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VOL. 25 NO. 51

www.terracestandard.com

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Contractors dig in at log yard By ANNA KILLEN Logs destined for export and the machines used to sort them remained fenced in and unmoving at a local log yard going into the weekend, while the company that owns the logs faced pressure to sort out a dispute with one of its contractors. The contractor, Bryco Enterprises, blocked the entrances to the Yaorun Wood yard with heavy equipment earlier this month to prevent Yaorun from moving any wood until the dispute was settled. And to passersby, the blockade

appeared to look more permanent at the end of last week, with the addition of a chain and lock at one entrance and at least half a dozen heavy equipment machines lined up facing out towards Keith Ave. Yaorun leased the property from the city in February for 10 years. It once served as the log yard for Skeena Cellulose. The Chinese-owned company owns a number of timber sales in the northwest area, a parcel of land in New Hazelton, and has also done operations in Burns Lake. Bryco was hired by Yaorun to clean and level the leased-site

which had become overgrown by young trees and all was going well until Yaorun declined to pay Bryco invoices. In the meantime, city officials have confirmed that Yaorun is paying an agreed upon lease rate of $10,000 a month to use the 20-acre parcel on Keith Ave. “The city has a lease agreement for land with this company that has provisions in place should the issue of non-payment arise,” added Terrace mayor Dave Pernarowski. He did rule out any attempt at intervening to find a way to end the dispute.

“It’s not the city’s responsibility to be a mediator in any business dispute,” he said. “I’m hopeful that the companies are able to continue operating their respective businesses at full capacity as soon as possible,” he said. “That would be the best scenario for our community.” Meanwhile, a hand-made sign was put up earlier this week at the Ebony’s Hidden Treasures store on Kalum Ave. warning contractors entering into business with the company that late payment or no payment could be expected. Long-time forestry contractor

No quick fix for closed recycling depot

Doug Suttis, who erected the sign in his wife’s storefront window after working for Yaorun since the summer, said Yaorun risks burning its bridges in the close-knit forestry sector. “The area drastically needs these projects, but at the same time we don’t need people not paying,” he said, noting it causes a domino effect in the community when people aren’t paid. He says that while Yaorun eventually paid him enough money to pay his employees, the company still owes him tens of thousands of dollars.

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By JOSH MASSEY TERRACE city council didn’t come up with any immediate solution to losing a free recycling service at its March 25 meeting. But it did resolve to implement a “comprehensive recycling strategy” that will include opportunities for public engagement after councillor Brian Downie put forth a motion to do “a recycling study for the city of Terrace and invite the citizens of Terrace to engage.” Waste Management closed down its self-serve depot March 31, citing costs. The company did not charge for the service and was not getting any other financial assistance. The company offered the service for nearly a year, placing bins at its facilities here in Terrace. Before that, the city had been operating its own service, a pilot project set up at the old Co-op property using two local companies, Geier Waste and DoYour-Part, until Waste Management said it would take on the task at no charge. Several councillors also said they discussed the issue at recent conferences and committee meetings, and are searching for solutions to Terrace’s unique challenges being a smaller population far from recycling plants in the south. Meanwhile, the city’s sustainability coordinator Tara Irwin said that the B.C. government plans to table legislation next spring that will overhaul the province’s recycling system, implementing “extended producer responsibility (EPR)”, forcing companies to pay for recycling programs based on the amount of packaging they produce. “This will incentivize industry to reduce their packaging,” said Irwin.

Margaret Speirs PHOTO

■■ Touching moment eva henry celebrates her 100th birthday with friends and family members, including her great-greatgrandaughter Chloe Pritchard above, at Terraceview Lodge March 28.

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More medals

Colourful

After you...

Four more locals awarded a Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medal \COMMUNITY A16

Local author and great grandmother Tess Tessier passes away \NEWS A13

The cage takes centre stage at the Terrace Sportsplex on April 13 \SPORTS A26


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Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Terrace Standard

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Terrace Standard

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MARGARET SPEIRS PHOTO

■ Bus stop JASON LACROIX, who works for the Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine, with one of the four new bus shelters in Thornhill. Two new ones are on River Drive, one on Dobbie St. and one on Edlund Ave.

NEWS

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Cain case cost $20,000 THE KITIMAT-STIKINE Regional District spent close to $20,000 in its unsuccessful bid to have a German shepherd declared a dangerous animal and then destroyed. The largest portion of that amount went to the regional district’s lawyer it hired to present its case in court. Legal fees to pay for the regional district’s lawyer Troy De Souza plus his flights, accommodation, meals and any other expenses totalled about $16,000, said regional district treasurer Verna Wickie. De Souza is from Victoria and had to be flown in for the trial. Cain spent nearly a year in jail after being seized and until the court case was heard. In all, he was at the regional district’s Thornhill animal shelter for 329 days – April 5, 2012 to Feb. 28, 2013 – and, at $8 per day, that cost the regional district $2,632. On April 5 2012, Cain allegedly attacked three boys, tearing the pants of one, biting the arm of a second boy and knocking down and

standing on the back of a third boy in lower Thornhill, reported police at that time. The dog was seized and taken to the Terrace animal shelter as it was a weekend and the Thornhill animal shelter wasn’t open, said police. He was taken to the Thornhill Shelter the following week. The case sparked widespread social media comment with supporters of Cain in particular advocating that he be moved to the Kitimat shelter where they said living conditions were better pending a conclusion of the hearing. Provincial court judge Brian Neal turned down the application to destroy the dog Feb. 28, saying the lawyer for the regional district had failed to prove its case, which took up four days of court time. But that’s not the end of Cain’s story. After court finished Feb. 28, owner Paul MacNeil said his understanding was that even though the bylaw says Thornhill residents may only have two dogs, that a

third dog is acceptable if the owner gets a kennel licence instead of individual dog licences. However, according to Murray Daly, regional district bylaw enforcement officer,

MacNeil lives in the single family residential zone (R1), which doesn’t allow kennels. Regional district animal control bylaw #13.1 says “no person shall keep three or more dogs

apparently over the age of four (4) months on any parcel unless kennel use is a permitted use of the parcel in accordance with the Regional District’s Zoning Bylaw.”

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What’s happening at Chances Terrace in April...

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A4  www.terracestandard.com

Blue skies at airport

On a cloudless day representatives from the provincial, federal and regional governments gathered at the Terrace airport to celebrate the Terrace-Kitimat airport society’s 15th year. Planes kept touching down throughout the meeting and tour on March 28, the celebration of recent success marked by a sense of urgency, as airport manager Carman Hendry said that upgrades to the aprons and access will be necessary if all of the major mining and LNG projects get approved in the area. Despite growing demand, not all funding applications have been accepted, said Hendry. Companies have been slow to let the airport know if their projects are going through, and need to provide “solid information,” said Hendry. Shell, for instance, keeps telling them their workers will be coming in droves, but can’t supply solid numbers, said airport society president

Ron Burnett. “We’re not going to build all this stuff just to be left with it at the end of the bubble,” said Hendry. This surge in passengers­ , driven by the expansion of major northern projects like the Rio Tinto Alcan smelter upgrade in Kitimat, Red Chris mine, the Northwest Transmission Line and others are driving traffic up. In February 2010 the airport sold $800,000 in ticket sales. Compare that to $2.4 million this February and the growth is obvious, said Hendry. The airport is run by a not-for-profit society, and judging by the statistics thrown around during the meeting and tour, the board has been successful at improving the airport’s reputation. It used to be the Terrace-Kitimat airport shared the dubious distinction of being the county’s most difficult airport to land in, along with Castlegar. In 2001 Terrace

to where you want the coverage. The signal doesn’t turn corners.” To get continuous coverage along the 190 kilometre stretch between Terrace and Prince Rupert would require sites every 10 to 20 kilometres or so, Hall said, and would also mean putting in new power lines and fibre optic cable. The cost of this telecommunications project is still undetermined, but each tower costs between $500,000 and one million dollars. Hall said Telus is speaking with regional

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Huge Airport machinery was on display last Thursday in celebration of the Northwest Regional Airport Society’s 15th Anniversary. turned away 221 flights. In 2012 that number was reduced to 23. Installation of new land-sky navigation technology has gone a long way toward bringing that number down, said Hendry. Recent additions to the airport include new bathrooms and a fourth airplane stand, said Hendry. Hawkair manager

Rod Howard underlined the importance of the airport to the local economy, saying he cuts cheques for $180,000 to employees living in the district. Burnett said one addition the society hopes to see in the future is a Canadian border service so international visitors can fly straight in, which would promote tourism.

Cell service to expand AN agreement between Telus and the provincial government could mean heightened safety along Highway 16. According to Telus spokesman Shawn Hall, currently 60 per cent of 911 calls come by cellphone, so having service along the highway could reduce all sorts of risk. “I can appreciate the specific concerns of northern communities,” said Hall. “Whether you are talking about Highway 16 or Highway 4 or Highway 1 there are important public safety reasons for coverage.” The plan to install new wireless towers along Highway 16 is part of a 10-year telecommunication contract between Telus and the province aiming to provide roadside coverage along 1,700 kilometres of highway in B.C. Achieving continual coverage between Terrace and Prince Rupert is a bit of a long shot. “Like many corridors it presents a challenge,” Hall said of the Skeena River valley. “Wireless sites are low power, 50 or 60 watts ... They have to be close

Wednesday, April 3, 2013  Terrace Standard

districts in areas which currently have shoddy coverage, such as Thornhill outside of Terrace and Telkwa east of Smithers. Hall said Telus is “fairly close” to finalizing the locations of sites in Thornhill and Telkwa, and expanding coverage in the Port Edward area. “We are in the process of identifying appropriate sites now and looking at where we might best get in. From there we have to do the proper environmental and archaeological studies and get our

permits in place and go from there,” Hall said. Hall sees increased coverage as something that is transforming the north, drawing in a sector of workers who might normally be restricted to urban areas. “Someone could move up and work as a graphic designer in their home in a rural area,” Hall suggested. “It also provides better access to health care services, educational services.” Telus’s agreement with the province includes expanding fibre optic connections to 450 schools.

AGM

Wednesday, April 10th 7:15 p.m. Carpenters Hall *New vendors wanting a permanent booth should attend.

TRUST YOUR INTUITION

Inner Peace Movement of Canada

Picture info: Kitchen Volunteers Larry, Deb and Claudia acknowledging the donation from Bob Erb to the TDCSS Homeless Outreach Program.

welcomes National Speaker

Philip Ponchet

Tuesday, April 9th 1pm & 7pm Sandman Inn, Terrace Find inner harmony and peace of mind. In the 90 min. presentation you will learn about four types of intuition and how to listen, communication with inner guidance, 7 year cycles of life, balancing your head and heart and much more. Learn how to create positive change in your life, experience giving aura impressions and moving mountains by the power of intent. 1½ hours, $16 at the door www.innerpeacemovement.ca A non-profit educational organization

Everyone is Welcome

It is with hundreds of heartfelt thanks and heaping spoonfuls of gratitude from the Volunteers and the folks who depend on the Homeless Outreach Program, who graciously received a $20,000 donation from local area resident Bob Erb. The TDCSS Homeless Program has been providing hot meals to the areas most vulnerable people and depends on community and individual donations to keep the doors open. For further information contact us at 250-635-3178. Thanks Bob for helping us help others!


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Terrace Standard

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

NEWS

www.terracestandard.com

A5

Heart of Kitsault I

Only the memories remain of what was, in the early ‘80s, a bustling school in the booming resource town of Kitsault By ANNA KILLEN

f you live in Terrace, you’ve heard of Kitsault – especially lately with the provincial government giving the approval, providing strict conditions are followed, to develop an open pit molybdenum mine near the location of the mining ghost town. And just last month, Terrace mayor Dave Pernarowski took a job with the company now owning Kitsault, helping promote the potential for the town to act as a hub for the liquefied natural gas industry. But although abandoned, there are still memories of the town when it served as the home for miners and their families when a molybdenum mine briefly operated there more than 30 years ago. Hopes were high in 1980/1981 when Amax opened the mine. But when the market for molybdenum crashed, so did the reason for the mine and the town, resulting in a flight of people leaving for other places. The townsite has been meticulously wellkept – manicured lawns, a maintained fire truck, running water – over the years when it was on the sales market. Purchased in 2005 by millionaire Krishnan Suthanthiran, the maintenance has been kept up and improved. Suthanthiran has steadfastly refused to allow the town to become overgrown and rundown – nor leave the public discourse for long. His dreams for the town have been nothing short of newsworthy – a resort for single mothers, a haven for medical research. Most recently he’s announced he believes it to be the perfect LNG hub, and there’s at least one truck marked with the Kitsault Energy insignia riding through Terrace. But as intriguing as the town is right now, and could be in the future, it’s the town’s past that gives it its depth. When looking at images of the town in its prime, the sense of community shared by its inhabitants is palpable – this wasn’t any old remote work camp, filled with men counting the days until their off-time, this was a bona fide community, facilitating lifelong friendships. And at the heart of that community during its final years was its school, Kitsault Elementary Secondary, home to the Silver Eagles. About 85 students attended the school, which taught K-10 and had all of the amenities of a regular high school – a shop, science lab, kitchen and proper gymnasium. The school had been shipped up to the site in pre-assembled pieces by the Terrace School District as the town began to fill and one portion of the school was the four-room elementary school from the last time the Kitsault mine had been in operation in the ‘60s. “I called it my Lego school,” said the school’s former principal, Sue Olson. She spent her first year in Kitsault as a teacher,

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

THIS IMAGE of Kitsault students was used in newspaper articles and messages from the town’s employer, Amax of Canada, in the school’s yearbooks. then became principal in ‘81. At 31, she was the oldest member on staff. In a word, the teachers, parents, and kids of Kitsault were “wonderful”, said Olson with a smile that could be heard shining through the line from her home in Terrace. “It was a wonderful experience for me. I would have loved to have stayed for the full 26 years [of my teaching career],” she said. The teachers were a close-knit group, living in accommodations provided by the mine and spending holidays together eating turkey, often cooked by Olson. “I’d cook two Thanksgiving turkeys at Labour Day so new teachers getting into the swing of things didn’t have to worry about eating for the first week,” she said. The first year was in flux – the school building wasn’t quite complete, so construction workers were on site, and junior high students attended classes in halls and cloakrooms using invisible typewriters to practise their typing skills – but spirits stayed high. “The kids were just such good sports about it all,” she said. But the community experienced its first tragedy that year, too, when one of the young workers was involved in a fatal car accident. “That just shocked everybody,” she said. “He was in the school all of the time, it was just so sad.” The experience brought the community closer – they sent sympathy cards to the

man’s family and grieved together. And while the residents waited for other town amenities, like the rec centre, to be finished, the school became the town’s focal point with dances and events every week. “It became in many ways a community school,” she said, adding that the school’s shop teacher would open the shop to the public a few nights a week. “I think it meant the world to the people there because otherwise their kids would have had to go out,” said Olson. When the mine was open in the ‘60s, all secondary students boarded in Terrace. And while the parents relied on the school, the school also relied on the parents. “If someone was having trouble in a class, I’d phone the parents and say ‘Hey, can I please send him home to you for the day and will you give him a chore to do that he’s not particularly happy about so that he wants to come to school tomorrow and behave?’,” she said. “It worked.” But all of this work came grinding to a halt one summer day in ‘83. “I’ll never forget it,” she said, voice dropping. “My husband and I were just getting ready to go away for holidays for the summer, I had gotten the school fully ready for the next September, the textbooks were all in and on the kids’ desks... And they closed the mine.” The miners hadn’t been working the year

before, but until that day they were hopeful work would start up again. “Our house was full of men crying. It was the most godawful day because the community was not a municipality. We belonged to the mine. So if the mine shut, you lost your job and your home,” she said. The workers and families were given until the end of October to vacate the site, and if they weren’t gone, the company would move them as far as Terrace. Years later, Skip Bergsma, who was assistant superintendent for the district during the Kitsault years, likes to joke that they could have held the opening ceremony and the closing ceremony for the school at the same time, because by the time the school was complete, there were already rumblings of the mine’s closure. But in ‘83, the district still held out hope that the mine would reopen fairly soon and the school would go back to being in use. “I remember talking to the mine manager at that time and he told me that he had three flare pistols – it was just a joke – one colour designated that the mine was going to open in a month, the other was a week, and the third one was it reopened yesterday,” he said. “But it never happened.” Bergsma travelled to the site two or three times over the next decade with a maintenance crew, slowly shipping out textbooks, chalkboards, equipment, and expendables and distributing them throughout the district. “It was a little bit eerie all right,” he said, of the empty property. “And sad. Kitsault was a really nice community. They did a good job in terms of building that community up so it’s a shame that it had to end so quickly.” It snowed on his last trip in and he remembers seeing trees growing on top of the roof of the school, and water pouring into the building. And now all that’s left of the school at the Kitsault townsite is its foundation. Eventually, the building was shipped to an outfit in Kamloops, and then probably to another district as pieces, said Barry Piersdorff, who was secretary treasurer for the school district from 1986-2000. But even though the physical building is gone, the people of Kitsault stay connected to their memories online through the Facebook group, Kitsault Remembered, which boasts photos of the town in its past and present state. Sue Olson says the first thing she noticed when she logged on were the full-grown trees in the recent photos. “When we were there, they were planted saplings,” she said. “They weren’t trees when we were there, they were just sticks out of the ground.” Special thanks to Heritage Park Museum for its contributions to this story.


A6

OPINION

www.terracestandard.com

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Terrace Standard

EDITORIAL

Recycling GOVERNMENTS can always find money for things they want to do. The trick is to combine that with things people want them to do and it’s a bonus when what the people want doesn’t cost a government (translated - taxpayers) any money. Such was the case last spring when Waste Management popped up to offer a free recycling service, thus relieving the City of Terrace of the need to spend $50,000 it had already set aside in its 2012 budget to continue its own pilot project service. And now that Waste Management, citing costs, has closed its free depot, city council, which has spent a lot of political capital and money (eg. the purchase of BC Hydro’s decorated hybrid car) painting itself environmentally-friendly green, is stuck between a rock and a dumpster. So far council seems content to make tepid motions about involving citizens in crafting some kind of other recycling plan. Council may not realize it but it has already shown some leadership, readily accepted by citizens, by committing money to its pilot project in 2011, by then placing money in its 2012 budget to continue that service and by then accepting Waste Management’s own free offer. This is not a rich local government and there would have been a huge sigh of relief when Waste Management made its offer last year. But if council was ready to commit $50,000 in 2012, then it owes its citizens the same consideration now. ESTABLISHED APRIL 27, 1988

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Getting a good night’s sleep

H

ave you ever wondered what stores do with goods dissatisfied customers return for a refund? Not foods with expired bestbefore-dates, but purchases such as a tape recorder with control pedals snipped from a recycled sardine can lid or $3 scissors whose blades display more antipathy toward each other than cellmates of rival drug gangs. Appliances, tools and other inedible products can probably be wiped clean of fingerprints and other smudges, and repackaged for resale. Any inferior product that came in a bubble package or protected by contoured styrofoam can be expected to return to the store with electrical cord dangling from one corner of its carton and excess styrofoam taped to the lid. Do these refunded purchases wind up in a backroom storage space where some minimum wage associate uniquely motivated by obsessive compulsive disorder takes on the challenge of fitting everything neatly back into its original carton, each cord coiled into a three inch figure-of-eight, twist-tied,

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CLAUDETTE SANDECKI and each hunk of styrofoam cuddling a corresponding curve of the product? I always feel sorry, even guilty, when I must return something that failed to perform or live up to its billing, but I never realized the possible full implications until I heard a TV ad for Octaspring mattresses. Octaspring Mattress, a United Kingdom manufacturer, advertises a money back guarantee for its expensive product: “60 night riskfree trial. We want you to have every possible chance to have that quality night’s sleep you deserve – that’s why we offer you a 60 night risk-free

S TANDARD

the prevalence of bedbugs in even the cleanest, best establishments today. Five star hotels, modest but clean motels, and hospitals battle periodic bedbug infestations despite rigorous extermination treatments. Even the stacks in the Vancouver Public Library harbour bedbugs but because the bloodsuckers don’t transmit disease, only an itch for reading, Vancouver Health isn’t too concerned about literary bedbugs. Without some reliable form of vigorous fumigation or steaming to kill any potential bedbugs, a money back guarantee looks to me like a recipe for trouble. Bedbugs can be hard to detect anywhere and mattresses, particularly their circumferential bindings and zippers, provide a veritable Indy Speedway for these pests. These mattresses are made from memory foam, not of itself a food source for bedbugs, except that’s where they hide, “sniffing for the sweet stream of your exhaled carbon dioxide and for your warm skin to grow still,” reports Dr. Johnathan M. Sheele from the Eastern Virginia Medical School.

TERRACE

$61.69 (+$3.08 GST)=64.77 per year; Seniors $54.37 (+2.72 GST)=57.09 Out of Province $69.49 (+$3.47 GST)=72.96 Outside of Canada (6 months) $167.28(+8.36 GST)=175.64 Serving the Terrace and Thornhill area. Published on Wednesday of each week at 3210 Clinton Street, Terrace, British Columbia, V8G 5R2. Stories, photographs, illustrations, designs and typestyles in the Terrace Standard are the property of the copyright holders, including Black Press Ltd., its illustration repro services and advertising agencies. Reproduction in whole or in part, without written permission, is specifically prohibited. Authorized as second-class mail pending the Post Office Department, for payment of postage in cash. This Terrace Standard is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory

THROUGH BIFOCALS

trial. Sitting on a bed for five minutes in a shop doesn’t tell you very much about a mattress – the only true test is sleeping on it night after night in your own home: And this is what we offer. No quibbles. No fuss. “We promise if you aren’t getting the best night’s sleep you’ve ever experienced just tell us ....” So, on the chance one of these fine mattresses fails to satisfy, what happens to the mattress once it’s returned to the store? Is it cleaned, vacuumed, steamed, fumigated and then re-packaged in a fresh plastic bag to be sold as new? What if there are smudges on it from improper handling by dirty fingers? The company claims their mattresses are handled by white gloves, and that may be company policy, but what if the policy isn’t followed on every delivery? Are less-than-pristine returned mattresses sent to a secondary outlet and sold as gently used? To allow a mattress to go into someone’s home for any length of time, but particularly 60 days, and then be brought back to the store for resale perturbs me given

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Special thanks to all our contributors and correspondents for their time and talents

PUBLISHER/EDITOR: Rod Link ADVERTISING MANAGER: Brian Lindenbach PRODUCTION MANAGER: Edouard Credgeur NEWS/COMMUNITY: Margaret Speirs NEWS: Josh Massey NEWS/SPORTS: Anna Killen FRONT DESK: Pat Georgeson CIRCULATION SUPERVISOR: Amanda Tolhuysen AD CONSULTANTS: Bert Husband, Erin Bowker COMPOSITION: Haley Laronde


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Terrace Standard  Wednesday, April 3, 2013

www.terracestandard.com A7

The Mail Bag Landfill plan needs review

We depend on them Dear Sir: Talk to the part-time and full-time paramedics in your community and ask them about their EMS professional duties, what it consists of being on-call day or night for the BC Ambulance Service (BCAS). And please then

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ask them what it’s like working in the remote, urban and rural communities while trying to survive off of wages offered to them as parttime paramedics on standby at their BCAS station or carrying their pager on-call. We need to show our

respect and appreciation for the dedicated services they provide in our communities and the ongoing training that is required to keep their license as emergency medical professionals. The part-time and fulltime paramedics are just as important as having

the firemen and policemen on station standbys for emergency response and therefore, they deserve the same benefits and wages. If the stations in remote communities cannot staff ambulance shifts and BCAS sends in part-time paramed-

ics with full wages and benefits to cover those stations, why can’t they pay fair full wages to the part-time paramedics who work in their own communities on station standby and oncall with a pager?

Cont’d Page A8

Dear Sir: As a follow-up to Mr. Brad North’s justifiable faith in qualified professionals, there are some factors regarding the proposed regional landfill at Forceman Ridge that may not be widely known. April, 2002: The Regional District of KitimatStikine applied for an operating permit and land and an accompanying package mentioned Onion Lake and Lakelse Lake as major surface water bodies, adding that inferred groundwater flow direction was away from both. January 2006: Project summary said that the existing landfills were having minimal, if any, impact on the Kitsumkalum River and Thornhill Creek. September 2007: Report suggested that the groundwater flow was likely headed directly to Clearwater Lakes. August 2008: A branch of Ministry of Environment called the aquifer under the site a valued resource and suggested 12 months water monitoring as a condition of an operating permit. Strangely, the MoE issued the permit within three months. May 2009: an independent hydrologist review said placing monitoring wells needs luck and added that if groundwater is polluted, it would be very expensive to cleanup, correct the source and deal with the environmental consequences. December 2009: from two added wells, the flow to Clearwater was confirmed. June 2011: A regional district hydrologist said that a defect in the liner at start-up could not be detected in less than two years. September 2011: Average discharge to ground from the site will be a quarter million litres per day. Few would argue that the landfill isn’t a world class design, but the site can hardly be classed as anything other than extremely unwise if you’re not willing to carry out a risk analysis or figure out the remediation costs of a liner defect.

Cont’d Page A9

Loose lips sink the government’s ships

onjuring the name “Orwell,” whose 1984 World State featured brutality, manipulation of information, and propaganda, seems over the top and fear-mongering, especially as we’ve grown up in the shadow of the “land of the free, home of the brave” (only in a country we smugly thought was even better). We need to revisit those assumptions. Truth is always provisional, that is, as fallible humans we can never be absolutely sure of our knowledge. We count on reliable information to make the best decisions we can. Further, we often rely on experts (e.g. doctors, lawyers, etc.) to assist us in determining how to deal with the information we are given or discover. If someone says, “The concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has risen from about 275 parts per million over 200 years ago to nearly 400 ppm today, a rise of about 45 per cent,” we have data. The vast majority of climate scientists have made the meaning of this phenomenon quite clear. How does information influ-

ence political liberty? For generations, the beacon of liberty on the world horizon was that held by Liberty, the famous statue in New York harbour. It symbolized the ideal that people should be free, and trusted, to work to create an abundant society, one marked by broad availability of information and knowledge, and by political participation. In the U.S., constitutional guarantees protect freedom of the press, basically to encourage political participation based on access to information, however biased reporting might be. Trust that the public can separate facts from fiction, propaganda and lies is made explicit. Canadians defined our adherence to these basic ideas in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Under Section 2 of the Charter, Canadians “are guaranteed freedom of thought, belief and expression.” The Charter also protects “the right of the press and other media to speak out.” Despite these duly constituted guarantees, the so-called Harper government has abridged and

g u e s t c o mm e n t

AL LEHMANN in some cases, eliminated these rights and freedoms. Since his original election as prime minister in 2006, Stephen Harper’s administration has adopted institutional procedures to prevent Canadians from gaining access to information that might influence us to disagree with, and ultimately (through electoral means) disown, his policies. Environment Canada scientists have been forbidden to speak

with the press about controversial issues such as climate change without having their messages vetted or “massaged” by officials from media relations headquarters, a comparatively new branch of Environment Canada. Get this straight. Despite constitutionally guaranteed rights to the contrary, scientists we pay for information have been forbidden to speak publicly without permission! According to a report by democracywatch.ca, for issues related to climate change, wildlife, water quality and supply, or protection of species, media relations sends media requests for scientist interviews to the Privy Council Office for approval. Thus, members of the federal cabinet or perhaps even the Prime Minister will decide whether or not an expert public employee and Canadian citizen may speak, or what he or she might say. Government scientist David Tarasick was prohibited from speaking on his research regarding an atmospheric ozone hole in Canada’s arctic. Instead, media relations advisors crafted re-

sponses for him. Scientist David Schindler, whose research discovered toxic pollutants from the tar sands contaminating the Athabasca Valley, received scripted answers from the office of Environment Minister Peter Kent. In B.C., scientist Kristi Miller was forbidden to address the media regarding her findings leading to testimony at the Cohen Commission regarding the collapse of Fraser River salmon. A professor at Dalhousie University characterized current conditions in Canada this way: “We have somehow deemed it…permissible for an Iron Curtain to be drawn across the communication of science in this country.” A government that arbitrarily limits freedom of speech and information does not deserve our confidence. Despite our constitutional rights and freedoms, our Prime Minister appears to prefer Orwell’s World State motto from 1984: Ignorance is Strength—our ignorance, his strength. Al Lehmann is a retired English teacher living in Terrace, B.C.


A8  www.terracestandard.com

THE MAILBAG

Wednesday, April 3, 2013  Terrace Standard

From Page A7

About letters

Paramedics deserve fair wages Why doesn’t Kitimat have a separate ambulance station so the female paramedics living there can work in the BCAS in their own community? If the part-time paramedics are required to come in and be at the station ready to respond to emergencies night and day just as the policemen and firemen, then they deserve full wages. If the paramedics are carrying a pager on-call

for schedule shifts, they should be getting paid minimum wages at the very least for being on pager and ready to respond to emergencies. This to me would seem more equal to the other employed professionals on station standby or on-call on a pager ready to respond to duties. Currently, I think the wage of the part-time paramedic on standby at the station and the paramedic ready to respond

to their pager at home is insulting considering that they are required to have the same training and skills as the full-time highly trained EMS professionals. I wonder if nurses, doctors and/or other health/public safety personnel get their wages cut for being on-call as a part -time or casual. If the part-time paramedics all stood together and stopped working for a single day, you would see the essential

service that they truly are in our communities across B.C. Who would respond and transfer our injured, sick or dying loved ones? Someone needs to step up to the plate and make the necessary changes by calling MLAs, municipalities and governments for more funds to keep the part-time and full-time paramedics employed fairly and to employ more part-time and

full-time paramedics to ensure that remote and rural communities don’t go without the necessary emergency medical services needed. We, as families and friends of the paramedics and as communities, need to talk the MLA and BCAS in your area. Find out how to support and keep our paramedics employed sufficiently for their high quality emergency medical services needed so they aren’t forced to go

work elsewhere. I see posters of the BCAS vision, mission and values to be a world leader and provide the emergency medical service needed. Let’s help support them to achieve and improve this in the remote, urban and rural areas. You can read more about it in Canadian Paramedic Magazine at www.emsnews.com. Kevin Goddard Terrace, B.C.

Smile, it’S oral health month

Park avenue dental CliniC 201-4619 Park avenue terrace, BC v8G 1v5 638-0841 635-5256 fax: 635-4537

Help older kids brusH up on oral HealtH (NC)—Did you know that an estimated 57% of kids aged 6 to 11 years-old have cavities? That number increases to 59% for teens, but with good oral care, specialists tell us that all children can grow up cavity-free. The habits you help them develop now will last a lifetime, so take a look at these helpful tips: 12-24 Months: Begin regular dental visits by age one. Teach a toddler about dental hygiene when the first teeth come through. Children should get used to holding a toothbrush and should watch others as they brush. Let them practice brushing, but continue brushing their teeth for them. Begin flossing when most of the baby teeth are in.

2-5 Years: Teach young children to use no more than a pea-size amount of toothpaste and make sure they do not eat it. Continue to brush and floss their teeth for them. Avoid sugary sweet treats. 6+ Years: Encourage children to begin flossing. Your dental hygienist will demonstrate proper technique. Continue to supervise brushing and flossing. The surface of your child’s permanent molars may be sealed with a light coating to prevent cavities in the deep fissure and grooves of the teeth. Keep a record of any accidents or falls that could affect the placement or condition of permanent teeth.

www.newscanada.com

HealtHy smiles for babies and toddlers (NC)—We don’t usually associate cavities or gum disease with infants but in fact, oral diseases begin very early. For example, early childhood caries (cavities) is a form of severe tooth decay in the primary (baby) teeth of children from birth to age 3, and it affects more than 10 per cent of preschool-aged children in Canada. Baby’s first teeth are crucial to healthy adult teeth, and early childhood cavities can lead to much bigger oral health issues later in life. More tips and information about oral health care is available online at www.cdha.ca. www.newscanada.com

Reduce the Risk and follow these simple caRe tips with youR little one:

• Be a good role model. Keep your own teeth and gums healthy. • Wipe baby’s mouth and gums with a clean, wet cloth or piece of gauze after feeding.

THE Terrace Standard welcomes letters to the editor by email to newsroom@terracestandard.com, by fax to 250-638-8432 or by mail to 3210 Clinton St., Terrace, B.C. V8G 5R2. Letters must be signed and contain a contact phone number. And letters are subject to editing for reasons of length and of taste. Letters may appear online before they appear in print.

dr. rick tabata dr. Brennan Weaver

Dr. Vincent Drouin, DDS • • • • • •

For all your family Dental Care Examination, Cleaning, Whitening Crowns, Bridges, Fillings Partial and Complete Dentures Sedation Dentistry Cosmetic Dentistry

101 - 4619 Park Avenue, Terrace British Columbia, V8G 1V5

Ph: 250-638-0679

• Fax: 250-638-0625

Drouin Dental Services

LAKELSE DENTAL CENTRE DR. MARK FORGIE

BSc D.M.D. 4438 Lakelse Avenue, Terrace, B.C. V8G 1P1

250-638-8567 New patients welcome

• Gently clean newly erupted teeth with a small, soft toothbrush. • Avoid fruit punches and other sweetened drinks in baby bottles, especially before bed. • Reduce the frequency of nighttime feedings. • Use only pacifiers with an orthodontic design, and don’t dip it in sugary substances. • Avoid transfer of your saliva onto items used by baby, including bottles, cups, pacifiers. Bacteria spreads. • Rinse baby’s mouth with clear water immediately after any liquid medication is given. • Check for early warning signs by lifting up baby’s top lip. White, chalky teeth or brown or black stained teeth indicate a problem. Contact your dental professional immediately. • Gradually introduce fresh fruits and vegetables to the diet. These foods, which require chewing, stimulate saliva flow and help to neutralize acids. • Begin regular dental visits by age one.

4663 Park Ave. (250) 635-1213 Toll Free 1-800-549-5594

www.horizonterrace.ca


THE MAILBAG

Terrace Standard  Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Signs not answer for bad behaviour Dear Sir: Regarding the incident that occurred on March 6th at the Terrace pool (“Offensive behaviour signs to be posted,” The Terrace Standard, March 27, 2013), I don’t know which is worse, the youths that committed this act, or the adults that responded to it. I’m sorry but you don’t need public signs posted that state that offensive or racist behaviour is intolerable, or have a bylaw officer to enforce it. What a waste of time and money. The minute this poor woman complained to city employees, these kids should have been told to leave, told to never come back until they smarten up (hey, maybe even apologize), and their parents notified. These same employees then should have assured this poor woman that this kind of behaviour was not tolerated.

As for city staff losing their awareness of this kind of policy – this defies any kind of common sense (or plain civility) to anyone with enough backbone to stand up to a couple of bratty teenage boys. I’m sorry to say these things, but to actually have to post signs and have a bylaw officer enforce proper behaviour at a public institution, just shows the level of absolute stupidity of our city council. Don’t the city bylaw officers and the Mounties have better things to do with their time? When I was a teenager and the figures of authority were this weak, me and every other kid would have been laughing our butts off. That is before my parents would have booted mine to the moon. William Ramsdin, Terrace, B.C.

Welcome to the conspiracy

Dear Sir: a concentrated blitz by servative conspiracy’s own planet, if you must. The Northwest Com- the feds’ chief compre- brave new world, kidJust leave ours alone, munity College long hensive claims negotia- dies. please and thank you. house makes a swell tor, meeting with recalAh, Joe. Go back to John How, symbolic back-drop for citrant bands along the Ottawa. Go gas your Terrace, B.C. a politician’s pitch for Gateway freeway, to be Joe Oliver, our natural completed by the end of resources minister, to November then handed share the boss’s vision directly to Harper. No for Canada in the 21st pressure here, boys. Century. Poor old Joe. He The Regional District of KitimatAnd the First Na- looks squarely into the Stikine wishes to advise its tions’ assigned place cameras, like Bambi within it. caught in the highWhatever. It’s just beams. another offensive in He’s literally turnHarper’s crusade to ing his back on a camliberate as much CO2 pus-full of our best and customers that a flushing as quickly as possible brightest – the kids with from the Tar Pits of Al- the hearts and the brains procedure will be carried out berta. to figure out how to exth th This time out, FLUSHING he’s tricate us from the ‘enWATER ADVISORY “enhancing engage- ergy’ mess we’ve gotten The Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine wishes to advise its South Hazelton water mentcustomers with thataboriginal ourselves into.out Tuesday, May 7 This procedure is necessary To remove system a flushing procedure will be carried until Thursday,in May 9, 2013. peoples the developHe’s smiling at us, any sedimenT ThaT may be presenT in The ment of isenergy allsediment the while waTer mains and To ensure The besT This procedure necessaryinfrato remove any that may consignbe present in the water mains and toTranslation: ensure the best possible water quality isto maintained. During structure.” ing the kids a future possible waTer qualiTy is mainTained. this procedure water pressures may fluctuate and water may appear coloured or of until hewing and co- during This procedure waTer pressures cloudy. You are advised to run your water it clears.wood Your ongoing operation and understanding is appreciated. drawing water under an may flucTuaTe and waTer may appear increasingly soiled sky. coloured or cloudy. you are advised Welcome to the ConTo run your waTer unTil iT clears.

WATER FLUSHING ADVISORY

NoRTh TeRRace commuNiTy april 17 – 18 , 2013

From Page 7

A landfill review is needed

Suite 300, 4545 Lazelle Avenue Terrace, BC V8G 4E1 250-615-6100

your ongoing cooperaTion and undersTanding is appreciaTed. Newspapers Are For Kids, Too!

You may think only adults read the newspaper or that children have no interest in the newspaper, but kids can find a lot to learn in a newspaper. This up-to-date learning tool can teach children history, science, math, business and much more. Encourage your child to start reading the newspaper today!

By contrast, the natuPhone: (250) 615-6100 ral clay lined sites of the Terrace and Thornhill landfills allow leachYou may think only adults read ate to be accurately and 3210 Clinton Street the newspaper or that children have no interest in the newspaper, easily assessed. but kids can find a lot to learn 638-7283 in a newspaper. This up-to-date So, if it’s not about learning tool can teach children history, science, math, business the design or the inName and much more. Encourage your tegrity of the designchild to start reading the Newspaper 3210 Clinton Street newspaper today! 000-0000 ers, what exactly is the You may think only adults 638-7283 read the newspaper or that problem? children have no interest Through Project funding is available for projects You may think only adults read the newspaperEco-prise, or that children the newspaper, but kids Could it be incanthat the have no interest in the newspaper, but kids can find a lot to find a lot to learn in a that Zero and reduce or divert materials from learn in apromote newspaper. This up-to-date learning tool Waste can teach newspaper. Thisno up-to-date public was given children history, science, math, business and much more. learning tool can teach landfills. Encourage your child to start reading the newspaper today! children history, to science, chance for 14 years math, business and much Encourage your 3210 Clinton Street or more. quesunderstand Applications for funding are reviewed three times per year: child to start reading the You may think only adults read the today! tion 638-7283 why wastenewspaper from April 15, June 15 and October 15. newspaper or that children have no interest in the newspaper, but kids can find a lot to 20,000 people should learn inon a newspaper. This up-to-date learning For more information Project Eco-prise, please see be truckedYou may tothinkaonlyrecreadults read the newspaper or that children tool can teach children history, science, math, or contact the Environmental Services have no interest in the newspaper, but kids can www.rdks.bc.ca find a lot to ational gemlearnlike the Onbusiness and much more. Encourage your in a newspaper. This up-to-date learning tool can teach children history, science, math, business and much more. Coordinator: 250-615-6100 ornewspaper 1-800-663-3208. child to start reading the today! ion Lake area? Encourage your child to start reading the newspaper today! A state of the art proposal should not be afraid of a state of the art review. Ian Maxwell, Terrace, B.C. Terrace, B.C. V8G 5R2

Terrace, B.C. V8G 5R2

Terrace, B.C. V8G 5R2

www.terracestandard.com A9

Check out this plan

Dear Sir: We are early care and learning professionals and we endorse Rob Hart’s guest commentary (“Feeling squeezed?” The Terrace Standard, March 20, 2013). Readers can access the $10 a day child care plan expertly formulated by Early Childhood Educators of BC and the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC, at the ECE BC website. Also, interestingly, Dr. Paul Kershaw (with accountants led by

Warren Beach) has figures which show that a $10 a day child care plan will result in net benefits to governments, businesses and families of $467 million. The following link will take you to his site: http://gensqueeze. ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/ Summary-benefits-costs-of-10dayChild-Care.pdf Terry Walker, Nancy Dumais, Nicole Guillemette, Terrace. B.C. Application No. 105017

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE

Application for a Permit amendment under the provisions of the Environmental Management Act. We, Red Chris Development Company Limited, Suite 200, 580 Hornby Street, Vancouver, BC, V6C 3B6, intend to submit an amended application (application number 105017) to the Director, to authorize the discharge of site runoff from plant site clearing, tailing impoundment area, crusher site and soil stockpile for the Red Chris Mine Project located near Iskut, British Columbia, and a new application to discharge air contaminants from an auxiliary fuel fired incinerator. The land upon which the facility is situated and the discharge occurs are Mining Tenure Numbers 337486 and 541436, located near Iskut, British Columbia. The effluent discharge locations are (Sediment Control Ponds 1 to 8, Crusher Area Diversion Dam 3 (CDD), Saddle Dam Discharge Location (SDD), and North Reclaim Dam Discharge Location (NRDD)) with discharge characteristics noted below in Table 1 and 2; and air emission discharges from an incinerator with characteristics presented below in Table 3 located in Mining Tenure Numbers 323341, 999362, 999363, 999364 and 999382, near Iskut, British Columbia. The locations and elevation of the 11 erosion and sediment control facilities are: Sediment Pond #1:

Northing: 6399242

Easting: 453422.4

Elevation: 1532m

Sediment Pond #2:

Northing: 6398857

Easting: 452801.9

Elevation: 1510m

Sediment Pond #3:

Northing: 6398459

Easting: 451636

Elevation: 1480m

Sediment Pond #4:

Northing: 6396641

Easting: 453185

Elevation: 1420m

Sediment Pond #5:

Northing: 6398722

Easting: 454958.6

Elevation: 1440m

Sediment Pond #6:

Northing: 6400995

Easting: 454218.3

Elevation: 1320m

Sediment Pond #7:

Northing: 6401448

Easting: 456872

Elevation: 1044m

Sediment Pond #8:

Northing: 6400915

Easting: 456638

Elevation: 1068m

CDD:

Northing: 6396787

Easting: 452881

Elevation: 1452m

SDD:

Northing: 6399098

Easting: 456335

Elevation: 1110m

NRDD:

Northing: 6401519

Easting: 456873

Elevation: 1050m

Incinerator

Northing: 6399401

Easting: 454593

Elevation: 1475m

Table 1.

Parameter TSS

Units

Average Concentration

Maximum Concentration

15

60

mg/L

Nitrates

mg/L

15

32

Total extractable hydrocarbons

mg/L

15

30

pH

pH units

7.5

9.0

Minimum discharge rate for each of the 11 facilities is 0 m3/sec. Maximum discharge rates are provided below in Table 2. Table 2.

Facility

Max. Discharge Rate (m3/sec)

Duration

Sediment Pond #1

0.02

24 hours

Sediment Pond #2

0.39

24 hours

Sediment Pond #3

0.62

24 hours

Sediment Pond #4

0.61

24 hours

Sediment Pond #5

0.04

24 hours

Sediment Pond #6

0.11

24 hours

Sediment Pond #7

0.52

24 hours

Sediment Pond #8

0.52

24 hours

NRDD

3.17

24 hours

SDD

2.0

24 hours

CDD

0.61

24 hours

The maximum rate of air emissions discharge from the facility [an Eco Waste Solutions model CA600 incinerator] will be ~44.4 m3/minute, with an operating period of 16 hours per day, 365 days per year. The incinerator’s air emissions discharge characteristics are as follows: Table 3.

Pollutant

Annual Emissions (kg)

Particulate

43.1

HCL

577.7

Total Metals

3.4

Any person who may be adversely affected by the proposed amendment and wishes to provide relevant information may, within 30 days after the last date of posting, publishing, service or display, send written comments to the applicant, with a copy to the Regional Director, Environmental Protection at Bag 500, 3726 Alfred avenue, Smithers, British Columbia V0J 2N0. The identity of any respondents and the contents of anything submitted in relation to this application will become part of the public record. Dated this 22nd day of March 2013. Signed by: Jack Love Contact person

Jack Love

Telephone No.

(604) 488-8959


A10  www.terracestandard.com

NEWS

Wednesday, April 3, 2013  Terrace Standard

Membership Meeting Monday, April 8, 2013 at 7:30pm in the Branch Lobby - 4660 Lazelle Ave.

Join us and enter for a chance to win a2012 Terrace Busin $100 Gift Certificate to Shames Mountain. “Powering Up for a Brigh

April 20, 21, 22, 2

We have booths avail First come, first se

2012 Terrace Business Expo “Powering Up for a Brighter Future”

Come and Participate in the largest tra George

April 20, 21, 22, 2012

Anna Killen

Moving Forward Together

We have booths available… PHOTO First come, first serve!

The Heavy Machinery that had been blocking this Keith St. entrance to the logCome sortandyard forin the largest trade show west of Prince Participate over a week was replaced by this chain and lock late last week, the machinery moved to one of George Don’t miss this opportunity! the other Keith St. entrances, and a large log blocking the Kenney St. entrance.

From front

www.northsave.comDon’t miss this oppor

Increase your visibility & expa within the regio

Increase your visibility & expand your contacts within the region!

This is your showcase use it to shine!

Log yard dispute goes on

For more information please

ATTENTION TERRACE ENTERTAINERS 250.635.2063 or terracecha

For more information please contact Carol @ 250.635.2063 or terracechamber@telus.net

2012 CORPORATE BUSINESS EXPO CO-SPONSORS

“They told me to get a lawyer,” he said, noting current financial hardships make doing that nearly impossible. Skeena MLA Robin Austin says similar situations involving larger parent companies and smaller subcontractors have played out in the northwest a number of times before. “In this case what’s new, and we don’t want to discourage investment, is that quite a bit of the investment is coming from Asia. You can’t go online and look up a history of the company like it’s a B.C.-based company. When it’s a company from far away there’s no way to check as to the legitimacy of that business,” he said. “Those are difficulties that happen when you have a company that’s coming from a country like China that doesn’t have the same sort of transparency that we expect here in British Columbia.” But Austin is hopeful the new Woodworkers Lien Act, which was passed in the spring and comes into law April 1, will help protect contractors. “Now when a subcontractor is not being paid, they will have the right to go and put a lien on the wood they’ve removed from the forest prior to it going off and generating money for the bigger companies up stream,” he said,

noting that if the situation does not improve the government of the day will have to meet with smaller companies to see what else can be done by way of more regulations and resources. As for the logs barricaded in by Bryco equipment, a forest service spokesperson confirmed forestry staff recently did an inspection of the Yaorun Wood site. “Yaorun had not yet completed its paperwork,” said the spokesperson of its plans to export wood. “Ministry staff educated Yaorun Wood staff about the necessary paperwork they would need to complete before they could export their logs, which includes making sure the correct timber marks are noted. Apparently the company has hired a local log broker to help them with this.” Before entering into its lease agreement with the city, Yaorun stored logs at Skeena Sawmills. “[Yaorun’s] logs did come to our yard with the intentions of processing through our mill, then eventually they made a decision that they didn’t want to go through with that and took the logs out,” said Skeena Sawmills’ Ian Sandhu. “We wanted to process at what was a super good deal for us and for them, and more for the city, to be very

honest, because having more logs for the city means we could continue processing and adding more jobs.” Skeena Sawmills’ is concerned local reaction to the dispute is painting all foreignowned companies with the same brush. “Our owner is committed to running the company to the highest Canadian standards, and that’s what he does,” he said, of the company’s owner, Teddy Cui. As for the company’s land in New Hazelton, in July of last year Yaorun asked city council there for a letter of support in order to purchase the crown land surrounding the site. “It was our understanding the land was to allow for the development of the site into a larger canting and chipping mill,” said Donny Van Dyk, chief administrator for the city of New Hazelton. “Council declined their request, but invited Yaorun to appear before Council and present a more thorough plan. A member of their staff requested to present to council on February 4, 2013 and did not attend the scheduled council meeting. No reason was provided for the absence.” Repeated phone calls to Yaorun Wood officials were not returned by press time.

From front

City advocating landfill awareness “Hopefully by May 2014, most of the materials (i.e. plastics, paper, boxboard) that residents were able to recycle at that depot will be included in the latest EPR program,” said Irwin. The city’s “comprehensive recycling strategy” will be designed in synch with this coming legislation, and council suggested that the new system might also mean fees for Terrace residents, or an alternate weekly pick-up schedule, meaning garbage one week, recycling the next, though

this will be discussed at further council meetings. Until the provincial legislation hopefully comes through next spring, Irwin is advocating landfill awareness, so people know what they should already be recycling. “Electronics companies and tire manufacturers already include recycling fees in their prices,” Irwin said. Tires, for example, are picked up from the dump under this system. And up at the Terrace Landfill, coordinators Fern and Denis

Baudette are informing people about current solid waste management systems. So is Linda Hawkshaw, who was recently hired and is very pro-active, Irwin said, about letting residents who visit the site know what can be recycled and handing out brochures also available online. Irwin added that a future improvement could be making a one-stop drop off for all the materials on the brochure. Council wants public input and creative solutions.

2012 CORPORATE BUSINESS EX

is hosting the

2013 TERRACE BUSINESS EXPO

April 19 (5pm to 9pm), April 20 (11am to 6 pm) & April 21 (11am to 4 pm) We are looking for entertainers to perform a 20 to 30 minute period on stage: Singers Dancers Bands Musical Groups Magicians Clowns Jugglers Fortune Tellers Storytellers Puppeteers Including demonstrations in: Martial Arts Sports Cooking Fly-Tying Renovations How-To Crafts Painting Pottery Carving Flower Arranging Fashion shows … and more! Please contact: Ryan Sergerie a Sight & Sound 250-635-5333 or ryan@sight-and-sound.ca or Carol Fielding at the Terrace Chamber 250-635-2063 or terracechamber@telus.net

Universal Geomatics Solutions Corp. is pleased to announce their expansion into British Columbia with the acquisition of Derry Land Surveying Inc. in Terrace, B.C.. Guy Derry, B.C.L.S., will remain with Universal and take on the role of Branch Manager of USI Land Surveying (BC) Inc., a division of Universal Geomatics Solutions Corp. effective April 2nd, 2013. Under Guy Derry’s direction, Derry land surveying has provided quality land surveying and geomatics services in the Terrace, Kitimat and Prince Rupert area for many years. With this acquisition, Universal will continue to offer that same level of service as well as expanded geomatics services for years to come. Guy Derry, B.C.L.S., C.L.S. 4416 WaLSh avenue TerraCe, B.C., v8G 4J5 250-635-6608


NEWS

Terrace Standard  Wednesday, April 3, 2013

On your marks Political candidates are opening their Terrace campaign offices around town in preparation for the upcoming provincial election. Incumbent NDP Robin Austin, the MLA for Skeena, will have BC Conservative Mike Brousseau as a neighbour a few doors down in the Lazelle strip mall where both are opening new campaign headquarters. “It’s a bit odd to have another opponent so close but that’s a good part of our democracy ... close together or not makes no difference,” Austin said. Brousseau is driving a donated (and fixed up) pick-up for his campaign, which will share the parking lot with Austin’s compact. While Brousseau had supporter Lloyd Wittkowski coming by to drop off oranges one recent afternoon, Austin emphasized that his supporters are typically of modest means, especially compared to the BC Liberal party. Brousseau has benefitted from whatever help he can in the community. Across town, B.C. Liberal candidate Carol Leclerc was accom-

panied by provincial justice minister Shirley Bond who was in the area on government business and who then made time to host the official opening of her campaign office March 25 in Terrace. In her address to the gathered supporters, Bond highlighted the important work to be done in this area, noting the packed airspace on her way in. “It’s great to have all this growth but we have to manage everything that comes with it,” Leclerc said to the group. She’s been attending everything from meetings focused on women’s rights to a comedy night in Kitimat, baking cookies as thank-you gifts to her volunteers, and going door-to-door. Brousseau said he has spent the last week knocking on doors as well and working on a plan to build a residence on Little Ave. that will provide counselling and job coaching to give people “not a handout but a hand up.” Austin was down in Victoria until a few weeks ago, attending the final sitting days of the legislature and says that he thinks it will be a tight race here.

widespread is the recognition that First Nations must be involved, said Bennett. “You have to negotiate impact benefits agreements. They have defined economic benefit aspects,” he added. Bennett urged local governments in the northwest to work together on region-wide benefits agreements. “With everything that is going on here, there are vast opportunities to make things happen,” he said. “Our resources are now in great demand and there is a great opportunity for this province that can be seized.” Although his father and grandfather were politicians, Bennett said he stayed out of politics until now. “I care about what’s going on here and around the province and I’ve agreed to dedicate my time to the premier and the BC Liberal par-

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josh massey PHOTOs

Top, NDP candidate, and Skeena MLA, Robin Austin outside of his campaign office. Middle, Liberal candidate Carol Leclerc gets a hand from justice minister Shirley Bond at her campaign office opening. Bottom, Conservative candidate Mike Brousseau settles into his office.

Familiar name visits BC LIBERAL candidate Carol Leclerc brought up a representative from B.C.’s best known political family last week as the provincial election campaign began to take shape. Brad Bennett, son of former Social Credit premier Bill Bennett and grandson of premier W.A.C. Bennett, who forged the Social Credit party into a decades-long political powerhouse, accompanied Leclerc on several stops in Kitimat and in Terrace. “There’s a great feeling,” said Bennett after a visit to Kitimat where Rio Tinto Alcan is replacing its aging aluminum smelter and where several LNG projects are slated to go ahead. “The key is to get to the ‘yes’ and to get the best benefits deal for everybody,” he said. Part of ensuring benefits from large industrial projects are

www.terracestandard.com A11

Brad Bennett ty right to the end of the campaign,” he said. Bennett added that only premier Christy Clark and her government can bring the kind of leadership needed to capitalize on a growing resource sector. “I’m just not convinced that an NDP government can get to ‘yes’ because of its special interests. You have environmentalists who oppose development and big labour

who want development. They can’t get to the ‘yes’.” Bennett was also in Smithers where the BC Liberal candidate for the Stikine riding is former Telkwa mayor Sharon Hartwell. And he went to Prince Rupert to take in the nomination meeting for Judy Fraser who will represent the BC Liberals in the North Coast riding. Bennett is a developer in his hometown of Kelowna and sits on a number of boards, including BC Hydro and Kal Tire. He is also the vicechairman of the Fraser Institute and the chair of an organization called MITACS which combines private and public sector money to place graduate and post-doctoral university students with businesses for real-world research and development opportunities.

Brucejack Gold Mine Project Public Comments Invited As part of the strengthened and modernized Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA 2012) put in place to support the government's Responsible Resource Development Initiative, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency has commenced a federal environmental assessment for the proposed Brucejack Gold Mine Project located in British Columbia on March 26, 2013. The Agency invites the public to comment on which aspects of the environment may be affected by this project and what should be examined during the environmental assessment. The public can review and comment on the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Guidelines, a document that identifies the potential environmental effects to be taken into consideration and the information and analysis that needs to be included in the proponent's EIS. Pretium Resources Inc. is proposing the construction, operation and decommissioning of a gold-silver underground mine located approximately 65 km northnorthwest of Stewart, B.C. The proposed project would produce approximately 16 million tonnes of mineralized material at a rate of up to 2,700 tonnes per day over a minimum 16-year mine life. Written comments must be submitted by April 25, 2013 to: Brucejack Gold Mine Project Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 410-701 Georgia Street Vancouver BC V7Y 1C6 Telephone: 604-666-2431 Fax: 604-666-6990 Brucejack@ceaa-acee.gc.ca To view the draft EIS Guidelines or for more information, visit the Agency’s website at www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca (registry reference number 80034). All comments received will be considered public. Copies of the draft EIS Guidelines are also available for viewing at the following locations: Smithers Public Library 3817 Alfred Avenue, Box 55 Smithers B.C.

Stewart Public Library 824 A Main Street, Box 546 Stewart B.C.

Terrace Public Library 4610 Park Avenue Terrace B.C.

Consistent with the transparency and public engagement elements of CEAA 2012, this is the second of four opportunities for Canadians to comment on this project. Following this comment period, the Agency will finalize and issue the EIS Guidelines to the proponent. An application period for participant funding and a future public comment period related to the EIS will be announced later. Projects subject to CEAA 2012 are assessed using a science-based approach. If the project is permitted to proceed to the next phase, it will continue to be subject to Canada’s strong environmental laws, rigorous enforcement and follow-up, and increased fines.


A12 www.terracestandard.com

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Terrace Standard


NEWS

Terrace Standard  Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Local author passes IF YOU’VE lived in Terrace for very long, the name Grandma Tess will ring a bell and evoke an image of a woman in purple, most notably a purple hat. If you’re of a certain age, it will remind you of being younger and seeing her at school entertaining students with her dogs. And motorists will remember Grandma Tess making her rounds on city streets in a large purple motorhome. But March 25, Tess Brousseau, 87, also known by her maiden name and pen name as Tess Tessier, died from a stroke while visiting her daughter in Kaslo, B.C. She decided to make a living will when her daughter was up here recently. “My mom was a wise woman. She had enough friends pass on and she was going to doctors and was fighting dizziness,” said son local roofer Mike Brousseau about why she made up the living will. “She said ‘I don’t want life support and if something does go wrong, let me go. I’ve had a good life. I’ve done what I’ve wanted to do.’” Her purple hat was her trademark. “That was my mom. She loved purple. That was her colour. She always wanted to be eccentric,” said Brousseau. When she would go to church, one member Brock Kozier, understood her, said Brousseau. “He would put his arm out and she would take his arm and she’d be seated by him,” said Brousseau. “She always wanted to be noticed as someone with character.” And her outspoken, passionate

file PHOTO

Tess Tessier in 2004. nature took her many places in life. Tessier was born and raised in Hudson Bay Junction, Saskatchewan in 1925. When she was older, she went up to Alaska and worked at Mount McKinley where she met her husband. Tessier was the cook and Clarence Brousseau supplied the meat to her; they fell in love. They married in 1946 and after four or five years, he wanted to move back home to Michigan but she said no. “So he got her fired,” said Brousseau. The couple moved back to

Michigan and had seven children – six boys and one girl. He wanted to raise the children out in the bush and while touring this area, he found property in Rosswood selling for $2 an acre and bought 60 acres. The family moved to Rosswood in 1959. In 1965, difficulties arose in their marriage because both Tessier and her husband had strong personalities and clashed. She packed up all the children and moved to Terrace. Her husband tried to reconcile with her for about two years, but she had had enough and they divorced in 1967, said Brousseau. She started working for the Terrace Herald, taking photographs and also started writing books – the White Spirit Bear Book and Iceberg Tea are two – and became very involved in the community. Known as Grandma Tess to her grandchildren, she gradually became known by that name to others; she was also known as always having a dog or cat or two or three. About 20 years ago, she was travelling around, writing her books and was in Grand Forks when her son Don died here. She came up for the funeral and Mike asked her to stay and live with him and his family, giving her a chance to be close to her grandchildren, he said. A Celebration of Life service for Grandma Tess will be held from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. April 10 at the Terrace Pentecostal Church. A full length version of this story appears in the community section of www.terracestandard.com.

www.terracestandard.com A13

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GATEWAY perspectives THEN AND NOW: Changes since Exxon Valdez Every Canadian of a certain age remembers the day the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Prince William Sound, Alaska. It was a tragic day and one which marked a turning point for marine shipping along British Columbia’s coastline. Following the Exxon spill, the marine shipping industry in Canada and worldwide began to rethink virtually every aspect of its business. It wasn’t easy. But it was absolutely necessary. And looking back 24 years later, the industry has taken great strides to ensure another catastrophic spill never happens again.

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trained professionals. And it means that laden tankers will have two tugs escorting them, one tethered. Our goal: to reduce the risk of a spill to as close to zero as possible. And if a spill does occur, our tug escorts will provide immediate first response to minimize the impact on the environment while our full emergency response is quickly brought to bear. Our response program will greatly enhance safety for all marine traffic on B.C.’s north coast.

Nowhere is our progress more evident than in the way we are approaching the Northern Gateway Pipeline. The standards it will be built and operated to far exceed anything ever contemplated a generation ago.

We hope all Canadians recognize that the Exxon Valdez spill resulted in real and lasting change. For Canada’s oil marine shipping industry, the events of that day 24 years ago marked a moment of profound change. As a result, British Columbians can benefit from the enormous economic opportunity our industry generates, while being confident that our environment is protected.

Like similar facilities in Norway and Scotland, every tanker calling on Northern Gateway’s marine terminal will be double-hulled, and adhere to stringent standards. That means no tankers older than 20 years will be allowed to operate. It means every tanker must carry the most advanced navigational technology and be crewed by only the most highly

Janet Holder Executive Vice President Western Access Enbridge Inc.

It’s more than a pipeline. It’s a path to delivering energy safely. Join the conversation at

northerngateway.ca

©2012 Northern Gateway Pipelines Inc. ©2013 Northern Gateway Pipelines Inc.


A14

www.terracestandard.com

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Terrace Standard

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Lost Film Returns

T

he long-forgotten drama “A Darkening Shore” lights up the screen It is a momentous day for fans of late legendary Italian director Claudio Shirra, whose unreleased 1985 film “A Darkening Shore” is finally seeing the light of day at this one-week-only run in New York and Los Seraphes. Loosely based on the 19th-century Russian saga “Circles of the Black Sea,” by Anatoly Alvang, the three-hour epic stars Frank

Hrakc and then-newcomer Seraph Piet. The movie languished on the shelf after failing to find a distributor, but Shirra’s stepson, fledgling producer Juergen Antony, rescued it from oblivion, convincing the independent Concamera Studios to release a new 35-mm print. “It’s an astounding piece of filmmaking,” said Antony, who spoke from the Hollywood set of his latest project, a still-untitled

Teaching an App a New Trick at the Easthelmstead Dog Show

T

he 290-year-old canine pageant embraces the 21st century. This weekend when the primo Fido is crowned at the 290th Easthelmstead Dog Show, its sponsors hope to attract more enthusiasts with an app that explains all the

rules and follows every doggie drama over the course of the two-day event. “We have found that it’s not a matter of not wanting to watch the show that keeps people away, but not being able to understand the rules or recognize the breeds, that turns

Marvin Rayke vehicle. “We dusted it off, made adjustments to the color, tweaked some of the edits and added a new score. Though the movie is rooted in history, the story feels fresh and timeless. I think [Shirra] would be happy with the final print.” The film is a sweeping tale of forbidden love between the betrothed Princess Kira Ablomonov (Piet) and the older, married Duke of Kyrol (Hrakc), who meet

at the summer palace of the Tsar and begin a passionate affair that spans two decades. When a socialclimbing member of the Imperial Court (a deliciously conniving Franz Worler), discovers their infidelity — and the real identity of the princess’ son — he blackmails the lovers, forcing them to choose between Russian society and their true desires. In the experienced hands of Shirra everything he had.

viewers off. And we will do whatever it takes to keep this show going for another 290 years,” said Alexandria Peachtree, grand marshal of the event. “And, of course, there is all the intrigue goings on behind the scenes – and an app is perfect to get inside the heads of champions and their handlers.” Easthelmstead organizers have been beta-testing

the app since last year’s event and feel confident they have worked out all the kinks to deliver free, user-friendly features that work on all mobile devices. “My favorite is the ‘Bark of Champions’ tab, where the top contenders are identified only by their voices,” said Peachtree. For those who want to follow on Twitter, follow #easthelm.

The Lion of the Desert W

ith big-name architects, billionaire’s new city is rising. Rising out of the flat, desert landscape, where there is little else to see but the occasional palm tree and swirling sand, is a city. A brand-new city. Like an oasis (or perhaps a mirage), as you draw nearer, this glittery cluster of buildings in the Central Asian nation of Tajikistan reveals itself to still be a construction site. Yes, there are people here, but they are all scurrying around in hard-hats, unfurling blueprints, climbing atop heavy machinery, operating cranes.

What is there — five sparkling towers, rising 60 to 90 stories, and designed by the renowned architecture team Rode + Peralla — is impressive. The undulating façades of glass are done in multiple tones of blue glass, from palest sky-blue to a deep turquoise, calling to mind the rolling waves of an ocean. (A bit ironic, since the nearest body of water, Vakhsha Lake, is hundreds of miles away.) The city is named Wakhi, in honor of a local dialect, and it’s the singular vision of one man, Gorvo Dushanbe, billionaire owner

of the country’s largest aluminum company. “This will be a worldclass metropolis, one that will attract all sorts of thriving businesses and many, many wealthy residents,” said Dushanbe, over a lunch of rare steak and mineral water at one of the city’s few open restaurants, a high-end bistro from star Belgian chef Pierre De Bwah. The towers, a mix of commercial and residential, along with a fivestar hotel topped with five floors of luxury condominiums, is meant to attract a whole new wealthy

class to the country. “Tajikistan has much to offer in terms of exports. We have hydroelectric power, we have many metals, we have coal and natural gas,” explained Dushanbe. “And we do have

“This will be a world-class metropolis...” some very rich Tajiks.” Not enough, though, to support the thousands of luxury apartments planned for Wakhi. So Dushanbe has courted an affluent Middle Eastern, Russian and Indian business clientele.

Terrace Standard Wednesday, April 3, 2013

www.terracestandard.com

ADVERTISEMENT

A15

ADVERTISEMENT

Fashion’s New Talent

La Cienega Y Ballet’s “Gazelle”

M

arcus Driaman’s production makes the heart pound while it is being broken. The opening of “Gazelle” sees the female cast — Gazelle at the center — on parade in all their finery before the party where the star-crossed lovers will meet. By the end of the first act, Gazelle, having fallen for

In the dark second act, Ramon goes to Gazelle’s grave an unavailable man, is in tatters. This production of “Gazelle” is also the first star performance by Annette McKeigh, the Canadian ballerina who joined the La Cienega Ballet Company last year with much fanfare, having first been courted by several companies around the globe. The first act is filled with glorious color as Gazelle meets and falls for Ramon, played by Jonathon Pawle, in a performance that would be the talk of the town if it were not overshadowed by McKeigh’s debut. They dance together like a mixed drink: so fluid are their movements.

oung fashion designer finds a new home Fashion designer Patricia Meonni isn’t one to talk too much about her technique. “I drape, I cut, I sew, and then repeat,” she said. “That is all.” What sounds simple is in fact a meticulous process that takes weeks – and sometimes even months to finish. “Yes,

I have worked on some dresses for nearly a year,” the petite, dark-haired Meonni admits. “But sometimes that is what it takes to make magic.” And magic is what she’s brought to her new line for Italian fashion house Daveni. The stunning 10-piece collection mixes dreamy pastels, intricate black lace and iridescent ruffles in a

truly bewitching way. Since its debut on the runway last week, the buzz has gotten even louder around this young talent. “I consider line, color, proportion, of course,” said Meonni, 29, who has been in the business since she was a girl, assisting her mother in a dressmaker’s shop outside of Bari, Italy. “My mother was a talented

In the Balance

B

rilliant direction and a strong cast come together for this operatic masterpiece. When we last ran into musical director Hans Blegmer at the Cosmopolitan Opera, he was busy preparing for the centennial celebration of “Jutka,” the famous (and famously difficult) Alphred Verga opera that stretches nearly five-and-a-half hours. That was eight months ago, and now Blegmer is mounting another production of the Hungarian composer’s magnum opus at perhaps the world’s

greatest opera house, Venice’s L’Ascensore. Is he prepared for yet another grand undertaking of the opera, at a venue renowned for audiences showing their displeasure rather vocally? “As long as I have the perfect soprano — one that has mastered the bel canto technique and these heavy vocal demands — then yes, I am ready,” said the 61-year-old Blegmer, a formidable presence with a tall, husky physique and a head of thick, wavy gray hair. He has likely found his gifted singer in Diana

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Alvirsen, the Boston-born soprano whose flaming red hair is nearly as recogniz-

“Indeed, the buzz around the production has been good” able as her vocal talents. While Alvirsen has never tackled such a strenuous role — up to now, her most challenging performance was in last year’s “Jean Ruillet” at the Weiner Neustadt Opera House.

seamstress; she could see the customer, take one look at a dress and know exactly where to let it out, where to add a dart. But what she didn’t have was vision. That I learned on my own.” Meonni began sketching in her free time, and considered entering fashion design school in Milan but decided instead to apprentice at the esteemed Roman

couturier, Sposia. With her excellent sewing skills, the teen was hired immediately. Still, it took close to five years before her true talents were recognized. “I was hired initially to sew beads – tons and tons of beads on all sorts of glamorous gowns – wedding gowns, especially,” she recalled. “It was dull, but it helped me understand.

Medea Resurrects at the Abuelitas M

usic claims its own, ageless night, five years in the making. Medea, with shimmering silver locks filling in her once ink-black signature bob, struck a defiant pose as she opened the fifth annual Abuelita Awards with a pitch-perfect a cappella rendition of “Shooting Comet,” her usually electric rock anthem, as synonymous with Medea as her hair. Medea has not performed in public since she collapsed during the final notes of “Shooting Comet” at the Golden

Timbre Awards in 2003. It was precisely that performance, and what Medea called the mistreatment by Golden Timbre programmers of seasoned performers, who have earned more respect (and might need a little more time getting to the stage), that inspired Hoit Swagger, lead singer of the Skipping Lizards, to give musicians over 50 their own awards night to shine. But it has taken five years of being relegated to Saturday afternoon telecasts and D-list presenters to attract Medea and headline performers.

New Episode

SUNDAYS at 8pm For more information, call 1.866.782.7957 or visit shawdirect.ca/moviecentral

*50% off for 6 months offer is available from March 1 – May 31, 2013 to Shaw Direct customers who are not currently subscribed to Movie Central and have not subscribed during the previous 90 days. Movie CentralTM is a trademark of CorusTM Entertainment Inc. or a subsidiary thereof, which might be used under license. HBO Canada®, Game of Thrones® and the associated logos are service marks of Home Box Office, Inc. © 2013 Home Box Office, Inc. All Rights Reserved. All times PT. Titles/times and dates are subject to change without notice.


A14

www.terracestandard.com

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Terrace Standard

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Lost Film Returns

T

he long-forgotten drama “A Darkening Shore” lights up the screen It is a momentous day for fans of late legendary Italian director Claudio Shirra, whose unreleased 1985 film “A Darkening Shore” is finally seeing the light of day at this one-week-only run in New York and Los Seraphes. Loosely based on the 19th-century Russian saga “Circles of the Black Sea,” by Anatoly Alvang, the three-hour epic stars Frank

Hrakc and then-newcomer Seraph Piet. The movie languished on the shelf after failing to find a distributor, but Shirra’s stepson, fledgling producer Juergen Antony, rescued it from oblivion, convincing the independent Concamera Studios to release a new 35-mm print. “It’s an astounding piece of filmmaking,” said Antony, who spoke from the Hollywood set of his latest project, a still-untitled

Teaching an App a New Trick at the Easthelmstead Dog Show

T

he 290-year-old canine pageant embraces the 21st century. This weekend when the primo Fido is crowned at the 290th Easthelmstead Dog Show, its sponsors hope to attract more enthusiasts with an app that explains all the

rules and follows every doggie drama over the course of the two-day event. “We have found that it’s not a matter of not wanting to watch the show that keeps people away, but not being able to understand the rules or recognize the breeds, that turns

Marvin Rayke vehicle. “We dusted it off, made adjustments to the color, tweaked some of the edits and added a new score. Though the movie is rooted in history, the story feels fresh and timeless. I think [Shirra] would be happy with the final print.” The film is a sweeping tale of forbidden love between the betrothed Princess Kira Ablomonov (Piet) and the older, married Duke of Kyrol (Hrakc), who meet

at the summer palace of the Tsar and begin a passionate affair that spans two decades. When a socialclimbing member of the Imperial Court (a deliciously conniving Franz Worler), discovers their infidelity — and the real identity of the princess’ son — he blackmails the lovers, forcing them to choose between Russian society and their true desires. In the experienced hands of Shirra everything he had.

viewers off. And we will do whatever it takes to keep this show going for another 290 years,” said Alexandria Peachtree, grand marshal of the event. “And, of course, there is all the intrigue goings on behind the scenes – and an app is perfect to get inside the heads of champions and their handlers.” Easthelmstead organizers have been beta-testing

the app since last year’s event and feel confident they have worked out all the kinks to deliver free, user-friendly features that work on all mobile devices. “My favorite is the ‘Bark of Champions’ tab, where the top contenders are identified only by their voices,” said Peachtree. For those who want to follow on Twitter, follow #easthelm.

The Lion of the Desert W

ith big-name architects, billionaire’s new city is rising. Rising out of the flat, desert landscape, where there is little else to see but the occasional palm tree and swirling sand, is a city. A brand-new city. Like an oasis (or perhaps a mirage), as you draw nearer, this glittery cluster of buildings in the Central Asian nation of Tajikistan reveals itself to still be a construction site. Yes, there are people here, but they are all scurrying around in hard-hats, unfurling blueprints, climbing atop heavy machinery, operating cranes.

What is there — five sparkling towers, rising 60 to 90 stories, and designed by the renowned architecture team Rode + Peralla — is impressive. The undulating façades of glass are done in multiple tones of blue glass, from palest sky-blue to a deep turquoise, calling to mind the rolling waves of an ocean. (A bit ironic, since the nearest body of water, Vakhsha Lake, is hundreds of miles away.) The city is named Wakhi, in honor of a local dialect, and it’s the singular vision of one man, Gorvo Dushanbe, billionaire owner

of the country’s largest aluminum company. “This will be a worldclass metropolis, one that will attract all sorts of thriving businesses and many, many wealthy residents,” said Dushanbe, over a lunch of rare steak and mineral water at one of the city’s few open restaurants, a high-end bistro from star Belgian chef Pierre De Bwah. The towers, a mix of commercial and residential, along with a fivestar hotel topped with five floors of luxury condominiums, is meant to attract a whole new wealthy

class to the country. “Tajikistan has much to offer in terms of exports. We have hydroelectric power, we have many metals, we have coal and natural gas,” explained Dushanbe. “And we do have

“This will be a world-class metropolis...” some very rich Tajiks.” Not enough, though, to support the thousands of luxury apartments planned for Wakhi. So Dushanbe has courted an affluent Middle Eastern, Russian and Indian business clientele.

Terrace Standard Wednesday, April 3, 2013

www.terracestandard.com

ADVERTISEMENT

A15

ADVERTISEMENT

Fashion’s New Talent

La Cienega Y Ballet’s “Gazelle”

M

arcus Driaman’s production makes the heart pound while it is being broken. The opening of “Gazelle” sees the female cast — Gazelle at the center — on parade in all their finery before the party where the star-crossed lovers will meet. By the end of the first act, Gazelle, having fallen for

In the dark second act, Ramon goes to Gazelle’s grave an unavailable man, is in tatters. This production of “Gazelle” is also the first star performance by Annette McKeigh, the Canadian ballerina who joined the La Cienega Ballet Company last year with much fanfare, having first been courted by several companies around the globe. The first act is filled with glorious color as Gazelle meets and falls for Ramon, played by Jonathon Pawle, in a performance that would be the talk of the town if it were not overshadowed by McKeigh’s debut. They dance together like a mixed drink: so fluid are their movements.

oung fashion designer finds a new home Fashion designer Patricia Meonni isn’t one to talk too much about her technique. “I drape, I cut, I sew, and then repeat,” she said. “That is all.” What sounds simple is in fact a meticulous process that takes weeks – and sometimes even months to finish. “Yes,

I have worked on some dresses for nearly a year,” the petite, dark-haired Meonni admits. “But sometimes that is what it takes to make magic.” And magic is what she’s brought to her new line for Italian fashion house Daveni. The stunning 10-piece collection mixes dreamy pastels, intricate black lace and iridescent ruffles in a

truly bewitching way. Since its debut on the runway last week, the buzz has gotten even louder around this young talent. “I consider line, color, proportion, of course,” said Meonni, 29, who has been in the business since she was a girl, assisting her mother in a dressmaker’s shop outside of Bari, Italy. “My mother was a talented

In the Balance

B

rilliant direction and a strong cast come together for this operatic masterpiece. When we last ran into musical director Hans Blegmer at the Cosmopolitan Opera, he was busy preparing for the centennial celebration of “Jutka,” the famous (and famously difficult) Alphred Verga opera that stretches nearly five-and-a-half hours. That was eight months ago, and now Blegmer is mounting another production of the Hungarian composer’s magnum opus at perhaps the world’s

greatest opera house, Venice’s L’Ascensore. Is he prepared for yet another grand undertaking of the opera, at a venue renowned for audiences showing their displeasure rather vocally? “As long as I have the perfect soprano — one that has mastered the bel canto technique and these heavy vocal demands — then yes, I am ready,” said the 61-year-old Blegmer, a formidable presence with a tall, husky physique and a head of thick, wavy gray hair. He has likely found his gifted singer in Diana

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Alvirsen, the Boston-born soprano whose flaming red hair is nearly as recogniz-

“Indeed, the buzz around the production has been good” able as her vocal talents. While Alvirsen has never tackled such a strenuous role — up to now, her most challenging performance was in last year’s “Jean Ruillet” at the Weiner Neustadt Opera House.

seamstress; she could see the customer, take one look at a dress and know exactly where to let it out, where to add a dart. But what she didn’t have was vision. That I learned on my own.” Meonni began sketching in her free time, and considered entering fashion design school in Milan but decided instead to apprentice at the esteemed Roman

couturier, Sposia. With her excellent sewing skills, the teen was hired immediately. Still, it took close to five years before her true talents were recognized. “I was hired initially to sew beads – tons and tons of beads on all sorts of glamorous gowns – wedding gowns, especially,” she recalled. “It was dull, but it helped me understand.

Medea Resurrects at the Abuelitas M

usic claims its own, ageless night, five years in the making. Medea, with shimmering silver locks filling in her once ink-black signature bob, struck a defiant pose as she opened the fifth annual Abuelita Awards with a pitch-perfect a cappella rendition of “Shooting Comet,” her usually electric rock anthem, as synonymous with Medea as her hair. Medea has not performed in public since she collapsed during the final notes of “Shooting Comet” at the Golden

Timbre Awards in 2003. It was precisely that performance, and what Medea called the mistreatment by Golden Timbre programmers of seasoned performers, who have earned more respect (and might need a little more time getting to the stage), that inspired Hoit Swagger, lead singer of the Skipping Lizards, to give musicians over 50 their own awards night to shine. But it has taken five years of being relegated to Saturday afternoon telecasts and D-list presenters to attract Medea and headline performers.

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A16  www.terracestandard.com

Wednesday, April 3, 2013  Terrace Standard

COMMUNITY TERRACE STANDARD

MARGARET SPEIRS

(250) 638-7283

bc government, nwcc and margaret speirs PHOTOs

local queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal winners include, from left, Terrace Pipes and Drums members Jill MacKay, far left, and Audrey Kerr, third from left; Freda Diesing School of Northwest Coast Art senior advisor Dempsey Bob; and Joyce Gibson, Riverboat Days president. McKay and Kerr went to Victoria for the ceremony and to receive their medals from Premier Christy Clark, pictured with them.

Locals surprised to win medals A NUMBER of locals have been awarded Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medals, and the latest have won for their voluntary and community services. World renowned Tahltan/Tlingit artist Dempsey Bob is an instructor and senior advisor at the Freda Diesing School of Northwest Coast Art at Northwest Community College here. He began carving in 1969 and was directed to the Kitanmaax School of Northwest coast Indian Art by Freda Diesing, who was his earliest mentor and teacher. Bob went on to become a close friend of Freda’s and frequently worked with her. His work is in the collections of such institutions as the Canadian Museum of Civilization, UBC Museum of Anthropology, the Columbia Museum of Ethnology, the Smithsonian Institution, national museum of Enthology in Japan, Canada House in London. Joyce Gibson won her medal for her community service involvement during her years here and it came as a surprise. After working for the school district for 35 years, she wanted something to do when

she retired. She has been president of the Riverboat Days committee for many years, and is involved in Relay for Life on its leadership committee. She works with the Terrace Community Foundation as its vice-chair. And she just signed up for Volunteer Terrace and has been doing volunteering at the Happy Gang Centre. “I like to be busy,” she said, adding it keeps her young. Gibson has also been involved with the dragon boat society and Terrace snowmobile association. Audrey Kerr and Jill MacKay have been with the Terrace Pipes and Drums Society for more than 35 years and nearly 20 years, respectively. Kerr was pipe major for three years from 1991 to 1994 while MacKay has been pipe major since 1994 and continuing with that role until this past September. During that time, she was also giving individual lessons from beginner to experienced as a music teacher.

One of her students has become the new pipe major, she said. She volunteered to shovel snow for seniors as part of Volunteer Terrace, and still does it, although she and her husband do it on their own. “I was absolutely surprised,” she said about being awarded the medal, which she says came as a result of pipes and drums member Murray Hamer nominating her and Kerr. “Something the premier said in her speech really rang true,” said MacKay. “She said ‘I bet you not one of you out there feels like you deserve the medal.’ She goes ‘you do deserve it.’ “All I could think was the dozens of other people who deserve a medal and went unnominated. “That was my biggest feeling ‘there’s so many other people that deserve this and I was happy and proud to get it.” MacKay shared the medal ceremony with her 85-year-old mother, picking her up in Vancouver and taking her to Victoria. “She the one who drove me to all my les-

sons,” said MacKay, adding her mother was surprised and proud of her for receiving the medal. MacKay started playing the pipes when she was a child after starting out as a highland dancer. The pipe band she belonged to played and won the highland games in scotland and in band when she reached the top stage, she was part of the first Canadian band to break the top five in the championships there, she said. Audrey Kerr says she felt very honoured to be selected. She has been with the Terrace Pipes and Drums since she was 15 when she started playing the pipes. She was pipe major, pipe sergeant and band manager and now her son is the pipe major, she said. “It certainly was a surprise to get recognized for it. I’ve done it out of the love of playing and contributing and it brings a lot of joy to other people,” she said, adding her mom was there to see her receive her medal too.

‘Buck for a truck’ boosts food programs By Diana Bateson The Kalum Community School Society is launching its “Buck for a Truck” campaign to replace the old pickup truck that has been used for the various food programs operating in Terrace. The old truck, which was donated to the society in 2002, has served the community well, picking up and delivering food for programs such as the Good Food Box, Food Share, and Hungry Kids Project. In the spring, it is also used to deliver equipment to the school

and community gardens. This has led to it being referred to as the “community truck”. However, the truck is now often needing repairs, costing the society money it can’t then use elsewhere and disrupting the operations of the food programs. It has been decided that it is time to retire the old truck and find a more reliable vehicle. An information table, with posters, brochures, and donation jars will be set up in Save On Foods on Saturday, April 6 to encourage people in the community to contribute a loonie toward buying a

newer vehicle. Donation jars, brochures, and posters will also be placed in various participating businesses around town. Although most people in Terrace have heard of the food programs, many are not aware of the Kalum Community School Society, which is responsible for developing these programs. KCSS is a non-profit organization that has provided community programs for vulnerable children, youth, and families in Terrace, Thornhill, and six surrounding First Nations villages since 1997.

KCSS’s mission is to work with community partners within neighbourhood schools to enable success and belonging for all people. The primary goal of the Hungry Kids Project is to improve food security for children in Terrace and surrounding areas. Terrace and the outlying communities have experienced higher than provincial average unemployment levels, 10.3 per cent in October 2012. These high unemployment levels have contributed to the rise in the number of people, including youth and children, using food banks. In March 2012, a count done

of people using food banks that month illustrates the need – 721 adults and 558 children. There is a link between nutrition and academic performance. It is hard to concentrate on schoolwork when you’re hungry. KCSS addresses this problem serving more than 2,000 servings of food in schools weekly in Terrace and Thornhill. In its efforts to respond to the emergency food needs, it receives significant donations from local distributors, stores and farmers.

Cont’d Page A17


COMMUNITY

Terrace Standard  Wednesday, April 3, 2013

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Campaign appeals for new wheels In 2012, more than 300 pounds of food a day was being recovered and distributed to those in need. That’s 9,000 pounds of waste per month that would otherwise end up in our landfill! KCSS has also developed some school community gardens, hoping to utilize and preserve produce for the school salad bars, breakfast and lunch programs. Canada is one of the few developed countries in the world without a national food program. It is time for all levels of governments and community members to deal with this prob-

lem in a way that prevents hunger from happening, increases community resources, and provides opportunities for those dealing with lack of food to become self-sufficient. Please support KCSS’s “Buck for a Truck” campaign and help with the effort to end hunger now! In addition to the table at Save On Foods April 6, larger donations can be made at the Northern Savings Credit Union in the name of the society or by going to the society’s website, at www.kcssterrace.com. Diana Bateson is a social services worker diploma student.

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VANDERHOOF AND DISTRICTS CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION

Fax your event to make the Scene at 250-638-8432. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday.

Clubs & pubs

■■ THORNHILL PUB: Free pool Wed. and Sun., karaoke night Thurs. Karin and Mark provide musical entertainment every Fri. and Sat. 7 p.m. Shuttle service if you need a ride. ■■ LEGION Branch 13: Meat draws every Sat. afternoon – first draw at 4:30 p.m. Steak Night is the first Fri. of every month. ■■ GEORGE’S PUB: Free poker Sun. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Wed. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Karaoke Sun. Live weekend entertainment. April 5, 6 River Valley Rats; April 11 Body Heat Male Revue, buy ticket at door, show at 9 p.m.; April 12, 13, 19, 20 Accelerators. Shuttle service if you need a ride. ■■ mt. layton lounge: Open daily noon to 11 p.m. Free pool, darts and shuffleboard. The lounge is at Mt. Layton Hotsprings just off Hwy37 between Terrace and Kitimat. ■■ beasleys mix: Karaoke is every Fri. night. Beasleys Mix is located in the Best Western at 4553 Greig Avenue.

Art

■■ Terrace Art Club moves to a new location for its next meeting April 8. Come to the Terrace Art Gallery Mondays at 7 p.m. in the lower level of the library. Open studio format. Please bring your own art supplies. Free. All skill levels wel-

come. For more, call Maureen 635-7622.

peacemovement.ca.

■■ Embracing Our Past: Collage Workshop with Joan Conway is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 14 at the art gallery. Bring treasured photos to life with a number of techniques, such as acrylics and photo transfer. All materials included. There is a cost to take part. Pre-register at the art gallery. For more details, call Joan 635-6753 or emmaj@telus.net.

■■ UNBC Speaker series presents “Greening the Curriculum: A Case Study in Nursing,” presented by Prof. Amy Klepetar, school of nursing UNBC northwest region from noon to 1 p.m. April 10 at the UNBC campus. Free. For more details, call 615-5578 or email alma.avila@ unbc.ca.

■■ TERRACE FRAME DESIGN and Gallery presents Photography Exhibition of Works by Allan Colton, Lori Jardine and Vi Timmerman until May 3 at its location in the Lazelle Mall. For more details, call 615-3215.

Music

Speaker

■■ unbc speaker series presents “Ecosystem Valuation” presented by Emily McGiffin of Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition from noon to 1 p.m. April 3 at UNBC. Free. For more details, call 615-5578 or alma.avila@unbc.ca. ■■ Philip Ponchet, President of the Inner Peace Movement of Canada, lectures at the Sandman Inn April 9 at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. His lectures help people trust themselves, clarify their life’s purpose and unfold their intuition. The Inner Peace Movement is a not-for-profit, community-based organization. Everyone welcome and admission can be paid at the door. For more details, see www.inner-

■■ Pacific Northwest Music Festival takes place April 4 to 20 at the R.E.M. Lee Theatre. ■■ copper mountain stringband plays at 7:30 p.m. April 6 at Cafenara. Admission by donation. Proceeds go to Relay for Life equipment rental. ■■ April 5 and 6 is Band, April 9 to 12 is Dance, April 13 morning is Dance and evening is Music Theatre, April 14 daytime is Choral and evening, is Music Theatre, April 15 is Classroom Music, April 16 morning is Classroom Music and afternoon is Choral Speaking, April 17 is Choral Speaking, April 18 and 19 is Orff. ■■ Pacific Northwest Music Festival Scholarship Night is at 6:30 p.m. April 19 at the R.E.M. Lee Theatre. ■■ Pacific Northwest Music Festival Gala is at 7 p.m. April 20.

Notice of the 68th Annual General Meeting

Monday, April 22, 2013 Time: 7:00PM, Supper: 5:45 PM Location: Nechako Senior Citizens Friendship Center To Consider: ➤ Review 2012 financial statement. Sales increased 5% to $201.9 million and net savings decreased $777,000 million to $15.8 million or 7.8% of sales. ➤ Directors recommendation of a patronage allocation of $8.9 million or 4.6% of 2012 purchases. ➤ Election of 3 Directors for the Vanderhoof, Fort St. James, Fort Fraser, Fraser Lake, Burns Lake, Prince George areas ➤ Special Resolutions will be voted on: 1. Directors remuneration Rule#108(1) and (2), Daily and Meeting per diems have not increased with Directors’ responsibilities and sales growth. 2. Nomination of Directors Rule #79(2) remove nominations from the floor at AGM ➤ Co-op Gift Certificates, Hampers and Door Prizes valued at $500. Complimentary tickets for supper must be picked up prior to April 19th at the Co-op General Office.

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS Interested in letting your name stand for the Board of Directors of Vanderhoof and Districts Co-operative Association? Directors participate jointly, with a total of nine Directors in planning and controlling the affairs of the co-operative, guided by Association Bylaws and Policies, so that it effectively moves toward achieving the objectives of the Co-operative. Nomination packages and info on Bylaw changes can be picked up at the Admin Office, Prince George, Quesnel Agro-CStore, Houston or Terrace Branches. The form should be dropped off at the office prior to April 19, 2013.

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THE NORTHWEST has three more heritage sites packed with history. At its Feb. 14 meeting, the Regional District of KitimatStikine formally recognized the Dorreen General Store and Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Station, the Grand Trunk Pacific Roundhouse at Pacific and the Meanskinisht Cemetery as heritage sites by adding them to the community heritage registry for the regional district. Director Dave Brocklebank of Telegraph Creek and director for the city of Terrace Marylin Davies moved that the board accept the statements of significance for the three locations. That brings the number of Regional District Community Heritage Sites to 11. The others are Telegraph Creek townsite, the Yukon Telegraph Trail, Gunanoot Gravesite, Meziadin River Fish Ladders, Anyox Powerhouse, Hagwilget Bridge, Old Skeena Bridge and Butedale Cannery.

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A18

COMMUNITY

www.terracestandard.com

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Terrace Standard

Community Calendar

The Terrace Standard offers the Community Calendar as a public service to its readers and community organizations. This column is intended for non-profit organizations and events without an admission charge. Space permitting, items will run two weeks before each event. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursdays. Fax your event or PSA to 250-638-8432. For complete listings, visit www.terracestandard.com

COMMUNITY EVENTS APRIL 3 – Relay for Life committee meeting takes place from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Terrace Public Library boardroom. For more details, call Michelle at 641-9954 or email mtaylor@ bc.cancer.ca. APRIL 6 – Terrace second annual Small Animal and Poultry Sale from noon – 3 p.m. at Thornhill Community Fair Grounds indoor arena. To register as a vendor, which requires a fee, contact Brittany at hewkos@gmail.com. APRIL 6 – Happy Gang Centre hosts a pancake breakfast from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Come one, come all, good eats, good laughs. APRIL 21 – Come get a great deal on all gently used kids stuff from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Kitsumkalum Hall. Bring cash and happy shopping!. A few tables still available for rent. Please contact Kim at 635-8600. APRIL 27 – The Terrace Hospice Society and RBC Royal Bank host the second annual Informational Tea from noon to 4 p.m. at the Happy Gang Centre. Everyone welcome to join us for tea and snacks. Free.

PSAS

THE TERRACE CHURCHES’ Food Bank will be open for distribution from April 15-18. Opening times are 9:30 – 11:30 a.m., in the basement of the Dairy Queen on Park Ave. Those with surnames from A to G should come on Monday, from H to P on Tuesday and Q to Z on Wednesday. Anyone who has missed his day can come on Thursday. Please bring identification for all household members. YOU’LL BE THERE: If you happen to have, or maybe know someone who has, a grad dress, shoes, or anything that may be used by girls in need of a grad dress to attend their prom, it can be dropped off at M&M Meat Shops or you can call Darlene at 975-0789 and arrangements can be made to have any of your donations picked up. If you are in Terrace,  Kitimat or Prince Rupert and are in need of a dress etc., call or text 975-0789 and Darlene will be happy to set up a private fitting for you. KIDS IN CONTROL is a free education and support group for children between the ages of eight and 12, who have a parent with a mental illness. Children meet for 1.5 hours, once a week, for eight weeks. During sessions, children are given information about mental illness as well as an opportunity to develop and practise healthy coping strategies for dealing with difficulties they may be facing. Using crafts, games and interactive learning activities, children have the opportunity to join together in developing healthy attitudes and coping skills. Registrations are currently being taken. For

more on this program, call 635-8206 or email terrace@bcss.org or see the bcss.org website. THE GREATER TERRACE Seniors Advisory Committee (GTSAC) meets on the first Wednesday of the month at 1:30 p.m. at the Happy Gang Centre. Everyone welcome. THE SALVATION ARMY holds Toonie Wednesdays every first and third Wednesday of the month – all clothing is $2. All children’s clothing $2 or less is half price. GREATER TERRACE BEAUTIFICAITON Society meets from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at the city council chambers. New members always welcome. COFFEE CLUB: TERRACE Freemasonry (Kitselas Lodge No. 123) invite all men of good character, strict morals to attend our Coffee Club from 9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. the first Saturday of each month at the Masonic Lodge, 4915 Lazelle Ave.  You are welcome to bring your family. For further information, phone Darcy 635-3580 or Richard 638-0852. HAPPY GANG CENTRE hosts a pancake breakfast the first Saturday of every month from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Come one, come all, good eats, good laughs. NORTHERN BRAIN INJURY Support Group meets at 4 p.m. on the second and fourth Monday of the month in the boardroom at the Terrace and District Community Services Society (3219 Eby St.). For more details, call Deb 1-866-979-4673. THE TERRACE ART Association meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the gallery. Call 638-8884 for details. THE TERRACE PARKINSON’S support group meets the second Tuesday of each month. Persons with Parkinsons, family, friends and support people are welcome. For more information, call Therese at 250-638-1869. THE TERRACE MULTIPLE Sclerosis Support Group meets every second Wednesday of the month. To find out the location of the next meeting, call Doug 635-4809 or Val 635-3415. THE TERRACE TOASTMASTERS Club meets every second and fourth Wednesday of the month at the Graydon Securities Building on Keith Ave. (next to Irlybird). For more details, call Randy 635-2151 or Rolf 635-6911. SENIORS TAI CHI at the Happy Gang Centre on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, 8:45 to 9:45. Chase away the winter while building your strength, balance and coordination. Dropin fee. All are welcome. Call Rita 635-0144 or Wendy 635-3847 for more info.

HAS YOUR LIFE been affected by someone else’s drinking? Al-Anon can help. Meetings are Sundays at 8 p.m. on the second floor of the Almarlin building at 3219 Eby St. For more information, call 250-635-8181. TERRACE BIRTHRIGHT SOCIETY has closed its pregnancy crisis office. The hot line 1-800-550-4900 will remain available free of charge. PARK CENTRE OFFERS a variety of parenting education and support programs including Infant Massage, Nobody’s Perfect, So You Have the Blues (PPD/PPND Support), Parenting Plus!, Fathers Group, Building Healthier Babies, and Building Blocks. Stop in or phone for more information: 4465 Park Ave, 635-1830, or on Facebook (Programs of the TCDC). THE HOMELESS OUTREACH Program and the Living Room Project provide services at the Old Carpenters Hall on the corner of Davis Ave. and Sparks St. Open Mon. to Thurs. 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Fri. until 2 p.m. ONLINE CHAT FOR youth in crisis or emotional distress – www.northernyouthonline.ca – from 4 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. daily, except Mondays and Tuesdays. This chat supplements the Youth Support phone line 1-888-564-8336, available from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. every day.

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HEALTH ISSUES? HIGH blood pressure? High cholesterol? Do you suffer from a chronic disease like diabetes, arthritis or any cardiac condition? Healthy Terrace offers free group sessions on various topics. For more, call Alanna at Healthy Terrace, 615-5533.

Look Who’s Dropped In!

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETS Thursday from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Christian Reformed Church and Saturday from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at St. Matthew’s Anglican Church. Both meetings are open to everyone. KERMODEI OPTIMIST CLUB of Terrace meets on the 10th, 20th and 30th of every month at 7:30 p.m. at Cafenara. For more details, call Dallis at 635-5352 or 631-7766. HEALING TOUCH COMMUNITY Clinics continue to be offered. Call Julie for more details 635-0743. Donations accepted. THE TERRACE CHAPTER of TOPS (Take off Pounds Sensibly) meets once a week in the cafeteria in the basement of Mills Memorial Hospital. Weigh-in starts at 6 p.m., meeting at 7:15 p.m. For more information about this, call Joan 635-0998 or Sandy 635-4716.

Baby’s Name: William Henry Butler Harrison Date & Time of Birth: March 22, 2013 at 9:04 a.m. Weight: 7 lbs. 10 oz. Sex: Male Parents: Candice & Paul Harrison

“New brother for Lilly-Mae & Violet” Baby’s Name: Faith Marie Wilson Date & Time of Birth: March 20, 2013 at 5:43 p.m. Weight: 9 lbs. 3 oz. Sex: Female Parents: Kayla Holosko & Dakota Wilson

“New sister for Claire & Ali”

Insurance agencIes LTD.

Behind Tim Hortons 250-638-1424

PACIFIC NORTHWEST MUSIC FESTIVAL APRIL 5 & 6, BAND APRIL 9 - 12, DANCE APRIL 13 MORNING, DANCE EVENING, MUSIC THEATRE APRIL 14 DAY, CHORAL EVENING, MUSIC THEATRE APRIL 15, CLASSROOM MUSIC APRIL 16 MORNING, CLASSROOM MUSIC AFTERNOON, CHORAL SPEAKING APRIL 17 CHORAL SPEAKING APRIL 18 ORFF APRIL 19 ORFF

PUBLIC PRENATAL CLASSES available thru the year. Classes run Tuesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or Thursday 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. For more info or register, call Park Centre at 250-635-1830.

Wightman & Smith Your Local and Independant Insurance Broker

APRIL 4 - 20, 2013

Weekly Weather Report Your safety is our concern For current highway conditions and weather forecast, please call 1-800-550-4997 or log onto: www.drivebc.ca

MARCH 2013 DATE

MAX TEMP °C

MIN TEMP °C

TOTAL PRECIP mm

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

7.0 9.0 9.5 8.5 9.7 11.9 12.0

-3.0 -3.5 0.5 3.0 2.6 0.2 2.0

0.0 0.0 0.0 2.6 2.6 1.2 0.0

www.abccommunications.com

Safety Tip: www.nechako-northcoast.com

MARCH 2012 DATE

MAX TEMP °C

MIN TEMP °C

TOTAL PRECIP mm

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

6.5 10.0 9.0 10.5 10.0 15.0 15.0

-1.5 -2.0 -3.5 -2.5 -1.0 1.0 2.0

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2

Adverse weather can strike any time. Please be prepared to give yourself extra time to reach your destination.

Baby’s Name: Blaire Raimey Twiname Date & Time of Birth: March 16, 2013 at 1:44 p.m. Weight: 6 lbs. 9 oz. Sex: Male Parents: Charlene Squires & Craig Twiname

Baby’s Name: Declan John Voogd Date & Time of Birth: March 12, 2013 at 1:17 p.m. Weight: 9 lbs. 6 oz. Sex: Male Parents: Lorena & Nathan Voogd

“New brother Isaac”

Baby’s Name: Chase Patrick Calder Date & Time of Birth: March 5, 2013 at 9:14 a.m. Weight: 13 lbs. 8 oz. Sex: Male Parents: Michelle Lafferty & Marc Calder

“New brother for Colsen”

Baby’s Name: Elisabete Maia Pimentel Date & Time of Birth: February 28, 2013 at 2:55 p.m. Weight: 7 lbs. 13 oz. Sex: Female Parents: Giselda & Armenio Pimentel

Congratulates the parents on the new additions to their families.


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Announcements

Announcements

Employment

Cards of Thanks

Information

Help Wanted We have an immediate opening for an

Bartender/ Server

Words can never express how grateful I am to everyone for the care given to my husband, Jim. From those who took the time to stop and stay with him at the accident site to all of the medical professionals, both in Kitimat and Terrace. I know he was in the best of hands. I especially want the thank everyone for their well wishes, thoughts and prayers during this time. They are what keeps us going. Special thanks to our extended families and to Terry & Laurie Hawman for everything they have done for us. Ann & Jim Rigler

Information

Please apply in person to Paul or Gus at

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Funeral Homes

Travel

Timeshare CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No Risk Program. Stop Mortgage and maintenance payments today. 100% Money back guarantee. Free consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

Vacation Spots $399 CABO San Lucas. All inclusive special! Stay 6 Days in a luxury beachfront resort with meals and drinks! For $399! 1-888-481-9660. www.luxurycabohotel.com

Employment Business Opportunities ALL CASH Healthy Vending Route: 9 local secured proven accounts. Safest, quickest return on money. Investment required + $72K potential training included. 1-888-979-8363.

Career Opportunities MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION rated #2 for work-at-home. Train with the top-rated accredited school in Canada. Financing and student loans available. Contact CanScribe today at 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com

S TANDARD TERRACE

Help Wanted Desk Clerk/ Chambermaid Position. Seniors welcome to apply, will train Bring resume to 3867 Hwy 16 East.

CARPENTERS AND CARPENTER APPRENTICES PCL Constructors Westcoast Inc. is seeking Carpenters and Carpenter Apprentices for the Lakes District Hospital and Health Centre in Burns Lake, B.C. Experiences in commercial concrete formwork systems an asset. We will be seeking a few with OFA2 or OFA3, Skid Steer (Bobcat) and Rough Terrain Forklift (Zoom Boom) tickets with experience. WHMIS, CSTS09 and Fall Protection training an asset. Fax or email your resume to 604 241 5301 or BCInteriorjobs@pcl.com

Client Relocations!

Immed. P/T professional provide tours provide rental tance. Need per day.

position for individual to of Kitimat and housing assiscar! $200-275

Fax resume to: 1-905-640-3836

Mount Layton Hotsprings currently taking applications for the following divisions: Bar Tender/Server, Front Desk Clerk, & Housekeeping. Email desiree.mountlayon@yahoo.com

or apply in person at Mount Layton Hotsprings & see Front Desk Manager.

ADVERTISING DEADLINES: When a stat holiday falls on a Saturday, Sunday or Monday, the deadline is THURSDAY AT 3 P.M. for all display and classified ads.

TERRACE STANDARD, 3210 CLINTON STREET, TERRACE, B.C. V8G 5R2

Obituaries

MacKay’s Service Ltd. Ltd. MacKay’s Funeral Funeral Service Serving Terrace, Kitimat, Smithers & Prince Rupert Serving Terrace, Kitimat, email: Smithers & Prince Rupert www.mackaysfuneralservices.com mkayfuneralservice@telus.net

Monuments Monuments Bronze Bronze Plaques Plaques Terrace TerraceCrematorium Crematorium

Concerned personal Concerned personal Service in the Northwest service in the Northwest Since 1946 since 1946

4626 Davis Street 4626B.C. DavisV8G Street Terrace, 1X7

TTerrace, B.C. V8G 1X7 Phone: 250-635-2444 Fax:635-635-2160 250-635-2160 Phone 635-2444 • •Fax

Toll Free: 1-888-394-8881 •2424hour hourpager pager

In Memoriam

In Memoriam

January 16, 1927 - April 7, 2012

Lost 5yr old siamese/black tabby cross. Black markings on legs, face & tail. Blue eyes & pink nose. Lost Sat March 2 near Pohle Ave. Reward offered for return. 250-6159575 or 250-615-7953.

DEADLINE: FRIDAY 3 P.M. Display, Word Classified and Classified Display

Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified. com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in

Joyce Annie Mary Mitchell

Lost & Found

a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

Gone one year today, Mom

Obituaries Maria Lynn Dougall

May 23, 1967 - March 21, 2013 Maria passed away peacefully in her home in Terrace, BC on Thursday, March 21, 2013. Predeceased by her mother Linda Dougall and father Bill Dougall, she is survived by her husband Larry, daughters Farrah (Jordan), Ashley, Courtney, and Christine, son Keith (April) and brother Bill (Leanne). Born in Terrace, BC, Maria loved being-outdoors. Some of her favorite pastimes include camping and going for drives up the mountain. She was an avid movie collector and an excellent baker. She dedicated most of her time to her family, making every holiday and birthday special. Her loving, thoughtful, and caring nature will not be forgotten. A memorial service will be held at a later date to be announced.



Miss you every day

Tess Tessier (Brousseau)

Hugs your daughters & family

Obituaries

Obituaries

Richard Stanley Faber April 15, 1966 March 25, 2013

Rick passed away suddenly due to complications from diabetes, in Terrace, B.C. on March 25, 2013. He is survived by his daughters, Desiree and Avril, his grandchildren, Brock and Kayden, his parents Jim and Margaret, sister Ingrid, nieces, family and friends. A memorial service was held March 30, 2013 at the Terrace Christian Reformed Church. In Lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Diabetes Association.

November 30, 1925 March 25, 2013 This is the hard part of life. My Mom Grandma Tess, whom we’ve loved dearly, will be greatly missed and leave a great void in our lives, has passed on to be with her Lord and Saviour. Tess Tessier (Brousseau) passed away peacefully on March 25 in Kaslo, BC while visiting her daughter. A stroke struck Thursday morning. Tess was born in Hudson Bay Junction, Sask. Nov 30, 1925 to Zoe and George Tessier, a horse jockey and animal veterinarian. Mom was a remarkable women who did life HER way, wrote the White Spirit Bear Book and Iceberg Tea. Tess was predeceased by her husband Clarence Brousseau and three of their sons, Bill, Don and David. She is survived by her only daughter Angele Ortega (Rowe) and three sons, Phillip, Paul and Mike Brousseau, and her twenty grand-children, Jeremiah, Vance, Gordon, Keith, Dale, Nehemiah, Darci, Penny, Aaron, Caleb, Levi, Meleah, Ezra, Alicia, Bethany, Trish, Abraham, Jewel, Jessica, Adam and by her three great grand-children Cora, Libby and Rowynn. She will be in our hearts forever and missed by her many grand children and few great grand children. A Celebration of Life will be held April 10th Wednesday at the Pentecostal Assembly 3511 Eby St. Terrace, BC. You are welcome starting at 1:00 pm. Mother loved orchids or in lieu of flowers a donation to any animal shelter. We would like it best if you showed up to share your memories and the good times, enjoying her tenacious spirit.

We’re on the net at www.bcclassified.com


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Employment

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

LOOKING FOR both F/T and P/T servers. Starting Apr 3. Pls send your resume to Shan Yan Restaurant at 4606 Greig Ave Terrace. No Phone calls pls

KALUM KABS LTD. Requires full/part time dispatchers and drivers. Guaranteed wages, flexible hours. Drop off resume to 4449 Lakelse Ave. No phone calls please.

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Prince Rupert Salt Water Fishing Guide. Ticketed. Experienced. 250-635-3521

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Find us on Facebook

(Trimac)

Trimac Transportation is North America’s premier provider of services in highway transportation of bulk commodities. Our Kitimat,Terrace and Prince George locations require...

CLASSIFIEDS Help Wanted

Wednesday,April April3,3,2013  2013 Terrace Standard Wednesday,

Help Wanted

HELP WANTED

Supervisor, Cook, Servers & Delivery Drivers with own vehicle

Company Drivers Owner Operators

Please drop Off Resumes

4665 Lazelle Avenue, Terrace, B.C.

Excellent pay • shared benefits • safety equipment • safety bonus dry bulk pneumatic hauling • shift work involved • B-train and mountain experience required Please send your resume to: Mark Davy, Fax: 403-265-8475 E-mail: canrecruiting@trimac.com Phone: 866-487-4622

North America’s Premier Provider www.trimac.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

250-638-8086

Job Opportunity Driftwood Dental is looking for two highly motivated, enthusiastic people who thrive on learning new skills and working in a fast-paced team environment. Office Manager: The successful candidate must have a positive attitude; the ability to manage an organization for growth; excellent computer knowledge; and exceptional leadership and communication skills. They must be solution oriented, highly resourceful and manage in a team environment. Bookkeeping skills and knowledge in the dental field are assets. Administration/reception: The successful candidate must have a positive attitude; a willingness to learn; the ability to prioritize and multitask effectively; excellent computer and communication skills; and work well in a team environment. Previous experience in the dental field is an asset. Written inquiries only please to PO Box 878, Smithers, B.C. V0J 2N0 Email: info@smilesmithers.ca or drop off at Driftwood Dental.

Valard Construction LP, Canada’s premier Powerline Contractor is seeking Project Assistants for the NTL project in the Terrace area. Project Assistants will work closely with the Project Managers, providing support in the areas of reception, payroll, financial control, accounts payable/accounts receivable, cost tracking and analysis, scheduling of flights and accommodation as required for project personnel. The ideal candidate will enjoy working in a fast paced work environment, be highly organized, able to work independently and be willing to reside in a camp environment if required. Preferred candidates will hold a post-secondary degree or diploma; related experience and above average skills in MS Word, Excel, Primavera or Explorer would be a definite asset. We offer a complete benefits package, competitive wages, and a company supported RRSP program. Please forward resume and a cover letter indicating competition # VCLP#11-0031 to: Fax: 780-577-4830 Email: resumesab@valard.com Closing Date: April 6, 2013 We thank all those who apply however only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

TIM-BR Mart Terrace is looking for an energetic enthusiastic individual to join our team. Duties would include customer service, quoting and ordering building materials. Preference will be given to individuals with the following assets: • Computer skills • Building supply or construction knowledge The successful applicant must enjoy dealing with the public, work well with others and be organized and self motivated. Wage will be based on experience. Resumes should be dropped off in person with a drivers abstract or emailed to: dennis@irlyterrace.ca Resumes will be accepted until April 15, 2013

Drop off your resume to: TIM-BR MART TERRACE 4425 Keith Ave., Terrace or fax to: 250-635-4465

KITSELAS FIRST NATION 2225 Gitaus Road, Terrace, B.C. V8G 0A9 Telephone 250-635-5084 fax 250-635-5335

Coast Mountain Alliance Hub Coordinator

WAREHOUSE PERSON

TIM-BR Mart Terrace is looking for an energetic enthusiastic individual to join our team. Duties would include customer service, receiving, shipping and deliveries. Preference will be given to individuals with the following assets: • Forklift experience • Building supply or construction knowledge • Valid class 5 Drivers License The successful applicant must enjoy dealing with the public, work well with others and be organized and self motivated. Resumes should be dropped off in person with a drivers abstract or emailed to: dennis@irlyterrace.ca Resumes will be accepted until April 15, 2013

Drop off your resume to: TIM-BR MART TERRACE 4425 Keith Ave., Terrace or fax to: 250-635-4465

FIELD PROJECT ASSISTANTS

SERVICE COUNTER SALES

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Join the Chances family today! If you’re looking for an exciting work environment in a first-class facility, Chances Terrace is the place for you. Chances offers excellent career opportunities and competitive wages. Be part of a team that delivers exceptional gaming entertainment in a fun, social setting. CHANCES TERRACE IS LOOKING FOR

NIGHT SHIFT SHUTTLE DRIVERS

We are looking for hard working individuals who will be responsible for serving customers in a courteous and professional manner. You will be required to complete a criminal record check and supply a drivers abstract. PLEASE LEAVE RESUME AT THE SECURITY DESK

4410 Legion Avenue, Terrace, B.C., V8G 1N6 Attention: Sandra daSilva

NIGHT SHIFT DRIVERS WANTED

The Coast Mountain Alliance Hub Coordinator will provide communications, planning and administrative expertise to the three partnering First Nations communities in implementing the goals of the Tripartite Health Plans. This is term position expiring March 31st 2014. Summary of Responsibilities: Through the facilitation of meetings and activities, the Coordinator facilitates and supports community representatives to focus on a united approach to the development of health plans. Position includes research and information sharing regarding best practices in First Nations Health Care such as cultural respect and integration. A comprehensive work plan has been developed and the successful applicant will be accountable for consistent progress against this plan. One central aspect of the initial work will be in coordinating three comprehensive Community Health Assessments to identify and develop strategies to meet identified health priorities. The Health Hub Coordinator will be responsible for the day-today management of the Health Communication with the three community health leads and link with the First Nation Health Council and eventual First Nations Health Authority. Knowledge, Skills & Abilities: Experience working with First Nations as well as knowledge of First Nation health, social and political issues and attached history. Familiarity with Kitselas – Kitsumkalum and Haisla culture and traditions will be required for increased success. Ability to provide leadership and co-ordination of multiple project processes and capacity to engage communities in planning and collaboration is essential. The incumbent must also have excellent communication and relationship skills with community members, council, and other health service providers. Additional experience working with media in the implementation, administration of communication strategies, good understanding and working knowledge of the principles of budgetary administration and control are essential skills for this position. Excellent computer and organizational skills are additional requisites. Expectations of work hours include flexibility and willingness to work on evenings and weekend as requested. Qualifications: Must have an undergraduate degree in Education, Social Services, Health or Business. A combination of education and community development or health experience may be considered. Experience with community development and research strategies is preferred. A Valid driver’s license, access to a vehicle and a Criminal Record Check will also be required. Preference may be given to applicants of Aboriginal ancestry. Further information and a job description are available upon request, by calling 250-635-5084. Please submit your resume and cover letter via email to sdnabess@ kitselas.com, mail 2225 Gitaus Terrace BC V8G 0A9 or fax 250-635-5335; closing date April 12, 2013.


Terrace Terrace Standard Standard  Wednesday, Wednesday,April April3,3,2013 2013

Employment

Services

Help Wanted

Legal Services

Home Care/Support

Hotel, Restaurant, Food Services TIN Rooster Holding Ltd, P.O. Box 160 (100 Boulder Ave.), Dease Lake, B.C., V0C1L0, requires full time cooks to prepare and cook short orders and full meals for eat-in and take-out. Prepare and cook deli items for retail sale. Maintain all health standards. Applicants must have 3 years experience. Salary $13.30 / hr. Apply by mail or fax: (250) 771-4382.

Medical/Dental RN’S and LPN’s Needed Well established and growing BC company hiring casual RN’s and LPN’s to work 1:1 in home with a medically fragile child in the Terrace area. Union wages, paid training and full support provided. Pediatric experience an asset. If you want to make a difference in a child’s life please fax your cover letter and resume to 1-250-9647097 attention Jennifer Hols or email jhols@western.ca

Trades, Technical GUARANTEED JOB Placement: General Laborers and Tradesmen For Oil & Gas Industry. Call 24hr Free Recorded Message For Information 1-800-972-0209.

Home Improvements

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

JOB POSTING

TYSA Summer Student Temporary/part-time

The Terrace Youth Soccer Association has an opening for a temporary part-time Summer Student position. This position will commence May 1, 2013 and end on August 31, 2013 (subject to review). This is a parttime position (20 hrs/wk) comprised of evening and weekend work. Hourly rate is $14/hr. DUTIES: Under the general supervision of the TYSA president and clerk, the incumbent will be required to run the canteen and line the soccer fields. Duties will also include assisting the TYSA clerk when needed, cleaning the washrooms, and ordering and restocking the canteen. Other related duties may be as assigned. QUALIFICATIONS: The incumbent must • Have experience in customer service and/or reception; • Have the ability to relate effectively with the public; • Possess excellent interpersonal, communication and time management skills; • Have the ability to handle and prioritize different tasks; • Possess a class 5 driver’s license and access to a vehicle Respond in confidence, by submitting a current resume to tysa1@telus.net We thank all applicants tor their interest; however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Closing Date: April 12, 2013

Financial Services

Legal Services CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CHANCES TERRACE IS LOOKING FOR

SLOT ATTENDANTS & FLOORWALKERS

We are looking for hard working individuals who will be responsible for serving customers in a courteous and professional manner, providing a fun, professional and entertaining experience for the customers. All employees of Chances Terrace are required to complete a criminal record check. PLEASE LEAVE RESUME AT THE SECURITY DESK

4410 Legion Avenue, Terrace, B.C., V8G 1N6 Attention: Sandra daSilva

Moving & Storage

HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC

FOR SHOP AND FIELD DUTIES. TWO AND THREE YEAR APPRENTICES MAY ALSO APPLY. Excellent wages and benefit package available to suitable applicant. If interested in this challenging position please forward your resume via email or fax to ranna@telus.net or 250-638-0898

CITY OF TERRACE

VACANCY

PAYROLL CLERK – FINANCE DEPARTMENT The City of Terrace is currently looking for a skilled candidate to fill the position of Payroll Clerk with the Finance Department. This is regular, full-time Union position (CUPE Local 2012) with a 35 hour work week. Please visit the City of Terrace website at www. terrace.ca under Employment Opportunities for a more detailed job description and information on how to apply for this vacancy. Deadline to apply is 4:30 p.m., Friday, April 12, 2013. Briana Pellegrino, Human Resources Advisor

CITY OF TERRACE

3111 Blakeburn, Terrace

250-635-2728 635-2728

Container or van service! www.bandstra.com

SEAPORT LIMOUSINE LTD. EXPRESS SERVICE

Scheduled freight service from Stewart to Terrace and return, and all points in between. Pick-up and delivery of goods in Terrace, C.O.D. and courier service. P.O. Box 217, Stewart, B.C.

Ph: 250-636-2622 Fax: 250-636-2622

Sand/Gravel/Topsoil

Sand/Gravel/Topsoil

SKEENA CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD. FACTORY DIRECT SCREENED TOPSOIL DRIVEWAY CRUSH LANDSCAPING ROCK DRAIN ROCK & BEDDING SAND BLOCKS AND CONCRETE

VACANCY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIST II – PUBLIC WORKS

Phone: 250-635-3936 or 250-638-8477 Fax: 250-635-4171 3751 Old Lakelse Lake Drive, Terrace, BC, V8G 5P4

The City of Terrace is currently looking for a skilled candidate to fill the position of Engineering Technologist II with the Public Works Department. This is a regular, full-time Union position (CUPE Local 2012) with a 40 hour work week. Please visit the City of Terrace website at www.terrace.ca under Employment Opportunities for a more detailed job description and information on how to apply for this vacancy. Deadline to apply is 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 9, 2013.

Inside Sales Consultants

(Regular Full-Time)

Briana Pellegrino, Human Resources Advisor

Join the Chances family today! If you’re looking for an exciting work environment in a first-class facility, Chances Terrace is the place for you. Chances offers excellent career opportunities and competitive wages. Be part of a team that delivers exceptional gaming entertainment in a fun, social setting.

Moving & Storage

has an immediate opening for a

(Regular Full-Time)

Massage (Reg Therapist)

DROWNING IN debts? Cut your debts in half & payback in half the time. Avoid bankruptcy! For a free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500. BBB rated A+ GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161. M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

Help Wanted

The quality shows in every move we make!

Residential/Commercial renovation Interior/exterior and service call. Experience 28 years, for free estimate call: Michel Villeneuve Cell: 250-6413872 gmail: reno1mike@gmail.com

Services

Prana Therapeutic Massage; Elissa Marcus RMT; deep tissue, sports related and relaxation massage. $85/hr 250975-0095

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Computer Services Enclave Managed Networks offers instant: email • website hosting backup solutions • help desk 250-847-0870 dstrain@bcenclave.ca

The Flight Deck Restaurant has an immediate opening for a cook. General kitchen duties as well as good customer service is required. Food safe & a reliable vehicle is a must. 35-40 hours a week. Drop off resume at the restaurant or fax to 250-635-4403 attention: Kathleen

WE Care is hiring health care aides and home support workers. Qualifications include: 1. Health Care Aide Certification for Health Care Aides only. 2. Employment, education and volunteer experience with seniors and the disabled. 3. Valid driver’s license and a vehicle. 4. Criminal record search. 5. Excellent communication skills. “ Join our growing home health care company”. For a hiring package or further information call 250-635-2274 ask for Linda or Cindy, or email terrace@wecare.telus.biz. Office location is 101-4614 Grieg Ave. Terrace

Services

CLASSIFIEDS Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Sales

Sales

REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY SKEENA AREA...

IF YOU HAVE A... • Positive Attitude • Good Verbal Communication Skills IF YOU ARE... • Self Motivated • Able To Take Direction FULL TRAINING PROVIDED, NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY, COMPETITIVE COMPENSATION & BENEFITS AVAILABLE Email: kdb1982@hotmail.ca or apply to File #323 c/o Terrace Standard 3210 Clinton St., Terrace, B.C. V8G 5R2

USI Land Surveying BC is a high-performance, progressive consultancy providing comprehensive Survey, Geomatics, and Project Management services to a variety of industries. We are actively seeking to hire Geomatics Technicians (Party Chiefs) and Land Survey Assistants (Chainmen) in our new Terrace branch. Party Chiefs: Responsible for the collection and management of data on legal and construction survey projects, conducting land surveys of designated sites for the purposes of determining accurate locations, elevations, areas, lines, and contours for property division, titles, and construction purposes on gas sites, pipelines, and construction sites. He or she will be responsible for all reporting processes related to this position. Land Survey Assistants: Responsible for assisting in conducting topographical land surveys of designated sites for the purposes of determining accurate locations, elevations, areas, lines, and contours for gas sites, pipelines, and construction sites as directed by the Party Chief using precision surveying equipment. Please email your resume to careers.fced@ugsc.ca Fax: 780-665-7025. Visit us online www.ugsc.ca


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Services

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

CLASSIFIEDS Merchandise for Sale

Wednesday,April April3,3,2013  2013 Terrace Standard Wednesday,

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Landscaping

Auctions

Misc. for Sale

Misc. for Sale

Misc. for Sale

Misc. for Sale

LAWN Mowing (Terrace area), Clean-ups, Trimming of shrubs/hedges, Exterior Home/Building soft washing/cleaning, Kill roof Moss, Pressure washing, Weed spraying Serving Terrace Kitimat 250-922-4534 Smithers 250-877-0965

ANTIQUES, FURNISHINGS & COLLECTIBLES AUCTION

AT LAST! An iron filter that works. IronEater! Fully patented Canada/U.S.A. Removes iron, hardness, smell, manganese. Since 1957. Visit our 29 innovative inventions; www.bigirondrilling.com or Phone 1-800-BIG-IRON.

Hay for sale $5/bale Barn Stored & u-haul. 1 (250)6352124

SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSaw mills.com/400OT 1-800-5666899 Ext:400OT.

STEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or see us online at: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

Pets & Livestock

Lessons/Training Spring Yoga Tuesdays & Thursdays 12 - 1pm Beginners and Drop-ins Welcome Atlantis Studio 4611 Lazelle Ave Call Naomi Gourlay at 250-641-5842 Spring Yoga Tuesdays & Thursdays 12 - 1pm (starting April 2nd) Beginners Welcome Atlantis Studio 4611 Lazelle Ave Call Naomi Gourlay at 250-641-5842

Tack/Supplies Professional Farrier Hot, Cold, Therapeutic. 28 Years Experience. Call Carmen Nyuli 250-641-5842

Merchandise for Sale

Auctions AUCTION SALE

Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 10 a.m. Decker Lake Hall. Large selection of good furniture. Large dining room set, patio furniture, antiques & collectable’s. Limited edition prints. Large commercial freezer. Snowblower, tools, tack, vehicles and equipment.

For more information: Richie at (250) 698-7377 or (250) 698-7351 Watch future papers for more details.

It takes 11 muscles to read this ad.

Don’t take your muscles for granted. Over 50,000 Canadians with muscular dystrophy take them very seriously. Learn more at muscle.ca

Sale conducted on behalf of several Estates

SALE 1 April 20, 2013 Saturday @ 10:00 am. Francois Lake Hall, Francois Lake, B.C. South of Burns Lake @ Intersection of Hwy 35 south & Colleymount Road. ANTIQUES: The sale will have some of the nicest antique furnishings ever offered by us at auction. We have a beautiful selection of large antique furnishings such as: Tables, sete, couch, sideboards, piano stool w/ bear claw feet, end tables, side tables, curio cabinets, grandfather clock, buffet, bedroom suites, dining room suites, marble top satin wood wash stand, antique oak table 6 chairs, buffet & hutch suite, misc. antique dining room chairs and other occasional chairs. This sale will have a beautiful selection of Victorian & Eastlake antiques and other beautiful antique Oak & Mahogany furnishings. ANTIQUE HORSE GEAR: There is a very large selection of antique horse gear that includes sleigh bells, spreaders, scotch tops, bridles, and hames etc. NATIVE & TRADITIONAL ART: Nice selection of native art including hides, drums, face masks, leather art & clothing, moccasins, paddles (exact items will be posted on the website). HOUSE HOLD & MISC COLLECTABLE’S: Very large selection of hockey, baseball & football cards, clocks, lamps, candelabra’s, brass, pewter, wrought iron collectable’s, plate ware, glassware, china & vases, sword, coal oil lamps, very old antique leather horse collectable, violin, banjo. Sale will include a few modern furnishings, deep freeze, fridge & furnishings. ANTIQUE TOOLS & MISC: Antique tools, antique survey transit, large antique brass gold scale in glass cabinet, antique bamboo fly rod. This Sale has a large & excellent selection of antiques & collectable’s. This is a partial listing, so look for future advertising as there are more items & consignments to come. Please view website for pictures of exact items and a list of all of our scheduled auctions. Consignments welcome! If you would like to consign any items contact Mikes Auction. Condition of Sale. Terms: Cash & cheque with identification, sorry no credit cards. Items are as is condition ~ not responsible for accidents. There will be a concession on Site. SALE 2 INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT & TOOL AUCTION May 25, 2013 Saturday @ 10:00 am. Topley Garage, Topley, B.C. Intersection of Hwy 16 & Hwy 118 to Granisle. SALE 3 ANTIQUES, FURNISHINGS & COLLECTIBLES AUCTION June 8th, Saturday @ 10:00 am. George Dawson Motor Inn, Banquet Room, Dawson Creek, B.C. Any question Please Contact: Mike Steinebach

@ (250) 694 - 3497 or Cell (250) 692-6107 or Egon Steinebach @ (250) 694-3319 or Cell (250) 570- 2055 E-Mail: mike@mikesauction.net & Website www.mikesauction.net

Heavy Duty Machinery A-STEEL SHIPPING DRY STORAGE CONTAINERS Used 20’40’45’53 in stock. SPECIAL 44’ x 40’ Container Shop w/steel trusses $13,800! Sets up in one day! Also Damaged 40’ $1950 Call Toll Free Also JD 544 & 644 wheel loaders JD 892D LC Excavator Ph. 1-866-528-7108 Free Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

CHOCOLATE LAB PUPS

for sale. 5 males and 3 females ready to go by May 12 $550 each. Call (250) 8474203 or (250) 643-0358.

HOME PHONE reconnect. Toll Free 1-866-287-1348 Cell Phone Accessories Catalogue Everyone Welcome To Shop Online at: www.homephonereconnect.ca HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper?

STEEL BUILDING - Blowout clearance sale! 20x22 $4,188. 25x26 $4,799. 30x34 $6,860. 32x44 $8,795. 40x50 $12,760. 47x74 $17,888. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422. or visit us online at: www.pioneersteel.ca

Misc. Wanted Local Coin Collector Buying Collections, Accumulations, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins + Coin Guy: 778-281-0030


CLASSIFIEDS Mobile Homes & Parks

Terrace Terrace Standard Standard  Wednesday, Wednesday,April April3,3,2013 2013

Real Estate For Sale By Owner

Family home on quiet west side of Prince Rupert. 3 min to ferry & container port. Clean & friendly neighbourhood. 4 bdrm split level, 1 full & 2-half baths. Laundry chute to large laundry room. Sunken living & family rooms. Large modern open kitchen. All appliances included. Double garage. Economical electric heat. natural gas avail. 3 yr old roof. For viewing contact 250-635-3733

Real Estate

Real Estate

For Sale By Owner

For Sale By Owner

FOR sale by owner..17acres 7min north of town on sealcoated road. Access off the Merkley road. Property overlooks the Dover Road beaver pond ..... creek and some saleable timber. Nice view of the mountains ... asking 129,500.00 call 1-250-6213445 ask for Jan

Must be seen to appreciate 3 Bdrm, 2 1/2 Baths, 3 level split, with Nat Gas Fire Place. All appliances incl. Living, Dinning & Kitchen have 9ft ceilings. Fenced back yard. Kitchen, eating & family room open concept. 3601 Cory Dr. Asking $365,900. Call 250-6355619.

Nicely updated 5 bdrm, 2 1/2 bath family home on bench. New high-efficiency furnace & hot water tank. Easy Maintenance landscaping. 4020 Anderson St. $305,000. Serious enquiries only. 250-638-1501

Lakeshore

We’re at the heart of things™

Real Estate

Celebrating 40 Years of Excellence

Commercial Properties for Lease

Offices, Warehouses and Retails Spaces 4635 Lakelse Ave - 2900 sq. ft. Prime location store front in the Safeway Mall 101-4816 Hwy 16 W - 2660 sq. ft. Visible and desirable, a prime retail location in Terrace

For Enquiries Please call: Hatha Callis (250) 635-7459

4-5002 Pohle Ave - 950 sq. ft Reception, offices and 3000 sq. ft. of warehouse 110 – 4818 Hwy 16 W – 1760 sq ft Double bay garage, warehouse or shop downtown

Other Areas AMERICA’S BEST Buy! 20 acres, only $99/mo! $0 down, no credit checks, money back guarantee. Owner financing. West Texas, beautiful mountain views! Free color brochure 1-800-755-8953. www.sunsetranches.com

Apt/Condo for Rent

Community Newspapers Real Estate

RETIRE IN Beautiful Southern BC, Brand New Park. Affordable Housing. COPPER RIDGE. Manufactured Home Park, New Home Sales. Keremeos, BC. Spec home on site to view. Please call 250-4627055. www.copperridge.ca

Scan to view all properties

For Sale Seasonal Cabin with 80 ft of lake frontage on Westside of Lakelse Lake. Asking $199,900. Property is not leased. Call 1-250-615-9181

3 bdrm appt avail June 1. 5 appliances incl washer/dryer. Quiet, walking distance to downtown Terrace. No pets/smokers/partiers. $775/m - util not incl. Adult oriented. If interested send inquiry to rental4terrace@gmail.com.

www.terracestandard.com A23 www.terracestandard.com A23

Real Estate Mobile Homes & Parks For Sale- 1990 23’ft 5th wheel trailer, very good condition. Hitch included. $4,000 OBO (250)624-6902 Unit No. 102 in Howe Creek Park For Sale on Kalum St. $2,500.00. Needs TLC. Must be moved from park. 250-6356224.

Rentals

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent For rent in Terrace, BC, quality accommodations of varying kinds. Ref. required. Phone 250-635-1799 or 250635-9333 now for best selection. Roomy Adult Oriented 2BDRM Furnished Apt. 10 min from Terrace. N/S, N/P, $950/ month includes Utilities, Laundry Room & Satellite TV. Ref’s Requ’d. 250-635-5061.

SHUSWAP COUNTRY ESTATES

Manufactured Homes by Moduline Industries Under $110.00/sq.ft. Retire with us...on time... on budget. In the beautiful Shuswap

250-835-2366

www.shuswapcountryestates.com

Summit Square

Apt/Condo for Rent

APARTMENTS 1 & 2 Bedroom Units

APARTMENT for rent. Available now. 2 bedrooms, beautiful oak cabinets, on southside. 3 appliances. No pets, no smoking, $875/ month. 1 - 2 year lease. 6387747, leave message. CLINTON MANOR - We are taking applications for a Bachelor unit $560 Hot water included. Adult oriented N/S,N/P 2 ref. required 250615-7543

ME Y FIND NT NEMPLOYMENT LO NT T T E P N E CLASSIFIEDS E EM E IN YM THE M M M O PL PLOY NT PLOY NT PLOY EM OYME EM OYME EM NT T L L ENT YME N P P E T EM YM PLO EM YM N O O E T L EEMN L M P P Y M M LO ENT E O YM T E P , T L re looking N N M EMEverything you for is P T T E E Y NEM YM ENOYM LO inMEthe classifieds! M P O L ENLTOY PL P EM PLOY M YMMP EM E M E E Estate LOEstate Real Real Real Estate

Mobile Homes & Pads

• Quiet & Clean • No Pets • Close to Wal-Mart • Laundry Facilities • Close to Schools & Hospital • On Bus Route • Security Entrance • On site Caretaker • Basketball, Volleyball & Racquetball Courts • 24hr Video Surveillance Now Available 2 bedroom furnished apartment

Ask for Monica Warner

Call: 250-635-4478

Commercial/ Industrial OFFICE for rent, #206-4557 Park Ave, Terrace. 1000 sq. ft., second floor, 2 bathrooms, Renovated 250-638-6070

Cottages / Cabins Furnished Cottage at Lakelse Lake, Highway side. Suitable for 1 or 2 people. Ref Required. No pets or partiers. Non smoking. 250-798-2267

Mobile Homes & Pads Mobile home for rent ($1000/mth) or for sale in Thornhill call (250)638-1885

Real Estate

Modular Homes Newer 2bdrm modular home in quiet adult oriented park in Thornhill. 5 appliances. $875/mo Phone Rob 250-6355652

Homes for Rent 2 Bedroom, fully furnished house. Downtown, clean and quiet. All included; $1500 250-975-0095 3 BRD, RANCHER f/s,w/d $1,200.00 mo Close to town, n/s 250-638-8435 or 250-6359040 damage deposit, Refs. req. Avail Immediately. 4 bdrm house at 3330 River Drive. N/S, N/P $1,200, ref. req. First & last month’s rent + Dep. 1 yr lease 250-638-8639.

Transportation

Suites, Lower 2BDRM Suite in executive home on southside. Avail. MAY 1ST $1000/mo. Incl. hot water, W/D, F/S, satellite, wireless internet. N/S, N/P, Enquire-hkholdings@hotmail.com

Townhouses PINE CREST 3 Bdrm. 2 Level T/H 1 ½ bath No pets Call Jenn 622-4304 TOWNHOMES in KITIMAT 3 bdrm, 1 ½ bath, carport Start $700. Sorry no Pets. Call Greg 639-0110

200-4665 LAZELLE AVE. (ABOVE PIZZA HUT)

250-635-9184 1-888-988-9184

www.terracerealestatecompany.com

! SOLD

STING! NEW LI

STING! NEW LI

LOT #7 EDGEWOOD DRIVE

MLS

2 acre lot w/mountain views, located in Jack pine flats on a dead end road

STING! NEW LI

3225 MUNROE STREET

$259,500 MLS

4 bedroom, 2 bath rancher with full basement, one block from downtown and close to schools and amenities. New roof, front window and a great family home.

5006 HALLIWELL AVENUE

#22 – 4832 LAZELLE AVE.

3 bedroom +office/den/guest room, 2 storey home on landscaped 1.613 acres with 28’ x 36’ shop. Classy, well maintained and located in town.

- great downtown location - 2 bedrooms - 2 baths - fireplace - balcony - just move in and enjoy

$575,000 MLS

$169,900 MLS

4927 SCOTT AVENUE

$272,000 MLS

5 bdrm, 2 bth split entry home with full garage, fenced yard and large patio plus newer roof, furnace, windows, siding, paint and more.

- great family home on Bench - 2 bedrooms up & 2 down - 2 baths - fireplace - numerous upgrades done

4925 GAIR AVE.

3620 ASPEN AVE.

$259,500 MLS

- 1840 sq. ft. of living area - 3 bedrooms - 2 1/2 baths - hardwood floors - garage - adjacent to parkland

GE! ACREA 5580 BARNES RD

5318 MOUNTAIN VISTA

$259,500 MLS

$266,500 MLS

- 1148 sq. ft. - full basement - 4 bedrooms - new sundeck - new furnace - rec room - close to Uplands Elementary

#25-3624 KALUM ST

$28,000 MLS

- 3 Bedroom Mobile Home with a view

SHANNON MCALLISTER cell: 250-615-8993

shannon@ Owner/Managing Broker terracerealestatecompany.com

$549,900 MLS

- A horse lovers dream! 10 acres, Riding Ring, 30x30 Barn, Heated Tack Room

RICE! NEW P 6194 KILBY RD

$139,900 MLS

3976 WALKER ST

$53,000 MLS

- Cozy 2 Bedroom Home w - 3 Bedroom Fixer Upper SpeFull Basement, 2 Shops, 3/4 cial, Cash Buyers Only acre lot

BUILDING LOTS

L! ATIONA E R C E R

3511 KALUM ST

COMMUNITY DONATIONS:

HAPPY GANG CENTRE on behalf of our client Tracy Hamilton, sale of 2830 Roseland Avenue TERRACE ANIMAL SHELTER on behalf of our client Lisa Smeysters, sale of 4944 Halliwell Avenue TERRACE ANIMAL SHELTER on behalf of our client Ryan Neal, sale of 3674 Hawthorne Avenue

TOLL FREE

- EXCELLENT LOCATION TO BUILD RENTAL PROPERTY 4716 HALLIWELL AVE.

4001 TEMPLE ST.

- 2000 sq. ft. of living area - 3 bedrooms - 2 fireplaces - new roof - detached workshop - close to park & tennis courts

- custom built view home - 4 bedrooms - 4 1/2 baths - sunroom - family room - home office - hardwood floors

$277,900 MLS

$739,000 MLS

3513 KALUM ST

- R2 ZONING, ADJACENT LOT ALSO AVAILABLE

909 ROBIN RD

$44,900 MLS

Skeena River Waterfront, Fishing Season is Just around the corner!

4831 POHLE AVE VERY PRIVATE 1/2 ACRE LOT

JIM DUFFY

DARREN BEAULIEU

jimduffy@telus.net

darren@ terracerealestatecompany.com

cell: 250-615-6279

cell: 250-615-1350


CLASSIFIEDS

A24  www.terracestandard.com www.terracestandard.com A24

Wednesday, Wednesday,April April3,3,2013  2013 Terrace Standard

COAST MOUNTAINS 4624 MCCONNELL AVE. $98,000 MLS

• Residential Lot • Borders Parkland • Resale Location KELLY BULLEID

• Zoned R5 Multi-family • 139 X 139 - corner lot • For developer or investor MARION OLSON

4418 GREIG $124,900 MLS

• Fresh Paint, Fenced Yard • Starter or Investment • 2 bdr appliances included www.rickmcdaniel.ca

1448 MAPLE ST $164,900 MLS

#7-4714 DAVIS AVE. $134,000 MLS • 3 bedroom townhouse • freshly painted and upgraded • with in a few blocks to downtown LAURIE FORBES

2-5102 JOLLIFFE AVE $299,900 MLS

• 1/2 duplex, 3 bedroom, home warrantee • executive adult living, hardware floors • electric furnace and heat pump, no stairs VANCE HADLEY

OFFER PENDING!

3902 HATTON $359,900 MLS

• 3100 sq. ft office/retail space • excellent exposure, lots of walk by traffic • FOR SALE or LEASE JOHN/SHEILA

• 3 bdrm 3 bth Executive Home • Large Yard backs on to green space • Great Neighborhood www.rickmcdaniel.ca

1758 WESTSIDE DRIVE $389,900 MLS

4739 HAMER $396,500 MLS

john evans

sheila love

Cell:250.638.6911 sheilalove@remax.net

vance hadley

Cell:250.631.3100 vancehadley@remax.net

K

RED

UCE

D!

1412 MEEK RD. $109,900 MLS

#127-4529 STRAUME $99,000 MLS

• 1336 Sq. Ft.- Full Basement • 3 Bdrms. 2 Full Baths • Pool Table & Hot Tub Included RUSTY LJUNGH

• 4 Bedroom 1.5 bath townhouse • Move in condition • WHY pay rent ? Call NOW DAVE MATERI PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORP

4450 LITTLE AVE.$139,900 MLS

• R5 Multi-Family Zoned • Lot Size 140Ft. X 200 • Within Walking Distance To Town RUSTY LJUNGH

2706 MOLITOR $144,900 MLS

4518 OLSON AVE $153,000 MLS

• Large Yard close to schools • Three bedroom • Finished Basement www.rickmcdaniel.ca

• 4 Bedrooms / 2 Baths • Vinyl siding, Electric heat Close to schools/shopping MARION OLSON

220 SOCKEYE $204,900 MLS

4909 GAIR $254,900 MLS

• 3/4 bedrooms • 2 acres • mountain view HANS STACH

• Completely remodelled throughout • New Kitchen,New Bathrooms • Immaculate inside SUZANNE GLEASON

3511 GORDON DR. $319,900 MLS

4809 TUCK AVE. $324,500 MLS

4712 STRAUME $259,900 MLS

• 3 bedrooms up with New kitchen • New roof and deck out back 1 bedroom suite and much moreDAVE MATERI PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORP

T

LIS

2421 KROYER $319,900 MLS

• 3 bedroom home, 100 ft of beach • European design, Genaire counter top • quiet, very private, includes dock VANCE HADLEY

!

GA

AN ITW

! ING

• Many upgrades great colors • Partly treed, over 2 acres 5 bdrm, 2 bth www.rickmcdaniel.ca

4614 LAZELLE AVE - $379,900 MLS

www.remax-terrace.bc.ca

D

• Maintained and Upgraded • Three bedroom rancher • Close to schools www.rickmcdaniel.ca NEW

G!

SOL

4627 WEBER $169,900 MLS

• Wood Stove • Large 70x227ft Lot • 14x22 Detached Shop KELLY BULLEID

email: remax.terrace@telus.net

OFFER PENDING!

D L O S

D L O S

Cell:250.638.7001 johnevans@remax.net

#39-3624 KALUM ST. $98,500 MLS

• Spacious mobile with extended main living • Bright interior, large kitchen with island • Sunken livingroom, private patio LAURIE FORBES

D SOL

G!

TIN

LIS NEW

3320 KENNEY ST. $127,900 MLS

250.638.1400

TIN

LIS NEW

• Residential lot on quiet street • 70 X 267 - almost half an acre • Close to schools & recreation MARION OLSON

4831 DAIRY AVE $45,000 MLS

4650 Lakelse Avenue

• 5/6 bedrooms • 100 x 122 lot • Horseshoe location HANS STACH

marion olson

Cell:250.631.3101 m.olson@remax.net

suzanne gleason Cell:250.615.2155

suzannegleason@remax.net

• Attractive family offering 4 bdrms, 3 bthrms • above ground bsmnt provides natural light • Lots of oak features, Upscale neighborhood LAURIE FORBES

3573 LARCH $342,000 MLS

• Perfect setup if sharing a home, • offering 6 bdrms, 3 bthrms, 3 bedrm suite well located in the Horsehoe, LAURIE FORBES

• Side by side Duplex Near golf course • Roof,windows,siding,furnaces replaced • Rental income or 1/2 mortgage helper DAVE MATERI

3806 ROWLAND $379,900 MLS

3611 KALUM STREET $389,000 MLS

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORP

D

SOL

3544/46 DOGWOOD $369,900 MLS • positive return duplex, excellent cond. • 2-3 bedrooms units, all appliances. • Strata titled, could sell sep. $199,900 VANCE HADLEY

SUNRIDGE - $399,900 MLS

• stunning view, patio & sundeck • 5 bdrms, 3 bath, walk out basement • vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors JOHN/SHEILA

kelly bulleid

Cell:250.615.8688 kellybulleid@remax.net

hans stach

Cell:250.615.6200 hansstach@remax.net

• Duplex with 2 basement suites • New roof just completed Excellent rental income propertyDAVE MATERI

• Top Condition Home • Custom Updates Throughout • Efficient Pellet Stove KELLY BULLEID

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORP

1577 KENWORTH ST - $450,000 MLS • 2 bay shop with office/retail space • 2.43 acres, fenced w/outbuildings • caretaker suite, Zoned Industrial JOHN/SHEILA

laurie forbes

Cell:250.615.7782 lforbes@remax.net

tashiana veld

Cell:250.635.0223 tashveld@remax.net

LAKELSE LAKE - $559,000 MLS

• stunning year round home, 15’ ceilings • wall to wall windows, 3 bdrms, 1 bath • detached garage, beautiful beach JOHN/SHEILA

rick mcDaniel PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORP

Cell:250.615.1558 rickmcdaniel@remax.net

dave materi

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORP

Cell:250.615.7225 davemateri@remax.net

rusty ljungh

Cell:250.638.2827 rustyl@remax.net


CLASSIFIEDS

Terrace Terrace Standard Standard  Wednesday, Wednesday,April April3,3,2013 2013

SEE THE ALL NEW M8000 & M9000 PROCLIMB MOUNTAIN SLEDS

www.terracestandard.com A25 www.terracestandard.com A25

PRESEASON YOUR 2014 ARCTIC CATÂŽ SNOWMOBILE AND GET: 18 lbs

Lighter

BEST BUY IS NOW. hurry! sale ends april 20th

PLUS

$500 CAT CASHTM

4921 Keith Ave., Terrace BC • Tel. 250-635-3478 • Fax 250-635-5050 “YOUR RECREATION SPECIALISTâ€?

AND

TO CAT’S PRIDE CLUB 1-YEAR FREE MEMBERSHIP

TM

*see dealers for details

Cars - Domestic

Commercial Vehicles WILL haul away your old vehicle for free. call DON 250-6388244

Recreational/Sale

KEN’S MARINE 2009 TOHATSU 6 HP LONG

4 STROKE OUTBOARD

$899.00 2004

POLARIS

SPORTSMAN 600

$3,499.00

2012 ARCTIC CAT M-8 162� SNOPRO

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

Creditors and others having claims against the estate of PETER HERBERT HUGHAN, also known as HERB HUGHAN, deceased, are hereby notified under section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the undersigned Executor at #200-4630 Lazelle Avenue, Terrace, B.C., V8G 1S6 on or before May 15, 2013, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard only to the claims that have then been received. NORMAN DAVID HAYDUK, Executor. Warner Bandstra Brown, Solicitors.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

Cars - Sports & Imports

FWD, 8 pass., rear power sliding doors, A/C, C/C traction control 17,951 kms,

$28,995

#TMT186

2007 Toyota RAV4 Limited, Leather, Heated Seats, Moonroof, CD/MP3, Auto, P/W, P/L, 80,565 kms

#2813AA #4192A

$17,995

2009 Hyundai Elantra 4 dr., AM/FM/CD/MP3, P/W, Keyless Entry, Heated Seats, A/C, 64,850 kms

$12,795

#T347A

TTR230 DIRT BIKE

WEEKLY SPECIAL

NORTEX ICE ROCK SNOW GEAR

20% OFF 4946 Greig Ave.

Ph: 635-2909 www.kensmarine.ca

TAKE NOTICE THAT application has been made to amend Section 7.4.2.2 of Zoning Bylaw No. 1431-1995. THE SUBJECT LAND: The application affects the land located at 4813 Lazelle Avenue and 4812 Highway 16, within the City of Terrace, shown hatched on the accompanying map and described as: Lot 14, District Lot 362, Range 5, Coast District, Plan 1026 and Lot F, District Lot 362, Range 5, Coast District, Plan 1919

,WWDNHV PXVFOHV WRUHDG WKLVDG

Cars - Sports & Imports

$4,999.00 $2,500.00

CITY OF TERRACE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ZONING BYLAW AMENDMENT

THIS WEEKS SPECIALS 2011 Toyota Sienna

RACE ATV

2007 YAMAHA

Legal Notices

HELEN RUTH JEPSEN and SUSAN MARGARET JEPSEN, Executors. Warner Bandstra Brown, Solicitors.

20% OFF

2009 Kawy KFX450R

Legal Notices

Creditors and others having claims against the estate of MARY DOROTHEA JEPSEN, deceased, are hereby notified pursuant to section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the undersigned Executors at #200-4630 Lazelle Avenue, Terrace, B.C., VSG 1S6 on or before May 17, 2013, after which date the Executors will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard only to the claims that have then been received.

$8,999.00 KLIM SNOW GEAR

PLUS

2-YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY

NEID ENTERPRISES LTD.

2005 Buick Alura 3925 Old Lakelse Lake Dr. Asking $2,500. Automatic. full power. 250-635-8225

5.99% FINANCING FOR 60 MONTHS

4912 Highway 16 West, Terrace, BC V8G 1L8

250-635-6558 or 1-800-313-6558 DL#5957

www.terracetoyota.ca

KYLE GONZALEZ

THE INTENT: To Amend Section 7.4.2.2 by including the following: .2 Despite the provisions of this Part, the following provisions shall apply to: .5 Lot 14, District Lot 362, Range 5, Coast District, Plan 1026 and Lot F, District Lot 362, Range 5, Coast District, Plan 1919 .1 In addition to the uses described in 7.4.2.1 the following uses shall be permitted: .2 apartment 17 units/hectare (6 units/acre) BYLAW INSPECTION: THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT BYLAW AND RELEVANT BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS MAY BE INSPECTED in the reception area at the City of Terrace Public Works Building at 5003 Graham Avenue, Terrace, B.C., between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day from Wednesday, March 27, 2013 to Monday, April 8, 2013, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and Statutory Holidays. For enquiries concerning this application contact David Block, Director of Development Services at 250-615-4000. PUBLIC HEARING DETAILS: Any persons wishing to voice their opinions regarding this application may do so in writing, and/or in person, AT THE PUBLIC HEARING TO BE HELD IN THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL CHAMBERS, AT 7:00 P.M. ON MONDAY, APRIL 8, 2013. THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, R.S.B.C., 1996, AND AMENDMENTS THERETO.

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A26  www.terracestandard.com

SPORTS

Wednesday, April 3, 2013  Terrace Standard

TERRACE STANDARD

ANNA KILLEN

(250) 638-7283

Cage fighting to take hold here Fight nights have happened in Terrace before – but none quite like the tournament taking place here on April 13. Because this upcoming amateur fight night, Cage Fighting Force One, means Terrace sports fans get to lay eyes on “the cage” in our local arena – a professional-grade fight cage not unlike those used in big, televised events, except this one's a hexagon, not an octagon. Athletes from all over the northwest, some as far away as Vancouver and Fort St. John, and at least half of the card hailing from the Terrace-area will be grappling it out in front of a packed Sportsplex, complete with a weigh-in the night before, ring girls, and ringside seating. It's the beginning of fight coach and promoter (we could actually refer to him as Terrace's Don King) Tony Rutledge's plan to build up a hub of amateur fighters here in the northwest. He and his national fighting federation, Cage Fighting Force, are set to start hosting events all over the area – Terrace, Kitimat, Smithers, Rupert to start – eventually moving to the national stage. “We're hoping we'll be up to Cage Fighting Force 100 by the next four or five years,” said Rutledge. By hosting a big tournament every few months, they’ll be showcasing local athletes in both mixed-martial arts (MMA) and kickboxing, while drawing more new athletes to those clubs. This means Cage Fighting Force will have a bigger pool of athletes to draw from to showcase to the professional league. “All and all, we're hoping that a UFC prospect comes out of the Terrace area,” he said. “A lot of people don't get the opportunity to take this journey – promoters like myself, I'm the only one outside of Prince George, and I've got Northern British Columbia pretty much to myself as an amateur promoter.” And if these athletes don't get showcased, they won't get bigger opportunities. “You can go to a thousand tournaments and be a great fighter, but if nobody knows

Anna Killen PHOTO

Coach and fight promoter Tony Rutledge wants YOU to get into the cage. about you...,” he said. “Now you can come onto one of our cards and thousands and thousands of people will see you and know about you and that's how you get recognized for the pro-league.” Rutledge has been involved in the industry since the very beginning – two of his fighters were on the card at the first Canadian-sanctioned event, way back in 1997 when they called the sport “shootboxing.” Since then, it's easily grown into one of

Canada's most-watched sports, and Rutledge's experience, as both a trainer and a promoter, has him confident he knows how to foster its growth in the area and get northwest athletes noticed across Canada. For fighters, solid training is key, he says. Sometimes difficult for athletes who also work full-time, physically demanding jobs – especially when you take into consideration the amount of rest time an athlete needs after a tournament.

And Terrace athletes will have a slight advantage going into these events simply because the cage that they'll be fighting in is right here, at Rutledge's dojo in Thornhill. “I've got the only cage outside of – holy mackerel – probably Vancouver,” he said. “I use it all of the time. Not everybody has a cage to train in – a lot of the athletes that come to these things have never been in a cage before, they train in a ring.” But cage training isn't just for athletes looking to compete in front of a crowd – Rutledge also does one-on-one work outs for those serious about getting in shape. “A lot of people are intimidated by the concept of working out in a cage,” he said. “But once you get in there, it's like being in your living room.” He says from a self-defence standpoint, it makes sense to train in a cage because if you need to fend off an attacker, it will more often than not be in an enclosed space. And Rutledge confronts the stigma that these fights are dangerous and masochistic head on – first, the event is all-ages without alcohol to encourage more women and kids. He also wants to encourage females to try the sport, noting there is a solid group of female fighters he's been training from New Aiyansh. “There are a lot training, but not many fighting,” he said. And he stresses they're serious about proper training for their fighters. “We don't just take people off the streets, some of these guys have trained for up to two years before they decide to get into the cage,” he said. “We're actually doing the opposite – we're taking these troubled kids and bringing them off the streets and teaching them respect, discipline and then letting them showcase themselves through our cage and showing them the right way to do it – there's a right way and a wrong way of course.” Cage Fighting Force One is April 13 at the Terrace Sportsplex. Doors at 6 p.m.

Peewees fall short of medal

Anna Killen PHOTO

■■ Maxed out Here’s Soccer coach Nick Kollias with some of the young athletes who attended his indoor soccer camp over spring break, where they focussed on basic skills and techniques and made some new friends. The camp was completely full with a waitlist to boot, said Kollias.

The Terrace Peewee Reps fell just short of a medal at Tier 3 provincial championships in Creston, falling 6-4 to Arbutus in the bronze medal game. Terrace beat Arbutus 6-3 early on in the tournament, but couldn't get past their goalie in the medal match. Shots on goal favoured Terrace 28-24. Terrace opened the scoring in the first period at 14:38, adding another goal two minutes later. Arbutus replied at 7:49 and the period ended with Terrace leading 2-1. But Arbutus tied the game at 19:45 of the second period and Terrace answered near the end of the period to take a 3-2 lead into the final frame. Arbutus came out strong in the final period and scored two goals near the middle of the period to take the lead. Terrace pulled its goaltender in favour of an extra attacker but Arbutus scored into the empty net to seal the victory. The young Terrace Peewees had unexpected success this season and went undefeated at zones to win the northwest zone championships. The provincial title went to Dawson Creek, who won gold in a dominating 14-1 final against Quesnel.


SPORTS

Terrace Standard  Wednesday, April 3, 2013

www.terracestandard.com A27

High scores for ringette players Three Terrace ringette players came home with gold from Ringette Division B Provincials in Surrey two weekends ago. Rory Bird, Aimee Qualizza, and Kristen Tooms played for Prince George’s U18+ team and were a definitive force in the team’s gold medal win. And the three athletes weren’t the only players from Terrace to attend ringette provincials – Jennifer Dahl, Peter Nicholson, and Hannah Resch played for Prince George U16. The Terrace players joined Prince George teams because Terrace didn’t have enough players to make up teams in those divisions – but ringette organizers are hoping that will change in the future as more young players, both girls and boys, get into the fast-growing sport. And the Terrace players were a strong force on each team. In the U18+ division, Terrace players scored more than half of the team’s goals throughout the entire tournament – 24 goals out of the total 42, with Rory Bird scoring 14 of those goals and assisting on six. And in the Under 16 division, Terrace players again scored over half of the goals – 15 goals out of the total 26, with Peter Nicholson scoring 10 and assisting on three. Of the other Terrace players, Aimee Qualizza scored five goals and assisted on 12, Kristen Tooms scored five goals and assisted on seven, and Jennifer Dahl scored five and assisted on three. And while the U18+ went on to win gold, the U16 was not successful enough to make it into the medal finals. Terrace’s ringette organizers are pushing for the northwest zone’s ringette squad to come out with a strong force for next year’s BC Winter Games. “It’s not just a game for girls; it’s a game for anyone who enjoys a fast-paced competitive sport,” said organizer Erika Nicholson, noting it is a sport that breeds incredibly strong, fast skaters. “Tryouts will start in the fall for those born in 1999, 2000, or 2001. Terrace has some great athletes, why not give ringette a try.”

W

e were approaching Prince George from the south. Our intention was to continue on, as always, to Vanderhoof, for groceries, then to Fraser Lake, and from there to Francois Lake and the Stellako Lodge, where we customarily rent a cabin and watch trout rising in the river below us until there are so many rainbows breaking the surface that I’m compelled to slip into my waders, don my vest, and venture forth hoping to hook the largest of them. Our daughter was working at the pool and Pizza Hut in Fort St. John that summer. As we cruised along the approach to PG, I sensed that Karen was getting restive.  We don’t have to drive straight through, I said. If you want, we can go North.  Before she said anything, her look made me realize this was our only course.  Soon we were winding through the Pine Pass toward Peace River country. I’d been in Fort St. John a decade earlier, at a time when the teachers there were on strike. The BCTF had flown me in to offer the troops moral support.  My recollections were of a prairie town, a small, bucolic place that was as much Alberta as it was B.C. Things had changed, the Patch had invaded the Prairie. The effect of short-term money –  the difference between gold rushes and oil  booms being negligible – was palpable.  The old signs opposing the flooding

JOSH MASSEY PHOTO

Here are members of the Terrace Kermodes, flanked by coach Mario Desjardins on the left and Terrace Mayor Dave Pernarowski on the right.

Local city council honours Terrace provincial champs By JOSH MASSEY CITY council gave a warm welcome to Terrace’s Bantam Rep Girls – who can now be referred to as provincial hockey champs – at last Monday’s meeting at city hall. The bright jerseys of the gold medal winning Terrace Kermodes lit up the council chambers as they received an ovation from members of council and accompanying fans.

The team returned recently from Vernon, and mayor David Pernarowski greeted them at the front of the chambers and congratulated them on their stunning victory at the BC Bantam A Championship held there. “You act as ambassadors for the city. Bringing back gold draws attention to the city and we thank you for that,” Pernarowski said. Coach Mario Desjardins gave a short speech about their progress over

of the beautiful valley pushing large appliances of the Peace were still and used motor vehicles standing off precipices is simply How beautiful, was too strong to resist. it? we wondered. In anThe people around swer to the question we here are such pigs, was were given directions to my gut thought, before I a viewpoint that would stopped myself short. afford us a premium Clearly, the people view of the gorgeous that tossed this trash expanse. In those days made up a small minoribefore Google Earth, ty of the area’s populace we followed the verbal – or at least that’s the directions to our best hope. And, how different recollection and found was this from Terrace SKEENA ANGLER ourselves at road’s end, where I’ve seen refrigROB BROWN on the brink of a great erators and deep freezers expanse where the land thrown over the banks of gave way,  fell away, the lower Copper River, to a great cavernous burned car bodies beside view of a great gaping the logging roads on all expanse, a geologically our river valleys?  unique chunk of unrealestate that the powWhen I hike along the Skeena below er mongers had for years been striving to Braun’s Island, I find old cars buried in the turn into a massive reservoir. It would and river channel and broken chunks of paveshould have been breathtaking. But, it was ment dumped over the bank in a feeble atand it wasn’t – our attention distracted by tempt at flood control. At Dutch Valley the the appliance graveyard at our feet.  banks of the Kalum are strewn with plasImmediately below us, between us and tic chairs, old propane tanks, and chunks the Peace, was an armada of derelict freez- of concrete, all of it in the river’s riparian ers, old stoves, fridges, washers, and a few zone, an area that is part of the commons rusted car cadavers. There probably wasn’t and protected by the Federal Fisheries Act a more conspicuous locale for disposing of because such real estate is almost always waste, but for some scofflaws, the lure of prime wildlife habitat.

Talking trash

the three years he has worked with the team, and recounted the thrilling finish to the 2-1 final game against the North Shore Avalanche on March 20. “We came together not just as a team but as a family,” said Desjardins. The team lost to North Shore earlier in the tournament, but studied their play over the week to eventually work out a plan to beat them – which the team executed perfectly, said Desjardins.

Next to this mess is a field whose owner has built a storage facility that houses a hundred or so recreational units in spite of provincial laws protecting agricultural land from such development. Half a kilometre upstream of the RV barn a road running to the river is strewn with appliances, sofas, rusting bikes, and all kinds of non-degradable plastic detritus. All of this unsightly trash, makeshift rip-rap, and the unsightly storage facility is set in one of the most beautiful parts of the valley, which makes it even more disturbing.  I can’t understand why the regional district and the provincial authorities have allowed the building of the storage facility. The federal government and the Department of Fisheries needs to determine who is responsible for the makeshift diking and take appropriate action to have the area next to it cleaned up.  Meanwhile the illegal dumping could be thwarted by incentives to recycle. Scrap metal and parts are worth money. Fortunes have been made buying and selling the stuff. People need to know where to take old appliances and know they will get paid something for them. This initiative could  and should be backed by disincentives to dumping in the form of steep fines, and jail time if necessary.  Leaving such eyesores unattended to shames us all. 


race Standard - April 14, 2010

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A28 www.terracestandard.com

2953.13.MMW.2C.indd 1

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2013-03-28 4:23 PM

Terrace Standard, April 03, 2013  

April 03, 2013 edition of the Terrace Standard