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CHARITIES OF PRINCE GEORGE • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Prince George & District

ELIZABETH FRY SOCIETY

Friends of Children

February 2013

Helping Those Who Need It Most

Section One


2

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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www.integriscu.ca

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DEVELOPING POTENTIAL AND EXPLORING POSSIBILITIES FOR CHILDREN OF ALL ABILITIES

The Child Development Centre of Prince George & District (CDC) aims to assist children of all abilities from Prince George and surrounding communities to develop to their highest potential through familycentred, child-focused rehabilitation, early childhood education and support services. We have been providing these services to children and their families since 1968. In the past year, nearly 1200 children and their families have received services such as speech language pathology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, family services, early childhood education and support services for children in community programs. On a daily basis, approximately 100 children attend the programs we offer. The majority of our funding is provided through the Ministry of Children and Family Development. Unfortunately, this funding does not stretch far enough to cover the resources that we need to work with our children and families â&#x20AC;&#x201C; things such as specialized mobility equipment, assessment forms and even the toys that we use to teach the children the skills they need to be successful later in life. The CDC must fundraise approximately $200,000-$400,000 every year to meet our current resource needs. In 2011-12, the CDC received approximately $250,000 in grants and donations. With the generosity of granting agencies and donors, we were able to purchase mobility equipment and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sized orthotics that we were able to loan to children who did not have the ability to walk on their own or who needed a little extra assistance. We were also able to provide some children with specially adapted toys and communication systems so that they could actually play with a toy and â&#x20AC;&#x153;talkâ&#x20AC;? with their families and friends. Children were able to beneĂ&#x20AC;t from specialized groups offered by our childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s therapy and early childhood education programs. We were also able to run a pilot program for young children with mental health needs in cooperation with other community agencies. The CDC relies on volunteers to assist with many of our fundraising activities such as our annual Christmas Gift Wrap booth at Pine Centre Mall and our annual Kris Kringle Luncheon. Volunteers are also an essential part of helping our centre run smoothly. For more information on volunteering with the CDC or if you are interested in making a donation or leaving a legacy to the CDC, please contact Darrell Roze, Executive Director, at 250-563-7168, extension 207 or darrellr@cdcpg.org.

Prince George Free Press - www.pgfreepress.com

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Fostering a more conscious society and striving for positive change in the life situations of women. For 33 years the Prince George & District Elizabeth Fry Society has been a turning point for many women, girls and children. As a non proĂ&#x20AC;t agency we recognize that Ă&#x20AC;nancial resources are becoming slimmer and that we need to continue to be vigilant in developing strategies of how to do more with less. Over the years there has been a steady increase in the number of individuals seeking our support and services and during the 2011 - 2012 year we provided services to more than 4000 individuals.

Since we Ă&#x20AC;rst opened our doors in 1979, the observation that must be noted is the complexity of the life situations that now accompany the women and girls who walk through the doors of our agency. In British Columbiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s north we are constantly reminded of the alarming number of women who face violence and homelessness; the increasing number of missing and murdered women; the waitlists for support and programs to children who have witnessed violence and abuse; the challenges for women and children accessing transition houses; the increasing number of women and girls who are in conĂ ict with the law and the lack of gender-speciĂ&#x20AC;c alternatives to incarceration; the need for more sustainable and signiĂ&#x20AC;cant employment opportunities for women and girls; the continued need for locally responsive funding and programs for women living with situations of addiction and trauma in which they can learn and heal in supportive environments grounded in gender analysis; and the ongoing challenges and outcomes of women and girls who live in poverty. The work of Elizabeth Gurney Fry remains our guide toward fostering a more conscious society and striving for positive change in the life situations of women. I would like to acknowledge those women with whom we work with on a daily basis. Our agency is strong because women have chosen to include the Elizabeth Fry Society in their lives. We continue in our commitment to respond to womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs as advocates, ensuring that they are supported and that their voices are heard with the realization and acknowledgment that each woman is the expert of her own story. I would like to take this opportunity to give thanks to all those who have assisted and supported the Elizabeth Fry Society to grow to be the respected organization that it is. The Elizabeth Fry Society is a strong agency that has many to thank. I am so appreciative of our Board of Directors, our employees and volunteers for their commitment and dedication to making our community a better place for women, children and families. I am also grateful to our funders, donors and friends who believe in our agency and who have made the resources available to do our work â&#x20AC;&#x201C; together we can be the change. In Strength Kathi Heim, MA Executive Director www.pgefry.bc.ca

Prince George & District Elizabeth Fry Society


www.pgfreepress.com - Prince George Free Press

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Giving to UNBC is an investment in the future. Graduates tell the story: Derrick O’Neill is defining the value of archaeology in industrial development. With a BA in Anthropology and now working at the Site C project in Fort St. John, Derrick was inspired by the practical experiences of a UNBC archaeological field school in preparation for a career in northern BC.

Jeremy Belyea is making a difference by leading and inspiring aboriginal participation in the national workforce through the National Aboriginal Human Resource Council. Completing a BA First Nations Studies, and MEd Counseling, Jeremy received student awards and credits his successful experience at UNBC in part to the donorfunded Northern Advancement Program.

Cathy Mackay is a UNBC graduate changing the world through entrepreneurship and sustainable resource development. Growing up in Taylor B.C., Cathy’s research at UNBC earned her an MSc., and today she is one of the owners of Environmental Dynamics Ltd, a northern BC based company that is supporting sustainable resource development across western Canada

UNBC is changing the region. Based on a recent survey more graduates of UNBC are living and working in northern BC than all other BC universities combined. With nearly 10,000 alumni, UNBC is serving growing needs for graduates in health care, natural resource and environmental sciences, engineering, education, business, social work and other programs that reflect the needs of our communities in northern BC. This is possible only with your support. Giving to UNBC makes a difference through the lives of students – the future citizens of our region.

In 2015 UNBC will celebrate its 25th anniversary. Giving to UNBC helps create the stories of the next generation. For more information about donating to UNBC or to make a gift online:

Development Office University of Northern British Columbia 3333 University Way Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9 Phone: 250-960-5750 Email: giving@unbc.ca Give Online: unbc.ca/giving

unbc.ca

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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

www.pgfreepress.com

Arriving in Prince George in 1920, the Army has been living its creed “Heart to God – Hand to Man”, as a religious organization and provider of support to all those in need. Today 300+ members continue to provide this assistance. Most everyone knows of The Salvation Army name, but may not be aware of the many services it provides to our community. Delivering on the second part of the creed “Hand to Man” requires year round work, 24/7, by local volunteers and staff. People may be are aware of the Army’s fund raising efforts such as the Christmas Kettle Campaign, the Tree of Lights and the Red Shield Appeal but may not know that it is completely dependent on Prince George for its Ànancial resources or that it is intimately inter- woven into the fabric of the Prince George community.

A total of 19 staff deliver support and supervise the programmes that impact our community every day; food bank, school support, counseling services, community out-reach and disaster relief. Each month at our food bank we support some 800 families and individuals with a basic hamper. Without our program, many of people would not have enough food to meet a basic requirement of life. If you are always hungry, it is difÀcult to improve aspects of one’s life which leave you disadvantaged or troubled. This program is very expensive and requires almost 50% of the annual budget. It is the support of the major food retailers in our community that allows us to meet this demand. Without them we never could. We wish to public ly thank them for their commitment to us and the community. Donations such as these are extremely important but so too are cash donations received through our various campaigns, as they allow us to purchase items that are not donated. Emergency Disaster Relief is a major service of the Prince George Salvation Army. We were there to help at the Lakeland Mill disaster. We have 50 fully trained Emergency Relief personnel who are on stand-by, ready to attend any emergency or disaster in the North Central Interior. While on site we provide support services to those who may have been directly affected by the disaster, those who may be displaced and to all emergency response providers. We have a fully contained service vehicle that is sent to the site to allow us to provide up to 500 meals per hour for responders and those affected by the event. The Nechako Rotary Club of Prince George has recently provided us with a specially equipped travel trailer allowing us to carry more emergency items and providing us with accommodation for our response staff. Often we are one of the Àrst emergency response groups to arrive and are usually the last to leave the site. This integral service is totally dependent on community donations, such as the generous support of Nechako Rotary. Salvation Army has always believed in Recycling, starting as early with the Household Salvage Brigades that went door to door in England, collecting reusable household items and clothing and redistributing it to those in need. Here in Prince George, we recycle through The Salvation Army Thrift Store, on Westwood Drive. At this location we sell clothing, household items and furniture at reasonable prices. All items are donated and all of the revenue received is used to support our local services. Donations of clothing, household goods, electronics and working appliances are accepted at The Salvation Army Donation Depot at 1990 Ogilvie Street. Here donations are sorted. Salable items are sent over to the Thrift Store for re-sale and unsalable items are sent off for recycling. Some facts and Àgures regarding the importance of our recycling program are on the next page. We encourage you to help others by recycling with us. The Prince George Salvation Army is community based, community funded and community driven. We are here to serve, just as we have been for the last 92 years. If you wish further information on our services or to make a donation please contact us at the numbers below: OfÀce: 250-564-4000 Recycling Donation Depot: 250-563-7475

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

Can we please ha ve your clothes?

The Salvation Army has been an integral part of the Prince George community for 92 years.

On a daily basis the Army works quietly behind the scenes to assist children and families in need of food, clothing and personal support. It works closely with many other community social service agencies to ensure that anyone requiring help, will receive it.

Prince George Free Press

We accept electronics also!

Textiles recycled 1.5 million lbs Electronics 20,000 lbs Metal 12,000 lbs waste diversion 3million lbs economic contribution $510,000 employment 10 fulltime, 6 parttime volunteers positions 50

PLEASE PUT YOUR UNNEEDED OR UNWANTED BUT STILL WEARABLE KIDS AND ADULTS CLOTHING IN A BAG AND DROP OFF @ DONATION DEPOT, 1990 OGILVIE STREET NO LIMIT ON NUMBER OF BAGS

If you have furniture or other items you would like to donate, call us at 250-563-7475

The Prince George Salvation Army Thrift Store thanks you

TOGETHER WE DO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

5


4

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

www.pgfreepress.com

Arriving in Prince George in 1920, the Army has been living its creed “Heart to God – Hand to Man”, as a religious organization and provider of support to all those in need. Today 300+ members continue to provide this assistance. Most everyone knows of The Salvation Army name, but may not be aware of the many services it provides to our community. Delivering on the second part of the creed “Hand to Man” requires year round work, 24/7, by local volunteers and staff. People may be are aware of the Army’s fund raising efforts such as the Christmas Kettle Campaign, the Tree of Lights and the Red Shield Appeal but may not know that it is completely dependent on Prince George for its Ànancial resources or that it is intimately inter- woven into the fabric of the Prince George community.

A total of 19 staff deliver support and supervise the programmes that impact our community every day; food bank, school support, counseling services, community out-reach and disaster relief. Each month at our food bank we support some 800 families and individuals with a basic hamper. Without our program, many of people would not have enough food to meet a basic requirement of life. If you are always hungry, it is difÀcult to improve aspects of one’s life which leave you disadvantaged or troubled. This program is very expensive and requires almost 50% of the annual budget. It is the support of the major food retailers in our community that allows us to meet this demand. Without them we never could. We wish to public ly thank them for their commitment to us and the community. Donations such as these are extremely important but so too are cash donations received through our various campaigns, as they allow us to purchase items that are not donated. Emergency Disaster Relief is a major service of the Prince George Salvation Army. We were there to help at the Lakeland Mill disaster. We have 50 fully trained Emergency Relief personnel who are on stand-by, ready to attend any emergency or disaster in the North Central Interior. While on site we provide support services to those who may have been directly affected by the disaster, those who may be displaced and to all emergency response providers. We have a fully contained service vehicle that is sent to the site to allow us to provide up to 500 meals per hour for responders and those affected by the event. The Nechako Rotary Club of Prince George has recently provided us with a specially equipped travel trailer allowing us to carry more emergency items and providing us with accommodation for our response staff. Often we are one of the Àrst emergency response groups to arrive and are usually the last to leave the site. This integral service is totally dependent on community donations, such as the generous support of Nechako Rotary. Salvation Army has always believed in Recycling, starting as early with the Household Salvage Brigades that went door to door in England, collecting reusable household items and clothing and redistributing it to those in need. Here in Prince George, we recycle through The Salvation Army Thrift Store, on Westwood Drive. At this location we sell clothing, household items and furniture at reasonable prices. All items are donated and all of the revenue received is used to support our local services. Donations of clothing, household goods, electronics and working appliances are accepted at The Salvation Army Donation Depot at 1990 Ogilvie Street. Here donations are sorted. Salable items are sent over to the Thrift Store for re-sale and unsalable items are sent off for recycling. Some facts and Àgures regarding the importance of our recycling program are on the next page. We encourage you to help others by recycling with us. The Prince George Salvation Army is community based, community funded and community driven. We are here to serve, just as we have been for the last 92 years. If you wish further information on our services or to make a donation please contact us at the numbers below: OfÀce: 250-564-4000 Recycling Donation Depot: 250-563-7475

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

Can we please ha ve your clothes?

The Salvation Army has been an integral part of the Prince George community for 92 years.

On a daily basis the Army works quietly behind the scenes to assist children and families in need of food, clothing and personal support. It works closely with many other community social service agencies to ensure that anyone requiring help, will receive it.

Prince George Free Press

We accept electronics also!

Textiles recycled 1.5 million lbs Electronics 20,000 lbs Metal 12,000 lbs waste diversion 3million lbs economic contribution $510,000 employment 10 fulltime, 6 parttime volunteers positions 50

PLEASE PUT YOUR UNNEEDED OR UNWANTED BUT STILL WEARABLE KIDS AND ADULTS CLOTHING IN A BAG AND DROP OFF @ DONATION DEPOT, 1990 OGILVIE STREET NO LIMIT ON NUMBER OF BAGS

If you have furniture or other items you would like to donate, call us at 250-563-7475

The Prince George Salvation Army Thrift Store thanks you

TOGETHER WE DO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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6

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

The BC SPCA North Cariboo Branch is dedicated to our mission statement: “To protect and enhance the lives of domestic, farm and wild animals in British Columbia.” In 2012 the BC SPCA – North Cariboo Branch cared for over 2100 abused, neglected and abandoned animals. Our cruelty investigation department investigated approximately 250 complaints about animal neglect and cruelty each year. In 2012, we adopted over 500 animals in the Prince George area. We encourage everyone to think of the BC SPCA as your first adoption option. We provide medical care for the many injured, neglected and abandoned animals that pass into our care on a daily basis. Education and information is also a priority for the the North Cariboo BC SPCA, through human education and attendance at community events we continue to educate about the importance of Animal Welfare. As a non-profit organization, the BC SPCA – North Cariboo Branch relies solely on donations and fundraising efforts to support our work. Fundraising dollars raised in Prince George, stays in Prince George. Though we do have smaller events throughout the year, our two major fundraisers are City Challenge, and The BC SPCA Paws for a Cause: Walk for the Animals. May is “Be Kind to Animals” Month. To celebrate it, we host our annual City Challenge vs Kamloops; Let’s Show Kamloops We Care. Throughout May, Kamloops and Prince George compete to raise the most funds for animals in need. 2012 City Challenge raised over $20,000 for the animals of Prince George. We aim to raise $30,000 for the abused, abandoned and neglected animals of the north in May and we need Prince George to help us show Kamloops We Care. May 3, 2013 kicks off City Challenge; The River 101.3 will be on location to talk to staff and volunteers about the importance of the BC SPCA in Prince George. The celebration continues as The Ramada Hotel presents the Dog Days of Summer Dinner and Dance on May 4, 2013. This exciting dinner, dance and auction benefits the animals in our care and tickets are available at the shelter. Our Annual Open House on May 11, 2013 allows the community to visit the shelter at 4011 Lansdowne and witness the lifesaving work we do. May 25, 2013 is our Kennel Lock In at Pine Centre Mall to help raise funds for the BC SPCA North Cariboo Branch. Community leaders are locked up for a good cause and raising bail. Consider being locked up for a good cause. Community members can get into the competitive spirit by raising funds for the BC SPCA North Cariboo Branch. Ideas include donating bottles at the BBK Bottle Depot or hosting an event and donating the proceeds. Challenging your coworkers or other similar businesses in Kamloops to raise money, or attending any of our events, helps in achieving our lofty goal. BC SPCA Paws for A Cause: Walk for the Animals raises $30,000 for the BC SPCA North Cariboo Branch. Walkers register online and collect pledges to benefit the animals of the BC SPCA. September 8, 2013 is the Paws for a Cause: Walk for the Animals. The all day event is hosted in 35 locations across the province and raises nearly $1 million dollars for the animals of BC. By fundraising and coming out to walk (with or without your four-legged friend!) you are letting others know that animal welfare is important to you. Whether you are the proud owner of a BC SPCA adoptee, or are just looking for the opportunity to join with others to save animal lives, BC SPCA Paws for a Cause is for you. To Donate, attend any of upcoming events, volunteer or adopt. The BC SPCA North Cariboo Branch is open at 4011 Lansdowne Rd on Tuesday to Saturday from 12 pm to 6 pm or available by phone at 250.562.5511. Help us to speak for those that cannot speak for themselves.

Prince George Free Press - www.pgfreepress.com

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Prince George is home to a children’s charity that has been supporting Northern BC children in medical need for over two decades. “We hear from the Prince George parent, the hospital worker, families from through-out Northern BC, seeking assistance with a child’s medical challenge,” says Kelly Sharp, Friends of Children General Manager. Financial pressures can leave a family swirling in uncertainty when constant medical trips are required for their daughter or son. Friends of Children will assist with fuel , food and accommodation costs related to the medical appointment. “We have also helped with the purchase of equipment, all to support the Northern BC child in medical stress,” notes Sharp. Through coordinating help or connecting the parent to other agencies, Friends of Children is a valuable resource during difÀcult times. “The biggest compliment I hear from parents is how Friends of Children relieves the stress surrounding their child’s illness. To me that is priceless,” says Sharp. Friends of Children relies on donations to support the Prince George and Northern BC mother, father or grandparent seeking assistance surrounding the medical condition of their child. Please check out our website at: www.friendsofchildren.ca


Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

www.pgfreepress.com - Prince George Free Press

New to Northern BC!!! • Family Camp for families of kids • with diabetes • to be held in Prince George • May 2013 at Ness Lake.

Every day in Northern BC the Canadian Diabetes Association: * Creates awareness about diabetes and speaks out on issues affecting people living with the disease (local Advocacy champions) * Provides hope and improves the lives of people living with diabetes (local education opportunities and support) * Supports promising new discoveries through research (including UNBC) Prince George Branch & area activities include Family camp, diabetes wellness displays, local speakers, diabetes expos, literature, information and referrals, cookbooks, the Picnic in the Park annual fun activity day and community fund raising events. Our goal is to provide even more hands-on learning opportunities for the thousands of Northerners and their families affected by diabetes while supporting important diabetes research. Today, more than 9 million Canadians live with diabetes or prediabetes. It is estimated by 2020, 1 in 3 Canadians could be living with diabetes or prediabetes. The Canadian Diabetes Association leads the Àght against diabetes by helping people with diabetes live healthy lives while we work to Ànd a cure. Together we can make a difference. For more information about diabetes, how to volunteer or to make a donation, visit 490 Quebec St. in Prince George, call 250 561 9284 or on line at diabetes.ca.

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The Prince George Council of Seniors (PGCOS) is a non-proÀt organization formed in 1990 by a handful of seniors who felt strongly about the power of group advocacy. Membership in this umbrella organization consists of Prince George’s Àve Seniors Activity Centres, retiree and community seniors’ organizations, various other community organizations concerned about seniors’ issues, as well as individuals unafÀliated with any of these. PGCOS membership represents over 3,500 Prince George seniors; however, membership is not a requirement for service or assistance. As many seniors feel unheard in this increasingly impersonal technology-oriented world, just talking to a live caring human helps, and PGCOS has friendly staff and trained volunteers available to listen, visit with lonely seniors in their own homes or chat on the telephone. Seniors or caregivers needing speciÀc information, ranging from local events and availability of seniors’ housing to Provincial rent subsidies or Federal pensions, can call PGCOS. Staff may not have every answer, but will do their best to point inquirers in the right direction. Last year, PGCOS responded to nearly 3,000 telephone inquiries and 1,800 drop-in clients. With the help of dedicated volunteers, PGCOS provides a number of practical programs and services. Over the past year: • 6,030 Meals on Wheels delivered • 26 students completed Beginners Computer Classes for Seniors • 19 seniors received at least partial funding for Dentures • 218 seniors had their Income Tax Returns prepared • 1,100 twice-weekly friendly phone calls placed • 120 Christmas Hampers delivered (value at least $300 each) PGCOS has served this community for over 20 years and is honoured to continue to play an important role in “empowering seniors” and improving the quality of life in Prince George. As a non-proÀt organization, PGCOS could not do this without the generosity of this community, and encourages you to continue to support them with your gifts of volunteer time, Ànancial donations and bequests.

Renovations underway in new Seniors Resource Centre.

In order to better serve our community, PGCOS has just moved to 721 Victoria Street. The new location will have a new name – Seniors Resource Centre – to better express what PGCOS does. Plans for a Grand Opening Celebration are currently in the works, and staff and volunteers alike are excited about Ànishing renovations and announcing new activities. The Seniors Resource Centre is open between 9 am and 3 pm weekdays.

721 Victoria Street Prince George, BC V2L 2K5 Phone 250 564 5888 Fax 250 564 9155

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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Mentoring is the solution to combat bullying and Big Brothers Big Sisters has been doing it for 100 years.

2013 celebrates 100 years of proactive mentoring in Canada by Big Brothers Big Sisters and we are looking forward to a new year full of great possibilities for the community of Prince George. We wrap up 2012 with the positive momentum our local programming is experiencing. This has being accomplished with the support of incredibly dedicated volunteers, many local businesses, organizations and individuals who support our programming. A recent Àve-year study, which tracks the experiences of almost 1,000 children and teenagers registered with Big Brother Big Sisters agencies across Canada, found that those with a mentor are signiÀcantly more conÀdent in their academic abilities and considerably less likely to display behavioural problems such as bullying. Results from this and other recent studies can be found on our website at www. bbbspg.ca. One stand-out Ànding is that girls in the study with a Big Sister were four times less likely to bully, Àght, lie or express anger than girls without a mentor. We are excited to kickoff our local Centennial celebrations during our Day of Mentoring on Friday March 1st. We are hosting a luncheon in partnership with the Chamber of Commerce to showcase our proactive approach and show how we empower our local youth. We are excited to welcome our Keynote Speakers, Bruce MacDonald, President and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada and the Honourable Shirley Bond, Minister of Justice, Auditor General and MLA for Prince George-Valemount. We hope you can join us on Friday March 1st. Get your tickets online at pgchamber.bc.ca. Our goal for 2013 is grow our program capacity by 10% and serve more local children. To help us reach this goal we are going to build on current opportunities and partnerships. To learn more about our programs and how you can be the start of something big for local children and youth, please call our ofÀce at 250.563.7410 or visit us online at www.bbbspg.ca.


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Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Prince George Free Press - www.pgfreepress.com

THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS! Thank you to our many dedicated donors who have supported us throughout the year to ensure that people who have special needs continue to have opportunities to learn, grow, work and feel valued as a contributing citizen of society. Thank you! AiMHi was formed by a group of concerned parents in 1957 who envisioned “Community Living” for their children who had special needs. Their vision included: • A desire to have their children taught within a public school system; • A home that provides respite services for their children; • Having their family members returned from institutions to neighbourhoods in their family’s community; • Daytime activities for their adult children to ensure they were valued and contributing members of society; • Services that provide safe and knowledgeable care. Today our culture here at AiMHi supports people to have good lives at work, at home and in the community. This is further possible because of the generosity of our many devoted donors!

In 2011/2012, AiMHi donors raised

$116,767.07 Funds raised by dedicated donors have helped us offer accessible homes and vehicles, purchase upto-date training materials and supplies, and have expanded our employment services to assist people in being gainfully employed! • This past year with the expansion of our employment services we now employ 3 people who have special needs. The people hired are part of our ‘Infinite Employment Solutions’ Team and they operate a new program called AiMHi’s Common Goods program. Through the collection of clothing and household items we raise funds. This self-sustaining program not only provides gainful employment opportunities but it has allowed us to purchase a new cube van to pick up your donations right from your home! • In 2011 we identified that many of our training resources were out of date and in need of replacement. We are happy to say that through donations, along with funding from Prince George Rotary – Nechako, we have updated most of these resources. We purchased 5 new I-Pads that are used to teach a variety of skills. The kids love the I-Pads because they are fun and in turn, they make learning fun too! Yes, your donations are helping kids with reading, writing and math! Your donations also helped to purchase apps! We purchase apps that help kids work through sensory issues, develop money skills and improve speech. Sam says, “I love working on the I-Pad! I’m learning how to count money and make change using the money app. I am taking math at school and I practice my math on the I-Pad at AiMHi. I also like to play games!” • Planning for aging is a big focus for AiMHi. This past year we identified the need to purchase a new accessible Van for one of our homes and we are happy to report that with your help we purchased this much needed accessible Van! • Throughout our city we provide residential services. These homes are often in need of updates to ensure the home is accessible for the people residing there. Accessibility modifications may come in the form of bathroom renovations, replacing flooring, moving light switches, lowering of counters, building additional living space or modifying areas of the home that could cause risk of injury to a person. We have been very busy this past year with ongoing accessibility modifications in our 40 homes!

Our future success depends on donors like you. We hope to raise $150,000 in 2012/2013 to address the following areas of need: Family Services Funds will be used to increase access to quality services for families who are raising a child with special needs, i.e.: Respite Services, Family Networking Group Seminars, Wills and Estate Planning, Infant Development Program, Children’s Life Skills, Family Support, Family Advocacy, Developing Personal Family Networks, Hospitality Industry Respitality. Community Access Services Funds will be used to enhance Community Engagement, i.e.: Raising Awareness in the Community, Developing Community Partnerships, Developing Personal Support Networks, Skill Building Library, AiMHi Internet Bistro, AiMHi Community Garden, Community Access supports for people, ongoing and increased access to AiMHi’s building for other Non-Profit Associations. “Real Work for Real Pay” Services Funds will be used to purchase equipment and supplies for training and to create new and enhance existing employment opportunities for people, i.e.: Infinite Employment Solutions equipment, Kerry Kitchen, Supported AiMHi Businesses (Document Shredding and Digitizing of Information), Employment Transition for Young Adults, and Training Resources. Health and Wellness Funds will be used to improve the quality of care for people who have disabilities and special needs, i.e.: Affordable and Safe Housing, Medical Equipment, Advocacy, Prince George Self-Advocates Caucus, Self-Advocate Peer Advisor, Adventure Odyssey Club and Training Resources. Facility Needs (950 Kerry Street Building and Homes) Funds will be used to address facility needs such as building enhancements, repairs, renovations to meet specific needs of people served (mobility access), expansion and equipment needs for various departments, i.e.: Maintenance Shop, Parking Lot, Snoezelin Room, Bike Warehouse, and the Purchase, Repairs and Renovations associated with Homes operated by AiMHi. Together we will help people remain safe and valued as contributing citizens in their community! THANK YOU! AiMHi – Prince George Association for Community Living is a registered charity in the area of community living in BC and a significant employer in Prince George, with approximately 460 employees. AiMHi supports over 1000 infants, children, teens, adults, seniors and their families throughout the year. We offer a vast array of services such as residential living options, respite, employment, educational and community access services. Our residential services are provided on a 24 hour/7 day per week basis. Many of our homes are licensed through the Community Care Licensing Act. Additionally, we provide various advocacy support programs for people who live in this community

Mission Statement Strong communities recognize and celebrate the value of all citizens. AiMHi contributes to a strong community by providing advocacy, supports and services to people who have special needs and their families. Our culture supports people to have good lives at work, at home and in the community. Charitable registration number: 11910 3323 RR 0001

950 Kerry Street • 250-564-6408 • www.aimhi.ca


CHARITIES OF PRINCE GEORGE Crisis Prevention, Intervention & Information Centre FOR NORTHERN BC

We are here for you 24-7

Discover How Your Donations Make A Difference

February 2013

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Section Two

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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The library is for everyone

The library is for everyone A visit to your local branch of the public library may be little different than expected – far from a hushed domain, our library is a vibrant hub of activity. From the voices of children singing songs and making rhymes in Toddler Time programs to instruction from any of the free computer classes offered –the library is a place where people come for information, WiFi, computers, classes, entertainment, books and more. Your support of the public library allows us to offer free programs to all people, addressing many different aspects of aspect of literacy. Some of our great donor-supported projects include: • Books for Babies (bags of books and information go home with new parents) • The Knowledge Garden (plans in place for this project to break ground in spring, 2013) • SkyLab (our new computer lab and open classroom) • Reading without Rules (bringing books to people without access to the library) • Library Lego Club (6-12 year-olds bring only their imaginations to play) It’s caring citizens and supportive corporate donors that help the library continue to expand what it can offer people, and how we remain on the forefront of civic engagement. We continue to rely on your help for upcoming projects and plans. Our Knowledge Garden is “shovel ready” for this spring; you can help us build it! We have great plans in moving forward with improvements to our services and how we deliver them – we ask that you become a part of our work in literacy and engagement. The library is for everyone, and every one can help us grow.

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

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Did you know the Canadian Red Cross is active right here in Prince George?

While most people think of Red Cross helping those impacted by international events like the earthquake in Haiti, staff and volunteers are also working hard right here at home in Prince George and throughout Northern British Columbia and the Yukon. Our regional ofÀce provides service to all of Northern B.C., Haida Gwaii and the Yukon Territory. Our team of 5 staff and more than 250 volunteers are actively working to support those in need. Programs and services offered to the public in Prince George and throughout the region include disaster assistance and support, access to Àrst aid, swimming and water safety classes, violence and abuse prevention education for children as young as Àve through to adults, and access to a free, short-term medical equipment lending program (with a referral from your health care professional). Through these programs and services, the Red Cross provided assistance or training to more than 30,000 residents of Northern BC and Yukon last year!

If you would like to get in touch, please contact us at: Phone: 250-564-6566; 1399 Sixth Avenue, Prince George E-mail: PrinceGeorge@redcross.ca; If you need emergency assistance and it’s after hours, please call: 1-888-800-6493. For more information please go to our web site at: www.redcross.ca

“The last place on earth you’d want to be is the Àrst place you’ll Ànd the Red Cross.” Anne Medina

Prince George Free Press - www.pgfreepress.com

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Since 1975, the BC & Yukon Division of the MS Society of Canada has supported research into Multiple Sclerosis and made services and programs available to help enhance the lives of the 7,300 – 10,000 British Columbians and Yukoners who are living with MS. There are nine chapters in BC & Yukon Division. Each chapter provides services and programs in and around its community. The Society is connected to more than 60 self-help groups offering support in BC and Yukon. Over a 12 month period MS Society Client Services Coordinators in the division will make over 31,000 connections with people living with MS, their families and their caregivers. This support includes providing: · Information on MS · Counseling · Peer and family support and Self Help Support Groups · Equipment to enhance mobility · Adapted social and recreational programs · Advocacy for legal matters

Prince George & Area Chapter Calendar of Events: April 13th 2013:

Annual General Meeting

May 2013:

May is MS Awareness Month

May 29th 2013:

World MS Day

June 9th 2013:

Prince George Scotiabank MS Walk

Wellness With MS Workshop: Will be posted on the wetsite as soon as available *Please go to http://mssociety.ca/princegeorge for more information and updates.* Annual fundraising events and donations account for 86% of funds that enable the MS Society to provide free services and programs for those living with MS and to support leading research to Ànd a cure. Each spring, over 6,000 people take part in one of the 25 Scotiabank MS Walks organized in communities across BC and Yukon. We welcome enquiries from third parties wishing to hold an event in of support our work. There are many ways to contribute to the work done by the MS Society of Canada. From becoming a member or board member, to making a donation or planned gift to volunteering in the ofÀce or at an event – your support makes a difference.

Together we will end MS. For more information contact us at: The MS Society of Canada Prince George Chapter 105 490 Quebec Street Prince George, BC V2L 5N5 Phone: 250-564-7074 Fax: 250-564-7005 Email: info.princegeorge@mssociety.ca Web: http://mssociety.ca/princegeorge


www.pgfreepress.com - Prince George Free Press

• • • • Crisis Prevention, • Intervention & Information Centre • FOR NORTHERN BC • We are here for you 24-7 • • • • • • • • • Is your world falling apart? Overwhelmed by stress? Feeling totally alone and unheard? • Who can you call when you have a panic attack in the middle of the night? • Our Mission Statement : “We provide crisis intervention, suicide prevention, resource • information, education and conÀdential peer support for the people of Northern BC.” • Incorporated in 1970 as the Prince George Crisis • Intervention Society, we changed our name in 2002 to reÁect our expanding coverage area. Our services • are available to all citizens of northern BC – from Quesnel to the Yukon border, and Alberta border to • Haida Gwaii. We provide the only 24 hour per day conÀdential alternative to the Hospital Emergency • Room. A database of organizations who can offer further help • and support is available. We produce a Community Resource Directory ($28.00) every second year. A • suicide awareness/prevention workshop is presented in area high schools, and we offer other suicide • workshops to the community such as safeTALK and ASIST . • Phone line volunteers receive 60 hours training/ practise before answering the phones. They range • in age from 16 to ??. No special skills are required – just be empathetic and non-judgmental, and have • three to four hours per week to volunteer. Phones are answered in the Crisis Centre. Check our website, and • phone the business line if interested in volunteering. • To quote one sentence from a former volunteer’s testimonial: “…In my personal life, the skills that • I received at the Crisis Centre have allowed me to more successfully meet the challenges of explosive • situations….” To reach us: • 24 Hour Crisis & Information Line 250-563-1214 or 1-888-562-1214 • Youth Support Line (4:00 – 10:00 pm) • 250-564-8336 or 1-888-564-8336(TEEN) On Line chat for youth (4:00 – 10:00 pm) • www.northernyouthonline.ca Suicide concerns 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433) • (partnering with other BC Crisis Lines) Business Line: 250-564-5736 • Website: www.northernbccrisissuicide.ca • We are a non-proÀt and charitable agency supported by Northern Health, United Way, a Community • Gaming Grant (youth services only) and other grants, such as the City of Prince George for speciÀc projects. • As with any non-proÀt organization, we thrive on community Ànancial support and volunteers. A $10.00 • donation will cover the cost of a 15 minute crisis call. $500 buys 13 Suicide Awareness workshops in schools • (one hour each). • Thank you for your continued support. •

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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AWAC: The Shelter of Last Resort AWAC (An Association for Women and Children) was created in 1994 by a small group of community activists and social service professionals in Prince George. There was a clearly identiÀed need for safe and supportive shelter and supports for street-involved women and female youth. This was a population of clients that did not Àt the criteria of the other shelters due to their challenging behaviours and complex needs arising from serious mental health, addictions and medical issues. With so many obstacles, these women and girls received little help because of services not responding to their unique needs. Meanwhile they were homeless, living in poverty and many were beaten and sexually assaulted. Others went missing and were murdered. AWAC became the only refuge from the brutality of living life on the streets. Our shelter opened in 1995 with minimal government funding and donations of food, materials and volunteer staff. There were times we didn’t know what to serve for supper because the fridge and cupboards were bare. Many miracles occurred during our Àrst few years such as supper showing up unexpectedly at the door. These were lean times but we managed to house approximately 250 women annually. Over time, our organization has become a valuable resource in the community, not only to our clients, but also for other service providers working with vulnerable and high-risk women and girls. AWAC is very honoured to have strong positive working relationships with agencies particularly in our downtown core that assist us in being the safety net for our clients. Currently AWAC operates a 24-hour emergency shelter and drop-in centre. We run an outreach support program that assist women to connect with medical, legal, social services, housing pre-employment and counselling services. On an average day we provide outreach, drop-in services and meals to 70 clients and on any given night house up to 40 women. Our supported housing program provides 8 units with shared kitchen, laundry and bathrooms. Our team of staff have assisted many of our clients to Ànd housing in the community. AWAC is currently in its fourth cycle of offering the Street Humanities Program. In partnership with the John Howard Society and the College of New Caledonia, Street Humanities is a non-credit humanities program geared towards people who have had numerous social barriers to education. Graduates of this program have gone on to complete credited programs. Now in our 19th year of operation, AWAC continues to adhere tightly to our founding vision which is all women and female youth regardless of circumstance deserve respect, safety and community. We were and still are the shelter of last resort. AWAC houses and supports the most challenging female population. We gratefully accept donations to assist us in continuing this much needed and valuable service.


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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Since 1991, the Spirit of the North Healthcare Foundation has helped people invest in enhancing healthcare in the north. Working with donors, the Foundation has been able to provide funds toward the purchase of such major pieces of equipment as a permanent MRI, Cat Scan, ophthalmology lasers, digital radiographic suites, ultrasound units, a burn tank, a gamma camera and crash carts. Donors to the Foundation have also funded major renovations to Jubilee Lodge and the Maternal Child Centre of Excellence at UHNBC. Each year, we are honoured to work with donors and volunteers who believe in supporting healthcare in the North. This support comes in many forms. From people who give many hours to organize fundraising events; individuals who establish a bequest in their estate to support healthcare; companies who make generous contributions towards equipment; and friends who give in memory of a someone they cherish. In so many ways through philanthropy, people and businesses are having a powerful impact on healthcare in the North. In doing so, they are helping to ensure the best of care, close to home. Recently, the Spirit had the privilege of receiving a donation from 11 year old Kayla Morin from Vanderhoof. Kayla decided to use her creativity to fundraise to help healthcare in Vanderhoof. She knit scarves and donated a portion of her proceeds to St. John’s Hospital for a new wall mounted TV in a designated room for children. Through her sales of 35 scarves and community donations, she was able to raise over $600 towards the new TV. Most 11 year olds aren’t focused on healthcare but for Kayla, helping out others is something she takes to heart. Her philanthropic spirit at such a young age is inspiring in helping others in her community. Thank you to Kayla and to the many members of our community who give to support healthcare. We look forward to working with you.

Paul Stewart Board Member, Kayla Morin, Dr. Charles Jago, Chair Northern Health. If you are interested in learning more about the Spirit of the North Foundation and how you can support healthcare in the north, please visit www. spiritofthenorth.ca or contact us at 250.565.2515 or spiritofthenorth@northernhealth.ca.

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

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Our Name:

Prince George Symphony Orchestra Our Mission: To bring the joy of music to traditional and non-traditional audiences Our Players: Our region’s best professional instrumentalists and top community musicians Our Home: Prince George, the hub city of central British Columbia Our Audience: Everybody

Now in our 41st year, the Prince George Symphony Orchestra is a non-proÀt organization devoted to the performance of orchestra repertoire. We offer regular subscription concerts of classical music, pops concerts, educational concerts for children, opportunities for local soloists, and special events, including our traditional Mother’s Day Tea matinee and our end-of-summer free concert in Fort George Park. We are British Columbia’s “Orchestra of the North”, the pre-eminent musical resource of British Columbia’s massive central and northern regions. Our orchestra provides core employment for our Ànest instrumentalists, who, in turn, are our region’s foremost artists/ teachers, mainstays of local music education. The PGSO is supported by municipal, provincial, and, through the Canada Council, federal levels of government, as well as corporate and individual sponsorships and a network of community donors. We are an orchestra for everyone. We are committed to bringing the joy of music to ever broader audiences. We are the orchestral “home team” of Prince George. For more information please call 250-563-0800 or visit our website www.pgso.com

Prince George Free Press - www.pgfreepress.com

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Making History Together

The Exploration Place Museum + Science Centre is an anchor in the cultural stream of our Community. Steeped in ancient history, the north central interior of British Columbia has stories to tell of its ancestors, geology, flora and fauna; stories that have shaped who we are today and what our community will look like in the future. Our Museum is a way-point on our collective journey; a place to revisit our past, share our successes while we dream about tomorrow. Our youngest visitors are first carried through the front doors by parents and grandparents, returning over and over as they explore the world around them and find their place within it. The Museum Collection holds, in perpetual safe-keeping, our stories; together with the objects, curiosities, documents and images necessary to bring them to life. This massive assemblage is constantly growing through donations from the public; requiring ongoing restoration, preservation and research in order to share this treasure trove with visitors and researchers. Started by volunteers in 1958, the Museum Society continues to be a strong presence in our Region, offering curatorial expertise to partner institutions, support for other local charities and by engaging our audience at all ages. We must earn at least 55% of our annual budget; over $2100 a day, every day of the year. The support the Museum garners from donors, volunteers and our small endowment fund is what allows us to meet the demands on our resources every year. Museums are often seen as a “nice to do” rather than a “need to do” when it comes to funding, but a Community is just a city if it has no sense of Place. We love our Community and the people who have built it and we know you do too. Help us share your stories with tomorrow’s leaders.


Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

www.pgfreepress.com - Prince George Free Press

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Join Us –We Are Here For Good

The YMCA of Northern BC is a trusted charity that has been providing relevant community programs and services that promote health and wellness in northern BC for almost fifty years. No one is turned away from the YMCA because of their financial situation. In 2012, $157,000 in financial subsidies was disbursed to local children and families with an additional $52,000 directed to our busing program that picks up and delivers school age children safely, to and from our child care. Our annual YMCA Strong Kids campaign creates awareness and raises funds for Camp Kanannaq and the Aurora Leadership Program. Held February 15 – March 15 our goal for 2013 is $18,000. Visit www.nbcy.org to learn more about giving local children the chance to spend a week at Kanannaq or Aurora. Thousands of children have attended Camp Kanannaq since 2008 and the Aurora Leadership is attracting teens who want to develop life skills that will guide them in their teen years and beyond. YMCA child care staff cared for 322 children from infant to school age – an all time record making us the largest provider of non-profit child care in Prince George. At the other end of the age spectrum, YMCA Recreation Staff at Simon Fraser Lodge ensure the residents enjoy a quality of life that keeps them busy and active with bingo, field trips and more. Youth Around Prince (YAP) provides vulnerable youth the opportunity to have a healthy meal and access to relevant social programs. YAP averages 8,000 visits a year from at-risk youth – many from outside Prince George. Our Board and staff are particularly excited about our recent name change to YMCA of Northern BC. This is one of the most significant steps taken in our YMCA’s history and will allow us to share the YMCA message with new and interested audiences in the north. 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the YMCA in northern BC. Following our core values of Honesty, Respect, Responsibility and Caring, we look forward to supporting children and their families for another fifty years and beyond. Rooted in more than 1,000 communities around the country, the YMCA has the long-standing relationships and physical presence not just to promise, but to deliver, lasting personal and social change.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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• • • • are generous with both their time and • Canadians money. We give because we care, not necessarily the tax benefit we receive. This can mean • for that despite our pure intentions, we may not be • living up to our charitable giving potential. Once we factor in the pretty substantial tax benefits – • could we be doing even more? • Before looking at the giving options, it is important to have a plan. Whether your giving • budget is large or small, here are some key things • to think about: 1. Does your giving have an overall theme? For • greater impact try focusing on 1 or 2 areas rather than giving a little to multiple entities. • you taken time to dream “BIG”? By • 2. Have talking to an expert they can help determine how to create lasting legacies that are within • your reach. • 3. Is it more advantageous to receive a tax benefit today, upon death, or both? Before • giving your next gift of cash, make sure you are informed of the other means of giving • that may be more beneficial for you and the • charity. • 4. Lastly, whether your final estate is anticipated to be substantial or not, think about adding • a gift into your Will. Even small bequests are greatly appreciated by local not-for-profit • organizations who work hard raising funds. • Debra Moffatt has a passion for helping clients charitable giving goals into their • incorporate financial plans. Recently Debra has undertaken • a planned giving initiative with a goal of “uncovering” $5 million in planned gifts for local • non-profit organizations over the next 5 years. • With a strong desire to motivate those with planned giving intentions to take action, Debra • is offering a complimentary, no-obligation 45 review to share ideas based on individual • minute financial situations and goals. In addition, she • is putting her money where her mouth is. When a specific planned giving solution is chosen • and put in place, generating income for Debra, she will • in turn donate 50% of that initial income to the local • organizations chosen • by the client. Debra is also available as a • speaker for organizations interested in this topic. For • more information, please contact Debra at the contact • information provided • below. • DEBRA MOFFATT, B.A. • Consultant debra.moffatt@investorsgroup.com • (250) 564-2310 • #900 – 299 Victoria Street, Prince George • • • • •

GIVING… With a Plan


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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Canadian Cancer Society Celebrates Opening of Kordyban Lodge in Prince George

The Kordyban Lodge will open to clients in March 2013 and will be the face of compassionate, supportive services that truly improve the quality of life for those on a cancer journey. The lodge will provide accommodation for cancer patients and their caregivers from Northern BC who need to travel for outpatient cancer care in Prince George. The Kordyban Lodge is 25,000 square feet and includes 36 beds. It provides full meal service for guests and includes facilities such as the Novak Family Spiritual and Meditation Room, the West Fraser Timber lounge, a family room, massage therapy room, library, activity room, exercise facility and wig and prosthetics rooms. The Kordyban Lodge is the fourth lodge operated by the Canadian Cancer Society, BC and Yukon. The other lodges are based in Vancouver ( Jean C. Barber Lodge), Victoria (Vancouver Island Lodge) and Kelowna (Southern Interior Rotary Lodge). In 2012, it is estimated that more than 23,300 people were newly diagnosed with cancer in British Columbia. Of these patients, approximately 1,000 lived in the North, a number projected to increase significantly over the coming years. For 75 years, the Canadian Cancer Society has been with Canadians in the fight for life. For more information visit our website at cancer.ca.

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

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Prince George Free Press - www.pgfreepress.com

We are very proud to announce we are number four in the Province for Community Arts Councils, 2013! There are over 80 Arts Councils throughout the Province. Prince George is considered a large Arts Council and are in the same category as Victoria, Vernon, Surrey and Kelowna to name a few. The number four ranking is based on Artistic Excellence. We could not be happier to have our PG artists recognized through projects and programming! The Prince George & District Community Arts Council (PGCAC) has moved up from a mid-forties ranking in the past Àve years to the number four position. The PGCAC is aiming for number one by 2015! To do this they are trying to increase their stafÀng to full time. The PGCAC works with the community through arts and culture in everything they do in PG. Examples of this would be found in the Arts Council’s programming and projects such as: Artists in the Schools, Preschool of the arts, Arts & Health, our Gallery of Honour and the School District #57’s Arts and Cultural Scholarship Fund. A little history: The PGCAC was started in 1968. It started off in just a small portion of the building now known as the 2880 Guild and Tenant Building. The Arts Council now Àlls the entire complex of 2880-15th Avenue and houses: The Prince George Symphony Orchestra, The Prince George Quilters Guild, The Prince George Potters Guild, C-FIS Public radio station, The Prince George Community Foundation, The Artists Workshop, The Children’s Music program, The Prince George Fibre Arts Guild, the Jack Bryan room that is available for renting for larger groups to meet and the Kitchen Workshop also available to rent for smaller gatherings or meetings. Next door at 2820 – still part of the same complex, you’ll Ànd the Studio 2880 Consignment Gift Shoppe and Ticket Center, Feature Gallery, the CAC ofÀces and the Preschool of the Arts Program. In the Gift Shoppe you will Ànd unique original locally produced arts in many mediums. It is a juried shop and boasts both the highest quality and is the only store like it in town. Just off the Gift Shoppe you with Ànd the very popular Feature Gallery in which the CAC hosts two artists for a two month period. Each Exhibition is kicked off with an Opening Reception where you can meet the artist and even get 10% off in the Gift Shoppe on any purchases that evening. Check out our website: www.studio2880.com for further information. The PGCAC advocates for the Arts and Culture at all levels from government meetings to school classrooms. A recent example of this would be our presentation to a Real Estate group about art and their community. We present where and when invited and speak about what arts and culture means here in Prince George. We have begun an Arts & Health Stream for our Community. We are focusing on youth, Seniors and our Aboriginal community members for inclusion through our art and artist driven projects. As a result of our work in this area, the Executive Director of the CAC sits on the Arts & Health Network BC and Canada start-up boards as a northern voice for arts and health, by invitation. Some of the projects the PGCAC have carried out in this vein would be: Creative Fusion where we triangulated youth, seniors and artists to create a mural collection that hangs on the CAC buildings. Another would be the Tagging project based on Restorative Justice. The CAC artists mentor youth in constructive positive mural projects in the community-the community gets the beneÀt of a beautiful mural. A Ànal example would be the Arts Engagement Project that focused on the topic of Anti-racism and anti-violence. Did we mention that we are a Not For ProÀt Organization governed by a volunteer Board of Directors? This is an integral component of our success. Another integral component of our success is our Volunteers! Without them the PGCAC could not bring you events like: Studio Fair (our major fundraiser of the year), The Spring Arts Bazaar-or more popularly known as The Great Chili Cook-off! The PGCAC has two new upcoming fundraisers: Damn Fine Little Art Auction and the Artist’s in the Garden.

If you would like to learn more about your Community Arts Council, please contact us at: (250)562-4526, you can check out our Facebook page which is open to the public, visit our Website www.studio2880.com or visit us at the Gift Shoppe: Open 9:30-5:00 Monday through Saturday at 2880-15th Avenue.


Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

www.pgfreepress.com - Prince George Free Press

Watch for it. Be included.

Your guide to leaving a legacy & estate planning

Next issue May 2013 Contact: David Wharrie, 250.614.6845

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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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The Immigrant and Multicultural Services Society (IMSS) is the only leading settlement agency providing free direct services to immigrants and refugees in Prince George and the northern region. With 37 years of experience IMSS has provided a myriad of complex services to the northern region of BC striving to promote multiculturalism, racial harmony and elimination of racism. IMSS has two important objectives: (1) to provide settlement services to immigrants and refugees throughout Prince George and the northern region and, (2) to promote multiculturalism, racial harmony in the pursuit of equality and social justice for all Canadians. Below is a list and description of the diverse services provided:

Settlement and Integration Services Assist immigrants and their families to understand, navigate, and access BC’s social and economic systems, in order to ensure their successful settlement and integration in BC’s communities. The various services provided include: •

• •

Assisting clients to fill out various applications such as: Sponsorship, Citizenship applications, LMO, Skilled Workers, PNP, In-Canada Experience Class, PR card, EI, Old Age Pension, CPP, Child Tax Benefits, MSA, SIN and many more. Counselling, interpretation and translation services Life skills and Education programs/courses

Vulnerable Immigrant Population Program (VIPP) VIPP aims to enhance settlement services to stay-at-home parents, foreign brides, seniors, and individuals living in remote and rural areas. The outreach team connects with the VIP in the comfort of their homes, church, temple or mosque, or other facilities in order to overcome any social exclusion and isolation and improve their sense of empowerment and belonging.

English Language Services for Adults (ELSA) Services ELSA classes are available at IMSS for newcomers who want to learn to speak and understand English in their day-to-day life, such as questions about housing, work, banking, and other important topics. IMSS provides classes for literacy levels 1-7. Transportation subsidy, and licensed child minding are available to students attending the English classes.

Skills Connect for Immigrants – Employment Services The Skills Connect program assists newcomers to secure jobs that fully utilize their pre-arrival qualifications and/or work experience. This includes help with: • • •

Resume and cover letter preparation Job search techniques and guidance Foreign credential evaluations and translation of documents

Welcoming Communities Project This project is intended to be a vehicle to lead and influence systemic change that will improve our communities’ social, cultural, and economic growth. Through community collaboration with various agencies, IMSS is working on building communities where immigrants can realize their full potential and where cultural diversity is valued and celebrated through the arts, open houses, and workshops around new resources about employment, and settlement for new immigrants and local employers. Setting the Stage for Girls and Young Women to Succeed This youth lead project is funded by Status of Women Canada. The project aims to address specific barriers and respond to the under-representation of girls and young women in the civic, political, business and community life. The project would like to build on supporting young women as they identify community actions on local and global issues.

Special Programs Youth Leadership Program (YLP) The YLP has been designed to ease the transition process for refugee and newcomer youth and to empower Canadian, refugee, and newcomer youth on moral ethical issues. It offers educational activities about Canadian culture, wellness, and diversity. Women Program The Women’s Program addresses the unique needs and issues of newcomer women through workshops, talking circles, and networking opportunities that address economic, social, and cultural barriers. Senior Program This program creates opportunity for seniors to meet with established immigrants from different ethnic backgrounds to find support within the community. Inter-Faith Bridging The Inter-faith program supports in building relationships between diverse, established faith communities and increase understanding of intersecting identities.

Immigrant & Multicultural Services Society (IMSS) 1270 2nd Avenue, Prince George, BC, V2L 3B3 Phone: (250) 562 2900 | Fax: (250) 563 4852


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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Charities of Prince George - An Annual Report

Prince George Free Press - www.pgfreepress.com

Dear Friend: On behalf of all of us at the United Way of Northern BC, I want to THANK YOU for your generous contribution to our 2012 fundraising campaign. The United Way of Northern BC helps people who are struggling financially to get back on their feet. We help people and families get healthy and stay healthy. We help kids get the education and opportunities they deserve. The work you are supporting touches one in three people in Northern BC. By reaching out with us, you are extending a hand to help people in your community and across the north. We thought you might like to hear from some of those people:

It’s not easy living with a spinal cord injury. You’re the first person who truly understood what I needed and actually knew how to get it. I’d definitely be lost without your help.

What I have learned in the girls group has given me greater self confidence overall and has changed my relationship with my parents for the better.

You’ve changed my outlook on life. I see the bigger picture when I’m in trouble, and always seem to get through my problems when I think about what you’ve told me. I want to thank you so much for always being there for me.

I am a different person because of this experience. Thank you!

Having a place where I have so much in common and acceptance means a lot to me. You have really helped build my self-confidence and you’ve shown me that I’m still able to do many things that I enjoyed before my injury.

These are real stories from your neighbours, friends and community. People you know are living better lives thanks to the help you and the United Way of Northern BC have provided. Everything we do contributes to the longer-term goal of building stronger communities. We work with organizations so they can focus on what’s important – helping those in need. We help bring people together to create long-term, lasting solutions that work for Northern BC communities. You are an important part of our success and the success of those we help. Thank you. Sincerely,

Rob Jarvis, Board Chair, United Way of Northern BC


February 27, 2013