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Peninsula resident Graham McCarthy needs your help for the next nine months, page 8

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NEWS REVIEW

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Friday, August 23, 2013

No food waste for composter Capital Regional District pulls licence at Foundation Organics after non-compliance Devon Mackenzie News staff

The Capital Regional District (CRD) has conditionally suspended Foundation Organics’ operation licence after the facility failed to comply to bylaws pertaining to odour emissions, among other things. The suspension of the licence for the composting facility on Lochside Drive in Central Saanich was announced Tuesday afternoon (Aug. 20) and focuses on the acceptance of food waste at the facility. “The suspension means “I hope the the facility won’t be able to suspension of the accept any new food waste they address the bylaw delivery of food waste until issues, but they will be able will allow the facility to continue to accept yard and garden waste,” explained time to review its Central Saanich Mayor and processes.” CRD Chair Alastair Bryson. The licence suspension fol– alastair Bryson lows contract suspensions with Foundation Organics by the CRD in the first week of August. At the time, the CRD stated that if the facility continued their non-compliance with CRD bylaws (namely bylaw 2376 which states that composting facilities must ensure they do not contaminate ground or surface water, or generate unacceptable levels of nuisance odour, vectors, litter or dust) it would result in action being taken to conditionally suspend the facility’s operations. According to a press release, the CRD conducted a hearing with the facility operator on Aug. 16 which determined the facility was non-compliant with bylaw 2736 and terms of its licence as a recycler. Please see: Citizens group still looking, page 2

Devon MacKenzie/News staff

Central Saanich Fire Chief Ron French stands in the front foyer of the new fire hall on Keating X Road. The hall’s grand opening is scheduled for Sept. 14. See page two for the story.

Mearns leads council walkout Trio of North Saanich councillors force end to housing questions Steven Heywood News staff

Three District councillors in North Saanich got up and walked out of a meeting Aug. 19, citing the “inquisition-like” line of questioning of another councillor, effectively ending the session. It’s another strange turn for a council sharply divided over the future of housing growth in the community. Councillors Craig Mearns, Conny McBride and Dunstan Browne left municipal hall after Coun. Elsie McMurphy began asking questions of the consultant who prepared a report on the state of housing and potential

density growth in the District. McMurphy asked if the consultant, Ed Grifone of CTQ Consultants of Kelowna, had been contacted during the consultation process by any of the three councillors listed, as well as Coun. Ted Daly, who was not at Monday night’s meeting. McMurphy, who later said she submitted a Freedom of Information request to the District, said she did so to obtain details about councillor contact with Grifone. She added she wasn’t sure if the report had been compromised as a result of that contact but the sudden departure of the three councillors

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raised more questions. “I didn’t really think (councillors contacting Grifone) was of any consequence - until now,” McMurphy said, adding the information she obtained shows councillors have had contact with the consultant at various times during the process. For their part, the three councillors who left the meeting admitted they have had contact with Grifone — although they say it was innocent in nature, simply asking for a time to expect his report. Please see: Councillor contact, page 3


www.vicnews.com A2 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, August 23, 2013- PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Citizens group still looking for a full ban tion Association, said he is happy with the latest developments. “From our perspective we’re “I’m very pleased to see the CRD has taken this step and I hope the happy,” Baker said. “I’m a bit concerned about the suspension of the delivery of food waste will allow the facility time to CRD issuing a suspension rather review its processes,” said Bryson, than a full cancellation but this is still a goal we’ve been workadding “I would like the ing towards and I know CRD to ensure they have our concerns have been a high level of confidence heard.” regarding the facilities Mayor Bryson also operation before they reinadded that he had state the licence.” received correspondence Foundation Organics from some residents in applied for and received close proximity of the facila licence from the CRD to ity who were curious as to run a compost facility on the health impacts of the Stanhope Farm two years smell and dust coming ago in June. from Foundation Organics. Since then, the operation Ray Baker “We want residents to has been a point of contenknow the District of Cention for neighbours of the facility who say the smell, noise, traf- tral Saanich has passed those confic and dust stemming from opera- cerns along to public health officer at VIHA,” he said. tions have been unbearable. Matt Mansell, manager of the FounRay Baker, a next door neighbour of the property where Foundation dation Organics facility, would not Organics is located and member of comment on the licence suspension. both the Stop the Stink group and reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com the Martindale/Hunt Valley ProtecContinued from page 1

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Crews work to put the finishing touches on the brickwork outside the new Central Saanich Firehall.

A firehall for the future Central Saanich’s new firehall set to open in September Devon MacKenzie News staff

The finishing touches are being put on Central Saanich’s new 23,000-square-foot firehall on Keating X Road and Ron French, the municipality’s fire chief, couldn’t be more pleased. “This is a state of the art facility which has been designed to be useful for many, many years,” said French. “Depending on how the municipality grows or changes, this hall will be able to expand to serve it.” It was determined close to 10 years ago, after a Fire Underwriters Survey identified response times for the southern half of Central Saanich (including the Keating industrial area) were well below what is considered appropriate, that the municipality needed a second firehall in a different location that was more seismically sound. A proposal for a new main firehall, with a smaller, satellite firehall (for now, the existing firehall at municipal office on Mount Newton X Road), became part of the district’s ongoing strategic planning process. The district used the alternative approval process to obtain the funding for the project. Ground was broken on the $8.9 million project last year. Over the long term the municipality estimates debt servicing fees will round the number out to closer to $13 million, but the district says they are investigating revenue options which could reduce the total borrowing amount. Major construction on the hall was completed last month and the finishing touches (interior finishing and landscaping) are expected to be completed this month. The project is around three weeks behind schedule but is on budget, said French, something he is very pleased about. The grand opening of the new hall is now slated for Sept. 14. “We have so many features in this facility that we didn’t have before,” explained French, adding that up until now, Central Saanich volunteer firefighters have been using other, better

Devon MacKenzie/News staff

The new playground and basketball court at the Central Saanich Firehall offer a place for local children and firefighters’ offspring to blow off steam. The two kid-friendly features were built using funds raised and donated by residents and local businesses like Sassy’s Restaurant. equipped firehalls for much of their training. “Now we’ll be able to offer our facility to other departments who need to train their firefighters,” he said. The new hall features a state of the art, four-storey tower for training firefighters in rescues, a gas training pad and a pumper test area that retains and reuses water. It also features training classrooms, gym, kitchen, dedicated showers and washrooms for both male and female firefighters and space for bunks should the department ever expand into having any full-time firefighters on staff. “The stuff the architects and designers (Johnston Davidson Architecture and Planning Inc.) thought of to include in the building really mean that the building will be sustainable for the department for years to come,” explained French. The hall, designed with a lifespan of around 50 years, is built to withstand 1.5 times the seismic force of a regular building. It will serve as the Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) for Central Saanich and the home base for the Capital Regional District’s HAZMAT Team. This means Central Saanich will have a facility and the emergency equipment should there be a major disaster, French explained. “Basically we could have the emergency operations up and running here right away after a

disaster.” The LEED certified building was also designed with environmental standards in mind and features technology like rainwater collection systems, geothermal heating and cooling and solar power collection through panels on the roof. “That will give us the ability to actually sell back electricity to B.C. Hydro,” said French. Not only will the hall serve as the main firehall and the EOC for the district, it was also serve as a place for community groups to meet. “It was important to us that it’s not just a firehall, it’s a community building and where we can, we want people to be able to use it,” he said, adding the district has already made connections with agencies like the local Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue Society (RCM SAR 36 or the Saanich Marine Recue Society, formally known as the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary) to use the hall as their meeting space. The hall also features a public playground and basketball courts on the property (fundraised for by the department, not funded by tax dollars) which may be useful as developers eye the land across the street for a townhouse project. The grand opening on Saturday, Sept. 14 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., will feature a barbecue, tours of the new facility and visits from local dignitaries.


www.vicnews.com • A3

2013 PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, August 23, 2013

Peninsula News in brief Save the Universe

SAANICH — The community is being called out to an event Saturday, Aug. 24 at the Centre of the Universe on Observatory Hill in Saanich. A day of action is being called for by local MLAs and MPs, in the hope of saving the public portion of the observatory. Saturday is its final public day. For details, contact MLA Lana Pophham, 250479-4154.

— News staff

New spa manager at Haven

SIDNEY — The Sidney Pier Hotel and Spa have announced that Roxana Sanchez Velazquez has been hired as the new spa manager of Haven Spa. She comes with more than 10 years of experience managing and operating spas world-wide.

— News staff

Tour de Rock event in Sidney

SIDNEY — Next week, on Wednesday, Aug. 28 and Thursday, Aug. 29 local Tour de Rock riders will head out on a 24-hour bike ride around Sidney to raise funds. The ride starts Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. on Beacon Avenue and finishes Thursday evening at 7 p.m. in the RCMP booth at the street market in Sidney.

— News staff

Housing report reflects divisions Consultant Ed Grifone outlines North Saanich housing study’s findings before the chaos Steven Heywood News staff

Before a stirred-up District council ended questions to a contracted housing consultant Monday night, they were on the verge of accepting his report and moving forward. Ed Grifone of CTQ Consultants Ltd. of Kelowna outlined key points of the Housing Strategy Implementation Plan, which was started in late 2012 with the bulk of the work done between January and March this year. Council had been chomping at the bit to get the draft report and their continued communications with Grifone over when to expect it has caused a major rift between the two factions of council (see related story in this edition). Grifone said he is fully aware council and the community had been waiting for his report since late May to the beginning of June — and that there were “various factions” in the community. “There are a lot of heart-felt opinions about the community and housing within the community,” he said, adding his challenge was synthesizing the copious amounts of information — and those opinions — into his report. Grifone admitted his report is a near echo of two other studies done in the District in 2003 and 2008. “We really did find support for higher density forms of housing. This support is not significantly different than what was found in past studies and reports — yet this time there were conditions to be considered.” Those included issues of affordability, worker housing, areas of growth,

What council thinks of the report It’s still early in council’s review of the CTQ Consultants’ housing study — there are more meetings yet to come — but in the wake of Monday’s council presentation and subsequent walkout, North Saanich councillors did comment on the report’s findings. Mayor Alice Finall said she had quite a few questions to ask, especially in regards to its look at affordability — the definitions and how much weight the issue was given. “It’s something I’ve been talking about since the start of this term,” she said. Finall added the report is still a draft and needs more discussion and should include more information, such as results from a North Saanich Residents Association survey — which had significantly different results when it came to density and growth support than a survey conducted by the consultant. Councillor Celia Stock said all of council will be asking questions of the consultant, which doesn’t mean councillors are opposed to the report. Coun. Dunstan Browne said the District hired a consultant and received a comprehensive report. He agrees questions must be asked about the issues raised within the document — but not going so far as trying to discredit what he called a professional report. Even with differences of opinion on council, the politicians had been poised to accept the CTQ document, pay the outstanding bill for the work, and proceed with a public input phase, leading to further debate over the fine points in the study. Monday night’s walkout will set that process back, said the mayor. density levels and service limits. Grifone said the critical concerns in the community appear to be over higher density housing options and resulting impacts on traffic, agricultural land, urban sprawl and more. “Council will have to expect to be challenged on any local need for workforce housing,” he warned. “But the area has done well, economically, which has led to the need.” He said he was told by the local business and industrial community that they have employees seeking new housing — and that demand could require between 400 and 500

new homes in the immediate area. Finding places for up to 4,500 people to live on the Saanich Peninsula must, he continued, be weighed against community values in North Saanich — including any impact on agricultural land which many people feel is sacrosanct, community character and property values. To meet that need, the District is being asked to consider higher density housing on smaller lots. Council has already put in place new bylaws allowing such lots and there are an estimated 395 units in various stages of the development application pro-

cess in North Saanich. Grifone’s report recommends higher, if only slightly, densities over what has already been considered in the 2008 housing strategy — a document Grifone called “solid.” He said the densities on the table now reflect what is happening elsewhere in B.C. Where he said he’s hearing a lot of community reaction is in the suggested areas of North Saanich ripe for further growth. While two sectors — the southeast quadrant (East Saanich road to the McTavish interchange) and McDonald Park Road east of Highway 17 — are the primary sites, it’s the two secondary areas that raised eyebrows. Those include McTavish Road west and the Sandown racetrack property. “In those areas, there are many issues to address,” he said, noting that if the District wanted to further develop the two primary sites they would have to do it soon and include “a finer grain of planning.” That is outlined in the action plan provided in the CTQ report, Grifone concluded. The report is available on the District of North Saanich’s website (under the Housing Strategy section). A committee of the whole council session set for Sept. 9 will include further debate on the report — and may include council’s formal receipt of the study, allowing CTQ to be paid the monies outstanding in their contract. Director of Planning Mark Brodrick indicated Monday night that his staff report on the document would say it has met the terms of reference set out by the municipality. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

Councillor contact with consultant part of the question Continued from page 1

“I phoned him a couple of times,” said Mearns, adding it wasn’t anything important. “I’m not sure about anyone else.” Mearns had asked staff approximately two months ago to collect all of the correspondence between councillors and municipal staff and the consultant between the end of March and mid-to-late June — and to have it made public. McMurphy said her FOI request was for information even before the start of the consultation process, but after CTQ had been hired. For her part, she said she never made personal contact with Grifone outside of the consultation process. She added she was even asked by him not to participate in a community consultation session. “I’m not aware of any influence in the process,” Mearns said, adding he thinks the whole line of questioning on Aug. 19 was a strategy between McMurphy and Mayor Alice Finall to discredit the consultant’s report. Finall, McMurphy and Coun. Celia Stock have continually been at odds with the majority of council on the housing issue. Finall said she is not out to discredit the report but added she feels there are points within it that need review and input from council and the community. “We’ve never had this happen,” said Finall. “I have never seen this happen before. I’m disappointed

because this issue is so important to the community.” McMurphy, during the meeting, asked Grifone if he recalled a conference call with Daly. Grifone said he did not, but was interrupted by Mearns, who warned “if this is going to be an inquisition, I’m leaving.” After Finall defended Craig Mearns McMurphy’s line of questioning, the three walked out to mixed applause, catcalls and even one call for the councillors to resign. Without enough councillors sitting at the table, Finall was forced to end the meeting. Grifone said he would not comment further when approached by the Peninsula News Review. McBride Conny McBride later told the News Review that Daly did call Grifone, but it was done at municipal hall with a staff member attending. She said she also emailed him, asking only for a time to expect the report (McBride emailed her correspondence on this to the News Review after the meeting). Finall said McMurphy had every right to ask her Dunstan Browne questions, which included

asking if Grifone had ever met with a councillor in a private situation. She said later she was puzzled that the three councillors didn’t use proper procedure to overrule her decision as chair to allow McMurphy’s questions. According to Finall, councillors have, during this term, voted not to sustain a decision of the chair (the mayor). In this case, she said they could have done so again, ended the questions and continued on with the rest of the business of the council. “They were making a mockery of the whole situation,” said Browne. “We have a consultant and we got a comprehensive report and the purpose tonight was to ask questions about it — not for this to turn into a witch hunt.” Browne admitted he too had called Grifone, again only to inquire about timelines. He indicated there seems to be allegations of influence from all sides. He called McMurphy’s questions inappropriate and one of his reasons for walking out.

“This is an intention to discredit Grifone’s report,” added McBride, “and to discredit Councillor Daly.” She and the other two who left the meeting said they are willing to stand up to criticisms they left council without dealing with other District business - including accepting Grifone’s report which would have allowed him to be paid the balance of his contract. Browne added there’s plenty of time to deal with other municipal matters that were on the evening’s agenda. Finall said no matter the positions taken, ending the meeting will significantly slow down the District’s planned changes to its housing policy. Council will give the matter another try at a scheduled Sept. 9 meeting, set up to specifically debate the housing report and to allow public input. All of council is expected to be at that meeting. Finall said council will have to hold a special meeting before the end of the month to deal with items from Monday’s agenda, including a paving contract and two staff reports on caretaker residences and the District’s amenity bylaw. The latter, Finall said, is part of council’s ongoing debate over housing density issues. The bylaw would establish fees paid by developers to pay for their direct and indirect impacts on the community. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com


www.vicnews.com A4 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, August 23, 2013 - PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW

Dusty pockets of Greater Victoria tourism Not all municipalities willing to pay for Victoria-based tourist marketing First in a series Danielle Pope News staff

Talk to any district on the Island and you’ll hear pride swell as mayors and residents boast about their city’s prized attractions. Oak Bay shines for its star park at Cattle Point, Langford puffs out its chest about hosting Rugby Canada, Colwood salutes its historic virtues of Fort Rodd Hill, while Sooke bows to its glorious natural reserves and Saanich brags about its Uptown shopping mecca. And, of course, Victoria smooths back its regal quaff to draw a postcard-perfect picture of everything touristy in the capital city. Tourism remains the biggest industry of the south Island region, yet a heated debate has trailed the 13 municipalities that rely on these funds to host worldclass exhibits – who pays to ensure tourists turn their heads? Although Tourism Victoria catapults its power around the globe, not everyone thinks aligning with the group is beneficial.

PNR file photo

Butchart Gardens is part of Tourism Victoria’s promotion of south Island attractions. “Tourism Victoria is a membership-based organization, and our approach to tourism is to market the destination in a holistic manner,” said Tourism Victoria board chair Dave Cowen. “We promote the Craigdarroch Castle, Butchart Gardens, the Fisgard Lighthouse, and all of those places take visitors around the area and away from the downtown core.” Victoria has had some form of

tourism bureau since 1901, but Tourism Victoria in its current form has been around for almost 40 years. The not-for-profit is funded through membership fees, grants from Victoria and Saanich (at $47,000 and $36,000) and a special hotel tax from the two communities that bring in about $2 million annually. The Visitor Services portion of the organization also receives a provincial grant,

giving Tourism Victoria an operating budget of $4.2 million. Though it sounds like a lot of money, the organization creates more than glossy brochures — it markets the region around the world and facilitates partnerships with places as far as Europe and Asia. “We are of the opinion that a strong tourist industry, that might appear to be centered in Victoria, is helpful to all the municipalities, and we think we have a responsibility to work together here,” said District of Saanich Coun. Susan Brice, chair of the finance committee. “Pooling our money with all the communities is the only way to focus our efforts effectively.” The City of Victoria, District of Saanich, District of Oak Bay, Township of Esquimalt, Town of Sidney and the Town of View Royal believe the cost is well worth the gains. But while the City of Langford also holds membership, the area mines a different philosophy – and collects a hotel tax which it does not contribute to Tourism Victoria. “There is no real benefit for us,

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from our point of view,” said Langford Mayor Stew Young. “Victoria’s focus is tourism, and they’re great at doing what they do down there, but we don’t have those kind of hotels and touristy things here. Our focus is on sports tourism, and making this the best possible community for the residents who already live here.” Young said Langford’s hotel tax, which largely comes from pro sports teams and conferences that make their way to the Bear Mountain Arena, directly funds the Langford Sport Authority which markets the home of Rugby Canada and all the district’s sporting potential. Funds also support community-improvement projects and economic developments. “Why would we give Victoria our money and then try to tell them to spend it on us?” said Young. “It’s not like Victoria is telling tourists ‘Go to Langford.’”

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, August 23, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A5



Theft Ferries’ bonuses send ‘wrong message’ takes from event Incentive pay for brass rose when extra subsidy created surplus Jeff Nagel

Black Press

TSARTLIP — Organizers of the recent Yellow Wolf Powwow at the Tsartlip First Nation are asking for the community’s help after a generator was stolen sometime during the event. According to Angel Sampson, event coordinator, in an email to the News Review, the generator was rented and is going to cost them an estimated $1,500 to replace. “We had a wonderful 20th annual Yellow Wolf Powwow event,” Sampson said. “We had so many people show up, especially an increase in dancers. We received some really positive comments about our powwow. “We also experienced something we never experienced in the 20 years that our family has been doing this powwow ... someone stole a generator.” She said the RCMP are investigating the incident but the event itself is on the hook for paying the rental company for the lost generator. To that end, their non-profit organization will be fundraising and events will be announced soon. “This is a real blow to our committee, as we are lucky to get everything paid off at the end of the weekend,” Sampson said. “We don’t make any money, so it is sad that we now have to pay for this stolen generator.” If anyone has information about the theft, please call the Sidney North Saanich RCMP at 250-656-3931.

Despite rising fares and looming service cuts, top executives at B.C. Ferries still collected big performance bonuses this year. President and CEO Michael Corrigan got a $64,421 “incentive payment” on top of a base salary that was up eight per cent to $364,000 for a total of $563,000 in overall remuneration – the maximum allowed after a cap on payouts was put in place last year. B.C. Ferries’ executive compensation disclosure says Corrigan’s bonus reflects his “exemplary leadership” that was borne out by the corporation beating its financial target for the 2012-13 fiscal year. Chief financial officer Robert Clark got more than $133,000 in incentive

File photo

Incentive pay at B.C. Ferries has once again stirred controversy, despite the bonuses being lower than in the past. pay and executive vice-president Glen Schwartz got an extra $127,000 based on performance. Both of their bonuses were almost twice as high as a year earlier and the two collected close to $500,000 overall. None of the payouts are anywhere near as high as the more than $1 million that former CEO David Hahn received in some past years until he left the corporation and the government eliminated additional long-term bonuses and imposed the compensation cap.

Managers were eligible for their full incentive pay this year because of the $15-million surplus B.C. Ferries posted for last year. In the previous two years, they got only half as much incentive pay because the corporation missed its financial targets. But NDP critic Nicholas Simons said the new surplus is a fiction because of the $21.5 million in additional subsidies the province injected. “The only reason they got their full bonuses was because the gov-

Partnership ends for power plant at Heartland Edward Hill News staff

The Capital Regional District will become the sole owner of the gas-fired power plant at Hartland Landfill after buying out its private partner, Maxim Power Corp. The CRD has agreed to pay Maxim Power $1.8 million for its 30 per cent stake in the 1.6 megawatt power plant, minus $900,000 for ending the lease agreement, for a net cost of $900,000. The CRD and Maxim entered into the private-public partnership in 2003 to produce electricity from methane gas discharged from the landfill. Maxim

Power paid the CRD an annual royalty for the right to sell power to B.C. Hydro. Andy Orr, who speaks for the CRD, said the CRD and Maxim Power came to a mutual agreement for the Calgarybased company to exit on the prompting of the CRD. Orr said the regional district now has the expertise to run the power plant. “Once upon a time the thought was, when we did the original deal, that going with the private sector was the best way,” he said. “As time moved on as we’ve had time to think about things, that there’s no need to have them involved.” The landfill produces

18 cubic metres of gas each minute, enough to generate 12,274 MWhours of energy per year, according to the CRD. Under the base power rate paid by B.C. Hydro, the plant could generate $1.2 million per year in revenues, although B.C. Hydro also paid a “green premium” for part of the power generated. In a press release, Maxim Power said it planned to use the $900,000 proceeds for “strategic corporate purposes.” It’s unclear why Maxim opted out of the project, although it had “the option to sell its portion of the facility to the CRD for fair market value if produc-

tion of power drops below a pre-determined threshold for a pre-determined period of time,” according to a CRD report. Orr said both sides had an optout clause. When the deal was struck in 2003, Maxim contributed $840,000 to build the $2.8-mil-

lion plant, and the CRD chipped in $1.96 million, which Maxim agreed to pay back to the CRD over the 20-year project. Orr couldn’t say how much Maxim actually paid back over nine years of operations, citing a confidential contract.

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All revenue generated by the power plant will become part of Hartland landfill’s revenue stream. He couldn’t say if the CRD is planning to expand the generating capacity of the plant, but said the potential is there. editor@saanichnews.com

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ernment provided that increased service fee,” Simons said. Transportation Minister Todd Stone wasn’t available for an interview but issued a statement saying the executive payouts send the “wrong message” at a time when B.C. Ferries is struggling to reduce its expenses. He said he will speak to the B.C. Ferries board to outline the province’s expectations for all executives at Crown corporations. “While B.C. Ferries isn’t a Crown corporation, they do receive provincial government funding and we would expect them to follow suit,” Stone said. Simons, however, said the B.C. Liberals have had plenty of time to act. The Powell-River Sunshine Coast MLA said his constituents are apoplectic because they’re ferry-dependent and have seen fares rise on average 75 per cent over the last 10 years. B.C. Ferries has reduced its executive by almost half and cut their overall salaries by more than 50 per cent, Stone noted.

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A6 A6 •• www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com

EDITORIAL

Friday, Friday, August August 23, 23, 2013 2013 -- PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW

Jim Parker Publisher Steven Heywood Editor Janice Marshall Production Manager Bruce Hogarth Circulation Manager

The Peninsula News Review is published by Black Press Ltd. | #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 | Phone: 250-656-1151 • Fax: 250-656-5526 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Mired in their own positions

I

f trust ever existed between the two factions on North Saanich District council, it doesn’t any more after Craig Mearns, Conny McBride and Dunstan Browne walked out of Monday night’s meeting, protesting what they called a “grilling” of a housing consultant by Elsie McMurphy and, by extension Mayor Alice Finall and Celia Stock. Council has reached a state of disfunction on the housing issue, bordering on dereliction of duty, and it’s at the expense of local taxpayers, no matter which side of the fence they sit. These two camps will be quick to point fingers at the other side, blaming them. Yet it is actions that count and what those three councillors showed was a lack of conviction. They seem unwilling to hear any criticism of a report they say will help usher in new growth in the community. Instead of participating in open debate, and allowing the consultant to respond, they chose to shut down the meeting. McMurphy said she didn’t think her questions about the communication between council and the consultant would have amounted to much. Finall agreed with that, alluding to some form of collective guilt shown in the trio’s departure. Yet even they need to look beyond using procedure to gain the floor and move beyond their suspicions of the majority. Which raises the question: was this a matter of posturing or style over substance? If so, the two factions appear only interested in making overblown demonstrations to their constituents to prove they are in the right. Without taking one side over another, McMurphy should have been allowed to ask her questions. If everyone is confident that their communication with the consultant was as innocent as they say, there was no harm in someone seeking answers. After all, Mearns had already asked for much of the same information back in June — and all of council agreed on that. It’s part of that whole democracy thing. Fears that the minority of council is out to discredit the report have as much weight as assumptions that the council majority are out to discredit McMurphy, Stock and Finall. Council faces potential paralysis on the housing debate in North Saanich. The two sides — and there are two sides, let there be no doubt about that — are dug-in and surrounding themselves with people willing to say what they want to hear. Council will find in a community with such strong opinions, there are more grey areas than black and white. Not accepting that will leave them stuck and unwilling to budge. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@peninsulanewsreview.com or fax 250-656-5526. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Peninsula News Review is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2010

Dammed if we do? Accounting for Site C It is hardly news that B.C. Hydro’s groups question both the need for Site C and B.C. Hydro’s financial proposal to construct the Site claims backing it. Concerned about C dam in the Peace River Valley exactly how much this faces massive opposition project could end up among local farmers, First costing the public, PVEA Nations, conservationists is asking the BCUC to and outdoor enthusiasts. confirm that BC Hydro is Recently, however, required by law to obtain growing concerns over certification for the whether the project is project. even necessary, let alone While most public fiscally viable, has given utility projects must the controversy a new be certified by BCUC twist. before they can be built, While proponents Anna Johnston when B.C. passed the and adversaries of large Guest Column Clean Energy Act in mining and energy 2010, it exempted a Site proposals often dance the C dam of a particular size from environment versus dollars debate, the requirement to undergo this pitting social and environmental important regulatory process. concerns against arguments for However, the current Site C economic growth, the discourse over Site C has increasingly become proposal has ballooned from the Site C exempted under the law. For a dollars versus dollars one. starters, its sticker price has shot Even the provincial government, up 58 per cent from the original historically Site C’s staunchest $5- to $6.6-billion estimate. It will advocate, has begun to question the wisdom of the $8-billion project. take years longer to construct, which means longer before any Earlier this month, Bill Bennett, benefits would be felt, and more B.C.’s newly minted Minister of time for additional delays and cost Energy and Minister Responsible escalations to occur. for Core Review, suggested the And if B.C. Hydro’s budgeting province needs to critically examine track record is any indication, B.C. Hydro’s proposal for Site C. ratepayers can expect a much The Peace Valley Environment larger final bill than the $8 billion Association is one step ahead currently projected. The Northwest of Bennett: earlier this month, Transmission Line (also exempt the conservation group filed a complaint with the British Columbia from the Commission’s review) is currently expected to cost $617 Utilities Commission over B.C. million, a whopping 53 per cent Hydro’s bypassing of the BCUC inflation over the $404-million certification process. original estimate. PVEA and allied conservation

B.C. Hydro is already mired in debt. Currently over $15 billion, its arrears have nearly doubled since 2010, when the provincial government decided to move forward with Site C, and is expected to rise to $18.85 billion by 2015. As a result, the dividends B.C. Hydro pays to the province will be cut almost in half. Site C is currently undergoing an environmental assessment, an essential part of responsible development. However, while an environmental assessment examines projects for their potentially adverse environmental, social, heritage and health effects, the BCUC would assess such specific factors as load growth forecasting, energy pricing policies and resource plans. As a Crown corporation, B.C. Hydro’s debt is borne by ratepayers. In light of the utility’s maxed-out debt-equity ratio, the massive capital costs it faces to upgrade aging infrastructure, recent requests to increase rates and strong indications that its current business practices are unsustainable, BCUC oversight is needed to ensure that Site C receives the kind of robust review necessary to protect ratepayers from being on the hook for an $8-billion mistake. Finally, something we can all agree on. Anna Johnston is Staff Counsel,West Coast Environmental Law and lawyer for the Peace Valley Environment Association

‘B.C. Hydro’s … arrears have nearly doubled since 2010 ’


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -- Friday, Friday, August August 23, 23, 2013 2013



LETTERS

www.vicnews.com • A7

People have the freedom to move

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s we are all aware, there is an ongoing battle on the Saanich Peninsula with the residents in subdivisions and the farmers on the Peninsula. This is nothing new. Over the years, the farmers have done one thing: that is to provide “us”, the residents of the Saanich Peninsula with food, fresh vegetables, milk and yes, compost for our vegetable and flower gardens. How do the residents repay the farmers? They get upset over the occasional odour that may come from their farms and try and shut them down. At one point in time, there were over 100 dairy farms. Now there are two. There were small family vegetable, fruit and berry

farms. Now, not many are left. When you can’t afford to feed your family or there is no food in the grocery stores, you will be saying “Where have all the farmers gone?” Be careful what you wish for. Take a trip down memory lane back 100 years, long before there was a Tanner Ridge, Island View, Oldfield, Keating and the Saanichton areas on the Peninsula. Most of this area was one of two types of property – agricultural or First Nations and I know that the home I live in was not here then. To the people in the Tanner Ridge area that are complaining, you should take a step back and look at where you are now living.

Most of, if not all the area, at one time was orchards of fruit trees and berry farms. How do you justify in your minds building homes on what once was prime agricultural land? You are no different than the people that move close to the airports then start complaining about the noise from the airplanes. We all have to try and live together. Watch the TV and see all the trouble and violence in the other areas of the world and be thankful that you do not live there. You have the freedom to move if you do not like where you are living or being told how to live. Bill Walters Central Saanich

Readers respond: Compost issues, smoking, North Saanich Check your sniffer I am responding to the letter from Ms. Duffield in (the Aug. 14) paper regarding Tanner Ridge residents’ complaints over the Stanhope Farm composting facility. I cannot believe anyone who lives here would pen such a holier than thou comment and if she does I suspect her olfactory senses are seriously missing or impaired. Those of us still possessing a sense of smell have endured a stomach churning stench almost daily the entire summer, resulting in many otherwise beautiful days being trapped indoors and possibly a loss of income for bed and breakfast owners and a devaluing of property for those wishing to sell their homes. M. Emerson Central Saanich

Many compost questions Let’s say there were a few people sitting around and the discussion came to business. They talked about all the cheap, fresh food being imported and sold in the area. What happens when it isn’t all sold? It is put into the garbage. What happens when you don’t finish your dinner when out dining? It is put in the garbage along with whatever is on the plate. The discussion continues. All this garbage can’t go in a landfill. Why? I’m not sure. OK, let’s organize a business to dispose of this and charge the government. Great, where can this be done? We need industrial land and good roads as there will be heavy truck traffic, noise and garbage is smelly. After looking around they discovered this kind of land is too expensive and they would have to get rid of the stuff too. How about farm land? Lots of it around as it is hard to grow produce to compete with imports. There would virtually no cost for the land. We could spread the stuff around in the fields. We could also get wood waste and grind it up and mix it with the garbage. One person asks: What about the noise, truck traffic, noise from the grinders and it will smell like garbage. All the farm land in the Victoria area is close to where people live. Won’t they complain? What about this so called compost? Will it be stored outside to rot down? If it is spread on fields who knows if it is safe and will it damage the land or maybe not

be suitable to grow food on it? Lots more questions, but hey, there will be good money in it, better than farming. Maybe we should start using all farm land for recycling, not only garbage but other things, cars, electronics etc. We don’t need heavy industrial zoned land with proper licences and controls over traffic, noise and odours. After all lots of people support recycling, maybe they don’t care about these problems that will come up when farm land is involved. One guy says that could never happen, they would never allow farm land to used like that. What do you think? D. Fulton Central Saanich

What smells? What is that stink? I work as an artisan at the Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal and drive home to Sooke about almost every evening.  Around Tanner Road and Pat Bay Highway, I drive through an area that smells vile. Surely something that smells so bad can’t be good for you. It doesn’t smell like any fertilizer I’ve smelled before. Linda Brown Sooke

Ban smoking I couldn’t agree more with Brian Trotto’s comments on August 14. For their own sake, we really ought to ban smoking when it comes to these kids and impose small fines if caught in public so they get the message.  I’m really shocked to see teenagers still smoking! Walt Deelman Saanichton

Questions were legitimate This is regarding the North Saanich council difficulties with development proposals for housing. CTQ’s Mr. Grifone has this on the company web site: The concern of many residents is that the process Mr. Grifone has used is flawed and is slanted to promote development. The refusal of the council majority to include the survey results collected by the Residents Association compounds those concerns.

As an aside, the expressions of rage at (the Aug. 19) meeting were entirely inappropriate. The questions are legitimate, the response abusive. Bert Slater North Saanich

Questions were an inquisition I would like to clarify my decision to leave the council meeting (of Aug. 19). This was not taken lightly. In my opinion Coun. (Elsie) McMurphy’s questions were not to address the report but to call into question the ethics of Mr. Grifone and the ethics of council. In my opinion that was totally unacceptable and all for the purpose to discredit Mr. Grifone’s report. Many residents and interested parties have contacted Mr. Grifone. Some individuals have sent numerous emails, and being a professional, Mr. Grifone has sifted through this information and compiled his report, reflecting the wishes of the majority of the residents of North Saanich. This is not the first time that a speaker has been put through an inquisition of this type. It must stop. If the reports are not to your views, you try to discredit the speakers. Council will get on with the business of the District of North Saanich. Conny McBride, Councillor District of North Saanich

Letters to the Editor The PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters should discuss issues and stories covered in the pages of the REVIEW. Please keep letters to less than 300 words. The REVIEW reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The REVIEW will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification. Send letters to: • Mail: Letters to the Editor, #6 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 • Fax: 250-656-5526 • E-mail: editor@ peninsulanewsreview.com

Engineering and Public Works Department The District of Central Saanich invites applications for:

Full-Time Water/Sewer LABOURER/MAINTENANCE WORKER

1 (Regular-Full Time Pay Grade 46) position Pay Grade 46 $28.05-$30.34 per hour (July 2013 rate) Plus a full benefits package The District of Central Saanich invites applications from qualified individuals interested in providing maintenance services in the Water/Sewer Section of the Public Works Division. Reporting directly to the District’s Water and Sewer Foreman. The successful candidate will be required to operate various heavy equipment, undertake the construction, maintenance and repair of municipal water/sewer infrastructure and associated works, serve the public in a courteous manner, establish and maintain good working relationships with his/her supervisor, other employees, and the general public. The candidate must be physically fit and be able to work outside in all weather conditions. Qualified candidates may submit résumes in confidence to: The District of Central Saanich, Attention: David McAlllister, Municipal Engineer, 1903 Mt. Newton Cross Rd., Saanichton, BC, V8M 2A9, no later than August 26 at 4:00 p.m. Applicants should clearly specify for which position they are applying and quote applicable posting number outlined in the detailed job posting PW2013-08. Please visit www.centralsaanich.ca for full posting details and information on how to apply. We thank all candidates for their interest; however,only those applicants selected for interviews will be contacted.


www.vicnews.com A8 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, August 23, 2013 - PENINSULA

Local resident hoping to make a difference

NEWS REVIEW

Central Saanich’s Graham McCarthy embarking on a nine-month internship program Steven Heywood

he will be spreading the word of the Gospel along the way. “Ministry is part of the trip,” he explained. “The message of the Gospel is the solution to a lot of the problems in the world and what kind of person would I be if I’m not sharing that?” The Stelly’s Secondary School grad begins his journey Sept. 10. It’s off to Europe first, then Southeast Asia. Along the way, the program sets McCarthy and another four students up with organizations working in those countries. “It’s going to be great, I’m going to love it,” he said in anticipation of the nine months abroad. The program, however, is not cheap and McCarthy has put out an appeal to the community for support. He has worked hard to be able to make the journey, and is seeking help to raise funds to ensure he can complete the internship program. To help, people can visit www.grahamstrek. weebly.com. That website will provide updates on his progress and the issues he will be helping with while on the road from September to May.

News staff

Steven Heywood/News staff

Graham McCarthy will be working with youth in need and in social activism overseas.

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www.vicnews.com • A9



Flare thrown into climbing venue

Three generations

PoliCe NeWS

The Saanich Peninsula beat Devon MacKenzie News staff

Central Saanich Police Service

• On Tuesday, Aug. 20 around 7 a.m. an officer spotted a motorcycle travelling along Wallace Drive doing 100 km/h in a 50 km/h zone. The officer pulled over the 58-year-old Central Saanich man who was driving the bike and issued him an excessive speeding ticket and impounded the motorcycle for 30 days. • Just before 9:30 p.m. on Aug. 20, as members of The Boulders Climbing Gym were finishing cleaning up after the World Youth Championships which were held at the venue over the weekend, an unknown male ran past the front of the gym and tossed an orange smoke flare into the building. An astute member of The Boulders was able to pick up the smoke flare and toss it outside before it filled the building with smoke. Damage to the inside of the gym was minimal. Police are looking for information on the incident after a K9 unit was unable to track down the suspect. They are currently reviewing security footage from the gym and from Stelly’s Secondary School. The person in question is described as a caucasian male, five-feet-nine-inches tall wearing a black hoodie. If anyone has information on the incident, they are asked to call Central Saanich Police at 250652-4441. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

Devon MacKenzie/News staff

On Aug. 21 at Resthaven Lodge, more than three generations of Borghild Hansen’s (centre) family gathered to celebrate her 100th birthday, including Lisbeth Strickland, Hansen’s granddaughter (left) and Ruth Haugen, Hansen’s daughter (right). Hansen emigrated to Canada in 1957 and spent most of her life in Victoria. She has seven great grandchildren.

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Friday, August August 23, 23, 2013 2013 -- PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW Friday,

Torque Masters auto show set for Sunday Show expected to draw some 10,000 spectators

Get involved

The Torque Masters club meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sidney North Saanich Library on Resthaven Drive. Informal meetings are held weekly on Monday evenings from 6 p.m. on. For more information, contact Cam McLennan at 250812-4676 or email president@torquemasters.ca.

Devon MacKenzie News staff

The Saanich Peninsula will be bustling this weekend as the Torque Masters prepare to host their annual car show on the streets of Sidney Sunday. The Torque Masters Car Club Annual Auto Extravaganza Car Show and Shine Fundraising Event happens Sunday, Aug. 25 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Beacon Avenue from Fifth to Second Streets. Cars of all years, makes and models will be present for the show which organizers estimate will draw upwards of 10,000 spectators to Sidney. The show was a long time fixture in Sidney and after a hiatus, took over Beacon Avenue again last year. Along with the slew of cars featured along the streets, a 50/50 draw will take place as well as a raffle for a barbecue, a power washer and a day at the spa. New features at the show this year include the Mustang Corral where all Ford Mustangs will be located in one special area of the show. For more information, visit torquemasters.ca. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

Helping out

Devon MacKenzie/News staff

Car enthusiasts take in last year’s Torquemasters car show. This year’s event happens on Sunday.

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www.vicnews.com • A11



Summer sounds, car show and flavours this weekend COMING UP IN ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

get crazy. Performances are outdoors on the Ortega Terrace at Muse Winery and Bistro in North Saanich. The last performance is Saturday, Aug. 31, curtain at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25, available at Muse Winery and Bistro, at Stonestreet Cafe or by calling 250656-2552. Come early and feast on the tasty delights of Bistro Muse. Call 250-656-2552 for Bistro reservations.

• Sidney Summer Sounds Concert Series brought to you by Peninsula Celebrations Society happens Sunday, Aug. 25 and features The Timebenders. With over 12 costume changes and hilarious impersonations of the hits and stars from the ‘50s right up to this afternoon, this show has something for everybody. The free show starts at 2 p.m. and runs until 4 p.m. at the Beacon Pavilion. For more information, visit www.peninsulacelebrations. ca. • The Torque Masters Car Club Annual Auto Extravaganza Car Show and Shine Fundraising Event happens Sunday, Aug. 25 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Beacon Avenue from Fifth to Second Streets. Cars of all makes and models along with 50/50 draw and a raffle for a barbecue, a power washer and day at the spa. • Peninsula Players and Muse Winery and Bistro team up to present One Flew Over the Cabernet — a play which takes place in an insane asylum where the inmates believe they are fairy tale characters. When the Sleeping Princess is admitted and awakened by the doctor, things really

• The North Saanich Flavour Trail happens Friday, Aug. 23 to Sunday, Aug. 25. A rural ramble offering residents and visitors an opportunity to explore and experience Peninsula food and agriculture. On farms and other locations in North Saanich. Free, except Friday night BBQ at Muse Winery ($25). Call 250-812-1312 or email info@flavourtrails.com. More information at www.flavourtrails.com. • The Artisans Summer Gift Gallery runs until Aug. 28 and features over 40 Island artists presenting contemporary and traditional arts and crafts. Visit and support local artisans, enjoy the waterfront location and learn more about arts in our community. Open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Free admission and free parking. — compiled by Devon MacKenzie

Shuttle ridership doubles Attractions Shuttle reports more than 1,700 riders so far SIDNEY — More people are hopping on and hopping off than ever before. The Peninsula Attractions Shuttle bus is reporting ridership of 1,774 as of the beginning of August. In a media release, Matthew Butterfield, public relations spokesperson for the service, said that is double what the shuttle saw last year. The service is free and began in the summer of 2012 as a paidfare shuttle. The organizers retooled it and made it free for its summer run this year. Open to both tourists and residents, the shuttle runs to six Saanich Peninsula attractions — the Shaw Ocean Discovery Centre in Sidney, Brentwood Bay Resort and Spa, the Butchart Gardens in Central Saanich, Victoria But-

File photo

The free summer shuttle service continues until Sept. 3. terfly Gardens in Central Saanich as well as Church and Start Winery and Sea Cider, both in Central Saanich.

Find out more, about the shuttle service at www.peninsulashuttle.ca. — with files from Devon MacKenzie

MP May to host town halls next month SIDNEY — Saanich-Gulf Islands MP Elizabeth May continues her series of communtiy town hall meetings this September. May, the only Green Party MP and the party’s leader, will be on the Peninsula and the Gulf Islands starting Sept. 4 at Gordon Head United Church in Saanich. A town hall meeting will be held there between 4 and 9 p.m. The series moves next to Brentwood Bay Sept. 5. From 7 to 9 p.m., May will Elizabeth May meet with citizens at the Central Saanich

Seniors Citizens Association building, located at 1229 Clarke Road. In Sidney, the town hall will be on Sept. 6, 7 to 9 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Church Hall, 9691 Fourth St. May will then move to events on Saturna, Mayne, Pender, Galliano and Salt Spring islands. For details, including dates and times, visit http://elizabethmaymp.ca/townhalls or call the constituency office in Sidney at 800-667-9188. — Submitted

LOCAL WOMEN MAKING A DIFFERENCE

C A L L FO R N O M I N AT I O N S AWARD CATEGORIES:

TO SUBMIT A NOMINATION:

Business Owner of the Year

◆ E-mail to promo@vicnews.com ◆ Drop off to: 818 Broughton St. (Downtown) or

✿ Nominee owns 51% minimum of a small or large business including home-based and franchise businesses ✿ Business in operation minimum 3 years

Eco-entrepreneur

✿ Nominee runs a small or large business, including homebased and franchise businesses ✿ Nominee must be the creator of the business ✿ Business must have an environmental/green focus ✿ Business practices must demonstrate knowledge of and adherence to eco-friendly principles

Rising Star ✿ Employee of any business in Greater Victoria ✿ Nominee may be new to her industry, but making her mark ✿ Nominee demonstrates creativity, enthusiasm, and a strong work ethic

Above and Beyond ✿ Employee of any business in Greater Victoria, including home-based ✿ Nominee is a veteran of her industry, and continues to make her mark in both her industry and community ✿ Nominee demonstrates dedication that goes beyond her job description ✿ Demonstrates community contribution

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Daytime Email: ________________________________________________________________________________ Company Website: _____________________________________________________________________________

NOMINATOR INFORMATION: Required information Title:____________________________________________________________________________________________ First Name: ___________________________________ Last Name: ________________________________________ Telephone: _________________________________________Email: ________________________________________ How do you know the nominee? ____________________________

Thank you for taking the time to nominate a hardworking Victoria businesswoman. All complete nominations will be reviewed. Finalists will be contacted directly. Look for award winners in our Women in Business special section published in October 2013


www.vicnews.com A12 •www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday,Fri, August - PENINSULA Aug23, 23,2013 2013, PeninsulaNEWS News REVIEW Review

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!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

IN MEMORIAM GIFTS

LOST AND FOUND

OFFICE SUPPORT CLERK

RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE BC Help Tomorrow’s Families Today– leave a gift in your will. legacy@rmhbc.ca

LOST DIAMOND Ring, in Sidney, between Fifth & St. Paul’s United. Pls call (250)656-2180

Auto Insurance Sales and Service Representative

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES COMING EVENTS JESKEN AERIE Assisted Living Facility BAKE SALE, BBQ & BAZAAR FUNDRAISER Sat, August 24, 11am-2pm 817 Goldstream Ave. All proceeds from this community event are going to the Recreation Department of this non-profit residence. Stay for BBQ, music and home made baked goods and some garage sale items for a low price.

INFORMATION DID YOU KNOW? BBB Accredited Businesses contractually agree to operate by the BBB’s 8 Standards of Trust. Look for the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory Eedition on your Black Press Community Newspaper website at www.blackpress.ca. You can also go to http://vi.bbb.org/directory/ and click on the 2013 BBB Accredited Business Directory

LEGALS WAREHOUSEMAN’S LIEN ACT Notice is hereby given that Kustom Towing, (2009) Ltd, 3297 Douglas St, Victoria, BC, V8Z 3K9 will be selling: 2000 PONTIAC MONTANA

Owner M. Jacks 1GMDX03E3YD306288 1987 FORD F-250 Owner Artistic Pavers Wall Ltd 2FTHF2510HCA86235 FORD F-150 Owner M. O’Brien 1FTEX15NX5KB47512 Will be sold on Sept 6, 2013. At 647B Dupplin Rd, Victoria, BC between 10am-2pm.

MAKE A FORTUNE with $3000, in wholesale. Free info pack. Call (250)590-9634. WORK SUMMER Events! Security License required. Great way to earn extra $$ - Apply: www.sourcesecurity.ca/jobs

• Huge Demand In Canada • Employers Seek Out Canscribe Graduates • Over 90% Graduate Employment Rate

www.canscribe.com info@canscribe.com 1.800.466.1535

HELP WANTED An Alberta Oilfield Company is hiring dozer and excavator operators, Lodging and meals provided. Drug testing required. Call (780)723-5051 Edson,Alta. HAIR STYLIST WANTED Full time/part time for First Choice Hair Cutters in their Victoria location. Guaranteed $11/hour, 25% profit sharing, paid overtime, benefits, paid birthday, vacation pay, annual advanced training and advancement opportunities. Call Christie at 250-360-1923 today for an interview.

LOST AND FOUND FOUND: DEBIT/CREDIT card, found Dallas Rd by Ogden Bay Cafe. Call to claim (250)381-3096. LOST: CAT, young male, black and very shy. From Topaz Park area. Please check yards and sheds. Call if found (250)381-6009.

We are looking for motivated candidates to ďŹ ll roles including outside sales and telesales. In both roles you will be selling advertising solutions to local businesses. The successful candidate is a results oriented professional that is comfortable and conďŹ dent in both managing existing relationships while prospecting to grow the business. You are relationship oriented and understand how to organize yourself to be successful in a deadline driven environment. Outgoing personalities that focus on advertiser needs while being creative and problem solvers are most successful in our industry. Experience in sales would be considered an asset.

SENIORS SERVING Seniors is recruiting Senior Peer Counsellors who provide emotional support to seniors undergoing loss, transition or lifestyle changes. Training begins midSept. on Wednesday mornings for 12 weeks, and after training a commitment of 1 hour per week for 6 months is required. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

We offer a competitive compensation package including base salary, commission, proďŹ t sharing, beneďŹ ts and exciting career growth options. You bring the talent, dedication and hard work and we will deliver the opportunity.

VICTORIA CHILDREN’S Choir needs an apprentice choir manager who enjoys kids and parents to assist with rehearsals, travel plans, meetings, and be part of an artistic team. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250-386-2269.

Please note outside sales consultants require a valid drivers license and a vehicle in good working order. Reply in conďŹ dence indicating whether your interest is in outside sales or telesales by August 26, 2013 to;

PERSONAL SERVICES

Oliver Sommer Director, Advertising Sales, Black Press 818 Broughton Street, Victoria BC V8W 1E4 e-mail: osommer@blackpress.ca

MIND BODY & SPIRIT

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

PERSONALS THE BEST Selection of Real, Local Singles. Try FREE! 18+. Call 250-220-1300 or online at: www.livelinks.com

Black Press Community Newspapers is Victoria’s market-leading integrated multi-media company proudly representing some of our city’s most recognized brands including your weekly community newspapers and the corresponding news portal vicnews.com, usedvictoria.com, Monday Magazine, Boulevard, Tweed, Where, Victoria News Daily and much more.

INTER-CULTURAL ASSOCIATION seeks conversation buddies to attend weekly ESL classes at the Inter-Cultural Association and converse with adult newcomers who are adapting to Canada. Patience, reliability and good English required. Training in September. Call Volunteer Victoria at 250386-2269.

GUARANTEED Job Placement. Laborers,Tradesmen & Class1 Drivers For Oil & Gas Industry Work. Call 24hr Free Recorded Message For Information 1-888-213-2854

LABOURERS

HELP WANTED

Outside Sales & Telesales positions available

VOLUNTEERS

INTERLUDE MASSAGE In practice since 2000, offering Kripalu (Swedish), Acupressure, Hot Stone, Chair massage. Reiki Master. Come experience my work at James Bay, Sidney and Bastion Sq Markets. Contact Andrea 250514-6223 or online at: www.andreakober.com

HELP WANTED

Advertising Sales

Vancouver Island InsuranceCentres Inc. located at #321 - 3980 Shelbourne St, Victoria is looking for an experienced Auto Insurance Sales and Service Representative. Please forward your resume with cover letter to Parm Sandhu, Branch Manager at: psandhu@viic.ca Please refer to our website at www.viic.ca for additional information.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION RATED #2 FOR AT HOME JOBS

HELP WANTED

110 -

If you are always organized, can manage tasks, and support others in the most efficient way possible – or would like to be – the Administrative Assistant program may be perfect for you. Career Opportunities:

Administrative Assistant O Payroll Support Receptionist O Invoice Clerk O Executive Assistant

CALL VICTORIA: 250.384.8121 OR VISIT SPROTTSHAW.COM


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW August 23, 2013 Peninsula News Review Fri,- Friday, Aug 23, 2013

www.vicnews.com •A13 A13 www.peninsulanewsreview.com



PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

MARINE

MIND BODY & SPIRIT

FRIENDLY FRANK

FOR SALE BY OWNER

HOUSES FOR SALE

SUITES, UPPER

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

BOATS

WHY DO you do things you later regret? Find out. Buy and read Dianetics. (250)813-1306 www.dianeticsvictoria.org

SPLADING GOLF bag, with 11 clubs, $48. (250)652-4621.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Incredible 5 acre treed PARK-LIKE PROPERTY with Well-Maintained Furnished Home 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake, in the town of Caycuse. Perfect for recreational property or full time living. Motivated seller $358,800. Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land. Call 250-745-3387 smartytwo@hotmail.com

VINTAGE SILHOUETTE picture, convexed glass, $30. Kid’s bike $30. (778)265-1615. WOODEN STOOL, brass trim, black leather seat, 27” high $25. Call 250-388-6725. XMAS CACTUS, larger white. African violet, dbl purple flower. Both $10. (250)383-5390

FUEL/FIREWOOD

RENTALS

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

APARTMENT/CONDO

FURNITURE

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

DINING ROOM set dark pine, table with 6 chairs, 2 piece china cabinet. Excellent condition. $550. Call (250)6564925.

Move in today 250-588-9799

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

HOMES FOR RENT Updated 1,545 sq ft 3 Bdrm 2 bath Rancher for rent in beautiful Sidney. Kitchen with eating area, dining rm overlooking sunken living rm with vaulted ceilings and gas fireplace, master bdrm with ensuite, family rm with elec fireplace & french doors leading to patio. RV parking. $1800 + Utilities AVAILABLE SEPTEMBER 1st PREFER 1 YR LEASE AGREEMENT NO SMOKING, PETS OK (MAY REQUIRE A DEPOSIT) PLEASE EMAIL Coralgilbert@telus.net TO VIEW 250-656-9938

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Home Movies to DVD. Also, Portraiture, Baby, Family + Maternity. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE BUILDING SUPPLIES LOG HOME shell kit WRC 6X8 flat 3 bdrm w/grge & curved glass sunroom, ready to ship, 604-856-9732

FRIENDLY FRANK BOOK: “BUILD West Coast Chopper Kit Bike”, $10. Call (250)477-1819. EL NINO 2000 high quality 13 lb 10-pin bowling ball. Multicolour red/gold. Used 2 years. Owner no longer able to play due to health. $375 new, asking $70. 250-479-2779. ERGONOMIC BLACK cloth chair, $40. Champagne bucket, $25. Call (778)426-4449. GARDEN LOUNGER new, $30. Computer desk used, $30. Gravity chair, new $35. Call (250)592-8509. JAMES TOWN tea pot, gravy boat, cream jug, excellent condition. $25. (250)595-6734. SHOWER STOOL $10. 14” porcelain flower vase $12. (250)656-7786. SLEEPING BAG red outside paisley pattern inside, good cond. $10. (250)656-1640.

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper? NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

SAANICH WEST- 1246 Hastings St, 3 bdrm Rancher, 2 garage, dining/living/family rooms, 2 bath (ensuite), F/P, appls incld, new roof. Walking distance to Interurban campus. $484,900. 250-477-4600.

Spots available at Great Rates. Daily, weekly, monthly. Pool, Hot tub, exercise room, laundry, putting green, hiking, fishing, Pickle Ball Court. Free coffee in one of the best clubhouses on the island. Nanaimo area. www.resortonthelake.com 250-754-1975 or admin@resortonthelake.com

ROOMS FOR RENT

APARTMENT/CONDOS

CRYSTAL POOL- 1 bdrm, full kitchen, shared bathroom, $565. NS/NP, non-drinker. Call (250)477-0686.

SIDNEY- 2444 Amherst Ave. 1300sq ft updated character home looking for a family w/2 children and a dog. Fenced south facing corner lot near the Salish Sea. Walk to town and schools. Orangic gardens & fruit trees, fireplace, hot tub, 6 appls. Free TV forever.... $499,000. (250)656-6136.

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

1966 CHEVY Pick up, 1/2 ton short box, burgundy. 3 in the tree, 6 cylinder. Good condition, runs great, comes with second set of winter tires and rims. Second owner for last 45 years, in Victoria. $10,000 obo. Call: 250 479 0441 or email: havoc@telus.net

TRUCKS & VANS

DreamTeam Auto Financing “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-961-7022 CARS

1993 BAYLINER 2452, in premier condition. 2 sounders & GPS, head, galley, canopy, 9.9 hp 4 stroke Yamaha on hydraulics, downriggers, dinghy in 27’ newer Van Isle Marina boathouse near the ramp. $18,000. obo. 250-656-6136.

BDF-14 RIB fast, stable, deep-V fiberglass hull, 30 HP Suzuki, Highliner trailer, Sunbrella cover. All in good condition. $2800. 250-477-7327 $$$$ BOATS WANTED $$$$ ALSO OUTBOARDS AND TRAILERS. CASH BUYER. $$$$$ 250-544-2628 $$$$$

AUTO FINANCING

www.iDreamAuto.com DL# 7557

18FT FIBERGLASS hull and oak and ash wood finish canoe with paddles and life jackets is suitable for exploring the coast or for more extended canoe trips where carrying capacity is required. To inspect please phone 250.665.6537 Asking price, $750.

1996 FORD F250- 7.3 Diesal, 5 spd, standard cab and box, 400,000 km. $3900 obo. (250)656-4707.

Time for a NEW car?

RV RESORT ON THE LAKE

REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE BY OWNER

TRANSPORTATION

2004 TITANIUM 29E34RL (new May 2005), good condition. One slide out, rear living room with fireplace, chair, hide-a-bed couch, sliding glass doors leading to fully screened patio. Patio deck slides out from underneath. Centre kitchen, double door refrigerator, microwave, double sink. Hardwood floors, oak cabinets, washer/dryer, porcelain toilet. Ducted A/C, gas/ electric hot water with DSI. Fiberglass exterior, dual paned windows, Polar Pak insulation, power front jacks, rear stabilizers. Ideal for traveling south in winter, parking at the lake or touring. Length/benefits of 34’ but tows like 29’. $65,000 new, asking $19,900. 250-8818833, chuck.salmon@shaw.ca

RECREATION

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

2-BEDROOM CONDO ground floor in desirable Saanichton. Open concept, electric fireplace, custom kitchen. Carpets & laminate. Ensuite laundry, small pet ok. Low strata fee. Great starter, $235,000. By appointment 1-250-652-1218

SIDNEY: 1-BDRM lower suite in new upscale townhouse complex. Priv. entr, all appliances with insuite W/D. N/S, small pet OK. $1100. Sept. 1st. 2320 Oakville Ave. Call (250)508-9095.

Bright lg Bach 1,2,3 br. Units Fully reno 5 min drive to DT Victoria Full time on site manager

O H I do like to be beside the seaside. I do this with my Invacare Auriga 3-wheel scooter. 2 new batteries, recently serviced. Manual available. $750. Call (778)426-4910. Need CA$H Today?Snap Car Cash www.snapcarcash.com

SIDNEY. 1-BDRM, 1 bath 750 sq.ft. legal suite. Quality throughout: granite, SS appl’s, vaulted ceilings, skylights, balcony. 1 blk from Beacon Ave. Close to all amenities. 1 yr lease. NS/NP, no parties. $1200./mo + hydro. Avail Aug. 15 or Sept. 1st. Call Suzanne (250)656-1850, (250)857-1851

SEASIDE LUXURY condo studio, Sidney, BC. Exceptional views, furnished. Offers on $154,900 for quick sale. www.shawnaytownsend.com/miraloma

778-977-8049. (250)656-5787.

Ozzie,

REAL ESTATE SERVICES COMING THIS FALL! Sell your home privately but use the power of the MLS to attract buyers. No commission. 6-month posting on MLS. $695 FF4M Property Postings Inc. 250-382-2885 rwherr@shaw.ca Also in Maple Ridge

1990 CHEVROLET Cavalier Z 24, 3.1 Litre. Only 70,000 km on rebuilt motor. Newer Luc High Performance clutch, 5sp trans, near new Hankook tires. Red, sun roof, mint interior, power doors/windows (new motors and regulators). Pioneer stereo w/iPod adapter, sub woofer, Pioneer 6x9 3 way speakers. Same owner since 1990, have all receipts. $3000. Chris, 250-595-0370 lv mess. RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

SIDNEY- 1 BDRM, 1 bath ground floor suite, F/S, W/D, large kitchen & living room, lots of storage, N/S, no dogs. $950 util’s incld’d. Available Sept. 1st. Call (250)654-0410.

#ALLÖ  ÖTOÖPLACEÖYOURÖGARAGEÖSALEÖADÖ ANDÖRECEIVEÖ&2%%ÖBALLOONS ÖINVENTORYÖANDÖTIPÖSHEETSÖ ANDÖBRIGHTÖGARAGEÖSALEÖSIGNSÖ GARAGE SALES FERNWOOD: SUNDAY Aug. 25. 9am-1pm. 1236 Princess Ave, off Cook. Good variety.

SUITES, LOWER HARRIET/UPTOWN: 3 bdrms, newly reno’d, 4 appls, bus route, NS/NP. $1600 utils incl, own laundry. 250-480-0849.

Garage Sales

FORD F-350 MOTORHOME. V10 engine, 24’ 125km, AC, trailer hitch, portable generator, anti-theft steering wheel lock incld’d. Pet and smoke free. Great shape, fully serviced ready for the road. Reduced price $17,500. Please phone 250-655-4840. Located in Sidney.

GARAGE SALES All Fun Swap & Shop. Every Sunday (weather permitting), 7am-2pm. 12.00 to sell- 1.00 to buy. No dogs in shopping area. 250-474-4546. www.allfun.bc.ca

NORTH SAANICH: 8891 Marshall Rd., Sat., Aug. 24th from 9am-2pm and Sun., Aug. 25th from 10am-2pm. Books, Kirby, tools, misc... No early birds please! SIDNEY- 2039 Melville Dr. Sat, Aug 24, 9am-2pm. MultiFamily. Concrete lawn ornaments, furniture, clothing, household, toys, wooden play gym, books, tools, fishing/diving gear, plant pots and much more.

SERVICE DIRECTORY YOUR COMMUNITY, YOUR CLASSIFIEDS

250.388.3535

THETIS HIEGHTS: 1 bdrm + den, deck, insuite W/D, incld’s utils, 975sqft, N/S, small pet ok, $1200. (250)478-4018.

WE’RE ON THE WEB

VICTORIA- 373 Burnside Rd E. Sat, Aug 24, 9-2. Rain or Shine! Crafts supplies,clothes.

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CARPENTRY

ELECTRICAL

FENCING

GARDENING

GARDENING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

McGREGOR HOME Repair & Renos. Decks to doors. Small jobs OK. WCB. (250)655-4518

250-361-6193 Quality Electric Reno’s, res & comm. No job too small. Lic# 22779.

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

FURNITURE REFINISHING

AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

GLENWOOD Gardenworks Landscaping & Garden Services. Satisfaction guaranteed. 250-474-4373.

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave- window, gutter cleaning, roof-de-moss, gutter guards, power washing. Free est.

GARDENING

TAX

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

22YRS EXP Clean-ups, weeding, hauling. $25/hr. All areas of city. Dave 250-656-7045. 250-216-9476 ACCEPTING new clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, finish carpentry, garden clean-ups. AURICLE BSC 250-882-3129 For lovely lawns-spectacular hedges-healthy garden beds & reno’s.

MIKE’S LAWN and Garden. Weeding, Clean-ups, & more. Senior’s discount. Free estimate’s. Mike 250-216-7502.

HANDYMAN SERVICES. Lawns, fences, pruning, flooring, painting, drywall, small reno’s. Mike/Chris 250-656-8961

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

250-477-4601

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

(250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK Yard & garden overgrown? No job too big. Irrigation, landscaping, patio stone, install. Blackberry & ivy removal. 25yr

HANDYPERSONS


Friday, August 23, 2013 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW Fri, Aug 23, 2013, Peninsula News Review

#OMPLETEĂĽGUIDEĂĽTOĂĽPROFESSIONALĂĽSERVICESĂĽINĂĽYOURĂĽCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

PAINTING

PLUMBING

WINDOW CLEANING

SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

(250)889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Moving- 2 men, 5 ton, $85/hr. 2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. *WRIGHT BROS* Moving. $80/hr, 2 men/3 ton. Seniors discount. Philip (250)383-8283

SAFEWAY PAINTING

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

BOB’S WINDOW Cleaning. Roof demoss, Gutters. Licensed and affordable. 250-884-7066.

250-479-7950 FREE ESTIMATES • Lawn Maintenance • Landscaping • Hedge Trimming • Tree Pruning • Yard Cleanups • Gardening/Weeding • Aeration, Odd Jobs NO SURPRISES NO MESS www.hollandave.ca

HOME IMPROVEMENTS JACK NASH, serving Victoria since 1980. Big or small, free estimates. Call (250)881-3886.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

LANDSCAPING

PAINTING

SPRING clean up! Lawns, hedges and more. Free estimates. 778-350-1880

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. DALE’S PAINTING Int/ext. Prompt, courteous, 25yrs exp $25/hr Free est. 250-516-2445 LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

JUNK BOX- We Do All The Loading

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee�. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

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STUCCO REPAIRMAN- Stucco & Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

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WINDOW CLEANING BLAINE’S WINDOW WASHING. Serving Sidney & Brentwood since 1983. Average house $35. 250-656-1475

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www.vicnews.com • A15



SPORTS

Playing aUg 23 - 29 The Butler

Fri Sat @ 6:45 & 9:15 Sun - Thu @ 7:00 Sat Sun @ 2:00 Tue Wed Thu @ 1:00

World climbing event successful

Planes G

Exciting lead climbing finals bring IFSC championships to a close CENTRAL SAANICH — The  2013 International Federation of Sport Climbing (IFSC) 2013 World Youth Climbing Championships came to a close Monday night with the exciting finals of the lead competition. Unlike the speed competition, which was dominated by the Russians on Sunday, medals in the lead climbing competition were distributed to climbers from a variety of countries. Leading the pack was Team Japan who took away four medals in total including gold medals from Aika Tajima in the Female Youth B category and Naoki Shimatani in the Male Youth A category.  Also in that category was Shinichiro Nomura who won a Silver Medal and Oba Miwa who took home bronze in the Female Youth B category. The Austrians also took home four medals, with Jessica Piltz in Female Youth A and Magdalena Rock in Female Junior taking home gold.  Katharina Posch joined Rock on the podium in Female Junior earning a silver medal, while Bernhard Rock won bronze in Male Youth A. Team France took home three medals, with Hugo Parmentier winning silver in Male Youth B and teammates Manon Hily (Female Junior) and Julia Chanourdie (Female Youth A) winning bronze. Next up was Team Germany with two silver medals, the Christian J. Stewart/Boulders Media first from Emillie Gerhardt in Poland’s Aleksandra Rudzinska would take gold in the Female Youth B and the sec- Junior Female speed competition on Sunday.

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Fri - Tue @ 7:15 Fri Sat @ 9:20 Sat Sun @ 2:15 Tue @ 1:15

Unfinished Song G Wed Thu @ 1:15 & 7:15

250-655-3384

info@ starcinema.ca www.starcinema.ca Christian J. Stewart/Boulders Media

The U.S.A.’s John Brosler reacts with joy after winning the Speed Climbing Bronze Medal. ond from the colourful Sebastian Halenke in Junior Male. Securing the final two gold Medals of the evening were Italy’s Stefano Carnati in Male Youth B and Russia’s Dmitry Fakiryanov in Junior Male. “This was the first time that the 2013 World Youth Climbing Championships were hosted in North America and by all accounts it was an unparalleled success,” said Christian Stewart, the media contact for The Boulders. “Over 500 people each day, 2,000 in total, attended the event and were treated to an exciting weekend of climbing from the 474 athletes in the competition.” Web resolution photos of all the winners, including the speed winners are available on the Boulders Climbing Gym Facebook page at www.facebook.com/bouldersclimb or visit climbtheboulders.com/ world-youth-championships.

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— Submitted

24 Hour Bike Ride ~ Wednesday, August 28th – Thursday, August 29th

Come out and support local riders Terry and Alan as they bike for 24 hours to raise money for the Tour de Rock. They will begin at 7pm on the 28th and finish at 7pm on the 29th just in time for the Sidney Night Market.

No Limit Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament ~ Thursday, August 29th

Register today for this Tour de Rock poker tournament taking place at the View Royal Casino. Entry fee is $100 and the game begins at 7pm. To enter, for your chance to win $1000, please contact Marc Lavergne at (250) 818-9177 or marc.lavergne@rcmp-grc.gc.ca To find out more, contact: South Vancouver Island Community Giving Co-ordinator, Corinna Adams. Cell: 250.893.4757 ~ Email: cadams@bc.cancer.ca Visit us on Facebook: Facebook.com/CopsforCancerBC OR follow us on Twitter: @Tourderock and mention #CopsforCancerBC

OFFICIAL FUEL SPONSOR


A16 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, August 23, 2013 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Langford Furniture Park has been SOLD!

THE

CLOSING FOREVER!

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Larimer King Storage Bed

Includes Upholstered Headboard, Storage Footboard and Rails

4 Piece Larimer King Bedroom $1,999 Includes King Storage Bed, Dresser, Mirror and Night Stand

SALE!

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Peninsula News Review, August 23, 2013