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The Columbia Valley’s Newspaper Since 1956

From Canal Flats to Spillimacheen

VALLEY ECHO T he

Wednesday, October 31,20, 2012 Wednesday, February 2013

Vol. 408 Vol.56 57Issue Issue

invermerevalleyecho.com

1

$ 15 INCLUDES HST PUBLICATIONS MAIL REGISTRATION NO. 7856

BERNIE RAVEN CHRIS RAVEN 1-866-598-7415 TEAMRAVEN.CA Offices in Panorama, Invermere & Fairmont

Community living legend remembered Pg A2

Cranbrook ready to carry out deer cull Pg A3

Wildlife fence and underpass slated for Kootenay National Park

MaxWell Realty Invermere

Weekend wilderness warrior

Nearly $5 million be to invested into safer highway crossing options for animals KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN kristian@cv-pioneer.com

Phase one of a $4.88 million wildlife fencing and underpass project for Highway 93 in Kootenay National Park is slated to begin in early spring. “Over the past decade, we have averaged 50 large animals killed on the road every year,” explained Trevor Kinley, wildlife crossing project manager for Parks Canada, during the Village of Radium Hot Springs council meeting on Wednesday, January 13. “It is a fairly major safety concern and a visitor experience issue because nobody wants to run into a dead animal or see a dead animal on the side of the road.” Phase one of the project, which could eventually include fencing and underpasses for up to 62 kilometres of Highway 93, will begin with a three kilometre stretch of highway north of the Dolly Varden day use area of Kootenay National Park — a location prone to animalvehicle accidents. The plan will feature 2.5-metre tall woven wire fences with a metre of chain link fencing buried underneath.

The project will also include a maximum of two culverts, which are to be constructed out of pre-cast concrete and measure between two to four metres high by seven metres wide. The project may also come with an element of electricity to keep animals off the road, Kinley added. “We are still challenged with carnivores because bears, wolves and cougars are able to figure out how to get past Texas Gates,” he added. “We are currently experimenting with electric mats embedded in the road, which are safe for people and vehicles.” Although the building process will be structured around non-peak travel times, some single-lane traffic situations are predicted during the build period, Kinley said. Entry points will still be made available on request. “There will be gates for vehicle access and for people,” he said. “If anybody is aware of any spot where people like to go fishing or hiking and need to get through the fence we will put a gate in. Certainly let us know and we can probably install a gate.” For more information on the project, please contact Trevor Kinley at trevor.kinley@pc.gc.ca.

We’re ready... are you?

KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN/ECHO PHOTO Radium Hot Springs' own Pete Feldmann saws a "button" off a log during the Wilderness Challenge at Radium's Winterfest on Saturday, February 16. The event held true to its name as the snow fell from sky while adults and younsters enjoyed sleigh rides, treasure hunts, and more. For more photos, turn to page A12.

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A2 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

NEWS

Nicholson leaves behind a lasting impression Champion of community living passes away at age of 92 KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN kristian@cv-pioneer.com

The Columbia Valley has lost a beacon of goodwill and friendship. John Norman Nicholson, the oldest senior in the province supported by Community Living BC, passed away from pneumonia at the age of 92 on Thursday, January 31st. “John’s longevity is surely a reflection of his being embraced by his community, the supports he received and his feeling of being included, which are key factors to a good quality of life for all people,” said Jennifer Terwood, the Kootenay Region manager of Community Living BC.

John's life story is a success for the community living concept, in which developmentally delayed adults are encouraged to live and work in the community, rather than staying in relative isolation. “For the first time we have a larger population of people with developmental disabilities aging in the community, and living longer,” she said. A resident at Mt. Nelson Place care facility since 1988, Mr. Nicholson was born with an educational disability, but is remembered as a man with emotional intelligence far above av-

submitted photo John Nicholson, who passed away at age 92 at Invermere & District Hospital, was the oldest person supported by Community Living BC. In addition to his zest for life, Nicholson is remembered by community members and friends as a man of compassion and community pride.

erage and a legacy we can all learn from. “John touched the lives of many people with his vibrant smile

and great sense of humor,” said Donna Jefferson, manager of Mt. Nelson Place. “He was a good friend to

The BC Services Card. Your CareCard, and more.

many and a valued member of our community. He can teach us all to be kind and to love one another.” Born on November 27th, 1920 to parents Albert and Vera Nicholson in the community of Swamp Point in northern B.C., John spent much of his life in institutions with his younger brother, Allan, who also shares his brother's educational disability. The two lived together from 1933 to 1959 at New Westminster's Woodlands School, a facility documented in a 2001 administrative review by former B.C. Ombudsman Dulcie McCallum as being a centre of systematic violence and abuse. From 1959 to 1972, John and Allen would live at the Tranquille facility outside Kamloops. Despite sharing rough addresses in their earlier years, the brothers would eventually find peace in their new mountain home of Invermere. Living at Pynelogs Cultural Centre until 1989, which was then a facility for the developmentally delayed, John and Allen

would get the stability they craved at Mt. Nelson Place later that year. “John finally had his own bedroom,” Ms. Jefferson added. “His walls were adorned with wolf pictures and keepsakes that he collected over the years. He spent hours in his room doodling and cutting out papers and Allan and he would sit side-by-side watching sports or the news together.” With a new home and support from

recreation, John was also instilled with a strong work ethic and sense of community pride. The local man worked at the Achievement Centre in Athalmer, where he assisted at the greenhouse and used his creative skills to participate in woodworking projects. During the mid 1980s, John took on more responsibility by accepting a position as a courier, delivering documents for the Invermere &

“John's longevity is surely a reflection of his being embraced by his community... ” jennnifer terwood community living bc kootenay region manager

dedicated staff came new adventures and opportunities. John developed a love for sports and was talented at bowling, Ms. Jefferson added. “He would often walk to the baseball diamonds or watch the local hockey games,” she said. “John bowled right up to his 90s; he had an incredibly strong throw and always had a consistent score.” Although he loved

District Hospital. “He took great pride in this position,” Ms. Jefferson added. “The ladies in the hospital office always made a fuss over John, buying him chocolates for each birthday. Just recently, they shared with me that John reminded them weeks ahead that his birthday was fast approaching.” Always a ladies man,

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August 20-24 One card. Many services. The new BC Services Card is part of government’s plan to modernize BC’s health care system. It replaces your CareCard, can be combined with your driver’s licence, and also acts as your photo ID. It’s more convenient and more secure, with enhanced features to protect your personal information. And getting yours is easy. Starting February 15, 2013, and for the next five years, you can simply enrol when renewing your driver’s licence. And even if you don’t drive, you can enrol at the nearest location where driver’s licences are issued. To learn more visit: BCServicesCard.ca

...Over 3500 55+ BC Seniors expected to participate ! Visit our website to find out more about what we have to offer Click on your It includes geographic zone and contact info for people you will find lots of who would be glad information to help you get involved

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to 'remembered' on Page A11

Archery Badminton Bridge Carpet Bowling Cribbage Cycling Darts Dragon Boating Equestrian 5 Pin Bowling Floor Curling Golf Horseshoes Ice Curling Ice Hockey Lawn Bowling Mtn. Biking Pickleball Slo-Pitch Soccer Swimming Table Tennis Tennis Track & Field Whist


Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

Page Three

Cranbrook to cull 30 urban deer Council approves second round of deer control: won't reveal when, where SALLY MACDONALD Cranbrook Townsman Staff

A second cull of up to 30 mule deer will be carried out in Cranbrook, the city announced on February 14. Council made the decision “after much careful deliberation”, reads the statement released by corporate communications officer Chris Zettel. “Due to concerns around public safety raised both by the RCMP and council, the city will not at this time be providing any additional details surrounding the population reduction activities,” reads the statement. It refers to the population control as “reduction” in the urban deer population and says the measures will “focus on several key areas of the community, based on complaints received both by the city and by the Conservation Officer Service.” The city was granted a permit from the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations in late 2012, it continues. However, it does not say when or where the cull will be carried out. Council and staff are not answering any questions about the statement nor speaking to the media. “The city will not at this time be providing any additional details surrounding the population reduction activities. The city will provide a comprehensive review to the public once these activities have been completed,” reads the statement. On February 13, the B.C. Deer Protection Coalition took out a full-page advertisement in the Townsman, stating “Will Cranbrook kill deer this winter? Rumour says yes.”

The advertisement asks Cranbrook residents to call or email the organization if it sees a trap set in the community. “If you have a trap in close proximity to your property, grant us access to your property so we can monitor the traps during the night,” reads the advertisement. Colleen Bailey, a spokesperson for the Humane Treatment of Urban Wildlife, which is a member of the B.C. Deer Protection Coalition, said the group is against the city’s decision. “We condemn the assertion that public safety is at risk if the city releases any details of the cull. We assert that this is simply being used as an excuse to conduct the entire operation under the cover of secrecy. Opponents of the cull have simply exercised their democratic right to be part of an open and transparent decision making process and this right was removed by council when it held secret meetings and heard from deputants of its own choice,” said Bailey. “We will continue to reach out to the community to tell us where traps are set and we are committed to monitoring the traps during this cull period.” Last April, council approved a second cull of up to 50 deer in Cranbrook. However, Mayor Wayne Stetski told the Townsman in October that the second cull had been put on hold pending legal action over Invermere’s cull. “(Invermere) has been taken to court over the public involvement process that was used by council to make the decision to cull 100 deer in Invermere’s case. That process that Invermere used is the same one that all of us used – in Cranbrook, Kimberley and Invermere. So if the court decides there was something inappropriate or perhaps incomplete on that public process, potentially it would impact the future around public processes leading up to whatever decisions councils make,”

said Mayor Stetski at the time. In November 2011, Cranbrook culled 25 urban deer — 11 white-tail and 14 mule — using clover traps. It was the first of three East Kootenay communities to carry out a cull with a licence from the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations. Kimberley culled 100 deer in January 2012, and Invermere was set to cull 100 deer in February 2012 before a court injunction put a hold on the plans. The Invermere Deer Protection Society started a civil suit against the District of Invermere in February 2012, claiming the district did not do enough public consultation prior to deciding to carry out a call. The court injunction halted the cull for much of February, but the society’s request to extend the injunction failed and eventually Invermere was able to cull just 19 deer before its permit to euthanize 100 deer expired. According to a March 2012 issue of the Invermere Valley Echo, Columbia Valley RCMP laid charges in cases where traps were tampered with or deer released from traps during the Invermere cull. In May, the Supreme Court of B.C. gave permission for the society’s civil suit against the district to continue. That case is still before the court. A hearing was set to be held in January, but was delayed. Despite this legal action, public safety concerns have led Cranbrook to proceed with a second cull anyway. Devin Kazakoff, a spokesperson for the Invermere Deer Protection Society, is questioning why Cranbrook council changed its mind. “Why was the mayor worried about Invermere’s court case in October 2012 and not in February 2013? Nothing has changed. Our case is moving forward,” he said in a February 14 press release.

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A3

Have a news tip? editor@invermerevalleyecho.com or 250-342-9216

Echo Index Content Opinion.............................................A6-A7 Community Calendar.............................A9 Sports.............................................A15-A17 Brain Games..........................................A18 Build Your Wealth.................................A20 Classifieds.....................................A21-A22 Remember When?................................A23 Serving the Valley.................................A24

Columns View from the Hill...................................A6 Tech Yourself...........................................A7 Grow Your Life........................................A7 Ramble On..............................................A8 Off the Record.......................................A10 B.C. Views..............................................A10

Features Valley Life......................................A12-A13 Hockey Pool..........................................A19

Find us online invermerevalleyecho.com InvermereValleyEcho @TheValley Echo

Got news? Call Greg, Dan, Kristian or Nicole at 250-3429216 or email news@invermerevalleyecho.com.

Last week's online poll results Do you think the director for the Jumbo Glacier municipality should be given a regional district travel allowance? Total Votes: 19 Yes: 21% No: 78%

(4 votes) (15 votes)

This week's online poll question Do you agree with the West Kootenay EcoSociety's assertion that the Jumbo municipality is unconstitutional?

Join the Kootenay Rockies Innova�on Council for this workshop and networking event, aimed at small and medium‐sized businesses looking to increase their produc�vity using technology. Learn the basics of the new cloud‐based IT landscape, including: IdenƟfying tools and narrowing the eld. Finding opportuniƟes and reducing risk. Understanding the relaƟonship between service, maintenance, exibility and cost. Staying agile as the IT ecosystem changes. Tuesday, February 26, 5 ‐ 8 pm | Golden There is no charge, but registra�on is required. Visit www.kric.ca/events for details.

ARTS, CULTURE & HERITAGE GRANT WRITING WORKSHOPS CKCA is hosting FREE workshops for individuals or groups in the Canadian Columbia Basin who are interested in applying for CBT’s arts, culture and heritage funding.

Golden: Sat. March 2, 9 – 11 a.m. Location: Civic Centre, Board Rm, 810 -10th Ave. S.

Invermere: Sat. March 2, 2.30 p.m. – 4.30 p.m. Location: College of the Rockies, Rm 112, 1535 - 14th St

Cranbrook: Sun. March 3, 10 a.m. – 12 noon Location: College of the Rockies, Rm 232, 2700 College Way Administered and managed by: P.O. Box 103, Nelson, BC, V1L 5P7 1.877.505.7355 wkrac@telus.net www.basinculture.com

Cast your vote at www.invermerevalleyecho.com/online poll *NO SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED*

Valley Echo subscription rates Annual subscription rates (incl. tax) Local (Spillimacheen to Canal Flats) $45.30 Office Pick-Up $34.50 Canada $62.60/ Outside Canada $182.00 Seniors (local) $34.50/Seniors (Canada) $56.00 Six months subscription rates (incl. tax) Local (Spillimacheen to Canal Flats) $29.40 Seniors (local) $22.80 The Valley Echo is published every Wednesday by Black Press Publishing.


A4 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

NEWS

Invermere sewer rates bylaw nears completion DAN WALTON reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com

Increases to monthly sewer service rates

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Invermere council passed second and third reading of a sewer rates bylaw at their February 12

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“Buzz finally wins one and he’s not here to see it,” noted Mayor Gerry Taft.

Thwarted attempt to raise property tax late fees

Despite a staff recommendation to align Invermere with other B.C. communities by raising the late fees on property taxes to 10 per cent, the district is choosing to stick with its 1.5 per cent late fee on property taxes filed after the July deadline. Mayor Gerry Taft saw merit in raising the fee, which would encourage more ratepayers to file on time. Other councillors cited Invermere as a tourist community where many businesses rely on midsummer income to balance the costs for the rest of the year, and argued against raising the fee. Taft proposed raising the fee from 1.5 per cent to five per cent. His motion was opposed by the other three councillors. (Coun. Greg Anderson was not in attendance.) 4.3125” x 4”

Downtown parking review discussion

The Downtown Parking Strategy was adopted, with an implementation plan slated to be integrated into the district’s 20-year capital plan. During discussion, councillors agreed that heavy downtown traffic could be mitigated with better promotion of the Lakeview parking lot, which is the large lot found behind the hockey rink. Councillor Spring Hawes said she’d like to see Invermere do away with diagonal parking spaces. She acknowledged the complexities that would ensue, but said she’d prefer to see parallel parking.

You can’t win ‘em all

During discussion regarding dollars the district will at some point require for road repairs, Taft noted people will complain about potholes while also complaining about higher taxes. “Its our job to find balance,” he said.

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Applications Now Accepted Columbia Kootenay Cultural Alliance, in partnership with Columbia Basin Trust, invites individuals of all artistic disciplines and arts, culture and heritage groups in the Columbia Basin to apply for project funding. Photo: Eye of the Mind Photography

Administered and managed by: P.O. Box 103, Nelson, BC, V1L 5P7 1.877.505.7355 wkrac@telus.net www.basinculture.com

Program brochures and application forms are available online at www.basinculture.com, or call CKCA at 1.877.505.7355 or email wkrac@telus.net. Deadline for applications is March 8, 2013, or March 22, 2013, depending on the program.


Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A5

NEWS

Six cell phone towers slated for national park Council briefs from the Village of Radium Hot Springs February 13 council meeting KRISTIAN RASMUSSEN kristian@cv-pioneer.com

Parks Canada has received a proposal from Telus outlining plans to install six cell phone service towers throughout Kootenay National Park. “Construction will be a year and a half from now at the earliest,” explained Trevor Kinley, wildlife crossing project manager for Parks Canada, during the council meeting. “Telus has got a preliminary proposal in and Parks Canada will review that proposal and go through the environmental assessment process.” The completion of the towers will likely mean cell phone cov-

erage throughout Kootenay National Park, Kinley said. “The intent is to get nearly continuous coverage throughout the entire park, but there are a few issues with canyons and trying to get around corners.” For more information, please contact Rick Kubian at rick.kubian@pc.gc.ca .

Shikedanz phase approved

Radium council approved phase one of a two-phase affordable strata subdivision proposed

by Shikedanz Properties in Elk Park. “We want to encourage new people to come to Radium and we think this development is what we need to do,” said Brent Berezowksi of Shikedanz. Construction of the first stage of the development has begun and will include 13 single family housing lots. The project raised concern when it was noted that the developer wished to exclude sidewalks from the sub-division because they would encroach on the natural surroundings and size of lots in the area. “The more trees we take down, the less desirable the lots are,” Mr. Berezowski told council. “We all know that the stacked townhouses and the higher density stuff has no place in the marketplace right now. We

have tried to keep the units with as little impact as possible on the green space.” In a memo to council, Arne Dohlen, Radium's director of planning and development services, raised concern that omitting sidewalks from the development could jeopardize the safety of children and oppose the community accessibility that Radium has worked to maintain. The proposed development of 13 sidewalk-less lots would not jeopardize pedestrians because the area would face minimal traffic and adjacent walking trails bordering the sub-division would be within 100 metres, Berezowski countered. Councillor Clara Reinhardt agreed. “The sidewalks, for me, are not really a big deal because I agree

that it is a short distance to walk.” Another concern regarding the development was raised over the implementation of a ditch system running the length of the development, with culverts at each home. “Every spring, runoff is an issue, and where we have a curb and gutter system it has really mitigated that problem,” said Councillor Ron Verboom. “At the Revelstoke sub-division and Jackson Avenue there is no curb and gutter, and every spring we have a big problem with runoff.” The cost-effective nature of the sub-division would be hindered by a curb and gutter requirement, Mr. Berezowski added. “I think we can find an engineering solution to the problem without having to go

with curb and gutter,” he said. Ultimately, because the project is a bareland strata with a private road it falls outside of the jurisdiction of Radium's strictest sub-division standards, said Mark Read, Radium's

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6 (ROCKY MOUNTAIN) KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION Eligibility - Age Children whose fifth birthday occurs on or before December 31, 2013 are eligible to enter Kindergarten in September 2013. For registration, please bring your child’s Birth Certificate, Care card, and custody papers (if applicable). If you have questions regarding which school your child should attend, please call the School Board Office at 250-342-9243

Please phone your child’s school for an appointment time. Edgewater Elementary: 250-347-9543 Registration will take place from Monday, March 4 to Friday, March 15 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Welcome to Kindergarten Orientation: April 29, 12:30- 2:00 p.m.

Jumbo Glacier Resort faces third legal challenge Nelson-based environmental group files court petition NICOLE TRIGG nicole@invermerevalleyecho.com

The West Kootenay EcoSociety is challenging the province’s decision to grant mountain resort municipality status for the Jumbo Glacier Resort. On Monday (February 18), the Nelson-based EcoSociety filed an application for judicial review in BC Supreme Court that argues that the creation of a municipality with no residents for the purpose of furthering a private development is inherently unconstitutional.

It’s the first legal challenge to changes made under Bill 41 last spring, which altered the Local Government Act to remove the requirement that resort municipalities must have residents. “Our action today is in defense of democracy,” said EcoSociety executive director David Reid in a press release. “Every Canadian should shudder at the idea of a provincial minister appointing a mayor and council for a municipality with no residents. It’s an affront to our constitution and our democracy.” This is the third application for judicial review regarding Jumbo Glacier Resort. In 2005, RK Heliski requested a judicial review of the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office process and the decision to grant an environ-

chief administrative officer. Despite the minor issue surrounding drainage, council unanimously approved the project. “It is nice to see another development permit like this come across our desk,” added Verboom.

Eileen Madson Primary: Registration Parents only – Wednesday, February 27 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. or 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. For appointment please call Judy Dow at 250-3429315 or e-mail judy.dow@sd6.bc.ca WELCOME TO KINDERGARTEN Day for new Kindergarten students: May 15.

mental assessment certificate in 2004. The challenge was unsuccessful. The Ktunaxa Nation filed an application for judicial review of the resort’s approval on November 30 last year, arguing that the intended location for the resort is at the heart of Qat’muk, one of its main sacred sites. “We deliberated long and hard over whether to file this application,” said Reid in the release. “In the end, we couldn’t sit by and see this perversion of democracy move forward in an area that we have fought to protect for 20 years. We’re confident that the court will agree with us, and that the Jumbo Wild! community will support our efforts.”

Martin Morigeau Elementary: 250-349-5665 Kindergarten registrations can be completed from Monday, March 4 to Friday, March 8 9:00 - 11:30 a.m. Welcome to Kindergarten Orientation: Thursday, May 16, 9:00 – 10:20 a.m. Windermere Elementary: 250-342-6640 Registration forms can be completed during school hours until March 15 and will be accepted after that date if space is available. Welcome to Kindergarten for parents and new Kindergarten students May 7, 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Please call for appointment. LEARNING@HOME PROGRAM: If you are interested in finding out more about the Learning@Home Program and/or wish to register for this program, please contact Becky Blakley at 250-342-9243, ext. 4429 or e-mail Becky. blakley@sd6.bc.ca or Ed Main at 250-427-5308 or e-mail Ed.main@sd6.bc.ca.

Continues to 'judicial' on Page A11

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A6 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Opinion

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

Something to say? email editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

Luddites had the right idea GREG AMOS editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

Like virtually everyone else my age in the developed world, I have come to rely heavily on my smart phone. The many time-saving apps and the sheer convenience of having my email, day planner, recording device, music (and yes, even a phone) all in one place make it a pretty essential piece of equipment for the post-modern journalist. Imagine my shock when this compact piece of technology began to fail me about two weeks ago. Being that it's not an Apple product, all the iPhone owners out there may begin gloating now. And all technological naysayers can remind me how I never should have gone so far down this road. Two hundred years ago in England, an angry mob of textile artists took issue with the new machinery spawned by the Industrial Revolution, which was quickly rendering their skills obsolete and allowing them to be replaced by low-paid, unskilled labourers. Supposedly spurred on by the smashing antics of a young Ned Ludd, the Luddites expressed their dislike of technology in physical terms, by smashing the newfangled machines, engaging in what historians have referred to as "collective bargaining by riot". Today's Luddites — and the spirit definitely lives on within a small sector of our society — will undoubtedly disagree fundamentally with the idea of putting up six new cell phone towers in Kootenay National Park (see the Radium council briefs on the previous page). To them, the move likely represents a further disturbance of a supposedly wild place, as well as an increased investment in technology that may one day fail us catastrophically. And as those of us who work daily with software and networks can relate to, the smallscale catastrophes alone are difficult enough to deal with. In a way, we all channel our inner Luddite every time we feel to urge to annihilate our frozen computers. We probably disagree with their methods, but Luddites might have been on to something with their inherent distrust of technology.

Something on your mind?

The Valley Echo welcomes all letters to the editor and submissions from community and sports groups, as well as special community columns. Please keep your signed, legible submissions under 500 words. We reserve the right to edit for clarity, taste, legal reasons and brevity. Each submission must contain a daytime phone number and place of residence. Send email submissions to editor@invermerevalleyecho.com.

VALLEY ECHO T he

The NEWSpaper in the Columbia Valley

#8, 1008 8 Avenue • P.O. Box 70 Invermere, B.C., Canada V0A 1K0 Phone: 250-342-9216 invermerevalleyecho.com

View from the Hill — MP David Wilks

Making things easier for First Nations The Conservative government is delivering results for constituents in Kootenay-Columbia and for all Canadians on the priorities that matter most. In December and January, I travelled throughout Kootenay-Columbia riding attending meetings with chambers, councils and individuals. Despite Canada’s very encouraging record, with one of the strongest economies in the G7, the job is far from done. That’s why our Jobs and Growth Act (Bill C-45) implements additional measures, as promised in the budget. These measures are essential to keeping Canada on the right track toward long-term prosperity. In addition to general measures, they include action on long-standing requests from some First Nations for more logical and timely processes for leasing land, helping them attract investment and jobs. Our government is working to support economic opportunities for all Canadians, with measures to enhance interprovincial trade and by cutting taxes more than 140 times. Angela Krebs

Rose-Marie Regitnig

Greg Amos

PUBLISHER

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Kristian Rasmussen

Dean Midyette

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ASSOCIATE EDITOR

PRODUCTION

Dan Walton

Our government has responded to requests from First Nations to make it easier for them to promote economic growth and jobs. Some First Nations have had success leasing land for commercial development, bringing jobs and generating property taxes to pay for services to members. Unfortunately, the lengthy, multiple-step approval process has delayed projects, sometimes causing developments to fall through during the average one-to-two year wait. Before our bill, approval of a lease required approval of a majority of voters in a vote in which a majority of potential voters in the First Nation took part. Because of the second requirement, 80 per cent of votes failed, forcing a second simple majority referendum. In addition, these leases require approval by the federal government — and we’ve replaced a lengthy Governor-in-Council process with approval by the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, saving additional months. These measures were undertaken in response to requests by First Na-

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In Absentia

tions, and following committee hearings that consulted with First Nations representatives. They show our government’s commitment to listening to First Nations and acting on their concerns, as well as our commitment to supporting economic opportunities across Canada. It’s important to note that these measures apply only to leasing — no land is lost — and that no First Nation is required to lease land or take any other steps. Instead, we’re simply making things easier for those First Nations for which land leases offer the potential for more jobs, more opportunity and better services supported by tax revenues. Canadians can be assured that our Conservative government remains focused on their priorities. As long as any Canadian is looking for work, we’ll continue to support jobs and growth. Through our low-tax plan, we’re helping keep Canada on track for long-term prosperity. For more information, call (613) 995-7246 or email david.wilks@parl.gc.ca. David Wilks is the Conservative MP for Kootenay-Columbia.

NOTICE OF COPYRIGHT: Reproduction of any or all editorial and advertising materials in whole or in part is strictly prohibited without the written consent of the publisher. It is agreed by the advertiser requesting space that the liability of The Valley Echo, owned by Black Press Ltd. in the event of failure to publish an advertisement or in the event of an error appearing in the advertisement as published, shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for only the one incorrect insertion for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect or omitted items only and that there shall be no liability in any event greater than the amount paid for such advertising. BC PRESS COUNCIL – The Valley Echo is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province's newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby Street, Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

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verifiedcirculation.ca 2009 2009 WINNER


The Valley Echo Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Word

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A7 I

on the Street

What have Panorama Mountain Village's 50 years in operation meant for the Columbia Valley?

THINK IT HAS

BEEN IMPORTANT

I

TO THE COMMUNITY

MEANT MUCH TO

THERE

AS A TOURISM HUB

THE VALLEY...

VERY LITTLE GOING

TO BRING PEOPLE

HAVE THEIR OWN

ON HERE IN THE WIN-

TO THE VALLEY...

RESTAURANTS AND

TERTIME IF IT WASN'T

AND A GREAT PLACE

EVERYTHING IS UP

FOR

FOR LOCALS TO

THERE.

HAS BEEN A GREAT

LEARN HOW TO SKI.

THINK IT HAS CON-

— DENISE OLICHNY

THINK IT HASN'T

I

THEY

DON'T

WOULD BE

PANORAMA. IT

ADDITION TO THE VALLEY.

TRIBUTED MUCH.

— PETER EVANS

— EARL HANSON

Tech Yourself — Aaron Mackenzie

Debunking myths around TV technologies In my last article, I was discussing the basic pros and cons of plasma televisions. This week, I’ll write about the other common choices, light emitting diode (LED) and liquid crystal display (LCD) screens, while hopefully debunking some of the falsehoods floating around. Comparing LED and LCD TVs can be very difficult, mainly because there really isn’t much of a difference. I’ll explain how an LCD screen works, then I’ll come back to how the two technologies aren’t very different at all. An LCD screen functions at its most basic level by running an electrical signal through a transistor to one of

three colours (red, green, and blue) in an individual pixel. By controlling the amount of voltage to each of the colours, you are able to create 256 individual shades for each of the colours, totalling close to 16.8 million possible colours. Now for the interesting part. LCDs on their own do not generate light. You need either a reflective back layer, which is how digital watches work, or you need some type of backlight. In TVs marketed as LCD, this backlight is a cold cathode fluorescent light (CCFL). These lights are typically run horizontally behind the screen, or mounted on the top and bottom, and

they use a diffuser plate to distribute light over the entire screen surface. So now that we know how an LCD screen works, why would I say that LED and LCD aren’t very different from each other? When you go into a store and look at a nice new LED screen, what you are actually looking at is an LCD screen using LEDs as the light source instead of a CCFL. There are a few ways LEDs can be used to light a screen. Most commonly, LEDs are arranged behind the screen, shining out towards the viewer. In higher end sets, these lights can be turned on and off in specific areas to help produce better contrast.

The other way the lights are used is in an edge-lit format. This design is what is used in the new ultra slim and frameless TVs on the market today. There you have it! The difference between LED and LCD TV’s is really just the backlight. Both of these styles of TV function very well in varied lighting conditions, so if you don’t have a nice dark room to really make a plasma shine, LED or LCD may just be the screen for you. Aaron Mackenzie is The Valley Echo’s technology columnist and the sales manager at The Source in Invermere. He can be reached at techracing@ gmail.com.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Dialysis double take Dear Editor, As a councillor for the District of Invermere, I was one of many local and provincial government representatives who strongly opposed the closure of the Invermere Dialysis unit. Resolutions have been passed by the District of Invermere and the Kootenay East Regional Hospital District Board calling on the Ministry of Health to re-open the clinic. And MLA Norm Macdonald, who has been very clear that the unit must be reopened, has made public statements and written a letter to the Minister of Health outlining the need in this community for this health service. But there was one person on the political landscape who wrote a very different letter. BC Liberal candidate Doug Clovechok immediately wrote a letter to the editor attacking the position taken by our MLA and defending the decision to close the clinic which was published in both the Golden Star and the Invermere Valley Echo on January 23rd. So when I read last week's story that indicated that it was 'unanimous' political pressure that resulted in IH agreeing not to immediately move the dialysis equipment, I was very surprised. Further into the article I was shocked to read that Mr. Clove-

chok is now claiming that he opposed the closure from the beginning. Mr. Clovechok then went on to claim that he was part of the effort to convince the government to review the decision. Nothing can be further from the truth. Mr. Clovechok wants the people of this region to vote for him in the next election. Yet he decided that in this case it was more important to attack the current MLA than to fight for what was best for this community. That's not the way to prove that you deserve the electorate's support. Paul Denchuk District of Invermere Councillor

Switch criticized Dear Editor, In January, Interior Health announced the permanent closure of the Invermere Dialysis Unit, forcing dialysis patients to travel to Cranbrook three times a week for treatment. Immediately Invermere Mayor Gerry Taft and MLA Norm Macdonald spoke out against the closure and began to work with government to make the case for the re-opening of the dialysis clinic. Due in large part to their effort, IH is is reconsidering the closure. CONTINUES TO 'LETTERS' ON PAGE A8

Grow Your Life — Elizabeth Shopland

Learning to embrace change Two weeks ago, I wrote about how my thoughts were drifting towards spring, and now I can hear the rain as it lands on the sunroom windows. It seems to me that over the past few winters’ nature’s thermometer appears to be a bit off the norm. How willing are we to adapt and change as the seasons arrive too early or seemingly too late? I believe we can feel the natural rhythm of nature working in the background of our lives and when the weather doesn’t match the date, we start to feel some resistance to this change. Change in any area of our lives doesn’t come easily to most people. It requires flexibility, energy, adaptability and a willingness to experience something new. Why is it we resist change so much? You’ve probably heard about a virtual place called your “comfort zone." Often described as a place within ourselves where familiar is the name of the game, it’s a place where we feel safe and the realm of possibility

is limited by our perceived boundaries. Self-talk such as “I can't…," “I have never…," “It’s beyond me…," “I don’t see why I have to…," “I’m too old…” are some examples that confirm we may be living well within our comfort zones. I know as you read this, there is someone thinking “so what’s wrong with resisting all this change and being content in my comfort zone?" I suppose the question would be then: do you want to be an oak tree or do you want to be an enormously grand oak tree? Gail Sheeny offers this quote, “If we don’t change, we don’t grow. If we don’t grow, we aren’t really living." How could we release the resistance to change, break out of our comfort zones and grow? Here is a simple formula given to us by Richard Beckhard, the founder of the field of organizational development in the 1950s: DxVxFS > RC. D is the experienced state of dissatisfaction with your current state or situation. V is the vision of the desired

future state. FS is the positive first steps toward your vision. You also need to answer the question, “Am I willing and am I able?” You will only take inspired action if the answer to both questions is yes. For change to be sustainable, the product of these three elements must be greater than your Resistance to Change. When the weather outside seems to change for the better or for the worse, some people will always find a way to complain and resist it, while others will embrace the opportunity to make the most of it. I believe the world needs more people growing through their comfort zones to become enormously grand oak trees. Elizabeth Shopland is a horticulturist for Homefront Essentials Gardening, a Certified Solution Focused Coach, author and speaker, and the owner of Banyan Tree Solutions. She can be reached at 250-342-8978 or www. btswellness.com.


A8 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Do your part...

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

Ramble On — Marilyn Berry

Knocking out polio

We want to hear from you! The RDEK’s Draft Five Year Financial Plan is open for public comment – and we want to hear from you!

Copies of the 5-Year Financial Plan are available at our Columbia Valley RDEK office, available on our website www.rdek.bc.ca and can be mailed to you. The comment period closes on February 25th. Get a copy of the Plan today and let us know what you think. Phone: 250-489-2791 • Website: www.rdek.bc.ca

I have just spent a most inspirational weekend in Seattle at a Rotary International training session for incoming club presidents and I want to share some truly amazing news. Did you know that as of February 13, 2013 there have been only two new cases of polio diagnosed in the world this year? At approximately the same time last year, I believe the number was 13. The final three countries in which polio is endemic are Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria — down from more than 125 countries in 1988 when the World Health Organization passed a resolution to eradicate polio. This followed the launching of PolioPlus by Rotary International in 1985. One of the speakers in Seattle was Ramesh Ferris, a polio survivor born in India in 1979 and adopted by a couple from Whitehorse. Ferris underwent several surger-

ies in Canada and walks with the aid of crutches and braces. After a visit to India in 2002 where he witnessed the plight of many other polio victims, he created Cycle to Walk and hand-cycled across Canada in order to spread awareness about polio and to raise money to aid in the battle to eradicate the crippling disease. His story is one that will bring a tear to almost any eye. I am so proud to be a member of this wonderful organization that took on a disease that was doing so much harm and strove to end it. There had to have been many who thought, "What audacity! Who do these people think they are and why do they think they have the power or ability to eradicate a disease?" Some think it is sad that our younger population has no idea what polio is. I think it is fantastic! Think about it: it has been so long since

a North American has been diagnosed with polio that there is a whole generation that doesn't know it existed. Perhaps I should modify my thoughts somewhat, though. Although it is terrific that our friends and neighbours no longer fear the disease, we must keep in mind that the fight is not over yet. So long as there is one case in the world, the war is not won and we cannot afford to give up now. Should we do so, it is possible that millions of children could still be crippled in the future. So please take every opportunity you can to support the battle. Polio is still the number one priority for Rotarians around the world... help us end polio now! Visit www.endpolio.org for more information. Marilyn Berry is the community columnist for The Valley Echo and can be reached at maberry7@yahoo.com.

LETTERS continued from page A7

2nd Annual

Kootenay Music Awards The Invermere Valley Echo in partnership with 11 other Kootenay Newspapers are heading up the 2nd annual 2013 Kootenay Music Awards. Artists and fans alike will begin submitting their favourites from the past year starting in March and voting in April with the Awards Gala on May 10th. This is your opportunity to be a major sponsor for 10 weeks you will be promoted across the Kootenay’s in 12 newspapers and other promotional material.

As a sponsor you will receive .... Platinum Sponsor - $800

• Top billing on all advertising, including logo • 10 weeks of advertising running in all Black Press Kootenay papers • Can hand out award at event • Mentioned in all editorial stories done on event • Top billing at event • Ability to put up banner and/or logo at event in high profile location • Large logo included on Thank You Advertisement

Gold Sponsor - $500

• Middle billing on all advertising, including logo • 10 weeks of advertising running in all Black Press Kootenay papers • Can hand out award at event • Numerous mentions as Gold Sponsor at event • Top billing at event • Ability to put up banner and/or logo at event • Medium sized logo included on Thank you Advertisement

Silver Sponsor - $300

• Mention on all advertising • 10 weeks of advertising running in all Black Press Kootenay papers • Recognition as Silver Sponsor at event • Recognition on Thank You Advertisement

Contact Lily at 250-489-3455 or lily@kootenayadvertiser.com Profit from the awards and event is being used to create a fund for muscians that can be used for scholarships.

page report, it was stated that "unanimous" political pressure had resulted in IH putting a freeze on removing the dialysis equipment while the situation was being reviewed. But the truth of the matter is that when it comes to politicians, or want-to-be politicians, opposition to the closure was not unanimous. On January 23, the local BC Liberal candidate, Doug Clovechok, penned a 300 word letter which he sent to at least three area newspapers, in which he defended both the government and Interior Health in their decision to close the clinic. His support for the closure was unequivocal. Yet when interviewed by the Valley Echo last week he claimed that the decision to close the dialysis unit

" didn't sit well with him from the beginning". Doug Clovechok is asking us to support him in his bid to become MLA; he is asking to be our representative in Victoria. But when he had the opportunity to fight for a program that provides a life-saving service for local citizens, he first chose to defend the government. And then, when others who were doing their jobs representing their constituents began to have some success, Mr. Clovechok tried to take some of the credit. I prefer an MLA who represents me in Victoria, rather than one who represents Victoria to me! Bob Campsall Invermere

Giving Back VEALLEY CHO T he

Community

Golf Tournament

The Valley Echo is pleased to announce the 4th Annual Giving Back golf tournament being held at Windermere Valley Golf Course on Sunday June 23.

We are now taking applications from local not-for-profit and service groups interested in receiving the funds raised from the golf tournament. Application forms are available at The Valley Echo offices now located at #8, 1008 - 8 Street, Invermere. Please note that the applications must be project-based. Please contact Dean Midyette with any questions at 250-341-6299 or dean@cv-pioneer.com

Deadline to submit proposals: Wednesday, March 25 at noon.


Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A9

COMMUNITY

Community Keeping your kids safe online Calendar ROB ORCHISTON Special to The Valley Echo

Your kids and teenagers were immersed into the Internet age right from those first grainy ultrasound images you proudly posted online. This means you may have some catching up to do to ensure you can help keep your kids safe online. Hackers, bullies, predators, identity thieves, and spyware all pose threats online. Kids must be aware of the need to protect their online reputations for prospective employers. From my observations, children are the perfect little Internet consumers; they click everything, install everything that’s presented to them and “friend” everyone with wanton abandon — so much so that my kids aren’t even allowed to walk near my computer in case they infect it with some unknown evil. I recently came to learn that my underage child had created an illegal Facebook account (the minimum legal age is 13). Despite regularly using the Internet for more than 20 years and having a home Internet-use contract with my kids, I discovered I had a lot of catching up to do with what I thought was harmless use of the game Minecraft. And with the explosion of cheap iPods and laptops under $200, faster broadband speeds here in the valley, wireless everything, Internet-connected TV and gaming devices, the creeping menace may have infiltrated your home without a second thought. While social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Skype and many others provide an important outlet for teen communication and can bring many benefits, I’ve come to realize that kids often need guidance to make good online decisions. The magnetic force exerted by sites like Facebook means that self-policing by teens may not work. I encourage you to spend time at the computer together with your child, know what they do online (no — I mean what they really do online) and ask lots of questions about who they communicate with and what all that code language banter means. I found this to be quite an enlightening experience into my child’s underground online life.

C C

mpanion rner

To be featured, send in your companion’s name, age and photo, along with a fun fact or story about them! Be sure to include your name. Email editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

Animal Name: PAIGE Age: Seven years Breed: Bordie Collie/ Pointer Family: Emily Rawbon Fun fact: True to her breed, Paige is completely and utterly psychotic, except when herding sheep (or groups of hikers.)

Here are a few simple starting points to learn more about keeping your kids safe online: • What you say online stays online — forever. • Use the “THINK” test before posting a statement online: is it true? Is it helpful? Is it inspiring? Is it necessary? Is it kind? • Know more than your kids know about the sites they use. • Understand the privacy and security settings on social media sites. Lock down profiles so they’re not accessible to the entire planet. • Encourage your kids to use caution when adding friends on social media sites; it’s wise to reject anyone you haven’t personally met or wouldn’t chat with on the street. Set a limit on how many friends you allow. • Consider time limits, removal of devices during certain hours and adding parental controls. • Sit with your kids sometime when they are online, and have them show you the sites they use; dig deep to see what really goes on. • Use really strong and unique passwords and change them occasionally. A weak password may allow evil automatons to breach your kid’s account and potentially gain control of their online identity. • Make sure your computer has automatic updates turned on, and consider protection software. • Be a responsible neighbour and lock down your wireless Internet connection so those kids next door aren’t chatting at all hours of the night on your dime and at the expense of your bandwidth. If you’re not sure your wireless is secured, find someone who can tell you, or just look for teens with iPods hanging around your front lawn. • Bring back the living room computer! Only allow Internet use in the public part of the house where you can monitor their use and time. • Start a regular, open dialogue with your kids about Internet safety. • Ensure your kids are getting enough exercise and sleep and not partying or playing games online when you think they are sleeping. Continues to 'ONLINE' on Page A14

Send your events to production@invermerevalleyecho.com WED FEBRUARY 20 • Windermere Community Association Bingo Night, Windermere Community Hall, 6 p.m. FRI FEBRUARY 22 • Soup lunch hosted by Edgewater Seniors, soup, bun, dessert and beverage for $6, Edgewater Legion • Sledding with the Summit Youth Centre, 7 p.m. • Denim on Denim and her Public Girls Night Party with Mary's Gun at Bud's Bar & Lounge, 10 p.m. SAT FEBRUARY 23 • Radium Public Library, "Drawing with Trudy", 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. All ages of children welcome • Lake Windermere Rod & Gun Club Annual Wild Game Banquet and Dance, Invermere Community Hall, cocktails at 5:30 p.m. dinner at 6:30 p.m. and dance at 9:30 p.m. Sold out. • Movie Night, Summit Youth Centre, 7 p.m. • Broken Down Suitcase play the Station Pub, 10 p.m. WED FEBRUARY 27 • Pink Shirt Day, wear a pink shirt to support anti-bullying • Baking night at the Summit Youth Centre, 6 p.m. EVERY SUNDAY • Public Indoor Rock Climbing, Laird School, 5-8 p.m., $5. • Radium Seniors’ Carpet Bowling, 1:30 p.m., Seniors' Hall • Drop-in roller skating, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m., $5, Glacier Peaks Gymnastics building, 250-342-5321

2nd SUNDAY • LW Alliance Church Sing and Celebrate, 7 p.m. For more information call Clarence Stauffer, 250-3429580 EVERY MONDAY • Gentle drop-in carpet bowling, 1:30 p.m., Seniors' Centre • Cadets, 6:30-9 p.m. for boys and girls, ages 12-17. Cost: FREE (includes uniform). Info: Rick Dendy 250-341-1509. • Duplicate Bridge, 6:30 p.m., Invermere Seniors’ Hall, $2/ person. Visitors welcome • EK Brain Injury Support Group, 1-3 p.m., Family Resource Centre. Info: 250-344-5674 1st & 3rd TUESDAY • OPT clinic, 6:308:30 p.m., Inv. Health Unit, 850-10th Ave. Confidential service: low-cost birth control, and STI testing 1st TUESDAY • Invermere Camera Club 7 p.m. Tanya, tanyadeleeuw65@ gmail.com EVERY TUESDAY • Shuswap Bingo at the Shuswap Indian Band Office downstairs, doors open at 5:30 p.m., early bird at 6:45 p.m., regular games at 7 p.m. • Cubs (8-10 year olds) and Beavers (5-7 year olds), JA Laird, 6 - 7 p.m. 1st & 3rd WED • Scrabble Night at Invermere Public Library. 6 - 8 p.m. Call 250-342-6416 • Bingo, Windermere Community Hall, opens at 6 p.m., starts at 7 p.m.

2nd & 4th WED • Seniors' Day at the Invermere Library, bus provided EVERY WEDNESDAY • Indoor soccer, DTSS gym. Drop-in, $2, 8:30-10:00 p.m. • Yoga THRIVE- Yoga for Cancer Survivors and Support People. Copper Point Resort. new 7- week session starts March 6 at 4:30 p.m. Call Jan Klimek at 250-342-1195 EVERY THURSDAY • Cadets, 6:30-9 p.m. for boys and girls, ages 12-17. Cost: FREE (includes uniform). Info: Rick Dendy 250-341-1509 • Children's Air Rifle Program, with the LWDRGC, Inv. Community Hall, 7 - 8:30 p.m., free of charge, ages 6-15. Learn safety, marksmanship, equipment provided EVERY FRIDAY • Baby Goose program for parents and babies up to 18 months. 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Eileen Madson Primary. kandruschuk@cbal.org • Public Indoor Rock Climbing, Laird School, 5-8 p.m., $5 • Preschool Story Time at the Invermere Public Library, 10:30 a.m. For info visit invermere.bclibrary.ca EVERY SATURDAY • Public Indoor Rock Climbing, Laird School, 5-8 p.m., $5. Invermere Thrift Store • Thursdays 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 1 - 4 p.m. Radium Thrift Store • Thursdays 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 12 - 4 p.m.


A10 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

Off the Record — Dan Walton Thursday March 7th – 7 p.m. at Pynelogs Cultural Centre • Election of officers • Review of financial position • Reception to follow Come out and support your community Arts Council. Everyone Welcome!

Shannonbrook Boarding Kennels Tender Loving Care for All Ages Registered Rough & Smooth Collies Obedience, Agility Training and Rally Obedience Training

250-342-6188

Kathy or Elizabeth 1628 Windermere Loop Road

Did you know..... •

The Valley Echo has won many provincial and national awards including most recently 2012 Best Ad Design in two categories for both B.C. and the Yukon.

The Valley Echo has donated over a $100,000 in sponsorship to non-profit groups in the Columbia Valley in 2012 and plans to do more in 2013.

We deliver to 2,000 homes and businesses across the Columbia Valley from Canal Flats to Spillimacheen every week.

The Valley Echo has been the Columbia Valley’s first choice for community news since 1956.

Black Press is B.C. owned and operated, and started its first newspaper in Williams Lake in the late 1970s, now with 170 Community Newspapers, 90 of them operating in B.C.

Bring hockey home to Canada You won’t meet many Canucks who don’t support the idea of the NHL expanding into a Canadian market. We love our hockey. But it seems that red tape and financial challenges add more resistance toward hockey projects that American owners don’t want. It was almost surreal to hear the news of Atlanta relocating its team to Winnipeg after all the hurdles they had to overcome. But it’s no surprise that the Jets are selling tickets. I’d be willing to bet that a lot of other northern cities — in other words, almost every capital and otherwise major city in Canada — could punch above their weight in population and provide lucrative support for their own NHL team. While Atlanta moved the entire franchise to Winnipeg, which was very successful, it would be nice to see struggling teams play a few of their home games each season in a hockey-deprived community. Among the handful of Canadian cities that could possibly support a national hockey team of their own, Saskatoon would serve as an ideal location. Similarly, the National Football League’s Buffalo Bills (from Buffalo, N.Y., a short drive south of the border) have taken a few of their

home games to Toronto. A team like the Phoenix Coyotes (which, ironically, fled from Winnipeg in the mid-1990s) — that has been operating many seasons at a loss — could see big benefits if they were to bring some opponents to Saskatchewan. Other teams have been greeted to sellout crowds during the preseason in Saskatoon. If the Coyotes were selling out stadiums in the prairies for a few games during the regular season rather than playing for a half-empty building in Phoenix, there would be a greater demand for the fewer desert games they struggle to sell tickets to. Phoenix would also benefit from satellite home games through the increased fan base, especially considering the number of Canadian snowbirds who frequent Arizona. They could expect larger television audiences and increased merchandise sale. Taking a few home games north of the border would probably benefit a team as broke as Phoenix. But the Coyotes are a lost cause; more than 15 years have passed since the first game in Arizona and fans continually offer weak support. It must be harder to appreciate hockey if you live in a desert.

It’s charitable of the NHL to cover Phoenix’s lost revenue, but businesses should operate to increase their wealth. While many hockey fans are confident that a team would succeed in Quebec City, Hamilton, Markham, or Saskatoon to name a few, the NHL appears reluctant to make such long term changes. Even though the league is losing money by hanging on to the burdened Coyotes, the board of directors seem naively worried about losing more money. Experimenting with satellite home games would be an effective indicator of the potential within various Canadian market. Communities that are hungry for an NHL team would be given an opportunity to demonstrate their support, while owners could earn money from a team operating at a loss and build support for an unpopular team. It might not work for Invermere or the Columbia Valley, but there are many regions of the country that could satisfy the local cravings for NHL hockey by tapping into this idea. Dan Walton is a reporter for The Valley Echo and The Pioneer. He can be reached at reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com.

Est. 1956

Invitation to Tenderers Owner: District of Invermere Contract: 17th Street Upgrades Reference No. 0953.0104.02

• • • • • •

The Owner invites tenders for: • Storm sewer, outfall and 2000 m2 road expansion catch basin installation 350m sanitary forcemain (optional) installation • 250m watermain extension Slope stabilization and (optional) erosion control 7A Avenue and 17th Street • 275m gravity sanitary sewer replacement (optional) intersection upgrade • Pavement markings (optional) (optional) 230 lm of sidewalk • Site restoration (optional) 420 lm of curb and gutter (optional)

Contract Documents are available during normal business hours at: Contract Documents, Contract Drawings and Reference Material for this project will only be distributed electronically in digital format (PDF) through the Merx tendering website at www.merx.com. Information will be available on or after February 28, 2013. An optional pre-tender site meeting will be held on Tuesday March 12th, 2013 at 10 a.m. local time at the intersections of 7Ath Avenue and 17th Street, Invermere, B.C. Representatives from the District of Invermere and Urban Systems Ltd. will be present. The Contract Documents are available for viewing at: District of Invermere, PO Box 339, Invermere, B.C. V0A 1K0 Tenders are scheduled to close: 2 p.m. local time, March 19, 2013 NAME OF OWNER’S REPRESENTATIVE District of Invermere Sara Anderson, P.Eng., Urban Systems Ltd. 101-2716 Sunridge Way NE, Calgary, AB T1Y 0A5 Telephone: (403) 291-1193 • Fax: (403) 291-1374

B.C. Views — Tom Fletcher

B.C. gas boom is real, all right Whether Christy Clark’s government survives the May election or not, the natural gas “Prosperity Fund” idea floated in last week’s throne speech is a useful one. B.C. is poised to join Alberta in the upper rank of energy producing jurisdictions, with an expanding network of natural gas collection, refining and processing into liquid (LNG) for export. Clark’s preelection throne speech proposed a resource fund similar to Alberta’s Heritage Fund that would be reserved for debt reduction and major projects, rather than spent on programs, which tends to happen under the political pressure of fouryear election cycles. Opposition politicians and media commentators have dismissed this as a pre-election stunt. They note that the LNG industry in B.C. doesn’t exist yet, and may never produce the hundreds of billions of

dollars projected over the next 30 years. I returned for a visit to B.C.’s northeast earlier this month, and I can tell you the gas boom is real. My parents homesteaded east of Dawson Creek near the Alberta border in 1962, and I recall when our farm was drilled for gas by Gulf Canada 40 years ago. Many more gas wells have been drilled since then, and country roads have been widened and numbered for industrial traffic. Hydraulic fracturing, already in use when our farm was drilled, has been combined with directional drilling to open up huge new supplies. A farming community called Montney is the latest hot play, yielding not only shale gas but petroleum liquids, which are valuable for diluting heavy oil among other things. B.C. has never seen this kind of international investment interest before. Initial projects have been

joined by global players such as British Gas, and Mitsubishi, a key player in Japan's replacement of its devastated nuclear power program. Why would B.C.’s shale gas be seen as a priority for new global investment in LNG? For one thing, we’re a stable democratic country with a mature industry and competent regulation. That adds cost to the pipeline system, but it has a benefit. At the beginning of the year, I predicted that the international protest movement that dishonestly targets Alberta oil would soon turn to demonizing natural gas. That pseudo-scientific attack has begun, right here in B.C. I’ll have more on that in a subsequent column. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com. He can be reached at tfletcher@blackpress.ca.


Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

COMMUNITY

Local walking club hits a new stride New club offers group suppport

on the time spent moving rather than distance travelled. "Ideally we'll have an educational aspect to the walking group, so we'll maybe have other healthcare professionals come in and include a session on footwear." The club currently uses routes around town, but hope to use trails when the weather is warmer. "Anybody is welcome. If somebody wants to run, they can run; if somebody wants to walk, that's fine," Ferguson said. "People with walkers, people who are post-op having joint replacements, new moms with their babies in strollers — really, it's for anybody who just wants to get out and have an hour or so of activity.”

DAN WALTON reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com

Young or old, fit or not, there's a new club in town for anybody who wants to stay active and social. The Invermere Walking Club has begun meetings every Tuesday at 9:15 a.m. in front of the Invermere Community Hall. "People have a hard time finding somewhere to walk for an endurance walk here in Invermere in the winter, because it's often really icy and hilly," healthcare professional Kayla Ferguson told The Echo. "We want to make it social,

submitted photo The Walking Club meets Tuesday mornings at the Community Hall.

we want to have water and coffee and offer a bit of a support group aspect." The club was founded by Kayla Ferguson, Catrien de Ruyter and Crissy Stavrakov, all of whom work at the Invermere Hospital. The aim of the free group is to promote healthy living.

"[Walking] makes you feel better, keeps you healthy and active, mobile, and gives you good piece of mind and stress relief,” added Ferguson. “And it increases your heart and cardiovascular health." The meetings will last for about an hour each week and there will be a stronger focus

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A11

ANNOUNCEMENT

Columbia Valley Chamber of Commerce Annual General Meeting

Thursday, March 7, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. Refreshments served Please contact the Chamber office for agenda details and Board of Directors nomination forms 250-342-2844 info@cvchamber.ca ICAN – Invermere Companion Animal Network EARL GREY – Hi! I’m Earl Grey. Yup, just as regal as my name implies. I’m so affectionate, only 1 year old, full of vigor, and oh, did I mention handsome? I don’t know why nobody has adopted me yet. I’ll be at ICAN, waiting, just for YOU!

Remembered for his strong community spirit Continued from Page A2

the Invermere local was known for his chivalrous attitude. “He was such a gentleman; every time we went out he was out there holding the door for all the gals,” she added. John was also keen to cultivate spiritually. He was proud of his Christian faith and would rarely miss Sunday

service at Valley Christian Assembly. “He loved the music and the church people,” She said. “He was a member of their family and they always treated him very kindly and he embraced them.” A memorial service was held for John at Valley Christian Assembly on Saturday, February 4. He is survived by his brother Allan, who continues to keep his legacy of warmth and positivity alive.

“It was the most intimate little service with about 40 people and nobody wanted to get up and talk, but all of a sudden this little group of people started talking,” she added. “There were 15 people at the end of the service who mentioned some little thing they remembered about Johnny. His smile was brought up in every conversation to remember the kind of wonderful person he was.”

Sponsored by:

Adoption Fee: $100 (to help offset spay/neuter and vet bills)

4992 Fairmont Frontage Rd. 250-345-6133

Invermere Companion Animal Network

250-341-7888

Photo courtesy of Tanya De Leeuw Photography

www.icanhelpapet.com www.facebook.com/icanbc

Judicial review may take up to six months Continued from Page A5

The West Kootenay EcoSociety has been a long-standing member of the West Kootenay Coalition for Jumbo Wild! and an active opponent of the proposed ski resort since 1994. According to the release, the EcoSociety is filing the application with the support and co-operation of the coalition, and with partial funding from West Coast Environmental Law. BC Attorney General Sheila Bond and Minister of Culture, Community Development, and Sport Bill Bennett have been named as parties in the case. Based on previous judicial reviews, the process could take as long as six months to resolve. If the province wins the case, the society will be liable to pay the province’s legal fees. The first Jumbo Glacier mountain resort municipality council meeting with appointed mayor Greg Deck and

$

59

99

bob hall/nelson star photo West Kootenay EcoSociety executive director David Reid stands outside the Nelson courthouse Monday afternoon after submitting an application for a judicial review of the Jumbo Glacier Mountain Resort Municipality.

councillors Nancy Hugunin and Steve Ostrander took place on the afternoon of Tuesday (February 19) in the

Radium Hot Springs council chambers. Meeting coverage will appear in the next issue of The Valley Echo.

ba$ic tax returns limited time only

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Until March 31st, let our tax professionals prepare your basic tax return for the special price of $59.99.*

Visit or call us today. Cranbrook: 250.489.5388 • Kimberley: 250.427.7312 • Fernie: 250.423.4011 • Invermere: 250.342.3626 * $59.99 price point is valid on basic tax returns only. Basic tax returns include one T4, CPP and OAS. Valid only at participating H&R Block locations in Canada. See an office for details. ©2012 H&R Block Canada, Inc.

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A12 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

Valley Life

Kristian Rasmussen photos Clockwise from top left: Nico Chiodo, 11, from Calgary, reaches up to fish a football out of the basketball net during events at Radium's Winterfest on Saturday, February 16; older brother Lukas Chiodo, 14, goes for a football dunk (warm temperatures and a lack of ice meant the court was free of any curling activity); Wilderness challenge competitors Aquilino Naccarato of Edmonton (left) and Sean Nakahaie of Calgary engage in a battle of Alberta while chopping wood; Calgary's Isabella Townson, 5, tries her hand at indoor carpet bowling during Winterfest; Radium Hot Springs' Irma Weder breathes life into a small fire during the fire building finale of the women's portion of the Wilderness Challenge.


Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A13

Valley Life

Clockwise from top left: Radium mascot Randie the Ram entertains kids at Winterfest (Kristian Rasmussen photo); Tattoo artist Sarah Eastick at work on February 16 during Puppy Love 2, the second annual tattoo fundraiser in support of Global Animal Lovers Society (Dan Walton photo); Roger Smith heaps tomato sauce on his wife Dot's spaghetti plate during the First Responders Appreciation Dinner at the Edgewter Legion on February 17 (Dan Walton photo); Chloe Hudson, 5, from Calgary, finds a loonie in a haystack at Radium's Winterfest on February 16 (Kristian Rasmussen photo).


The Valley Echo Wednesday, February 20, 2013

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A14

Babies of 2012! The Valley Echo will be publishing this section in the February 27 issue featuring babies born in 2012. We would be pleased to publish the photo of your baby! Drop off or email advertising@invermerevalleyecho.com a photo along with baby’s name, parents’ and siblings’ names and for $40 + HST we will include them in this section. Booking deadline is Friday, February 22 at 12 p.m.

We’re ready... are you?

Complete snow removal services available Did you know we have

huuuuge

COMMUNITY

Cougar sightings prompt caution Two deer killed recently by cougars within urban areas in Invermere and Timber Ridge GREG AMOS editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

Vigilance is being urged for valley residents after cougars have proven bold enough to take their prey within urban neighbourhoods. On February 13 at 9:17 a.m., the Invermere Conservation Officer Service had a report of a cougar bedded down in the backyard of a residence in Timber Heights, a community located along the Copper Point Golf Course. Upon arrival, conservation officers confirmed the cougar was still in the backyard, and were able to get a picture of it as it fled. Shortly after, a search of the area revealed a cougar had killed deer, fed heavily upon it and partially buried the carcass, which has since been removed. Just two days later, on February 15 at 7:52 p.m., the Invermere Conservation Officer Service had another report of a cougar feeding on a deer carcass, this time in the 100 block of 12th Avenue in Invermere. The cougar had already left by the time a conservation officer responded. The deer carcass was removed to prevent further feeding in the area for public safety.

LEGAL NOTICE

Catamount – North Star Glaciers Motorized Use Restrictions Catamount - North Star Glaciers Motorized Use Restrictions

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GAS DROP

FORSTER CREEK CABIN

Radium Hot Springs 43 km

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FORSTER

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Whirlpool Lake

Thunderwater Lake

TRAIL

P E A K S

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NORTH STAR PEAK MT ALPHA CENTAURI

Irish Lake

ANTRIM PEAK

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Eire Lake

CONNEMARA PEAK

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KILLARNEY PEAK

LEITRIM PEAK

SHANNON GLACIER DONARD PEAK

MOUNT SALLY SERENA

BANSHEE TOWER

GALWAY PEAK photo: Pat Morrow

The area is served by this amended Recreation Order S.58(1)(b) FRPA as follows:

Area 1st- Forster Creek Meadows: Closed to motorized use th June 1 to November 30 annually.

Area 2st- Catamount Glacier: Closed to motorized use th June 1 to February 14 annually.

Area 3 – North Star Glacier:st Closed to motorized use st January 1 to December 31 annually.

Compliance, education and enforcement activities will be prominent.

The area is served by this amended Recreation Order S.58(1)(b) FRPA as follows: (No motorized use permitted past the summer roads end during these dates.)

• Create a home Internet use contract with your kids, update it often and ensure they understand it. Put it on the fridge. (Examples in links below). • Play the games your kid plays online with them and ensure you understand who their online friends are. • Limit your kid’s amount of time in front of an LCD screen before bed; there’s nothing like a glowing light four inches from their face to get them wired. • Read up online about internet safety and educate yourself. Try some of these excellent sites for parents: www.thedoorthatsnotlocked.ca, humanservices.alberta.ca/abusebullying/14838.html

Tara Lake

CARMARTHEN PEAK

R

CONTINUED FROM PAGE A9

• Discuss with other parents their strategies for keeping our kids safe, and patrol their internet playground just as you would the neighbourhood or skate park. • Hope for more regular Shaw internet blackouts, or have Internet free days. Our local schools and the police are doing what they can to help educate your kids about online safety, but ultimately we as parents need to work with our kids and show them how to be a responsible online citizen. Like me, you might even find that you begin to understand that tween or teen of yours just a little bit more and thus have a closer, more rewarding relationship with them. Rob Orchiston is a loving parent of two kids and a computer programmer (not always in that order).

DONEGAL PEAK

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The Columbia Valley is cougar country, said conservation oficer Greg Kruger, who's reminding the public to stay alert, as the current abundance of ungulates in the valley means more cougars may be expected to come into urban areas in pursuit of food. The public is asked to bring pets in at night as roaming pets are easy prey for cougar, to keep children close at hand, and to report all cougar sightings through the provincial Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) number, 1-877-952-7277. "We're hoping the cats go away," Kruger added. The two recent sightings follow a January 17 observation, when conservation officers received a report of a cougar killing a bighorn sheep in the driveway of a motel along Highway 93 leading into Kootenay National Park. In the interest of public safety, the carcass was promptly removed from the area.

Online moves need parental guidance

Seniors' discounts?

Recreation Sites and Trails BC

GREG KRUGER PHOTO This cougar was seen fleeing from a back yard in Timber Ridge on February 13, after it had been eating a carcass.

(Open to snowmobiling Feb 15th to May 31st, strictly enforced)

(No snowmobiling permitted in this area, strictly enforced)

Area 1 Forster Creek Meadows:

Area 2 Catamount Glacier:

Area 3 North Star Glacier:

Closed to motorized use June 1st to November 30th annually.

Closed to motorized use June 1st to February 14th annually.

Closed to motorized use January 1st to December 31st annually.

(No motorized use permitted past the summer roads end during these dates.)

(Open to snowmobiling February 15th to May 31st, strictly enforced)

(No snowmobiling permitted in this area, strictly enforced)

Who’s watching your property? RFE provides: • Alarm Systems monitoring by internet, cellular and landline.

• Surveillance Systems, internet based • Custom home theatres • Authorized Marantz dealer • Russound sound systems

Compliance, education and enforcement activities will be prominent. For more information visit www.SitesandtrailsBC.ca RecInfo@gov.bc.ca • Rocky Mountain District •250-426-1766

ALARMS & SOUND

250•342•6549

Sell some tools or get a bigger box


Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

A&E Sports

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A15

SPORTS Have a sports tip? editor@invermerevalleyecho.com or 250-342-9216

Alpine excellence

Submitted photo The David Thompson Secondary School Alpine Club is pictured here in Fernie at the East Kootenay Championships on February 13. Provincials will be held in Smithers from March 4 to 6 and the DTSS boys snowboard "A" team, the girls ski team, and an individual female snowboarder (Shelby Zaporosky) will be taking part. The boys ski team qualified, but due to financial constraints of a few members, will not be going.

Salsa dancing finds a foothold in valley Night of Latin American dance will be shaking up the Station Pub GREG AMOS editor@invermerevalleyecho.com

A popular Latin American dance style is stepping its way into a local establishment on Sunday (February 24). The Station Pub is hosting its first-ever salsa dancing night, in which newcomers and seasoned salsa swingers alike will have the opportunity to take a $10 lesson at 8 p.m. An open dance session

will begin at 9 p.m., at which point anyone is welcome to join in on the dance floor without having to pay. All skill levels are welcome and no partner is required, said organizer Kirsten Harma, herself a devoted salsa dancer. The evening will begin with the simpler meringue style, and move into basic salsa from there. “Anyone can pick up the basic steps pretty quickly,” she said. “For women, it really helps to have heels, as they force you to be on your toes.” Salsa is a mid-tempo ballroom dancing style that's rooted in Afro-Caribbean culture and augmented with Spanish flair.

The steps typically take place to a four-beat measure, with a male partner taking the lead role in the dance pair. “A lot of Latin dances actually developed in the Caribbean; Cuba is very well known for its salsa dancing,” noted Harma. Though her training is in the areas of jazz and Highland dancing, the local demand for salsa led Desiderata Health and Wellness Studio owner and instructor Colleen Wagner to start a two-nights-a-week salsa class last November. She's already planning another three-week session in March. “Salsa is very tricky, and I learned through my first session of teaching it to

CV Arts AGM March 7 at 7 pm

Come and get involved! What does ART mean to you? Support ARTS in the Columbia Valley… Visit columbiavalleyarts.com for our current events calendar, or call 250-342-4423.

start off with the basics,” she said. “I've just started my teaching experience with salsa, and I'm finding the Latin American dances are very vibrant. It's a different area of dance for me.” The salsa night at the pub will include snacks along the lines of chips and salsa, and other refreshments won't be far away. “I've been looking for a way to get a salsa teacher out here from Calgary, as there's a bit of a salsa scene there,” said Harma. Distance and winter driving conditions have prevented that from happening thus far. “My ulterior motive in doing this is to get people who already know how to dance to come out as well,” she added.


A16 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

SPORTS

Playoff-bound Rockies end season on high note Columbia Valley Rockies win two of last three games of the regular season JOSHUA ESTABROOKS Special to The Valley Echo

With the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League (KIJHL) regular season over, the Columbia Valley Rockies are looking forward to making their first playoff appearance in five years. The Rockies played three games over the weekend to round out their season, winning two of the three contests. "We're trying to get the guys into the mindset that we are going to war," said coach Wade Dubielewicz. "It will be made up of a lot of little battles and it is such a fine line now." The Rockies faced the Penticton Lakers on Friday, February 15 at home and after blowing a three-goal lead, took the game in double overtime with a goal from Briar McNaney. The final score was 5-4 in favour of the Rockies, who were also playing host to the players' families who came in to cheer on the team for the final three games of the regular season. On Saturday, February 16, the Rockies played their division rivals, the Creston Valley Thunder Cats, at the Eddie Mountain Memorial Arena. The Rockies had strong showings from River Lafferty who scored twice, Briar McNaney who grabbed three points, Brendan Burge who netted one goal and had three assists, and goaltender Stewart Pratt who stopped 42 shots to help his team win the game 5-3. Finishing off the regular season and foreshadowing the first round of the playoffs, the Rockies travelled to Fernie to play the Ghostriders, who ended their season at the top of the Eddie Mountain Division. The game was a hard fought loss, said Dubielewicz, and was tied 1-1 until the last seconds of the game when Fernie

joshua estabrooks photo Rockies forward, Briar McNaney, feeds a pass across the ice as his team battles the Creston Valley Thunder Cats on Saturday (February 16). The Rockies won the contest 5-3.

squeaked a shorthanded goal past Brody Nelson with nine seconds left in the third period. Looking forward to their playoff run, Dubielewicz said he is confident his team has what it takes to be competitive and is hoping to have everyone healthy for the start of the first round. "I'm not going to say we're favourites, but if we play the way we have to we can

beat any team. The hard part is keeping all the players on the team focused and going in the same direction. We have to be willing to make every single sacrifice possible to keep the puck out of our net and get it into the other guys' net." The Rockies play their first two games of the playoffs in Fernie on Saturday (February 23) and Sunday (February 24) and then return home for two games on

Tuesday (February 26) and Thursday, February 28. If needed, game five of the series will be played in Fernie on March 1, game six in Invermere on March 2 and the seventh game in Fernie on March 3. If successful in the first round, the Rockies would go on to face either the Kimberley Dynamiters or the Golden Rockets in round two, beginning on March 4.

Columbia Valley Rockies Home Game:

Tuesday, February 26 7:30 P.M. Thank you to our major sponsors

VS


The Valley Echo Wednesday, February 20, 2013

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A17

SPORTS

Panorama’s half-century remembered by lifelong skier Andy Stuart-Hill shares tales from the fourth edition of A History of Panorama: The hill that became a mountain DAN WALTON reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com

What started as a rope tow and a warming hut in front of a parking lot has developed into a mountain village where alpine enthusiasts are now spoiled with over 1,800 acres of snowy terrain. Panorama first opened in the fall of 1962. While it lacked many amenities that are considered essential today, the grassroots founders of the hill were adamant about developing a location for people to participate in the increasingly popular sport of skiing. The rich history to follow over the next 50 years was documented by Andy Stuart-Hill in his recently-updated book “A history of Panorama: the hill that became a mountain”. Speaking with The Echo, Stuart-Hill explained the reference about “the hill that became a mountain.” “My wife suggested that [title] because the original was a

little mom and pop ski hill: Panorama ski hill, we all knew it by that,” he said. “Then as the different companies took it over, it eventually became Panorama Mountain Village, and the word hill never ever appeared again.” A History of Panorama: The hill that became a mountain was published in 2007 and is now in its fourth edition. It has sold 1,900 copies, and Stuart-Hill has ordered another 100 copies that are now being sold at Panorama and at the Book Bar in Invermere. During a special presentation at the Windermere Valley Museum on February 15 (Friday), Stuart-Hill highlighted Panorama’s significant changes to commemorate the fiftyyear anniversary. He spoke about the gradual expansion of lifts before skiers could reach the summit, the additional

KIJHL Standings-Feb. 13 Kootenay Conference - Eddie Mountain Division

attractions like heliskiing and mountain biking, as well as condo and hotel development, all of which are detailed in his book. During the early days, chilly skiers looking for refuge could take shelter in a small warming hut. Only a few years later, an A-frame building was constructed, connecting the first modern building with Panorama’s legacy. Along with proper washrooms and a better heater, the new building provided a communal hub for families. “All the young mothers used to bring their kids there, and then the mothers would take turns to babysit the kids while they went out to ski – one mother stayed behind and looked after the kids and another would come in,” he said. Stuart-Hill moved to Invermere in 1967, five years after Panorama’s first season. Having witnessed 90 per cent of the resort’s history firsthand, he noticed drastic changes. Comparing this ski season to the 1960s, Stuart-Hill noticed a big difference in weather. “In those days, there was an awful lot more snow, there was lots of snow, but the equipment was very primitive and that made a big difference,” he said. “We

PANORAMA MOUNTAIN VILLAGE photo A collection of now-classic cars sit in the parking lot as skiers cruise down the Old Timer ski run at Panorama in the 1963-1964 season . The mountain looked a little different back then, noted local author Andy Stuart-Hill.

struggled and battled because the [ski] bindings were really old-fashioned; you had to be so careful.” “The equipment was really lacking in those days – hence the broken legs just about every weekend,” he said. “Now, if you get one or two broken legs a season, I don’t know if it’s fact, but it’s very rare now that you get a broken leg.” The greatest change happened between the mid 1980s and the late 1990s, he said, when Panorama benefited from housing sales. “Real estate was the big focus and whatever money they could spare, they put it into the hill as im-

Team

GP

W

L

T

OTL

PTS.

Fernie

52

35

13

1

3

74

Golden

52

31

14

1

5

69

Kimberley

52

25

25

0

1

53

Columbia Valley

52

19

24

0

6

48

Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS.

Creston Valley

52

17

27

0

7

41

Inside Edge

2

2

0

0

4

Aquair

2

1

0

1

3

Warwick Interiors

2

1

0

1

3

Kootenay Conference - Neil Murdoch Division

Oldtimer Hockey Standings Playoffs

Team

GP

W

L

T

OTL

PTS.

Castlegar

52

33

9

6

2

74

Huckleberry's

2

1

1

0

2

Beaver Valley

52

33

15

3

1

70

Nelson

52

32

16

2

2

68

Radium Petro

2

1

1

0

2

Spokane

52

14

28

3

4

35

Kicking Horse

2

0

1

1

1

Grand Forks

52

8

39

1

3

20

Hi-Heat

2

0

1

1

1

Finish Line

2

0

2

0

0

provements,” he said. As a walking encyclopedia of Panorama Mountain Village’s history, Stuart-Hill explained how he was inspired to write the history book. “So many people have said, ‘I wish there was a book around here’ and I was going to do postcards, because I do photography as well, and somebody says, ‘Well, why don’t you put it all in book form?’,” he explained. “So I did it on my

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VALLEY ECHO T he

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own. I interviewed people, I put it all together, and I had a lady help me edit, to make sure it flowed and all that.” Once he had the book written ready for readers, he had to overcome a hurdle before his work was published. “I tried to look for financial support to publish it, but nobody would come forth, so I said, ‘To

heck with it, I’m too independent,’ so I published it myself,” he said. “It was printed down here locally. The first run of about 300 or 400 books sold out very quickly, so I was able to recoup my money. I have all these pictures and everybody’s expressed great interest and thanked me for having done this project because they wanted it done.”

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6 (ROCKY MOUNTAIN) School District No.6 (Rocky Mountain), Windermere Zone is now accepting applications for the following Special Education Assistant position: David Thompson Secondary School – Temporary, part-time (28.65 hrs/wk), effective March 4, 2013 to March 15, 2013 or the return of the incumbent. This position is part of the Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 440. General SEA duties, assistance for students with behavioral concerns; sharing duties with other SEA’s to support special needs students. Applicants must have training in Autism and Related Disorders Practical Skills course (Provincial Outreach Program and Related Disorders) or the equivalent, and experience in dealing with students with ADHD. The successful applicant will work with a low incident student with specialized needs, including toileting. If you are interested in these positions, please submit a resume, with three references, by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 27, 2013 to: Ms. Meghan O’Neill Human Resources Coordinator School District No.6 (Rocky Mountain) P.O. Box 430 Invermere, B.C. V0A 1K0 Phone: 250-342-9243 e-mail: hr@sd6.bc.ca Successful applicant will be subject to a criminal record search.


A18 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

SPORTS

Brain Games

Columbia Valley

Weekend Weather

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Variable cloudiness

Flurries

Variable cloudiness

Temp: 0oC o Low: -8 C Precip: close to 1 cm

Temp: 1oC o Low: -8 C Precip: 1-3 cm

February 22

Crossword February 20, 2013

February 24

February 23

CLUES ACROSS 1. Jam into 5. Egypt’s capital 10. Disfigure 13. Biblical Hamath 14. Vipera berus 15. The three wise men 16. “The foaming cleanser” 17. Earthquake 18. Breezed through 19. South Pacific island 21. Legal possessors 23. List of dishes served 25. Jai __ 26. Superhigh frequency 29. Farm fanbatic 34. Double agents 36. No (Scottish) 37. Peninsula off Manchuria 38. As fast as can be done (abbr.) 39. Apulian city 70121 40. Talk show host Philbin 42. USA’s favorite uncle

VALLEY ECHO T he

invermerevalleyecho.com

250-342-9216

Temp: 4 C Low: -5oC Precip: close to 1 cm o

45. More coherent 46. PBS drama series 49. Retirement plan 50. Be obedient to 51. French river 53. __ fatale, seductive woman 56. Made a surprise attack 60. Winglike structures 61. Belittle oneself 65. Department of Troyes France 66. Mains 67. Shoe ties 68. A carefree adventure 69. Mariner or sailor 70. Modern chair designer 71. ____ Gin Fizz cocktail CLUES DOWN 1. Chew the fat 2. A prince in India 3. A Far East wet nurse 4. Axiom 5. The frame

around a door 6. Fruit drink 7. Ugandan Pres. Amin 8. Real Estate Services 9. Brass that looks like gold 10. Nutmeg seed covering spice 11. River in Austria 12. Eliminates 15. Canadian province 20. Green, Earl Grey and iced 22. Four ball advancement 24. Vaselike receptacle 25. Highest card 26. Unction 27. 1st of the books of the Minor Prophets 28. Symbols of allegiance 30. Farm state 31. A citizen of Iran 32. More dried-up 33. Alt. spelling for tayra 35. Perfect exam-

customerservice@ invermerevalleyecho.com

ples 41. One point E of SE 42. Secretly watch 43. Three toed sloth 44. __ student, learns healing 45. Liquid body substances 47. Act of selling again 48. Stroke 52. Selector switches 53. Speed, not slow 54. City founded

by Xenophanes 55. Picasso’s mistress Dora 57. Having two units or parts 58. 2nd largest Spanish river 59. Delta Kappa Epsilon nickname 62. The cry made by sheep 63. Air Cheif Marshall 64. Perceive with the eyes

Answer to February 6:

Horoscope Third Week of Februar y

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Last Sudoku answer -->:

ARIES Aries, planning is going well and you have been following through with your responsibilities. Expect to tweak a few things in the days to come.

CANCER Cancer, expect to see eye-to-eye with your significant other this week. You will be on the same page and this will help to strengthen your relationship.

TAURUS Taurus, open up to a trusted friend to regarding a significant decision you have to make this week. This friend can provide some valuable perspective.

LEO Leo, embrace the opinions of those closest to you. Those opinions might differ from your own, but they may also provide you with some important perspective.

GEMINI A barrage of new ideas makes you a hot item this week, Gemini. Your brain is working overtime and you may be shocked at what you come up with.

VIRGO Try something different this week, Virgo. It may mean taking a new route to work or trying a new food. Try something that is out of your element and you may find you like it.

LIBRA You will be full of energy this week and ready to handle anything that comes your way, Libra. When you get on a roll, you may find you have some admirers. SCORPIO Scorpio, the coming week may try your patience. Relax when the week starts to prove too stressful, and you will make it through the week with your peace of mind intact. SAGITTARIUS Keep listening when others around you are talking, Sagittarius. You can learn valuable lessons just by keeping a trained ear on the conversation and use this information later on.

CAPRICORN Capricorn, you may have big plans this week but that doesn’t mean you can leave all other responsibilities by the wayside. If you can’t get to things yourself, then delegate. AQUARIUS Aquarius, you crave change this week, even if it is something small and mundane. Figure out something you can do on a small level to incorporate change into your day. PISCES You may be inclined to help your community this week, Pisces. There are bound to be plenty of places to share your time.


The Valley Echo Wednesday, February 20, 2013

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A19

Grand Prize

Ana 16

This week's winner is:

1 night stay at Copper Point Resort and $50 dining certificate for Elements Grill

Visit the Valley Echo office to claim 2 Hot Springs passes and 2 Ski Passes to Fairmont Hot Springs Resort

Head to Tim Hortons to redeem your lunch prize!

Hockey Pool Manager

http://www.officepools.com/pool/print http://www.officepools.com/pool/print must be claimed before the following week's results are released.TOTAL RNK TEAM RNK TEAM

TEAM

Rank RNK

Jets Faithful 2 1

GNIMELF

Jivey 2

2 3

T61

Total

TOTAL

Jets Faithful 2

272

GNIMELF

269 268

Jivey 2

LW LW

50

T61

221

LW

T63 671 Snow Ball 0.89

Rock-5050

248

47

671 T63 248

Snow Ball47 0.89

31

Kilimanjaro 331

Kilimanjaro 3

247

36

669 T63 247

30 2 Nelson 0.9130362 T63 669 Nelson0.91

T32

Marco 2

T32

Marco 2

245

41

66674 245

DB22 0.88 41

T32

Jhaley 11

T32

Jhaley 11

245

49

67669 245

Daddy 67 0.87Mode 49 27

LW 40

665 T68 244

GR

Tor 0.86 3 40

668 T68 244

Big 0.86 Nasty48 14 T68 668 Big Nasty 0.8614

70669 243

Banana 3 Captain 0.85 Banana 50 703 669 Captain0.85

669 T71 242

Zman 0.852 52

T71 669 Zman 0.85 2 T71 675 3251 20.90

T34 673 272

51

Lute 88

Rock-5050 T28

McNasty McNasty 9 GR T34 GR P/G LW9 Rank 2T34 GR Name TOTAL P/G P/G

47

Lute 88

Rockies Pilon 5 Rockies Pilon T63 5 T63 GR P/G LW TOTAL GR P/G

NHL Hockey Pool Standings Name TEAM

http://w http://www.officepools.com/pool/print

T28

The Valley Echo's 2012/2013 IVE

Hockey Pool Manager

RNK TEAM RNK TEAM TOTAL 250-341-4000 http://www.officepools.com/pool/print http://www.officepools.com/pool/print

Hockey Pool Manager Hockey Pool Manager

Hockey Pool Manager All prizes

2 rounds of golf for the Ridge at Copper Point Golf Club

2

S.S. 0.95Beagle 47 T34 673 S.S. Beagle 0.95

Total 244 244

48

P/G

66

42

6

674 DB22 0.88

219

46

676219

0.84

46

6

Mode 27 669 Daddy 0.87

218

41

664218

0.78

41

6

Total 217

LW 45

GR 673217

P/G 0.82

45

6

217

46

675217

0.80

46

6

216

38

670216

0.79

38

6

215

48

676215

0.80

48

6

215

39

675215

0.85

39

6

215

37

670215

0.86

37

6

214

54

674214

0.80

54

6

213

37

670213

0.79

37

6

213

43

674213

0.77

43

6

211

48

669211

0.81

48

6

Tor 3 0.86 T68 665 Name Rank

242

51

675 T71 242

T37 672 Fards 0.96 2

242

42

671 T71 242

Rocket 25 4 Rouge 25 4671 Rouge 0.86 0.86Rocket 42 T71

241

50

74674 241

Paul0.93 Stanley 50 74

41

T37 673 266

Rockies Payci T5 2

Rockies Payci 2

265

39

T37 672 265

Fards 0.96 239

Wute 31 2

Wute 31 2

265

57

40 673 265

Dany 0.93 Heatley 2 57 40

Kristi KowalskiT7

Kristi Kowalski

263

43

T41 670 263

Canucks Suck 0.92 43Suck T41 670 Canucks 0.92

240

44

670 T75 240

Prattsy 0.85 244

Silent Sam

T7

Silent Sam

263

44

T41 670 263

Bird 0.94 44

T41 670 Bird

0.94

240

41

674 T75 240

Piks Granny's Piks T75 674 Granny's 0.85 41 0.85

Snakitou

T7

Snakitou

263

51

43 673 263

Grace 0.94 6512

43

2 673 Grace 6 0.94

238

43

77668 238

Red0.88 Rum43 21 277

A. Hann

Sobeys

Jye 2

T10 T10 T10

261

A. Hann

261

Sobeys

261

Jye 2

T44 673 261

50 55 56

Wolfgang 0.93 50

Abe 0.93Froman 55 T44 671 Abe Froman 0.93

46 673 261

Farside Nucks462 673 Farside0.95 Nucks 2 0.95 56

13

Foddude 2

260

46

47 674 260

Jet Rocker 0.94 46

Firebird 7 2

14

Firebird 7 2

259

49

48 668 259

King Chris 2 T15

King Chris 2

258

51

Wind Walker'sT15 2

Wind Walker's 2

258

Rock-50 2

Rock-50 2

Jerome Jr 15 T15 2

Aces of 8's 2 19

Harli

Ana 16

20 21

237

T44 671 261

Foddude 2

T15

T44 673 Wolfgang 0.93

237 235

49 45 50

lilb 0.86 49

T78 673 lilb

0.86

210

46

681210

0.79

46

6

672 T78 237

Noah 0.85 45

T78 672 Noah 0.85

210

45

676210

0.77

45

6

672 T78 235

1 Wind Walker's 1 0.87 50 T78 672 Wind Walker's 0.87

210

39

672210

0.80

39

6

209

43

679209

0.82

43

6

673 T78 237

679 Alex

233

43

81679 233

KBR 0.92 2 49

48

668 KBR 20.92

232

39

668 T82 232

Larry Phillips 0.81 39 T82 668 Larry Phillips 0.81 3 3

208

37

669208

0.80

37

6

49 673 258

Mags 0.95 251

49

2 673 Mags 0.95

230

45

672 T82 230

Make-b-leaf 0.82 45 2T82 672 Make-b-leaf 0.82 2

208

35

675208

0.80

35

6

45

T50 674 258

Fanta 0.95 245

T50 674 Fanta 0.95 2

229

42

672 T84 229

479 3 Joelene 0.81 479 42 3T84 672 Joelene0.81

207

50

679207

0.81

50

6

258

44

T50 670 258

Van 0.91Fan44

T50 670 Van Fan 0.91

229

55

674 T84 229

Jesse1968 0.82 55

T84 674 Jesse1968 0.82

207

44

677207

0.81

44

6

Jerome Jr 15 2

258

39

T50 667 258

Crew 0.95 Slut 39

T50 667 Crew Slut 0.95

229

46

672 T84 229

I tried 0.84 46

T84 672 I tried 0.84

207

50

670207

0.75

50

6

Aces of 8's 2

257

Banny02 0.84 46 2

T84 678 Banny02 0.842

207

47

674207

0.80

47

6

Harli

256

206

42

670206

0.76

42

6

204

40

672204

0.79

40

6

204

45

679204

0.80

45

6

201

42

200

49

676200

0.73

49

6

36 LW

198 672 GR TOTAL

36 0.80 P/G LW

6 G

197

41

683 197

0.76 41

6

196

37

670 196

253

Ana 16

53 663 257

39 42 61

Heavy 0.91 Water 39 53

Water 663 Heavy 0.91

228

54 675 256

Nelly 0.92 42

T55 669 253

Lo-Ball 0.88 61 3

T55 669 Lo-Ball0.88 3 T55 673 NWT 20.90

226

T57 675 Big Lew 0.94

224

54

675 Nelly 0.92

227 226

46 39 48

Jules

252

42

T55 673 252

E. Hann 2

T23

E. Hann 2

251

47

T57 675 251

Big 0.94Lew47

Dan Hecher T23

Dan Hecher

251

53

T57 677 251

Love B's 0.90 the 53B's T57 677 Love the 0.90

224

48

NWT 1

T23

NWT 1

251

223

46

Pet Rock

T23

Pet Rock

251

Harley 59 49 Pool Manager 670 0.93 Pool 59 670 Harley 0.93 Hockey 251 Hockey 49 Manager Old 60 46 671 0.89Rock 251 46 2 60 671 Old Rock 0.892

222

45

13 Wolfpack

249

50

Dace 2

248

33

T28

21 2 668 Red Rum 0.88

47

22

Buster's 2 EAM PickRNK T28

T75 670 Prattsy0.85 2

Alex0.87 43

NWT 0.90 2 42

Rock-5050

674 Paul Stanley 0.93

674 Jet Rocker 0.94

Jules

13 Wolfpack 27 Hockey Pool Manager Dace 2 T28

6

0.76

3251 0.90 2 51

2 673 Dany Heatley 0.93

0.79

666220

266

T5

6

46

42

Jye

4

44

220

T37 673 Tony 30.96

52

0.78

6

T37 671 Merrymen 0.96

242

672221

43

Tony 0.96 3 41

Jye

44

250-341-3392 220 46 677220

0.81

T37 671 268

50

G

672220

Merrymen 0.96 50

243

P/G LW

43

Snake 0.96 53 51

53 671 Snake 0.96

TOTAL GR

220

36 671 269

36

LW

248 TOTAL

Buster's Pick 2 TEAM Rock-5050

248

Go Habs Habs Go 3 T61 221 RNK TEAM TOTAL 664 0.87 T61 3 664 Go TEAM 249 50GoRNK 0.87 http://www.officepools.com/pool/print http://www.officepools.com/pool/print Lute 88 221 T61 669 0.91 33 T61 669 Lute 880.91 248 T63 664 GR248 TOTAL

40 LW 2 of 4 47

T63 671 248

Rockies Pilon 5 Pilon 5 0.90 P/G LW 40 T63 GR 664 Rockies 0.90 P/G 2 of 4 Snow Ball Ball 0.89 47 T63 671 Snow 0.89

46

678 T84 228

0.87

670 Sabu Dave 0.83 4

88670 227

Sabu Dave 0.83 39 4 88

673 T89 226

Who0.86 Me?484 T89 673 Who Me? 0.864

669 T89 226

Rho0.84 46

51Pool Manager 91668 224 Hockey

39 LW 3 of 4 44

81

92683 224

T89 669 Rho

0.84

Precious Louie & Precious 91 668 Louie &0.81 0.81 51 Manager Hockey Pool Finn0.84 3 48 92 683 Finn 30.84

Spook 93 669 Spook 0.79 446 RNK 93669 198 4 223 TEAM RNK TOTAL http://www.officepools.com/pool/print TEAM 0.79 http://www.officepools.com/pool/print 94672 222

Flame 6264 0.83 45

94

672 Flame 6264 0.83

10 LW 678 GR P/G 95 221 Rivs0.86 678 Rivs 10P/G 0.86 239 95 GR 2 TOTAL 3 of 4 0.78 44 5 96 672 skateordie 96672 221 skateordie 0.78 5

6 681201 0.81 42 http://www.officepools.com/pool/print http://w

195

43

676 195

0.73 37 6 2/18/13 1:40 PM 0.76 43 6

45

674 193

0.72 45

6

98672 220

0.79Bay Shanty Bay 193 97 677 Shanty0.79 46 2/18/13 1:40 PM 2/18/13 1:40 PM 0.81 Gurl Hockey 16 Hockey Gurl 16 190 98 672 43 0.81

45

679 190

0.74 45

6

42

99666 220

0.76 42 Blondie

184

40

675 184

0.71 40

6

219

46

676 100 219

Die 0.84 Hard46 Bruins Bruins 100 676 Die Hard 0.84

181

39

676 181

0.70 39

6

220

46

97677 220

220

43

Nelson 30 21:40 220 302/18/13 0.91 T63PM 2/18/13 36 669 Nelson 0.91 2 1:40 PM

Kilimanjaro 3 31 of 4

Kilimanjaro 3

247

36

T63 669 247

Marco 2

T32

Marco 2

245

41

66 674 245

haley 11

T32

Jhaley 11

245

49

67 669 245

Daddy Mode 27 Mode 27 0.87 49 67 669 Daddy0.87

218

41

664 T101 218

0.78 41 Up All Pumped T101 0.78 Up 2 2 664 All Pumped

178

40

675 178

0.71 40

6

T68 665 244

Tor 0.863 40

217

45

673 T101 217

0.82 MN1 3 45 T101 673 MN1 30.82

178

34

679 178

0.70 34

6

T68 668 244

Big Nasty 0.86 48 14 T68 668 Big Nasty 0.86 14

217

46

675 217

0.80 46

675

0.80

50

70 669 243

Captain Banana Banana 3 0.85 50 70 3669 Captain 0.85

670 216

0.79 38

670

0.79

52

T71 669 242

Zman 0.85 2 52

T71 669 Zman 0.85 2

215

48

676 215

0.80 48

676

0.80

3251 0.90 251

T71 675 3251 0.90 2

215

39

675 215

0.85 39

McNasty 9 2 T34

.S. Beagle

nake 53

Merrymen

T34 36 T37

McNasty 9 2

244

S.S. Beagle

244

Snake 53

243

Merrymen

242

40 48

DB22 0.88 41

66 674 DB22 0.88

T68 665 Tor 3 0.86

Sponsored by:38 216

99 666 Blondie0.76

T37

Tony 3

242

51

T71 675 242

675

0.85

T37

Fards 2

242

42

T71 671 242

Rouge RocketT71 25 671 Rouge0.86 Rocket 25 4 4 0.86 42

215

37

670 215

0.86 37

670

0.86

Dany Heatley 2 40

Dany Heatley 2

241

50

74 674 241

Paul 0.93Stanley 74 674 Paul Stanley 50 0.93

214

54

674 214

0.80 54

674

0.80

Canucks SuckT41

Canucks Suck

240

44

213

37

670 213

0.79 37

T75 674 240

Granny's 0.85 41PiksT75 674 Granny's 0.85Piks

213

43

674 213

0.77 43

674

0.77

43

77 668 238

Red 0.88Rum 43 21 277 668 Red Rum 0.8821 2

211

48

669 211

0.81 48

669

0.81

49

T78 673 237

lilb 0.86 49

T78 673 lilb

0.86

210

46

681 210

0.79 46

681

0.79

Noah 0.85 45

T78 672 Noah 0.85

210

45

676 210

0.77 45

ony 3

ards 2

Bird

Grace 6 2

Wolfgang

T41 43 T44

Bird

240

Grace 6 2

238

Wolfgang

237

41

Prattsy T75 250-342-0800 2 670 0.85 44 T75 670 240

Prattsy 0.85 2

670 0.79 250-341-3777

be Froman T44

Abe Froman

237

45

T78 672 237

676

0.77

arside Nucks 46 2

Farside Nucks 2

235

50

T78 672 235

Wind 1 672 Wind Walker's 1 0.87 Walker's T78 50 0.87

210

39

672 210

0.80 39

672

0.80

et Rocker

47

Jet Rocker

233

43

81 679 233

Alex 0.87 43

209

43

679 209

0.82 43

679

0.82

48

KBR 2

232

39

T82 668 232

Larry 3 668 Larry Phillips 0.81 Phillips T82 39 0.81 3

208

37

669 208

0.80 37

669

0.80

T82 672 230

Make-b-leaf 2 672 Make-b-leaf 0.82 45 T82 0.82 2

675 208

0.80 35

675

0.80

T84 672 229

Joelene 479 T84 479 3 3 672 Joelene 0.81 42 0.81

679 207

0.81 50

679

0.81

KBR 2

Mags 2

49

Mags 2

anta 2

T50

Fanta 2

250-341-4000 230 45 229

42

81 679 Alex 0.87

250-342-9424 208 35 207

50

250-688-8885


A20 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

Building your Wealth Market Update

Weekly change

Level

Year-to-Date

12,687

-0.9%

2.0%

Dow

13,982

-0.1%

6.7%

NASDAQ

3,192

-0.1%

5.7%

Oil US$/B

$95.90

0.2%

4.5%

CDN $ Per USD

$0.995

-0.3%

-1.3%

S&P/TSX

Take the test Canadians are taxed on the income in a calendar year, minus deductions. The important principle is, reduce your income by taking every legal deduction available. Most people forget at least some deductions, which means income is not reduced as much as possible. Every year, thousands of people report larger incomes than they really have, and have larger tax bills than they could. Every year around this time you hear lots of advertising about RRSPs. That’s because the RRSP has a deadline. It must be complete in sixty days from the first of the year. The RRSP is one of the tools that will allow you to both reduce your income and your tax bill at the same time. Whether it’s the right one for you is more complicated. The use of an advisor is strongly advised, because the choice has to do with your situation. As you think of contributing to an RRSP, remember that saving is for your advantage, not the advantage of a seller. Use an advisor who you can trust and who works for you, not some other financial institution. It is very important – to you – to be sure you use the saving plan most suited to you. I’m going to list some of the available tools. To help me, I will be using some wording from a newspaper article written by Gordon Pape, published by the Globe and Mail. Gordon Pape created a series of ‘tests’ to help you make a decision on what it right for you. The first test, he called The Age Test. If you are over 71, an RRSP is not an option. All RRSPs must be either cashed out or converted to income by Dec. 31 of the year of your 71st birthday. Your income is likely to be smaller at that age than before, so your tax is lower. For anyone under 18 RRSP is the only option. You can’t open a Tax Free Saving Account (TFSA) until your 18th birthday. Pape’s second test, he called The Pension Test.

Anyone with a really good pension plan could consider reducing the use of the RRSP. That’s because you will have a good income in retirement - probably above the national average. Withdrawals from an RRSP or RRIF, added to your pension, Old Age Security (OAS), and Canada Pension Plan (CPP), could push you into a high enough bracket that some or all of your OAS benefits will be clawed back. This year that happens when net income surpasses $70,954. At that point, the tax rate for an OAS recipient is higher than that of someone with a million dollar income. Another saving program would likely be more effective.

The third test, Pape called The Goals Test: Ask yourself why you are saving. Is it for retirement? If so, the RRSP is probably the best because it has a much higher contribution limit. Not counting previously unused room, you can put only $5,500 this year into a TFSA but this year’s RRSP limit is 18 per cent of the previous year’s earned income to a maximum of $23,820. If you are saving for a short-term goal, such as to

buy a car, use another saving plan. Money you put into an RRSP will be taxed coming out. A TFSA (if you are not already using it for something better) or other savings program is the best choice for an emergency fund. If something unexpected happens, such as a job loss or critical illness, you’ll want to be able to get at your money quickly, without having any held back for taxes. For education savings, neither an RRSP nor a TFSA is the best choice. Instead, opt for a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) where the federal government will also make a contribution on your behalf of up to $500 a year. For people with disabilities, the Registered Disability Savings Program (RDSP) is the best choice, for either yourself or someone else, and will likewise get a matching government contribution. Pape’s Fourth test is The Support Test: Do you think you will need government support in your retirement years, such as the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS)? Then choose a TFSA over an RRSP. GIS payments and provincial support programs are income tested. You could lose income, depending on the level. RRSP withdrawals and RRIF payments count as income for GIS calculations. This means that lower-income people who scrimped to put some money aside in an RRSP for retirement are penalized. TFSAs are not considered as income for the GIS calculation. The fifth, and last, of Pape’s tests is The Income Test: If you have any idea what your income will be after retirement, it makes the choice easier. If your retirement income will be lower than when you were working, get the RRSP. Your taxes will be lower. It’s the reverse if your income will be higher in retirement. In this case, the TFSA or another program is better. In any case, the process is complex and the rules confusing. Explaining them is what we do well, and we would be happy to help.


The Valley Echo Wednesday, February 20, 2013

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS TRAVEL CHILDREN EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SERVICES PETS & LIVESTOCK MERCHANDISE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE RENTALS AUTOMOTIVE MARINE

AGREEMENT

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. bcclassified.com cannot be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. bcclassified.com reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisment and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassified.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisment and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

Announcements

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A21

Employment

Employment

In Memoriam

Automotive

Katharine Alberta Moore b. Jun 1, 1905, d. Feb 9 2004 She was so gentle, concerned for others yet courageous beyond her advanced years. Named in the birth-year of a proud boisterous Province, she had a quieter strength in her-born of troubles and triumphs in a Pioneering life. Raised in an enterprising Scots-Canadian family who “loved to laugh, dance and sing,” Katharine Alberta Moore did her best as a mother and a neighbour. In the days when Doctors were scarce, she tended the sick and sat up at nights with the gravely ill. In those bright and prosperous times in Edgewater, she worked with others, made things fair for young people and challenging for local school boards and provincial politicos. We remember her beliefs and aspirations and joys to this time. She will be in the History she recorded and always wanted to write. Someday we will dance again to sweet old fiddle tunes in honour of her and her inspiring generation. In love and respect, her friends and family.

For Sale: 2005 Ford Escape V6 XLT. Good condition. Remote starter and winter tires. $8500 Call 250-270-0683

Education/Trade Schools

Information ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca ALCOHOLICS Anonymous If alcohol is causing problems or conflict in your life, AA can help. Call 250-342-2424 for more information. All meetings are at 8 p.m. Invermere: Saturday, Sunday, Tuesday and Wednesday groups - Columbia United AA at the BC Services building, south end, 625 4th Street Invermere. Radium Friendship Group: Friday, Catholic Church. All meetings are open.

Travel

Timeshare CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. NO Risk Program, STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

Business Opportunities ACCOUNTING AND Tax franchise - Start your own Practice with Canada’s leading Accounting Franchise. Join Padgett Business Services’ 400 practices. Taking care of small business needs since 1966. www.padgettfranchises.ca or 1-888-723-4388, ext. 222.

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking DRIVERS WANTED:

Terrific career Opportunity with outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Rail Experience Needed!! Skills Needed - Ability to travel 3 months at a time, Valid License w/ air brake endorsement. Extensive Paid Travel, Meal Allowance, 4 weeks Vacation and Benefits Package. Compensation based on prior driving experience. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver. DO NOT FILL IN CITY OR STATE

Education/Trade Schools EXCLUSIVE FINNING/Caterpillar Mechanic training. GPRC Fairview Campus. High school diploma, mechanical aptitude required. $1000 entrance scholarship. Paid practicum with Finning. Write apprenticeship exams. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. NO Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. SignUp online! iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853 PUT POWER into your career as a Fairview Power Engineer! On-campus boiler lab. 4th Class-Part A 3rd Class. Affordable residences. GPRC Fairview Campus. 1-888-9997882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview TAYLOR PRO TRAINING *Heavy Equipment Operator Training *Commercial Driver Training Call today 1-877-860-7627 www.taylorprotraining.com TRAIN TO be an Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 32 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456.

Employment

THE ONE, The only authorized Harley-Davidson technician training program in all of Canada. You’ll work on all types of HD bikes. Quality instruction and state-of-the-art training aids. GPRC Fairview Campus, Fairview Alberta. 1888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Income Opportunity

Financial Services

EARN EXTRA Cash! - P/T, F/T immediate openings. Easy computer work, other positions are available. Can be done from home. No experience needed. www.BCJobLinks.com

DROWNING IN debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1 877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com

Looking for a Permanent P/T Community Health Worker for Golden Health Centre.

PYRAMID CORPORATION is now hiring! Instrument Technicians and Electricians for various sites across Alberta. Send resume to or fax 780-955HIRE or hr@pyramidcorporation.com

In Memoriam

In Memoriam

APPLY AT:

www.roomtogrowbc.ca Competition #464349

Elizabeth Paauw (1923-2013)

Elizabeth Paauw passed away suddenly at the Brentwood Care Center on February 5, 2013 at the age of 89. Elizabeth was born in North Holland, but immigrated to Canada in 1952 and was a long-time resident of Radium Hot Springs, B.C., where she John, built built and and operated operatedthe theArrow and husband, John, Arrow Motel. They retired in 1979 and moved to Calgary in 1995. Elizabeth was predeceased by her husband John Paauw in 2002, son-in-law Bruno Marti, and by her parents and 4 siblings of Spierdijk, North Holland. She is survived by 5 children: Teresa (Denver) DeWitt of Beaverlodge, AB, George Paauw of Sugar Land, Texas, Veronica Paauw of Kimberley, B.C., Michael Paauw of Calgary, AB, and Juliana Paauw (Bruce Minty) of Gatineau, Quebec, and 6 grandchildren. She is also survived by one sister-inlaw and numerous nieces and nephews in Holland. A private family service will be held at a later date.

SHOP ONLINE...

Anytime!

bcclassified.com

Services

Journeyman HD mechanic required for oilfield construction company. Duties will include servicing, maintenance and overhaul of our equipment. The job will be predominately shop work , but with a portion of your time spent in the field. A mechanics truck will be supplied for you. The job is based in Edson, Alberta. Call Lloyd at 780-723-5051.

EXPERIENCED PARTS Person for a progressive auto/industrial supplier. Hired applicant will receive top wages, full benefits and RRSP bonuses plus moving allowances. Our 26,000 sq.ft. store is located 2.5 hours N.E. of Edmonton, Alberta. See our community at LacLaBicheRegion.com Send resume to: Sapphire Auto, Box 306, Lac La Biche, AB, T0A 2C0. Email: hr@sapphireinc.net GUARANTEED JOB Placement: General Laborers and Tradesmen For Oil & Gas Industry. Call 24hr Free Recorded Message for Information: 1800-972-0209.

ON THE WEB:

Employment

Professional/ Management DIRECTOR OF Public Works & Engineering, Competition #13-05 for the City of Quesnel. Please refer to our website at www.quesnel.ca for more information on municipal services and a full job description. City of Quesnel, 410 Kinchant Street, Quesnel BC V2J 7J5 Fax (250) 992-2206 or Email: ncoe@quesnel.ca

Trades, Technical SHORE MECHANIC – F/T Heavy Duty Mechanic Certificate or equivalent w/5 yrs exp. www.westcoast tug.ca/shore-mechanic

Floor Refinishing/ Installations

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: it’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161. M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

FIND EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

Floor Refinishing/ Installations


A22 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Services

Rentals

Transportation

Legal Services

Apt/Condo for Rent

Auto Financing

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind and a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

2BDRM, 1 1/2 BATH Willow View apartment for rent, in Canal Flats. Great view, 2 parking stalls, F/S, D/W. Walking distance to arena, park and store. $775 + utilities & D.D., references required. Available immediately. Call (250)349-5306 or (250)489-8389, leave mess.

Merchandise for Sale

Heavy Duty Machinery

AKISKINOOK resort - 1 bdrm fully furnished condo, indoor pool, hot tub. $675/ month includes cable. Call 403-281-3991

A-STEEL SHIPPING DRY STORAGE CONTAINERS Used 20’40’45’53 in stock. SPECIAL 44’ x 40’ Container Shop w/steel trusses $13,800! Sets up in one day! Also Damaged 40’ $1950 Call Toll Free Also JD 544 & 644 wheel loaders JD 892D LC Excavator Ph. 1-866-528-7108 Free Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

Invermere - 1 block from downtown. Fully Furnished, 2 bdm, 2 bath, 2 levels. Avail March 1. $1000/mth includes utilities. N/S, N/P. References please 403-978-4559 Radium - 405 Top unit Pinewood West building. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, underground parking, fully furnished. All inclusive. Avail immediately. $1000/mth. Call Lina @ 403-264-2782 or 403277-7898 ask for Emilio

Misc. for Sale HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper? SAWMILLS FROM only $3997. Make money and save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info and DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/ 400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT STEEL BUILDINGS/Metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x 40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x 150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

Misc. Wanted Local Coin Collector Buying Collections, Accumulations, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins + Coin Guy: 778-281-0030

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

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Homes for Rent 3 BEDROOM condo, top floor, lake view, heated parking. Executive furnishings included for $1395, unfurnished for $1295. Includes water, gas and condo fees. cbaum@2toyota.com

Seasonal Acommodation $449 CABO San Lucas, all inclusive Special! Stay 6 Days in a Luxury Beachfront Resort with Meals & Drinks! For $449! www.luxurycabo hotel.com 1-888-481-9660.

Suites, Lower LOWER LEVEL 2 bdrm suite available immediately in Windermere 4 plex, w/d, fridge/ stove/dw/microw. Large yard and driveway only few blocks from beach with lake views. Pets considered, $825/month. Call or text 250-409-7435 or email Shellimilley@gmail.com.

Sporting Goods For Sale: 2007 Skidoo 1000 Summit High Mark 150 one track. Great shape, well maintained. $4900 firm. Call Jye 250-342-5887 Left handed golf equipment for sale. Call Dan 250-347-6422 or 250-417-7199

Real Estate Acreage for Sale MOVE TO KIMBERLEY! Large Homesites from $100K. Home + lot start at $290K. Visit www.forestcrowne.com for more info. Call 403-265-6180

Houses For Sale Exclusive MOUNTAIN HOME For Sale - Visit:

www.newbuildinglinks.com

DreamTeam Auto Financing “0� Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-961-7022

www.iDreamAuto.com DL# 7557

Sex and the Kitty A single unspayed cat can produce 470,000 offspring in just seven years. Sadly, most of them end up abandoned at BC SPCA shelters or condemned to a grim life on the streets. Be responsible - don’t litter.

Two homes and a shop in Golden for sale. Kijiji 370618987. Phone 250-344-5772 or 344-0553.

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www.spca.bc.ca

CHURCH SERVICES DIRECTORY ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN MISSION Of INVERMERE OF Worship Services every Sunday at 1:30 p.m. at Christ Church Trinity 110 - 7th Avenue, Invermere fraser Coltman Pastor Rev. Fraser Pastor Rev. David Morton 1-866-426-7564

WINDERMERE VALLEY SHARED MINISTRY ANGLICAN-UNITED 250-342-6644 100-7th Avenue, Invermere www.wvsm.ca Reverend Laura Hermakin

9:30 a.m.: God’s Breakfast Club 10:30 a.m.: Worship at Christ Church Trinity, Invermere. (Every Sunday)

CANADIAN MARTYRS CATHOLIC CHURCH

Roman Catholic Parish Pastor: Father Gabriel 250-342-6167 Invermere 250-344-6328 Golden Confession: 1/2 hour before Mass Canadian Church Canadian Martyrs’ Martyrs Church 712 - 12 Ave, Invermere Saturday at 7 p.m. Sunday at 9 a.m. St. Joseph’s Church Highway 93-95, Radium Hot Springs Sunday at 11 a.m. Sacred Heart Parish 808 - 11 Street, Golden Sunday at 5 p.m. St. Anthony’s Mission Corner of Luck and Dunn, Canal Flats

Saturday at 4:30 p.m. (served from Kimberly)

RADIUM CHRISTIAN fELLOWSHIP FELLOWSHIP For more information call 250-342-6633 or 250-347-6334 Loving God, Loving People #4 - 7553 Main Street W, Radium Sundays at 10 a.m. Bible Studies #4 - 7553 Main Street W, Radium Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Kids’ Church Edgewater Hall Thursday 6:30 p.m.

LAKE WINDERMERE ALLIANCE CHURCH

326 - 10th Ave. 250-342-9535 REV. TREVOR HAGAN Senior Pastor www.lakewindermerealliance.org

february 24th Sunday, February 10:30 a.m. CELEBRATION SUNDAY

VALLEY CHRISTIAN ASSEMBLY Hwy. 93/95 1 km north of Windermere Pastor: Murray Wittke Sunday Service 10 a.m. Worship & Word Kid’s Church Provided

“The Easter Experience: What If What Happened Then Changes Everything Now? Call the office at 250-342-9511 Dismissed By The Soldiersâ€? ‌ for more information. Pastor Trevor ministering. The www.valleychristianonline.com Lord’s Supper will be served. “K.I.D.S.â€? Church, for children Sharing Truth Age 3 to Grade 1; and Grades Showing Love 2-5, during the Morning Following the Spirit Service.


The Valley Echo Wednesday, February 20, 2013

www.invermerevalleyecho.com A23

Remember When?

Pet overpopulation, surrender to shelters and animal euthanization are preventable problems with a rational solution:

SPAY & NEUTER!

www.globalanimallovers.com info@globalanimallovers.com

Find us on Facebook, and see who we have available for adoption! Adopt, don’t shop

DISTRICT OF INVERMERE

914 - 8 Avenue • Box 339 Invermere, B.C. V0A 1K0 Tel: 250.342.9281 • Fax: 250.342.2934 info@invermere.net www.invermere.net ECHO FILE PHOTO 2010 - In response to the need for aid in earthquake-ravaged Haiti, a group in Invermere raised funds for the cause through yoga. The entire day of saluting the sun and downward dog raised $750 for Haiti relief and offered as many as 60 participants a great workout in the process.

A look back through The Valley Echo over the last 50 years DAN WALTON reporter@invermerevalleyecho.com

5 years ago (2008): Invermere residents started curb side recycling. For $60 per year, or $2.50 per pickup, blue and clear bags were collected every second week along with regular garbage service. The DOI anticipated $84,000 in revenue; a $43,000 surplus would be collected in a reserve fund. 10 years ago (2003): "Gas prices soar to new heights" was the front page headline in The Echo after fuel costs rose between 82 and 84 cents per litre. *** Highway 93 was blocked by tree trunks for hours after a logging truck tipped while trying to make a turn on a busy route through Kootenay National Park. 20 years ago (1993): Teachers worked for the Windermere School District without a contract since July 1, 1992 until February 18 when a twoyear deal was reached. Teachers would see a two per cent wage increase that year, taking effect retroactively, and a 0.8 per cent increase the following year. Substitute teachers would earn five dollars more each shift that year, and another five dollar bonus the next year. 25 years ago (1988): Silver Springs Family Chinese Restaurant opened for business in Radium. Co-owners Chuck and Cathaleen Chow had owned the restaurant in the

Geoff Hill MaxWell Realty Invermere

250-341-7600

connect@geoffhill.ca Invermere-RealEstate.com

OF HEARING PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE OF NOTICE PUBLIC No Build Restrictive Discharge NoDischarge Build Restrictive CovenantCovenant XL7289XL7289

NOTICE is given of a Public Hearing to be held at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday National Park Hotel for six months until it February 26, 2013 in the Council Chambers at the District of Invermere burned down. NOTICE is given of a Public be held 6:00 pm on Tuesday 2013 in the Office,Hearing 914 - 8thtoAve, in theatDistrict of Invermere, to February consider the26, discharge 35 years ago (1978): Over 150 people attended at the Council Chambers District Invermere Office, 914 - 8th Ave, in the District of Invermere, to of No BuildofCovenant XL7289. the Rod & Gun Club sponsors' meeting ondischarge Febconsider the of No Build Covenant XL7289. ruary 22 where biologists and the president of The request before Council is for release of a no build Restrictive The request before Council is forXL7289 releasefrom of a Lot no build Restrictive Covenant XL7289 from Lot A, Plan Covenant A, Plan NEP23751, District Lot 216, Kootenay the club spoke against the proposed Kootenay th NEP23751, District Lot 216, Kootenay District. Residential location is 7 Avenue, Wilders Subdivision District. Residential location is 7th Avenue, Wilders Subdivision (vacant Columbia diversion. Many of those in atten(vacant residential property) – PID 023-718-129. residential property) – PID 023-718-129. dance were disappointed with how the question period was handled, claiming to have experienced "put down" responses to valid questions. 40 years ago (1973): The Pollution Committee Chairman attempted to resign at a Chamber of Commerce meeting, claiming that some residents appeared to have the impression that he had a "magic stick to wave over pollution problems." A motion was passed refusing the resignation. 45 years ago (1968): A struggling farmer sent his local co-op a letter with $5 in response to his $769.80 bill for cow feed. "Will try and send you another $5 when I sell some calves in April but don't count on it too much because my daughter graduates college in June and you know that takes quite a little money," his letter said. "But don't worry about this account as we are honest people and we will pay you every cent we owe you." 50 years ago (1963): Columbia riding SoThe intent of the application is to amend the property title by releasing a cial Credit MLA Richard Orr Newton died in S. 215 Land Title Act Covenant, which currently does not permit building, his sleep at age 57 on February 14. Attorney The intent of the application to amend the property title by releasing S. 215 Land Title Act Covenan and toisconsider replacing the no build covenant withaalternate requirements/ currently does not building, and to consider replacing the no build covenant with alternate require General Robert Bonner, to whom Newton hadpermit restrictions on the parcel to address the specific site concerns. restrictions onBonthe parcel to address the specific site concerns. forgone his seat a decade earlier to allow The above synopsis is not intended to be, nor should it be interpreted as ner to run in a by-election and retain his presThe above synopsis is the notfull intended tocontent be, norofshould it be interpreted as A the fullof text content of the text and the proposed amendment. copy theand relevant tigious post, commented in legislature that, amendment. A copy ofbackground the relevantdocuments background documents may be inspected at the District may be inspected at the District of Invermereof Inverme "In my experience, Orr was municipal one of theoffice kindest 914 - 8th Ave., Invermere from February 8, 2013 to Tuesday February municipal office 914 - 8th Friday Ave., Invermere from Friday, February 8, 2013 26, 201 members in this house." hours are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. to Tuesday, February 26, 2013. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. All persons who believe that their interest in the proposed covenant release may be affected may: •Send written briefs to the District of Invermere prior to the hearing •Fax written briefs to the District of Invermere prior to the hearing; or •Present verbal or written briefs at the hearing. NOTICE is also given that the Council will not accept any written or verbal presentations after the close of the public hearing. Rory Hromadnik Director of Development Services


A24 www.invermerevalleyecho.com

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 The Valley Echo

Serving the Valley RADIUM HOT SPRINGS ESSO

Sholinder & MacKay

Septic Tank Pumping Portable Toilet Rentals

• Gas • Propane • Diesel • Automotive Repairs • Tires & Batteries • Greyhound

Sand & Gravel

Complete line of aggregate products for construction and landscaping

NEWER SEW ERA CAM

• CAA approved automotive repair •

• Complete sewer/drain repairs • Reasonable rates - Seniors’ discount • Speedy service - 7 days a week • A well-maintained septic system should be pumped every 2-3 years • Avoid costly repairs

MECHANICAL REPAIRS AVAILABLE 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 7 Days A Week

250-347-9726

7507 Main Street West

Office:

Bruce Dehart 250-347-9803 or 250-342-5357

Hot Shot

Snow Removal

To advertise, call: 250-342-9216

250-342-6452 • 250-342-3773 Cell: 250-342-5833

The WaTer & air Company! Water Treatment: filtration and purification Furnace and Duct cleaning

Equity Repair & Maintenance Ltd. Ph: 250-342-5024 Cell: 250-688-5594 24 hour service

Purify the water you drink and the air you breathe! Kerry Colonna

RR#3, 954 Swansea Road, Invermere, B.C. V0A 1K3 • www.equityrepair.ca • rjennix@hotmail.com

250-342-5089

Located in the Diamond Heating & Spa building in Athalmer

QUALITY QUALITYAUTO AUTOSERVICE SERVICE YOU YOUCAN CANTRUST TRUST

Lake LakeAuto AutoService Service • Furnaces • Heat PumPs • air conditioning • FirePlaces• Hot tubs • cHemicals • service & maintenance • gas Fitting 385 Laurier Street Phone: 250-342-7100 Invermere, BC Fax: 250-342-7103 www.diamondheatingandspas.com

ALL ALLMAKES MAKES••ALL ALLMODELS MODELS AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVEREPAIRS REPAIRS

If you saw this ad, imagine how many others did as well.

OPEN OPENMONDAY MONDAYTO TOFRIDAY FRIDAY 8:30 8:30A.M. A.M.- -5:30 5:30P.M. P.M.

Call 250-342-9216 for more information.

Main MainStreet Street••Downtown DowntownInvermere Invermere 250-342-9310 250-342-9310

DCS Plumbing & Heating Universal Doors & Exteriors

Cranbrook Pest Control Environmentally-friendly integrated pest management Ask about our maintenance programs All work guaranteed

Sales • Service • Installation

• Plumbing, Repair and Installation • Drain Lines • Hot Water Tanks

24-Hour Emergency Service

DOUG

250-341-8501

• Garage Doors • Passage Doors • Truck Doors • Windows • Sunrooms • Patio Covers • Vinyl Decking • Aluminum Railings • Siding • Soffit • Facia • Window Capping • Renovations

Senior Discount Invermere

Lambert-Kipp Pharmacy Ltd. J. Douglas Kipp, B. Sc. (Pharm.) Laura Kipp, Pharm D. Irena Sedlakova, B. Sc. (Pharm.) Your compounding pharmacy Come in and browse our giftware! Open Monday - Saturday • 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 1301 - 7th Avenue, Invermere • 250-342-6612

Phone

Thermal Imaging PEST QUESTIONS? Visit our website: WWW.CRANBROOKPESTCONTROL.COM info@cranbrookpestcontrol.com

250-426-9586 • 1-888-371-6299

250-342-6700

■ Lockout Service ■ Lake Recovery ■ 24 Hour Towing ■ Prompt Service

Also offering FREE year-round pickup of unwanted vehicles

Warbrick Towing & Salvage warbrick@shaw.ca • Cell: 250-342-5851

READY MIX CONCRETE Your search for quality and dependability ends with us.

Your search for quality and dependability ends with us. Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Specialists

Carpet System & Upholstery Cleaning Specialists Guaranteed Truck Mounted • Customer Satisfaction

TruckHubman Mounted System • Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed Dean Toll Free: 877-342-3052

Dean Certifi ed Hubman Technician

Certified Technician 250-342-3052

250-342-3052

TollInvermere, Free: 877-342-3052 BC V0A 1K3 Invermere, BC V0A 1K3 odysseyrestoration@telus.net

odysseyrestoration@telus.net

• CONCRETE PUMP • SAND & GRAVEL • HEAVY EQUIPMENT RENTALS • CRANE SERVICE

Proudly serving the Valley for over 50 years. For competitive prices and prompt service call:

250-342-3268 (plant) 250-342-6767

(office)


Invermere Valley Echo, February 20, 2013  

February 20, 2013 edition of the Invermere Valley Echo

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