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Volume 12 • Issue 1

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March, 2012

Inside your

• The chair of B.C.’s Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) is questioning whether winery restaurants and other business ventures that seek to sprawl on agricultural land should be authorized farm uses. • Michael Dossett is now a research fellow under the leadership of Chaim Kempler at the Pacific Agriculture Research Center (PARC) in Agassiz. • Stuart Wilson is retiring as chair of the Investment Agriculture Foundation BC after three years as chair, and six years in total on the board of directors. • Abbotsford raspberry and blueberry growers have voted on whether they want their industry to form national councils to oversee marketing, and particularly to monitor imports.

OUTSTANDING – Peter and Nicole Tuytel have earned this years Outstanding Young Farmer award for B.C. and will represent the province at the national OYF competition in Prince Edward Island in November. See story, page 3.

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grant ullyot

Fraser Valley’s Agriculture Publication PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

New budget promises relief from carbon tax

Publisher: Liz Lynch 604-702-5560 Managing Editor: Greg Knill 604-702-5570 Editor: Grant Ullyot Advertising: Larry Krause 604-702-5579 Production: Gina Rokochy 604-702-5569 Classified Manager: Sharon Harmsen 604-702-5555

MAILING ADDRESS 45860 Spadina Avenue Chilliwack, B.C. V 2 P 6 H 9 Published by

E-MAIL ADDRESS westcoastfarmer@theprogress.com

FAX (604) 792-4936

INDEX 3 OYF winners 3 ALR concerns 4 Dairy tours 6 National berry councils? 8 Take a bite of BC 10 Beyond the Barn

Grassroots

Agriculture Minister Don McRae is ecstatic to learn that the government plans to get rid of the carbon tax which is costing the agriculture industry millions of dollars annually. BC Finance Minister Kevin Falcon stated in his budget speech that while the government remains committed to addressing climate change, it now realizes that the revenue-neutral carbon tax is the only one of its kind in North America. The next scheduled increase in the tax on July 1 will be the last, according to Falcon. “So this is a good time to examine how the carbon tax is affecting the provinces economic competitiveness. We will pay particular attention to agriculture, recognizing its critical importance to our future,� said Falcon. By 2030, Canada will be one of just a small handful of countries exporting more food than it imports. B.C. is recognized around the world as a trusted supplier of safe, nutritious foods. Falcon further stated, “B.C. has a diverse agri-food sector facing significant challenges to its competitiveness and profitability with the return to the PST in 2013. That’s because the industry is export driven, and sells to international markets where competitors with similar or lower cost structures enjoy greater economies of scale and create downward pressure on prices. Within this highly competitive environment, the carbon tax is a concern and so in the months ahead we will work with the greenhouse sector, initially, to provide relief to offset the cost of the carbon tax.� The agriculture sector has been paying the carbon tax for four years, and when it was first introduced, the provincial government indicated it would put in place a system of off-sets. But that never happened, and the industry has been paying the carbon tax ever since, with the greenhouse sector hurting the most. McRae also noted that discussions are well underway among provincial agriculture ministers and other officials to develop the new Going Forward II strategy to be implemented by the federal government by April 1, 2014.

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So this is a good time to t examine i how h the carbon tax is affecting the provinces economic competitiveness. We will pay particular attention to agriculture, recognizing its critical importance to our future ~ Finance Minister Kevin Falcon BCAC

Garnet Etsell, who has been chair of the BC Agriculture Council (BCAC) for the past four years, is stepping away from the position on March 23. He plans to retain his position on the executive of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) and will continue to be involved with B.C. and national issues in future. He has been a part of CFA for eight years and on the executive for six years. His biggest disappointment as BCAC chair was the defeat of the HST, which he considered a huge benefit for farmers and agri-businesses. He is currently one of many working on development of the new Provincial Sales Tax that will replace the HST on April 1 of 2013. The former PST was considered an onerous tax by the agriculture community. The Carbon Tax is another major concern for Etsell. He sees no advantage for farmers with this tax, in fact it is a disadvantage for B.C. in competing against other provinces which has no carbon tax. He mentioned New Zealand as one of the few countries that have a carbon tax. However New Zealand exempted its farmers from the tax. Etsell is also concerned that the recent increases to the minimum wage which he said are hurting farmers. The effort to come up with a plan which would provide the ag industry with stable funding continues. Etsell says the lack of any funding increases in recent provincial budget allocations is keeping the industry from reaching its potential. Today’s budget allocations are well behind what they were a decade or more ago, and operating and capital

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PAC Ag Show

The 14th annual Pacific Agriculture Show in the Tradex facility at the Abbotsford Airport was another huge success. Close to 250 displays and info booths and seminar rooms filled Tradex to capacity. Show manager Jim Shepard did a great job of arranging the various displays, bringing in an additional large tent put up at the south end of Building B and more tent space outside in the east side parking lot. And he still has requests for more space. Spokespeople for the implement industry were very pleased with their displays commenting that all of them were accessible to the public, which was not forced to just walk by down the aisles and admire the displays, but could actually move about in the displays – an up close encounter. Organizers of the main events, the Lower Mainland Horticulture Improvement Association’s Mark Sweeney and Sandy Duncan, the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture’s dairy specialist Tom Droppo, and Matt Dickson with ARDCorp arranging the Agri Energy forum along with the Greenhouse Growers Linda Delli Santi, Harvey Snow and his group of organic producers, and other organizers for direct marketing,

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Agro Forestry, and Vegetable producers also put in long hours and a lot of work to ensure their presentations were well attended. Thursday, by far, drew the biggest turnout at the show with some 6000 plus people taking in this year’s event. It is obvious that the show has outgrown the amount of space currently available to it in Tradex. Tradex will be adding 70,000 more feet of exhibition space with a new addition scheduled to open in 2014. The 2013 show is scheduled to take place in Tradex starting Thursday, Jan. 24 through Saturday, Jan. 26. Hoof Health

BC Agriculture’s dairy specialist Tom Droppo advises all who are interested that the BC Dairy Hoof Health Group has organized and now confirmed three dates for the upcoming 2012 Hoof Health Dairy Seminar Series. They include Nanaimo (March 12), Abbotsford (March 13), and Salmon Arm (March 14). With funding assistance from IAF (Investment Agriculture Foundation), WEF (Westgen Endowment Fund), and DIREC (BCDA’s Dairy Industry Research & Education Fund), the BC Dairy Hoof Health Group is quite pleased to have pulled together a very practical, high calibre education outreach program that producers and industry will find very informative and valuable to improving herd hoof health. This seminar series is one of several education outreach programs being planned and offered to the BC dairy industry by the BC Dairy Hoof Health Group this year.

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costs have done nothing but rise over that same period. So the quest for more stable funding will continue. Etsell is optimistic when it comes to the BCAC. The current organization was the brainchild of Steve Thomson, and for many years it looked like he was going to be the long term chair. However Thomson stepped down to enter provincial politics and now is the Minister of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resources.

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News

Outstanding Young Farmers highlight awards gala By Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer B.C.’s youngest-ever Holstein Master Breeders are not only outstanding in the dairy show arena but now outstanding among all B.C. farmers. Peter and Nicole Tuytel of Elmbridge Farms in Chilliwack were named the winners of the 2012 BC & Yukon Outstanding Young Farmer Award in front of about 400 people at the annual B.C. Agriculture Gala in Abbotsford. The Tuytels received their award from B.C. Minister of Agriculture Don McRae and B.C. OYF chair Suzanne Cuthbert, a former B.C. Outstanding Young Farmer. Last year, Peter Tuytel was named a Master Breeder by Holstein Canada, an award which recognizes at least 15 years of superior dairy cattle breeding. Both have a lifelong passion for cattle and a keen understanding of

what makes a superior cow. Peter began building his herd at age 14 while Nicole began even earlier, tracing her herd back to two calves her grandfather gave her when she was just four. Their most famous cow, Elmbridge FM Loveable, a two-time Canadian national champion, is actually a cross of Pete’s maternal line with Nicole’s paternal line and was named the best bred and owned cow in the red-and-white Holstein show at the 2011 World Dairy Expo. The Tuytels also own Davidsons Raider Bronze, the first Canadian cow to receive a 97/100 rating. After beginning with a small dairy and broiler chicken farm in 1996, the Tuytels now operate a 70-acre dairy farm with 130 cows. Along the way, they have increased their production from an average of 24.5 kg/day in 2000 to 43.6 kg/day in 2011. Runners-up for the 2012 BC OYF award were hog producers Chad and Angela Goertzen of Sundance

Farms in Chilliwack. To be eligible for the Outstanding Young Farmer award, farmers must be between 19 and 39 years and derive at least two thirds of their income from farming. Nominees are judged on conservation practices, production history, financial and management practices, and community contributions. Selecting the 2012 winners were BMO agriculture account manager Lana Dueck, Ritchie Smith CEO Des Gelz and former Outstanding Young Farmer Karen Brown. The BCOYF program is sponsored by BMO Bank of Montreal, BC Broiler Hatching Egg Commission, BC Egg Producers Association, BC Chicken Growers Association, BC Chicken Marketing Board, BC Milk Marketing Board, Bobcat Country Sales, Clearbrook Grain & Milling, Farm Credit Canada, Golden Valley Foods, Investment Agriculture Foundation of BC, Prairie Coast Equipment, Ritchie Smith Feeds, RBC Royal

Bank, Scotiabank, TD Canada Trust, TerraLink Horticulture, and United Agri Systems. The Tuytels will represent BC at the national OYF competition in Prince Edward Island in November. The national competition is sponsored by AdFarm, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Bayer Crop Science, CIBC and John Deere. Other Awards

Two other awards were also handed out at the Gala. The Excellence in Agriculture Leadership award put up by the BC Agriculture Council this year went to Grant Huffman from Riske Creek. For four decades Huffman has built Riske Creek Ranching into a successful 1,200 head cow-calf operation raising grass-fed cattle in the Cariboo. His belief that the most difficult issues can be resolve through collaboration led him to serve on numerous committees including the Executive of

the Canadian Cattlemen’s’ Association and is a director with Canada Beef Inc. His tireless contributions have earned him deep respect within the industry testimony to his business acumen and natural leadership. The Award of Excellence for Innovation in Agriculture presented by the Investment Agriculture Foundation was presented to Dr. Timothy Durance, founder, Chair and Co-CEO of Enwave Corp. for his innovation and advancement of superior food dehydration technology. NutraREV technology represents the first commercial-scale food dehydration technology which is not only more energy efficient and less expensive than alternate methods, but also retains more nutrients. Dr. Durance’s innovation promises to significantly impact BC’s agri-food sector by providing producers with an economical, high quality method to diversify their operations by supplying value-added dry products.

Dairy tours showcase innovation Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer

ALC wary as wineries, industry eat into farmland Jeff Nagel Black Press The chair of B.C.’s Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) is questioning whether winery restaurants and other business ventures that seek to sprawl on agricultural land should be authorized farm uses. Richard Bullock said he’s examining whether the trend may erode the productivity of Lower Mainland farmland, which is already under attack on multiple fronts. “We want to find out how serious a problem it is,” he said. “How far should we go in allowing these businesses to grow and morph into something far beyond what the original idea was?” Bullock raised the issue of farms building add-on facilities with little connection to their crops at a meeting of Metro Vancouver’s regional planning and agriculture committee last Friday. The ALC is to rule on whether Richmond’s Lulu Island Winery can add a 3,500 square foot restaurant on land in the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR). Richmond Coun. Harold Steves, who opposed the

application that was approved by Richmond council, said the Lulu winery complex is already “huge” and primarily uses grapes grown in the Okanagan, not its local property. “The winery is there to have a restaurant, it’s not there for any other reason that I can see,” said Steves, who calls it a serious concern and argues such non-farm uses should be steered to commercial or industrial land instead. “All kinds of people are looking at ALR land for commercial wineries, restaurants and banquet halls,” he said. Bullock said the commission regularly receives requests to add restaurants to wineries. The issue isn’t limited to wineries, he said, noting some farmers start with small-scale processing facilities that “all of a sudden become very large scale industrial operations” on farmland. “When people get successful at doing something, they want to grow,” Bullock said. “But when have you grown beyond what was originally anticipated?” Bullock also told Metro Vancouver reps he shares their fear that Port Metro Vancouver could seek to transform more ALR farmland into port terminals and related industry.

“We, like you, are concerned,” Bullock said, adding the ALC wants to determine whether the port can override the land commission’s rulings on what can be built on ALR land. “We are doing further research into this question about jurisdiction,” he said. “We’ve had, frankly, very little engagement with Port Metro Vancouver.” Metro’s concerns were heightened last month when the port’s CEO suggested ALR farmland could be swapped for other land to achieve further port expansion.’ Metro directors also told Bullock they remain deeply concerned about the degradation of farmland through the illegal dumping of fill. Delta Coun. Ian Paton said developers who need to dump unwanted soil from construction sites but balk at paying $800 to $1,000 a load at the Vancouver Landfill are instead finding farmers who let them dump it for as little as $200 a load. Farmland owners frequently claim they need to raise the level of their land because it’s too low to grow crops. “Nine times out of 10, it’s a crock,” Paton said. “All they want to do is bring in fill mate-

rial and make themselves a purse full of money.” Steves said the owner of a large property can make $1 million or more piling fill on it. But the next farmer who tries to plow the land often turns up plastic, garbage and contaminated debris. Bullock said the ALC wants to partner with local cities that are willing to use their staff to help enforce rules on ALR land. The Metro committee plans to meet the ALC again to explore agricultural concerns more fully. Steves said more must be done to prevent farmland from turning into parking lots for trucks. “The port has told independent truckers they have to find somewhere else to park their trucks other than port land,” he said. Too many farms seem to be adding large areas of gravel fill, he said. “They say it’s for farm vehicle operation and then they use it for parking trucks,” Steves said. “These are all growing pains from the city. Trucks, soil and residential activities are all being pushed into the ALR when they don’t really belong there.”

This year’s Dairy Tours event included visits to three Chilliwack farms plus LSC Pre Cast’s new production facility; two farms in Agassiz, and three more in Abbotsford. The Alf Kloot family recently opened their new 50-stall turnstyle by DeLaval in their brand new barn located on a 100-acre farm in Chilliwack. The modernistic milking facility is linked directly to the loafing barn which houses the main herd of 290 milking cows. The cows are milked three times a day producing an estimated 18,000 liters of milk. J.D. Dairy Services of Abbotsford installed the new rotary milker. The Kloot farm estimates they had around 1,000 visitors to the farm during the dairy tours based on the fact that the demand exceeded the supply of 850 lunches they had prepared. Next stop the Jake Dick dairy farm in Greendale where West Coast Robotics has installed five Lely A4 Astronaut milkers making the Dick farm the largest robotic milking farm in Western Canada. And there is room for a sixth robot if needed. George Dick is the go-to guy in the barn who looks after the 280 milking cows. The installation of the robots has resulted in major operational savings. And like the Kloot farm, Dicklands also had close to 1,000 visitors. Hugo Schroeder’s farm on Boundary Road in Chilliwack has installed a DeLaval VMS (Voluntary Milking System) robot with convenient uninterrupted viewing and open areas between all three robotic milking stations. Continued: TOUR/ p6

Kloot farm DeLaval Rotary Milker


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MARCH, 2012

People

Michael Dossett joins the research staff at PARC Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer Michael Dossett is now working as a research fellow under the leadership of Chaim Kempler at the Pacific Agriculture Research Center (PARC) in Agassiz. He was hired last May after graduating from Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon with his Doctorate (PhD) degree and Masters degree. He says he always wanted to work in the berry industry. “I love raspberries, in fact I love fruit crops in general,” he stated. When he heard that there was an opportunity to come and work in B.C. with strawberry, raspberry and blueberry growers in developing new varieties, he jumped at the chance.

Dossett said he and his wife had decided they wanted to stay on the west coast, as he has family in Seattle and his wife’s family lives in Oregon. “The position I have with PARC will allow me to work for a few years in the fruit industry and still be close to family.” Dossett grew up in the U.S. Midwest in Missouri, and then moved to Seattle when he started high school. “I lived in Seattle for about eight years where I did my undergrad at the University of Washington for four years before going to Oregon State. I started in Corvallis in 2004 and finished in 2011, about seven years in graduate school.” Dossett admits that he has no farming background per se, but has always been interested in growing plants.

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PARC’s newest researcher says there are a lot of great things happening in terms of ground work for developing new varieties in BC. “The chore is really slogging through it all and putting it all together to come up with something that is going to work for growers. This takes a lot of time and effort, but I am using molecular tools to help select things quicker so we can get things out to growers a little bit faster in developing new varieties. With raspberries we are working on finding genetic markers for root rot resistance and resistance to raspberry bushy dwarf virus and other diseases. “If we can select plants based on those genetic markers after we do a cross and run a quick test, it cuts down on the amount of time and work involved in figuring out if a plant will have the characteristics we want down the road.” Kempler says the main objective of their breeding program is to develop varieties that are resistant to disease and pests which is the cheapest way to combat diseases and insects. For example, Sto:lo, a new locally developed strawberry introduced a few years ago, is resistant to root weevil, which means the farmer does not have to spray that crop for

Michael Dossett

root weevil. “A lot of work goes into developing varieties that are resistant to certain types of diseases, and it also takes a lot of time to work through a testing program both in greenhouses and in the field. However, consumers should know and realize that such a program guarantees them a safe, high quality berry.” Kempler added that just about every crop that people grow for food production has one particular production

problem or another. Breeding is a way to help solve those challenges and make industries more competitive by developing varieties that have fewer problems or are resistant to certain types of diseases or pests. Dossett explained it is important to know what to look for. “The industry tells us what they want us to work on such as root rot which has been a serious problem for awhile. There is a lot of literature out there in terms of what is resistant and what is not. But a lot of things with resistance to root rot do not have the yield or fruit quality to be competitive with today’s cultivars. So we have to cross-breed and choose the best offspring from those crosses to use in the next generation of crosses, and hopefully after two or three generations we get something out of that is going to stand up.” He says that even if there are no disease problems, or problems with adaptability, climate or whatever, the industry will still want something that is going to give them higher yields and higher quality. A little over two years ago, the federal government provided the berry industry in B.C. with research funding under

the Developing Innovative Agri-Products (DIAP) initiative. Kempler says the money was put to extremely good use, helping to extend research work in raspberries and strawberries to include blueberries and develop their molecular breeding program. Kempler’s research includes growing berries in test plots on local farms and also south of the border in Oregon and Washington States. Kempler remarked that there are no nurseries propagating raspberries in B.C. “They are all in the United States. We are working with three of them in Puyallup, Burlington and Lynden in Washington State.” According to Kempler, Chemainus is the number one raspberry variety for growers in BC. Kempler noted PARC received three years of funding under the DIAP program and has just another year to go. “We are hoping the federal government will come up with another program that will replace the existing DIAP program soon, and will allow some continuity. The DIAP program allowed us to bring Michael over under a research fellowship training opportunity in conjunction with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.”

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MARCH, 2012

People

Wilson retires this month as chair of IAF Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer Stuart Wilson will retire from his position as Chair of the Investment Agriculture Foundation BC later this month after three years as chair, and six years in total on the board of directors. “The last meeting I will chair takes place on March 23 and that same day the members will hold their annual general meeting and my replacement will be named at that meeting.” Two other directors are also stepping down, Derek Janzen who represents the poultry sector and Barr Hayre who represents the berry industry. Wilson has no specific plans for his immediate future would like to keep his fingers in the pie. “I pretty well have to” he says. “I couldn’t stay at home and do nothing. I have put a lot of years in with the foundation and with my previous career. Agriculture has been good to me and I think I can still contribute. “I have been working with the Chicken Marketing Board on the Pricing and Production Advisory Committee with both the growers and the processors so that will give me something to do by attending their meetings.” Wilson has a long career in the agriculture industry, covering 32 years of employment with Agriculture Canada and then with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). He

started in B.C., moved to Manitoba, then Ottawa, back to Vancouver Island and then back to the Lower Mainland. Wilson believes CFIA’s function is important to Canada because exports are very important to Canada and the CFIA is involved with all aspects of the export of agriculture products from Canada. They are also involved in the health and safety regimes related to agriculture production to make sure food products meet the quality and safety standards set out by government. Both of these are huge roles according to Wilson. “And because the CFIA has these roles to play it must meet regulatory standards at both the domestic and international levels. And that sometimes leads to misunderstandings of what the CFIA’s level of responsibility is and can cause some conflict.” If you were to talk to poultry farmers in BC, they can well recall CFIA being called in to manage the local Avian Influenza outbreak. “That’s absolutely correct,” says Wilson. “The avian influenza case had a substantial impact on the feather industries in B.C. It was tough, but somebody had to manage the way out of that outbreak and the CFIA, despite the fact that dealing with outbreak with no previous experience was a huge learning curve for the organization, in the end did manage along with other government bodies to eventually get rid of AI.’ In the wake of the Avian flu prob-

“ It is a great organization, a group of people from within the industry who all want agriculture to succeed in this province.

lem the feather industry has put in place a strict bio-security program to protect farms in the future. “Funding for that bio-security program flowed through Investment Agriculture,” noted Wilson, “to ensure it did what the feds wanted it to do. That’s the safeguard today.” Today the IAF manages its mandate differently than it did when the program started several years ago according to Wilson. “The rules today are a little broader. It is a more deliberate dialogue; more research and understanding what the projects are at the local level, which I think is the right way to do it. Each of the provincial councils have some great people around the table and they can understand where the applications are coming from and they

have a reasonably broad opportunity to access funds. If the funding rules were so onerous that you can’t sway a millimeter one way or the other then our work is not going to be effective. “When the new Federal GF2 program comes out in 2014 we are hoping there will be even more flexibility to allow for regional differences in priorities. This would leave the IAF with the responsibility of deciding which projects to support and allow more projects to go forward.” Now the IAF under Wilson’s leadership has been promoting the idea of innovation - developing new ideas and new products. The program is going pretty good according to Wilson. “Innovation,” he said, “is really hard to define. But I think our challenge these last few months was to

put out about $500,000 for innovative programs up to March 31 and I believe we have expended all of that. We had in excess of 100 applications for funding over the last three months. Those applications went to the Innovation Council which has federal, provincial and local folks on it. They provided the IAF with an opinion that was part of the final determination of applications that were approved. This is a whole new mind set for the board compared to what we had been doing – a tried and true process that had never been applied before in BC.” One of the things that gives IAF its strong structure is the selection of directors, people from various sectors of the agriculture industry, all of them leaders in their own right, who are able to discuss and evaluate funding applications that prove beneficial to the industry. “We do have the cream of the crop,” said Wilson, “and I for one am very happy to be able to work with such a diverse group of people. It was one of the things that is very obvious once you sit at the table and listen to them speak. “I was a rookie six years ago with some experience and some credibility - but there are 12 others around that table and we are all peers. “It is a great organization, a group of people from within the industry who all want agriculture to succeed in this province. And I think we do a very good job of it.”

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24 Kind of automotive wheel 26 Pride youngster 27 Ease up 28 Soothsayer 30 Top secret? 31 Feedlot critters 33 Lecherous looks 39 Butterfly catcher 41 Retrovirus component

Answers on pg. 10

take the financial commitment necessary to build anaerobic digesters in BC. Along with all the environmental advantages, through being Cowpowered, participating commercial consumers also add credibility to their brand by demonstrating their commitment to environmental sustainability. “Anaerobic digesters are a truly remarkable technology that can completely revolutionize BC’s agriculture sector,” offers Matt Dickinson of Cowpower. “And with Cowpower, we’re providing electricity users all across BC with an affordable and effective way to directly support local, sustainable agriculture while also improving their own environmental sustainability. It’s truly a win-win situation.” To learn more about Cowpower and to sign-up to be part of this new solution for environmental sustainability, please visit us at www.cowpowerbc.com!

Tour highlights dairy farms

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they represent, would not have been produced had the anaerobic digester not been built. Residential and commercial electricity consumers create the demand for Cowpower by voluntarily signing-up at www. cowpowerbc.com and purchasing environmental attributes for 25, 50 or 100% of the electricity they consume. In doing so, Cowpower customers enhance their electricity consumption, ultimately contributing towards a more sustainable environment. Once sold, all environmental attributes are retired on behalf of the customer. This ensures that no one else is able to claim ownership or use the attribute to permit any harmful emissions. While residential customers can sign-up for as little as one per month, commercial customers are required to commit for a minimum of three years. This is done to provide anaerobic digester owners with the certainty they need to under-

Last year LSC PreCast systems opened a new production plant at the intersection of Lickman Road and Vedder Mountain Road. It replaces one in use for years located on Brian Janssens Chadsey Road farm. LSC PreCast has provided agricultural, industrial and commercial concrete building products since 1996. The firm has installed both above ground and underfloor manure storage facilities on farms as well as bunker silos and composting systems throughout the Fraser Valley. Fraser Dyke Farms in Agassiz was the first robotic-based straw and sawdust pack barn to be built in Western Canada. It has one Lely A4 robot milking a heard of approximately 60 cows. Group pens are rototilled each day to encourage composting to occur in the sawdust and straw mix. The sawdust pack is incorporated into the barn to promote better hoof health and cow comfort. Creekside Farms also in Agassiz has a new 85-stall free stall barn with a feed alley on one side. A new double eight parabone parlour

with Westward stalls was installed by Westfalia Surge sold and services by Pacific Dairy in Abbotsford. In Abbotsford visitors could stop at Gifford Farms on Glenmore Road, Kenmarank Farms or Bakerview Eco Dairy. Gifford Farms has now been equipped with two new Lely A4 robotic milkers. They also have a Lely Juno robotic forage feed pusher in their drivethrough alley. Kenmarank Farms has a new six row barn and dairy parlour which handles 140 milking cows daily utilizing a double 12 Magnum 90 parallel parlour installed by Westfalia Surge. Bakerview Eco Dairy, a demonstration farm located on Highway 11 just south of the Freeway has an anaerobic digester that has now been operating for a year digesting manure and milk fat producing 20 kilowatt hours of electricity, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Bill Vanderkoii says thousands of people have visited the facility since it opened, and it has helped to expand the disemination of dairy industry knowledge to many, many consumers and their families.


7

MARCH, 2012

News

B.C.’s Best Cow Market For Over 40 Years

Raspberry, blueberry growers eye formation of national councils Grant Ullyot

The results for the proposed National Raspberry Council were 76 per cent in favor and 24 per cent opposed. “Our proposal to form a National Council is ready to move forward now that we have an affirmative vote,” says Sharmin Gamiet, Executive Director of the B.C. Raspberry Industry Development Council. “We will be making application to the Farm Products Marketing Council seeking their approval. That body must determine that there is support across the country for formation of a National Council.” Raspberry production in Canada is concentrated in three provinces. If a grower produces more than 10 thousand pounds of raspberries they will be expected to be a part of this national council. Producers with lower amounts do not have to be a part of the council but can join they if they wish. The three provinces producing raspberries are B.C., Ontario, and Quebec. These producers need to verify their support for a national council before application can be made to the federal minister of agriculture for certification. Last year was a challenging year for the raspberry industry in B.C., and Gamiet says the industry really needs a national council. “If you look at some of the data between 2006 and 2010 imports of raspberries into Canada have increased from 31 per cent to 63 per cent and unless we do something about it the Canadian industry is facing the prospect of disappearing.” Gamiet says the industry is doing a lot of research today to find new varieties and improve production. However, countries that are exporting berries into Canada, such as Mexico and Chile with their low labour costs, can take advantage of

MACHINERY

Saturday, March 31st this research and out-compete the Canadian producer by selling berries at a cheaper price. “So what we are hoping to do with this national council is basically level the playing field. A national council will levy a fee that will increase the price of imported berries with the money to be used to improve the Canadian industry which faces higher land and labor costs. It will be a check-off”, says Gamiet. Raspberry producers have for years been concerned about the cyclical price for their berries notes Gamiet. “What we want to do as global partners is to improve our promotional efforts which in turn will lead to increased consumption. There are several health benefits to be gained from eating raspberries but these have not been exploited enough. One needs only look at the blueberry industry to see how it has grown in the world economy because of the emphasis on health benefits.” Blueberry Industry

The results of the blueberry growers vote for a National Council taken at the Pac Ag Show are still not available. Executive Director Debbie Etsell said the results are in limbo pending verification of several producers who cast ballots. BC Blueberry Council President, Mike Makara, feels the consensus among growers who are really educated and have been going to meetings is virtually 100 per cent. However, he says, there are some growers who want to shave a penny, a quarter of a penny or a half penny off a pound of production cost and that is their reason for not supporting the idea. “They think that if they can save half a penny it is a plus. In my opinion I think they have misunderstood what a national council can do for them.” Makara went on to explain that B.C., as a region by itself, is limited as to how much pull they have politically on world marketing. “The federal government is on our side big time,” says

Makara. “Our M.P. (Ed Fast) has indicated the government is on side; Prime Minister Harper is on side and has made us a priority. The federal government wants us to be a successful organization so that is why we are pushing the idea of a national council. It is not very often that we get the federal government supporting an industry like blueberries so we want to make this a success.” Makara stresses that it is vitally important, in his opinion, that the B.C. blueberry industry become part of a national council. “We market and compete against other food products, but we also compete against other blueberry growing areas in North America, South America, and no doubt Europe in the future. The only way we can get a premium price is to access Asian markets. There are countries that have done this to a certain extent, but we are on the Pacific Rim and have better access to those Asian markets. However, we need money to go over there and promote; to convince customers that they should buy from us rather than from the U.S. or South America. Chinese buyers know all about the health aspects of B.C. blueberries, however many consumers do not. We have to tell these consumers about those benefits and why Canada is considered a “safe-food” area. Without money we can’t do that. “We also need lots of money to do large scale clinical trials and publish the results. Right now we have research that sometimes, most of the time actually, is not publishable as claimed. Unfortunately, when you do clinical research it takes from one to two million dollars per little project to publish and promote that information. “So the promotion dollars would translate to more secure steady prices back to the grower because we have done the marketing. But, if we don’t do the marketing we might not even get access to those markets in Asia."

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10:00am Start! McClary Stockyards Ltd. 34559 McClary Ave., Box 40 Abbotsford, B.C. V2S 4N7 Office (604) 864-2381 • Fax (604) 854-3038 www.mcclarystockyards.com

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Wednesday Sales 12:30 p.m. Dairy & Beef Cattle

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Sale Days: Monday - Slaughter, Feeder & Misc. Livestock 11:00 AM start. Wednesday: Dairy and Slaughter 1:00 PM start SLAUGHTER CATTLE (Prices Quoted CWT) Choice Holstein Veal .................................... ....................................(600-700) (600-700) ......................................................................... $95.00 -120.00 Holstein Feeder Veal .................................... ....................................(175-300) (175-300) ........................................................................ $96.00 - 118.00 Good Beef Type Cows .................................. ..................................(Exportable) (Exportable) .................................................................... $64.00 - 74.50 Medium Beef Type Cows............................. Cows.............................(Over (Over 10 Years Old) ........................................................ $58.00 - 65.00 Young Cows and Heiferettes Heiferettes.................................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................... 68.00 - 80.00 Best Holstein Cows ................................................................................................................................. $64.50 - 74.50 Medium Holstein Cows ........................................................................................................................... $54.25 - 64.25 Poor Holstein Cows .................................................................................................................................. under $54.00 Holstein Heifers........................................................................................................................................ $62.00 - 74.00 Slaughter Bulls .............................................. ..............................................(1200-2400) (1200-2400) ...................................................................... $75.00 - 89.00 Good Slaughter Lambs................................. .................................(80-100) (80-100) ........................................................................ $125.00 - 150.00 Good Slaughter Goats .................................. ..................................(67 (67 lbs) .......................................................................... ..........................................................................`$50.00 `$50.00 - 175.00 Good Slaughter Horses................................ ................................(800-1200) (800-1200) ........................................................................ $15.00 - 27.00

FEEDER CATTLE Cow Calf Pairs ................................................................................................................................... NONE ON OFFER Beef Type Calves .......................................... ..........................................(200-399) (200-399) ...................................................................... $143.00 - 190.00 Beef Type Steers........................................... ...........................................(400-600) (400-600) ...................................................................... $130.00 - 150.00 Beef Type Steers........................................... ...........................................(600-800) (600-800) ...................................................................... $109.00 - 131.00 Beef Type Steers........................................... ...........................................(800-950) (800-950) ...................................................................... $101.00 - 116.00 Beef Type Steers........................................... ...........................................(1000-1250) (1000-1250) .................................................................... $95.00 - 107.50 Beef Type Heifers ......................................... .........................................(400-600) (400-600) ...................................................................... $118.00 - 143.00 Beef Type Heifers ......................................... .........................................(600-800) (600-800) ...................................................................... $110.00 - 127.00 Beef Type Heifers ......................................... .........................................(800-950) (800-950) ........................................................................ $98.00 - 106.00 Beef Type Heifers ......................................... .........................................(1000-1250) (1000-1250) .................................................................... $90.00 - 100.00

BABY CALVES (By The $) Started Holstein Bulls (4 Weeks Old+) ............................................................................................. $110.00 - 230.00 Good Holstein Bulls (100 lbs+) ............................................................................................................. $60.00 - 100.00 Small Holstein Bulls................................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................................$$ 20.00 - 50.00

DAIRY REPLACEMENT - Wednesday (ALL COWS CMT TESTED - HEIFERS VET CHECKED) Good Fresh & 2nd Calvers.............................................................................................................. $1900.00 - 2200.00 Springing Holstein Heifers ............................................................................................................. $1800.00 - 2000.00 3rd & 4th Lactation Cows ................................................................................................................. $900.00 - 1500.00 Good Open Heifers ....................................... .......................................(630 (630 - 800) .................................................................... $670.00 - 860.00 Good Open Heifers ....................................... .......................................(840 (840 - 970) .................................................................. $990.00 - 1050.00

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Raspberry Industry

S T O C K YA R D S L T D .

SALE

West Coast Farmer At the recent Pacific Agriculture Show in Abbotsford raspberry and blueberry growers voted on whether they wanted their industry to form national councils to oversee marketing, and particularly to monitor imports. At present imports of berries can come into Canada duty free. But a national council will be able to assess a fee which would be collected and used by Canada to promote expansion of their industries. The funds would also provide for clinical trials vital to market expansion in Asia and other world countries.

McCLARY


8

MARCH, 2012

Feature

Chilliwack students take a bite of B.C. Katie Bartel Black Press When Jessie Funk tastes a dish made from fresh ingredients, it’s like heaven in his mouth. His tongue knows when a cooked vegetable is straight out of the ground or prefrozen; it knows when poultry is organically grown or mass produced; it knows when fruits are picked from local branches or have been transported thousands of kilometres. “Fresh ingredients bring out the entire flavour of a dish,” said Funk, a Grade 12 student in Sardis secondary’s culinary arts program. “Fresh always makes the dish taste way better, definitely more flavour.” Funk’s finely honed palette for fresh, local foods is thanks in large part to Take a Bite of BC. Take a Bite of BC was started as a pilot program in 2009 to provide young chefs with an opportunity to learn about foods grown in their communities. The program, which was developed by BC Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation, in partnership with the BC Culinary Arts Association, BC agricultural

commodity groups and BC producers, provides secondary school teaching kitchens with BC grown product – 100 per cent donated. “The goal is to give students an ability to work with fresh, B.C. product and understand what’s grown in their backyard,” said Tammy Watson, program operations manager with BC Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation. “It gives students who want to go into a professional cooking career a real look at what they could be working with.” The program has 30 suppliers from all over B.C.. Approximately every two weeks a large shipment of seasonal product is delivered to participating schools, which includes such things as fresh eggs, milk, cheese, root vegetables, greenhouse vegetables, cranberries, blueberries, turkeys, a side of beef, other meats and more. Pretty much anything grown and raised in the province, the program tries to include, said Watson. When Take a Bite of BC first started there were 14 schools participating, now there’s 38, including Chilliwack secondary and Sardis secondary.

Hanna Preto (left) and Emma Jessop prepare a turkey in the kitchen at Sardis secondary. The turkey is one of several food items that comes from a B.C based farm as part of the Take A Bite of BC program. JENNA HAUCK/ BLACK PRESS

The program has enabled teachers to expand their lesson plans. They’re able

AgriStability Interim Payments Attention Producers Farm operations experiencing income declines can apply for an Interim payment for the 2011 crop year. According to the program a participant can receive up to 50 percent of his or her final AgriStability benefit. Here are some important details. x

To apply for an Interim Payment, you must be a participant in AgriStability for the 2011 program year. You must have received an Enrolment Notice (EN) for the 2011 program year and as well you must have paid the enrollment fee by the deadline date.

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The Interim Payment is an advance on your final 2011 AgriStability benefit.

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to theme menus around the products, be creative in developing recipes, enlighten their students on the benefits of cooking with fresh and local foods, and perform thorough instruction on the different cuts of a cow using the side of beef donated to them, or on how to properly debone a chicken. For Sardis secondary foods teacher Donna Frost, it was a no brainer to get involved. “I do a lesson every year on eating and buying local, on the nutritional values of it, and the freshness of it,” said Frost. Take a Bite of BC has helped her broaden those lessons. For the agriculture community, donating products isn’t a loss, it’s a gain, said Watson. The long-term ben-

efits are huge. “The top vocations that are going to be crucial in the next 10 years are woodworkers, mechanics and chefs. This program lends itself so wonderfully to that – if you watch these kids in the kitchen, it’s amazing, intense, a very professional environment.” In a recent class, Grade 10 student Emma Jessop was assigned to washing B.C. grown turkeys and removing their insides. At the sink, Jessop didn’t let her petite size or her thoughts get in the way of the job needing to be done. “It was really slimy and disgusting, but at the same time it was a really good experience,” said Jessop who enrolled in the class as a way of getting a head start in the

job-seeking field. “I thought maybe it would be a good job opportunity for when I’m in college,” she said. After four semesters of professional cook training courses at Sardis secondary, Jessie Funk knows his future lies with food. “I enjoy working with food and creating different dishes,” said Funk, who will be attending Culinary Arts at the Art Institute of Vancouver next year. And working with fresh, local food, “the taste and the textures you get from them, you can’t get that from frozen food.” For more information on Take a Bite of BC, visit the website at http://www.aitc. ca/bc/programs/take-a-biteof-bc/.

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Growing Forward, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative

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9

MARCH, 2012

News

At the recent Pacific Agriculture Show, Take A Bite of BC was presented $30,000 for the program. (l to r) Kenda Allen, District Vice President, TD Bank; Mark Johnson, President BCAITC; Lindsey Babineau, Exec. Director BCAITC.

A boost for Take A Bite Take a Bite of BC started out as a pilot program in 2008 with eight schools participating. Today 37 schools have implemented the program. It is a culinary arts program only in secondary schools where students in the program develop dishes from donated local food which is then served to students at lunch in the school cafeteria. Students pay for their meal and many have said they were surprised that local food tasted so good. Not only does it taste better, but students learn about where their food comes from.

“It’s a positive experience for everybody,” says Ag in the Classroom Communications Director Emma Sweeney. At the Pacific Agriculture show in January the organization’s Executive Director Lindsay Babineau was presented with a $30,000 cheque, with the funding going toward AITC programs such as Take a Bite, and the elementary schools Fruit and Vegetable snack and Spuds in the Tubs programs. The elementary school programs have reached an estimated 400,000 students in 1300 schools.

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10

MARCH, 2012

Research

SERVING THE AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY SINCE 1980 Beyond The Barn

Latest research shows promise for sheep farmers Few domestic animals have had such a long association with humans as sheep. In fact, these benign, woolly creatures are pretty much up there on the popularity scale as an animal offering great meat, warm clothing, and raw materials for spinners and weavers to put their skills to the test. Now, an international team of researchers has produced a comprehensive in-depth look at the genetic diversity and history of sheep. The study was published last month in the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology. It details certain regions of the sheep’s genome that have rapidly adapted in response to selective breeding targeting genes controlling traits such as coat colour, body size, reproduction, and the lack of horns which was, apparently one of the earliest goals of the selective breeding process. Archaeological evidence points to sheep being first domesticated in the Fertile Crescent, an ancient region sweeping in an arc from Iraq and the Persian Gulf through the Middle East to Turkey, about 8,000 to 9,000 years ago. They spread rapidly with expanding human settlement. According to the research paper, A Genome Wide Survey of SNP Variation Reveals the Genetic Structure of Sheep Breeds, human-controlled breeding has generated specialized animals suitable for a diverse range of purposes including the production of wool, meat and milk. Over millennia, sheep have been introduced to a wide geographic range due to their adaptability to nutrient poor diets, their ability to graze on a diverse range of grasses and shrubs, their tolerance of a wide range of climatic conditions and their manageable size. The net result of this is a spectrum of genetically diverse populations which constitute in excess of 1,400 recorded breeds.

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Crossword Answers from page 6

P A C K E T

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L O O S

O R A C

S T A N D A R D B R E

S E O N N G A G S E E D E L E N E

P A T H S A S H E N S P O R E S S R O E E E O E R T M U S S F L A G R I G H T S E O B O T E N R U E C R E P E

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British Columbia’s sheep breeders farm a variety of breeds from Border Cheviot and Charollais to Dorset, Romney, St. Croix and Southdown. According to breed, the texture of their fleece varies with descriptions according to breed profiled as fine, dense, coarse, lustrous white, soft, long, or crimped. Like everyone invested in livestock farming, breeders are Margaret passionate EVANS about their animals not only for their quality products but as show and exhibition animals. Compared to cattle, dairy and chicken farming, sheep farming in British Columbia is small, representing just one per cent in livestock sales in 2010. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, B.C. generated $9.2 million in sheep and lamb sales in 2010, 6.5 per cent of the Canadian total. In 2006, 28 per cent of B.C. farms reporting sheep and lambs were located in the Vancouver Island-Coast Census Agricultural Region and there were 385 farms in the province primarily producing sheep and lamb. Nationally, StatsCan figures show that, as of July 1st 2011, the number of sheep on Canadian farms increased 2.2 per cent over 2010 to 1.1 million head. In the first six months of 2011, Canada exported 3,000 lambs after four years of virtually nonexistent exports. Given the results of the latest genetic research, B.C. sheep breeders should be able to benefit from improvements in economically important production traits while gaining better understanding of genetic variants that cause diseases.

The research team from Australia, U.S.A., and New Zealand traced the relatedness between nearly 3,000 sheep representing 74 sheep breeds from around the world by comparing 50,000 DNA sites and highlighting the genetic consequences of domestication that resulted in hundreds of breeds of sheep. Dr. James, Kijas with Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO and lead author of the study is reported by the online ScienceDaily as saying that frequent mating and strong gene flow between animals of different breeds has ensured that most modern sheep breeds have maintained high levels of genetic diversity, meaning that sheep breeders can continue to expect strong improvements in important production traits that could contribute to the growing need to feed an expanding global population. A greater understanding of the sheep genome will also help researchers and breeders develop breeds with greater resistance to disease. In fact, in recent years genetic resistance to a parasite nematode that infects sheep has been discovered by a team of scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDAARS) and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Kenya. They detected genetic locations on chromosomes for resistance to gastrointestinal nematode parasites which are common in sheep in tropical regions and cause significant economic and production losses every year. Research is continuing to try to identify some of the genes that can increase tolerance to parasitic infection so that production can be increased, livestock can remain healthy, and a better level of food security attained. Clearly, research into sheep genetics is holding new promises for B.C. sheep farmers.


11

MARCH, 2012

News

Horticulture council visits the Pacific ag show Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer The Canadian Horticulture Council was among the many organizations which participated in this year’s Pacific Agriculture Show in Abbotsford in January. Ann Fowlie is the executive vicepresident of the CHC, the umbrella group for Canada’s fruit and vegetable producers based in Ottawa. “My purpose in coming to B.C.” she said, “was to extend membership outreach and support for our members because we are an association and the BC Vegetable Marketing Commission is one of

our groups. We need to get behind them so they can better serve their members. Fowlie spent her time talking to visitors to the CHC booth explaining the merits of the Seasonal Farm Workers program and Canada Gap, the national food safety program. Her primary audiences were the many fruit and vegetable producers who attended the Pac Ag Show. Fowlie noted the seasonal worker program is still relatively new in BC but is growing very quickly. “The seasonal agriculture worker program all started over 40 years ago with the intervention of our organization with the govern-

ment of Canada to implement such a program. The original memorandum of understanding is between the government of Canada and CHC. Certainly this has been a success story over time because harvesting fruit and vegetable crops is very labor intensive and labor is critical. We need people working to ensure we can grow and harvest our crops as needed.” One of the other things the CHC has worked on quite a bit over the past number of years said Fowlie is On Farm Food Safety which is something most farming people are familiar with. “What we did was develop a

program for fruit and vegetable producers for implementation at the farm level and it is called Canada Gap. It was developed by producers for producers and it has gone through technical review with the CFIA. It’s on their list of criteria and protocols and it is also benchmarked to the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) program which was quite an accomplishment and not easy to do. “Many buyers today are requesting that producers have a food safety program which is GFSI recognized in their place of operations. Canada Gap is the only program that is in a position to meet

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those demands, and there has been a fair amount of uptake and implementation of the program in BC and right across Canada by fruit and vegetable producers.” Canada Gap is a national program and BC has been involved almost since the outset in terms of membership and being involved in the development of the program. Fowlie says she sees increased adoption as it becomes more commonplace, among all different sizes of buyers, to request that their vendors be on a recognized food safety program of some sort. This year’s CHC President Jack Bates is from the Lower Mainland


12

MARCH, 2012

News

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Federal funding to help dairy farmers boost exports Canadian dairy farmers will grow their businesses through increased market opportunities supported by nearly $1.3 million federal dollars. The funding allocation was announced at the recent annual Dairy Farmers of Canada policy conference in Ottawa by the federal Parliamentary Secretary Pierre Lemieux. “Our government’s top priority remains the economy, and Canadian dairy farmers play an important role in creating jobs and keeping our economy strong,” said Lemieux. “This latest investment will boost dairy farmers’ bottom lines by enabling them to better showcase their world-class dairy products and genetics systems internationally.” An investment of over $1 million will enable the Canadian Livestock Genetics Association (CLGA) to create new markets to export dairy genetics. The CLGA will accomplish this by participating in key trade shows and targeted trade missions, conducting market assessments and training more farmers in the production and transfer of embryos. “These funds help us to grow markets through promotion and the equipping of clients in other countries to profitably manage their investment in Canadian dairy genetics,” said Rick McRonald, executive director of the CLGA. “Whether it is training in embryo transfer, advice on feeding and nutrition or whatever the client needs, the AgriMarketing Program helps provide the ‘full package’ Canadian advantage.” Recently, the Government of Canada has achieved concrete results for Canadian exporters of live breeding cattle by successfully working to open markets in Vietnam, the United Arab Emirates and the Philippines. An investment of over $130,000 will assist

DFC in developing niche markets for high-value cheese made with the unique know-how of Canada’s cheese makers. Many Canadian specialty and artisan cheeses featuring value-added attributes have won top distinctions in national and international competitions. More than half of Canadian exports of specialty cheeses go to the US, a market which received more than $12 million worth of specialty cheeses from Canada in 2010. “Canada’s great cheese makers and the dairy farmers that provide them with outstanding, high-quality milk are working together to expand the interest in Canadian cheese in international markets, and the market development expertise provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Dairy Farmers of Canada are valuable resources in making this happen,” said Wally Smith, DFC President. “Canada is well known abroad for its cheese-making history and the reputation of the Canadian cheese maker is an instant door-opener to foreign consumers who seek products.” Today's announcements are part of an $88 million investment provided through the AgriMarketing program under Growing Forward, which helps industry implement longterm international strategies including activities such as international market development, industry-to-industry trade advocacy, and consumer awareness and branding. As a recipient of AgriMarketing funds, the CLGA and DFC will help brand Canadian agricultural products around the world, building greater recognition for the quality, safety advantages and environmental benefits of Canadian products.

Are you having trouble managing your farm debt? We can help. Mediation may be the solution.

Need a Hose Fix?

The Farm Debt Mediation Service helps insolvent farmers overcome financial difficulties by offering financial counselling and mediation services. This free and confidential service has been helping farmers get their debt repayment back on track since 1998. Financial consultants help prepare a recovery plan, and qualified mediators facilitate a mutually acceptable financial repayment arrangement between farmers and creditors.

24/7 Dispatch

604-455-5405 Hose & Fittings For All Types of Equipment:

To obtain more information about how the Farm Debt Mediation Service can help you: Visit: www.agr.gc.ca/fdms

3-11 wcf

Call: 1-866-452-5556

Industry Flows Through Us


13

MARCH, 2012

News

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BMO continues its legacy of serving the farm community

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Grant Ullyot West Coast Farmer I recently took the time to meet with Dave Dieleman and the Bank of Montreal’s agriculture team to find out how well B.C. farmers are doing and to learn more about what issues they feel are affecting today’s farming sector. When one thinks about BMO Bank of Montreal, one might remember Bob Mitchell (now retired) who almost single handedly represented the bank in B.C. for many, many years, and was the architect of today’s policy that guides the bank in its relations with the ag community. Dave Dieleman, currently the Director of Agriculture Markets with the bank, tutored under the watchful eye of Bob Mitchell. “One of the key things that Bob taught me was that this isn’t a business about commodities, it’s about relationships. I know we all talk about relationships and the importance of it, but it is something our bank has made a key policy focus. Bob was a real example of what a relationship banker should be. He really understood the business; the clients; and was there - not just in the good times but all the time. And today, when challenges come about, farmers can rely on knowing that today’s BMO agriculture team will be there as well. Dieleman, like Mitchell, travels about the province visiting both clients and wouldbe clients. He is familiar with all the various agriculture sectors dairy, poultry, hogs, berry crops, field crops, organic agriculture, ranching and marketing. Proper marketing is the key to success in any business says Dieleman. “The more agricultural products we can sell, the better it will be for producers.� According to Dieleman there is a lot of room for

expansion in the Chinese market which has become a major focus for the Federal government. “In the wake of the recent visit to China by Prime Minister Harper and Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz, an agreement has been signed that will open the door for the first time to imports of BC cherries. David Stirling, president of BC’s OkanaganKootenay Cherry Growers Association calls it great news, saying new markets like China will help keep the whole industry growing. He credits the success in the cherry industry to new varieties and research advances developed at the Pacific Agriculture Research Center (PARC) in Summerland. “BC’s blueberry industry is on the brink of expanding into China. And China has for years been importing dairy genetics to improve and expand their industry. The genetics industry has been growing by leaps and bounds in China.� Dieleman thinks Canada is going to continue to see more opportunities for sales of Canadian genetics. “There are three dairy farms in China that have more cows on them than in all of BC. China is in the midst of re-tooling its dairy industry and modeling it very closely to the Canadian dairy industry to set up larger commercial sized farms, and they are looking to Canada for a lot of the genetics they will need to enhance their breeding stock.� Dieleman noted there is a strong interest among Chinese investors as well who want to buy into the Canadian agriculture industry. In the last couple of months he has met with a number of Chinese investors who seem primarily interested in investing in the non-supply managed sectors specifically blueberries, cranberries, and processing. Dieleman said that succession plans for farmers has

become a huge topic with a much stronger effort being made these days to set things up. “It is extremely important for farm owners to be thinking about who is going to be the heir to the farm and how are they going to take care of their family, as well as those family members who aren’t on the farm. BMO is actually doing a series of succession planning seminars taking in ten to fifteen clients at a time with their spouses and/ or their children to listen and discuss family farm succession with their account managers, members of our agriculture team, and our key professional partners in the industry�. The sessions are set up to inspire discussion and give clients an opportunity to ask questions. They have gone over extremely well, notes Dieleman. “The BMO agriculture services group (agrologists/agri managers) consists of four people�, explained Dieleman, “myself, Steve Saccomano and Ian Sutherland in the Abbotsford office, and Amos Rossworm in the Interior. We have ten specialized agriculture account managers in the Fraser Valley and another half dozen or more in the Interior and on the Island. It is a fairly big and dedicated team and is a key focus for our bank, which has now become the largest bank involved with agriculture in B.C., and its our agriculture services group that is there to support our agricultural account managers and their clients.� BMO Bank of Montreal, recognized an important milestone that Canadian consumers reach on Sunday, Feb.12 - Food Freedom Day 2012. - the date by which the average Canadian will have earned enough money to pay for groceries for the entire year. Canadians spend an average of just over $7,000 on food annually, which is approximately 10 per cent of Continued: BMO/ p13

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BRITSH COLUMBIA CHICKEN MARKETING BOARD

INTERESTED IN AN OPPORTUNITY TO GROW CHICKENS? The British Columbia Chicken Marketing Board (BCCMB) with the assistance of the Council of Marketing Boards (COMB) will be conducting a random draw for applicants to form waiting list(s) for the Interior and Lower Mainland Regions of BC. Fifteen (15) applicants will be drawn for each region. Drawn applicants will be placed on the applicable waiting list in the order drawn. Each waiting list will be for quota to be issued in any amount not to exceed 7,716 kilograms live weight per eight (8) week cycle as required by the Board. Applicants may apply by submitting an application form and the applicable fee to the Council of Marketing Boards by no later than 4:00 pm PST on March 23, 2012. The draw will be held by COMB on March 27, 2012. Application forms and the regulations regarding the New Entrant Program for Growers can be downloaded from www.bcchicken.ca If you have any questions, or would like the application package to be mailed, please contact the BC Chicken Marketing Board at 604-859-2868. 2-12 wcf

Did You Know...

the use of hormones and steriods in the production of chicken is illegal, and has been since the 1960ĂŠs.


14

MARCH, 2012

Business FCC vision panel claims farmers' optimism high

BMO's ag roots run deep BMO from p13 household expenditures. Compare that to the 45 percent people in Indonesia spend or the 13 percent in the United States. Overall, food price increases are expected to be a fair bit lower, on average, this year compared to 2011. When asked in a recent BMO poll, 86 per cent of Canadians responded that they felt it was important or very important that they purchase Canadian produced food. Dieleman added he thinks the Canadian consumer really values what our local producers are putting on store shelves. By supporting local producers consumers are also supporting local businesses and local communities. Recently the Bank of Montreal bought M & I bank in the U.S. and together with their huge agriculture portfolio they are now the second largest bank in North America to participate in the agriculture market. BMO's roots in the Canadian agricultural sector date back to 1817, when it first began working with farmers. For Canadian businesses, including those in the agriculture and agri-food sectors, looking to innovate, enhance productivity, and grow their business, BMO Bank of Montreal recently announced a credit boost of 10 Billion dollars over the next three years.

Federal Ag. Minister Gerry Ritz (right) enjoys a laugh with U.S. Ag. Secretary Tom Vilsack (left) along with members of their staffs.

Canada and the U.S. strengthening agricultural trade relationship Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz concluded a productive trade mission to the United States, which included meetings with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and livestock, grains and oilseed industry representatives to find new ways to work together to benefit our integrated agriculture industry and economy. "As each other's largest trading partner, we need to continue working together to make sure trade can move at the speed of commerce and benefits the agriculture industry on both sides of the border," said

Minister Ritz. "Like never before, the flow of agriculture trade is essential to our economic growth." Minister Ritz focused on the importance of maintaining a science-based approach to trade and agreed to collaborate internationally to promote innovation and biotechnology as vital tools to ensure global food security. Both countries agreed to continue working together to improve productivity and competitiveness for the sector. By removing red tape and duplication, it will be easier for companies on both sides of the border to do business and increase North

America's global competitiveness. Following Canada's victory at the World Trade Organization (WTO) Panel on mandatory Country of Origin Labelling (COOL), Minister Ritz once again raised the issue with Secretary Vilsack and the U.S. livestock industry. Canada underlined the need for the U.S. to implement the changes required to comply with the WTO panel decision and end the restrictive nature of COOL as soon as possible. Every year, $33 billion in agricultural trade crosses the Canada-U.S. border.

Optimism among Canadian agriculture producers and agribusiness owners is at an all-time high, according to the fifth annual Farm Credit Canada (FCC) national Vision panel survey. A full 80% say that their farm or business will be better off in five years - a shift from 76% in 2010. More Canadian producers report being better off today than they were five years ago - 77% compared to 67% in 2010; 58% of producers plan to expand or diversify their operations within the next five years; and seven in ten producers would encourage a friend or relative to pursue a career in primary production. “The results are great news," says FCC President and CEO Greg Stewart. "Producers said their optimism is driven by their expectation of profitability over the next five years, increasing global demand for food and the fact that they have either recently, or expect to, reduce their debt over the next five years. In the survey, producers openly shared hundreds of positive comments about the industry. "Agriculture is more than a job, it is an amazing lifestyle," said a B.C. dairy producer and member of the Vision panel who answered the survey.

It’s the Best Part of Summer COME CELEBRATE AT BC’S LARGEST AGRICULTURE SHOWCASE

PNE 4-H FESTIVAL

SAFEWAY FARM COUNTRY

PACIFIC SPIRIT HORSE SHOW

Over 30 project competitions as well as provincial programs for judging, speak and show and educational displays.

Come out and experience BC’s remarkably diverse agriculture industry. Featuring the crowd-favourite Discovery Farm exhibit plus a whole barn full of exciting animal displays!

Competitions in: JuniorAmateur Jumping, Cattle Penning, Draft Team, Miniature Horses, Indoor Eventing and the PNE summertime challenge, The Battle of the Breeds.

AUGUST 18–21

Entry deadline: June 29, 2012

AUGUST 18–SEPTEMBER 3

AUGUST 22–SEPTEMBER 3

Entry deadline: July 20, 2012

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15

MARCH, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

INFORMATION

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540. DENIED CANADA PENSION plan disability benefits? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca

041

PERSONALS

DATING SERVICE. LongTerm/Short-Term Relationships, FREE TO TRY!!! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1. Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877-8045381. (18+). DATING SERVICE. LongTerm/Short-Term Relationships, FREE TO TRY!!! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1. Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877-8045381. (18+).

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

130

DON’T MISS this opportunity. 30 year manufacture expanding across Canada. Fencing, decks and docks. Expanding your business or start new. Email: info@friendlyearth.com; www.friendlyearth.com. 1-800-4659968.

An earthmoving company based in Edson Alberta requires a full time Heavy Duty Mechanic for field and shop work. We require Cat Dozer/Deere excavator experience. You will work a set schedule for days on and off. Call Lloyd @ 780723-5051

HOME BASED BUSINESS We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

Bring the family! Sizzling Specials at Florida’s Best Beach! New Smyrna Beach, FL. See it all at: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166 CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO Risk Program. STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call Us Now. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248 HAWAII ON THE MAINLAND, where healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica “the most friendly country on earth”! 1-780-952-0709; www.CanTico.ca

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca

130

WORK FROM HOME. Largest Medical Transcriptionist employer in Canada looks to CanScribe for 100 more MT’s. We need more students! Enroll Today! 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

HELP WANTED

300

WEBCO LEDUC - division of Sun Media, requires Full-time Heatset/Coldset 1st & 2nd Pressmen. 15 unit Goss Community. Competitive rates and benefits. Email resume: et@webcoleduc.com.

SAWDUST Hemlock, Fir & Cedar

An employment service assisting employers and job seekers. Ph: (604)823-6222 www.agri-labourpool.ca ASPHALT PAVING Personnel Required: Paving contractor in the beautiful BC Interior requires paving personnel for all aspects of Asphalt Laydown. Applicants should have minimum 1 years’ experience in Highway, Commercial and Residential Paving, although candidates with construction experience will be considered for training. Please forward resume to paverswanted@yahoo.ca.

Carpenter-Joiner

needed for Westeck Windows Mfg. Inc. $ 22.00 -25.00 hourly - 40 hrs. per week. Send resumes to 8104 Evans Parkway Chilliwack, British Columbia V2R 5R8, apply by email at westeckjobs@hotmail.com or by fax at (604) 792-6714.

SALES

604-465-5193 or 604-465-5197

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D Self-motivated D Excellent attention to detail D Exceptional customer service skills D Strong keyboarding skills / Data entry experience is an asset D The ability to thrive in a fast-paced environment D Comfortable using most Microsoft office programs

EDUCATION

HELP WANTED

Send resume with salary expectations to: Leanne.Woelke@school specialty.com

DIRECT SALES REPRESENTATIVES. Canada’s premiere home automation and Security Company is NOW hiring AprilAugust. No experience necessary. Travel Required. E-mail resume: kkurtze@vivint.com Visit: www.vivint.ca Experienced Service Advisor required in our Service department in Salmon Arm. Must possess strong customer satisfaction skills as well as above average paper work skills. The ability to work in a fast paced environment is essential. Excellent wage/benefit package available to the right individual. Please fax resume 1250-832-4545 or email to pat@brabymotors.com .

Interested in starting a career in automotive sales, but not sure if you can do it?

624

UP TO $20/HR We need 12 CSR reps now!

PAID training. F/T Hours Benefits after 6 months Must be outgoing!!! ERICA @ 604-777-2195

Farms & Ranches for Sale!

MOVING & STORAGE

Farm & Ranch by Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Signature Service 1-866-345-3414

A-TECH Services 604-996-8128 Running this ad for 8yrs

www.canadafarmandranch.com

626

HOUSES FOR SALE

818

CARS - DOMESTIC

2000 CHRYSLER INTREPID, clean, auto, 4 dr. 125,000km. Great shape. $2900. (604)583-1366 2003 Pontiac Sunfire, 2dr, auto, 170,km, good cond. 1 owner. $3499. Call (604)792-0246 2005 PONTIAC G5, 4 dr. 4 cyl., auto, 87,000km. $5300 obo (604)746-2458 2006 BUICK Allure CX. 94K kms. No accd’s, local, garage kept. Exc. cond. $9,300. Abbts 604-855-1335 NEED A VEHICLE? EASY FINANCE!! Low Payments! $99 Delivers 24 Hour Approval. We Deliver! 3,000 Vehicles to choose. Call Now! Marty 1-888-414-8042. Big Discounts! www.eagleridgegmc.com. New & Used Vehicles

www.chilliwacksuzuki.ca

821 CARS - SPORTS & IMPORTS 2001 NISSAN ALTIMA,103,000 km. No accidents. Local. auto. New brakes & tires.$4400. 778-241-6086 2004 Honda Civic DX 4cyl 4dr auto a/c p/dl keyless entry,110,000K Great cond $8400. 604-626-8894 2005 SUZUKI SWIFT HB,exc cond, all records, low miles, owner history $5000/obo.604-942-8171/506-4120 2011 HONDA CRV 4 wd, Auto, silver. Loaded. Local car. $22,500: 9000kms. (778) 895-7570 New & Used Vehicles

PAINT SPECIAL 3 rooms for $299, 2 coats any colour (Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Cloverdale Premium quality paint. NO PAYMENT until Job is completed. Ask us about our Laminate Flooring, Carpet Cleaning & Maid Service! www.paintspecial.com

353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

www.chilliwacksuzuki.ca

MOTORCYCLES

2005 POLARIS Sportsman ATV, 700 twin, EFI, mossy oak camel, warn winch, front & rear bumpers, Easy-Off windshield, exc. cond. 1538km. $5500 firm. Chilliwack 1 (604)799-8533

845

.

PETS SECURITY OFFICER TRAINING B.S.T. classes in Abby. Job placement. 604-859-8860 www.brissonsecurity.com

160

TRADES, TECHNICAL

Required Immediately! Journeyman RV Technician for Kamloops largest RV Dealership. Jubilee RV Centre offers excellent wage compensation, medical & dental benefits, ongoing industry training and year round employment. Come join our team in sunny and warm Kamloops, where you will be appreciated, love our climate and enjoy all our outdoor activities! Please forward your resume to service@jubileerv.com Attention Steve Joyce - Service Manager

PERSONAL SERVICES 173E

HEALTH PRODUCTS

477

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Auto Financing FREE CASH BACK WITH $0 DOWN at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or Bad credit call Stephanie 1-877-7920599 www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309. Free Delivery. DROWNING IN DEBTS? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. AVOID BANKRUPTCY! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500 If you own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

WANT A VEHICLE BUT STRESSED ABOUT YOUR CREDIT? Christmas in March, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-593-6095.

PETS

CATS GALORE, TLC has for adoption spayed & neutered adult cats. 604-309-5388 / 604-856-4866

2006 YAMAHA APEX 1000, 4stroke, MLX Mtn. 163” x 2¼” track, reverse, comes with service manual. 1024 mi. Cheapest Apex/4stroke in Canada! $5900 firm. Chilliwack (604)799-8533

CATS OF ALL DESCRIPTION in need of caring homes! All cats are Spayed, neutered, vaccinated and dewormed. Visit us at fraservalleyhumanesociety.com or call 1 (604)820-2977

847 SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

GOLDEN Retriever puppies, born Jan. 7th, family raised, very well socialized, 1st shots & deworming included. Mission 604-820-4827.

2004 JEEP GRAND Cherokee Ltd. 4x4, auto, green, 126K, $7400 firm. Call 604-538-4883

PITBULLS ~ PUREBRED. Ready for sale. $500. Vet ✔, 6 weeks old. Call 604-217-2983

851

STANDARD SCHNAUZER pups. 17 - 19” / 30 - 35lbs full grown. $500. each. 604-826-5846 Mission. TIBETAN MASTIFF puppies. P.B. 8 wks old. Ready to go. Good health. 604-302-5914 or 604-440-3650

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE 518

BUILDING SUPPLIES

660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS

SAWMILLS from only $3997 MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800566-6899 Ext:400OT.

www.dannyevans.ca

STEEL BUILDINGS FOR ALL USES! Spring Deals! Make an offer on selloff models at factory and save thousands NOW! Call for FREE Brochure - 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170.

560

RENTALS 736

MISC. FOR SALE

Can’t Get Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1866-981-5991 SAWMILLS from only $3997 - MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-5666899 Ext:400OT.

HOMES FOR RENT

2BDRM + den on 1/4 acre lot, fenced yard, Agassiz, 5appl., no cats, pet neg., $1300/mo. util. not incl., avail immed., ref’s a must, (604)226-4797

TRANSPORTATION 818

TRUCKS & VANS

1998 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 4x4, Z71 off-road package, extra cab, matching canopy, alarm with remote start. 5.7 litre Vortec V8, 4 speed auto. Regular maintenance, good tires, good brakes, new shocks, trailer brake & hitch. Clean, solid truck. $5900 obo. 604-852-4412 2001 GMC SIERRA 4x4, ext cab, auto, green, 135K, $8300 firm. Call: (604)538-9257 2004 GMC Jimmy ZR2 4x4, 1 owner, 139,km, auto, gd cond. $6250. Call (604)792-0246

859

UTILITY TRAILERS

REESE TRAILER HITCH, heavy duty, allmost new $200 obo. (604)820-8218

MARINE 912

BOATS

AGASSIZ- 12’ aluminum boat with oars and boat assist wheels $550. Call 1-604-796-8792

CARS - DOMESTIC

1997 BUICK LESABRE LTD leather, 139 kms, prem. cond., one owner, $3900/obo. (778)565-4230 1998 DODGE NEON, 2 dr, 161K, runs well, good rubber, $800 obo. Call: (604)826-4918 (Mission area)

MOBILE POWER WASHING:

STEEL OF A DEAL - BUILDING SALE! 20X24 $4798. 25X30 $5998. 30X42 $8458. 32X58 $12,960. 40X60 $15,915. 47X80 $20,645. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca.

Hot & Cold Power Washing of Equipment, Milking Parlours, and Buildings.

POWER SWEEPING:

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

Driveways, Barns & Concrete Surfaces 3-12 wcf

283 GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS GUTTER Cleaning Service, Repairs Free Est, 20 yrs exp, Rain or shine. 7 days/week. Simon 604-230-0627

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Minimum $150 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673

Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley

GET PAID TO LOSE WEIGHT. $5,000 For Your Success Story.Personal Image TV Show. Call to Qualify: 416-730-5684 ext 2243. Joanna@mertontv.ca. www.mertontv.ca.

MONEYPROVIDER.COM. $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

3-12 wcf

FARMS

TRANSPORTATION

830

182

• Tuesday, June 5th • Tuesday, September 4th • Tuesday, December 4th

REAL ESTATE

329 PAINTING & DECORATING

The time couldn’t be any better for you to try! At the Honda Way in Abby, we’re looking for hard working and motivated people to join our evolving and growing sales team. Our training program is second to none and our last addition is thriving and on their way for a successful career. The training we provide will give you the necessary foundation to succeed in this fast paced position. We are investing in our people. Let us invest in you. Don’t miss out! No experience necessary. Please contact Brian Choo E-mail: brian@hondaway.com Fax: 604.857.9146

HERBAL MAGIC - With Herbal Magic lose up to 20 pounds in just 8 weeks and keep it off. Results Guaranteed! Start today call 1-800-854-5176.

Next issues:

MISC. WANTED

Collecting Old Coins: Can + USA $1, 50c, 25c, 10c, Olympic, Gold Call Travis 604-796-0320

SPARTAN Moving Ltd. Fast & Reliable. Insured Competitive rates. Wknd Specials. Call Frank: (604) 435-8240

AUTOMOTIVE SALES CAREER

CUSTOMER SERVICE/ ORDER ENTRY ASSOCIATES Required *Seasonal work* (Mar.Sept.) with potential for F/T at a busy company in Aldergrove. The following skills / attributes are a must:

TransX hiring O/OPS BC-AB Excellent Rates + Lease Program PH: 1 877-914-0001

SERVICE MANAGER - Hanna Chrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta). Opportunity in a perfect family environment. Strong team, competitive wages, benefits, growth potential. Fax resume: 403-854-2845. Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

563

Available for Delivery Call for pricing

320

Star Fleet Trucking HIRING!! DRIVERS, FARMERS, RANCHERS & RETIREES with 2003 or newer 1-Ton duallie, diesel; pickups & 8’box to deliver new travel trailers & fifth wheels from US manufacturers to Canadian dealers. Free IRP plate for your truck and low insurance rates! Prefer commercial Driver’s License. Top Pay! Call Craig 1-877-890-4523 www.starfleettrucking.com

115

LANDSCAPING

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

www.augustinesoilandmulch.com

Exp’d TRUCK DRIVER wanted for BC runs. Exc wages, benefits & equipment + weekends home. Fax or email resume & drivers abstract 604-513-8004 or tridem@telus.net

AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783 TRAIN TO BE AN Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-665-8339, 604-681-5456.

PHONE: 604-702-5550 OR FAX: 604-702-5542

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

114 TRAVEL

HELP WANTED

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

156

EARN EXTRA CASH! - P/T, F/T Immediate Openings For Men & Women. Easy Computer Work, Others Positions Are Available. Can Be Done From Home. No Experience Needed. www.HWC-BC.com

TRAVEL 75

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

TO ADVERTISE


16

MARCH, 2012

SUPERIOR QUALITY. TRUSTED TRADITION

www.prairiecoastequipment.com

John Deere 02E Z 05 /oaGer TEST DRIVE ONE TODAY!

4 Se Seater eate err as low as

$11,997

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NEW

SEAT S EA AT GATOR!!

- $1717 PCE Discount - $1500 John Deere Spring Discount 2S Seater Sea Se Seat eat ater err

Retail $20,714 $20 714

as low as

$8,998

On Sale $17,497

Get 0% for 48 Months Come See us during John Deere Days March 23 & 24.

Come check out the NEW 2012 AG and Turf Products! Lunch will be provided both days from 11am-2pm

Only at our Abbotsford Location 339 Sumas Way

John Jo J ohn Deere De D e 5045E Tra Tractor

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Add a 553 Loader for $6930 Retail $24,592 $

On Sale $22,570

Get 0% for 48 Months 1-877-553-3373

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Get more done with a single, extraordinarily versatile tractor. Row crops, hay, transport, material handling..... You name it the 6R and 7R’s can handle it! With up to 280HP engines you get a power dense tractor with exceptional comfort and productivity features

Keep your eyes open for our Official Langley Grand opening happening April 10th-14th! Check our website closer to the date for more details! There will be exciting events all week!

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Chilliwack Progress, March 06, 2012