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Bee shortage could cost $6M in lost crop production.

Page 3

Volume 13 • Issue 2

Free rural delivery from Langley to Agassiz

June, 2013

Inside your

• Federal MP Mark Strahl comments on recent reports of cuts at the Agassizbased research centre operated by the federal government. • John English, Dean of the Trades and Technology Centre at the University of the Fraser Valley, talks about UFV’s commitment to agriculture. • Former MLA John Les talks about agriculture, UFV, and his plans for the future. • Free trade talks between Canada and the European trade Union are wading through beef, dairy, eggs, chicken and cheese quotas. • Lower Mainland mayors are concerned new federal regulations for medical marijuana grow ops will put pressure on agricultural land.

Aaron Warkentin (right) and Abe Goertz take a close look at a 1919 tractor during the 91st annual Chilliwack Plowing Match at Fore Road and Highway 11 in Abbotsford in May. JENNA HAUCK/BLACK PRESS

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JUNE, 2013

Grant Ullyot

Fraser Valley’s Agriculture Publication

Federal staff layoffs in Kamloops and Agassiz

Publisher: Liz Lynch 604-702-5560 Managing Editor: Greg Knill 604-702-5570 Editor: Grant Ullyot Advertising: Larry Krause 604-702-5579 Production: Gina Rokochy 604-702-5567 Classified Manager: Sharon Harmsen 604-702-5555

45860 Spadina Avenue Chilliwack, B.C. V 2 P 6 H 9 Published by

westcoastfarmer@theprogress.com

INDEX 3 Agassiz research 3 Agriculture at UFV 5 John Les 6 EU free trade talks 8 Carbon tax relief 10 Beyond the Barn

Grassroots

Cuts in federal funding have hit hard in BC with the announced closure of the Kamloops Research facility and reductions in staffing at the Pacific Agriculture Research Centre (PARC) in Agassiz. (See story, page 3.) The three federally employed dairy scientists at Agassiz are being re-located to Lennoxville, Quebec, which is Canada’s largest dairy research facility. The closure of the federal program in no way affects the operation of the University of BC Dairy Education and Research Centre which will continue to function as a separate operation. In fact, the centre is now working with an architect to draft plans for new accommodations for both staff and students who have been housed in antiquated facilities or boarded out. A new 32 bed dormitory should be completed sometime next year. Meanwhile the last of the poultry research staff at Agassiz have also been given layoff notices. The closure of Kamloops is a major job loss for the city with over 200 people being cut by the federal government.     

By protecting BC’s farmland we are ensuring the farmers and families who grow our food will continue to develop their passion and knowledge for the next generation ~ Norm Letnick

boost in funds will result in the ALC receiving almost $3M in operating funding from the BC government this year, and re-emphasizes the government’s commitment to help the ALC become a stronger organization and transition to a more self-supporting operating model. ”The province supports BC’s diverse agri-foods industry in different ways and the balanced budget 2013 includes significant action that provides relief to an industry that employs about 5,500 of the 61,000 British Columbians working in the agri-foods sector. The budget provides Commentary The following comments are those $20M in carbon tax relief over three of Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick.   years to help offset carbon tax costs “Despite the economic challenges for commercial greenhouse vegetable governments around the globe are and horticulture operations. The new facing today, BC’s balanced budget funding follows the $7.6M the prov2013 reaffirms our government’s sup- ince provided in temporary funding port for agriculture. The ministry’s in 2012.  “Linda Della Santi, executive direc2013-2014 operating budget is $79.3M – an increase of almost 20 per cent tor of the BC Greenhouse Growers Association said the expansion  of from the year previous. “The increased funding builds on the rebate creates a predictable tax the BC government’s Agri-Foods strat- regime and allows members to keep egy, a roadmap to the sector becoming their competitive edge by reinvesta $14B a year industry by 2017. One ing in the sector while bringing  new of the main  commitments in our dollars to our province through the Agri-Foods strategy is to provide a export  of high quality and high value sustainable land base for production. BC greenhouse products. In addition, By protecting BC’s farmland we are we intend to introduce legislation this ensuring the farmers and families who fall to provide carbon tax exemption grow our food will continue to develop for farmers for motor fuels used in their passion and knowledge for the on-farm equipment such as tractors, and fuel on highway in eligible farm next generation. “One of the elements of the budget vehicles. Together with the carbon I find most rewarding is the additional tax relief these measures will result in $4M the government is providing to BC farmers being  about $11M more the Agricultural Land Commission competitive a year. “Other elements of the budget that (ALC) over the next three years. The

will benefit agriculture include changes to the Property Tax Act that support farm succession and an additional $1M to expand the School Fruit and Vegetable Snack program.   “Balanced budget 2013 carries on the constructive working relationship we’ve established with BC’s agriculture sector and builds on initiatives like the $2M buy local program.  “Our role as government is to create an environment in BC where agrifoods producers  succeed. Budget 2013 supports this, and outlines a sustainable fiscal plan that supports our economy and our commitments.” CDC

Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz has confirmed the re-appointment of Randy Williamson as Chair of the Canadian Dairy Commission (CDC). The chairperson is responsible for the continued leadership of the CDC, and finding viable ways to help build a strong, sustainable Canadian dairy industry, Williamson heads up the 3-person CDC Board of Directors.  The CDC is a crown corporation established in 1966 and plays a key role in shaping dairy policy in Canada.

John vanDongen

After 18 years of being an MLA in BC, John vanDongen has been relegated to the sidelines losing out in his re-election bid in the Abbotsford South riding to Daryl Plecas. vanDongen was a long time Minister of Agriculture in BC, and one of the best being accorded accolades for the work he did for the industry. I recall a comment made during a meeting of the Farm Writers of Canada during a national meeting

in Kelowna, when one of the visiting eastern Canadian writers expressed surprise when vanDongen not only showed up for lunch, but stayed at the meeting throughout the afternoon and evening. He noted that his provincial Ag Minister wouldn’t likely do that. John used to drive himself from Abbotsford to his Ministry office and claimed that he passed just about every type of agriculture operation during his trips. He noted that it showed just how diverse BC’s Ag industry was. Two sticky wickets that vanDongen get involved with, and which generated both compliments and criticism, were the dissident farmers issue in the nineties and more recently the BC Rail payout. Few people can criticise vanDongen’s initiative, however the results are not what he wanted nor strived for. I have always had and continue to have a lot of respect for John, and I was sorry to see him defeated in the May 2013 election. However, I am sure his keen desire to serve will stand him in good stead in the future, and while it may mean doing a different job, hopefully it is one he can enjoy. PAS date changed

Jim Shepard has announced that due to Tradex scheduling conflicts the Pacific Agriculture Show will be a week later than normal next year. The new dates will be Jan.30 to Feb.1, 2014.

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News

Poultry operations end at Agassiz research station By Jessica Peters Black Press

The Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre is not closing, MP Mark Strahl has stated in an email to Black Press. The statement is in response to a recent reports of cuts at the Agassiz-based research centre operated by the federal government. Several positions are reported to have been terminated in the past weeks, leaving the centre with as few as five scientists and causing fear that the centre will eventually close. Last week, the Agriculture and AgriFood Canada office confirmed that the centre is experiencing a “work force adjust-

ment situation” and that employees impacted are being provided with support. While Strahl said “the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre in Agassiz will continue to play an important role in agricultural research in our region,” he also confirmed that operations there will be affected by changes. “I am advised that poultry research similar to that currently conducted by the Research Centre is also being done by academia/ industry and that the Research Centre will cease to duplicate their efforts,” he wrote. “While AAFC’s dairy research will be consolidated elsewhere, UBC’s Dairy Education and Research Centre will continue

to operate on site.” The centre will continue to host research into minor use pesticides, horticulture and crop protection, he added. Strahl also confirmed that the reason for the cuts was a fiscal decision, in an effort to reduce overall government spending, and balance the budget. “Unfortunately, that means that some federal civil servants will be affected,” he said. “Employees who are affected have several options ranging from early retirement to alternative federal employment, to catching on with projects that may be sponsored by academia or stakeholder groups.” He also referred to the new

Growing Forward 2 program that puts money in the hands of the provinces and stakeholders, “to develop market access, innovative products and to explore solutions to food and environmental issues.” He suggested that the facilities in Agassiz could be used by stakeholders to begin new projects that “address the needs of the community.” GF2 is a $3 billion dollar investment by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments and the foundation for government agricultural programs and services over the next five years. The new program came into effect on Apr. 1, and includes three key components for

agricultural: AgriInnovation, AgriCompetitiveness and AgriMarketing. It also includes a business risk management program to help protect farmers against severe market volatility and disasters. The Agassiz research station is one of 19 federally funded stations across the country. It has been operating in Agassiz since 1889 and consists of 310 hectares, research greenhouses, an arboretum and the longest-running weather station in the province. Each summer, staff and scientists open the doors the public for an interactive open house explaining all the functions and current projects.

Bee shortage stings farmers, beekeepers Agriculture

takes root at UFV campus

By Adrian MacNair Black Press

There are only a few days left in the blueberry pollination season and according to experts, there’s not enough bees to go around. “It’s the same from Tsawwassen to Chilliwack and ever ywhere,” says John Gibeau, president the Honeybee Centre in Surrey. “We’re 4,000 colonies shy.” Gibeau estimates that bee shortage will amount to a $6 million deficit in fruit production this year due because the flowers just aren’t being pollinated. “I’ve been using every single bee we can find,” said Gibeau. “Any one colony by itself in the field, we took it and gave it to a blueberry grower.” Gibeau attributes this year’s shortage to three reasons. Firstly, current customers are ordering more bees than expected, while new growers are entering the market for the first time. And although Gibeau said they might have been prepared for that demand, the unseasonably warm weather has had growers asking for bees, which are notoriously productive in warm weather. The third reason is three large Alberta-based beekeepers that usually supply the Lower Mainland did

By Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer

gives a bigger, more fertile berry.” Because of the shortage of both wild and commercial bees, the cost of renting hives has gone up considerably. Where it may have cost $50 to $60 a hive a decade ago, a hive can run $90 to $120 today. Caroline Bremner of Birchwood Blueberry Farm in North Delta has been growing blueberries since 1985 and gets her bees from a reliable beekeeper in Fort St. John. She is using between 150 and 200 hives for her 28-hectare (70 acre) crop and says she has no supply issues. “People always talk about it,” says Bremner. “It’s amazing, people say, oh you can’t get bees anymore. I’ve never had a problem.” But Bremner says she hasn’t seen the wild bees this year as she had in years previous.

John English is the Dean of the Trades and Technology Centre at the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV). He was appointed to the position in 20ll after spending ten years as Dean of Construction and the Environment at BCIT in Vancouver.  English considers UFV to be a bit smaller than BCIT, but feels UFV is a little more focused on what it does. With the recent introduction of a graduate program, the university is starting to exercise its full mandate, he says. “We haven’t been a university very long, so you can expect more advanced science and arts degrees and some more graduate studies.” The Trades and Technology Centre is unique in its own way with the various components built so that each incorporates a classroom adjacent to a workshop enabling students to easily get both their theory and practical work in the same location. English says the centre provides an excellent education facility for people in their home area. “I am trying to see where technology fits into a university and am making progress on that front. However I appreciate the fact that everyone, from President Mark Evered on down, are putting a lot of priority on agriculture programs. When I originally got here I thought that agriculture was not as well served as it could be from an education perspective. I consider it to be a very important part of my mandate.”   English says his department is elated by the recent $1 million grant given to UFV to help pay for construction of two new greenhouses and a barn at the Canada Education Park site. English said the now-retired Chilliwack MLA John Les engineered the government funding which now gives the university around $2.3 million for these projects. (See related story, page 5.) However UFV’s financial goal is $3.5 million, so it still has to raise another million dollars. But they can now move ahead with the timetable to provide new greenhouses and a barn. “The new infrastructure is going to go a long way toward keeping the people in the region focused on their agriculture careers,” says English. ”They are essential to what we teach and it is nice see them being developed.” The UFV School of Agriculture is in its own building at the education park site. However, agriculture students share a new lab inside the main university building which is considered an essential ‘state of the art’ facility.   He says something that is a credit to the leadership at UFV is the fact that they are being very sensitive to the region. “We have been asked to go back and re-evaluate our agriculture programs to determine how we can improve both the educational and research programs that mean so much to the Fraser Valley economy.

Continued: BEES/ p4

Continued: UFV/ p4

Beekeeper Don Cameron of Westham Island Apiary has all of his bees in production on this blueberry farm in Ladner. ADRIAN MACNAIR PHOTO

not come this year, nor give notice to growers. “So, the growers are out thousands of colonies and it’s been a scramble for those growers that had committed to these beekeepers to fulfill their orders.” That has left Gibeau and other Lower Mainland beekeepers struggling to meet

The Buzz on Bees • Bees support 30 per cent of the world’s food crops and 90 per cent of wild plants • A honey bee colony can have up to 60,000 bees • A queen honey bee lives 3-4 years and lays 1,500 eggs a day • Honey bees cluster around to queen to keep the hive at a temperature of 34 Celsius • A worker bee may visit 2,000 flowers each day, surviving three weeks at this pace • Bees generated 1.8 million pounds of honey worth $6.8 million for the B.C. economy in 2011 • B.C. is home to 2,000 beekeepers, with 38,000 colonies of honey bees • In 2011, 57 per cent of B.C.’s honeybee colonies were located in the Lower Mainland

demand. “There are not enough bees in the province of British Columbia to satisfy the blueberry grower demand,” he said, adding that means importing hives from out of province. Kevin Husband of Emma Lea Farms on Westham Island has been using commercial bee hives since he started growing blueberries a decade ago. He booked 250 hives a year in advance to pollinate his 20 hectares (50 acres) of blueberries. With 20,000 bees to each hive, there could be more than five million bees in his fields. “It is a challenge to get bees, especially for someone else that’s just starting up and just starting to realize how important it is,” says Husband, adding growers will usually use between two to four hives per acre. “To get a top quality crop you need many visits by a bee to a blossom, and that


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June, 2013

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“We have completed a study in partnership with others to help us understand what kinds of programs we should be looking at and we are just in the process of digesting that. I am hoping that over the next year the University will be able to look at that (study) and conclude we should be offering science degrees, arts degrees, health degrees, as well as trades and technology degrees, to help the agricultural economy of the region.” English notes that a farmer can also find it useful to be a woodworker, a machinist, a pipe fitter; - any of the technical trades could be a part of a farmer’s responsibilities.   “Right now we are contemplating a notion of a ‘farmwright’ program, similar in concept to a shipwright. This program would enable an individual capable of keeping a farm operation maintained. It is an interesting concept and an example of the kind of thinking that is going on here at the University.” English says that even getting a business

degree is important today with our global economy, productivity expectations and sustainability expectations. “When someone graduates with a business degree from UFV they are also participating in the agriculture economy of the region. And so we want students to graduate with a business degree. We have programs that talk about plants and animals and the nuts and bolts of the farm operations, but we need students with a technical education too. “I just learned that health products are becoming a big part of the agriculture sector, something I wouldn’t have ever guessed.” English stated that UFV’S expansion plans are also looking at automation, heavy duty mechanics, and advance science degrees as well. English stated he is optimistic about UFV’s plans. “I am hoping we will see capital investment from groups that were also investors in the development of the current university participate again in our future endeavors.”

 

 

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“I’ve got a big garden at the front and a number of very large rhododendrons,” she says. “Well, when they’re in bloom they’re usually buzzing with the wild bees. This year I’ve seen just one.” The shortage of bees is referred to by experts as a “colony collapse disorder” which has been happening throughout the world in commercial and wild colonies alike. Hobbyist beekeepers have been saying they just aren’t seeing the wild swarms of previous years. The annual mortality rates in beekeeping have escalated over the past decade from a high of 35 per cent in 2008 to about 25 per cent today. For beekeepers, that’s a tremendous loss of “livestock” over a one year period. But with a good queen, a beekeeper can replace his

losses relatively quickly. Don Cameron is a smallscale beekeeper with 40 to 50 hives on Westham Island. Right now, all of them are pollinating a blueberry farm in Delta. “I’ve had a couple of calls from people asking if I have extra hives and I don’t,” says Cameron. “So, I would have no trouble putting more hives out there.” Cameron will finish pollinating blueberries and then move his hives into blackberries in the summer. Toward the fall he’ll put his hives out for pumpkins or wild flowers on Brunswick point. But small-scale beekeepers like Cameron or the backyard hobbyists don’t really make a big difference in the province’s fruit yield. “If you’ve got a big blueberry or raspberry or cranberry operation, you don’t want to be dealing with a bunch of people with five or

10 hives,” he says. Gibeau blames declining wild bee populations on “intensive growers” who are spraying insecticides outside of the pollination season. When farmers spray their fields with non-residual insecticides for aphids or fruit flies the commerciallyprovided honey bees aren’t there, but the wild bees are. That means the wild bee colonies are wiped out before the pollination season. Gibeau said he teaches beekeeping in developing countries such as the Dominican Republic and Ethiopia and he has seen the same problem. “The growers and the wild bees are both at odds with each other,” he says. “If there was a way for the growers to deal with fruit flies and aphids without having to spray insecticides then they would have less reliance on honey bees.”


5

June, 2013

News

John Les: Agriculture and life after government West Coast Farmer

Former MLA John Les has always been a supporter of B.C. agriculture, so when he was able to secure a million-dollar grant from the provincial government to help fund new agricultural facilities at the University of the Fraser Valley in Chilliwack he was elated. We sat down together to talk about his involvement, opinions and future plans. So how did you manage to secure a million dollars for UFV at a time when the provincial government is pleading poverty? It was just something I wanted to get done. I think I have had real success in developing the new campus in Chilliwack’s Education Park. However, there was a bit of unfinished business and that was the agricultural component. It was a lot hard work, but at the 11th hour we got it done. Getting everybody on line, from the provincial finance minister on down, took a lot of time and effort. The money came out of the 2013-2014 budget. There is always a capital allotment in each budget and I got the million bucks before it could be allocated to anyone else. When you are early into the budget there is some money there and I just made it my personal objective. I wanted to leave a little bit of a legacy for agriculture to allow for future expansion of the sector including additional programming at the university. B.C. has some of the best farmland in the world and so many different opportunities in the future with the academic support of the university. What the million dollars essentially did was trigger contributions from other organizations and agencies. Hopefully they

will be able to push the total amount to something over $3 million. And that will give them (UFV) some pretty nice new facilities. Is the increased emphasis the university is putting on agriculture education going to help the industry to grow? Since he arrived at UFV to become president, Mark Evered has made it part of his ambition to fully develop the agricultural faculty at the university. UFV needs to improve its technology and research to take on a leading role in the agriculture region. We need to find ways to better utilize our small acreages. It doesn’t take much land to produce an awful lot of food and agricultural products. There are a lot of things UFV can do to support agriculture because some of the other support agencies that used to be major players like the Research Station in Agassiz and even UBC, I would argue, are less relevant to supporting agriculture today than they have been in the past. And that is where I think UFV can fill the void. I think it would be a natural fit. Evidently you heard about the layoffs at PARC in Agassiz. Yes, I have and it is a real concern to me in terms of what it is going to mean not only from a University point of view but also in terms of the agriculture industry in the valley. These are federal institutions that have been here for years and years. I’m not sure where it’s all going to go. There comes a point when the curve for the mass is gone and the rest of the way down is a slippery slope that gets even steeper. The Agassiz dairy researchers are being relocated to the dairy research facility in Lennoxville, Quebec. Meanwhile the blueberry research program has been transferred to Nova

Scotia. And that makes no sense at all to me. We, in B.C., are in the middle of the world’s largest blueberry production area; it isn’t located in Nova Scotia. The Fraser Valley in B.C. is where the largest concentration of blueberry production is located. Again, a huge opportunity for Tom Baumann and the folks at UFV. They have already been intricately involved with the blueberry industry and they should just continue to develop their role. If the federal government doesn’t understand blueberry production. I guess we will have to do it ourselves. The federal cutbacks are part of the government’s attempt at eliminating its deficit, but cuts to agriculture research seem to be self defeating. Doing ag research is a long term commitment not an 8 to 5 day job. The down side of the cuts is that once they are made they will not be restored in the future, so the programs are gone. I am sure the B.C. industry will find a way to develop the needed research and academic support it needs. It won’t come from the research station, it will come from UFV. Ottawa has talked about increasing research programs but the current trend is just the opposite. Agriculture requires research because they are discovering new things all the time – new breeds, new varieties, new strains and new hybrids. You have to have the supporting institution there. The global market as they call it today has really changed how we handle food products and other commodities. That’s true. We can ship fresh blueberries and cherries to markets in Europe and that wasn’t possible 20 years ago. Today the

fall air is in the

Former Chilliwack MLA John Les talks about agriculture, UFV, and life after politics. Jenna Hauck/ Black Press File

flower market which used to be a major crop for B.C. producers is no more. A lot or our flowers now come from South America, from Mexico and Europe, where a lot flowers are grown in smaller countries like Ethiopia. At one time the Fraser Valley had a booming rose growing industry in

September 10th 6-13 wcf

have no regrets. However, I am far too young to retire so I am looking at potential employment possibilities. Now that you are out of politics looking back what might you consider some of your most memorable moments? When I was in cabinet we Continued: Les/ p6

Following the Leader Across 1 Paid players 5 “Seinfeld” role 11 Grammy category 14 Deliver a tirade 15 Supper 16 Ram’s mate 17 Perpetually 18 Male or female 19 Econ. indicator 20 February celebration for many provinces 22 Kimono sash 24 Wide open 25 Noisy fight 28 Big attraction in London 29 Common connector 32 Courtroom goal 33 Sequencer of print jobs 35 Brain wave 36 Blue-collar employee 39 Type of pepper 40 California mountains 41 Goes back 43 Craving 44 Acquire 47 Idolizes 48 Barnyard honker 50 Pilgrimage to Mecca 51 Donna Fargo song 55 Big fuss 57 Flowering shrub 59 Dud 60 Chum 61 Okanagan city 62 Dublin’s land 63 Printers’ widths 64 Deprives of courage 65 Nerve network Down 1 Kind of house 2 Wreak havoc upon 3 Kind of band

our next issue is

Chilliwack and it’s gone. So why did you decide to retire from your position as MLA? I made my decision many months ago, feeling that 30 years in politics was enough for anyone. I had three years as a councilor in Chilliwack, 12 years as mayor of Chilliwack and another 12 years as MLA. I

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next month. Back in the 70s I sold passed civil forfeiture legislaa lot of agriculture properties so I * By Grant Ullyot tion which allows the Solicitor feel very comfortable going back West Coast Farmer General’s ministry to go in and into that. seize property that was used for Beef, dairy, eggs, chicken and As you look ahead to a real estate unlawful purposes and keep the cheese quotas remain the lone career again, what is the potential proceeds to be used for crime prePackage for includes loader and implement obstacles X. to hammering out a the agriculture sector in B.C.? vention activities. That was pretty free-trade agreement between The potential is huge. The popuimportant legislation. per month Canada and the European trade lation of B.C. will continue to grow Overall though through all my Union (EU). Both sides are eat. It’s that MAX 28XL Hurry topeople saveneed ontoMahindra years in politics my favorite days inand now focused on this country’s simple. Plus, I think we have some were the 12 years I was mayor of supply management system opportunities for exports Chilliwack. I had the my most fulfilling #1real anddeal how much access the EU world’s selling tractor before this ends. especially for the non-supply manyears during my time as mayor. It should be given into our quota Come Red Tag Sale, and system. save As onfar as Canadian proaged our commodities like blueberries, was a time when we created the in for cranberries, perhaps even raspberducers and the federal governChilliwack Economic Partners ries although they face stiff comment are concerned – nothing. * Corporation and that has worked Ottawa has sustained a policy of out exceedingly well. We were able petition from eastern European no further access to our supply countries. to pay off Chilliwack’s debt, keep management system, a guaranThe other major opportunity taxes down, and create some new tee given producers during the for farmers is the really high end economic development, which still now defunct World Trade Talks. organically grown foods; first class serves Chilliwack well today. Already the current free trade quality products. Chilliwack is one of the fastest discussions have gone on longer I have a son-in-law who grows growing medium sized cities in than anyone imagined.      strawberries hydroponically and all of Canada and has been for the Canada’s supply management he can’t grow them fast enough. past five to six years. system was put in place by the He gets a good dollar for his prodWill you be going back into the federal government over 40 ucts proving that people will pay real estate business? years ago. It provides a system for quality. Over 30 years ago I had my real of licenses and quotas that limWe are heading into the maturestate license. And because I had its how many producers each ing of the baby-boom generation segment can have, and covers that license back then, I was able off sales of chicken, dairy prodover the next 10 to 20 years. A lot to challenge the current exam ucts, eggs, and cheese while  them have money and they want process at UBC, which I did. I got protecting Canada’s production the results today - passed the exam first class quality, and are prepared by imposing a set of tariffs on with Model 89 perMax cent.28XL to pay for it. It is a real opportunity imports. So I will be going back into real for agriculture. v

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Meanwhile the focus is now on the Canada-EU free trade negotiations. A strong supporter of supply management Bruce Muirhead, from the University of Waterloo in Ontario says those that claim American dairy products are cheaper should also know that the U.S. government provides an annual 40 per cent tax payer subsidy to the American dairy industry. Without this hidden support, American dairy products would be much more costly for consumers.     However, we haven’t heard the last word about supply management. It could well become a bone of contention for countries involved in the Asian Trans Pacific Partnership, which Canada dearly wants to join. Several countries have already stated they oppose supply management. And Australia, once one of the biggest supporters of supply management has now disbanded its system. New Zealand did the same several years ago, and dairy prices in that country increased to where the government had to step in and set a ceiling to prevent a collapse of its dairy industry.

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Canada’s supply management system has been a bone of contention in this country with many notable organizations suggesting it be disbanded among them the Fraser Institute. Recently that organization claimed that groceries in Canadian stores would be cheaper to buy if there was no supply management system. Other groups like the Conference Board of Canada support that theory. They contend the federal government is forced to subsidize the supply managed sector. Producers and their organizations argue supply management benefits both the consumer and the producer. For years now, Canada has been forced by the World Trade Organization to modify its supply management agreement to satisfy other world trading partners. Heading into the last round of WTO discussions which collapsed before any agreement was reached, the federal government solidly backed supply management, stating it would not allow it be changed. So as of today, the WTO round is in limbo, and no further talks are scheduled and our supply management system remains intact.

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Come inWest forCoast ourEquipment Red Tag Sale, and save on no evasFreeman dna ,Machinery elaS gaMAX T deRCentral ruMAX o rSERIES of ni emoMJB C Auto*& Equipment* THE REVOLUTIONARY REVOLUTIONARY HandlersTHE Equipment Aurora Truck MAHINDRA Centre Ltd. MAHINDRA Inc. Equipment SERIES 0000 0000 Street Street Name Name • T own • T Name own Name the world’s #1311selling before this .deal sd neends. la eT dag siht and erCommercial ofebsave rand otWay, carton g nille s on 1#Drive, s’dlrow eSales ht Ltd. Come Come intractor for in our for Red our T Red ag Sale, Sale, save 39451 No 3 Road Culbertson Way, 2206 Nadina N. 106-1363 10290 Dallas 000.000.0000 000.000.0000 • dealersite.com • dealersite.com the world’s the world’s #1 #1 selling tractor before before this this ends. deal ends.2701 Alberni Hwy Abbotsford, BC Princeton, BC selling Houston, BC tractor Penticton, BC deal Kamloops, BC Hurry in to save on Mahindra MAX 28XL L X 8 2 X A M a r d n i h a M n o e v a s o t n i yrruH by Call Joel: 604-850-3601 Ext. 225 Call George: 250-295-0101 Call Brent oraddition Dennis: 250-845-7600 250-493-0138 250-573-6809 Coombs, BC by Hurry Hurry in to save in on save Mahindra on Mahindra MAX MAX 28XL * Interest/payment-free * Interest/payment-free period is not period in addition is not to in to contract to term. contract With term. approved With 28XL approved credit. Discounts credit. Discounts may varymay vary

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model. Program model. Program restrictions restrictions may apply may . See apply dealer . See for dealer details. for Offer details. expires Offer March expires 31,March 2013. joel@handlersequipment.com All prices are FOB Abbotsford. Additional freight charges vary for other $ $ per month per per month htnmonth olocations. m rep

31, 2013. 250-752-1010

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Handlers is includes raising loader fundsand forimplement the Canadian bank Package X. .X tneFoodgrains melpmi dna re daol sin edMay ulcni eand gakcJune. aP

SMITH TRACTOR SAVE WITHSMITH 0% FOR NTRACTOR OS MONTHS HT N OM 2 ON 7Name UP TO 72 OT PU ROF %0 HTIW EVAS 00000000 StreetStreet NameName • Town • T own Name For every Mahindra tractor sold during these months, up to $800 will go towards their Food Aid programs around the world to help end World Hunger. Contact Handlers for more information or visit www.handlersequipment.com/news


June, 2013

7

News

Keep medical marijuana off agriculture land, cities say Black Press

Lower Mainland politicians want any new licensed medical marijuana factories built on industrial land, not already scarce farmland. A resolution passed Thursday by the Lower Mainland Local Government Association (LMLGA) urges the Union of B.C. Municipalities to lobby for the industrial-only land restriction as the federal government prepares to approve new large-scale indoor growers. Ottawa announced in January it will phase out individual licences for medical marijuana users to grow pot in their own homes and instead have all medical pot grown and distributed by highly regulated, secure commercial operators. Surrey Coun. Linda Hepner said medical marijuana is a pharmaceutical that should be grown in industrial zoned areas rather than competing against food crops for agricultural land that’s already too expensive for some prospective conventional farmers. “We would be utilizing a lot of agricultural land for something that could be in a greenhouse environment in an industrial zone,” Hepner said. “We don’t want to see all our agricultural food space in marijuana,” added outgoing LMLGA president Barbara Steele. Also backing the resolution were several politicians from Fraser Valley communities. The federal health ministry intends to launch the new system by April of 2014. Maple Ridge Mayor Ernie Daykin is one local leader who disagreed. “We feel very strongly our industrial park is not the appropriate place,” he said.

The main concerns, Daykin said, are odour for neighbours and whether operators have tough enough security to fend off grow-rips by gangsters. Maple Ridge wanted the federally regulated pot growers to instead be limited to agricultural parcels, with large setbacks, similar to what would be used for a mushroom or hog farm. “We’ve got somebody who is already interested in putting up a 26,000 square foot facility,” Daykin said. Hydroponic pot farms grown in well-gated industrial buildings would still be a good fit on low-quality agricultural land with marginal soils, he said. Daykin dismissed concerns that weed might crowd out food crops. “The reality is there’s probably only going to be 60 to 70 of these facilities across the country,” he said. “We might get one or we might not get one. It won’t hurt my feelings if we don’t.” A big concern for Daykin and other Lower Mainland leaders is what will be done to enforce the shutdown of existing federally approved medical marijuana growers, which have long been criticized for safety hazards and ties to the illegal drug trade. Health Canada won’t share their locations with local cities, so civic teams continue to conduct fire safety inspections that root out many growers. Medical marijuana grows often turn out to be in violation of health, fire, building or plumbing safety regulations. “The big issue for us is the fire hazard – the grow ops in the residential areas that go up in smoke,” Steele said.

Helping Families Giving Hope Today

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8

June, 2013

News

Permanent tax relief for greenhouse growers By Kathryn Hardy

Special to West Coast Farmer The 2013 grant program which provided tax relief for commercial greenhouse sectors, including vegetable commercial greenhouses, floriculture growers, wholesale production and forest seedling nurseries, will become permanent this year. It will be set at 80 per cent of the carbon tax paid on natural gas and propane used for heating and CO2 production. Interested producers should visit - www.gov.bc.ca/agri - or contact their respective industry association for application forms, details and deadlines. Application packages are now available. Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick says the 2013 budget provides a new permanent grant program to help offset carbon tax costs. The B.C. government also intends to introduce legislation this fall to provide a carbon tax exemption for farmers for the same coloured motor fuels, and uses, that they are currently able to purchase exempt from motor fuel tax. The carbon tax exemption for farmers and the carbon tax relief grants for greenhouse operators will provide a combined benefit of about $11 million annually to the B.C. agriculture sector. The floral and horticultural industries have been requesting

gas tax relief, and Letnick says the BC Government remains committed to its objective of lowering greenhouse gas emissions, while recognizing the unique circumstances faced by the industry. Letnick says his government remains committed to the objective faced by B.C.'s greenhouse industry which calls for heavy investment in technology and innovation, with projected sales of over $500 million in 2011, and the B.C. government wants to support and sustain that growth." B.C.’s Finance Minister Michael De Jong says providing relief to the greenhouse sector recognizes that it is not the only industry with competitiveness challenges. “Greenhouse growers are distinct from most others in that they need carbon dioxide and purposely produce it because it is essential for plant growth. Maintaining the affordability and competitiveness of locally produced agricultural products is essential." B.C. Greenhouse Growers' Association president and chair Peter Cummings says, “The GH Industry is very gratified that the provincial government has listened to our competitiveness concerns around the carbon tax and has responded by creating a permanent grant program that provides relief over the next 3 years. In the longer run, this provides greater certainty to those growers

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Relief from B.C.'s carbon tax is being welcomed by a variety of sectors in the green house industry.

contemplating expansion in British Columbia." United Flowers Growers Cooperative Association chair John Kerkhoven states, “The carbon tax rebate helps to level the playing field for B.C. flower growers. Our commodity prices are often set to compete with growers from other provinces and countries, and now our heating and tax costs are more comparable. We are very appreciative that the Province has stepped up and supported a competitive environment for our industry." BC Landscape Nurser y Association chair Tim Loewen

noted the total economic impact of the horticulture sector in British Columbia is $2.03 billion and 25,065 jobs. “This carbon tax rebate will enable B.C.'s nursery growers to be competitive within B.C. and across North America, wherever B.C.'s top quality plants are shipped." To be eligible for the Greenhouse Sector Carbon Tax relief program, operators must have a minimum of 5,000 square feet (455 square metres) of heated greenhouse production space. At least 75 per cent of their total B.C.

commercial greenhouse production area must be dedicated to the production of the following eligible products: vegetables, floriculture, nursery crops, or forest seedlings. Growers must be using natural gas or propane for greenhouse heating and/or the production of CO2, and have annual sales exceeding $20,000. The grants will be based on the volumes of fuel used by eligible operators for eligible crop production in 2012 multiplied by 2013 carbon tax rates, which are 148.98 cents per Giga Joule (5.70 ¢/m3) for natural gas and 4.62 cents per litre for propane. The greenhouse vegetable and floriculture sector in B.C. is the second largest in Canada with 2011 sales of $511 million. B.C.'s greenhouse growers currently employ about 6,700 British Columbians in 550 greenhouses that produce tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, plants and flowers. The carbon tax represents 1-2 per cent of greenhouse operating costs. B.C. exported almost $139 million of greenhouse tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers in 2011, the great majority to the USA. B.C. greenhouse floriculture produces a wide range of ornamental plants, including both flowering potted plants and cut flowers. B.C.'s largest export market is the USA.

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Sale Days: Monday - Slaughter, Feeder & Misc. Livestock 11:00 AM start. Wednesday: Dairy and Slaughter 1:00 PM start Choice Holstein Veal ....................................(600-700) ....................................................................... $95.00 – 105.00 Holstein Feeder Veal ....................................(175-400) ......................................................................$100.00 -107.00 Good Beef Type Cows ..................................(Exportable) ................................................................... $65.00 – 75.25 Medium Beef Type Cows.............................(Over 10 Years Old) ........................................................$55.00 - 64.75 Young Cows and Heiferettes................................................................................................................. $70.00 – 80.00 Best Holstein Cows ................................................................................................................................ $64.00 – 73.00 Medium Holstein Cows ...........................................................................................................................$50.00 - 63.75 Poor Holstein Cows ..................................................................................................................................under $49.75 Holstein Heifers....................................................................................................................................... $70.00 – 75.00 Top Quality Slaughter Bulls .........................(1200-2400) .....................................................................$82.00 - 89.00 Good Slaughter Lambs.................................(80-100) ...................................................................... $135.00 – 145.00 Good Slaughter Goats ..................................(54 - 164 LBS)................................................................. $55.00 – 90.00 Good Slaughter Horses ..............................(800-1200) ...................................................................... $10.00 – 27.00

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Started Holstein Bulls .................................(4 Weeks Old+) ...........................................................$100.00 - 180.00 Good Holstein Bulls .....................................(100 lbs+00) .....................................................................$50.00 - 90.00 Small Holstein Bulls ..............................................................................................................................$ 10.00 - 40.00

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Good Fresh & 2nd Calvers .............................................................................................................$1400.00 - 1700.00 Springing Holstein Heifers ............................................................................................................$1200.00 - 1550.00 3rd & 4th Lactation Cows ................................................................................................................$900.00 - 1200.00 Good Open Heifers ......................................(630 - 800) ...................................................................$400.00 - 600.00 Good Open Heifers .......................................(840 - 970) ................................................................... $600.00 – 900.00

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June, 2013

9

Business

Canada frigid to U.S. ‘COOL’ By Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer

In Washington D.C., Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz met with his counter-part,USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack, to express Canada’s strong disappointment with the proposed Countr y-of-Origin Labeling regulator y changes put forward by the U.S. Minister Ritz underlined that the proposed changes will not bring the U.S. into compliance with its WTO obligations and will further increase discrimination against exports of cattle and hogs from Canada, increasing damages to the Canadian industry. “Our Government is extremely disappointed with the proposed regulatory changes put forward by the United States with respect to Country of Origin Labelling”, he said in no uncertain terms. “We do not believe that the proposed changes will bring the United States into compliance with its WTO obligations. “The proposed changes will increase the discrimination against exports of cattle and hogs from Canada and increase damages to Canadian industry. “Our Government will consider all options, including retaliatory measures, should the U.S. not achieve compliance by May 23, 2013, as mandated by the WTO. “We will continue to stand with Canadian cattle and hog producers against unfair Country-of-Origin Labeling in the U.S. “Our Government is focused on ensuring that Canadian producers will be able to gain and maintain broader access to diverse markets, to bolster the Canadian

economy. COOL continues to have a negative economic impact on the Canadian livestock industry and we are standing with Canadian cattle and hog producers against unfair mandatory Country-of-Origin Labeling in the U.S.” Minister Ritz and Secretary Vilsack also discussed opportunities for collaboration and the integrated nature of the CanadaU.S. agriculture and food supply chain that supports jobs and growth on both sides of the border. They both instructed their officials to work on ways to further enhance collaboration in a number of thematic areas, including third country adoption of sciencebased standards, new technologies and agricultural innovation. Over the past three years, approximately $38 billion in agricultural trade has crossed the Canada-U.S. border annually. “As each other’s largest trading partners, we need to work together to ensure trade is contributing to the productivity and competitiveness of the sector for the benefit of our farmers,” said Minister Ritz. “The flow of cross-border trade is essential to our economic growth.” Minister Ritz also met with key decision-makers on the Senate Agriculture Committee and with congressional representatives, to convey Canada’s strong position to stand up for Canadian cattle and hog producers against the unfair mandatory COOL. He then met with the American Meat Institute and livestock industry stakeholders who expressed their support for Canada’s position and are advocating for changes to the U.S. mandatory COOL that hurts their industry.

Tractor sales will support efforts to end world hunger During the months of May and June 2013, Abbotsford based company Handlers Equipment will be campaigning to raise funds for the Food Assistance Programs with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.  In 2012, Handlers worked to raise funds for the Food for the Hungry organization to gift cows and chickens to poverty stricken countries.  This year, they have partnered with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank to raise funds for their Food Aid Programs.  With every new Mahindra purchased during the months of May and June at Handlers, up to $800 will support their Food Assistance Programs.   “Mahindra is humbled and honored to partner with Handlers Equipment for such a noble and worthy cause for the Food Assistance Programs with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.  Their efforts epitomize Mahindra’s Rise philosophy of challenging conventional thinking and innovatively using all our resources to drive positive change in the lives of our stakeholders and communities across the world, to enable them to Rise.  Ending world hunger can only be achieved when

we work together to make a difference and that effort begins with a single person that takes it upon themselves to Spark the Rise.” said Cleo Franklin, Mahindra USA’s vice-president, marketing and strategic planning.. How does this work? The fundraising campaign is unique in that salesman Joel Venema will be personally donating $50 to the Canadian Foodgrains Bank for every Mahindra tractor sold during the campaign. Mahindra will then match the donation, bringing the donation total to $100. Handlers will match their combined donation again, increasing the total to $200.  Funds are also multiplied up to 4:1 by the Canadian Government (CIDA) which would increase the total amount to up to $800. “Ending global hunger is a big job—no one group can do it. That’s why we’re pleased to receive support from businesses like Handlers,” says Jim Cornelius, executive director of the Foodgrains Bank.  “Donations like this allow us to help more people around the world who don’t have enough to eat,” he adds.  The donations will be used by the Foodgrains Bank to

improve the availability of, and access to, food.  It does this by working member agencies and their partners on the ground, helping people who are facing hunger as a result of emergencies such as drought, flooding, poverty and conflict. “This organization and their partners are really working hard to end global hunger,” explains Joel Venema with Handlers Equipment, “Not only are they supporting programs to meet immediate food needs and working to achieve sustainable food security, but they are doing a great job at engaging Canadians to support their efforts and meet their goal to end global hunger.  We just want to help support that goal.”  Handlers is proud to be a dealer of the number one selling tractor in the world, Mahindra.  The series, ranging from 22-100 horsepower, is also offered with Mahindra’s best-in-class 5-year powertrain warranty.    Anyone interested in supporting this campaign or visiting Handlers Equipment should contact Joel Venema directly on or before June 30.    joel@handlersequipment.com – 604.850.3601 ext. 225

We’re here to We’reyou here to help succeed

help you succeed

This doesn’t mean we can help you buy a new tractor, expand your farm or build a fence. But it does mean This doesn’t mean we can you buy a new tractor, we can provide funding forhelp projects to help BC’s expand your farm or build a fence. But it does mean agriculture industry deal with today’s challenges and we can provide funding for projects to help BC’s be ready for tomorrow’s possibilities. And that gives agriculture today’s challenges and your sector –industry and youdeal – a fiwith ghting chance to succeed. be ready for tomorrow’s possibilities. And that gives Is there a new technology or new process being used your sector – and you – a fighting chance to succeed. elsewhere that you would like to test here in BC? Is there a new technology or new process used Would you like to try out a new solution forbeing managing elsewhere that you would like to test here in BC? pests or addressing an ongoing problem or threat Wouldyour you like to try out asector? new solution forwilling managing facing region or your Are you to pests or addressing an ongoing problem or threat share the results of your project with other producers facing yourproduction region or your sector?production Are you willing to increase or reduce costs?to share the results of your project with other producers to increase or reduce production costs? You knowproduction what needs doing!

We able to help. Youmight know be what needs doing! We might bethrough ableprograms to help. Funding is available like Agriculture &

Agri-Food Canada’s Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program. Funding is available through programs like Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada’s Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program. 5- wcf

CONTACT US OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO LEARN MORE! T 250.356.1662 E funding@iafbc.ca www.iafbc.ca CONTACT US OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO LEARN MORE! T 250.356.1662 E funding@iafbc.ca www.iafbc.ca

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Program Funding Provided by Program Funding Provided by 12-IAF-02 Joe & Judy_West Coast Farmer.indd 1

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10

JUNE, 2013

Beyond the Barn

Natural defences against a munching menace

S

lugs are the bane of every gardener but hidden in the soil is an ally with some very simple counter offensives which have now past the science test for efficiency. According to studies in Austria, the gardeners’ best friend is the earthworm. It seems that, although they spend their lives in the soil, they are able to protect plants above ground. According to recent research by a team of scientists at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria, the worm proved to be great at protecting leaves from being chomped by slugs. In addition, they found that an increase in plant diversity has a corresponding decrease in the amount of damage slugs do to individual plants. Their findings were published in the open access journal BMC Biology. Slugs are shell-less terrestrial gastropod mollusks. This lessthan-lovable creature has two pairs of feelers, or tentacles, on its head. The upper pair is light sensing with eyespots at the ends. The other two feelers have a sense of smell. Both are retractable and both can be regrown if lost. The animal moves along through waves of muscle contractions while secreting mucus on which it travels to prevent damage to its underside.

Slugs are generalists when it comes to diet and they feed on a wide variety of vegetables, herbs, and flowers, chomping through leaves and turning even the best planned garden into a wasteland.

That glistening mucus is its telltale residue alerting any gardener that they are on the prowl. Slugs are generalists when it comes to diet and they feed on a wide variety of vegetables, herbs, and flowers, chomping through leaves and turning even the best planned garden into a wasteland. But apparently, a way to get ahead of their slimy curve is to apply the work of earthworms and plan the vegetable or flower garden with the maximum plant diversity. Using large incubators to simulate a grassland environment, the scientists were able to regulate the degree of diversity of plant species and plan when to introduce earthworms and slugs.

The presence of the worms increased the nitrogen content of plants and reduced the number of leaves damaged due to slugs by as much as 60 per cent. Then, when comparing the leaf area damaged, the researchers found that the slugs ate 40 per cent less plant material when the incubators had high plant diversity compared to incubators with low plant diversity. "Our results suggest that two processes might be going on,” said Dr Johann Zaller who led the study, “Firstly, earthworms improved the plant's ability to protect itself against slugs perhaps through the build-up of nitrogen-containing toxic compounds. Secondly, even though

these slugs are generalists they prefer widely available food. But in high diverse ecosystems slugs eat less in total because they have to switch their diets more often since plants of the same species are less available. Therefore gardeners can help protect (the work of) earthworms by increasing plant diversity in the garden in order to keep slug damage low.” Proactive defense of the garden starts with knowing where slugs live. They like wet, damp, sheltered areas such as ground covers of leaves, stones, yard waste or debris where they nest and hide in the day, slithering out to feed at night. Cutting the grass and clearing away litter

will go a long way to reducing ideal slug habitat. Slugs need to protect their soft bodies. By placing a rough, sharp barrier around your plot will help lessen their travels. They don’t like anything dry, dusty or scratchy. A barrier could include mulch, eggshells, coffee grounds, sand, gravel, coarse sawdust, cinders, or any mixture that contains a rough, abrasive edge that slugs must avoid. Do not use salt as it unbalances the soil for plant growth. For plant diversity, consider creating a barrier around your target garden with the following species that slugs avoid: roses, cacti, begonias, fuchsias, dusty miller, hydrangeas, lavenders and lady’s mantle. They will avoid any plant that is tough, hairy or bitter. Water plants in the morning rather than the evening so you don’t provide a watery highway for night time access. Encourage natural predators by creating a pond for frogs, newts and toads which eat slugs. Plant some berry bushes to attract blackbirds, redwings, and thrushes. The studies are ongoing. “In order to elucidate the mechanisms behind these complex interactions, all parts of an ecosystem need to be investigated,” said Zaller.

it’s the best Part of summer Come Celebrate at bC’s largest agriCulture showCase

PNE 4-H FEstival

saFEway Farm CouNtry

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Over 30 project competitions as well as provincial programs for judging, speak and show and educational displays.

Come out and experience BC’s remarkably diverse agriculture industry. Featuring the crowd-favourite Discovery Farm exhibit plus a whole barn full of exciting animal displays!

Competitions in: JuniorAmateur Jumping, Cattle Penning, Draft Team, Miniature Horses, Indoor Eventing and the PNE summertime challenge, The Battle of the Breeds.

August 17–20

Entry deadline: June 28, 2013

August 17–september 2

August 21–september 2

Entry deadline: July 19, 2013

604-251-7788 • agriculture@pne.ca • www.pne.ca


11

June, 2013

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Warning: The Polaris RANGER and RZR are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license to operate. Passengers must be at least 12 years old and tall enough to grasp the hand holds and plant feet firmly on the floor. All SxS drivers should take a safety training course. Contact ROHVA at www.rohva.org or (949) 255-2560 for additional information. Drivers and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Be particularly careful on diffi cult terrain. Never drive on public roads or paved surfaces. Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. Check local laws before riding on trails. ©2012 Polaris Industries Inc.

6-13 wcf


12

June, 2013

News

 B.C.’s new meat inspection program

n P lowing O n

Adam Degenstein of Armstrong, B.C. competes in the novice walking horse plow division during the 91st annual Chilliwack Plowing Match at Fore Road and Highway 11 in Abbotsford in May. JENNA HAUCK/BLACK PRESS

Investment Agriculture Foundation and BCAC hold joint AGM By Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer

The Investment Agriculture Foundation of B.C. (IAF) held its annual general meeting in Abbotsford last week to present its contributions for 2012 to the British Columbia agriculture and agri-food industry. For IAF chair, Peter Levelton, the meeting was especially significant as it marked his sixth and final year as an IAF director. Reflecting on the relationships forged during his tenure, Levelton credited his peers for his most memorable experiences. “I have met countless dedicated people in agriculture during the past six years.” Levelton noted. “It is their input and perspective that help the industry grow, and I believe our continuing partnership with these agricultural leaders will not only help our industry survive, but continue to prosper.” IAF’s successful collaboration with

industry was further illustrated during an overview of project impacts within the crop, livestock and panagricultural sectors. As numerous client testimonials demonstrated, IAF contributions coupled with industry leadership have yielded benefits across all sectors and throughout all regions of B.C. The Foundation’s broadening program delivery role was also a subject of discussion, as with the $1.5 million BC Government’s Buy Local Program. While Levelton touched on the end of federal adaption funding, he emphasized that IAF will continue to support industry and invest in the future of B.C. agriculture in 2014 and beyond. The theme of partnership and prosperity was further reinforced during the financial report. Treasurer, Jim Tingle reported that IAF paid out nearly $9.75 million toward industryled projects and initiatives in 2012, before Executive Director, Peter

Donkers wrapped up the meeting with a look at IAF’s priorities for 2013. Following the AGM, five new directors were welcomed onto the IAF board. Len Bouwman (Chilliwack/ dairy), Alistair Johnston (Abbtsford/ post farm gate), Jack DeWit (Langley/ Other Livestock), and returning IAF directors Bert Miles (Vernon/ Greenhouse, Floriculture and Nursery) and Bar Hayre (Abbotsford/ farm supply) were appointed. Along with departing chair, Peter Levelton, a fond farewell was also bid to vice-chair, Gay Hahn, and directors Chris Byra, Debbie Aarts and Jens Larsen after six years of service, the maximum allowed by IAF policy. Continuing IAF directors are Ken Bates (Lower Mainland/field vegetable, berry and mushrooms), secretary, Paula Brown (Lower Mainland/emerging sectors), Irmi Critcher (Peace River/grain, oilseed and forage), Rick Gagner (Lower Continued: AGM/ p14

It took a while, but when it came time to approve the new BC meat inspection program everyone agreed it was exactly what the province needed. The agreement continues the current safeguards and inspection system in Provincially Class A and B abattoirs. The federal government is withdrawing its support for meat inspection at the end of this year. The new system follows extensive consultation with ranchers, abattoir operators, local governments and small-scale ranchers with licenses to sell their meat at the farmgate. Abattoirs will continue to require the presence of a trained government meat inspector to inspect each animal or flock beforehand and each carcass after slaughter. The new system will also require all Class A and B plants to develop and maintain comprehensive written food safety procedures for maintaining meat safety, facility hygiene and animal health and welfare, and include the development of an audit program of all Class A and B abattoirs. Inspectors must be trained to provincial standards, including enhanced knowledge and skills in humane livestock handling and humane slaughter. The system must maintain third party government inspection and the use of a government stamp on inspected products and also maintain the graduated enforcement approach to support the integrity of the inspection system. The new system will be fully implemented by Jan. 1, 2014, and will replace the B.C. government's arrangement with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to inspect provincially licensed Class A and B abattoirs, which has been in place since 1988. The current service agreement ends Dec. 31, 2013. The CFIA will continue to inspect the 11 federally registered abattoirs in B.C. The Ministry of Agriculture is also in discussion with the retail sector in B.C. to expand the domestic market for meat processed in a provincially licensed Class A or B Abattoirs as well as working with the BC Association of Cattle Feeders to further develop and promote their "Certified B.C. Beef" brand. The B.C. government is also beginning a two-year pilot project in the Regional District of North Okanagan for up to five Class E License operations. These pilot licenses will be available to operators within a two hour travel distance of a provincially licensed abattoir. Current Class E License holders are small farms located in areas where there is no provincially licensed abattoir to fill the consumer demand for locally produced meat. Class E License holders are permitted to sell restricted amounts of meat at their farm gate and temporary food markets such as a farmers market. In addition to the new meat inspection system, the B.C. government also announced that a mobile abattoir will be stationed in 100 Mile House to help address the need for safe and wholesome local meat, providing the community can meet specific criteria. Upon the full implementation of the mobile abattoir in 100 Mile House, other B.C. communities demonstrating a similar need will be able to apply for a mobile abattoir to be based in their community, subject to meeting the same criteria. B.C’s Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick says “The new provincial meat inspection system strikes an important balance, and we took the time to do it right. The new system will protect public health, animal welfare, and expand economic opportunities for farmers, processors, and communities."

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14

June, 2013

News

Growing Forward 2 sets the stage for innovation, market opportunities By Grant Ullyot

West Coast Farmer The new Growing Forward 2 (GF2) program became Canada’s hallmark funding program as of April 1. It is the top policy framework for Canada's agricultural and agri-food sector. GF2 is a $3 billion dollar investment by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments and the foundation for government agricultural programs and services over the next five years. “The Harper Government remains focused on jobs, growth

and long-term prosperity,” said Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz. “We are working with Canadian farmers to move the agriculture and agri-food industry forward to adapt, innovate and compete in markets at home and abroad. "Growing Forward 2 delivers what the sector needs to position Canadian farmers, producers and processors for growth and prosperity in the years ahead." The agriculture and agri-food sector is an important contributor to Canada's economy. The Canadian agriculture and agri-

food system accounts for 8.0% of total GDP (or $101.1 billion) and employs 2.1 million people. GF2 programs will focus on innovation, competitiveness and market development to ensure Canadian producers and processors have the tools and resources they need to continue to innovate and capitalize on emerging market opportunities. GF2 includes $2 billion costshared on a 60:40 basis for programs delivered by provinces and territories and $1 billion for federally delivered strategic initiatives. Under GF2, FPT costshared investments will increase

by 50% and provincial and territorial governments will have greater flexibility to tailor programs to local needs. In addition, GF2 includes an effective suite of Business Risk Management (BRM) programs to help farmers manage risk due to severe market volatility and disaster situations. Governments will also assist the industry in its efforts to research, develop and implement new agricultural risk management tools. The federal Government recently announced details of its three GF2 federal programs: AgriInnovation, Agri-Marketing and

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2011 DODGE RAM QUAD CAB 4X4 ST

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ARE OPEN

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Agri-Competitiveness. Together, these programs aim to accelerate the pace of innovation, improve competitiveness in domestic and international markets, and help the sector adapt to emerging global and domestic opportunities, as well as enhance business and entrepreneurial capacity. Bilateral negotiations between the federal government and provincial and territorial governments to finalize details of the cost-shared programs are well under way. Specific provincial and territorial programs will be announced as they become available.

604

795.3700

• CLOSED SUNDAY 6/13wcf_WM4

Mainland/post farm gate), Dale Krahn (Fraser Valley/ poultry) and Ernie Willis (Okanagan-Similkameen/ cattle). Directors re-appointed for a further two-year term are Rob Dawson (OkanaganSimilkameen/tree fruit and grapes) and treasurer, Jim Tingle (Fraser-Fort George, community agriculture). Also sitting on the board are non-voting liaisons Philip Bergen and Rodney Dlugos (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada), as well as Grant Parnell (BC Ministry of Agriculture). The Investment Agriculture Foundation is a not-for-profit organization that manages and distributes federal and provincial funds in support of innovative projects to benefit the agriculture and food industries in British Columbia. BCAC Chair Rhonda Driediger is one of five recipients from across Canada to receive the Farm Credit Canada (FCC) Rosemary Davis Award for agriculture leadership for 2013.  In early April, Rhonda travelled to Boston to attend the 2013 Simmons School of Management’s premier leadership conference for women.   At BCAC’s AGM, a representative from FCC officially presented the award to Rhonda.   “Rhonda is an innovative farm business owner with demonstrated skills in leadership, creativity and an overall passion for the agriculture industry." said Kimberly Ross, FCC Senior Relationship Manager. "The countless hours she devotes to volunteering in the industry contribute to advancing the business of Canadian agriculture. This award is very well deserved and we are extremely pleased to present it to Rhonda Driediger."


15

JThe U NChilliwack E , 2 0 1 3 Progress Monday, June March3,4,2013 2013

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EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 130

PERSONAL SERVICES HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HELP WANTED

182 300

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R A V A G E

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S T R I L P E A

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Crossword Answers from page 11

Crossword Answers

P R E F 11A B

R A V A G E

O N E M A N

S T R I L P E A S P C R AT L E W E D R E G N A J I A V C A U

E L D I G E Y D

Crossword Answers Crossword Answers

is in the

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P R E F A B

R A V A G E

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E D G Y

L I E D

A N N A

I N D Y

3-13 wcf

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O N E M A N

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CHILLIWACK. 1 bdrm, $560m; heat & hot water incl. Refs, avail now, (604)703-9076

REAL ESTATE 625

EAST CHILLIWACK Storage/Work Promontory lrg 1 bd, top flr, 5 appl., Shop. hydro Callshared 6043 patios, privincl, ent.,secure. gas f/p, 819-7231. Mon-Sat. bk yrd, jacuzzi tub, hrdwd flrs $850, avail June 1st. (604)518-3417

CHILLIWACK, 28x40’ shop in Greendale area, $500/m. Call (604)823-6530

1 & 2 Bdrms Starting at $575/m

Ref’s required, no pets Crime-free multi-housing Call for appt. 604-792-3010 or leave message

566 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

CLASS ADS WORK! CALL 1-866-575-5777

• Tree Trimming • Fully Insured • Best Rates

709 COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL

FURNITURE

Mainland Roofing Ltd.

TREE & STUMP

Insuite storage Laundry on every floor Heat & hot water incl Secure underground prkg

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

604.562.0957 or 604.961.0324

374

NEED TO advertise rental of an apartment? Look to the Chilliwack Progress classifieds, 604-702-5552

www.treeworksonline.ca 10% OFF with this AD

PIANO, Full keyboard, all the bells and whistles. Yamaha Clavinova. $500. Good cond. (604)531-1267

Family owned & operated. Fully ins. We do Cedar Shakes, conversions, concrete tiles, torchon, fibreglass shingles, restoration & repairs. 20 yr labour warr. 604-427-2626 or 723-2626

Cheam View Apts • • • •

• Tree PUPS Trimming TOY POODLE 4 wks old, 2 males; 1 white, 1 blond/white. $700 • Fully Insured • Best Rates each. Avail. June 15. 604-820604-787-5915/604-291-7778 4230, 604-302-7602

Liability Insurance/BBB/10% off with ad

Bright, extra large 1 and 2 bedrooms

Heat & hot water, new carpet & lino, balcony, parking, coin laundry, elevator, cls to amenities, under new on-site mgmt. Ref’s req’d. 604-795-9492 to view

Clean, quiet building

POMERANIAN - 10 weeks old. 2 black males. 1st shot, vet checked, paper trained. $500 (604)941-2959 removal done RIGHT!

*NEW QUEEN MATTRESS SET* Pillow Top in Plastic. Mfr. Warranty Must Sell! $200 ~ 604-484-0379 .

Some of Chilliwack’s Largest apartments.

639 REAL ESTATE SERVICES

JACK RUSSELL pups 3F 1M. 8wks old, short legs, smooth coat. Dew claws done. $500. 778-883-6049

548

NO CREDIT CHECKS

GUARANTEED Job Placement: General Laborers and Tradesmen For Oil & Gas Industry. Call 24hr Free Recorded Message For Information 1-800-972-0209

Chilliwack. Fully renovated incl. new kitchen, spacious & bright 1 bd, balcony, FREE heat h/w, parking, elevator, great Mary St location, from $675. 604-702-0722

604-819-6229

P/B blue brindle ~ 1 Female Ready to go. 1st shots & tails/dew claws done. ULTIMATE FAMILY GUARDIAN 374 $1000 TREE SERVICES 604-308-5665

STORAGE SUITES, UPPER

CHILLIWACK AREA, 1 , 2 & 3 bedrooms, family building close to schools, shopping and bus. Parking, cable, laundry incl. small pet ok, avail now. Rob, 604-316-5404.

Mountain Village Apts 9482 Williams St.

MATTRESSES starting at $99 1 • Twins bedrooms • Fulls • suites, Queens •upmarKings ket 100’s quietin building, w/balcony, stock! www.Direct Liquidation.ca (604)294-2331 hot water, 3 appls, good security, u/grd park, storage, fireplaces, hook-ups, REAL ESTATE laundry on site, on-site manager, n/s, n/p. Suits available now.

www.paintspecial.com

•MONEY TODAY! •$500-$5000 • Instant Approvals • 60 Day Loans • Privacy Assured • Burnaby & Surrey Locations

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

Broadway MERCHANDISE FOR SALE Maples Apts

778-997-9582

HANDYPERSONS 283A ROOFING 353 & SKYLIGHTS

ELECTRICAL

706 APARTMENT/CONDO Shepherd x, spayed female, all shots, 7 mos. asking $400. Call (604)847-0171

749 751

fairhaven apts

5489473 Broadway FURNITURE St.

No Credit Checks!

260

Newly updated, large, 2 bath condos in secure and well maintained building. Secure parking, elevator with wheel CHILLIWACK: 2 bdrm 2 bath end chair access. Walk across unit, 1 storey condo, Oak kitchen, new paint, for gas shopping, f/p. Low strata the street next fees, $224,900, 778-809-0757. to library, park. Includes 3 appliances, window coverings, insuite storage, laundry RENTALS on every floor. Onsite manager. Available now. for details 706 604-792-1506 APARTMENT/CONDO

.

Interior & Exterior Unbeatable Prices & Professional Crew. • Free Est. • Written Guarantee • No Hassle • Quick Work • Insured • WCB

No same Credit Cash day,Checks! local office.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ITALIAN MASTIFF(Cane Corso) P/B blues, ready to go, 1st shots, tails/dew claws done. Ultimate family guardian $1000 CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN (604)308-5665 MORE BUSINESS PHONE 1-604-575-5777 PUG avail for stud service. He is a rare silver male, purebred but not registered, $700 or puppy back. Also GoldenRENTALS retriever (not reg.) avail for stud $600 (OFA hips and cert eyes) Mission 604-820-4827

“ ABOVE THE REST “ www.paisleyservices.com

Need Need CA$H CA$H Today? Today? Own Own A A Vehicle? Vehicle?

www.topdogloans.com 604.503.BARK (2275)

1 bdrm, $575/m & 2 bdrm, $675/m

604.562.0957 or 604.961.0324

604.339.1989 Lower Mainland 604.996.8128 Fraser Valley

CHILLIWACK/SARDIS APARTMENT/CONDO

45810 First Ave., West

Liability Insurance/BBB/10% off with ad

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Cloverdale Premium quality paint. 257 DRYWALL NO PAYMENT until Job is completed. Ask us about our BOARDING, TAPING, Laminate Flooring &spraying, drywall repairs. No job too small. Maid Services. Call Les, (604)866-4594/391-2296

Cash same day, local office. www.PitStopLoans.com www.PitStopLoans.com 604-777-5046 604-777-5046

648 706

LAKESIDE COURT

ITALIAN MASTIFF Eastcan Roofing & Siding Corso) •New (Cane Roofs •Re-Roofs •Repairs

NO HST/GST! Contact John Zillwood Chilliwack - 604-792-7635

FINANCIAL SERVICES FINANCIAL SERVICES

PETS MORTGAGES

RENTALS

CHILLIWACK

353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

(since 1988)

All aspects of Personal Tax Mobile Service for shut-ins

DECADENT RELAXING

Borrow Up To $25,000 Borrow Up To $25,000

477 636

www.paintspecial.com GOLDEN DOODLE puppies. Mom is 604.339.1989 a Golden Retriever (68lbs) & Dad Lower Mainland is a Poodle (50lbs). Various shades 604.996.8128 Valley of gold and blond. Fraser Males & females. this ad for 8yrs Ready Running to go mid June, raised in homePAINT with children. Our dogs are SPECIAL part of our family and life, we hope 3 rooms forpups. $299, for the same for our Will have 2 coats colour $950 1st shots and any deworming. (Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Mission 604-820-4827. Cloverdale Premium quality paint. GOLDEN RETRIEVER NO PAYMENT until pups Job is P/B. 1st completed. shots, vet Ask checked, dewormed, us about our 10 weeks old, $700. (604)850-3329 Laminate Flooring & Maid X Services. HUSKY WOLF pups. 3 F; 9 wks old. $500/ea. 1st shots/dewormed. Glenn 604-308-3396 Boston Bar.

www.topdogloans.com 604.503.BARK (2275)

dan knoke

LANDSCAPING PETS

REAL ESTATE RENTALS

GERMAN SHEPHERD Pups & 329 PAINTING & DECORATING young adults. Quality German & Czech bloodlines. 604-856-8161.

• MONEY TODAY! • Instant Approvals • No Credit Checks • Privacy Assured

203

REALPETS ESTATE

UPPER VALLEY BOBCAT German shepherd cross with husky puppy, Female. 2-1/2 mos. Services. (604)316-6791 $600/obo. (604)463-8924

Borrow Against Your Vehicle!

FULL BODY SWEDISH MASSAGE PERSONAL SERVICES *PRIVATE *EUROPEAN From $65 & up. 604.230.4444

182 182

HOME/BUSINESS PETS SERVICES

S T R I L P E A S P C T L E D R E A J A V U

E D G Y N O O S E S

L I E D

A N N A

D O L R Y I E S

I N E N E R D E R Y O B F R A J U S T E R I W O R K R R A S Y E N G O N N Y F E A F O N E N S R

from page 5

R O AE N VR E AR M GO AB ER NA

A P W E N P

from page

E A DP W GE LN YP E C AA NS U S T SI PC OE F Z A E R N M

S TR RE I G PI

R E G I C I D E

U L N A

Larry Krause,

G O A L I E

SALES 604-702-5579

A S C E E A R

E S C O R T

L I E D

I N FE A B E L NRE ER C DAE DR O H Y A DO OB Z E P A L F R A S N E M S D J U S T I C E O L E R I D E A T E E P E E

A N N A

N O PO S EE PS

D O R I S

F A R M

A I N E N N E R N D E R O A Y F R J U S L E R Y W O R E R R A Y E N G U N N Y L E A N O N A N S

B A T I K S O F F E R

R E G I C I D E

A P W E N P

G O A L I E

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A S C E E A R T E E P E E


16

June, 2013

Happy Father’s Day to all the Dads out there!

0% Financing for 60 Months

5083E Tractor

•83HP •MFWD •4 Cyl. turbocharged PowerTech diesel engine •12F/12R PowerReverser Trans Regular $44,434 Reduced by $6059

Add a H260 Loader $9927

Superior Quality. Trusted Tradition

SALE $38,375

The Tools you Need to get the Job Done!

Regular $12,594 Reduced by $2667

X300 Select Series

SALE $3299

•42” Mower deck Regular $3810 Reduced by $511 •Standard cruise control •Tight 16” turning radius Enjoy No Payments •4 Year/ 300 hour warranty Or Interest For 12 Months! •17HP Kawasaki V-Twin engine

D105 Lawn Tractor •17.5HP •42” Mower Deck •Auto transmission •Cast-iron front axle •18” turning radius

Regular $2028

Reduced by $329

SALE $1699

Enjoy No Payments Or Interest For 12 Months!

459 Silage Special •BaleTrak™ Pro Monitor Control •MegaWide Plus pickup •CoverEdge Surface Wrapwith Twine •Exclusive DiamondTough belts

0% Financing for 60 Months

$13,499

*Price includes a $750 Attachment bonus, Must purchase 2 or more attachments to qualify.

$500 OFF A 5E TRACTOR!

SAVE NOW!

Order your choice of a John Deere 5055E, 5065E or 5075E 3 cylinder Cab tractor or an Open Station tractor with PowrReverser and get an additional $500 OFF! Go online to get your discount, the new 5E’s are coming! Order yours today!

•Impeller Conditioner •8ft 2in Cutting Width •Clevis Hitch w/Std Tongue •3 year Cutterbar Warranty

Kamloops 250.374.1932

Kelowna 250.765.9765

Langley 604.530.4644

SALE $24,700

Frontier Disc Mower-DM1150 •540 rpm •35HP PTO (requirement) •6ft 7in Cutting Width •5 oval discs, ribbed profile •10 knives

SALE $7999 Frontier Rotary Rake-RR2211

1-877-553-3373 www.prairiecoastequipment.com Abbotsford 604.864.9844

0% Financing for 60 Months

Retail $27,198

Retail $8899

visit www.JohnDeere.com/5ECoupon Or Scan the QR code to enter

Offers Expire June 30, 2013. While In stock quanities last.

SALE $38,900

625 Mower Conditioner

1023E Tractor Loader Pacakge Starting at Regular $15,703 Reduced by $2204 •22.4HP •4WD •3 cylinder Yanmar diesel engine •Twin Touch auto transmission •Differential lock •Comes with a D120 Loader 0% Financing for 60 Months

Retail $44,259

Duncan 1-877-553-3373

Items may not be exactly as shown, accessories & attachments cost extra. Taxes, set-up, delivery, freight, and preparation charges not included and may increase price. A documentation fee of up to $250 will be applied on all finance offerings. Additional fees may apply. Programs and prices subject to change, without notice, at any time, see dealer for full details.*Offer valid from March 1/13 until June 30/13. Down payment may be required. The charge for amounts past due is 24% per annum. Subject to John Deere Financial approval. Eligibility for the $0 down payment offer is limited to highly qualified customers and scheduled monthly payments will be required. 0% purchase financing for 60 months on Compact Utility Tractors. For Example: Model 3720 at $37,040, plus a $50 documentation fee, less a down payment of $0, at 0% APR, monthly payment is $618.17 for 60 months, total obligation is $37,090.20, cost of borrowing is $28.70. **Offer valid from March 1/13 until June 30/13. Subject to John Deere Financial approval and dealer participation. In the event you default on this or any John Deere Financial Multi-Use Account transaction, interest on all outstanding balances on your Multi-use accounts (including on this and all special Term transactions on your Multi-use Account) will begin to accrue immediately at 19.75% AIR from the date of default until paid in full, and you will be required to make monthly payments on your Multi-use Account equal to 2.5% (personal use); 3.0% (commercial use) of the original amounts financed plus interest. Min purchase and finance amount may be required. See your dealer for details. For purchases on your Multi-use Account for personal use. Offer is unconditionally interest free for the first 12 months. After the 12 month period, for eligible purchases of goods and services: 1) a minimum monthly payment of 2.5% of the original amount financed is required; and 2) finance charges will begin to accrue immediately on amount financed at 17.9% per annum.

•540 rpm •Tandem Axle •40HP PTO (requirement) •11ft Raking Width •Enclosed Oil bath gearbox •Exclusive Level Lift Hyds Retail $9650

SALE $8700


Abbotsford News, June 04, 2013