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VALLEY ECHO T he

Wednesday, October 31,2013 2012 Wednesday, March 6,

Vol. 57 56 Issue Issue 40 Vol. 10

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Queen gives nod to Verge for Youth founder Pg A4

Rockies battle, but Ghostriders prevail Pg A14

No cause yet determined in Panorama condo blaze

MaxWell Realty Invermere

Fire in the mountains

KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN The Valley Echo

After day and a half of digging through the charred remains of Panorama Mountain Village's 1000 Peaks Lodge, Columbia Valley Fire & Rescue and the B.C. Safety Authority have produced no leads as to the cause of the Wednesday, February 27th blaze. “Due to the extreme heat in the area of origin, vital evidence was completely destroyed, giving investigators no option other than to deem the cause undetermined,” Fire Chief Jim Miller states in a Regional District of East Kootenay press release. “We have identified where the fire started and although the cause is undetermined, we can confirm that foul-play and human-related activities were not factors in the fire.” The fire, which ripped through the top two PHIL MARSHALL PHOTO floors of the lodge early Wednesday mornPanorama Mountain Village's 1,000 Peaks Lodge became a fi ery inferno in the early hours of Wednesday, February 27, in a blaze where foul play ing, displaced dozens of residents staying at has now been ruled out as the possible cause. In addition to alerting building residents of the fi re, Phil Marshall found time to take this photo. the lodge, including seven members of the Rabbit Hill Ski Steam who were preparing for the U16 CanAm Western Championship. Alnorth stairwell and was joined by another good sa- tinguisher to put the fire out on one side of the deck though visitors were left temporarily homeless by the maritan, Cam Cole. before it ran dry.” blaze, the inferno could have had much more drastic The duo loudly banged on each door they could He returned to the kitchen and filled a garbage can consequences if it were not for the efforts of bystand- find to warn resident of the quickly escalating with water to fight the blaze. Realizing that the fire ers, including Panorama resident, Phil Marshall. inferno. was out of control, Mr. Marshall performed a hand In a statement given to authorities, Mr. Marshall, “Once I had alerted each of the condos, I returned search of the bedrooms and found them empty. who owns the Earl Grey Lodge and restaurant with to the penthouse and kicked the door in, being He quickly fled the building, but not without sufhis wife Clare, noticed flames erupting from the aware that there may have been a flash back,” Mr. fering from prolonged smoke inhalation, which penthouse condo of the 1000 Peaks Lodge while Marshall stated in official testimonial. resulted in an evening of sickness and difficulty walking along Summit Drive and chatting with a The sprinklers on the top floor were working, but breathing. friend, Jason Smith, at around 1 a.m. Mr. Smith, who the area was filled with smoke. Although his actions were crucial in warning was carrying a fire department radio at the time, “I grabbed a towel from the kitchen and wet it to visitors of the blaze, Mr. Marshall remains modest immediately called in the blaze. The restauranteur put over my face before proceeding through the about his role in rescue efforts and would rather not grabbed a fire extinguisher from his business and lounge to the deck because the glass door to the be singled out. gained access to the 1,000 Peaks Lodge through the deck had broken and I was able to use the fire ex“A lot of people did a great job that night,” he added.

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Wolf snare program halted in Columbia Valley after photographer speaks out

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the RDEK is on the hunt for the 2013 Electoral Area Volunteers of the Year

Deadline is Monday, March 25th! Nomination forms are now available at our Cranbrook & Columbia Valley RDEK offices and on our website.

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Province shelves program, but remains ready to re-deploy if predator conflicts flare up KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN The Valley Echo

The efforts of a local nature photographer, whose keen eye behind the lens and beyond helped him discover 18 wolf snare traps located six kilometres from his Columbia Lake home, have played a role in halting a provincial government snare trapping program. As of Thursday, February 28, the Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resource Operations program has been curtailed, but will begin again if conflicts between cattle and wolves arise. “I am not just happy about the fact that we have saved a few wolves, which is great, but at the same time we have saved a lot of other wildlife and even dogs in the area,” said Brad Hill. “The choice of traps are certainly questionable, potentially on legal grounds, but there is also no doubt that these traps cause

KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN The Valley Echo

While diversity in our community is often celebrated, nowhere is it found more abundant than in the natural world that surrounds the Columbia Valley. With the help of a new interactive mapping

Columbia Valley Figure Skating Club

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59

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CONTINUES TO 'SNARE PROGRAM' ON PAGE A13

Atlas takes wild look at diversity

Eddie Mountain Memorial Arena

$

pain and suffering even if they work perfectly, which they often don't.” The snare program was started on February 8 after 14 verified incidents of cattle killed by wolves while grazing on crown land were reported between the spring and fall of 2012 by a local rancher, Hill said. The traps, which were spread out around the Dutch Creek, Lake Windermere and Columbia Lake area, were baited with road-killed elk and mule deer. Hill learned of traps on the northern end of Columbia Lake after he bumped into a neighbour who had reported observing baited snares in the area. Fearing for the safety of his dog, Hill discovered the location of the traps for himself and started an online petition to halt the program, which has now received more than 2,000 signatures. Although the traps represent a moral concern for Hill, he feels that the campaign may also be on shaky legal grounds. “This is a much bigger story than a few local snares,” he said. “Theses snares are in direct violation of an international agreement on humane trapping standards that Canada is signatory to.”

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system known as the Columbia River Basin Biodiversity Atlas, citizen scientists can participate and explore a natural world with the omniscience of mother nature herself. “The Biodiversity Atlas works by bringing together, in a single Internet portal, all the technical information we can find on biodiversity in the region, and presenting it in way that is easy to use and understand,” said project coordinator Ian Parfitt. “Profiles for 42 species have been prepared — each has a beautiful picture, and links to reports from research, monitoring projects and interactive web maps.” The atlas includes layers on a map of the Columbia Basin. Citizen scientists can load up different layers that represent anything from endangered species to logging tenures. Each layer shows the impact between species and events. “If you are in Invermere and you are curious about the presence of grizzly bears downtown and how logging had impacted their prevalence, you can see both layers at once on a map,” said Andrew Creighton, communications representative for the project. CONTINUES TO 'CITIZEN SCIENTISTS' ON PAGE A3

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Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

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Page Three

Have a news tip? editor@invermerevalleyecho.com or 250-342-9216

Public composting considered DAN WALTON reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com

While surveys have indicated that Invermere residents are in favour of a district-wide composting program, the local population has made it clear that a tax increase to pay for it would not be well-received. The Community Composting Feasibility Analysis, a report conducted by Groundswell Network Society, is taking aim at an ideal solution to reduce Invermere's wastefulness and hopefully generate revenue for the community. "At Groundswell, what we want to see, is better management of our waste as a community and potentially turn it from what is currently a cost, at least into a revenue-neutral or revenue-positive kind of enterprise where we can treat our waste and even create a job for someone managing a

facility like that right here in our own community,” said Groundswell Project Leader Bill Swan in conversation with The Echo. Groundswell is talking with the District of Invermere, as well as interested partners, in efforts to “determine if a workable business model can be developed that will advance community and regional level composting.” Swan was at the Invermere council meeting on Tuesday, February 26 to discuss Groundswell's Community Composting Feasibility Analysis and request an in-depth business meeting about the project. Council approved the request and will hold a committee of the whole meeting in March. To make a composting program feasible would coincide with Groundswell's mission statement: to promote sustainability in the Columbia Valley by fostering innovative projects that

Echo Index Content

encourage health for people, the environment and the economy. Groundswell Network Society has three main focuses, Swan explained: enticing social enterprise to succeed, encouraging economic viability on a sustainable level for the community (youth training and employment and long term employment is of strong interest), and ensuring that projects are fulfilled environmentally. "Composting can kind of bring those three things together in one package," Swan said. Enterprising Non-Profits of B.C. and the Invermere supported the Feasibility Analysis, and are now encouraging the business planning phase to begin. The Community Composting Feasibility Analysis was prompted by responses to the 2011 Imagine Invermere plan, where residents indicated their desire to implement a public composting program.

Opinion.............................................A6-A7 Community Calendar.............................A9 Sports.............................................A14-A16 Brain Games..........................................A18 Build Your Wealth.................................A20 Classifieds.....................................A21-A22 Remember When?................................A17 Serving the Valley.................................A23

Columns MP David Wilks ......................................A6 Off The Record........................................A7

Features Hockey Pool..........................................A10 Valley Life..............................................A12

Find us online invermerevalleyecho.com

Citizen scientists needed for project CONTINUED FROM PAGE A2

“It is primarily for science-based folks, but it is also now more and more for anyone that is interested in seeing how different things interact.” Although the atlas was started 10 years ago, upgrades to the online tool have been constant, including the most recent development of a citizen science field added to mapping. Amateur biologists can contribute to the program by fulfilling three new positions: road kill reporter, wildlife tree reporter and nest box reporter. The job description of the road kill reporter is to note the time, date and species of animals found dead on valley roadways for the atlas to keep tabs on vehicle-animal accidents. The wildlife tree reporter fulfills the role of documenting trees, living or dead, that support animal life. Participants are advised to look for holes, nests, cones around the base of the

tree and fresh wood chips to signify a tree is occupied. Reporters are asked to note the number of trees, type and location of findings in their study. Finally, the nest box reporter documents the activities at nest boxes scattered at 200 different locations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The boxes are designed to act as surrogate homes for birds unable to build tree burrows due to a lack of appropriate habitat. “Combinations of rare species and ecosystems, as well as healthy populations of large mammals and relatively intact predator-prey relationships, is part of what makes the Columbia Valley such a special place,” Mr. Parfitt added. “We are hoping that the Atlas will provide a platform for citizens interested in contributing observations of wildlife trees, nest boxes, and road kill that can be used to help biologists better understand and monitor the region’s biodiversity.”

InvermereValleyEcho @TheValley Echo

The Columbia River Basin is the fourth largest watershed in North America with 67 per cent of the vertebrate species in B.C. living in the region. The Biodiversity Atlas was started with funds from the British Columbia Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program, which was begun in 1988 to compensate areas of the province affected by BC Hydro power generation projects throughout the province. The atlas was developed by Selkirk College’s Geospatial Research Centre. “I’d like to see the BioAtlas live on for many years and grow to include more information on more species and ecosystems,”Parfitt added. “British Columbians should be extremely proud of the biodiversity that still thrives here and take the necessary steps to ensure that future generations also have the opportunity to experience the amazing richness of the natural world around us." For more information on the project, 2.815x3 please visit www.biodiversityatlas.org .

Got news? Call Greg, Dan, Kristian or Nicole at 250-3429216 or email news@invermerevalleyecho.com .

Last week's online poll results Do you think The Echo and The Pioneer should cover provincial court cases in Invermere? Total Votes: 5 Yes: 40% (2 votes) No: 60% (3 votes)

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Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

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Verge earns royal honour KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN The Valley Echo

Support for adoptive families and those considering adoption across B.C. Networking – Support - Family events - Workshops

Connect today with your adoption support coordinator! Dianna toll-free 1-866-694-1222 dmortensen@bcadoption.com

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2013 CITIZEN OF THE YEAR For more than thirty years the ROTARY CLUB OF INVERMERE has sought the assistance of the residents in the region (Canal Flats to Spillimacheen) to recognize an individual for having made a significant contribution to our community, quite possibly in a quiet way, with little or no fanfare. Anyone can be nominated so long as their contribution is not work related or political. They cannot be a Rotarian nor can they have received the honour previously. Please send us a signed letter nominating a person of your choice and the reasons you feel they should receive such an honour. Please mail to The Rotary Club of Invermere, Box 877, Invermere, B.C. V0A 1K0 Please mark on the envelope COY All nominations are confidential. The deadline for nominations is Tuesday April 2, 2013. For more information, please ask or call any Rotary member.

A man known for his booming laugh and over-sized heart earned recognition for the mountain of contributions he has made valley-wide on Saturday, February 23rd. Floyd Verge, the founder of Verge for Youth, an organization which has raised over $350,000 for youth and families in need, received Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee award after being nominated by B.C. Liberal Party candidate Doug Clovechok and Columbia Valley RCMP detachment Staff Sergeant Marko Shehovac for his devotion to the community. “The work that he has done and his selfless commitment to young people needed to be recognized,” Mr. Clovechok said. “I was absolutely thrilled to be able to put that nomination forward and even more thrilled when he got it.” Mr. Verge, who was one of the last children born at Pynelogs when it was still a hospital, was raised in the Columbia Valley and first started his volunteer career in 1990, when he offered his time on a Parent Advisory Committee with his wife Shelan, and acting as a Scout leader for his son, Shayne. Several years later, after reuniting with his extended family over a series of funerals, Floyd decided that the group should meet under happier circumstances every year. After three years of getting together for golfing tournaments, Floyd's philanthropic side showed up.

“I just happened to say, 'Listen, we are here every year; why don't we see if we can raise some money?'” During the first summer of the Verge KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN photo for Youth Golf Floyd Verge, centre, accepts his award with nominators Tournament Doug Clovechok (left) and Marko Shehovac (right). in 1996, the and also received the Diamond group raised $800 for the community and Jubilee Award, is surprised by were motivated to continually Floyd's drive to constantly betfundraise for youth and their ter his community. “To me, I received the award families struggling through difbecause it was my job,” he said. ficult times and illness. “That was the start of it and “I am glad that someone put then you just spread your wings my name forward, but that is from there,” he added. “Unfor- what I expect of myself. With a tunately, the way our system volunteer, it is even more speis, when you are in the hospital cial to me because it is not their everything is covered, but when job and they are not getting you are out of the hospital noth- paid for anything.” Floyd's popularity in the valing is covered and because of ley was nowhere more obvithat, we got involved.” Although he has helped doz- ous than when he received his ens of community members, award. “There was a lady that came one story sticks out for Floyd. A four-year-old child, who had up to him in tears and hugged recently received a heart trans- him,” Staff Sergeant Shehovac plant, was in need of a $7,000 added. “I think that is probably monitoring machine in order the best thing about what he to be able to come home to her does is when people get back family. Through the generosity to Floyd about the difference of Verge for Youth the young that he made to them.” Although Floyd is an awardgirl received the equipment and was reunited with her fam- winning example of a volunteer, anyone can get involved ily at home. “The more we can help the to support their community. “Everybody's time, no youth out, the more they are going to help their communi- matter how small, is importies wherever they are later on,” tant,” Floyd added. “Even if you he explained. “I think that is can only give five minutes or half an hour or whatever, if you the best investment.” Staff Sergeant Shehovac, who are giving of yourself you are a was a co-nominator of Floyd volunteer.”

Giving Back VEALLEY CHO T he

Community

Golf Tournament

The Valley Echo is pleased to announce the 4th Annual Giving Back golf tournament being held at Windermere Valley Golf Course on Sunday June 23.

We are now taking applications from local not-for-profit and service groups interested in receiving the funds raised from the golf tournament. Application forms are available at The Valley Echo offices now located at #8, 1008 - 8 Street, Invermere. Please note that the applications must be project-based. Please contact Dean Midyette with any questions at 250-341-6299 or dean@cv-pioneer.com

Deadline to submit proposals: Monday, March 25 at noon.


Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A5

Hot Springs meeting heats up debate in Radium KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN The Valley Echo

The lure of a discussion around the upcoming privatization of Radium Hot Springs drew a crowd of 53 concerned citizens to the Radium Seniors' Hall on Wednesday, February 27th. “The hot springs should remain accessible, affordable and distinctly Canadian because they belong to you as citizens of this valley,” said Kevin King, regional vice-president of the Union of National Employees, to open the meeting. “There has not been enough consultation, and stakeholders are not engaged in this process.” The decision to privatize the hotsprings was made far away from the valley it will impact, without consideration on what effect it will have on businesses that rely on the stable hours and low entry fees that draw tourists to the attraction and to the community, added Marianne Hladun, regional executive vice-president of the Public Service Alliance of Canada (Prairies). “Local businesses and First Nations were never identified as stakeholders in the process,” she said. “These are traditional healing waters.” Members of the Shuswap Band, Audrey and Ox Eugene, spoke about the historical failure of the Federal Government of Canada to honour a contract that was forged by Shuswap Chief Pierre Kinbasket and Indian reserve commissioner, Peter O'Reilly. “They took the hot pools away and in return they were supposed to give more land for the reserve, which never happened,” Audrey Eugene told the meeting. “Actually, they cut off more land.” During the September 21, 1914 meeting of the McK-

enna-McBride Commission the Shuswap band, led by Chief Kinbasket, explained to the group that the Sinclair Hot Springs were also regularly used by the Shuswap Nation until the government fenced in the attraction. “Mr. O'Reilly had told the Shuswap Band that they could access the springs at any time and in a 1914 letter, Chief Pierre Kinbasket is asking for the hot springs back so that it could be used by the public. He didn't want it back just for our band, but so the public could use it for healing.” Eugene's father, Ox, was equally dismayed at the failure of the contract between the Shuswap people and the federal government. “If you want to privatize, give us our land,” he added. “It was taken from us in 1914, but it won't be taken in 2013.” In addition to concerns surrounding the Shuswap Nation's claim to the land, hot spring employees were also KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN photo dismayed about the move to privatize. Marianne Hladun, regional executive vice-president of the Public Service Alliance Head coach of the Columbia Valley of Canada (Prairies), speaks to a crowd of 52 concerned citizens about the negative Swim Club and lifeguard at the Radi- impacts of turning Radium Hot Springs over to a private operator during a meeting um Hot Pools Karen Fahrni expressed organized by the union at the Radium Community Hall on Wednesday, February 27th. her concern about the possibility of around? We will be phased out with no swimming the springs turning into a private spa, which is one of the suggestions put forward by Parks pool for the valley.” For more information on the Public Service AlliCanada. The move to a spa environment would limit ance of Canada's fight to keep Radium, Miette and entrance to the facility for families and children as well Banff Hot Springs public, please visit www. prairies. as remove the ability for the swim club to train at the psac.com/our-organization/campaigns/dont-sellfacility, she said. “What spa wants five and six-year-olds running our-hot-springs .

2ND ANNUAL! IF YOU ARE AN ARTIST THAT LIVES IN AND CALLS THE KOOTENAYS HOME THEN UPLOAD YOUR SONGS TO BE ENTERED INTO THE KOOTENAY MUSIC AWARDS!

Award Categories Artist of the Year Song of the Year Album of the Year Best Rock/Metal/Punk Best Roots & Blues

Best Folk/Country Best New Artist Best Live Producer- Electronic Best DJ Best Live Act

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N E W S

General Information

The Kootenay Music Awards are open to any resident of the Kootenays. Please make all submissions mp3 format. From there they will be shortlisted by our panel of judges that includes Christine Hunter from Shambhala, Ryan Martin of The Hume Hotel, Lea Belcourt of Starbelly Jam Music Festival, Jay Hannley Program Director of Kootenay Coop Radio and Paul Hinrichs of the Royal on Baker. Nominations are open to all, you can nominate your self or favourite artists or acts, we want to make sure we have a great representation of the talent that the Kootenays have to offer. Nominations are open from March 1 to the 29th.

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Opinion

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

Something to say? email editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

A business model that fits the valley? GREG AMOS editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

Far be it from me to offer praise towards the provincial government, regardless of which party is in power, but I think there may have been a glimmer of intelligent life coming from the Legislature last week. An order-in-council made on Wednesday, February 27th brought into effect a new corporate structure for B.C., something called a community contribution corporation, it was quietly announced in a Saturday press release. It's about generating private investment in the social enterprise sector, through companies that borrow traits from both regular, forprofit companies and the not-for-profit sector. It sounds like a great recipe for thriving small and medium-sized businesses that care about giving back to their community. The model allows a company to be propped up by private equity and to issue shares, but with a limited ability to pay dividends and an obligation to put a portion of the company's profits towards social good deeds. It's clear to me that many businesses in the Columbia Valley take seriously their commitments to support the community. Rather than doing this at the expense of profit margins, maybe they could assume this interesting new structure — and whatever tax benefits it would hopefully entail — once it comes into effect at the end of July. Having community contribution corporations in the valley would almost definitely add to the economic incentives to buy local, while helping businesses avoid the dreaded "chump factor" that sometimes accompanies charitable acts. The idea was picked up by the BC Social Innovation Council , who noticed this model working well in the United Kingdom. It's the first legislation of its kind in Canada — why not show the rest of the country how beneficial it could be right here in the Upper Columbia Valley?

Something on your mind? The Valley Echo welcomes all letters to the editor and submissions from community and sports groups, as well as special community columns. Please keep your signed, legible submissions under 500 words. We reserve the right to edit for clarity, taste, legal reasons and brevity. Each submission must contain a daytime phone number and place of residence. Send email submissions to editor@invermerevalleyecho.com.

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MP Report — David Wilks

Acting on the need for AEDs Heart disease is a major problem in Canadian communities. That’s why our Conservative government is committed to both helping prevent the disease, and ensuring that when heart attacks occur, the proper life-saving equipment is available. According to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, 40,000 Canadians are affected by sudden cardiac arrest each year. The risk of experiencing sudden cardiac arrest is increased during intense physical activities such as hockey, and is especially prevalent in people with high blood pressure and other risk factors. Unfortunately, the survival rate for those 40,000 people is only 5 per cent on average. That’s why, in 2011, Prime Minister Stephen Harper pledged to place Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) in hockey arenas across the country. Recreational

Greg Amos

PUBLISHER

EDITOR

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editor@invermere valleyecho.com

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Nicole Trigg

Jessica de Groot

Kristian Rasmussen

Dean Midyette

Sheila Tutty

nicole@invermere valleyecho.com

production@invermerevalleyecho.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

PRODUCTION

Dan Walton

Angela Krebs

Rose-Marie Regitnig

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In Absentia

arenas are often a hotbed of physical activity in smaller communities and they’re used for numerous events aside from hockey, making them a likely location for sudden cardiac arrest victims. The Heart and Stroke Foundation notes that survival rates for those who experience sudden cardiac arrest can be increased by up to 75 per cent if they’re given CPR or treated by a defibrillator within the first three minutes of a heart attack. Recently, the Prime Minister followed through on this commitment by announcing our Government’s partnership with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. This partnership will help ensure that community hockey arenas across Canada are provided with defibrillators and appropriate attendant training. This initiative has the potential to save the lives of thousands of Canadians.

Through a four-year program, our government will give $10 million to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. The first $300,000 will be used to scout ideal arenas and locations for the defibrillators, with a special emphasis on rural communities. After these locations are found, the remaining money will be used by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and their partners to place defibrillators in arenas nationwide and train associates how to use them.v This coincides with actions being taken across the nation to increase the number of AEDs in high-traffic public locations. It also coincides with action being taken by our government to combat heart disease: $5.2 million is being spent each year on the Cardiovascular Disease Program, increased research investments, and increased investments in promoting healthy, active lifestyles.

NOTICE OF COPYRIGHT: Reproduction of any or all editorial and advertising materials in whole or in part is strictly prohibited without the written consent of the publisher. It is agreed by the advertiser requesting space that the liability of The Valley Echo, owned by Black Press Ltd. in the event of failure to publish an advertisement or in the event of an error appearing in the advertisement as published, shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for only the one incorrect insertion for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect or omitted items only and that there shall be no liability in any event greater than the amount paid for such advertising. BC PRESS COUNCIL – The Valley Echo is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province's newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby Street, Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

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The Valley Echo Wednesday, March 6, 2013

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A7

Word

I

THINK YOU

SHOULD JUST STICK

on the Street How do you think The Pioneer and The Echo should cover local provincial court cases?

TO THE HIGH-

I

PROFILE CRIMES,

CERTAIN AMOUNT

KNOW THERE'S A

AND THEN LEAVE

OF PROTOCOL

THE CHEERS AND

BUT

JEERS FOR THE

THE COVERAGE IS

NO GOOD, IT SHOULD

LOW-PROFILE ONES.

ADEQUATE FOR THIS

BE REPORTED.

— JUSTIN GRENDA

— CAL BJORGAN

I

I

WOULD SAY

THINK IT'S FINE

-

IF

PEOPLE ARE UP TO

LITTLE VALLEY.

— MARTY BEINGESSNER

Off The Record - Dan Walton

Government spending runs amok A government is supposed to be responsible for keeping the chequebook balanced, but some aspects of public spending can really make you question the decisions of our right-leaning federal government. More than a billion dollars was spent in 2010 to host Toronto's G20 meeting; the Tories chose the most heavily populated city on the planet's secondleast dense country. The feds spent more than a billion dollars on security, and made it a self-fulfilling prophecy: mass protests left downtown Toronto looking like a city in the ruins of war. From a fiscal point of view, the G20 dog and pony show was a mindless stimulus campaign. How easily could thousands of protesters have been eluded if they just held the G20 summit in Huntsville, Ontario (population: 19,000) like they did with the G8? Very easily, even without the fake lake. But that billion plus dollars put a lot of people to work. That tax money was divided between tens of thousands of Canadian's during tough times — mostly blue-collared workers. Sure, the summit could have been organized for one per cent of the cost, but a lot of security guards, police officers and contractors were hungry for the extra work. They're not the kind of people who hoard large reserves of money or invest overseas. And the decision to keep the penny around as long as the Conservatives did hardly seems conservative. Although the penny is now dead, the

Conservative Party of Canada passed five budgets before axing the worthless pocket trash we call pennies. Even homeless people hate pennies. Who, other than mathematically declined bozos, would support the idea of spending 1.5 - 1.8 cents on every penny pressed? Call me communist, but I'm open to the idea that Canadians benefit from government spending. Maybe steel, nickel and copper miners would support the penny. Maybe the truckers who work between the mines and the mint would support it too. As long as Canadians are the people earning the 1.5 - 1.8 cents on the cost of production, the money isn't quite wasted. The Conservatives also blew tens of millions on an exhausting Action Plan campaign to remind us how well they spent our money. And how about those Action Plan ads. The advertising industry doesn't get a whole lot of sympathy; the $26 million price tag can be tough for Joe Taxpayer to swallow. But we need optimistic reminders during times of uncertainty. That's not to say tens of millions had to be spent to remind Canadians that everything's going to be okay. As credible surveys are pointing out, most Canadians don't care about the ads, and the ones who do care think they're propaganda and a waste of money. So the Conservative Party's dropped the ball on their Action Plan ads, but its cold heart was in the right place. While the loss or gain from such cam-

paigns are nearly impossible to measure monetarily, the feds spent a lot of money and did a poor job reinforcing confidence among Canadians. Regardless of the effect of the campaign, those tens of millions didn't vanish. Though Canada's advertising industry requires less domestic production than our mining industry, there are an abundance of lower and middle class Canadians in the marketing industry that benefit from the CPC's attempt at advertising. Government spending sure can seem wasteful, and often is. But look further than the price tag. Ask who's making the money — it could be your neighbour. However, when the feds waste boatloads of cash looking into the purchase of new fighter jets, or the implementation of a Religious Freedom Office, it can be difficult to expect reciprocity. Politicians, you would think, try to avoid unpopular public spending. It makes perfect sense in a democracy. But as long as the federal leader's jobs are at the marcy of the voter every four years, they'll pander to the short-term in effort to increase their chances at winning the electoral popularity contest. Editor's note: in last week's column, Dan made reference to a police incident involving rough tactics employed while arresting an accused pharmacy thief. To be clear, this incident took place in Quebec, and does not have anything to do with the Columbia Valley RCMP detachment.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Smart meters or dialysis? Dear Editor, The latest BC Liberal budget would cut healthcare by $235 million, while raising premiums by four per cent. Didn’t they just blow almost a billion dollars on smart meters? Explain that logic. What do these meters do — dialysis? Apparently not; all they do is save you a phone call when the power goes out. So why the priority? My guess is that someone's making a buck.

Maybe someone like BC Hydro director Tracy McVicar, who is also managing partner of CAI Capital Management, which owned Corix, the company that installed the smart meters. Other insiders have done well off BC Hydro, such as the independent power producers who signed lucrative contracts to sell spring runoff power to BC Hydro at rates far above market value. Hydro doesn’t need the power in

the spring; their reservoirs are full. If BC Hydro were a private company today, they’d be bankrupt. They aren’t because Hydro has a cash machine: your hydro bill. So you see, some of the 85,000 British Columbians who refused the smart meter did it for reasons other than just the World Health Organization report which classed wireless phones (and smart meters) as Group 2B “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” Microwaves increase the risk of glioma, a malignant

type of brain cancer. The BC Liberals are willing to take chances with your health for their own gain. Bryan Stawychny Edgewater

Parking proposal problems Dear Editor, On the subject of downtown parking, I don't understand why Councillor Spring Hawes wants

to do away with angle parking. Where the streets are wide enough, we'd end up with even less parking stalls. It's also hard to get into a parallel parking spot if you have bumper to bumper cars behind you. Using the parking lot to capacity would certainly help, but for customers purchasing heavy or bulky objects, carrying them long distances isn't much of an option. Joy Bond Invermere

Voter registration drive underway With three weeks of enumeration starting across the Columbia River Revelstoke riding ahead of the May 14 provincial election, a voter registration drive is underway in Invermere and surrounding areas. All 85 electoral districts in B.C. are getting the voter information update, as even a move to a new address within the same town can sow confusion in B.C.'s voter registration system. Drives are set to take place in Invermere on Thursday, March 7, from 11 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. at Sobey's, and another drive at AG Valley Foods from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information on either event, call 250-344-6484, or see the advertisement on page 13 of this newspaper.


A8 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

Social workers go beyond call of duty Visit us online! invermerevalleyecho.com SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6 (ROCKY MOUNTAIN) School District No.6 (Rocky Mountain), Windermere Zone is now accepting applications for the following Special Education Assistant position: David Thompson Secondary School – Temporary, part-time (28.65 hrs/wk), effective immediately to the return of the incumbent. This position is part of the Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 440. General SEA duties, assistance for students with behavioral concerns; sharing duties with other SEA’s to support special needs students. Applicants must have training in Autism and Related Disorders Practical Skills course (Provincial Outreach Program and Related Disorders) or the equivalent, and experience in dealing with students with ADHD. The successful applicant will work with a low incident student with specialized needs, including toileting. If you are interested in these positions, please submit a resume, with three references, by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 13, 2013 to: Ms. Meghan O’Neill Human Resources Coordinator School District No.6 (Rocky Mountain) P.O. Box 430 Invermere, B.C. V0A 1K0 Phone: 250-342-9243 e-mail: hr@sd6.bc.ca Successful applicant will be subject to a criminal record search.

MARY ELLEN TURPEL-LAFOND B.C.'s Representative for Children and Youth

I am grateful that Social Work Week, March 3 to 9, allows us all the opportunity to recognize the social workers in British Columbia and to reflect on their dedication and commitment to the safety and well-being of the children, youth and families. In my role as Representative, I often issue reports that view the child-serving system through the lens of a child. By examining the work of professionals in this system, I do not apply a standard of perfect 20-20 hindsight vision, but rather seek to support the system to do the best work it can to ensure the most positive outcomes possible. Through writing these reports, as well as my advocacy function and outreach activities, I often hear of stories of heroism and front-line workers going beyond the call of duty. It is not often that I get to share the numerous stories that come to my attention about the positive differences social workers make in the lives of children and youth across B.C. and also the impact they have on the community at large. One example of heroism comes from this entry, written for our Representative’s Award of Excellence nominations: “There is no doubt that

the voices of children and youth are heard, listened to and acted upon because of this person’s inherent belief that positive change is possible. For anyone who has seen her work with high-risk youth, it is easy to see that it is a labour of love. Her dedication is infectious and she exemplifies the quality of an outstanding, dedicated leader who possesses personal integrity and a natural gift in connecting with youth.” Here is another example: “She often works many hours outside the job standard to ensure a rich and stimulating experience for children and youth. She gives selflessly and generously of her time and knowledge to create communities of care and celebration both within the region and community. She promotes and celebrates Canada’s Aboriginal cultures – First Nations, Inuit, and Metis – and thereby improves the lives of those in her care by fostering Aboriginal pride in children and encouraging cross cultural tolerance and understanding in the wider community.” The significant contribution made to society by social workers is all the more inspiring given how difficult their work is. Social workers specialize in their field much like many other professionals, including the areas of special needs support, child protection, guardianship, health care, resource, adoption

SUBMITTED PHOTO Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond

and Aboriginal children. By specializing in these areas, they can better help align the needs of their clients with the services and resources available to them. They are perpetual learners, maintaining the best interests of their clients as their most important priority. Social Work Week allows us to extend our gratitude to social workers in B.C. who work tirelessly to support children and youth across the province. These caring individuals make it their mission to protect and support children and youth. They deserve a heartfelt thank you for their commitment and dedication to changing children’s lives for the better.

$12,509

$50/month family contribution Canada Education Savings Grants

$8,203

Provincial Grant

$4,458 $1,200

Age 6

Age 10

Age 14

Age 18


Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A9

COMMUNITY

Community Bats face white-nosed threat Calendar DAN WALTON reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com

Biologists are on the lookout for unexpected activity among bat species residing in the Columbia Valley, as the possible arrival of White Nose Syndrome could pose a serious threat. The illness, which causes hyperactivity among North American bat populations, is causing alarming fatality rates in the continent. "In some bat populations in the United States, it's wiped out 95 per cent of some species in some caves, so it really is a lethal disease," said Angus Glass, the communications coordinator for the Columbia Region Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program. Dr. Cori Lausen, one of BC's leading bat biologists, will be in Invermere on Thursday, March 7 to offer a free presentation on bat ecology and the “unprecedented conservation threats” facing bat populations in North America. The 90-minute session takes place in the David Thompson Secondary School theatre at 7 p.m. "We need to find out as much about local bat populations and their hibernacular over-wintering as much as possible before White Nose Syndrome gets here," said Glass. "Cori's digging up some really interesting information about winter activity with bats. Many people thought that they basically hibernate for five months of the year; Cori's finding out that bats typically are more active than usually, but with White Nose Syndrome, it could make them [even] more active." As biologists only recently discovered that

Canadian bats are relatively active during the winter, the symptoms of the syndrome seem to play a fatal role during the cold months. "The more we know about these things, the better solutions we can come up with to slow the spread,” said Glass. “It's just like invasive weeds, the more knowledge that we have the better we can cope with them." Glass says the disease is most often spread by humans traveling from one mine or cave to another and transmitting contaminated soil, “especially in winter periods when the bats are in there," he said. "What [White Nose Syndrome] does, is it typically makes the bat more active in winter than they otherwise should be; they should be just trying to look after their own resources and make sure they survive through winter, but with White Nose Syndrome, it could make them more active." Although White Nose Syndrome resembles certain human illnesses, there are no known cases of human contraction. If White Nose Syndrome spreads northward into Canada, Glass warns of larger effects. "[Bats are] pretty critical with the role they play in their ecosystem," he said. "They're important pollinators and eat lots of insects." The presentation, titled Bats active in winter - and in crisis? will appeal to those interested in learning about bat ecology, and anyone fascinated with nature and wildlife, Glass said. Those seeking more information about the seminar can contact the Columbia Region office for BC Hydro at 250-365-4551. No registration is required.

New pension plan promises to serve small businesses in B.C. TOM FLETCHER Black Press

VICTORIA – The B.C. government is moving ahead with a new pension option for the two thirds of B.C. workers who don't have access to a group pension plan through their employer. Finance Minister Mike de Jong introduced legislation this week to create Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPP), making B.C. the first province to sign on to a new federal program. The system would allow businesses or self-employed people to set up defined contribution pension plans administered by financial institutions. De Jong announced the program along with Ted Menzies, federal minister of state for finance, who hopes to have harmonized systems across the country so people can continue to build retirement income if they move. Menzies said the PRPP system offers greater simplicity for small businesses that don't have employee pension plans. The new approach is designed to close a gap in tax-deductible Registered Retirement Savings Plan room that Canadian workers are choosing not to use despite the tax advantages. Once an employer signs up, employees would be automatically enrolled. They have 60 days to opt out, after which time pension contributions would be deducted. Employers

don't need any financial expertise, and employees would have to "overcome the inertia of being involved in the plan" to get out of it, Menzies said. De Jong said B.C. decided to make employer contributions optional, after consulting with business organizations. Mike Klassen, B.C. director of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, said small business accounts for almost half of the private sector employment in B.C., the largest share of any province. "Working forever is not an option," Klassen said. Menzies said expanding the Canada Pension Plan would require two thirds support from all provinces, and that support was not offered at a recent meeting of provincial finance ministers. But there was unanimous support for the PRPP option. Wilf Scheuer, president of Courtney-based Pro Star Mechanical Technologies Ltd., said he plans to use the new pension option and match employee contributions in order to retain skilled workers. Pro Star retrofits buildings with geothermal heat pumps, tankless hot water systems and other specialized equipment. Scheuer said he recently lost an engineer, hired away by a large Los Angeles-based company, a sign that his and other small firms are in a global competition for top talent.

Send your events to production@invermerevalleyecho.com THURS MARCH 7 • Provincial voter registration, Sobeys from 11 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., and at AG from 3 - 8 p.m. 250-3446484 • Stone Creek Resorts Hiring Fair, Eagle Ranch clubhouse, 1-3 p.m., 250-342-0562 • Columbia Valley Chamber of Commerce Annual General Meeting, Lions Hall, 6 p.m. • CV Arts Annual General Meeting, Pynelogs Cultural Centre, 7 p.m. • "Bats active in winter - and in crisis?" presentation with Dr. Cori Lausen, DTSS Theatre, 7 p.m. FRI MARCH 8 • Provincial voter registration, Akisqnuk First Nation Band Office, 1 - 4 p.m. 250344-6484 MARCH 8-10 • 50th Anniversary Alumni Reunion, Panorama Mountain Village, panoramaresort.com SAT MARCH 9 • "Drawing with Trudy" Session #3, Radium Public Library, 10:30 a.m. MARCH 9 - 10 • KFC - The Kootenay Freestyle Classic. Slopestyle and Mogul Competition, Panorama, pmfc.ca or 250-341-1967 • Panorama Stampede festival, Panorama Mountain Village TUES MARCH 12 •CV Arts Cinefest at Pynelogs showing "We Have a Pope", 7 p.m. EVERY SUNDAY • Public Indoor Rock Climbing, Laird School, 5-8 p.m., $5. • Radium Seniors’

Carpet Bowling, 1:30 p.m., Seniors' Hall • Drop-in roller skating, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m., $5, Glacier Peaks Gymnastics building, 250-342-5321 2nd SUNDAY • LW Alliance Church Sing and Celebrate, 7 p.m. For more information call Clarence Stauffer, 250-3429580 EVERY MONDAY • Gentle drop-in carpet bowling, 1:30 p.m., Seniors' Centre • Cadets, 6:30-9 p.m. for boys and girls, ages 12-17. Cost: FREE (includes uniform). Info: Megan McConnell at 250409-4455 • Duplicate Bridge, 6:30 p.m., Invermere Seniors’ Hall, $2/ person. Visitors welcome • EK Brain Injury Support Group, 1-3 p.m., Family Resource Centre. Info: 250-344-5674 1st & 3rd TUESDAY • OPT clinic, 6:308:30 p.m., Inv. Health Unit, 850-10th Ave. Confidential service: low-cost birth control, and STI testing 1st TUESDAY • Invermere Camera Club 7 p.m. Tanya, tanyadeleeuw65@ gmail.com EVERY TUESDAY • Shuswap Bingo at the Shuswap Indian Band Office downstairs, doors open at 5:30 p.m., early bird at 6:45 p.m., regular games at 7 p.m. • Cubs (8-10 year olds) and Beavers (5-7 year olds), JA Laird, 6 - 7 p.m. 1st & 3rd WED • Scrabble Night at Invermere Public Li-

brary. 6 - 8 p.m. Call 250-342-6416 • Bingo, Windermere Community Hall, opens at 6 p.m., starts at 7 p.m. 2nd & 4th WED • Seniors' Day at the Invermere Library, bus provided EVERY WEDNESDAY • Indoor soccer, DTSS gym. Drop-in, $2, 8:30-10:00 p.m. • Yoga THRIVE- Yoga for Cancer Survivors and Support People. Copper Point Resort. new 7-week session starts March 13 at 4:30 p.m. Call Jan Klimek at 250-3421195 EVERY THURSDAY • Children's Air Rifle Program, with the LWDRGC, Inv. Community Hall, 7 - 8:30 p.m., free of charge, ages 6-15. Learn safety, marksmanship, equipment provided EVERY FRIDAY • Baby Goose program for parents and babies up to 18 months. 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Eileen Madson Primary. kandruschuk@cbal.org • Public Indoor Rock Climbing, Laird School, 5-8 p.m., $5 • Preschool Story Time at the Invermere Public Library, 10:30 a.m. For info visit invermere.bclibrary.ca EVERY SATURDAY • Public Indoor Rock Climbing, Laird School, 5-8 p.m., $5. Invermere Thrift Store • Thursdays 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 1 - 4 p.m. Radium Thrift Store • Thursdays 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 12 - 4 p.m.


A10 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

Grand Prize

Sobeys

This week's winner is:

1 night stay at Copper Point Resort and $50 dining certificate for Elements Grill

Visit the Valley Echo office to claim 2 Hot Springs passes and 2 Ski Passes to Fairmont Hot Springs Resort

Head to Tim Hortons to redeem your lunch prize!

Hockey Pool Manager

http://www.officepools.com/pool/print http://www.officepools.com/pool/print must be claimed before the following week's results are released.TOTAL RNK TEAM RNK TEAM

TEAM

A. Hann

1

LW

Zman T61 GR P/G2 LW T61 GR Zman 2P/G TOTAL

Jet Rocker

333

48

543 T64 333

Big 0.83 Lew 48 3

T31

Jules

T31

Jules

332

44

541 T64 332

T31

Merrymen

T31

Merrymen

332

53

540 T64 332

NHL Hockey Pool Standings Name TEAM

Total

TOTAL 352

A. Hann

LW LW

Rock-50 3 T33

GR T33 GR TOTAL P/G

Rank

Rock-50 3

331

Name

Rockies Payci Payci 2 T33 P/G LW 2 GR RockiesP/G

48

http:// http://www.officepools.com/pool/print

35 545 352

Van 0.86Fan48

35

545 Van Fan0.86 534 Snake 53 0.903

Total 331 330

Love the B's 2

Love the B's 2T61

Jet Rocker T26

T33

Rank RNK

T61

T26

The Valley Echo's 2012/2013 IVE

Hockey Pool Manager

RNK TEAM RNK TEAM TOTAL 250-341-4000 http://www.officepools.com/pool/print http://www.officepools.com/pool/print

Hockey Pool Manager Hockey Pool Manager

Hockey Pool Manager All prizes

2 rounds of golf for the Ridge at Copper Point Golf Club

38

LW 37

44

67535 331

GR

T64 543 Big Lew0.83 3

LW

TOTAL GR

P/G LW

G

46

555307

250-341-3392 307 40 541307

0.81

46

5

0.79

40

5

307

306

47

535306

0.78

47

5

21 Red0.82 Rum44 21 T64 541 Red Rum 0.82

306

53

536306

0.81

53

5

Heavy 0.81Water 53 T64 540 Heavy Water 0.81

306

36

548306

0.78

36

5

305

37

534305

0.77

37

5

Total 304

LW 46

GR 542304

P/G 0.76

46

5

304

42

543304

0.81

42

5

5

Fanta 0.843 38

P/G

535 Fanta 3 0.84

67

Rank

Name0.86

T68 541 lilb

541 T68 331

lilb 0.86 37

541 T68 330

Lo-Ball 0.81 344

T68 541 Lo-Ball0.81 3 T70 536 Finn 3 0.82

Jivey 3

351

40

36 534 351

Snake 0.90 53 40 3 36

328

44

536 T70 328

Finn0.82 3 44

303

54

543303

0.79

54

Jets Faithful 2 3

Jets Faithful 2

350

35

37 543 350

Rockies Rule 37 0.88 35 2

Rule 2 543 Rockies0.88

327

35

543 T70 327

Pilon 5 Rockies 5 0.83 Pilon 35 T70 543 Rockies0.83

303

44

548303

0.76

44

5

Ana 16 3

4

Ana 16 3

349

39

38 537 349

Dany 0.85 Heatley 2 39 38

537 Dany Heatley 0.85 2

323

42

537 T72 323

Old 0.86 Rock423 T72 537 Old Rock 0.863

302

43

539302

0.79

43

5

Sobeys 3

5

Sobeys 3

347

56

T39 538 347

Aces 8's 5T39 538 Aces of0.87 8's 5 0.87 of56

322

33

534 T72 322

Paul0.84 Stanley 33 T72 534 Paul Stanley 0.84

302

43

541302

0.77

43

5

Dan Hecher

T6

Dan Hecher

346

42

T39 542 346

Wolfgang 0.83 42

T39 542 Wolfgang 0.83

322

44

542 T74 322

30 3 Nelson 0.8130443 T74 542 Nelson 0.81

301

40

529301

0.74

40

5

Silent Sam 4

346

40

T41 540 346

Nelly 0.88 240

T41 540 Nelly 20.88

321

48

543 T74 321

I tried 0.824 48

301

32

535301

0.78

32

5

13 Wolfpack

346

533 T74 321

Rocket 25 3 Rouge 25 3 533 Rouge 0.85 0.85Rocket 29 T74

301

52

536301

0.83

52

5

540 T77 319

1 Wind Walker's 1 0.79 44 T77 540 Wind Walker's 0.79

299

47

548299

0.78

47

5

539 T77 319

Piks Granny's Piks T77 539 Granny's 0.80 46 0.80

299

51

544299

0.76

51

5

298

37

545298

0.79

37

5

Jivey 3

2

Silent Sam 4 T6

13 Wolfpack T6

Foddude 3

GNIMELF

T9 T9

345

Foddude 3

345

GNIMELF

36 46 35

T41 533 346

Jerome Jr 15T41 Jr 15 4 0.85 36 4 533 Jerome0.85

T43 539 345

Bird 0.87 46

T43 541 345

Crew 0.86 Slut 35

T43 541 Crew Slut 0.86 T43 541 Marco 0.86 4

319

40

537 T79 319

Alex0.82 40

T43 539 Bird

321 319

0.87

319

29 44 46

T74 543 I tried 4 0.82

T79 537 Alex

Wute 31 3

344

44

T43 541 344

Marco 0.86 44 4

Kristi KowalskiT11

Kristi Kowalski

344

49

46 540 344

Noah 0.84 49

46

540 Noah 0.84

318

53

542 T79 318

Sabu Dave 0.79 53 4 T79 542 Sabu Dave 0.79 4

298

50

532298

0.78

50

5

Harli

Harli

343

39

T47 539 343

DB22 0.84 39

T47 539 DB22 0.84

317

51

542 T79 317

Precious Louie & Precious 0.83 51 T79 542 Louie &0.83

298

53

549298

0.79

53

5

Firebird 7 3 T13

Firebird 7 3

343

48

T47 537 343

Big Nasty 0.88 48 14T47 537 Big Nasty 0.8814

317

51

544 T82 317

Banny02 0.80 51

297

53

538297

0.79

53

5

Snakitou 4

T15

Snakitou 4

342

43

49 537 342

Harley 0.86 43

537 Harley 0.86

315

41

536 T82 315

Banana 5 Captain 0.76 Banana 41 T825 536 Captain0.76

297

37

534297

0.80

37

5

Jye

T15

Jye

342

38

T50 542 342

Grace 0.86 6385 T50 542 Grace 60.86 5

314

45

540 T82 314

Snow Ball45 0.83

297

41

539297

0.74

41

5

Wute 31 3

Pet Rock

T11

T13

T17

Wind Walker'sT17 2

Jhaley 11 2 T19

340

Pet Rock

340

Wind Walker's 2

339

Jhaley 11 2

43 39 48

49

T50 539 340

S.S. 0.82Beagle 43 T50 539 S.S. Beagle 0.82

T50 540 340

Dace 0.84 439

T53 535 339

Daddy 27 535 Daddy 0.84 Mode 27 0.84 Mode 48 T53

313

314

T50 540 Dace 40.84

314 313

36

85541 314

Rho0.77 36

0.82

T82 544 Banny02 0.80 T82 540 Snow Ball 0.83 85

541 Rho

0.77

294

50

549294

0.78

50

5

86

3 538 Prattsy0.82

293

37

541293

0.76

37

5

87

533 Jesse1968 0.76

291

40

540291

0.76

40

5

290

54

546290

0.76

54

5

290

38

542290

0.74

38

5

540289

0.76

40

5

86538 314

Prattsy 0.82 334

87533 313

Jesse1968 0.76 56

35

535 T88 313

Gurl 16 Hockey T88 535 Hockey0.83 0.83 Gurl 35 16

34 56

Rock-5050

339

43

T53 540 339

Kilimanjaro 0.83 43 5T53 540 Kilimanjaro 0.83 5

King Chris 2 21

King Chris 2

338

45

T55 543 338

Canucks Suck 0.88 45Suck T55 543 Canucks 0.88

312

40

538 T88 312

Lute0.78 88 240

NWT 1 2

NWT 1 2

336

43

T55 540 336

Tony 0.87 3 43

T55 540 Tony 30.87

312

38

541 T90 312

Make-b-leaf 0.84 38 2T90 541 Make-b-leaf 0.84 2

289

40

McNasty 9 3 T22

McNasty 9 3

336

48

T57 530 336

NWT 0.84 2 48 2

T57 530 NWT 2 0.84 2

311

289

41

Jye 2 3

T24

Jye 2 3

334

36

T57 542 334

KBR 0.87 3 36

T57 542 KBR 30.87

3251 T90 539 3251 30.81 0.81 36 Manager 3 Pool Hockey

311

45

288

34

544288

0.77

34

5

E. Hann 2

T24

E. Hann 2

334

310

34

35 LW

285 533 GR TOTAL

35 0.76 P/G LW

5 G

Farside Nucks 2

333

309

43

285

37

540 285

0.75 37

5

279

43

542 279

Rock-5050

T19

T22

Farside NucksT26 2

Fards 4 T26 Hockey Pool Manager Go Jets Go T26

Mags 2 TEAM

et Rocker

Buster's Pick 59 Pick 4 59 46 Pool Manager 544 0.86 Pool 4 544 Buster's Hockey 334 46 0.86 Hockey Manager Go Habs Go 2 60 53 542 0.86 2 542 Go Habs 333 53Go 60 0.86

Fards 4

333

53

Go Jets Go

333

48

333 TOTAL

Abe Froman T61 307 RNK TEAM TOTAL 537 0.85Froman T61 2 TEAM 333 53 RNK 537 Abe 0.85 2 http://www.officepools.com/pool/print http://www.officepools.com/pool/print Love the B's 307 T61 B's 2 2 543 0.83 48 T61 333 543 Love the 0.83 T61 539 GR333 TOTAL

T26 RNK

Mags 2 TEAM

333

46 LW 2 of 4 48

T64 543 333

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279

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36

534 278

0.76 36

5

53

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275

43

537 275

0.71 43

5

36

548 100 306

0.78 Flame 6264 36

6264 100 548 Flame 0.78

272

31

551 272

0.72 31

5

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307

40

541 T95 307

T64 543 Big Lew 0.833

306

47

T26

Jet Rocker

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T31

Jules

332

44

T64 541 332

Merrymen

T31

Merrymen

332

53

T64 540 332

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67 535 331

Fanta 0.84 338

67 535 Fanta 0.84 3

305

37

534 101 305

0.77 37 Blondie

101 534 Blondie0.77

269

44

544 269

0.71 44

5

37

T68 541 331

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T68 541 lilb

0.86

304

46

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102 542 MN1 20.76

262

37

545 262

0.70 37

5

44

T68 541 330

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304

42

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259

38

542 259

0.72 38

5

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303

54

543 104 303

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257

36

538 257

0.66 36

5

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Rock-50 3

331

Rockies Payci 2

331

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38

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328

44

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327

35

T70 543 327

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303

44

548 303

0.76 44

548

0.76

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Dany Heatley 2

323

42

T72 537 323

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302

43

539 302

0.79 43

539

0.79

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Aces of 8's 5

322

33

T72 534 322

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302

43

541 302

0.77 43

541

0.77

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301

40

529 301

0.74 40

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0.74

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I tried 0.82 4

301

32

535 301

0.78 32

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301

52

536 301

0.83 52

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0.78 47

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51

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298

37

545 298

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319

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318

53

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534 297

0.80 37

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539

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250-341-4000 315 41 314

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41

250-688-8885


Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A11

Emergency Responders

Geoff Hill MaxWell Realty Invermere

Responding to crisis 250-341-7600

connect@geoffhill.ca Invermere-RealEstate.com Many thanks to all of the Valley’s Emergency Responders for keeping us safe.

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Thank you for protecting us and our families in the Valley.

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Thanks to all the men & women who dedicate their lives to watching over us. phone

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ECHO FILE PHOTO Invermere Ambulance Unit Chief Peter Hecher (left), with part-time paramedics Richard Marchand, Sandra Mercier and Leisha Lake (left to right) stand ready for duty in this photo from 2011.

Emergency responders keep us safe Volunteer firefighters are professionals who practise their profession on a part-time, usually on-call basis. Their contribution to public safety still plays a vital role in society. In fact, being a volunteer firefighter is not always easy; time must be committed to a principal source of income while remaining completely available for when an emergency arises. There is no doubt that volunteer firemen share certain characteristics with other part-time jobs, particularly on-call work. This, however, is where comparisons come to an end — not everyone can become a volunteer firefighter. The selection process of candidates is very rigorous which means the population is in good hands. Basic training is the same as it is for full time fire fighters. It is also possible to specialize and some can possess highly

Thanks.

To our local Emergency Responders for all you do to keep us safe. From the Staff, Guests and Community of Panorama

CMY

K

PanoramaResort.com

specific skills. What is surprising about this profession is that it includes people from different trades and professions, who have in common a highly developed sense of duty and altruism to the point of putting their own lives in danger. Volunteer firefighters are found mostly in lightly populated municipalities or in a grouping of municipalities covering a large area. Paramedics play a key role in our healthcare system. Their numerous interventions can mean the difference between life and death. These professionals must have exemplary composure and be well-balanced both mentally and psychologically. Every time paramedics are called to an emergency, they never know in exactly what state they will find their patients. Some scenes would make your blood run cold. A paramedic’s great strength resides in his or her ability to make rapid decisions while considering a multitude of different factors, depending on the con-

text. Every gesture must be made with care and follow certain rules. Over the years, paramedics have had to offer more and more advanced emergency medical care. Before, members of this profession were called ambulance men and did not possess the same degree of expertise as the paramedics of today. Now, these professionals are authorized to carry out various medical procedures, such as providing basic trauma care and administering certain medications. “Specialized” or “advanced level” paramedics can be found working in some Canadian provinces. Among other procedures, they can provide advanced respiratory assistance and use electrocardiograms. In short, these front-line professionals work in conjunction with doctors and nurses more than ever before. The police are an essential part of public security services. Unfortunately, some people have little respect for them. It is,

Thank you for all you do!

To show our appreciation, volunteer fire fighters receive 20% off food at Elements Grill.

however, a difficult and dangerous profession that requires nerves of steel and exemplary selfcontrol. Even though a police officer’s main role is to represent law and order within society, their work also involves other, underlying roles. Police officers are in constant contact with that which is truly complex and unpredictable: the human being. Their work brings them into contact with the best and the worst. If good physical condition is often among the hiring criterion, their most important qualities include an affinity for human relations, a high level of self-discipline, public-spirit, politeness and a capacity for empathy. Monotony is not a part of the job. Police officers' work is often associated with handing out traffic tickets, which really represents only a tiny fraction of their job. If this part of their work sometimes makes them appear less sympathetic in the public eye, we should never lose sight of the fact that they sometimes save lives while putting their own in danger. The police’s role in the community has evolved over the decades. In addition to enforcing the law, they work in prevention, public relations and the upholding of commitment to the community.


A12 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Valley Life Pictured, clockwise, from the top left: Skiers compete in the Cresa Under-16 Can Am Western Championships at Panorama; the Columbia Valley Rockies make amends with their series rival, the Fernie Ghostriders, after their elimination loss last weekend; Rockies player Jeremy Julian crosses over the Ghostrider's blue line before his team's 6 - 3 defeat on Saturday; aspiring yogis at the My Best Life retreat at the Copper Point Resort last weekend became familiar with the "dragon dance" during a yoga session.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo


Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A13

Snare program legality in question Continued from Page A2

Hill is referring to the Agreement on International Humane Trapping Standards signed by the European Union and Canada in December 1997. “If you look at the list of approved traps for a wolf, the only thing certified is a leg hold trap that doesn't close all the way and has rubber jaws to not hurt the animal,” Hill added. The use of snare traps complies with the requirements of the Wildlife Act and utilizes the best methods and equipment to avoid incidental catches, the Ministry of Environment wrote in an email to The Echo. The snares themselves are designed with an added tension spring to dispatch the predator as quickly and humanely as possible. They are also designed to break if a larger animal, such as an ungulate or bear is caught, releasing the animal unharmed, the Ministry of Environment added via email. Hill, who is a biologist with a Master of Science in Behavioural Ecology, is unconvinced that the snares used are humane. “We have testimony from not only the American Humane Society, but from veterinarians about the speed of death and amount of pain that these inflict,” he said.

The reasons for the decision to stop the trapping of wolves in the Columbia Valley were not released by the Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resource Operations before press deadline, but Hill has a theory. “It appears to be a very recent decision to remove the snares,” he said. “I would not be surprised that there was a bit of a move to diffuse the story and diffuse the major issue we are facing in terms of how we are managing wolves, in this case with the snares.” The Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resource Operations would be better off to employ a risk-mapping program on Crown Land where they could look at the probability of a wolf preying on cattle in an area and keep the predator Image courtesy of Brad Hill / out, as opposed to using lethal www.naturalart.ca means, Hill explained. This wolf image was shot on a mountain trail northwest “Use of risk maps can actuof Golden in August 2004. Believing this wolf was nearby, ally reduce the depredation rate photographer Brad Hill set up his camera gear on a pretty dramatically, he said. game trail and was able to capture this dramatic shot. “That is one of the only mitigation measures on public land.” November 14, 2012. For more inforThe Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resource Opera- mation about the plan, please visit tions released their Wolf Manage- www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/public-conment Plan for public comment on sultation/grey-wolf/ .

invermerevalleyecho.com

ICAN – Invermere Companion Animal Network COLE – Hi Everyone, I’m “Cole”. At 8 years young, I’m quiet, polite, and a purring machine while being cuddled. I’m not thrilled living with all the youngsters at the shelter, so really need a home, and a human, all my own. Won’t YOU please come to ICAN and visit me? I’ll charm your socks off Sponsored by:

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Are you on the voters list? Elections BC is conducting an enumeration and updating the voters list for the May 2013 Provincial General Election. Are you registered to vote? It’s easy. It’s convenient. You have choices. Be ready. Your choices to register to vote or update your voter information are: Online Register or update your information on Elections BC’s Online Voter Registration (OVR) system 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at elections.bc.ca/ovr. You need a B.C. Driver’s Licence or a Social Insurance Number to use the system. (OVR) By Phone Call Elections BC toll-free at 1-800-661-8683, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., Saturdays. In Your Community From March 6 – 23, temporary voter registration opportunities are at hundreds of locations throughout the province. View electoral district voter registration opportunities at: elections.bc.ca/registration-opportunities.

Is there someone registered at your address who no longer lives there? Call Elections BC or go to elections.bc.ca/remove to have them removed from your address. Who can register? You are eligible to register to vote if you: . are a Canadian citizen, . are 18 or older, . have lived in B.C. for the past six months. Election workers required: Over 37,000 election workers are needed to work for the May 2013 Provincial General Election. View available postings at elections.bc.ca/jobs.

B.C. voters can also register or update their information when they go to vote in the May 2013 Provincial General Election. Elections BC is a non-partisan Office of the Legislature responsible for administering the Election Act, the Recall and Initiative Act, and the conduct of referenda under the Referendum Act .

find us on

elections.bc.ca / 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 6 1 - 8 6 8 3


A14 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

Sports Windermere Community Association Annual General Meeting Saturday, March 30 10:00 a.m. Windermere Community Hall

Have a sports tip? editor@invermerevalleyecho.com or 250-342-9216

• Needing Board Members (residence within the Windermere Fire District) • Needing Volunteers (anyone) to sit on committees and organize/plan children, youth and adult events. Examples: Halloween, youth, bingo, dances, New Year’s Eve, garage sale, among many others.

For more information contact Gracie at 250-341-1548 or info@windermerecommunity.ca

We’re ready... are you?

Complete snow removal services available Did you know we have

huuuuge

JOSHUA ESTABROOKS PHOTO Columbia Valley Rockies forward Ryan Henderson collides mid-air with Fernie Ghostriders defenceman Patrick Webb during a hard fought 6 - 3 loss to the Ghostriders on Saturday, March 2nd.

Seniors' discounts?

“Come Play with us”

Kamloops

August 20-24

...Over 3500 55+ BC Seniors expected to participate ! Visit our website to find out more about what we have to offer Click on your It includes geographic zone and contact info for people you will find lots of who would be glad information to help you get involved

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1988

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WV

Archery Badminton Bridge Carpet Bowling Cribbage Cycling Darts Dragon Boating Equestrian 5 Pin Bowling Floor Curling Golf Horseshoes Ice Curling Ice Hockey Lawn Bowling Mtn. Biking Pickleball Slo-Pitch Soccer Swimming Table Tennis Tennis Track & Field Whist

2013

INDERMERE ALLEY

Rockies reflect on season after playoff run concludes Rockies groundbreaking season ends as Fernie moves on to second round of playoffs JOSHUA ESTABROOKS Special to The Valley Echo

If anyone would have predicted that the Columbia Valley Rockies would still be playing hockey in March at the beginning of this KIJHL season, they would have been called crazy. But the Rockies made the Kootenay International Junior Ice Hockey league playoffs, and although the series has come to an end, the hometown team with heart left it all on the ice on Saturday, March 2 in front of a cheering home crowd. "We've been in playoff mode since pretty

much December," said coach Wade Dubielewicz. "Every one of these players gave their all this season, but sometimes it just isn't enough." The Rockies lost a heartbreaker on Saturday, losing the game 6-3 and the series 4-2 against the first place team in their division, the Fernie Ghostriders. The Rockies split the first two games in Fernie, then split the next two games at home, but things came unglued in Fernie on Friday, March 1. A parade to the penalty box allowed the Ghostriders to capitalize on 17 power play opportunities, taking the game 6-1. Not to be rattled, the Rockies returned home on Saturday night and fought a valiant battle in front of a sell-out crowd. The game just wasn't long enough for the Rockies to scrape their way back into it, which meant a locker room full of teary eyes and weary bodies as the staff and players reflected on the season. Continues to 'HUGE STRIDES' on Page A15

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Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A15

International paralympic skiing event for Panorama in 2015 GREG AMOS editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

Panorama Mountain Village will be the worldwide hub of international paralympic competition for one week spanning February and March in 2015, after the International Paralympic Committee named the local ski resort as the destination for the Alpine Skiing

World Championships on Wednesday, February 27. "I am proud to announce Invermere as the host city for the 2015 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships following the great Paralympic Winter Games that Canada put on nearly three years ago and last year's World Cup final," said International Paralympic Committee chief executive Xavier Gonzalez.

"I am delighted to see winter parasport flourishing in Canada, and this will bring it to another level outside of the Paralympic Games," he added. The 2015 Championships will be the seventh edition of the competition, which will be organised by Alpine Canada and follow a successful 2011-2012 World Cup final event at the same resort. The an-

nouncement came as the 2013 event wrapped up in La Molina, Spain. Invermere is expected to welcome 120 athletes to the championships, which is due to run from February 24 until March 4 in two years from now. The event will be one of several major parasport competitions Canada hosts in the next few years, in addition to several IPC Alpine Skiing World Cup events.

Hard work rewarded

ANGIE MCKENZIE PHOTOS Two Columbia Valley Rockies players were honoured with top awards in the Eddie Mountain division. Left, defenceman Jake Fardoe accepts the Rookie of the Year award, presented by KIJHL vice president Milton Crawford; right, forward Brendan Burge accepts two awards, one as the most valuable player in the division, and the other for being the top scorer. ContinueD FROM Page A14

Huge strides for Rockies; 41-point improvement over last season "Basically the long and short of it is we now have people in place who really care about this team, these players and the community," said general manager Ross Bidinger. "Wade really steered the ship and he has an unbelievable rapport with the kids, but the way all three brothers (Scott, Kirk and Wade Dubielewicz) compliment each other makes for a really strong coaching staff."

Reflecting on the season behind and looking ahead to a new season, Dubielewicz said they have already started on recruiting new talent for next year's Rockies team. "This season turned around because of the time commitment everyone put in to getting better, and because the players could feel that we all really cared about the team," he said. "Our job go-

ing forward is to carry this momentum through the summer recruiting and onto the ice next year." Rockies president Al Miller was overjoyed at the results the team achieved this season, and the incredibly wellattended home games during the shortlived playoff run. "This was a tremendous year," Miller said. "Our new coaching staff has pro-

duced an excellent product with the time that they had, and the fans, I think, will be able to see where we're heading now. Next year is going to be fantastic." The Rockies finish the 2012-2013 season with 21 wins, 25 losses, six overtime losses and 48 points overall in the 52 games they played. That's a far cry from the previous season, when the team only mustered three wins and seven points all year.

Congratulations

on an excellent season! We can’t wait to see what next year brings! CV Rockies major sponsors


A16 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Got something to say? @ere editorrm

invvaelleyecho.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

SPORTS

Send your comments to:

editor@invermere valleyecho.com Draft Official Community Plan

The Village of Radium Hot Springs is in the process of preparing a new ‘Official Community Plan’ (OCP) and we are inviting informal comments from residents and ratepayers on the contents of the plan. The draft OCP and schedules can be found on our website www.radiumhotsprings.ca by clicking on ‘Draft OCP’ located on the home page menu bar. Please refer your questions and comments to CAO Mark Read at the following email address: Mark.Read@radiumhotsprings.ca Informal comments will be received until April 4th, 2013.

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GREG AMOS PHOTO Skyler Wallinder of the Nakiska Alpine Ski Association catches some air over a lip during Sunday, March 3 skier cross action at the Cresa Can Am Under-16 Western ski championships at Panorama Mountain Village.

Racers compete after condo blaze at Can Am Under-16 ski races GREG AMOS editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

It took more than last Wednesday's raging condo fire to put a damper on the Cresa Can Am Under-16 Western alpine ski race championships at Panorama Mountain Resort, where more than a dozen racers from the Columbia Valley made their mark on the field of nearly 200 competitors. With some racers fetching their sprinkler-soaked boots from dryers in the Panorama rental shop just prior to a practice session on Thursday, February 28, the weekend race series took advantage of some fresh snow on the mountain and enthusiasm imported from all corners of B.C. Amelia Smart from the Panorama Ski Club began the competition by winning the Ladies' Giant Slalom event with two strong runs that totalled 2:08.18. Following close behind was Haley McKercher of Sunshine Village with 2:11.16. She was trailed by third-place finisher

Courtney Hoffos of the Windermere Valley Ski Club, who registered 2:11.16. Robyn Fiell of Panorama placed 11th with a time of 2:15.38. Whistler's Riley Seger was the top finisher in the Men's Giant Slalom event, with two runs totalling 1:58.18, placing ahead of runner-up Keegan Sharp of the Panorama Ski Club, who registered a time of 1:58.67. Placing third was Sam Mulligan of Grouse Mountain with 1:58.74. Tyra Collombin of Fernie won the Slalom Ladies' event on Friday, March 1 after clocking 1:22.13 following her two runs. Finishing second was Sarah Taylor of Lake Louise with 1:22.78. Banff 's Georgia Burgess came in third with a time of 1:22.95. Fifth place finisher Courtney Hoffos registered the most impressive time locally with 1:23.21, barely faster than seventh place Robyn Fiell of Panorama at 1:23.93. Max Scharf of Revelstoke earned first place in the Slalom Mens' event after completing two runs in 1:24.29. The runner up was Whistler's Alex

Gershon who registered time of 1:24.93, followed by Big White's Alex Roehrig at 1:25.41. David Catherwood with Panorama placed seventh with a time of 1:25.98 Georgia Willinger with the Kananaskis Ski Club declared victory in the Super G Ladies on Saturday, March 2 after posting a time of 53.29. In second was Haley McKercher of Sunshine Village with 53.96, followed by Georgia Burgess of Banff at 54.05. Windermere's Courtney Hoffos came in fifth with a time of 54.30, right before sixth-place finisher Amelia Smart of Panorama at 54.42. Robyn Fiell tied for 12th with 56.60. Riley Seger from Whistler was crowned the Mens' Super G winner after registering 52.35 as his final time. Keegan Sharp from Panorama was the runner-up after posting 52.44 as his final time. James Crawford from Whistler took third place with a time of 52.52. Results from the Sunday, March 3 skier cross events were not available at The Echo's press deadline.

Starlight Challenge wraps up for 2013 GREG AMOS editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

Another year of competing for greatest similarity has come to an end at the Fairmont Hot Springs Resort, where the most consistent skiers were rewarded after the February-long race series concluded. The challenge is a daunting task, as skiers and boarders must aspire to string together runs of as close to the same times as possible. It took place on Friday nights throughout the month of February. Erin McNeill proved she was the

most consistent lady, putting together a pair of runs that differed by a mere 0.510 seconds. She competed in three of the four challenge nights. Lone Harding came in second place with a 0.932-second differential, while Madison Haynes managed a 1.207-second differential. On the men's side, FAIRMONT HOT SPRINGS RESORT PHOTO Jordan Downey managed A jovial team shows off their spirit in the Challenge. a mere 0.549 second gap between two of his runs, Matthew Hammond managed a 0.916 Bryan Armstrong came up with a 0.774 second difference, and second gap between his times.


Wednesday,March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

A&E

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A17

Remember When?

SUBMITTED photo Edmonton's A/B Trio is looking forward to bringing their playful jazz stylings to Strand's Old House on Friday, March 8.

echo file photo Four competitors from the Panorama Ski Team competed at the Canada Games in February of 2011, with Alexandra Starker winning two gold medals. From left to right: Matt Mario, Rob Greig, Alexandra Starker, and Brydon Coombe.

A/B Trio hits Strands

A look back through The Valley Echo's archives over the last 50 years

DAN WALTON reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com

An evening of jazz is booked at Strands on Friday, March 8 as Edmonton's A/B Trio makes their first-ever stop in Invermere. The drummer, bassist and saxophone player combo from Edmonton formed three years ago, and after the release of their debut album Take No Prisoners one year ago, they're hitting the road in Western Canada. "We're looking forward to checking Invermere out for sure," drummer Thom Bennett told The Echo. "It sounds like a really cool cultural community." Bennett is joined in A/B Trio by Dan Davis on saxophone and Keith Rempel on the upright bass. Take No Prisoners ranges from “light in character” to “heavy shuffle” and features original tracks from all three members, as well as collaborative work with associated jazz artists. "It kind of jumps all over the place, and it takes from a variety of influences," Bennett said. "There’s some Brazillian stuff, some straight-ahead swing stuff, and some up tempo things; it just sort of touches on a lot of different areas." The A/B Trio's material stretches from “inventive re-interpre-

tations of standards into modern, original repertoire and high energy groove-based music. The Trio's format is fresh, and their music is accessible and compelling,” says a bio on the group's website. "Everything is sort of a single-note instrument, there’s no chords happening," Bennett said. "It kind of puts the onus on us to really make sure the form is super clear, and it’s sort of a new challenge to sort of play around with that much space." While a listener's personal preference may influence which instruments are most apparent, Bennett says that every member carries the band. "It's a cordless group, so I suppose there's no actual leader all three of us are sort of leaders." "The tunes sort of open up and have a little more space to breathe," Davis added. Bennett said members of the band have travelled through Invermere en route to Panorama, but have yet to explore. Strands will be charging a $6 cover for the show. Before their formation, members of A/B Trio had previously been associated with high-profile musicians, such as Juno Winners Brad Turner and Mike Lent, as well as the Calgary Jazz Orchestra and the Southwest Florida Symphony.

DAN WALTON reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com

5 years ago (2008): A driver was followed by police on February 22 after he was observed exiting a bar and entering his vehicle. After obvious signs of impairment were noticed through poor driving, the police pulled the vehicle over. The driver immediately exited the vehicle with his hands in the air admitting that he was “pissed”. Because of his level of impairment, registering a breath sample of 0.24, he was driven home and has pending charges. *** 10 years ago (2003): Radium Hot Springs resident Lorraine Brazeau was told to “come on down” on the television game show The Price Is Right. Brazeau won ceramic cats and a queen-sized bedroom suite before the showcase showdown, where she was awarded a surf board, Hawaiian shirts, a Chrysler Sebring and a trip to Hawaii – a total value of $35,660. “We had to go all the way to

Cinefest @ Pynelogs We Have a Pope

Tuesday March 12 What does ART mean to you? Doors open at 6:30 – Film at 7 pm Visit columbiavalleyarts.com for our current events calendar, or call 250-342-4423.

Canada to get a winner,” Bob Barker said. *** 20 years ago (1993): All teenagers have needs, whether they are rich or poor, said the new youth pastor at the Alliance Church. Relocating from Regina where he worked with “natives and disadvantaged white teenagers,” Steve Kirby aimed to bring youth and young adults closer to God in Invermere. “Eighty to 90 per cent of teenagers are interested in spirituality, but only 15 per cent go to church because they see it as being adult-oriented,” he said. *** 25 years ago (1988): Revised results of provincial exams were mailed out to students who were incorrectly evaluated at the end of their last semester. *** Radium Poetess Sarah Mierau's 'Life in Poetry' was recently released; a book featuring the senior citizen's best work between '88 and the time she was a young girl. *** 35 years ago (1978): The BC Teachers' Federation requested extra support from the province. They request that the government recognize the costly venture of “mainstreaming” the education of handicapped children

by relocating them into the public school system. Also, the teachers' federation requested more financial support from the province to offset the costs of “integrating native Indian children” into the provincial system and the development of French-language programs in some areas. *** 40 years ago (1973): Every house in the village will have an identification card delivered to their house for the purpose of coordinating emergency response. The card will give the ID number of the fire hydrant closest to each residence, which should be kept near the phone for emergencies. *** 45 years ago (1968): Southern Interior lumber operators were five months into a strike. While the International Woodworkers Association union called the offer an insult, the Interior Forest Labour Relations Association stated “it seems impossible to bargain with IWA leaders in a responsible way. Every concession we have made to settle this dispute has been rebuffed. All that is required is for our employees to return to work. The substantiallyincreased wages will be ready and waiting for them when they do.”


A18 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

SPORTS

Brain Games

Columbia Valley

Weekend Weather

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Variable cloudiness

Sunny

Temp: 7oC o Low: -3 C Precip: none

Temp: 7oC o Low: -5 C Precip: none

Cloudy periods o Temp: 9 C Low: 2oC Precip: 1 mm rain, 1 cm snow

March 8

Crossword March 6, 2013

March 10

March 9

CLUES ACROSS 1. Swedish rock group 5. Teen skin disorder 9. An instrument that magnifies 14. Sledgehammer 15. Ran away from 16. Old European silver coin 17. “Rule Britannia” composer 18. Rend or tear apart 19. Oats genus 20. Greater TV resolution 23. Kiln 24. A furrow in the road 25. Family Turdidae 28. Duck-billed mammal 33. German tennis star Tommy 34. “You Send Me” singer Sam 35. Volcanic mountain in Japan 36. Governed over

VALLEY ECHO T he

38. Process of decay 39. Clear wrap brand 41. Put into service 42. Snake catcher tribe of India 44. Best section of the mezzanine 45. Masseur 47. Funereal stone slabs 49. Before 50. Again 51. 1 of 10 official U.S. days off 58. Alternate name 59. One of Bobby Franks’ killers 60. Port capital of Vanuatu 61. Individual dishes are a la ___ 62. Shellfish 63. Welsh for John 64. Fencing swords 65. Griffith or Rooney 66. Titanic’s fate

CLUES DOWN 1. Far East wet nurse 2. Apulian seaport 3. Barrel hole stopper 4. Tavern where ale is sold 5. Anew 6. Actor Montgomery 7. Pigmented skin moles 8. Adam & Eve’s garden 9. Legislative acts 10. Pit 11. Butter alternative 12. Actor Sean 13. A major division of geological time 21. Hyrax 22. Country of Baghdad (alt. sp.) 25. Repetitive strumming 26. West Chadic 27. Rattling breaths 28. Savile Row tailor Henry

invermerevalleyecho.com

250-342-9216 customerservice@ invermerevalleyecho.com

29. Burbot 30. Christmas lantern in the Phillipines 31. Utilization 32. Sound units 34. Leg shank 37. Umlauts 40. Female owners of #4 down 43. One who regrets 46. Serenely deliberate 47. Stuck up 48. Cablegram (abbr.)

50. In advance 51. Envelope opening closure 52. Ireland 53. Australian Labradoodle Club of America (abbr.) 54. Poetic forsaken 55. Female operatic star 56. Actor Alda 57. An American 58. Highest card

Answer to February 27:

Horoscope First Week of M arch ARIES Finding time to get everything done can be challenging, Aries. Fortunately, you have quite a few supporters in your corner who are willing to lend a helping hand. TAURUS Taurus, difficult decisions take time to mull over. Although you want to properly work through all the scenarios, this week you might not have all the time you need. Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Last Sudoku answer -->:

GEMINI Gemini, water rolls off of your back quite easily. However, something tugs at you this week and you may have to give it more thought than you’re accustomed to.

CANCER Cancer, with such a hectic schedule, you may be feeling the pressure. It is not unreasonable to take some time for yourself and focus on your relationship with a spouse or significant other. LEO Sometimes you have to make a few mistakes before you get things right, Leo. Don’t let this worry you because you’ll get back on the right path soon enough. VIRGO Virgo, it’s important to recognize your way is not always the right way. If you absorb what other people are saying, you might have an easier go of things.

LIBRA Libra, keep the lines of communication open with a loved one. There may be messages coming your way, and you should be ready to receive them. SCORPIO You may need to break out of your routines this week, Scorpio. Even though you thrive when things are organized, you cannot expect everything to go according to plan. SAGITTARIUS There are some happy moments in your immediate future, Sagittarius. This will make any difficult days in your recent past seem well worth it.

CAPRICORN Capricorn, now is a good time to get friends or family together for an informal dinner party. Focus your energy on socialization to get away from the daily grind. AQUARIUS Aquarius, others appreciate all that you do for them, but sometimes they have to do for themselves to learn valuable lessons. This week is a time to step aside. PISCES Pisces, things may seem like they are going to go one way this week, but at the last minute things turn in an entirely different direction.


The Valley Echo Wednesday, March 6, 2013

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A19

Go-Go bake sale a go for St. Patrick's Day LUANA GILLIES Valley Go-Go Sisters

Our annual St. Patrick’s Day Tea and Bake Sale at Christ Church Trinity will be held on Saturday, March 16th, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., to raise money to

deal with the effects of HIV and AIDS in Africa. Admission is by donation. The Valley Go-Go Sisters are part of the Stephen Lewis Foundation's Grandmothers to Grandmothers campaign, to support families in sub-Saharan Africa who have been impacted by HIV and AIDS. Since 2006, more than

250 groups of Canadian grandmothers have raised an incredible $16.5 million to support African grandmothers who have stepped forward to care for millions of children orphaned by AIDS. From this fund-raising campaign, 90 per cent of the money raised reaches these families. These resources provide

grandmothers and children supports that include food, educational supplies, medical care, and more. Grandmothers in Africa display amazing resilience and courage, even while grieving for their own children. Our Valley Go-Go Sisters are proud to be part of this movement in Canada.

Used Kootenays offers local classifieds resource KIRSTEN HILDEBRAND Black Press

Looking for a job, a new car, maybe trying to get rid of an old set of bunk beds; or are you a collector? UsedKootenays.com is a resource not to be overlooked. With the rise of online classified sites such as Kijiji or Craigslist, UsedKootenays.com offers up an alternative that aims to connect with the community offline that it’s bringing together online. “We actually have a genuine concern and care for the communities we serve,” says Erin Richards, Marketing Coordinator for UsedKootenays.com, which is also owned by Black Press. Black Press is the largest publisher of community newspapers in B.C. and has newspapers in every community in the Kootenay region. Recently, all of the Kootenay Black Press titles began running all of its print classified ads on UsedKootenays.com. “We feel this is a great value for our customers and makes Black Press the best option when it comes to placing classified advertising throughout the Kootenays,” said Chuck Bennett, Group Publisher for Black Press in the Kootenays. “We are really excited about this opportunity for us to grow our business in this area, but more importantly, this is good for our customers.” This partnership also aligns well with the values of UsedKootenays.com, as being truly local. “We have staff on the ground in most of the communities we serve. They involve us in local community events, we partner with local non-profits and charities... We want to be that different classifieds that cares about people using our sites,” said Richards. UsedKootenays.com has its own charity as well. Called the Community Angel Program, Richards explains staff, or “angels”, spend time looking for ways to help out a person placing an online ad.

“Their job is to search our sites to find people who have posted ads saying they’re in need,” she says. “That can be anyone from a single mom who needs a birthday present for her son because she can’t afford one this year to a senior needing a new battery for their scooter.” The angel makes contact and meets with them in person to learn their story. “Whether that’s financially, or whether they just need help connecting to other resources, we do our best to give them a hand,” says Richards. “We really want to have personal connections with our users.” Also setting them apart from other online shopping venues is tighter moderation, ensuring things like weapons, puppy mills and pornography aren’t promoted. Scams, spam and low quality content are less likely to appear on this site as well. It’s all part of maintaining a high quality service that allows a positive exchange of goods with those living nearby. “People want to buy and sell from their neighbours, from people that they trust, from people living in their own communities,” Richards says. Secondhand bargain shopping is also the trend among many trying to save a buck these days. As well, it’s convenient to shop from a home computer, says Richards. “You can see the item right there online and you all the information and then you just go pick it up.” As part of a network of websites across the country, UsedKootenays.com covers the entire Kootenay region but users can narrow down a search based on how far they’re willing to look. On Facebook and Twitter, UsedKootenays.com is increasing its profile after a few years of operation. The feedback forum on their site is also open for comments from users who see a way they can better serve the immediate area. “I would love to engage in some dialogue with people in the Kootenays,” says Richards.

THREE DAYS ONLY! Friday, Mar 8th - Sunday, Mar 10th 32

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SHOP LOCALLY AND SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY 526 13th Street, Invermere BC tel#: 250-341-6173 Store Hours: Mon – Sat: 9am – 6pm, Sun & Holidays: 10am – 5pm


A20 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

Building your Wealth Market Update

Weekly change

Level

Year-to-Date

12,773

0.6%

2.7%

Dow

14,090

0.6%

7.5%

NASDAQ

3,170

0.3%

5.0%

Oil US$/B

$90.68

-2.3%

-1.2%

CDN $ Per USD

$0.974

-0.5%

-3.4%

S&P/TSX

When can I retire on my savings? You can see, as I can see, the effect of change all around us. In many ways, change is a good and necessary part of our lives. However, in a financial sense, it can be a very large problem. We have no way of testing the results of changes on the horizon, but we don’t have to look far to see how unexpected change is happening. Just look at the effects of the cell phone. Not only have the phones become more sophisticated, but for many people they have become a necessary part of life. The phone has become more than its starting place as a tool for communication. Many people have smartphones now and they are used all the time for more than phoning. The world of work has already started to change as the cell phone expands opportunities. If such a small thing can have such profound impact, what will we experience with some of what’s coming, especially with how effects interact and compound. All of this means that creating any type of future plan is getting more and more challenging. For that reason, some people won’t even start. “What’s the point in creating a plan if I’m just going to have to change it down the road?” I often hear. The truth is we are not going to be able to create the same kind of plan that was possible for our greatgrandparents. We want something that will last a long time, but we can’t make plans for a lifetime any more. We know, too, it’s only going to get more complex. The effect will compound with everything else around us, and plans we attempt to create will fail. Then, we need to be prepared to do it all over again. There is something we can do, but first we are going to have to stop doing two things. We must stop being too lazy to do the work necessary to create the plan. And, we are going to have to be willing to change the plan as the conditions change. It all begins with knowing what you spend and how you spend it. When you know that, you will have an

idea of what you need to retire as you wish. This includes not only the obvious amounts, like rent or mortgage, groceries, utilities and heat, but also what you spend on meals, gas and everything else you do. At first you will forget a lot, but that will improve. You will get more accurate and more complete and after a while you will have it. It’s impossible to come up

with an exact number, but you can get pretty close. Then, ask your bank for a statement of actual spending over a year. That will let you check your work. Two things will result. First, you will be able to compare the result with your estimate and find the differences. Second, you will be certain of your figures. That gives you a place to start. In a basic sense, if you then simply multiply that number by 20, the result will be fairly close to what

you need to have saved for a retirement lasting about 20 years. It is important to remember your income will probably increase over the rest of your working life, so you will need to do this over and over again, but you will also have a greater chance to succeed. So, if your target number for each retirement year is $24,000, you’ll be shooting for $480,000. It seems like a lot, doesn’t it? At first glance, many of us will find retirement plans too expensive. They may, in fact, have to be modified and reduced. The important part is that we try, and every effort we make will help a little. It would take many years to reach the goal of having the $480,000 we need to fund the sort of retirement we dream about, but every little bit helps, and the ‘magic’ of compounding helps as well. Remember, you get to choose the lifestyle you live. If you inflate your lifestyle with more spending, you save less and you push the date of your retirement into the future. If you keep things low-cost in perpetuity, you’re off the grind even sooner. This does not have to last forever, but you are the one who chooses. Keep in mind, this plan doesn’t have to create a full income replacement. It can be a plan to try lowerpaying, or non-paying career paths, for example. And, since you are still likely to have CPP, OAS and at least some of the benefits that come with them, you will need a smaller total income. Since your taxes are likely to be lower, too, you will need less to be comfortable. Remember, an expensive lifestyle, combined with laziness, is the biggest enemy of your own future. Every increase in expense puts off the date you can walk away from the need to go to work. The same is true for apathy towards planning. Use that fancy new cell phone for something practical. Take the time call and speak with a Certified Financial Planner® now. It is never too late to get started on the right path.


The Valley Echo Wednesday, March 6, 2013

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS TRAVEL CHILDREN EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SERVICES PETS & LIVESTOCK MERCHANDISE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE RENTALS AUTOMOTIVE MARINE

AGREEMENT

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. bcclassified.com cannot be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. bcclassified.com reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisment and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassified.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisment and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

ON THE WEB:

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4HE"#30#!CARESFOR THOUSANDSOFORPHANED ABAN DONEDANDABUSEDDOGSEACH YEAR)FYOUCANGIVEAHOMELESS DOGASECONDCHANCEAT HAPPINESS PLEASEVISITYOUR LOCALSHELTERTODAY

"#30#!

WWWSPCABCCA

Announcements

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A21

Employment

Employment

Information

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Medical/Dental

ALCOHOLICS Anonymous If alcohol is causing problems or conflict in your life, AA can help. Call 250-342-2424 for more information. All meetings are at 8 p.m. Invermere: Saturday, Sunday, Tuesday and Wednesday groups - Columbia United AA at the BC Services building, south end, 625 4th Street Invermere. Radium Friendship Group: Friday, Catholic Church. All meetings are open.

Black Forest Restaurant is hiring

INVERMERE PETRO CANADA

Cook. $12 - $14 per hour 40 hours per week.

is currently accepting applications for full time and part time employment. Apply in person to 185 Laurier Street, Invermere, BC between 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

LOOKING For Registered Massage Therapist. Work Alongside Chiropractor. Kimberley/Cranbrook Call 250-919-5726

Travel

Timeshare CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. NO Risk Program, STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

Employment Business Opportunities ACCOUNTING & Tax Franchise - Start your own Practice with Canada’s leading Accounting Franchise. Join Padgett Business Services 400 practices. Taking care of small business needs since 1966. www.padgettfranchises.ca or 1-888-723-4388, ext. 222.

Help Wanted

Email resume to: careers@ blackforestrestaurant.com or drop off resume between Noon-5:00pm. EXPERIENCED CDA required for Dr. Dale Henry, starting April. Prostho module an asset. Office Hours TuesdayWednesday-Thursday 7:30am - 6pm. Resumes to: 201-330632nd Ave, Vernon, V1T 2M6 Fax 250-545-6872 or email: docsmiley@shawcable.com FARM~TASTIC! Winderberry Nursery is looking for an enthusiastic and energetic person to join our spring and summer team. Position would be full time from April 1 until the end of September. Job would include such duties as soil preparation for greenhouse operation, handling of nursery stock (can you lift 50 lbs.?), property maintenance, and assisting with all aspects of vegetable crop seeding, production, harvest and sales. In other words, good honest hard work, in the beautiful setting of Windermere. Perks include a delicious array of organically grown veggies to snack on all summer! Please direct any questions or your resume to lin@winderberry.ca

Resident Manager for 20 unit Silver Star Motel,Vernon Fax 250-545-3859 email silverstar motel@shaw.ca

GUARANTEED JOB Placement: General Laborers and Tradesmen For Oil & Gas Industry. Call 24hr Free Recorded Message for Information: 1800-972-0209.

Obituaries

Obituaries

HERBERT NUESSLEIN

March March 3, 3, 1928-February 1928-February 26, 26, 2013 2013 ItIt isis with great sadness we mourn with great sadness we mourn the the death death of of Herbert Herbert Nuesslein, Nuesslein, aa beloved beloved husband, husband, father father and and grandfather. grandfather. He He will will also also be be deeply deeply missed missed by by the the Invermere Invermere Congregation Congregation of of Jehovah’s Jehovah’s Witnesses Witnesses and and many many close close friends. friends. Herbert is survived by his wife Hilde, son David Nuesslein Herbert is survived by his wife Hilde, son David Nuesslein (Deanna), (Deanna), daughter daughter Eunice Eunice Kortegaard Kortegaard (Gorm) (Gorm) and and grand-daughter grand-daughter Elise. Elise. Herbert Herbert and and Hilde Hilde arrived arrived in in Invermere Invermere in in 1971 1971 with with their their children children Eunice Eunice and and David. David. Since Since that that time time Herbert Herbert and and Hilde Hilde have have been been an an integral integral part part of of the the Invermere Invermere Congregation, Congregation, and have distinguished distinguished themselves themselvesbybytheir theirgenerosity generosity, and have of hospitality and zeal. Herbert expended himself for the Jehovah’s Witnesses, hospitality and zeal. Herbert expended congregation there were and few there peoplewere not few touched by not his himself for theand congregation people integrity, and large-heartedness. He was especially touched bykindness, his integrity, kindness, and large-heartedness. He noted for his fervour forhis thefervour ministry in the was especially noted for forand the many ministry and valley many received regular visitsregular from him. in the valley received visits from him. There There was was aa special special place place in in his his heart heart for for anyone anyone struggling struggling and and disadvantaged, disadvantaged, and and he he was was quick quick to to help help out out wherever wherever he he saw saw aa need, need, quietly, quietly, without without fanfare. fanfare. His His love love for for Jehovah Jehovah and and his his family family was was always always evident. evident. Herbert Herbert was was well well known known in in Columbia Columbia House House North North Wing Wing for for his his twice twice daily daily visits visits to to Hilde, Hilde, often often bringing bringing her her flowers flowers and and fruit. fruit. He He wanted wanted to to “see “see her her through through another another season�. season�. ItIt was was not not to to be. be. He He died died peacefully peacefully on on Tuesday, Tuesday, February February 26, 26, 2013, 2013, surrounded surrounded by by special special friends friends who who would would not not let let him him die die alone. We eagerly await his resurrection as promised alone. We eagerly await his resurrection as promised (John (John 5:28,29) 5:28,29) and and we we are are comforted comforted that that he he isis sleeping sleeping peacefully peacefully in in Jehovah’s Jehovah’s memory. memory. There There was was aa Memorial Memorial Service Service held held for for Herbert Herbert on on Saturday Saturday March March 2, 2, 2013 2013 at at the the Invermere Invermere Kingdom Kingdom Hall Hall of of Jehovah’s Jehovah’s Witnesses. He will be missed by many.

Employment

We’re at the heart of things™

Trades, Technical FITTER/FABRICATOR

Maple Ridge shop req. full time Fitter/Fabricator with specific pressure vessel/heat exchanger experience. Can interpret shop dwgs is well versed in layout, fitting and tacking of pressure vessel tube and shell heat exchangers & tanks w/minimum supervision. Competitive Salary, with BeneďŹ ts Including Pension. Please e-mail resume emmfg.com

Coming Events Calling all Edgewater Residents!

careers at cbt Manager, Community Initiatives (13-14 month maternity leave coverage) %FBEMJOFOPPO145.BSDI  Administrative Assistant, Sector Initiatives (13-14 month leave coverage) %FBEMJOFOPPO145"QSJM  A detailed description of both positions can be viewed at www.cbt.org/careers or requested from Debra Stewart at 1.800.505.8998. Please forward resumes to dstewart@cbt.org by the deadline for consideration. XXXDCUPSHt

The Edgewater Recreation Society will be holding the Annual General Meeting on March 19th, 2013, 7:00 p.m. Edgewater Community Hall. We strongly encourage you to attend and see what’s been done and what’s to come! For meeting agenda please go to www.facebook.com/ERSevents or call Tammy 250-270-0340. See you there!

Obituaries

Help Wanted

Community Newspapers

Spur Valley Golf Resort currently has two positions available for the golf course and one for the resort. Individuals need to have a strong work ethic, be able to work unsupervised, and be able to work weekends. Wage negotiable upon experience. If you would like to work at a family-oriented, fun-loving environment, we would like to have you. Please send your resume to k_g@shaw.ca or contact Kelly at 250-347-6500.

Coming Events

Help Wanted

Career Opportunities

December 13, 1921 -February 23, 2013

On Saturday February 23 we said goodbye to a great friend, husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather. Donald Thompson enjoyed a very long and charmed life. He was born in Moose Jaw Saskatchewan, the son of Jack and Jean Thompson, and brother to Helen Hardy of Saskatoon. While still in high school, Don fell in love with the beautiful Mary Johnston of Moose Jaw. In 1945, as soon as Don returned from overseas, he and Mary were married. Don and Mary had four children: John (Lesley Ostrosser), Donna Price (Askey) (Bob), Pam Thompson (Ted Fullerton) and Pat Peters (Mat). Also 3 grandsons -Paul Askey (Cori), Colin Askey and Spencer Brown, as well as 2 great grandsons--Ethan and Marco Askey. After Don retired, he and Mary moved to their Windermere cabin, which they have enjoyed since 1958. They spent their summers in Windermere with family and their many golfing friends at Fairmont, then escaping the Canadian winters enjoying the company of friends and family in Palm Desert California. Don enjoyed a life with good health, many good friends and much laughter. His friends and family will remember a man with a million stories, a quick inquiring mind and a great sense of humour, which he maintained to the end. We will miss you Dad, and we will continue to celebrate your life well lived. Friends are invited to join the family in a celebration of Don’s life 2 p.m. Saturday, March 9th, at McInnis and Holloway, 14441 Bannister Rd S.E., Calgary (403256-9575). Condolences may be forwarded through www. mcinnisandholloway.com. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Alberta Adolescent Recovery Center (AARC).

Career Opportunities

REPORTER

Obituaries

Dr. Donald Lloyd Thompson DDS

Join us:

Job Description: The Columbia Valley Pioneer and The Valley Echo, two awardwinning, jointly operating community newspapers based in Invermere, B.C., have an immediate opening for a reporter/ photographer. We require a self-starter who needs little training and can immediately become a productive member of our staff. This is a great opportunity to practise your professional skills while living in our gorgeous resort community in southeastern B.C. Our print-run is 6,400 and 2,100 respectively, Wednesday and Friday.

Qualifications: • • • • • • • • •

A post-secondary journalism diploma or degree A valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle A digital SLR camera and extensive photography experience Experience with Adobe CS6 suite, including Photoshop and InDesign Excellent writing, interviewing and computer-assisted research skills Excellent competency with Google documents and spreadsheets Available to cover evening and weekend events on an as- needed basis Comfortable covering a wide variety of topics Team-oriented and able to take direction well

Interested candidates should send a cover letter, resume, writing and photography samples to:

Greg Amos, Editor Columbia Valley Pioneer and The Valley Echo N E W S PA P E R Box 868, #8, 1008-8th Avenue Invermere, B.C. V0A1K0 VALLEY ECHO Email: greg@cv-pioneer.com T he

The NEWSpaper in the Columbia Valley

A healthy local economy depends on you

SHOP LOCALLY


A22 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

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Auto Financing

Auto Financing

INVERMERE Fully Furnished 3 BR, 2 Bath, 5 Appliance Home in Wilder Subdivision for rent. N/S, DD. $1400/month. Utilities/cable included. Call 403-819-8121.

INVERMERE bright 2 BR Basement Suite in Wilder. Separate entrance. $850/mo. Utilities/cable included. N/S DD. Call 403-819-8121.

NOW HIRING! Journey person, 30 Millwrights, 50 Pipefitters, 20 Welders, with industrial experience for a large project in Vanscoy, SK. Wages $34-$40/hour, plus retention & completion bonuses, 14/7 shift rotation, paid benefits, RRSP’s. Travel & living out allowance (for eligible candidates). Successful candidates must complete a pre-access A&D test & CSTS 09 training. Apply with current resume and references to jobs@monad.ca or online at: www.monad.ca or fax 1-888398-0725 or in person at 9744-45 Avenue, Edmonton, AB, T6E 5C5

WHERE DO YOU TURN

TO LEARN WHAT’S ON SALE?

YOUR NEWSPAPER:

The link to your community

Services

Financial Services DROWNING IN debts? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500 GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161. M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

Legal Services CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

A-STEEL SHIPPING DRY STORAGE CONTAINERS Used 20’40’45’53 in stock. SPECIAL 44’ x 40’ Container Shop w/steel trusses $13,800! Sets up in one day! Also Damaged 40’ $1950 Call Toll Free Also JD 544 & 644 wheel loaders JD 892D LC Excavator Ph. 1-866-528-7108 Free Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

Misc. for Sale AT LAST! An iron filter that works. IronEater! Fully patented Canada/U.S.A. Removes iron, hardness, smell, manganese. Since 1957. Visit our 29 innovative inventions online at; www.bigirondrilling.com or Phone 1-800-BIG-IRON. BIG BUILDING sale... “”This is a clearance sale. you don’t want to miss!”” 20x20 $3,985. 25x24 $4,595. 30x36 $6,859. 35x48 $11,200. 40x52 $13,100. 47x76 $18,265. One End wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca FOR RESTLESS or Cramping Legs. A Fast acting Remedy since 1981, sleep at night, proven for 31 years. Online: www.allcalm.com, Mon-Fri 8-4 EST 1-800-765-8660. HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper? SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD online: www.Norwood Sawmills.com/400OT or call 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT. STEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 or check us online at: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

2BDRM, 1 1/2 BATH apartment for rent, in Canal Flats. Great view, parking, F/S, D/W, microwave. $775 + utilities & D.D. Available immediately. Call (250)3495306 or (250)489-8389. Radium - 405 Top unit Pinewood West building. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, underground parking, fully furnished. All inclusive. Avail immediately. $1000/mth. Call Lina @ 403-264-2782 or 403277-7898 ask for Emilio

Homes for Rent 3 BR HOUSE - Great location & lake views! One level, W/D, F/S, DW. Avail Mar 1st. $815 + Utilities. Jeff 250-688-1105

Misc. Wanted Local Coin Collector Buying Collections, Accumulations, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins + Coin Guy: 778-281-0030

Real Estate Houses For Sale

Office/Retail For Lease: 725 sq.ft. office space in professional building, street level, air conditioned, 712-10th Street. Call 250-342-9767

Transportation

Auto Financing

Seasonal Acommodation $449 CABO San Lucas, all inclusive Special! Stay 6 Days in a Luxury Beachfront Resort with Meals & Drinks! For $449! www.luxurycabo hotel.com 1-888-481-9660.

DreamTeam Auto Financing “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-961-7022

www.iDreamAuto.com DL# 7557

Vehicle Wanted Wanted: for parts 1976-1984 VW Rabbit/Jetta or up to 1989 Cabriolet. Email: valleyvdub@gmail.com.

Three million Canadians have a hearing loss. I’m one of them. The Hearing Foundation of Canada funds the only nationally coordinated medical research program to find the cause and cure of hearing loss. To learn more about our programs and how you can help, call 1-866 HEAR YOU, toll free or visit our web site, www.hearingfoundation.ca

Exclusive MOUNTAIN HOME For Sale - Visit:

Don Harron

www.newbuildinglinks.com

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent 2 bd in Windermere 4 plex all appliances close to beach pets considered, $825/month. Call 250-409-7435 or Shellimilley@gmail.com. AKISKINOOK resort - 1 bdrm fully furnished condo, indoor pool, hot tub. $675/ month includes cable. Call 403-281-3991

We’re on the net at www.bcclassified.com

CHURCH SERVICES DIRECTORY ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN MISSION OF INVERMERE Worship Services every Sunday at 1:30 p.m. at Christ Church Trinity 110 - 7th Avenue, Invermere Pastor Rev. Fraser Coltman Pastor Rev. David Morton 1-866-426-7564

WINDERMERE VALLEY SHARED MINISTRY ANGLICAN-UNITED 250-342-6644 100-7th Avenue, Invermere www.wvsm.ca Reverend Laura Hermakin

9:30 a.m.: God’s Breakfast Club 10:30 a.m.: Worship at Christ Church Trinity, Invermere. (Every Sunday) March 10, 7 p.m.: Lenten Quiet Prayer Service at Christ Church Trinity, Invermere

CANADIAN MARTYRS CATHOLIC CHURCH

Roman Catholic Parish Pastor: Father Gabriel 250-342-6167 Invermere 250-344-6328 Golden Confession: 1/2 hour before Mass Canadian Martyrs’ Church 712 - 12 Ave, Invermere Saturday at 7 p.m. Sunday at 9 a.m. St. Joseph’s Church Highway 93-95, Radium Hot Springs Sunday at 11 a.m. Sacred Heart Parish 808 - 11 Street, Golden Sunday at 5 p.m. St. Anthony’s Mission Corner of Luck and Dunn, Canal Flats

Saturday at 4:30 p.m. (served from Kimberly)

RADIUM CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP For more information call 250-342-6633 or 250-347-6334 Loving God, Loving People #4 - 7553 Main Street W, Radium Sundays at 10 a.m. Bible Studies #4 - 7553 Main Street W, Radium Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Kids’ Church Edgewater Hall Thursday 6:30 p.m.

LAKE WINDERMERE ALLIANCE CHURCH

326 - 10th Ave. 250-342-9535 REV. TREVOR HAGAN Senior Pastor www.lakewindermerealliance.org

Sunday, March 10th 10:30 a.m.

Fourth Sunday of Lent. Worship and Life Instruction, “The Easter Experience. What If What Happened Then Changes Everything Now? Tortured By The Romans” … Pastor Trevor ministering. “K.I.D.S.” Church, for children Age 3 to Grade 1; and Grades 2-5, during the Morning Service.

7:00 p.m.

“SING and CELEBRATE” … at L.W.A.C. You are welcome to join us for an evening of singing the great hymns of the faith; food; and fellowship!

VALLEY CHRISTIAN ASSEMBLY Hwy. 93/95 1 km north of Windermere Pastor: Murray Wittke Sunday Service 10 a.m. Worship & Word Kid’s Church Provided Call the office at 250-342-9511 for more information. www.valleychristianonline.com

Sharing Truth Showing Love Following the Spirit


The Valley Echo Wednesday, March 6, 2013

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A23

Serving the Valley RADIUM HOT SPRINGS ESSO • Gas • Propane • Diesel • Automotive Repairs • Tires & Batteries • Greyhound

• CAA approved automotive repair •

MECHANICAL REPAIRS AVAILABLE 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 7 Days A Week

250-347-9726

7507 Main Street West

To advertise, call: 250-342-9216

Sholinder & MacKay

Septic Tank Pumping Portable Toilet Rentals

Sand & Gravel

Complete line of aggregate products for construction and landscaping

NEWER SEW ERA CAM

• Complete sewer/drain repairs • Reasonable rates - Seniors’ discount • Speedy service - 7 days a week • A well-maintained septic system should be pumped every 2-3 years • Avoid costly repairs

Office:

Bruce Dehart 250-347-9803 or 250-342-5357

250-342-6452 • 250-342-3773 Cell: 250-342-5833

The WaTer & air Company! Water Treatment: filtration and purification Furnace and Duct cleaning

to give your business maximum exposure for your advertising dollar?

Call 250-342-9216

Purify the water you drink and the air you breathe!

for more information.

Kerry Colonna

250-342-5089

Located in the Diamond Heating & Spa building in Athalmer

Call us to advertise in this spot! • Furnaces • Heat PumPs • air conditioning • FirePlaces• Hot tubs • cHemicals • service & maintenance • gas Fitting 385 Laurier Street Phone: 250-342-7100 Invermere, BC Fax: 250-342-7103 www.diamondheatingandspas.com

QUALITY AUTO SERVICE YOU CAN TRUST

Lake Auto Service

250-342-9216

ALL MAKES • ALL MODELS AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. Main Street • Downtown Invermere 250-342-9310

DCS Plumbing Universal Doors & Exteriors

Cranbrook Pest Control Environmentally-friendly integrated pest management Ask about our maintenance programs All work guaranteed

Sales • Service • Installation

• Plumbing, Repair and Installation • Drain Lines • Hot Water Tanks • Over 30 years experience • 24 hour emergency service • Seniors’ Discount

250-341-8501 Lambert-Kipp Pharmacy Ltd. J. Douglas Kipp, B. Sc. (Pharm.) Laura Kipp, Pharm D. Irena Sedlakova, B. Sc. (Pharm.) Your compounding pharmacy Come in and browse our giftware! Open Monday - Saturday • 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 1301 - 7th Avenue, Invermere • 250-342-6612

• Garage Doors • Passage Doors • Truck Doors • Windows • Sunrooms • Patio Covers • Vinyl Decking • Aluminum Railings • Siding • Soffit • Facia • Window Capping • Renovations Invermere

Phone

Thermal Imaging PEST QUESTIONS? Visit our website: WWW.CRANBROOKPESTCONTROL.COM info@cranbrookpestcontrol.com

250-426-9586 • 1-888-371-6299

250-342-6700

■ Lockout Service ■ Lake Recovery ■ 24 Hour Towing ■ Prompt Service

Also offering FREE year-round pickup of unwanted vehicles

If you saw this ad, imagine how many others did as well.

Warbrick Towing & Salvage warbrick@shaw.ca • Cell: 250-342-5851

Call 250-342-9216 for more information.

READY MIX CONCRETE Your search for quality and dependability ends with us.

Your search for quality and dependability ends with us. Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Specialists

Carpet System & Upholstery Cleaning Specialists Guaranteed Truck Mounted • Customer Satisfaction

TruckHubman Mounted System • Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed Dean Toll Free: 877-342-3052

Dean Certifi ed Hubman Technician

Certified Technician 250-342-3052

250-342-3052

TollInvermere, Free: 877-342-3052 BC V0A 1K3 Invermere, BC V0A 1K3 odysseyrestoration@telus.net

odysseyrestoration@telus.net

• CONCRETE PUMP • SAND & GRAVEL • HEAVY EQUIPMENT RENTALS • CRANE SERVICE

Proudly serving the Valley for over 50 years. For competitive prices and prompt service call:

250-342-3268 (plant) 250-342-6767

(office)


A24 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 The Valley Echo

DON’T WAIT for Spring! The SAVINGS are

NOW! www.allweatherwindows.com

Winter booking SAV E SALE CONTINUES 1 % CLEARLY COMPETITIVE

0

If you are shopping for windows, Until bring in any current quote from our March 30, 2013 competitors. If we can’t beat it... ”WE’LL BUY YOU LUNCH”* ES MAT I T S E G FREE RVICIN E L SE WHO ENAY E H T T KOO T S A E

THE CLOCK IS TICKING.

Don’t let time run out on this special offer. Replace or upgrade those drafty windows and doors now and SAVE HUNDREDS!

Simply THE BEST for over 20 YEARS

UNIQUE WINDOWS & SOLARIUMS

724 - 304th St., Mainstreet Marysville, BC 1-800-881-1588

www.uniquewindowsandsolariums.ca *Quote must be on like kind or comparable quality windows. Lunch gift certificate for Bavarian Chalet or Franks $25 value.

Great Selection of in stock windows NO HST


Invermere Valley Echo, March 06, 2013