to Oak Bay council last week.

An Oak Bay deer lover hopes a road sign she designed and had created will be placed along a lowspeed stretch of Foul Bay Road, telling drivers to slow down. Marion Cumming presented a red-and-white sign reading, “Please Slow Down” with a picture of a deer on it, to Oak Bay council at its Oct. 15 meeting. She admits having driven faster than the 30

km/h speed limit on Foul Bay Road between Oak Bay Avenue and Fairfield Road in past, until learning it is a heavily used pathway for the animals. “When I found out it is a deer crossing, I slowed down,” Cumming said, adding that most people speed along it. “People don’t think there is any reason to slow down to 30 km/h.” Cumming spent $125 to create the sign. If people knew there were deer in the area, she said, they would slow down and follow the speed limit. However, council wasn’t enthusiastic about adopting it for use. “We already have deer warning signs on some of our roads,” said Mayor Nils Jensen. “We always try

to have standardized signs to limit visual pollution.” Jensen later said it is a challenge creating and placing signs, because too many can cause confusion and often leads to them being ignored. While Jensen recalled seeing a deer caution sign on the stretch of Foul Bay, superintendent of public works Phil Barnett confirmed there are none. Cumming, undeterred, said another sign would add something different to catch people’s attention. She also spoke to Oak Bay’s engineering department and was told it’s really up to council. “The next step is I will go back to council,” she added. “The design, the engineer said, is up to council.” reporter@vicnews.com

Prostate cancer proving to be a tough nut to crack Two UVic scientists tackle cancer using high-tech techniques Edward Hill News staff

Frank van Veggel places a small vial of clear liquid in the path of a laser and it glows neon green, proof of the microscopic nanoparticles inside. Nanoparticles, objects on the scale of a billionth of a metre, could be the ticket to better imaging of tumours and possibly as a delivery system to kill the cancer itself. The chemistry professor is developing the technology at his UVic lab in partnership with the Victoria branch of the B.C. Cancer Agency. Currently, the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal exams are the most common ways to detect prostate cancer. PSA tests look for changes in PSA levels over time – a rapid increase could indicate cancer, or it could be something unrelated. Digital rectal exams examine changes and irregularities in the prostate, which may or may not mean the disease is present. A biopsy typically is needed to confirm cancer. “It’s complicated to have spe-

cific tests for prostate cancer. That tells us it is a huge challenge,” van Veggel says. Van Veggel started talking with the BCCA on using nanoparticles about a decade ago, and since then has received eight patents and has two more under review related to developing nanotechnology for imaging. He’s figured out ways to attach nanoparticles, all made of rare earth elements, to an antibody that will seek out diseased prostate tissue. Those nanoparticles in turn will emit light in an MRI imaging machine, or could even be engineered to carry bits of radioactive material directly into the tumour, offering Frank van Veggel highly focused radiation thervative Radiation Therapy and apy that could reduce its toxic Informatics, which seeks novel side effects. ways to improve outcomes for “With high magnetic fields (like cancer patients. in an MRI), there are no good “We are always looking for contrast agents. That’s where nanoparticles have a clear advan- new technologies and new ideas to help with the diagnosis and tage,” van Veggel says. “I see the treatment of cancer patients. It’s antibody is a vehicle and the why Frank’s nanoparticle work is nanoparticle is the cargo. The interesting to us,” Beckham says. antibody delivers the nanopartiHe notes, however, that testing cle which is used in imaging, and nanotechnology in humans is still hopefully in the future, (radiayears down the road. tion) therapy as well.” Van Veggel still needs to definiWayne Beckham, head of meditively show that nanoparticles cal physics for the B.C. Cancer will flush from the body, aren’t Agency-Vancouver Island, works with the agency’s Centre for Inno- toxic and are better than exist-

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ing imaging agents. Van Veggel says nanotechnology in humans is like drug development – it can take 15 years before it hits the market. “Frank’s got to finish his work on how nanoparticles respond in cell systems ... before its used in humans,” Beckham says. “We think this has a lot of potential. It’s why we are interested in working with Frank. It’s interesting enough to put in the time and effort to move this to the next phase.”

The sound of a tumour

UVic mechanical engineering professor Rodney Herring has spent the last 10 years designing and building the most powerful electron microscope on Earth, a device that was opened to researchers last month. As a project off the side of his desk for eight years, Herring has also developed a device to detect and diagnose prostate cancer using sound waves, similar to beams used in an ultrasound. His device focuses high frequency sound onto a prostate – a lumpy green artificial version so far – and the reflected, scattered signals are measured and used to build an image of prostate tissue. “(The medical imaging tool) ... not only sees the diseased tis-

sue, it can diagnose the state of the diseased tissue,” Herring says. “I believe the same device can treat the diseased tissue and monitor the process. It’s like four machines in one.” Engineer Peter Jacquemin has tested and refined the device, and its software and hardware. The proof of concept is complete, but Herring needs several hundred thousand dollars to test the technology on actual cancerous prostate tissue and to shrink the cumbersome prototype to the size of a wand. Securing consistent funding has been difficult, but if the device can find backers and reach a stage of human testing, it could replace the PSA blood test with a tool that provides quick, clear diagnoses, Herring says. “Studies show PSA levels have no bearing on cancer in the prostate,” he says. “The only way is to go in and remove tissue. It is a major disease of men. It’s why we need a better method and why we are focusing on the prostate. “I don’t need to do this project, but I’ve made it personal and given it a high priority ... I think this solves the prostate problem. There isn’t another method where you can see the disease and diagnose the diseased region. This has a high potential to save lives.” editor@saanichnews.com

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Execs, staff roll up sleeves Dr. Brendan Carr, president and CEO of Island Health, receives a flu shot at the Patient Care Centre from nurse Pat Ashton. Hospital staff were first to get their shots, while free flu shot clinics for at-risk populations begin Oct. 28. For locations and criteria, visit viha.ca/flu.

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Continued from Page A1 She also recites poems at various civic events and hosts a number of events each year. “It’s like having a lawyer on retainer,” Rogers said about the position. “I’m like a poet on retainer.” A highlight of her appointment was being able to pen the official Victoria 150 poem, “Lekwungen Land,” she added. Rogers also offered advice to those overseeing Oak Bay’s new artist laureate position. She said the three-year term is the perfect amount of time for such appointments and that the position should be somewhat fluid in terms of expectations and duties, because new ideas often emerge with each appointed laureate. “In your first year, you’re freaked out, figuring out what is this position and what I can do?” Rogers said. “The second year, you feel more grounded and you have a full understanding of what is expected of you and what you can do in the position. Next year, I’ll be coming out full force.” The Oak Bay position is unpaid and will have a budget of $7,500 over three years to organize and co-ordinate events and projects that will enhance arts and culture in the community. Funding will be shared equally by the municipality, Oak Bay Tourism and the Oak Bay Business Improvement Association. reporter@vicnews.com

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Steps urged to curb problem gambling Limit access to booze, cash, high-risk slot machines: report Jeff Nagel Black Press

B.C. does too little to fight problem gambling, according to provincial health officer Dr. Perry Kendall. Among the steps he recommended to tackle the problem are making it harder to get alcohol and cash in casinos to removing the most addictive high-risk slot machines. Kendall analyzed the health impacts of gambling in preparing his annual report, titled Lower the Stakes. Among the findings, B.C. underspends other provinces in prevention and treatment for problem gambling – it invests about half the national average per capita. Liquor access is one area of risk the province could tighten, Kendall said, perhaps through reduced hours of alcohol service at casinos or by raising drink prices. Gambling delivers endorphins that stimulate pleasure centres of the brain, he says. “If you (add alcohol) to the mix and you’ve got an ATM there with an unlimited cash amount, you’ve got a scenario where people are going to behave less and less responsibly.” Banning ATMs or

requiring players to set an advance limit on what they might spend is another idea advanced in the report. It also zeroes in on high-risk electronic gaming machines – the slots designed by manufacturers to generate the most compulsive behaviour. Kendall suggested they be replaced with lower-risk models and urged the province to post the risk rating on each machine so gamblers could choose a lower risk option. Gerald Thomas of the Centre for Addictions Research, a co-author of the report, said the province has high-, medium- and low-risk ratings for all slot machines in B.C. casinos and should disclose how many it has of each.

Kendall noted government is in a conflict of interest because it relies heavily on gambling revenue, but is also responsible for protecting vulnerable citizens. “This is a public health issue,” he said, adding the time may be right for a “fulsome discussion on the benefits and the risks” of gambling, in light of rejections of new casinos over the past two years by Surrey and Vancouver. According to 2007 statistics, 3.7 per cent of B.C. residents are at “moderate risk” and 0.9 per cent are classified as problem gamblers. Kendall noted the two groups account for 26 per cent of total gambling revenue despite making up less

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than five per cent of the population. There are 160,000 gamblers in the two risky groups but only 4,000 calls per year to a problem gambling helpline, suggesting the number of people who could be helped is “much higher.” Kendall argues B.C. Lottery Corp. could do more to identify problem gamblers – possibly using data on their gambling gathered through a loyalty card program – and then dispatching staff to attempt treatment interventions. It also suggests students in Grades 10 to 12 be warned of the dangers of gambling. editor@oakbaynews.com

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OAK BAYNEWS

EDITORIAL

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Laura Lavin Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The OAK BAY NEWS is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-480-3239 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Gambling policy at odds with health The B.C. government collects significant revenue from gambling in all of its forms, yet is also responsible for protecting its most vulnerable citizens. Such a quandary places at odds a finance ministry charged with balancing the provincial budget with a health ministry whose mandate is to not only care for the sick, but to promote wellness within the population. Provincial Health Officer Dr. Perry Kendall’s report outlining the government’s shortcomings in addressing problem gambling in B.C. raised our eyebrows. Not only did the document paint a vivid picture of how addiction develops – primarily, but not limited to fast-play electronic slot machines – it hinted at problems which may develop in future, such as the online grooming of teens and young adults to become regular gamblers. For as long as there have been outcomes to bet on in this province, whether it be mah-jong, horse races, 6/49 tickets or sports games, a certain segment of the population has taken that opportunity to the extreme and spent more than they should on the pastime. For decades, the B.C. Lottery Corporation has promoted gambling in various forms, while only relatively recently adding the tagline to its ads, “Know your limit, play within it.” Clearly, the government has little appetite to distance itself from what has become a major cash cow that funds a broad spectrum of services. The best way to solve the problem gamblers conundrum is to create an arm’s-length organization to work with the health ministry and University of Victoria-based Centre for Addictions Research to create resources and solutions aimed at reducing the effect of problem gambling on B.C. residents. Such a group would report directly to the legislature and, in theory, be free from the political interference that tends to seep into ministry-led research or initiatives. That B.C. lags well behind other provinces in funding prevention and treatment programs for addicted gamblers proves how low it is on the Liberals’ priority list. It’s time for the government to take its collective head out of the sand on this issue and take real steps to address this growing problem. What do you think? Give us your comments by email: editor@oakbaynews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The OAK BAY NEWS is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009

B.C. oil spill study misinterpreted the entire time, without a whisper The release of the B.C. of protest or media attention, even government’s detailed study into after the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster oil spill response capability off the near the oil’s point of West Coast created the origin. usual brief wave of media The current narrative, shock and horror. hammered home by U.S.This just in! If crude controlled environmental oil spilled in the Dixon groups and their Entrance, the stormaboriginal partners in the tossed sea lane north “Great Bear Rainforest,” is of Haida Gwaii, the that only Canadian oil is a combined resources threat. of Canadian and U.S. How much Alaska containment and crude is shipped down collection response could Tom Fletcher the B.C. coast? According only recover an estimated B.C. Views to Nuka’s analysis, it’s four per cent of it. And currently about 38 million that’s in the summer! cubic metres each year. The winter recovery rate That’s enough to fill B.C. Place would be more like three per cent. stadium to the roof – 15 times. Talk radio and website headlines The Sierra-Greenpeaceset the narrative in minutes. ForestEthics-Dogwood gang, a How could anyone even consider sort of billionaire-bankrolled green running oil tankers through that Team America, has worked hard pristine B.C. coastal area? It’s crazy! to promote the falsehood that “tar Here’s the big fact clearly stated sands” oil is vastly worse than in the study by U.S.-based Nuka that nice fair-trade Alaska stuff. Research and Planning Group, Their claims about acidity and and ignored by most of the media abrasiveness of diluted bitumen and public: there are hundreds of didn’t hold up, and it’s still hotly tankers filled with crude oil sailing contested whether the heavy oil through these stormy seas every year. It’s been going on since Alaska in diluted bitumen would float, emulsify or sink in actual sea North Slope crude was developed conditions. in the 1970s. When the federal government Six of the seven oil spill announced a study to determine simulations run by Nuka are based what spilled bitumen would do on Alaska crude, because that’s in North Coast waters, that too overwhelmingly what has been was attacked by the Green Party shipped along B.C.’s North Coast as a secret scheme to prop up for 40 years. This lack of crude oil spill response capability has existed Enbridge’s pipeline proposal. So it’s

a scandal when you don’t know the answers, and it’s a scandal when you try to find them. Another question that gets little attention is whether it’s better for spilled oil to sink rather than wash up on beaches. Crude oil is, if you’ll pardon the expression, organic. Spills produce a huge spike in oil-eating bacteria that leads to an increase in fish populations at a certain stage. This was documented in a 1994 book called Degrees of Disaster, written by an expert who stayed on in Valdez for four years, long after the TV cameras and grandstanding politicians went home. Victoria-based Dogwood seized on a 2012 Nuka study done for the Haisla Nation at Kitimat, which found that in ocean conditions that are present more than half of the time, there would be no immediate way to respond to a spill at sea. Dogwood’s “no tankers campaign director” hinted that this information was intentionally left out of the B.C. government study, and the media ate it up. No tankers? Better check again. Dogwood’s mission is clearly not to protect the B.C. coast from oil spills. If it were, they would be protesting the ongoing risk from Alaska tankers. Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalNews.com Twitter:@tomfletcherbc E-mail: tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Hundreds of tankers per year filled with Alaska crude sail through B.C. waters.’


OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, October 23, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A7



LETTERS

Fence idea wrong People come Re: Oak Bay to consider new offleash area (News Oct. 16). We have just opened the Oak Bay News and were shocked at the headline. So, someone wants to fence in our park on Oakdowne Road. We not only live on Oakdowne Road, but were born and went to school in Oak Bay. We came back after a 20 year absence and have resided on Oakdowne Road for 24 years. This is the first time we have heard of this plan that was submitted by the South Oak Bay Windsor Park Dog Group. We do not have a computer. We own two corgis, one of which is a registered medical service dog. After being on duty 24 hours a day, he needs to have time off to run freely and safely within walking distance of our home. Not only do we walk our dogs in the park but our adult children, grandchildren and greatgrandchild also enjoy the park.

Over the past years, the parks department have added a wooden bench and a lined garbage can. Both items are greatly appreciated, but a fence? Get real people. If this goes ahead there will no longer be families playing baseball, bocce ball or pick-up football. When a ball goes over the fence onto the road this becomes a safety issue. In the aforementioned issue of the Oak Bay News there is a notice of a committee of the whole meeting on the last page in small type regarding the dog management report. As we cannot attend in-person, we want to say – leave our park alone. And a big thank you to the parks department staff for all the time and effort they put into mowing the lawn, planting new trees as well as watering in the summer. A job well done to each and everyone. Aleda Bates and family Oak Bay

Don’t spend our tax dollars on indulgences Re: Oak Bay to consider new offleash area (News Oct. 16). The article said that Oak Bay council is considering more offleash areas for dogs, and the expenditure of public funds to fence those areas for the benefit of dog owners. It also reported that “Oak Bay residents love their dogs.” I am an Oak Bay resident. When I was a child my family owned two dogs. I have worked around dogs that served a useful purpose in the agricultural industry. I respect dogs, and I must acknowledge the love affair that some people in our society have with their dogs as pets. However, I do not have a love affair with any member of the canine species, and I firmly believe that dogs that serve no useful purpose in our society are

no more necessary to it that yet another body tattoo. Simply put, dogs that perform no necessary purpose are a dog owner’s indulgence or hobby. I am absolutely opposed to Oak Bay council using my tax dollars to support someone else’s hobby or indulgence. I have never asked government to contribute financially to any of my hobbies or indulgences, and I don’t want government to contribute my hard earned tax dollars to someone else’s. If a dog is so poorly managed that it cannot be controlled effectively by its owner without being on a leash, then the dog should continue to be kept on the leash. Bruce Filan Oak Bay

before dogs

I’ve lived in many cities in a variety of countries around the world and I’ve never seen anything like the Oak Bay dog worship. I like dogs, but I also like people. Kids especially, need mess-free grass to run around in. And even though local dog owners are very good about picking up after their pets, there’s always an ugly residue. Please, a dozen off-leash parks is surely sufficient for our canine friends and their doting owners. Jose Naranja Oak Bay

Oak Bay’s Uplands residents are no better protected Re: OCP lacks teeth on building size (Letters Oct. 16). I applaud the person who wrote that longtime residents of this community don’t count any more This is looking more and more apparent. However, this person is mistaken in believing that residents of the Uplands are any better off. We have lived in Oak Bay (Uplands) for many years and naively thought that the special bylaws and guidelines were there to protect the Uplands parkland and its residents. However, it appears that these rules are merely for decoration purposes since neither council nor the unelected design panel shows much interest in applying them properly. The inappropriate construction happening next door to us and the War Memorial is a classic example of how rules, regulations and residents alike are being ignored by this council in its overzealous expansion plans. The next election is a long way off, but hopefully it won’t be too late by then for residents to change things. This is about the only change in Oak Bay which would appear to make any sense to me. Paul Worsley Oak Bay

What do you think?

Enforcement will solve dog issues Re: Oak Bay to consider new off-leash area (News Oct. 16). Oakdowne Park is a sloped green expanse in a neighbourhood with a growing younger population. The only two amenities in the park besides a bench and a garbage can for dog poo is a paved pathway. Currently, there are multiple users including any number of owners with off-leash dogs. This park doesn’t need to be fenced. What it does need is enforcement of current animal bylaws and the addition of playground equipment for children. Jonathan M. Churchill Oak Bay

Capital Regional District

Applications/Nominations for Membership Water Advisory Committee The Capital Regional District (CRD) invites applications/ nominations from residents interested in sitting on the Water Advisory Committee to provide advice on water supply, water quality, the stewardship of the lands held by the CRD for water supply purposes and water conservation measures. There are vacancies for members representing Agricultural, Environmental, and Commercial/Industrial groups and organizations. Meetings are held at 9 am on the first Tuesday of each month at CRD Integrated Water Services office, 479 Island Highway, Victoria, BC. Appointments will be for a two (2) year term commencing January 2014. Send us a one-page summary telling about yourself, which interest group you represent, your area of expertise, and why you would like to serve on the committee. Deadline for receipt of applications is October 30, 2013. For a copy of the Terms of Reference contact CRD Integrated Water Services at the address below or visit our website: http://www.crd.bc.ca/water/ administration/advisorycommittee.htm . Mail, fax or email your application to: Water Advisory Committee CRD Integrated Water Services Phone: 250.474.9606 479 Island Highway Fax: 250.474.4012 Victoria, BC V9B 1H7 Email: water@crd.bc.ca

Email editor@oakbaynews.com

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Regina captures crown again The Mustard Seed food bank raised more than 46,000 pounds of food last week as part of the fifth annual Great Canadian Food Fight. The 48-hour event included food and cash donation stations at Ogden Point, Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre, The Bay Centre and grocery stores and fire halls across Greater Victoria. “I can’t thank this community enough for their support,” said Brent Palmer, food bank director. “Though our final total raised was lower than we Brent Palmer had hoped, it all goes toward helping our community in need as we head into winter.” Five other Canadian food banks competed in this year’s event including Regina, Halifax and Waterloo, Ont. The Great Canadian Food Fight is a national initiative to raise awareness about hunger and help food banks across Canada fill their shelves in preparation for winter months. For more info on the Mustard Seed, please call 250-953-1575. editor@oakbaynews.com

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www.vicnews.com • A9

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Island Health top target for complaints in B.C. More than 1,100 patient grievances were recorded against the former Vancouver Island Health Authority last year Island Health garnered more Patient Care Quality Office. We complaints than any other actively promote this throughhealth authority in B.C. last year, out the health authority.” Complaints are but officials say it’s logged, allowing simply a sign the proIsland Health to keep cess is working. better track of patient The Patient Care concerns, she said. Quality Review Board Kelly Bradley, received 1,122 comwhose daughter was plaints about Island discharged premaHealth (formerly Vanturely after requiring couver Island Health emergency mental Authority) in the past health services at Vicyear, however only 12 toria General Hospital of those complaints were accepted for Daniel Palmer last January, was glad Reporting to see several recomreview by the board. mendations in the The highest number of complaints were related to board’s report. They include an assurance patient care concerns. But the higher incidents are that emergency room doctors nothing to be ashamed of, said keep patients for observation spokeswoman Sarah Plank. or therapy before discharging Rather, it’s a sign health officials them when necessary, and that are following proper reporting acute care patients receive adequate follow-up from doctors. procedures, she said. “(Board members) were the “If someone is not able to resolve a concern with the care first people we contacted,” Bradteam directly, we would strongly ley said. “I think this is a positive thing. encourage them to contact our

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We didn’t even have the emergency room doctor talk to us the last few times we went to the hospital. … I just hope other families won’t have to experience what we’ve experienced now.” Plank pointed out over 99 per cent of the complaints were resolved at the local level, while eight recommendations, including those that stemmed from Bradley’s complaint, have all been addressed. “This is out of well over 500,000 patient encounters in just our hospitals alone last year, and thousands more through our community and residential services,” Plank said. In comparison, Fraser Health, which administers Lower Mainland health care, received 1,008 complaints and Vancouver Coastal Health received 943 complaints. To learn more, visit patientcarequalityreviewboard.ca or call 1-866-236-5544. dpalmer@vicnews.com

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A10 • www.vicnews.com

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death from a Victorian point of view. Actors will fill the space on the third floor of the provincial museum with characters. A pair of Pioneer Players will porsign in Old Town at the Royal tray mourning widows while others offer B.C. Museum formed a ghost gothic readings of Victorian poems and of an idea in Kim Gough’s stories. mind. A lovelorn fortune teller – popular in “Mourning orders given Victorian times – will try to lure guests into prompt attention,” it reads. traditional games and activities. Black dresses, veils, handkerchiefs and “This thought that spirits are closer to widow’s-wear laid out for the Halloween the earth this time of year gave people the season inspired a social event with a hint opportunity to reach out to them,” Gough of education: Night Shift: Living and said. “(Mediums) really became this craze. Dying in Victorian Times. A lot of it however, was parlour tricks and “This is the first time I’ve tried to slip theatrics. It became an opportunity to persome learning in there,” said Gough. “I form.” wanted to find an event where people A short-sighted medium will bring her may have had no conscious intent for brand of treachery offering a Victorian-era learning.” séance. She knows adults want an excuse to “You can’t talk about spirits and not talk ROYAL BC MUSEUM PHOTO be part of the education program, having about how it affected the living,” Gough Felicity, the Lovelorn Fortune Teller, as portrayed by actor Megan Anderson, will lure guests seen parents and caregivers look wistfully said. into Victorian games during the Royal B.C. Museum’s adult-only event Night Shift: Living on during children and family programs. and Dying in Victorian Times. Magestic Theatre will become the lecShe calls Night Shift: Living and Dying in ture theatre, featuring seriously spooky but Victorian Times a “Wonder Sunday for true tales from a collections manager, an of each month. insight into characters and customs from grownups.”   archivist and an archaeologist.   In the adults-only version, D.J. Primitive the past. Wonder Sunday is an interactive, learnCollections manager Delphine Castles and Bucan Bucan provide the live The Halloween-themed event introduces ing-based event geared toward kids and will show the meaning hidden in the soundtrack as costumed players offer experts extolling true tales of life and families that happens on the last Sunday mourning clothing of early Victorians. “She’s going to talk about the clothing and … how it passed along messages about how to behave and how to treat (widows).” Archivist Ann ten Cate will share some of the tragic stories found in the B.C. Coroners’ reports, preserved at the B.C. Archives, and University of Victoria archaeologist Erin McGuire will show how she uncovers death as revealed in the archaeological record. The Royal B.C. Museum hosts Night Shift: Living and Dying in Victorian Times on Oct. 25, and the evening includes a cash bar and light snacks. An evening of solidarity and hope, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Guests are invited to Society’s annual Light The Night Walk supports vital blood arrive between 7 and cancer research and patient services across Canada. 8 p.m. to view other exhibits, then enjoy the party in Old Town UVic, Parking Lot 10 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $30 and Heating water accounts for about 20 per cent of are available only in Presenting your home’s energy use. Choosing a high-efficiency Sponsor advance. natural gas model offers plenty of hot water when Participants must you need it—plus savings on your energy costs. be 19 years of age or Rebates are available. older and photo ID will be required for entry. Discover the benefits and cost Visit royalbcmuseum. savings of natural gas water heating bc.ca for more information and to purat fortisbc.com/naturalgaswaterheater. chase tickets. Walk to make a change. Register today as an individual or team cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

pretty low place,” he said. But through writing and recording his music, supported by a talented group of friends and musicians, he managed to break through the sadness. “I’ve always written about what’s going on with me; I don’t think this album carries in that way. The subject matter varies a bit but I tried to balance with some moments of life,” Francey said. “I’ve always had the feeling that, if you keep marching, you’ll get through to the other side. “None of the music is dark, sad or dreary. When I introduce songs (on stage) I try to make them a little bit funny, and I think that helps to balance off the weight of the lyrics.” Francey performs at Hermann’s Jazz Club next Tuesday and Wednesday. Showtime both nights is 8 p.m. Tickets ($29.50) are available at hightideconcerts.net, rmts.bc.ca or in-person at the McPherson Playhouse box office, Ditch Records or Lyle’s Place.

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www.vicnews.com • A11

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, October 23, 2013

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F

olk singer-songwriter David Francey says he’s looking forward to coming to Victoria next week (Oct. 29/30) as part of his lengthy cross-Canada tour. “I’ve been there so many times over the years. There’s quite a number of people there I certainly recognize by sight who come out to the shows. “It’s always an excellent crowd in Victoria – they have a good time, they like to sing along,” Francey said. “The city itself is absolutely beautiful. It’s a nice place to spend some time.” Francey and his band are currently driving across the country, stopping everywhere from tiny Hunter River, PEI to Toronto, in support of his new album So Say We All. Francey, 58, says the album was written during a period of his life where he was going

David Francey.

through some deeply emotional experiences. “I lost my best friend in the world and I ended up in a

MONDAY’S TOP PICKS FOR yOUR WEEK MORe OnLine: mondaymag.com/calendar

calendar Stage fri. oct. 25 Frankenstein -Victor Frankenstein’s creation is assembled from strange chemicals and old body parts, animated by a mysterious spark. The grotesque monster enters life with the mind of a newborn, trying desperately to fit in, yet is shunned by everyone. Ballet Victoria presents a touching twist to a gothic tale told through classical and contemporary choreography and music. Three shows only at McPherson Playhouse. Tickets at the Royal and McPherson box offices, 250-386-6121 and online at rmts.bc.ca. Until Oct. 27.

eventS thurs. oct. 24 J Mclaughlin solo exhibition - Polychrome Fine Art invites you to attend INSTANT: J Mclaughlin solo exhibition of paintings. Opening Thurs. Oct. 24 , 7-9 pm until Nov. 7. Polychrome is located at 977-A Fort St. polychromefinearts. com.

sat. oct. 26 Japanese cultural Festival - The Victoria Nikkei Cultural Society presents the 14th annual celebration of Japanese culture at the Esquimalt Recreation Centre. The family friendly event is free and runs from 10 am to 4 pm. vncs.ca. art oF the cocktail - The Victoria Film Festival presents its fifth annual festival celebrating all things cocktail with workshops

from industry leaders, tastings and competitions. The Grand Tasting is at Crystal Gardens Oct. 26 featuring restaurants and distillieries from across the Pacific Northwest. More information and complete schedule at artofthecocktail.ca. Until Oct. 28. auntie kate workshop Victoria blues singer ‘Auntie Kate’ Roland will work with aspiring vocalists on a broad range of vocal techniques at a workshop presented by the Victoria Blues Society, Oct. 26., 2 to 4pm at Long and McQuade Music Education Centre, 2822 Nanaimo St. Free. victoriabluessociety.ca.

MuSic thurs. oct. 24 sarah brightMan - The bright and airy voice of Sarah Brightman lights up Save-on-Foods Memorial Centre. 7:30pm. Selectyourtickets. com.

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sit Down, servant!! - The Victoria Jazz Society presents Sit Down, Servant!! with Lee Harvey Osmond. 7:30pm at Alix Goolden Hall (907 Pandora). Tickets are $35 at rmts. bc.ca or 250-386-6121.

fri. oct. 25 atoMic vauDeville’s Fall cabaret - Victoria’s favourite Vaudevillian sketch comedy troupe presents its annual Fall cabaret at the Victoria Event Centre (1415 Broad). Oct. 25-26, 31 and Nov. 2. Doors at 7:30pm, show at 8pm. Tickets are $18/22/35 at ticketrocket.org or 250590-6291.

sat. oct. 26 seriously FaMous - The DieMahler Chamber Music Ensemble presents Seriously Famous. 2:30pm at St. Mary the Virgin Church (1701 Elgin). Tickets are $25 at rmts.bc.ca or 250-386-6121. pablodiemecke.com.

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death from a Victorian point of view. Actors will fill the space on the third floor of the provincial museum with characters. A pair of Pioneer Players will porsign in Old Town at the Royal tray mourning widows while others offer B.C. Museum formed a ghost gothic readings of Victorian poems and of an idea in Kim Gough’s stories. mind. A lovelorn fortune teller – popular in “Mourning orders given Victorian times – will try to lure guests into prompt attention,” it reads. traditional games and activities. Black dresses, veils, handkerchiefs and “This thought that spirits are closer to widow’s-wear laid out for the Halloween the earth this time of year gave people the season inspired a social event with a hint opportunity to reach out to them,” Gough of education: Night Shift: Living and said. “(Mediums) really became this craze. Dying in Victorian Times. A lot of it however, was parlour tricks and “This is the first time I’ve tried to slip theatrics. It became an opportunity to persome learning in there,” said Gough. “I form.” wanted to find an event where people A short-sighted medium will bring her may have had no conscious intent for brand of treachery offering a Victorian-era learning.” séance. She knows adults want an excuse to “You can’t talk about spirits and not talk ROYAL BC MUSEUM PHOTO be part of the education program, having about how it affected the living,” Gough Felicity, the Lovelorn Fortune Teller, as portrayed by actor Megan Anderson, will lure guests seen parents and caregivers look wistfully said. into Victorian games during the Royal B.C. Museum’s adult-only event Night Shift: Living on during children and family programs. and Dying in Victorian Times. Magestic Theatre will become the lecShe calls Night Shift: Living and Dying in ture theatre, featuring seriously spooky but Victorian Times a “Wonder Sunday for true tales from a collections manager, an of each month. insight into characters and customs from grownups.”   archivist and an archaeologist.   In the adults-only version, D.J. Primitive the past. Wonder Sunday is an interactive, learnCollections manager Delphine Castles and Bucan Bucan provide the live The Halloween-themed event introduces ing-based event geared toward kids and will show the meaning hidden in the soundtrack as costumed players offer experts extolling true tales of life and families that happens on the last Sunday mourning clothing of early Victorians. “She’s going to talk about the clothing and … how it passed along messages about how to behave and how to treat (widows).” Archivist Ann ten Cate will share some of the tragic stories found in the B.C. Coroners’ reports, preserved at the B.C. Archives, and University of Victoria archaeologist Erin McGuire will show how she uncovers death as revealed in the archaeological record. The Royal B.C. Museum hosts Night Shift: Living and Dying in Victorian Times on Oct. 25, and the evening includes a cash bar and light snacks. An evening of solidarity and hope, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Guests are invited to Society’s annual Light The Night Walk supports vital blood arrive between 7 and cancer research and patient services across Canada. 8 p.m. to view other exhibits, then enjoy the party in Old Town UVic, Parking Lot 10 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $30 and Heating water accounts for about 20 per cent of are available only in Presenting your home’s energy use. Choosing a high-efficiency Sponsor advance. natural gas model offers plenty of hot water when Participants must you need it—plus savings on your energy costs. be 19 years of age or Rebates are available. older and photo ID will be required for entry. Discover the benefits and cost Visit royalbcmuseum. savings of natural gas water heating bc.ca for more information and to purat fortisbc.com/naturalgaswaterheater. chase tickets. Walk to make a change. Register today as an individual or team cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

pretty low place,” he said. But through writing and recording his music, supported by a talented group of friends and musicians, he managed to break through the sadness. “I’ve always written about what’s going on with me; I don’t think this album carries in that way. The subject matter varies a bit but I tried to balance with some moments of life,” Francey said. “I’ve always had the feeling that, if you keep marching, you’ll get through to the other side. “None of the music is dark, sad or dreary. When I introduce songs (on stage) I try to make them a little bit funny, and I think that helps to balance off the weight of the lyrics.” Francey performs at Hermann’s Jazz Club next Tuesday and Wednesday. Showtime both nights is 8 p.m. Tickets ($29.50) are available at hightideconcerts.net, rmts.bc.ca or in-person at the McPherson Playhouse box office, Ditch Records or Lyle’s Place.

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olk singer-songwriter David Francey says he’s looking forward to coming to Victoria next week (Oct. 29/30) as part of his lengthy cross-Canada tour. “I’ve been there so many times over the years. There’s quite a number of people there I certainly recognize by sight who come out to the shows. “It’s always an excellent crowd in Victoria – they have a good time, they like to sing along,” Francey said. “The city itself is absolutely beautiful. It’s a nice place to spend some time.” Francey and his band are currently driving across the country, stopping everywhere from tiny Hunter River, PEI to Toronto, in support of his new album So Say We All. Francey, 58, says the album was written during a period of his life where he was going

David Francey.

through some deeply emotional experiences. “I lost my best friend in the world and I ended up in a

MONDAY’S TOP PICKS FOR yOUR WEEK MORe OnLine: mondaymag.com/calendar

calendar Stage fri. oct. 25 Frankenstein -Victor Frankenstein’s creation is assembled from strange chemicals and old body parts, animated by a mysterious spark. The grotesque monster enters life with the mind of a newborn, trying desperately to fit in, yet is shunned by everyone. Ballet Victoria presents a touching twist to a gothic tale told through classical and contemporary choreography and music. Three shows only at McPherson Playhouse. Tickets at the Royal and McPherson box offices, 250-386-6121 and online at rmts.bc.ca. Until Oct. 27.

eventS thurs. oct. 24 J Mclaughlin solo exhibition - Polychrome Fine Art invites you to attend INSTANT: J Mclaughlin solo exhibition of paintings. Opening Thurs. Oct. 24 , 7-9 pm until Nov. 7. Polychrome is located at 977-A Fort St. polychromefinearts. com.

sat. oct. 26 Japanese cultural Festival - The Victoria Nikkei Cultural Society presents the 14th annual celebration of Japanese culture at the Esquimalt Recreation Centre. The family friendly event is free and runs from 10 am to 4 pm. vncs.ca. art oF the cocktail - The Victoria Film Festival presents its fifth annual festival celebrating all things cocktail with workshops

from industry leaders, tastings and competitions. The Grand Tasting is at Crystal Gardens Oct. 26 featuring restaurants and distillieries from across the Pacific Northwest. More information and complete schedule at artofthecocktail.ca. Until Oct. 28. auntie kate workshop Victoria blues singer ‘Auntie Kate’ Roland will work with aspiring vocalists on a broad range of vocal techniques at a workshop presented by the Victoria Blues Society, Oct. 26., 2 to 4pm at Long and McQuade Music Education Centre, 2822 Nanaimo St. Free. victoriabluessociety.ca.

MuSic thurs. oct. 24 sarah brightMan - The bright and airy voice of Sarah Brightman lights up Save-on-Foods Memorial Centre. 7:30pm. Selectyourtickets. com.

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sit Down, servant!! - The Victoria Jazz Society presents Sit Down, Servant!! with Lee Harvey Osmond. 7:30pm at Alix Goolden Hall (907 Pandora). Tickets are $35 at rmts. bc.ca or 250-386-6121.

fri. oct. 25 atoMic vauDeville’s Fall cabaret - Victoria’s favourite Vaudevillian sketch comedy troupe presents its annual Fall cabaret at the Victoria Event Centre (1415 Broad). Oct. 25-26, 31 and Nov. 2. Doors at 7:30pm, show at 8pm. Tickets are $18/22/35 at ticketrocket.org or 250590-6291.

sat. oct. 26 seriously FaMous - The DieMahler Chamber Music Ensemble presents Seriously Famous. 2:30pm at St. Mary the Virgin Church (1701 Elgin). Tickets are $25 at rmts.bc.ca or 250-386-6121. pablodiemecke.com.

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High-tech firms in spotlight Startups encouraged to blossom Arnold Lim Black Press

In a city known as much for its visitors as its visionaries, Victoria’s high-tech startups are stepping into the spotlight. At two years old, BackyardBC is one of those companies, combining co-founder Brian Friesen’s experience in Victoria’s

hospitality industry with the blossoming local tech industry. Friesen’s tourism site, backyardbc.com, does what online travel giants do not: promote tourism for British Columbians within B.C., with a focus on money-saving deals. “We found that travel (services) like Expedia and Travelocity became huge and in their growth got too aggressive with commission,” Friesen says. “We looked at that and said, ‘let’s collect 10-per-cent

commission and that way there is more flexibility for pricing (for hotels).’” The model targets B.C. residents who must prove their residency with valid identification. That helps BackyardBC make money by taking less from hotels, who then offer discount rates to customers. The 31-year-old Friesen, formerly with the Hotel Grand Pacific, had a readymade contact list and transferable skills to form the starting

ARESST

point. He found a techfriendly silent partner who built the website from scratch, then stretched the familiar be-a-tourist-in-yourhometown model over the entire province. “Over half the rooms in B.C. are booked by British Columbians,” he said. The obstacles to building the company from the ground up have been formidable, but with two years under their belt and aggressive plans to expand in Canada and the U.S., the partners

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Brian Friesen stands inside the Fairmont Empress Hotel, one of more than 75 hotels across British Columbia that have signed up as part of his Victoriamade tech startup BackyardBC. Arnold Lim/Black Press

hope to mimic the successful growth of other Victoria startups. One of those, indoor navigation app designer Wifarer, has grown from three employees in 2010 to 15 in a field Lise Murphy says could exceed $2 billion in revenues by 2017. “Our technology is quite groundbreaking.

We were among the first to figure out how to locate a smartphone inside (a building),” says Murphy, the firm’s vice-president of marketing. The smartphone app picks up where GPS leaves off, providing indoor navigation for airports, museums, galleries and other destinations.

The growth of Wifarer and Backyard BC is good for Victoria, says Rob Bennet, with the Victoria Advanced Technology Council. “What is really cool about Victoria is there are a number of (startups), we see five or six of those every month and it is really exciting,” he says. editor@oakbaynews.com

INFLUENZA SEASON IS HERE IMMUNIZATION CLINIC INFO

The Association for Responsible and Environmentally Sustainable Sewage Treatment

OPEN LETTER TO THE CITIZENS OF VICTORIA: YOU ARE BEING MISLED ABOUT SEWAGE TREATMENT The October 3rd media release by Georgia Strait Alliance (GSA), TBuck Suzuki Foundation (TSF), and David Suzuki Foundation (DSF) presented misinformation suggesting that Victoria’s current system of natural marine treatment needs to be replaced. In a subsequent October 4th CHEK TV news-cast, retired UVic microbiologist Dr. Ed Ishiguro presented informal test results that were neither scientifically peer-reviewed nor published. On the same newscast, CRD director Judy Brownoff cited his tests to support her promotion of the CRD’s sewage plan. ARESST offers the following documented* clarifications: • Dr. Ishiguro, GSA, TSF, and DSF compared fecal coliforms in local marine sediments to fecal coliform water standards (from Health Canada, US EPA, and WHO.)

The best way to protect yourself and your family from influenza this season is to get immunized. For more information or to find out if you are eligible for a FREE influenza shot: • visit www.viha.ca/flu • call the local Public Health Unit at 250-388-2200 (Victoria) • call HealthLink BC at 8-1-1 If you are eligible for a free influenza shot, please bring your Care Card to one of the local Influenza Clinics. Free influenza vaccine is also available from some pharmacists and physicians at any time during the influenza season. If you are not eligible for a free vaccine please contact your family physician or local pharmacy about vaccine availability and cost.

• They were negligent to apply water quality standards to evaluate sediments. Their claims of contamination and threat to human health are therefore unfounded. • Their claim that human fecal coliforms traveled 2-10 km is absurd. The marine environment is hostile to coliforms from the human gut. A peer-reviewed analysis of 1700 samples found no evidence beyond 400 metres of fecal coliforms from Victoria’s outfalls. • Fecal coliforms from plants and animals exist throughout the marine environment. Their presence in sediments off William Head or Trial Island is no more related to Victoria’s outfalls than sediment coliforms off Tofino or Alaska. At an October 9th sewage meeting, in response to a query from Director Brownoff, CRD science staff reported no problems with fecal coliforms – thus contradicting Ishiguro, GSA, TSF, DSF, and herself. The CRD offers many scientific studies online confirming that Victoria’s current method of marine treatment is essentially as effective as secondary treatment. Victoria’s system already meets the objective of the new Federal regulation because there is no evidence of a threat to fish, fish habitat or human health due to consumption of fish from the waters around Victoria. Citizens should be outraged that the majority of CRD Directors voted NOT to invite experts to explain all this evidence to the sewage committee. Citizens should be equally outraged that our elected representatives are not using this abundance of scientific evidence to make the case to Ottawa that it is senseless to continue to force Victoria to build a costly and unnecessary land-based treatment system. PAID FOR BY ARESST

*For documentation, visit aresst.ca (The Association for Responsible and Environmentally Sustainable Sewage Treatment).

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Track and field Island championships

Enter the

The Vancouver Island High School Cross Country Championships are today at Beaver Lake Park, near the entrance to the park off of Elk Lake Drive. The senior girls race at 1:30 p.m. followed by the senior boys race at 2 p.m. Liam Kennel is a favourite to win today’s boys race as he leads his team from Oak Bay High against Reynolds, Mount Douglas and Claremont, and up-Island teams Dover Bay and Carihi, for one of the four spots to go to the B.C. Championships, Nov. 2 in Langley.

Vikes soccer women host playoff quarterfinal Travis Paterson News staff

The UVic Vikes men’s and women’s soccer teams are burning through the Canada West competition with playoffs fast approaching. On Friday, the first-place Vikes women (10-2) host the eighth-place Regina Cougars (5-5-2) in the quarter-final round of the playoffs, 6 p.m. at Centennial Stadium. The Vikes capped the regular season on Saturday with its Armando Tura/Neatpicture.com seventh straight win, 4-0 over UVic Vikes midfielder Craig Gorman crashes through the fog into Lethbridge Huskies the Winnipeg Wesmen, seal- goalkeeper Tyler Boast during the Canada West match at Centennial Stadium on ing the Canada West regular Oct. 18. Gorman scored once in the Vikes’ 4-0 win. season championship. The Vikes are getting used Final Four. “It was an accomplishment looking the Cougars despite The Vikes topped the Lethfor our program to win the beating them handily, 4-0, in to playing important games league but this is a whole their only meeting this sea- at home and it gives them bridge Pronghorns 4-0 on new start,” said Vikes coach son back on Oct. 11. Goals in less to worry about. They’re Friday. Cameron Stokes conalso used to training in tinued his frenzied scoring Tracy David. “Everythe Victoria fog, which pace with his eighth goal of one is on the same may return for Friday the season. The Vikes rolled page, same level, through nearly their entire night. and the points from “In a game of such bench to rest their regulars. the regular season importance there’s a On Saturday the Vikes earned mean nothing except lot of unknowns so a come-from-behind victory for the fact we get to it’s nice to feel there’s over the Calgary Dinos 4-1. host the next game.” no distraction with Stokes scored his ninth goal A win in Friday’s (Centennial Stadium). and is currently tied with single-game elimiWe don’t have to waste UBC’s Milad Mehrabi for the nation quarter-final time thinking about Canada West goal scoring puts the Vikes into the site, we know it so lead. Hundal is tied for third the semifinal of the with eight. well.” Canada West Final The Vikes men’s Four here in Victoria, Nov. 1 to 3. Last year Armando Tura/Neatpicture.com team is on the road the Vikes advanced Mallory Hackett of the UVic Vikes, right, this weekend for its Last year’s Canada West to the CIS semifinals heads the ball in a contest with Erica final two games of the Rookie of the Year Jenna but suffered a loss Parenteau of the Saskatchewan Huskies Canada West schedule. Bugiardini paced the UVic Saturday and Sunday Vikes women’s basketball to Trinity Spartans, at Centennial Stadium on Oct. 12. the second-place Vikes team to a 77-76 exhibition win then rebounded for a bronze medal win over the that game came from Lindsay (8-3-1) are in Prince George over the visiting Wilfrid LauHoetzel, Emma Greig, Sarah against the last-place UNBC rier Golden Hawks at McKinOttawa Gee-Gees. “We are eyeing the national Douglas and Jackie Harrison. Timberwolves (2-7-3). non Gym on Sunday. BugiarThe Vikes men have quali- dini scored the Vikes’ final six “It would be nice (to score championship final but there’s lots of games to play four goals again) but as they fied for the Canada West points to win the game. She between now and then,” say, our playoffs are do-or- Final Six while first-place UBC finished with a game-high 28 die, which makes them so Thunderbirds have clinched points. David said. the right to host the men’s Her squad is not over- dangerous,” David said. sports@vicnews.com

Vikes hardcourt

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The Lambrick Park Lions senior girls volleyball team was successful in taking down top provincial talent for its third tournament win this season, coming out on top at Brentwood College. The No. 1-ranked AA Lions beat No. 1-ranked AAA Timberline in the final 25-12, 28-25. The Lions also beat G.P. Vanier, Brentwood and Belmont before taking down Pacific Christian School in the quarterfinal and Ballenas in the semifinal. One weekend prior the Lions won the Cedar tournament by defeating the hosts in the final. “Hard work beats talent, we can’t stress enough how much we work hard,” said Lions coach Chris Koutougos. “If you look at where our wins come from, we earn everything we’ve got.” There are two more weeks in the Lower Island senior girls volleyball schedule before the final power pools are decided for the region’s top tier and second tier championships, the Vic Lindal Cup and Ron Green Cup, respectively.

Red hot Victoria Cougars cooled by Nanaimo Buccaneers

The Nanaimo Buccaneers proved the Victoria Cougars are not a runaway favourite to win the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League title this year beating the Cougars 3-2 on Thursday. The Cougars (12-1-0-1) are back at it Thursday night against the Kerry Park Islanders (5-90-2), 7 p.m. at Archie Browning Sports Centre. After winning 11 straight to start the season the Cougars have lost two of the past three games. The other loss was a 4-3 double-overtime decision to the Peninsula Panthers (6-6-21) on Oct.11. The Saanich Braves (5-8-1-0) visit the Westshore Wolves (8-7-1-1) tonight, 7 p.m. at Bear Mountain Arena. The Cougars and Panthers meet again on Friday at Panorama Rec. Centre, 7:30 p.m. start. The Braves are seeking redemption as the Wolves put a sound 7-1 drubbing on the Braves at George Pearkes Arena on Friday.

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Bulldogs, Rams split double-bill Vancouver College eke out buzzer win over Belmont Travis Paterson News staff

Despite the pain of a last-second loss, there’s no time to dwell as the Belmont Bulldogs. The AAA Bulldogs (2-2) continues its B.C. High School Football campaign on the road against the Handsworth Royals (2-1) on Friday (Oct. 25) afternoon. The Vancouver College Fighting Irish (3-2) burned the Bulldogs 27-20 last Friday at Goudy Turf, scoring the winning touchdown at game’s end, and with no time on the clock. “If you were on the field, it was devastating. A great game to watch, but a really tough one to lose,” said Bulldogs coach Kevin Harrington. Both teams executed well, a treat for the spectators, which included the players from Handsworth and the Mount Douglas Rams, who played in the earlier game of the double-header. Running back Sam Varao was a “beast” for the Bulldogs, Harrington said. Though Varao didn’t score any touchdowns, he was instrumental in sparking the offence, especially on a late drive. Varao plowed through the Fighting Irish defence to set up a Josh Tipton touchdown to tie the game at 20-20 with 90 seconds left in the fourth quarter. Unfortunately, the Bulldogs couldn’t catch a break as the Irish marched downfield on a game winning drive in the last minute. “I’m proud of our guys. We have a core of Grade 12 players who lost this same (Fighting Irish) team 45-0 three years ago when they were juniors,” Harrington said. “We went in knowing we’ve improved a tonne and that we can hang with the better teams in the province.” Running back Jordan Worth recorded the Bulldogs’ other two touchdowns, a reception in the first half to make it 7-7 and another reception in the sec-

ond half. Hugo Louis kicked two of the three converts, as both team’s kickers missed a convert on three touchdowns, which led to the 20-20 draw.

Junior dogs in the house Belmont showed up on Saturday with its full complement of 23 players, missing a couple due to injury. Van College brought upwards of 60. Even the Mount Douglas Rams, with three provincial senior championships in the past four years, carry similar numbers with about 25 seniors. “It’s pretty cool to see us battle as most players are on the field all game playing offence and defence. We can’t be as specialized as the big programs (such as the Fighting Irish),” Harrington said. The junior varsity Bulldogs are in Nanaimo today against John Barsby. Last year the two junior teams played to a nil-nil draw.

Mt. Doug Rams quiet Handsworth Royals It was a battle of first versus second on paper, but AAA powerhouse Mount Douglas Rams proved far stronger as the No. 1-ranked high school football team in Canada (per Canadafootballchat.com) silenced the Royals 52-0 at Goudy Turf on Friday (Oct. 18). The Rams are on the road this week against West Vancouver Highlanders (0-5) on Friday. Last week’s win at Goudy started with a fast attack for the Rams, as the defence intercepted Royals’ passes three times in the first quarter. Defensive end Zach Wilkinson scored a rare touchdown to get the Rams on the scoreboard when he returned his interception 20 yards for the major. Alec Wong and Sean Waugh made the other interceptions. “We challenged our defensive backfield to improve over the previous week,” said coach Mark Townsend in his team report. “We had a great week of practice in preparing against a

File photo

Marcus Davis added three more touchdowns on Friday. well-coached and potent Handsworth air attack and responded extremely well.” Running back Julian Luis led the Rams defence with six tackles while the Rams sacked Handsworth’s quarterback four times. Offensively, Luis and Pato Vega each rushed for a touchdown and Luis also caught one of Ashton MacKinnon’s two TD passes. Ever-dangerous Marcus Davis was limited in his deployment. On just five touches he continued his outstanding campaign with three touchdowns, one on the rush, one a pass reception and one on the punt return, totalling 167 all-purpose yards gained. Kicker Callum Duke converted all seven touchdowns and nailed a 48-yard field goal to end the first half.

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We currently have a full time sales opportunity available for the Victoria News. Published twice weekly in print and online with a full complement of specialty supplements and features, our focus on local communities has produced positive relationships with both readers and advertisers. This is a challenging career opportunity for a result-oriented individual who enjoys working independently. Candidates for this position will possess the ability to service existing clients, develop new business and create strong marketing programs for print and on-line. You have built your career on relationships and understand the importance of consulting with clients about their objectives and developing solutions that help them achieve their goals. Ideally you have experience in a fast-paced sales or service environment with a focus on client interaction. You are creative, organized and thrive in a fastpaced, competitive market. Black Press community news media is an independent and international media group with more than 190 community, daily and urban publications, 14 press facilities and over 160 websites in B.C., Alberta, Washington, Hawaii and Ohio. You can expect a supportive work environment, competitive compensation package including full benefits and unlimited opportunity to grow your career. Candidates must have a valid drivers license and a vehicle in good working condition. Reply in confidence with resume by November 8, 2013 to; Oliver Sommer Director, Advertising Sales, Black Press 818 Broughton Street, Victoria BC V8W 1E4 e-mail: osommer@blackpress.ca Phone: 250-480-3274

250.388.3535

Thunder roll on The Spectrum Thunder (0-2) continued its trial-by-fire inaugural season with a lopsided exhibition loss to the John Barsby Bulldogs 68-0 on Oct. 11. The AA Thunder are home to the Holy Cross Crusaders (1-1) at 3 p.m. on Friday at Spectrum Community school. sports@vicnews.com

www.blackpress.ca

Moonlight

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A16 •www.oakbaynews.com www.vicnews.com A16

Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 2013 - OAK Wed, Oct 23, OakBAY Bay NEWS News

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.388.3535

$2997 plus tax

fax 250.388-0202 email classified@oakbaynews.com

SELL YOUR STUFF! Private Party Merchandise Ad 1" PHOTO + 5 LINES

BONUS! We will upload your ad to

Choose any: Black Press Community Newspapers!

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(99¢ extra lines) Runs till it sells, up to 8 weeks! Add any other Greater Victoria paper for only $9.99 each +tax

FREE!

Ask us for more info.

SOOKENEWS

MIRROR

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

TRAVEL

COMING EVENTS

GETAWAYS

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ. Fall Special. 2 nights $239 or 3 nights $299 Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

HOUSESITTING RETIRED COUPLE interested in house sitting in Oak Bay January to May or part of. Refs avail. Elaine 1-905-8623035. ebarrie@sympatico.ca

DRIVERS WANTED

AZ, DZ, 5, 3 or 1 w/ Airbrake • Guaranteed 40hr. Work Week & Overtime • Paid Travel & Lodging • Meal Allowance • 4 Weeks Vacation • Excellent Benefits Package

TIMESHARE

INFORMATION DID YOU KNOW? BBB provides complaint resolution services for all businesses and their customers. Look for the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory E-edition on your Black Press Community Newspaper website at www.blackpress.ca. You can also go to http://vi.bbb.org/directory/ and click on the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory

CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No risk program. Stop mortgage and maintenance Payments today. 100% money back guarantee. Free consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ALL CASH drink/snack vending business route. Complete training. Small invest. req’d. 1888-979-VEND (8363). www.healthydrinkvending.co

Must be able to have extended stays away from home. Up to 6 months. Must have valid AZ, DZ, 5, 3 or 1 with airbrake license and have previous commercial driving experience. Apply at:www.sperryrail.com/ careers and then choose the FastTRACK Application.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

HELP WANTED

TRAIN TO be an Apartment/Condominium Manager online! Graduates get access to all jobs posted with us. 33 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1800-665-8339, 604-681-5456.

An Alberta Oilfield Company is hiring dozer and excavator operators, Lodging and meals provided. Drug testing required. Call (780)723-5051 Edson,Alta.

REAL PEOPLE, Real Chat, Real Discreet Try FREE! 18+. Call 250-220-1300. Or visit online at: www.livelinks. com

4HEĂ–KEYĂ–TOĂ–YOURĂ– NEWĂ–#!2%%2

LOST AND FOUND FOUND: KEY (Ford key on VW fob), found at Island View Beach, Oct. 17. 250-652-2141

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

LOST: BROACH 2� long, 1� wide, very, very sentimental. Lost around Hatley Park laundry. Reward! (250)474-5514.

GETAWAYS

Marquise Hospitality is looking for a F/T Night Housekeeper / Emergency Responder at a Senior Care facility in Victoria, BC. Shifts include wkdys & wknds 11pm-7am. Emergency First Aid is required. Please send resumes to: Fax: 1-866-272-9632 Email: 1450.marquise@ hiredesk.net Website for full posting: http://www.marquise.ca/ careers.php

TRADES, TECHNICAL

VOLUNTEERS

AUTOMATED TANK Manufacturing Inc. located in Kitscoty, Alberta, is looking for experienced welders. Competitive wages, profit sharing bonus plus manufacturing bonus incentive. Full insurance package 100% paid by company. Good working environment. Keep your feet on the ground in a safe welding environment through in hole manufacturing process. No scaffolding or elevated work platform. Call Cindy for an appointment or send resume to: cindy@ autotanks.ca 780-846-2231 (Office), 780-846-2241 (Fax).

GREATER VICTORIA Performing Arts Festival needs assistants excited about dance to help with logistics and scheduling for next April’s festival. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages from $30/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrylser.ca. Fax 403-854-2845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet. net.

VOLUNTEERS

VICTORIA FILM Festival now screens classic films every evening at the Vic Theatre and is looking for assistance in the box office and concession stand. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

PERSONAL SERVICES MIND BODY & SPIRIT INTERLUDE MASSAGE: They are back at school!! Treat yourself to therapeutic, relaxing, massage now! In practice since 2000, offering Kripalu Bodywork, Acupressure, Hot Stone, Chair massage. Reiki Master. Contact Andrea at 250-514-6223 or online www.andreakober.com

The Trager Approach

is an Innovative, Gentle and Pleasurable Bodywork that Reduces Pain & Tension, and brings a sense of Balance and Presence in a Relaxed Body. Rae Bilash, CertiďŹ ed Trager Practitioner for appt, call 250-380-8733 www.raebilash.ca

Call 24Hr. Free Recorded Message 1-888-213-2854

JOURNEYMAN HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC is required for coastal logging operations near Woss, BC. Year round employment with full benefits. Further details can be found at www.hdlogging.com Please fax resume to 250-287-9259.

CFAX SANTAS Anonymous requires a social media coordinator to gather information, train a team of social media volunteers for the campaign, and be trained to update the website. Website skills are required. Other positions are available, including data entry, office assistant, volunteer coordinator. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

GUARANTEED Job Placement Labourers, Tradesmen & Class 1 Drivers For Oil & Gas Industry.

MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT 110

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS

-

YOUR COMMUNITY, YOUR CLASSIFIEDS Call 250.388.3535

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Join a profession that supports and cares for our community. Medical and dental office clerks and transcriptionists are always in high demand. In addition to basic administrative and bookkeeping skills, you will also learn standard medical terminology. Career Opportunities: Medical Office Assistant O Dental Office Assistant Medical Transcriptionist MSP Billing Clerk O Ward Secretary Pharmaceutical Firms O Medical Supply Firms Medical Clerical in Research & Care Agencies

AND

EMPLOYERS www. localwork.ca

ITALY- VILLAGE house in beautiful central Italy for rent. Call Anita 250-655-4030.

Night Housekeeper/ Emergency Responder

TRADES, TECHNICAL

LOST CANNON camera on beach seat in Agate Lane Park. If found please call (250)658-1577.

TRAVEL

MANAGEMENT and HAIR STYLIST positions available. Full time/part time for First Choice Hair Cutters in their Victoria location. Must have hairstyling qualifications. Guaranteed $11/hr, benefits, vacation pay, 25% profit sharing, paid overtime, paid birthday,advanced training and annual advancement opportunities For an interview call 250-391-7976

GENERAL LABOURERS

PERSONALS

LOST: CAT, young male, black and very shy. From Topaz Park area. Please check yards and sheds. Call if found (250)381-6009.

HELP WANTED

CALL VICTORIA: 250.384.8121 OR VISIT SPROTTSHAW.COM EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

LEARN ONLINE

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Guided online learning, instructor-led, in a highly supported environment

Psychiatric Nursing (online): This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Special Education Assistant (online): In only 9 months you could be earning $17 - $25.99/hour. You will receive training and certiďŹ cation from the Provincial Outreach Program for Autism and Related Disorders (POPARD). Therapeutic Recreation – Gerontology (online): Support and promote optimal health for seniors by planning, implementing and evaluation therapeutic recreation services. Earn up to $23.50/hour. Government student loans & funding (ELMS/WCB) & other ďŹ nancing options available to qualiďŹ ed applicants.

Toll Free: 1-866-580-2772

www.stenbergcollege.com

Over 92% of our grads are employed in their ďŹ eld of study within 6 months of graduation.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS


OAK BAY News NEWS Wed, - Wednesday, Oak Bay Oct 23,October 2013 23, 2013

www.vicnews.com A17 www.oakbaynews.com •A17



PERSONAL SERVICES

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

FINANCIAL SERVICES

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

FOR SALE BY OWNER

COTTAGES

AUTO FINANCING

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Home Movies to DVD. Also, Portraiture, Baby, Family + Maternity. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

STEEL BUILDING - The great super sale! 20x20 $4,070. 25x26 $4,879. 30x32 $6,695. 32x40 $8,374. 35x38 $9,540. 40x50 $12,900. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422. or visit us online at: www.pioneersteel.ca

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE FREE ITEMS FREE folding 250-654-0056.

single

cot.

FREE- LOTS of wood, big & small from taking down wood shed. Call (250)474-6675.

FRIENDLY FRANK DROWNING IN debt? Cut debts more than 60% & debt free in half the time! Avoid bankruptcy! Free Consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1-877-556-3500 BBB Rated A+

LADIES SAS lace up shoes, size 8B, excellent cond, black, $20. Call (250)383-5390.

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

SINGER ZIG Zag sewing machine 3 arm model 533. $90 hardly used. (250)544-4322.

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

LULU LEMON Grey hoodie, men’s size small, like new condition. $45. (778)265-7743.

TOILET SAFETY frame $25. Electric prestige garage heater $20. Toast-R-Oven $35. 250-652-9643.

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division. STEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or visit us online www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES SIDNEY- 3 bdrm sxs duplex, 1.5 bath, NS/NP. $1475+ utils. Available now (250)656-4003. SPACIOUS 742sq ft condo in the Wave, 705-845 Yates St. Great investment close to all amenities downtown Victoria. Open House: Saturday, Oct 26, 1-4pm.

SOOKE, 3-bdrm, 4-plex, $750 mo, on bus route, nice deck & yard. Call 250-478-2450.

SUNNY COOMBS field/treed acreage. Room for revenue development. Comfortable 2 floors of 1400 sq ft. Wood, hot water heat $745,000. Phone/Fax 250-248-4495.

NORTH NANAIMO: Attention Students/Working Professionals: fully furnished room, nice, quiet area. Own bathroom, cable, FREE WiFi, shared kitchen and laundry. N/S, N/P, no partiers. $550/mo. Avail. immediately. 250-756-9746

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

BUSINESSES FOR SALE

APARTMENT/CONDO

CLOCK SHOP for Sale- repair watches, jewelry. Battery accessories. Established shop. Large clientele. 1046 Fort St. For more info: 250-361-4480.

FOR SALE BY OWNER

GORDON HEAD- (4062 Feltham Place) 3 bdrm rancher, w/appls, F/P, garage. Close to UVic, Shelbourne. New price$449,000. Move-in now, motivated seller. To view: 250514-3286.

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

SUITES, LOWER CENTRAL SIDNEY- bright, quiet, private, 3 bdrms, 1.5 bath, newly reno’d, grnd level, skylights, W/D, parking, storage, Gas F/P. Walk to beach & shops. NS/NP. $1440/mo. Call 250-544-1180. DOWNTOWN SIDNEY- 1bdrm south facing condo in The Landmark w/underground parking, close to sea with views, NS/NP. $1200/mo. Call 250-652-7707.

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

DOWN-SIZING SALE. 4050% off. Brentwood Bay Nurseries. 1395 Benvenuto Ave. Oct. 1st - 27th. (250)652-1507.

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

FUEL/FIREWOOD

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

LEGAL SERVICES

YAMAHA PIANO, $500. Mahogany display unit, $275. 2 fabric swivel arm chairs, $75 each. Gold print sofa, $75. Patio furniture, $75. Call (250)592-6485

DEEP COVE- cozy 1bdrm, wood floors, acreage, skylights $950/mo, N/S. 250-656-1312.

DOWNTOWN SIDNEY- 2bdrm north facing condo in The Landmark w/underground parking, close to sea with views, NS/NP. $1400/mo. Call 250-652-7707.

COLWOOD: COZY 1 bdrm $700 inclds utils & wifi. Close to all amens. Pet ok N/S. Avail Nov. 1, refs. 250-294-5516

MT DOUG- Large 1 bdrm, all inclusive, close to amenities bus+ University $850. Call (250)721-0281.

TRANSPORTATION AUTO FINANCING

CARS

TRUCKS & VANS

1990 CHEVROLET Cavalier Z 24, 3.1 Litre. Only 70,000 km on rebuilt motor. Newer Luc High Performance clutch, 5sp trans, near new Hankook tires. Red, sun roof, mint interior, power doors/windows (new motors and regulators). Pioneer stereo w/iPod adapter, sub woofer, Pioneer 6x9 3 way speakers. Same owner since 1990, have all receipts. $3000. Chris, 250-595-0370 lv mess.

$50 to $1000 Scrap Junk Broken Down Cars Trucks Vans

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT Bright lg Bach 1,2,3 br. Units Fully reno 5 min drive to DT Victoria Full time on site manager

$$$ TOP CA$H PAID $$$. For ALL unwanted Vehicles, any condition. Call (250)885-1427.

MARIGOLDcozy 1 bdrm, woodstove. shared W/D, quiet. NS/NP. $850. 250-727-6217.

SAANICH: 55+ furnished 2 bdrm, balcony faces Swan Creek, 5 appls, in-suite W/D. $1200. utils incld 250-479-5437

SAANICH WEST- 1246 Hastings St, 3 bdrm Rancher, 2 garage, dining/living/family rooms, 2 bath (ensuite), F/P, appls incld, new roof. Walking distance to Interurban campus. Reduced price, $460,000. Call 250-477-4600.

AUTO SERVICES

2004 TITANIUM 29E34RL (new May 2005), good condition. One slide out, rear living room with fireplace, chair, hide-a-bed couch, sliding glass doors leading to fully screened patio. Patio deck slides out from underneath. Centre kitchen, double door refrigerator, microwave, double sink. Hardwood floors, oak cabinets, washer/dryer, porcelain toilet. Ducted A/C, gas/ electric hot water with DSI. Fiberglass exterior, dual paned windows, Polar Pak insulation, power front jacks, rear stabilizers. Ideal for traveling south in winter, parking at the lake or touring. Length/benefits of 34’ but tows like 29’. $65,000 new, asking $19,900. 250-8818833, chuck.salmon@shaw.ca

FREE TOW AWAY

250-686-3933

1990 DODGE 3/4 ton 4x4 long box. Excellent shape, good tires, exceptional loading capacity. Welded top carrier. $1100. Pls call (250)727-7905. ESTATE SALE. 2000 Ford F350 - 4x4 Supercab Lariat. 7.3L power stroke Turbo Diesel. Many extras, one owner. 156,808 original kms. Phone (250)479-4238.

MARINE BOATS DIESEL 36’ cruiser (First Lady) blue registry, land winter stored, sleeps 5, hyd’s, elec’s & inverted AC. Grand wheelhouse $145,000. Ph/Fx 250248-4495.

SERVICE DIRECTORY CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

Move in today 250-588-9799

SELL IT FAST WITH CLASSIFIEDS!

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

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HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

FURNITURE REFINISHING

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

MOVING & STORAGE

PRESSURE WASHING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

LANDSCAPE & TREE- lawns, hedges-tree pruning, gardening/landscaping. WCB. 18 yrs exp. Andrew 250-893-3465.

FLOORING SALE

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Moving- 2 men, 5 ton, $90/hr.

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601

DRYWALL BEAT MY Price! Best workmanship. 38 years experience. Call Mike, 250-475-0542.

ELECTRICAL

GARDENING (250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK Fall clean-up, hedge & tree pruning, weed & moss repair on lawns, blackberry/ivy removal, gutter repair/cleaning. 250-216-9476 ACCEPTING new clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, finish carpentry, garden clean-ups.

(250)217-3090.ELECTRICIAN 30 yrs exp. New homes & Renos. Knob & tube replacement. Senior’s Disc. Lic.#3003 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. RENOVATION SPECIALIST. Father & Son team. Great rates, 25 years exp. (778)9770531. www.scottelectric.ca Lic. #201714.

FENCING

DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

JUBILEE LAWN & Garden; Hedges, fall-cleanups, lawns. Insured, WCB. 778-265-3903.

Lowest Prices Guaranteed! Laminates - $0.69/sq ft Engineered - $1.99/sq ft Hardwood - $2.79/sq ft

PREPARE YOUR Lawn & garden for fall & winter. Glenwood Gardenworks. 250-474-4373.

Overnight Delivery in most of BC!

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

1.877.835.6670

ABBA EXTERIORS Gutter cleaning & repairs. Seniors discounts. WCB, Insured. Free estimates. (778)433-9275.

RED DOT RENOVATION & DESIGN No job too small. Call Mark 250-896-4561

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave- window, gutter cleaning, roof-de-moss, gutter guards, power washing. Free est.

LANDSCAPING

HANDYPERSONS 250-479-7950 FREE ESTIMATES • Lawn Maintenance • Landscaping • Hedge Trimming • Tree Pruning • Yard Cleanups • Gardening/Weeding • Aeration, Odd Jobs NO SURPRISES NO MESS www.hollandave.ca

Over 300 Choices

BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071

HAULING AND SALVAGE $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

www.kingoffloors.com

JUNK BOX- We Do All The Loading

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774 SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS ARAM RENO’S Basement, bathrooms, additions Free est. WCB/Insured 250-880-0525

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

COMPLETE HOME Repairs. Suites, Renos, Carpentry, Drywall, Painting. Licensed and insured. Darren 250-217-8131.

JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK.

JACK NASH, serving Victoria since 1980. We do it all! Free estimates WCB. 250-881-3886

COMMON GROUND Landscape. Specialists in complete yard care and construction. Ask about our $100 Seasonal Promotion. 250-727-8002

MASONRY & BRICKWORK CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Retaining Rock Walls, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Excavating. Fully insured. Estimates. 250-588-9471

CHECK CLASSIFIEDS!

✔ 250.388.3535 or bcclassified.com

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

TELEPHONE SERVICES

DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

DISCONNECTED PHONE? National Teleconnect Home Phone Service. No One Refused! Low Monthly Rate! Calling Features and Unlimited Long Distance Available. Call National Teleconnect Today! 1-866-443-4408. www.nationalteleconnect.com

PAINTING

TREE SERVICES

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

BUDDY’S TREE SERVICESTrimming, pruning, chipping, removals, hedges, lawn care, Insured. Keith, (250)474-3697.

OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

PLUMBING EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376. FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

WINDOW CLEANING BOB’S WINDOW Cleaning. Roof demoss, Gutters. Licensed and affordable. 250-884-7066. DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS 250.388.3535


RIDE ALONG ❱ Keith Morgan every Friday ❱  driveway

A18 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - OAK

BAY NEWS

New Maritime Museum exhibit marks tragedy on high seas Horrific day from the Second World War recalled Daniel Palmer

and aircraft bombers. After the carnage, 153 merchant mariners were lost to the seas. “PQ-17 is not something the British like to One of the most tragic yet unknown maritime disasters of the Second World War is acknowledge, because they made a mistake being intimately displayed at the Maritime that resulted in a lot of destruction,” said Christopher Butterfield, a University of VicMuseum of B.C. The survivor’s stories and artifacts from toria associate music professor. In 2000, Butterfield teamed up with choConvoy PQ-17, a botched marine supply mission in the Arctic Ocean, recount a ter- reographer Bill Coleman, whose father was rible day in July 1942, when 22 of 33 mer- one of PQ-17’s survivors, and created a chant ships were sunk by German U-boats requiem for the lost men that has been performed by the Victoria Symphony and by symphonies as far away as Russia. On Nov. 10, Victoria Symphony will revive that requiem at the Royal Theatre, while the Maritime Museum hosts a deeper look at Coleman’s choreography and the heartache behind the tragic event. “There are really intense personal experiences behind these seemingly bland historical events,” said Anissa Paulsen, director of exhibits at the museum. “This exhibit shows a very personal side of that history. Bill has always created his dances through William Shepherd/News staff personal stories. As a little boy, he This recovered waterproof container of matches grew up knowing his father had from a liufeboat kit is among the artifacts in the experienced this, but never really understood exactly what his father Maritime Museum of B.C.’s new exhibit. News staff

William Shepherd/News staff

Hill Wilson, left, and Harry Martin, veterans of the merchant navy, are instrumental advisors for the Maritime Museum of B.C.’s new exhibit, Convoy PQ-17: Art of History. Wilson and Martin are holding a few of the artifacts similar to ones used on the lifeboats from the convoy. had gone through.” In addition to Coleman’s story and how he and Butterfield created a commemorative dance and musical piece, the museum will also reveal the historical details that led to the botched supply mission from Iceland to Russia. “It is a little bit about a disaster that was avoidable, and it tells us a lot about the way the Germans … deployed their forces, how the British and Americans moved their convoys,” Butterfield said. There will also be stories and artifacts

from local merchant marines, like Butterfield’s father, who served in the Indian Ocean during the war. It took more than 50 years before merchant mariners were awarded full veteran status by the federal government. “One of the lousier moments in Canadian history,” Butterfield said. “We don’t like to memorialize our failures, but I think the climate might be a little different now.” For more information on the exhibit, visit mmbc.bc.ca. dpalmer@vicnews.com

COURAGE REMEMBERED GeE ReA C U rem mb red

A Special Section November 8th, 2013

nt

Special Suppleme

VICTORIANEWS OAK BAY NEWS SAANICH NEWS

Featuring historic photos of local residents and family members who served. Bring us your photos of WWI, WWII,

November 9, 2012

Returning to civilian life can be a battle for vets

Korea, Vietnam, Gulf War, Afghanistan, Iraq & Peacetime.

, Orser and South Africa milimer Yugoslavia al release from the received a medic Orser health concerns, sed tary. Among other having been diagno suffers from PTSD, in 1999. anxiety attacks and It all started with a She also felt desire an inability to sleep. om marked by an for isolation, a symptother people or dayKyle Wells inability to cope with News staff to-day life. came when she went in the Canadian Orser said the day After nearly 27 years her civilian life, on and she into combat uniform went to Army and five yearslive at Cockrell House to put her g. It was then she to Terri Orser came could no longer keep started shakin see a doctor. last year when she n’t have wished would I nts. time payme “At that up with mortgage co-director, secretary . It’s just horrible,” enemy worst nt, my reside on admitted Now, as , the it in ’99, you never of Cockrell House ian she said. “Back and “den mother” of military perOfficer in the Canadoth- that. You’re the worst type st former Warrant It was the harde time trying to help son if you have PTSD.with. And to admit Army spends her her own challenges. dealt to thing I’ve ever I didn’t tell ers while tending on Sooke Road me a long time. The large pink house like any average it, that took look dy.” might sod anybo depre in Colwo Cockrell ntly leads to nce, but inside The disorder freque trymulti-unit reside e cases, addicin the most extrem r military personnel have sion and House are forme together lives that civil- tion or even suicide. up ing to put back ing to of those who end ity return major since the While 40s gone off the tracks are veterans in their n- at Cockrell House t with veterian life. people in five self-co - and 50s, Orser has had contac to people With space for 11 War home the Second World house is there for limited g off ans from tained units, the and some spent need help gettin in their early 30s, less veterans who y. militar to time in the the street. Mike A., who asked , 2009, Cockrell House Cockrell resident e. Since opening in due to stigma than two dozen peopl last name removed from 1978 to has assisted more ere from a couple of have his the Canadian Navy Veterans stay anywh three years. While served in old when he joined um He was 17 years as a “breedweeks to a maxim ’s doors 1980. navy the home the bes h descri not all who pass throug the vast majority and now lics.” said ing ground for alcoho drinking. No treatget better, Orser the ve their lot. “I got booted for that kind manage to impro d to me or any of upstairs now said if it “One guy who lives ,” she said. “It’s ment was offere “I don’t even know a palace of stuff,” Mike said. feel it’s like being in it was just basithey then, think And I was available back beautifully set up. out.’” e ‘you’r safe.” er (PTSD) is cally n photo disord Steinsso stress Freyr tic Gunnar Post-trauma nts of PLEASE SEE: t among the reside Mayor Dean a common ailmen watch, Victoria ds, Page A4 nce Day 2011 sentry standing Having few deman Cockrell House. rifle of a silent the cenotaph during Remembra d the region Gulf War, the forFramed by the at ning aroun After tours in the to lay a wreath rial events are happe Fortin prepares legislature. Memo times and locations. our of for t ceremonies at the list Page 5 for a full of those who fough on Sunday. See in Remembrance and veterans.

s Cockrell House help s with struggling veteran tary transition from mili

T FORGETrs ” “LOurETPast’S, PresNO ent & Future Protecto for our We Thank You

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Publishing November 8th 2013 Tell us their story • A special section to honour the memory of local residents who served • Submit a max. 75 word write up and photo (black & white or colour) • Email to adminassist@vicnews.com or drop off at 818 Broughton Street, Victoria BC • Submissions due Monday, October 28th 2013


OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, October 23, 2013



RIDE ALONG ❱ Alexandra Straub every Friday ❱  driveway

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Community volunteers honoured for service Victoria Rotary Club hands out awards to help mark 100th year Don Descoteau News staff

Club members are more likely to receive recognition for demonstrating Rotary’s motto of “service before self.” But three members of the greater community who have offered service to their communities above and beyond the norm received gold lapel pins last week as winners of the Victoria Rotary Club’s prestigious Paul Harris Awards. “This recognition continues to be a respected honour for Rotarians and non-Rotarians alike,” club president Murray Ramsbottom said before honourees Gordy Dodd, Paul LeTour and Betty Kennedy received their awards. Dodd, owner of Dodd’s Furniture, has for years organized charity dinners for hundreds at Thanksgiving and Christmas. He

has also been involved in food and clothing drives here and donated time and money to organizations in his native India. His inspiration to give came when he met an old man on a train in India who was handing out business cards which read, “The most graceful of all the virtues is to develop the habit of giving something everyday as per your ability …” “Give whatever you can, every day, however small,” Dodd said. LeTour’s HeroWork organization’s “extreme community events” were compared by his presenter to “an old-fashioned barn raising,” for the way they harness the power of volunteers to create charitable good deeds for families or groups. Having overseen a major renovation at the Mustard Seed on Queens Street earlier this summer, he dedicated his Harris award to “courage,” that of the employees and clients of the Mustard Seed, the 300 volunteers who gave time and money to the cause and 100 local businesses that donated labour or materials to the project. Retired college and University of

Don Descoteau/News staff

Community volunteers Gordy Dodd, left, Paul LeTour and Betty Kennedy join hands with Victoria Rotary Club president Murray Ramsbottom at the Union Club in Victoria, after being honoured with Rotary’s Paul Harris Award for community service. Victoria professor Betty Kennedy was honoured for her volunteer work with various boards over the years, ranging from St. Joseph’s Hospital (which became Victoria

General) and the Capital Regional District Health buildings committee to her work with Girl Guides and the Royal B.C. Museum. She now lives in Galiano Island.

The special Harris awards were handed out as part of Victoria Rotary’s centennial year celebrations. ddescoteau@vicnews.com

Flu Shot Clinic Flu season stops here. Prevent the flu this year. Book an in-store flu shot with your Save-On-Foods pharmacist. Also, you may qualify to get the flu shot for free. Ask your pharmacist for details.

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A20 • www.vicnews.com

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Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - OAK

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Ask at the pharmacy to learn how you can receive your flu shot! Talk to your healthcare professional, including your Safeway Pharmacist, about having your own immunization record reviewed to determine your individual needs. Vaccines may not be suitable for everyone and do not protect all individuals against development of disease. Some vaccines may require a prescription. Vaccines may not be available in all locations. Age restrictions may apply. Check with our pharmacist for further information.

Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, Oct. 25 through Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Canada Safeway Limited. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

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Oak Bay News, October 23, 2013