Page 1

NEWS PENTICTON WESTERN

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

2

news

Senior sentenced for a host of criminal charges

VOL. 47 ISSUE 6

9

Documents detail issues at Osoyoos border crossing

3 page

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2013

entertainment Daniel Bolshoy fires up symphony with Espana

17

sports Penticton Vees score sniper on deadline day once again

CITY SWEPT UP IN CURLING EVENT Steve Kidd

NEWS Western News Staff

PENTICTON WESTERN

Though the Continental Cup didn’t generate as many ticket sales as expected, it’s still being hailed as a successful event by both the event managers and local organizers. “The fans were light. But Saturday and Sunday were good, Friday night was good. But I think by the sounds of it, it probably averaged out to where they wanted to see the numbers,” said Kim Kirkham, chair of the host committee. The event did carry a cost for Penticton, with a $55,000 grant in kind from the city to the host committee used to cover the costs of a 10-day rental of the South Okanagan Events Centre. The returns promised, however, were substantial. “Money well spent and I can’t say enough about the people that were involved in it and how they portrayed Penticton,” said Mayor Dan Ashton. “We all want more attendance, but they were ecstatic with the facilities, the volunteers were unbelievable.” Ashton notes that the event received close to 30 hours coverage on TSN, which included not only having the host city mentioned often, but briefs showing the city and “Penticton” in the ice every time a rock slid down the sheet. “You can’t buy that kind of advertising for that price,” said Ashton, who said a representative from Las Vegas, where the 2014 Cup will be hosted, complimented not only how the Cup was handled, but the area. “He couldn’t believe this area,” said Ashton, who responded with “and it only gets better, this is the worst time of the year to come, these three months. You ought to see what it is like the other nine months.” According to the staff analysis presented to council when they upped the grant from the original $38,500 to $55,000, the event was expected to draw an attendance of 25,000 with an economic impact to the city of about $2 million. The SOEC was expecting to generate $150,000 in event cost revenues plus food, beverage and a percentage of merchandise sales. Based on estimates from the Canadian Curling Association, Penticton’s host committee was also expected to receive upwards of $80,000, of

Mark Brett/Western News

NIKLAS EDIN of Sweden shouts out instructions to his teammates during the recent WGF Continental Cup curling at the South Okanagan Events Centre. Organizers were happy with the success of the event.

which $27,500 would be paid back to the city to be held in a reserve account for future improvements to the Penticton Curling Club. “We won’t be that high. Some of the events might have been around that mark, but definitely not our event,” said Kirkham. “We will get a por-

tion of the 50/50 funds and a small portion of the ticket sales after all the expenses have come off.” As a local non-profit organization, Kirkham said, they weren’t taking any financial risk, that was all on the part of the Canadian Curling Association.

“We didn’t have any risk, we only stand to gain something, of which a portion of our 50/50 will go back to the city, but the number I don’t know yet,” she said. Dean Clarke, Global Spectrum’s general manager for the SOEC, was also pleased with the results of the event, which was a rental contract involving both the events centre and the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre. “I think it met its budgeted numbers as far as the buildings were concerned,” said Clarke, who said that thanks to previous experience with Continental Cups in the Global Spectrum family, they were well ahead of the curve in hosting the event. “The CCA, they could not stop complimenting those three things: my staff; the building; and the local organizing committee,” said Clarke. “I think it has woken up Canadian Curling for bigger events. We did a great job, better than most, and we’ve got to be a part of that conversation now.” Mark Ziebarth, chair of the SOEC select committee, said the decision to waive the rental fees for the Continental Cup did not come before the committee, but it would not be uncommon for the Global team to waive the rental fee for a guarantee of revenue from other directions.” “We do it with the trade and convention centre all the time. The thinking being: ‘Hello, Mr. Association, you don’t have to pay the rental fee, as long as you guarantee $200,000 of food and beverage at your four-day event,’” said Ziebarth. “If the committee had a say in this, we would have encouraged them to try this, to work it out, but it just didn’t come to the committee.” Even if the decision to waive rental fees had been a poor or marginal outcome, Ziebarth said it is necessary to try these events to see what works. “It is the same kind of challenge we are going to face with Challenge Penticton, where we have to start, not quite from ground zero, but at a lower level and build it up,” said Ziebarth. “Barb Haynes (executive director for Challenge Penticton) and the city team are going to have to figure out what works and what doesn’t work. It’s the same thing with Global, they’re trying to see what will work and what won’t work.”


2

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

news

Declining health blamed for senior’s crime spree Kristi Patton Western News Staff

The lawyer for a senior sentenced on a range of charges from uttering threats to assault is blaming his client’s declining mental and physical health for the crimes. Wendall Larkin, 75, pleaded guilty at the

days before he will be released on a two-year probation. On May 11, 2012, Larkin was confronted by a woman upset with the threatening letters he had sent her and for throwing garbage on her property. While in the manager’s office of the Carmi Hotel Larkin

Penticton courthouse on Monday to assault, criminal harassment, possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose, two counts of uttering threats and assault with a weapon. Having been in jail for the past eight months, Larkin was sentenced by Judge Gregory Korturbash to 30 more

had been residing at in Penticton, she called the police and told the senior not to leave. As he tried to walk away she grabbed him and Larkin turned and hit her in the face and threatened her with a knife. Larkin walked away to a nearby gas station where the woman followed him and asked

Have your Lenses Scratched? Ask about Dr. Specs Optical’s

Tougher than Glass Lenses ✃

½ Price Value $7000

the staff to call 9-1-1. This only infuriated Larkin further, who then hit her in the right side of her face and pulled the knife out, stating he was “going to freaking kill” her. A second incident occurred on Aug. 31, 2011, when Larkin brandished a knife and attempted to stab a Penticton man who was unloading his quad near Oliver. “Larkin came out of the bushes towards him with a knife and said this was a mining claim and he would stab him if he didn’t get off the proper-

Dr. Specs Optical

174 Men’s Styles to choose from

PENTICTON PLAZA

Complete

near

Safeway

250-492-5550

Eye Exams call for an appointment

Western News Staff

A Penticton store clerk was robbed at knifepoint on Sunday evening. RCMP resounded to a hold-up alarm from the Foodland store located at 698 Westminster Ave. at 8:42 p.m. The clerk advised police that a female entered the store wearing a flesh-coloured mask and a red bandana over her head. The robber produced a knife and black reusable shopping bag and demanded money from the till. The clerk

gave the woman the money from the till which was placed in the black bag and the suspect departed. The suspect is described as being five-foot-three to five-foot-five, wearing a white jacket, gloves and black pants. A Penticton RCMP police service dog unit and officers searched the area but were unable to locate the suspect. RCMP continue to investigate the incident and ask anyone with information to contact them at 250-492-4300 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.

CASE LOT

7519 Prairie Valley Rd., Summerland 250-494-4376

EVEN T

We Make It Easier For You

COME IN FOR MORE GREAT SAVINGS!

Purex

BATHROOM TISSUE

3 ply ultra or 2 ply double roll 24’s Equivalent to 48 single rolls

Hunt’s

TOMATOES

stewed, crushed or diced 6x398 ml

10

$

EACH CASE

each

Swanson

MEAT PIES

beef, chicken or turkey 200g

5

5 $ for

Winner

JAN. 18 - JAN. 24, 2013

or squares 1.36 kg

1160 Government St., Penticton 250-493-1737 Locally owned & operated. Serving Penticton and area for over 50 years.

298

$

each

20 09 2011 200 9 2011

Prices in effect

Imperial

SOFT MARGARINE

2010 2010

416g-433g

10

SAVE

South South

Okanagan Okanagan

2012 2012

TRADITIONAL CRUST PIZZA

4 $ for

5

$

BofEthSe T Winner South BofEthS e T Okanagan So Winner W u th in ner Okanaga BofEthSe T BofEthSenT

STOCK UP & McCain

known that he would like to reside in a seniors care home and previously had been living in the bush in the summer and staying in motels in the winter. Judge Korturbash said the senior’s criminal charges which have grown more violent over the past three years are of concern to the community. “If you are going to be living in an assisted living home you need to behave yourself because I don’t think they will put up with any of this,” said Korturbash.

Penticton store robbed

with purchase of Designer Frame & coupon. On Tougher than glass lenses. Not valid with other specials, offers, or discounts. Valid until Jan. 31, 2013.

ty,” said Crown counsel Deb Drissell. The man tried to reason with Larkin and explained the area was a provincial park and he was allowed to be there. The senior came around the quad and tried to stab the man in the stomach twice with a three-inch blade but did not make contact. Defence counsel Michael Welsh said this is a difficult case as he is unsure what will happen with his client when he is released. He said Larkin has made his intentions

Open Daily from 8am - 8pm


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 3

news

Canadian border seizures outpace U.S. CBSA officers tasked with clearing travellers “use a risk-management approach to facilitate legitimate travel and trade while focusing on higher or unknown risks,” the statement said. It also noted that all goods purchased out of country must be declared, and failure to do so could result in permanent seizure or a penalty to get them back. Undeclared alcohol and tobacco, however, will be seized with no terms of release.

Joe Fries

Western News Staff

American border guards at the Osoyoos land crossing made fewer seizures and generated fewer complaints than their Canadian counterparts did in 2011, according to a Western News analysis. For the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, 2011, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents stationed at the crossing were the subjects of 18 complaints and made 123 seizures, according to documents provided through freedom of information legislation. Their counterparts from the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) sparked 22 complaints and made 175 seizures during the 2011 calendar year, according to similar documents obtained under this country’s access to information law.

ameriCan seizures

Canadian Complaints

All 24 complaints (see synopsis on page 4) against CBSA officers at the Osoyoos crossing were relatively minor in nature, according to the redacted investigation documents. One unhappy customer said an officer “displayed attitude that ‘would have gotten him punched in the nose’ in other settings,” while another claimed she was laughed at when she asked to be served in French. The information package did not include details about any disciplinary measures against the officers involved, due to apparent privacy issues, and the documents were redacted to make it unclear whether or not the complaints were found to have merit. “Normally, they keep it very confidential,” said Jean-Pierre Fortin, national president of the Customs and Immigration Union, which represents about 6,000 CBSA officers across Canada. Officers who are the focus of a complaint and found to be at fault face a range of discipline, from verbal reprimands to dismissal, said Fortin, adding his members are seen in the same light as police “who are exposed probably in the same way we are.” The CBSA said in a statement that 550,849 people entered Canada through the port of Osoyoos in 2011 and that its employees “are held to a

Mark Brett/Western News

CaNadiaN Border ServiCeS officer erin Steeksma displays some of the items seized at the osoyoos border crossing. Such weapons seizures at the okanagan point of entry are not uncommon.

very high standard.” “Any behaviour that falls short of this expectation is addressed immediately,” the statement continued, and “employees are subject to the same laws as all Canadians.”

ameriCan Complaints

The CBP office did not provide information about the nature of the complaints nor disciplinary action against the officers involved, citing privacy provisions of its freedom of information law. However, the 18 complaints represent grievances from just a fraction of the 512,520 people who passed through the Osoyoos crossing into the U.S. in 2011, noted Ronald Arrigoni, the CBP’s regional port director. Arrigoni added that his officers also refused entry to 874 people that year and the people who were turned around likely lodged some of the complaints.

Canadian seizures

if you can grow it, hunt it, feed it or eat it, don’t bring it in. — Luca Furnare

“When you’re going to send 874 people back, there are going to be people who aren’t happy. That’s just the nature of it,” he said. Regardless, Arrigoni added, anyone who feels wronged by an officer at the border should go into the CBP office there and ask for the boss. “We take every complaint seriously. And if anybody has an issue we always encourage them to speak to a supervisor no matter what.”

CBSA staff seized 175 items headed for Canada worth about $656,000 in 2011, according to the documents. Drugs were the most commonly seized item, accounting for 49 of the grabs. Marijuana was taken 18 times while 26 other drug seizures were classified as “other.” The next most commonly intercepted items were vehicles, trailers and parts, accounting for a total of 28 seizures, followed by prohibited weapons, including switchblades, revolvers and stun guns, which were nabbed 16 times. Rounding out the top five seizures were alcohol, and aircrafts and boats, with eight each. The majority of the goods seized, such as booze or vehicles, were purchased in the U.S. but taken from Canadians, the CBSA statement said, while the majority of prohibited items, like drugs or handguns, were confiscated from Americans.

On the other side of the line, fruits and vegetables were the most frequently seized items by CBP officers at Osoyoos during 2011. The most commonly taken items in that category were citrus fruits and tomatoes. Luca Furnare, agricultural program manager at the CBP’s Seattle field office, said the U.S. keeps a close eye on produce entering the country to protect its own crops from pests and disease. The ever-changing list of banned items is available online at www. aphis.usda.gov, but Furnare said the rule of thumb is easy to remember: “If you can grow it, hunt it, feed it or eat it, don’t bring it in.” Marijuana paraphernalia, including pipes and grinders, was intercepted 30 times, making it the second most common seizure, followed by marijuana 27 times. Cuban cigars were confiscated eight times, while guns and ammunition were intercepted seven times to fill out the top five. Arrigoni estimated about 80 per cent of the travellers his staff check at Osoyoos are Canadians who live in the area and are crossing the line to shop, so they generally know the rules. He added that even when Washington completes the decriminalization of marijuana later this year, that doesn’t mean B.C. bud will be able to travel freely across the border. “That’s a Washington state law and we’re a federal agency, and for us the law still hasn’t changed,” Arrigoni said. “Marijuana’s still a violation of federal law and if anybody brings it down they’re going to be subject to federal prosecution.”

See BORDER - Page 4

Seeing Possibilities Taking Action Enabling Progress en•act•us Okanagan College After eight years of service to the community, SIFE Okanagan is building on its promise to use the power of entrepreneurial action to transform lives and shape a better, more sustainable world. The student-led organization is undergoing a name change to become Enactus. But don’t let the new look fool you – the group’s mission is still the same. Moving forward Enactus will continue to make connections with the community. More than 100 students throughout the valley will work with youth, not-for-profit organizations and drive community initiatives to improve the lives of others.

entrepreneurial – we see opportunity, and develop projects which build the talent in our region and enable progress. action – we provide leadership, inspire change and take

Penticton students Trina Carroll and Cassandra Lum with Melanie McLean, project participant, Mary Ellen Heidt, Community Futures and Lois Hutcheson, Birth Right.

action in our community.

us – we are the students of Okanagan College, powered and

supported by our College and our partners in the community.

To learn more about how Enactus is enabling progress in our community, visit: www.enactusoc.ca or follow Enactus on Twitter @enactusoc


4 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

news

BORDER - Officers the subject of a variety of complaints Joe Fries Western News Staff

Below is a summary of some of the 22 complaints filed against Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) staff members at the Osoyoos border crossing in 2011,

according to documents provided to the Western News. Details that would tend to identify either the officers involved or the complainant were redacted, as were the exact dates of the incidents and whether or not

CBSA substantiated any of the allegations.

January

A man who was moving permanently to Canada from the U.S. thought it unreasonable that he was asked to declare the value of everything he had with him,

including the clothes on his back. He also took exception to the sounds an officer made while checking the well-being of a horse he had in a trailer, and noted that despite aggressively questioning he and his girlfriend

about carrying guns, CBSA officers never actually searched their truck or trailer. The man said he and his girlfriend were the only civilians in the port office that night and the officers appeared to be bored and harassing them just to pass the time.

*****

A smarter way to save.

Rough handling of a man’s grocery bags by a CBSA officer caused a milk container to leak all over the back of his vehicle, the man complained, and then when he asked the female officer if everything was back in place, she “giggled like a school girl and said, ‘Yeah.’” He also alleged that one of the officers slammed the side door of his van so hard that it loosened the hinges. The complainant asked for a written apology from two officers and their supervisor.

March

Despite “urgently” needing to use a washroom, a woman who was

taken inside the CBSA office for a secondary inspection complained she was not allowed to do so until her purse and pockets were searched. The woman also complained that the 104 minutes it took for the secondary inspection was too long and that she was laughed at when she requested service in French and told, “We don’t have to because we’re in B.C.”

april

A man complained that he and his wife were “treated like naughty children” when told to dispose of onions and any other items that were not allowed entry, and were lectured about researching beforehand what they’re allowed to transport across the border into Canada. The complainant was also told he would be subject to a $400 fine for each banned item subsequently found, and that the officer went on to “rave about how much produce is put in landfills everyday and the

need to hire people to dispose of it.”

May

Three officers “ganged up” on an elderly man who had a few rounds of ammunition in his vehicle, then harassed him and demanded to know what guns he owned and where he kept them, according to the complainant, who said one officer “displayed attitude that ‘would have gotten him punched in the nose’ in other settings.” The complainant bemoaned the “deplorable state of affairs” and said he’d rarely seen such a “despicable misuse of authority.”

July

A complainant alleged that during an inspection of her motorhome, the lid to her blender went missing and an inflatable air mattress was damaged. She requested that if the lid could not be found, that she be reimbursed for it. The woman also claimed the inspection took too long.

Tax Free Savings Account

2.10

%

*

7 Month Non-Redeemable Term Deposit

Talk to us today! Mark Brett/Western News

1.888.440.4480 prospera.ca * Rates subject to change without notice. Limited time offer. Some conditions apply. See us for complete details. Bank note images used and altered with permission of the © Bank of Canada. L’utilisation et la modification des images de billets de banque ont été autorisées par la © Banque du Canada.

POOliNg their resOurces — co-chair rcMP insp. Brad haugli of the united Way south Okanagan similkameen holds up a toonie, which is the price of admission this sunday to the Penticton community centre pool for Family swim Day in support of the organization. With haugli is (front to back) other co-chair Angela Marino, director riley gettens and executive director Marla O’Brien of the united Way. the swim is from 1-4 p.m.

A place to stay forever PUBLIC NOTICE TOONIE SWIM FOR UNITED WAY - JANUARY 20TH Swimming and supporting a good cause have never been so easy – or affordable. The City of Penticton is inviting all residents to take part in a Toonie Family Swim Day on Sunday, Jan. 20 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the

Community Centre pool. Admission costs only $2 per person, and proceeds will be donated to the United Way South Okanagan Similkameen. “We hope the entire community comes out Sunday and supports this great cause,” said Penticton RCMP Insp. Brad Haugli, who is also the Co-Chair of the United Way’s 2012 Campaign Cabinet. “Our community is filled

with very active individuals, and each and every donation – no matter how big or small – will go a long way to promoting recreation among all families in the region.” Funds from the event will be directed to providing opportunities for local youth to participate in recreation activities who could not without assistance. United Way supports vulnerable children,

families and seniors in the community – individuals who need help most. When United Way helps others, our community is stronger. The South Okanagan Similkameen organization consists of volunteers, with a small staff, that raise funds to support community in ways that impact lives in a real way. For more information about the United Way, visit www.unitedwaycso.com.

THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF

PENTICTON

| 171 Main Street Penticton, British Columbia V2A 5A9 | Phone 250.490.2400 | Fax 250.490.2402 | www.penticton.ca


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

news

The TFSA: A Flexible Savings Choice

Mark Brett/Western News

GettiNG thiNGS rolliNG — Colin roussel of the Penticton radio Control Club works on one of his vehicles during a break in the racing action at the group’s indoor track facilities located at 375 Warren Ave. east. the group gets together several times a month and spectators are welcome.

Housing market remains stable Steve Kidd Western News Staff

A large drop in property sales through December isn’t causing concern for realtor Judy Klassen. The president of the South Okanagan Real Estate board said that December is traditionally a slow month for real estate sales. Though there was a 45 per cent drop in December 2012 as compared to the same month in 2011, Klassen said the market was overall stable through 2012. “As realtors, we find that a lot of people don’t want to move during Christmas,” said Klassen, noting that this is just a comparison for the single month. “Everywhere you will notice there are drops normally in sales at this time of year.” Klassen said sales are down a little bit throughout the South Okanagan. “2012 was just a year where

things dropped a bit everywhere,” she said. “Basically we have a flat market. The first half of 2012 was good, the second half we went down a bit.” Statistics released by SOREB show that larger centres in the South Okanagan experienced a decline in home sales, while smaller communities, like Naramata, Kaleden and Princeton, had small increases in sales. Throughout the area, 52 units were sold, compared to 95 in December 2011. That translates to a decrease in sales of 41 per cent: $17,230,600 in December 2012 compared to $28,987,700 in December 2011. At the same time, the average selling price of a single family home was up, increasing from $331,358 to $305,134 over the same region through December. “For buyers, it’s a good time to buy. Interests rates are good. I think a lot of consumers are in a wait-

and-see attitude, waiting to see if prices are going to fall some more,” said Klassen, who thinks that prices have reached their lower limit. “Prices are up a little bit, but nothing significant. No huge price increases in most areas,” said Klassen. “I think buyers will realize that now is the time to buy, that prices aren’t going to get much lower.” “We will start to see a bit of a pickup. Overall, year to date, the South Okanagan looked to be about a two per cent drop over year to year,” she said. Klassen predicts more of the same for 2013, that the market will remain stable. “There could be a modest increase in sales, but I don’t expect anything, no significant increases until 2014,” she said. “We are pretty much in a stable market. Year to year, we are basically up two per cent. And I don’t expect there to be too much of a drop over this year.”

The Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA) is frequently called “a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) for everything else beyond retirement.” Unlike with an RRSP, you can access the money in your TFSA with no tax consequences for any need, and the amounts withdrawn are added back to your contribution limit amount in the following year. Any Canadian resident who has reached the age of majority can contribute up to $5,500* annually to a TFSA. But when should you consider this type of savings plan? A TFSA may be useful if: • You are a younger investor. If you are currently in a low tax bracket and expect to be in a higher bracket in the future, contributing to a TFSA may be best for you. RRSPs offer tax savings if your income is in a higher tax bracket when you contribute to the plan and in a lower bracket when you withdraw. By contributing to a TFSA while in a low tax bracket, your investments grow tax free. When your tax rate is higher, you

Joe Fries

Another letter from the local school board is on its way to Victoria to complain about the Education Ministry’s cash-handling skills. The board of the Okanagan Skaha School District voted Monday to send a letter to express its “displeasure” about the possibility of the ministry holding back $15 million it feels should go directly to districts around B.C. District finance director Maureen Maywood said the ministry annually holds back portions of its perstudent funding to deal with fluctuations in enrolment, but the cash is generally released to districts by the end of the year. This year, however, she’s been told by ministry staff that $15 million in holdback money might instead be used to offset “other possible cost pressures (the ministry) may be under” Maywood noted that isn’t yet certain as “there were other things that they were looking at doing with that $15 million. It may come back to the districts in another form as part of their (annual facilities grant) funding.” Regardless, board chair Ginny Manning said trustees still feel the need to weigh in on the matter now. “It’s not bonus money,” she said. “It’s money that should be going to districts for their classrooms.” Secretary-treasurer Ron Shongrunden said the holdback funding totalled about $188,000 in his district last year.

The school board also wrote to Education Minister Don McRae in late December to protest his request that districts across B.C. come up with savings plans by mid-January to offset expected wage increases for support staff. For the Okanagan Skaha School District, that meant finding about $300,000 over the next two years. Trustees were told Monday that 44 of 60 districts in B.C. had sent similar letters to the education minister, who reportedly apologized earlier this month to the head of the B.C. School Trustees Association. Manning said McRae is now “certainly well aware of the consternation of districts” and agreed to further discussion with the BCSTA on funding for support staff wage increases. She noted that the district never did draft a savings plan, but was unable to say if the minister had backed down from his request. Family Dentistry

New Patients Welcome

can withdraw funds from your TFSA to contribute to an RRSP and reduce more of your future taxes. Also, you are able to reclaim the amount you withdraw toward your TFSA annual contribution limit in the following year. • You are an established saver. If you have limited contribution room or have maximized your annual RRSP contributions and are looking for ways to save more for retirement, a TFSA can help complement your retirement plan. In addition, you can give your spouse money that he or she can then use to contribute to a TFSA without affecting your TFSA contribution room or attracting income attribution. • You are transitioning to retirement. The TFSA can

The Mystery of CHELATION Therapy The Results and Science Behind it

FREE PUBLIC SEMINAR

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013 at 3:00 PM CHELATION MEDICAL CENTER 661 Main Street, 3 Doors Down from Theo’s (Call to Reserve your Seat)

RECEIVE 50% OFF A CONSULTATION When you bring in this ad and reserve a seat. (Normally $120, including computerized Arterial Elasticity Test, $75 value) ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Detoxification Cardiovascular Disease High Blood Pressure Arthritis Auto Immune Disease Aging Skin Lung Disease

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Heavy Metal Toxicity

(Lead, Cadmium, Mercury)

Allergies Poor Eyesight Diabetes Fatigue Brain Health Alternative Cancer Treatments

Dr. D. Wittel MD, PhD MV DENTAL CENTRE Dr. Maryam Vojdani Inc. 103 - 2504 Skaha Lk. Rd.

250.493.3525

Questions? Please call Justin White at 250.490.3390

justin.white@edwardjones.com

School board slams funding holdback Western News Staff

Justin White

Financial Advisor

offer you tax-free income during retirement, which may help diversify your income stream. You can hold accounts with differing tax treatments in order to help smooth out your tax liabilities. • You are retired. Unlike with an RRSP, there is no requirement to close your TFSA at age 71. In addition, you can continue to contribute to a TFSA even though you may no longer be eligible to make RRSP contributions. • You are interested in preserving your financial legacy. The TFSA allows you to directly name a beneficiary. Upon your death, your TFSA assets can pass directly to your beneficiary tax free and also avoid probate. As always, please consult your tax advisor or estate-planning lawyer and your financial advisor. If you’re looking for a flexible savings vehicle, take another look at the TFSA. You might like what you see.

• International Lecturer and the only qualified MD in Chelation Therapy in B.C.’s Interior • Practicing Integrative Medicine for 15 years and not going back to conventional medicine

250-490-0955 www.drwittel.com

5


6

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

Published Wednesdays and Fridays in Penticton at: 2250 Camrose St., Penticton B.C. V2A 8R1 Phone: (250) 492-3636 • Fax: (250) 492-9843 • E-mail: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

EDITORIAL

Political infighting costly for Liberals

I

n the sporting world, there’s a sure sign when things aren’t going well for a team: Players begin to point fingers at their teammates and find fault with decisions made by management. The same holds true for politics, which has become a blood sport in Boundary-Similkameen. A huge and apparently insurmountable rift has developed between the B.C. Liberal Party and John Slater, the riding’s MLA, along with much of the local party executive. So bitter has the relationship become that Slater has quit the Liberal caucus and vowed to run in the spring election as an independent. Problems developed when the Liberal party refused to endorse Slater’s candidacy papers that had been filed in September. Party officials would only cite personal issues that would impact Slater’s ability to represent the party. However, whispers and speculation indicated that a drinking problem was behind the Liberals’ decision to oust Slater. For his part, Slater denies having a problem with alcohol, and by all indications the former Osoyoos mayor remains popular with his constituents. It is more than a little ironic that Slater claimed the Liberal nomination in 2009 after the party turfed Joe Cardoso. Slater ended up winning that election by just over 800 votes over the NDP’s Lakhvinder Jhaj — a total no doubt made closer by the strong showing of Cardoso, who ran as a Conservative. Whatever the reason, the party infighting seems almost certain to strip BoundaryPENTICTON from WESTERN Similkameen the Liberals’ grasp. And with Adrian Dix and the NDP leading handily in all the polls only a few months out from the election, one would expect the Liberals to fight tooth and nail to hang on to every potential path to victory. But the battle now raging in Boundary-Similkameen has made that path a little more narrow.

NEWS NEWS PENTICTON WESTERN

2250 Camrose Street, Penticton, B.C. V2A 8R1 Tel: (250) 492-3636 Fax: (250) 492-9843 Publisher: Mark Walker Editor: Dan Ebenal Sales Manager: Larry Mercier Creative Director: Kirk Myltoft

The Penticton Western News is a member in good standing of the Canadian Community Newspapers Association and the British Columbia & Yukon Community Newspapers Association.

2005 Black Press Graphic Standards Guide > Black Press Logos Nameplate/Masthead

The Penticton Western News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the The Black Press Corporate logo must always appear in the configuration shown. newspaper and the holder. If 032talking with the editor or Corporatecomplaint colour combination is Black with Red (Pantone Red). Black/grayscale version is used in situations where colour is not available. Solid black version used publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story in small applications. treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Version 1. colour logo for newspaper nameplate Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Version 2. black/grayscale for newspaper masthead Press Council, 201 Selby St., Version 3. solid black for small applications Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888687-2213 or go 1.to< <www. bcpresscouncil.org>. This publication reserves the right to refuse any material — advertising or editorial — submitted for publication and maintains the sole right to exercise discretion in these matters. Submissions by columnists and guest writers do not necessarily reflect the opinion of this newspaper. All material contained herein is copyright. 2. <

3. <

opinion

French stars look to Russia with love It’s as if Paul Newman and Jane Fonda had fled the U.S. in protest at something or other — they were always protesting — and sought Russian citizenship instead. Americans would be surprised, but would they really care? It’s a free country, as they say. Whereas the French are quite cross about the decision of Oscarwinning actor Gerard Depardieu, who received Russian citizenship at the hands of President Vladimir Putin personally last Saturday. A taxi driver in Paris went on at me about it for the whole ride yesterday. (Talking to taxi drivers is how we journalists keep our fingers on the pulse of the nation.) After 42 years of starring in French films, Depardieu had acquired the status of “national treasure” in the eyes of the public, but he clearly does not reciprocate their loyalty and pride. And hard on the heels of Depardieu’s defection comes the news that actress Brigitte Bardot, France’s leading sex symbol for the generation who are now drawing their pensions, is also threatening to give up her French citizenship and go Russian. Depardieu, who was described by director Marguerite Duras as “a big, beautiful runaway truck of a man,” is much larger than life — about the size of a baby whale, in fact. He is over the top in every sense: 180 films and TV credits, 17 motorbike accidents, five or six

Gwynne Dyer

Dyer Straits bottles of wine a day by his own reckoning. He reckons he has paid 145 million euros ($190 million) in taxes since he started work at 14, and he doesn’t want to pay any more. France’s Socialist government is bringing in a new 75 per cent tax rate for people earning more than one million euros ($1.3 million) per year, and so Depardieu is leaving. Initially he was just moving to Belgium, to a village 800 metres from the French border that already hosts a number of other super-rich tax exiles, but then French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault said that his decision was “shabby and unpatriotic.” At this point, Belgium was no longer far enough. When the outraged actor declared that he would ask for Russian citizenship, Putin (who

knows how to play to the gallery) announced that he could have it at once. By the weekend it was a done deal. “I adore your country, Russia, your people, your history, your writers,” the actor burbled. “...Russia is a country of great democracy.” It is also a country with a 13 per cent flat tax rate, and Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin crowed on Twitter: “In the West, they are not well acquainted with our tax system. When they find out, we can expect a mass migration of rich Europeans into Russia.” He had barely finished tweeting when another French celebrity said she was also thinking of moving to Russia. It wasn’t high taxes that obsessed Brigitte Bardot, however; it was animal rights. She was protesting a court order in Lyon ordering that two circus elephants that have been suffering from tuberculosis since 2010 be put down. “If those in power are cowardly and impudent enough to kill the elephants,” she raged, “then I will ask for Russian nationality to get out of this country which has become nothing more than an animal cemetery.” But elephants aside, going Russian opens up a huge new opportunity for avoiding burdensome taxation. All those American millionaires who have been condemned by recent events to live under the rule of that foreign-

born Muslim Communist, Barack Obama, and pay an appalling 39.6 per cent tax on the portion of their annual earnings that exceeds $400,000, have an alternative at last. They can do exactly what they have been telling anybody who complains about the gulf between the rich and the poor in America to do for decades: they can go to Russia. The only problem is that they will actually have to live there for six months of the year to qualify for the 13 per cent Russian tax rate. Well, actually, there is another problem. Some Russians may not welcome them with open arms. Even the arrival of Depardieu, who is world-famous in Russia as a result of acting in several high-profile Franco-Russian coproductions and appearing in television ads for credit cards from the Sovietski Bank, is being greeted with mixed feelings. Fellow celebrity Tina Kandelaki, the celebrated host of the celebrity talk show Details for the past 11 years, has no reservations about him at all: he can stay in her apartment. “Let’s not divide up Depardieu,” she tweeted. “Simply give him to me.” But a less starryeyed observer replied: “Haven’t we got enough alcoholics?” Evidently not. Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

To d a y ' s L a u g h


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

letters

7

Utility charges going down the drain Despite the fact that there is only forecast to be a $40,000 surplus in the water utility at the end of 2013, Penticton city council voted to spend $1.1 million of the $3.6 million we received from the West Bench as part of their water services contract. This council has been different in many respects including their zero rate increases in taxation. While this is a laudable achievement in the present uncertain economic times, it should be noticed that despite the general erosion of reserves that there have been significant increases in fees ranging from dog licences to water rates and electricity fees as well. Many people are unhappy with the increases in user fees, however, the upside is that user fees are a fairer system of use of services than a hike in Penticton property taxation. Remember we also supply West Bench with water now. Both Councillors Vassilaki and Konanz opposed the $1.2

Grannies going strong

The South Okanagan Grandmothers for Africa had a successful autumn of fundraising thanks to the generosity and support of many businesses, organizations and individuals. Big thanks go out to the Barking Parrot (Lakeside Resort), Dallas and staff, Gary Kehoe, Penticton United Church, Theo’s Restaurant and Nikos, Cherry Lane shopping centre, Penticton Western News and EZ Rock Radio. Through your generosity we have been able to send many thousands of dollars to grandmothers and grandchildren in Africa. We wish all of our supporters the happiest of new years. Upcoming events include a day of Bridge on Jan. 25 (call Lynn at 778-476-0609 to register or for information) and our pub night, now known as Burger and a Beverage in the Ballroom, on May 10. We also welcome new members to our monthly meetings. For more information call Rita at 250-493-0076. Rita Taenzer, Penticton Judy Koe, Summerland

Nominations invited

The eighth annual Women Front & Centre Gala Awards, Dinner & Dance will be held March 2 at the Penticton Lakeside Resort. The event is tied in with month-long celebrations centered on International Women’s Day. This fun evening is twofold — celebrating the achievements of women in our communities of the South Okanagan and at the same time raising funds for the South Okanagan Women In Need Society. We invite women and men of the South Okanagan to nominate that special person — you know her. Women who are role models and advocates and use their talents, vision and de-

million upgrade for sidewalks, trees, lighting, etc. in the 200 blocks of Martin, Winnipeg and Westminster fronting Landmark Cinemas. According to Coun. Vassilaki, little will change except a few trees and benches. Vassilaki’s alternate proposal to use $1 million in surplus funds to upgrade water and sewer lines downtown was rejected. Vassilaki said many of the existing water lines near downtown are too small to provide enough water for adequate fire protection for any new higher density developments, and we should be doing a major water and sewer upgrade such as last year’s Ellis Street project every year. In conversation with Mitch Moroziuk, the director of operations, I was told depending on soil conditions, sewers can last up to 100 years and the average replacement for Penticton is 55 years.

termination to make our communities a better place. Women who inspire us through their creativity, leadership, compassion and dedication. There are eight award categories to select from: Arts, Culture & Design; Community Building; Education, Training & Development; Entrepreneur; Health, Wellness & Active Living; Non-Profit or Public Sector; Young Leader; and Courage. We are sure you know of someone (be it in the workplace, friend or family member, neighbour — someone in your community) that fits one or more of these categories. Nominate her today so we can recognize and celebrate her on March 2. Nomination deadline is Jan. 25. For more information visit: www.sowins.com or call 250493-4366, ext. 110. Maimie De Silva, board director SOWINS

All rights should be equal

The First Nations appear to be on the ‘warpath’, letting the white man know that they are not satisfied with the status quo, but the white man has some issues also. For instance, how come the Aboriginals have the right to control the nation’s natural resources? Next, they complain about their living conditions on the reserves, but they do not explain why they are not personally responsible for these conditions and why they are not fixing the situation themselves instead of asking for more government handouts. In our world, if we are not satisfied with the living conditions or the lack of employment in our area, we simply move to a more suitable place, but the Aboriginals are shackled by the reserve system and still they want to maintain this system rather than integrating with the rest of us Canadians.

My leaking sewer was replaced at 67 years. More leaking sewers are being replaced this year. I sent Mr. Moroziuk a questionnaire on leaking sewers which included the following two questions: If averages are done on a whole city basis then newer construction or newer areas could dramatically skew the results and would not present a true figure of actual age of individual sewers and water lines and problem areas. For example, what is the age of the sewer and water lines in the older parts of the city, downtown business and downtown residential area? What budgetary plans have been put in place to ensure these lines are replaced before they collapse and how many tax dollars are in reserve to ensure necessary work is done? I have not received a reply.

Yes they have rights, but those rights should not be at the expense of the majority, and at present it appears that they have more rights than the rest of us in Canada. If we were to blockade any reserve they would call foul and we would face criminal charges. We are all Canadians, some by birth and others by choice, so we should all benefit from our democratic way of life equally and not by ancient and completely worn-out treaties that are 200 years old. My wife is of Native heritage and is rightly proud of her heritage and I am proud to support her, but this show of ingratitude and the apparent lack of self determination by the Natives only diminishes the respect that these great people deserve. The Aboriginals would do well to follow the Osoyoos band and learn how they have prospered by developing their land and have become a great asset to the whole Okanagan community and to their reserve as well. My hat is off to these hard-working Natives and I wish them well in the future. Donald E. Thorsteinson Oliver

Change is overdue

Idle no more! Thank God, it’s about bloody time. Fine, OK, you want change, then let’s do it. Change is far overdue. There are no words in the English language strong enough to describe the terrible injustices heaped upon North American First Nations, but it’s time to bury the past. You cannot blame the white people any longer. There is need of a revitalization, something that our political leaders seem incapable of providing so the initiative and new ideas must come from the First Nations community collectively.

Elvena Slump Penticton

The dysfunctional and racist Indian Act is suffocating and robbing people of the incentive to be enterprising. It needs to be done away with now, starting with the elimination of the reserve system. Should have happened years ago. Jamming people onto far-flung camps is inhumane. This road does not go anywhere except to breed broken people and sink them into poverty. Integration into mainstream society needn’t mean losing your cultural identity, but can be the path to prosperity. The incentive must begin with the Native communities, and until this takes place nothing will change. To argue otherwise is to join the majority and do nothing. Paul Crossley Penticton

We want to hear from you

The Penticton Western News welcomes letters to the editor for publication. We suggest a maximum length of 400 words and reserve the right to edit letters for length, brevity, clarity, legality, abusive language, accuracy and good taste. All published letters remain the property of the Penticton Western News, which is the sole judge of suitability for publication. Letters must include the writer’s address and daytime phone number, which will not be published. Letters should be signed with the writer’s full name and be sent by e-mail to letters@ pentictonwesternnews. com; mailed to the Penticton Western News, 2250 Camrose St., Penticton, B.C., V2A 8R1; or faxed to 250492-9843.

Fast, Hassle-Free

PAYDAY LOANS 496 MAIN STREET Downtown Penticton

(250) 487-1192 Open 7 Days A Week

Get up to $1,500... IN CASH! PDL License # 50000


8

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

Tresemmé haircare or styling

European Formula or Down Under haircare

selected sizes & varieties 700-900 mL

3

Pantene haircare 375 mL or styling

375-381 mL 578730

selected sizes and varieties

1L

414622/805918

510472/515943

97

Clear haircare

2

47

ea

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

5.26

ea

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

4.49

4

97

3

397743/101638

97

ea

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

5.99

473 - 532 mL 921847

AFTER LIMIT

4.99

selected varieties and sizes

6

757814/351836

77

97

ea

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

4.79

Axe deodorant 76-113g, shower gel 473 mL or haircare 355 mL

Vaseline intensive care lotion 295 mL, selected varieties

2

LIMIT 6

Simple facial cleansers and toners

Dial bodywash

2

ea

828859/727923/875420 392581/665070

3

112105

97

97

ea

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

4.29

Oral B cavity defence manual toothbrush

Trial & Travel size Axe body spray, shower gel or Tresemmé hairspray

ea

AFTER LIMIT

4.99

8.49

selected varieties and sizes (excludes Adrenaline) or Q-tips 170’s

selected sizes and varieties

1

AFTER LIMIT

Degree deodorant

116449/348246/596856 131061/194435

1

162054/278507/500450

LIMIT 6

ea

LIMIT 6

97

77

ea

ea

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

2.49

no name® shampoo, bodywash or body lotion, 1 L

Atkins bar

selected varieties

2 47 2 47 9

00

146999/379216/448364/631034

787427

988757

ea

exact™ pads 12-24’s, liners 36-48’s or tampons 20’s, selected varieties

Lypsyl lip balm

356607/245343/317978/785495

cherry or regular, 319938

1

$ Dove 1 x 90g or Lever bar soap 2x 89g

ea

471457/411958/286161

ea

Goody value pack or Sunsilk haircare 355 mL

LIMIT 6 AFTER LIMIT

3.49

429451/286161

exact™ Essentra multivitamin and multimineral 60’s - 100’s

242068/251034/341000/181768

ea

Prices are in effect until Thursday, January 24, 2013 or while stock lasts.

>ÃÌiÀ >À`

©MasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial banking services are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ©PC, President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.

Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2012 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

Run Date: Run Date:

THU, JAN 17, 2013 FRI, JAN 18, 2013

Guaranteed Lowest Prices *Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ print advertisements (i.e. flyer, newspaper). We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s print advertisement. Our major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us and are based on a number of factors which can change from time to time. Identical items are defined as same brand, item type (in the case of produce, meat and bakery), size and attributes and carried at this store location. We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this promise at any time.

We Match Prices! *Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ flyers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and for fresh produce, meat and bakers, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us).

Chilliwack / Langley / Surrey / Kamloops / Summerland / Abbotsford / Burnaby / Richmond / Vancouver/ Coquitlam / North Shore / Campbell River Duncan / Cranbrook / Comox / Maple Ridge / Vernon / Victoria/ Kelowna / PENTICTON

Typesetter: MKZ


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

a&e

A&E Editor: Kristi Patton • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 228 E-mail: kpatton@pentictonwesternnews.com

9

@pentictonnews

SOWINS

Presents the 8th Annual

WOMEN FRONT & CENTRE GALA Awards, Dinner & Dance FUNDRAISER March 2, 2013

R

She deserves an award. Who is she? You tell us!

R

NOW ACCEPTING NOMINATIONS 8 categories to select from. For details: 250-493-4366, ext. 110 Email: fundraising@sowins.com or online: www.sowins.com

Kristi patton/Western News

HIgH Hopes performed a laid-back acoustic set at The Elite on Wednesday evening featuring guitarist Casey Long and vocalist Joel Cossette. See TGIF listings for upcoming concerts and events on Page 10 or for a more extensive list check it out online www.pentictonwesternnews.com.

It will give a huge, impactful wall of sound — Scott Wilson

returning to play in Oliver on Feb.8 as Duo Rendezvous with violinist Jasper Wood, said Guitar Concerto D has emotional appeal. He said the composer wrote it at a difficult time in his life when his wife was pregnant and he was looking forward to having a child. The second movement was written at the time his wife gave birth to a stillborn and was fighting for her own life. “It came from a very deep place and he managed to create a very moving melody that almost everyone that hears it wants to cry. He managed to connect the music to that feeling very well,” said Bolshoy. The Youth Symphony of the Okanagan will also be join-

ing the OSO to fill the stage with 100 musicians performing at the Cleland Community Theatre on Saturday. General manager of the Okanagan Symphony Orchestra Scott Wilson said the energy and enthusiasm coupled with the guitar sounds of Bolshoy will be unparalleled and will tempt the audience to get up and dance in the aisles. “This is the largest orchestral force that we have ever deployed,” said Wilson. “It will give a huge, impactful wall of sound for those in the audience. Classical music, until you see 100 people pulling together in synch on stage, you don’t really appreciate what a human achievement it is. It is quite precise to have all those people

Real Home-Style Cooking! A Great Way to Start Your Day!

Winner

ST BE of the

uth So Okanagan

Voted “Best Breakfast” 2006 to 2012

2012 2012

If you have never been to the symphony, this weekend might be one of the best concerts for a first-timer, promises guest artist Daniel Bolshoy. Bringing his fiery guitar for the Spanish-flavoured program Espana, Bolshoy said not only will it feature some upbeat tempos but also music that almost everyone has heard at some point. The Concierto de Aranjuez and the Rodrigo guitar concerto is quite famous as well as composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, who was an important Hollywood composer in the 50s. “If you have never heard classical music or never been to the symphony this is a good concert to start from because the guitar is very familiar so people will connect to it and the tunes because the melody from the middle movement is so familiar,” said Bolshoy. The guitarist, who will be

thinking as one, governed by ideas that were written down as many as hundreds of years ago. It is really quite remarkable.” The five pieces in this concert represent vigorous rhythms, expansive melodies and direct emotional appeal. Espana, written by Emmanuel Chabrier, is a boisterous rhapsody with a folk music feel, Saudades is an emotional piece by composer John Estacio where melancholy, nostalgia, anger, frustration and solitude are felt. The concert then moves into Concerito de Aranjuez which is a fusion of colourful and classical music. Guitar Concerto D, written by Castelnuovo-Tedesco provides a serene story of the composer’s life in Italy. The concert then has a Spanish, fiery closing with the piece Capricci Espagnol written by composer Nicola Rimsky-Korsakov. Espana runs Jan. 19 at the Cleland. Tickets are available at the Penticton Wine Information Centre or online via www. okanagansymphony.com.

LUNCH SPECIALS

7

$ 99

MONDAY ............. VEAL CUTLET .....................................DINNER TUESDAY ............... BEEF STEW WEDNESDAY ..... CHICKEN STIR .......................... FRY WITH RICE THURSDAY...........ROAST PORK .....................................DINNER FRIDAY ...........FISH AND CHIPS NOW SERVING THE CANNERY LAKEBOAT LAGER! MENU FOR JANUARY 21ST TO 25TH

250-490-9972

7:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M. Located at 950 Westminster Avenue West

Kristi Patton

Western News Staff

Espana fires up Okanagan Symphony

GET OUT OF TOWN! OR... UP THE HILL WITH ALL WHEEL DRIVE!

DL#9653

7,950

$

18,950

$

ironmancitysubaru.com 250-770-2002

990 ECKHARDT AVENUE WEST, PENTICTON

2009 TRIBUTE

2004 FORESTER

One Owner Loaded V6 with Leather, Roof and 104K.

A-1 Condition, Fully Serviced, Local Car!

16,950 $10,950 “We’re Friendly, Not Fancy!”

$

AL13336A1

17,995

$

2008 OUTBACK

One Owner Car with Heated Seats, Sunroof and 91K!

AL13304A

2005 BLAZER

Rugged 4x4 with A/C, Tow Hitch, 5 Speed and 135K.

AL12163A

21,950

$

AS3876

AB1012

23,995

$

2010 LEGACY

Comfy All Wheel Drive Sedan with Heated Seats and 51K!

AS3883B

2011 RAV-4

Bargain Priced Import 4x4 with Power Group and Only 49K.

AS3915

2012 IMPREZA

Sport Model with Sunroof, Alloys, Heated Seats and Only 14K!


10 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

a&e

Happiness is... the Winter Sale

Purchase a good buy

Save up to

60%

“Everywhere you are this Winter” 407 Main Street ~ Penticton ~ 250-493-1513 www.urbanaclothing.ca

Heather Allen

care

Armchair Book Club

about your carrier Especially during the winter months when it’s icy, cold, snowy and dark outside, think about the carrier who’s walking the streets to deliver your Penticton Western News. Please take the time to clear a path to your door and leave on an outside light to enable your carrier to safely accomplish their task.

250-492-3636

Many of us are attempting to finally do things we left neglected in 2012. For me, that means perusing a big list of enticing yet unopened books. At the top of my stack for January was the Governor General’s Award winner The Purchase, by Linda Spalding. As I suspected it turned out to be one of the best books of last year. The Purchase is inspired by a historical character from Spalding’s own family. Her distant ancestor, Daniel Dickinson, was a devout Quaker living in Pennsylvania in the 1800s. After being made a widower by the birth of his fifth child, Daniel quickly re-marries a 15-yearold Methodist. Unfortunately, this is an unforgiveable act for a Quaker, and his community shuns him. Daniel loads his children and new wife into a wagon and heads for Virginia, a state where the land is all but free. The problem is that black people are not. As a Quaker, and therefore a staunch abolitionist, Daniel is warned against trying to live in a place where slavery is allowed. Daniel is sure that he can avoid slavery. Yet, soon enough, he attends a slave auction, and whether mistakenly or not, purchases a young boy. This one decision is a disastrous turning point in Daniel’s life. He vows that he will treat the slave fairly, and will eventually set him free. But Daniel finds this isn’t an easy promise to keep when living amongst a society of slaves and slave owners.

Spalding explores a perplexing question: how do people end up making decisions that are so counter to their own moral ideals? Tragedy and misery follow the purchase of the slave. Spalding shows how truly difficult it is to keep one wrong decision from bubbling over and seeping into the rest of your life — and the lives of those around you. Of course, no one today agrees with keeping slaves, but still we are often tempted by choices counter to our own moral compass. Over the holidays a relative confided in me that he is considering going up north to work in the oil patch. He also said this choice would compromise his family life and environmental ideals. “But it’ll just be for a short time,” he told me. “Until I get back on my feet.” After reading The Purchase I am less certain that he’ll be able to successfully separate this work from the rest of his life. Though set in the United States, The Purchase is written from a profoundly Canadian perspective. It’s sometimes hard to pinpoint the differences between our two countries — but Spalding shows that founding a country on the backs of slaves is one of those decisions which profoundly affects a society for centuries to come. The Purchase is an illuminating, thoughtful and beautifully-written story. Feel free to send your suggestions for the best book of 2012, and I’ll add them to my list. Heather Allen is a reader and writer living in Penticton. allenh@telus.net

t.g.i.f. concerts Jan. 19 — Telling timeless stories with his guitar in hand, singer/songwriter Del Barber is appearing at the Dream Café. Tickets are $18. For reservations call 250-490-9012. Jan. 19 — Okanagan Symphony Orchestra presents Espana, a fiery Spanish program that will melt the iciest winter spirit. Concert at 7:30 p.m. at the Cleland Community Theatre. Jan. 20 — Jazz Vespers at St. Saviours Anglican Church at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 25 and 26 — Brandon Isaak and Keith Picot mix great blues music with comedy at the Dream Café. Tickets are $24. Jan. 26 — Electro-Soup dance party at Fibonacci’s featuring StepOne, Wolftrack, DJ Krom, Politically Korrekt. Cover is $5 and show starts at 8 p.m. Jan. 26 — Canadian country musician Dean Brody brings his Dirt Tour to the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre. Feb.1 — Eric Church The Blood, Sweat & Beers tour comes to Penticton at the South Okanagan Events Centre.

events Jan. 18 — Exhibition opening reception at the Penticton Art Gallery for Eliza Fry on Healing Codes for the Biological Apocalypse. Artists talk 1 p.m. Jan. 19. Also opening is Shawn Serfas RePicturing the Landscape. Artist talk Jan. 19 at 2 p.m. Jan. 19 to Feb. 9 — South Okanagan Similkameen Federation of Canadian Artists present New Beginnings, an exhibition of fine art at the Osoyoos Art Gallery. Opening reception on Jan. 19 from 10 a.m. to noon with artists in attendance. Jan. 24 — Film premiere of A Second Chance: The Janelle Morrison Story, an elite athlete’s inspiring journey from near-fatal crash to the podium. Screening at Landmark Cinema 7 at 7 p.m. Hosted by Steve King with Q&A session after screening with Morrison and director Rob Kelly. Jan. 26 — The Okanagan Caledonian Pipe Band hosts their 13th annual Robbie Burns Night at the Penticton Legion. Social hour 5 p.m., tradition Burns supper with haggis and all the trimmings at 6 p.m. Entertainment includes pipes and drums, highland dancers and a Celtic singer. Tickets $30 from band members, Carl’s Flowers on Front Street, Penticton, or call 250-493-6331. Jan. 26 — Naramata Scottish Country Dancers and the Shatford Centre host a full-scale Burns supper. Entertainment from Fiddlekids, Summerland Pipes and Drums, Naramata Scottish Dancers, Liz Lupton, Bob Moss and Kristi Lind. Tickets are $40 at Shatford Centre or The Book Shop. Jan. 31 — Kitchen Stove Film Series screens Barbara at Landmark Cinema 7 at 4 and 7 p.m. Tickets available at the Penticton Art Gallery.

Glen McNicol

Huber Bannister Chevrolet Sales Professional for December Happy New Year! I would like to take this opportunity to thank my new and previous customers for helping me achieve “Sales Professional of the Month” for December and looking forward to a great 2013. Come see the exciting all New Chevrolet Trax! Glen McNicol

“Our family serving your family” 933 Westminster Avenue West

250-493-2333 glen.mcnicol@huberbannister.com


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 11

a & e

Triathlete turns accident into inspirational story Kristi Patton

Western News Staff

She came as close to death as one could, said a doctor, and now a Penticton triathlete’s story of recovery is being shared on the big screen. A Second Chance: The Janelle Morrison Story is an inspiring documentary directed by Rob Kelly of Kelly Brothers Productions. “It doesn’t have to do only with triathletes or athletes in general, it is a life thing. It is a fall down seven times and stand up eight kind of story,” said Morrison. In November of 2010 Morrison, an elite athlete looking to improve upon her third place position at her debut Ironman Canada race, was in a near-fatal car accident near Revelstoke. A minivan lost control, crossed the centre line and collided with her Toyota Matrix leaving it a pile of twisted metal. Morrison’s feet were jammed into her console, taking rescuers more than three hours to get her out of the wreck. Had the rescue taken any longer, the tools to amputate her leg were going to be used. Her injuries were extensive, including a ruptured diaphragm, punctured lung and many broken bones. She was put into a medically-induced coma and doctors said had it not been for exceptional physical condition she would not have survived her injuries. A

File photo and art courtesy of Kelly Brothers Productions

Janelle Morrison (at left) was in a devastating car accident in 2010 that threatened the triathlete’s life. Kelly Brothers Productions captured her inspirational story on the road to recovery in A Second Chance: The Janelle Morrison Story which is showing in Penticton next week.

Second Chance follows Morrison on her road to recovery and goal to complete the Ironman in Penticton once again. Last summer, Morrison accomplished that goal in the 30th and final Ironman race in the city , finishing third in the women’s pro category. “My coach was skeptical because I had limited running miles and tendonitis, but I really felt strongly within myself that I wanted

my first Ironman back to be in Penticton,” said Morrison, who will race in Challenge Penticton this August. A huge part of her recovery involved the making of the documentary. Morrison said video diaries she filmed were better than any type of counselling or therapy she could have had. As well, speaking engagements Morrison has been conducting to tell her story have helped her come to terms with what

happened. Throughout it all she assigned no blame. “I don’t think the people driving meant to cause an accident that day and that was not going to help me heal. I can get angry at the drivers or insurance companies causing stress or I can focus on what I need to in order to heal. That is the way I chose to see everything. It is not that I had rose coloured glasses on. I definitely had feelings to deal with

Now is the time for Laser Hair Removal. Call today to book your appointment

SERVICES WE OFFER

• Botox • Fillers • Laser Hair Removal • Sclerotherapy FOR BOTH MEN AND WOMEN

PENTICTON

LASER & SKIN CLINIC % Medical Director: Dr. P. Louw • #140 - 1636 Main Street • 250-490-8590 www.laserandskin.ca • info@laserandskin.ca

%

and I did not deal with everything perfectly, but that kind of anger or blame doesn’t help overcome things,” said Morrison. The athlete praised the director for allowing things to occur naturally and not being invasive while she was training and in recovery. This is the third showing of A Second Chance in a theatre setting. It screened in Calgary and the town she was born in, Fort St. John, but Morrison said this one will be special for her. “The Okanagan Valley and Penticton especially, the community and support here has been overwhelming. I really feel that the support that people within this community provided and even the nature of this place is healing. I really feel being here had a really great impact on my recovery,” said Morrison. “I had a lot of support in so many ways it’s countless, and this is sort of a way to show how much that support really meant and the result of that support in a situation that was initially deemed to be impossible.” The documentary will be shown on Jan. 24 at the Landmark Cinema 7 in Penticton at 7 p.m. Tickets are on sale and area available only online at www.ASecondChanceFilm. zoobis.com. Penticton’s Steve King will be hosting the screening and Morrison and the documentary director, Kelly, will be answering audience questions after the showing.


12

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

calendar Friday January 18

South Main Drop-in Cenre at 2965 South Main St., has an evening of social dancing, music by Dale Seaman at 7:30 p.m. $5 per person. All welcome. 890 Wing of South Okanagan Air Force Association gets together at 4 p.m. at the clubhouse at 126 Dakota Ave. Care CloSet thrift Store at 574 Main St. has weekly specials and silent auctions. Open Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Volunteers always welcome. f allS o kanagan legion has a meat draw at 5 p.m. al-anon meets at the Oasis United Church at 2964 Skaha Lake Rd. from 6 to 7 p.m. For info call 250-4909272. a l C o h o l i C S anonyMouS Big book, 12x12 thumper group

meets at 7:30 p.m. at 102 1825 Main St. Naramata group meets at 8 p.m. at 3740 3rd St. In Summerland, the step study meeting is at 7:30 p.m. at 13204 Henry Ave. Nooners meetings are Monday to Friday at noon at 361 Wade Ave. C anaDian r oyal legion branch 40 has daily lunches from Monday to Thursday, with fish and chips on Friday. elkS CluB on Ellis Street has poker at 7 p.m. and drop-in darts/ pool at 6:30 p.m. S u M M e r l a n D pleaSure painterS meet every Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the lower hall of the Summerland Library. funtiMerS BallrooM DanCe Club holds a dance most Fridays upstairs at the Elks Club at 343 Ellis St. at 7:30 p.m. There is ballroom and Latin dancing. Non-members welcome. Details at www.pentictonfuntim-

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

ers.org or call Brian at 250-492-7036. p entiCton p uBliC liBrary invites kids aged six to 12 for their afterschool program, Winterrific. There will be snowy stories, a cool craft and puppet show from 3:30 to 5 p.m. The program is free. They also have toddlertime from 10 to 10:30 a.m. for kids aged 16 months to three years with a caregiver until March 22, no program March 1. Also, baby songs and rhymes from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. for infants up to 15 months old until March 22. No program March 1. anavetS has karaoke with DJ Phil at 7 p.m., prizes at 9:30 p.m., $25 Anavet bucks. St. S av i o u r ’ S a ngliCan Church is having free stores the second and fourth Fridays until March from 11 a.m.to 1 p.m. o kanagan f allS legion has a meat draw at 5 p.m.

Saturday January 19

r oyal C anaDian legion branch 40 has crib at 10 a.m. p entiCton S eniorS Drop-In Centre has partner cribbage every first and third Saturday of the month. a l C o h o l i C S anonyMouS has its 12 bells group at noon at the Oasis United Church at 2964 Skaha Lake Rd. The Saturday night group meets at 8 p.m. at 150 Orchard Ave., and in Summerland, the Grapevine meeting is at 8 p.m. at 13204 Henry Ave. anavetS has fun pool at 12:30 p.m., supper at 5:30 p.m. by Stu, and entertainment by DJ Phil at 7 p.m. elkS CluB on Ellis St. has crib at 10 a.m., meat draw at 4:30 p.m., followed by dinner. o kanagan f allS legion has a meat draw at 4:30 p.m., followed by Robbie Burns

night at 5:30 p.m. with a traditional supper and the Summerland and District Pipe Band performing. Cost is $12.

Sunday

January 20 alCoholiCS anonyMouS MeetS in OK Falls at 10:30 a.m. at 5328 Hawthorne St., then in Penticton at 11 a.m. for the women’s group at the Lawn Bowling Club at 260 Brunswick St. Also the Sunday 123 group meets at 8 p.m. in the Education Room in the basement of the Penticton hospital. The closed men’s group meets at 11 a.m. at the Eagles hall at 1197 Main St., side door, upstairs. anavetS has a general meeting at 11 a.m., horse races and meat draws at 2 p.m. l akelanDS C hurCh holds Sunday services on the second floor of the Penticton Community Centre from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Come and share the love and grace of Jesus Christ. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 250-488-5275. elkS CluB on Ellis Street

has dog races, M&M meat draw, door prizes, Last Man Standing and pool/darts at 2:30 p.m. Jazz veSperS is every third Sunday at St. Saviour’s Anglican Church at 250 Orchard Ave. at 4:30 p.m. the City of pentiCton is inviting residents to their Toonie swim from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Community Centre in support of the United Way.

Monday January 21

M ental W ellneSS Centre has Brown Bag family support group from noon to 1 p.m. weekly and individual support for family members from 2 to 4 p.m. weekly. a l C o h o l i C S anonyMouS nux group meets at 7:30 p.m. in the Heritage Centre at Green Mountain Road and Penticton I.R. Road. Summerland 12 and 12 group at 8 p.m. at 13204 Henry Ave. in the United Church basement. fitneSS frienDS MeetS at 10 a.m. in the Legion

Hall at 502 Martin St. Come, get in shape. Everyone is welcome. pentiCton SeniorS Drop-In Centre has improver line dance at 9 a.m., Scrabble at 10 a.m, easy to intermediate line dance and duplicate bridge at 1 p.m. Call 250-4932111 to confirm line dance activities. pentiCton aCaDeMy of Music women’s choir rehearses at the Leir House under the direction of Joanne Forsyth from 7 to 8:30 p.m.. New members welcome. For information please call 250493-7977. elkS CluB on Ellis Street has pub league darts at 7 p.m. anavetS has dart and pool leagues and Stu’s kitchen is open. the hüMüh BuDDhiSt Center is hosting a Satsang spiritual study group at 7 p.m. in the Community Services Building at 6129 Kootenay St. (on the corner with Fairview) in Oliver. Everyone is welcome to attend. Donations are accepted. For more information, call 250 446-2022.

BC’S EYEWEAR HEADQUARTERS!

125 OFF

$

COMPLETE

PAIR ASK FOR DETAILS

DID YOU KNOW

?

44.8% OF ONLINE PRESCRIPTION EYEWEAR PURCHASES WERE INCORRECT According to a joint study conducted by the American Optometric Association, the Optical Association, and The Vision Council

FREE EYEGLASS CLEANER FOR LIFE with RX purchase

F R E E V I S I O N E X A M I N AT I O N S “BC’s Eyewear Headquarters” Cherry Lane Mall

250.492.8997

w w w. v i s i o n s o p t i c a l . c o m


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

13

calendar Tuesday January 22

S outh o kanagan toaStmaSterS meet every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the community services building at 6129 Kootenay St. Oliver. Become a more confident speaker. Call Corinne at 250-6890676 for details. toPS B.C. 4454 has weekly meetings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at 445 Ellis St. Use back lane entrance. Meetings are downstairs. Phone Susan at 250-496-5931 or Sally at 250-4926556. al-anon for friends and family of alcoholics meets at 10:30 a.m. at 2800 South Main St. and 6:45 p.m. at 157 Wade Ave. at St. Andrew’s Presbytarian Call 250-490-9272 for information. PentiCton SeniorS Drop-In Centre has a luncheon served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., partner bridge at 12:45 p.m., and knitting and crocheting at 1 p.m. m ental W ellneSS Centre has individual support for family members in Summerland from 10 a.m. to noon at 13211 Henry St. P e n t i C t o n PhotograPhy CluB welcomes all photographers for slide shows, speakers, tips and networking every fourth Tuesday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Penticton Museum. More info at pentictonphotoclub@ gmail.com. $5 drop-in, $50/year. 890 Wing of South Okanagan Air Force Association gets together for a gab and coffee every Tuesday at 9 a.m. at 126 Dakota Ave. e vening P ieCeful Quilt Guild meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Penticton Seniors Drop-in Centre on 2965 South Main St. For more info call Sue 250-492-0890, Fran 250-497-7850 or Penny-April 250 4938183. o k a n a g a n Caledonian PiPe band practises from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Legion hall on Martin Street. All are welcome. PentiCton ConCert Band rehearses at 7 p.m. Intermediate to advanced musicians, as

well as rusty encouraged to join the group. It is an opportunity to renew playing of an instrument in a concert band and an opportunity to join a vital musical group for personal enjoyment and camaraderie. Wide variety of musical selections. The Penticton Concert Band is available for performances. Phone 250-809-2087 for info. a l C o h o l i C S a nonymouS young person’s group at 7:30 p.m. at 150 Orchard Ave. in the Outreach Centre. Call/text Guy at 250-460-2466 or Niki at 250-460-0798. As well, the beginners’ meeting runs at 8 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbytirian Church at 157 Wade Ave. P e n t i C t o n toaStmaSterS meetS every Tuesday from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Shatford Centre at 760 Main St. Toastmasters is an excellent way to enhance confidence, speaking, and leadership skills in a fun, supportive setting. Membership is open to anyone 18 and up. Guests are always welcome and allowed up to three free meetings. Call 250-492-2362 for more info. y oga meditation / vegetarian

Jan. 26 at the Penticton Legion. Social hour is at 5 p.m., traditional Burns supper with haggis and all the trimmings at 6 p.m. Entertainment includes pipes, drums, highland dancers and a Celtic singer. Tickets $30 from band members, Carl’s Flowers on Front St. Penticton, or call 250-493-6331. PentiCton SCoutS has registration. Sign up by Feb.1 for $85 until Aug. 1. Try it free three times in January. Offering half year rates to families. For info, call 250-4933446. Soil to SuPPer, the Penticton Urban Agriculture Association

ing the same partner all day. All proceeds go to the Stephen Lewis Foundation. i.o.d.e aPPliCationS are now available for visual and performing arts awards. The OkanaganThompson Arts Award is $1,000 and the Provincial Junior Award $500, ages 13 to 16 inclusive. The Senior Award is $800, ages 17 and 18 inclusive. If you are a musician, dancer or singer you are eligible. Contact Rhelda at 250-493-9149 or email rhelda@telus.net. t he o kanagan Caledonian Pipe Band hosts their 13th annual Robbie Burns night

DS ST N E 31 R Y FE AR F U O N JA

AGM is Jan. 28 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Cowork Penticton at 125 Eckhardt Ave. Non-members welcome. Reply to pentictonurbanag@gmail. com. heart and Stroke Foundation is seeking volunteers for the Big Bike Ride fundraiser to provide visiting and companionship to someone in need; to help with a puppeteering program to raise awareness of mental illness; to assist in preparing food to feed the hungry and poor throughout the world. Call 778-4765661 or visit www.volunteercentre.info.

• WHAT IS RECOVERY? • QUALITY OF LIFE • SELF MANAGEMENT • MEDICATION AS A TOOL • MOVING FORWARD This free recovery support program starts January 22nd every Tuesday, 10:30 am to 12:00 noon or 6:30 pm to 8:00 pm. Presented by the Peer Support Program. Call 250-493-7338 to register. Mental Wellness Centre Family Support Peer Support A REASON TO HOPE. THE MEANS TO COPE. RECOVERY IS POSSIBLE.

kia.ca

UNTIL

PAY %

Are you a person in recovery from a mental illness wanting to help your recovery?

SPRING

FINANCING ON

2013

DRIVE IN WINTER, PAY IN SPRING.

**

SELECT MODELS

SuPPer

is upstairs in the Elks Lodge at 344 Ellis St. in Penticton Tuesdays at 6 p.m. Everyone welcome and donations accepted. BroWn Bag leCtureS is at the Penticton Museum from noon to 1 p.m. with Chris Scott on developing first nation economies. Admission is by donation. anavetS has beef dip from 4:30 to 7 p.m. and karaoke with Monica. P entiCton W hole foodS Market has the truth about fish oil from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Admission is free.

COMING eVeNTs grandmotherS for afriCa are hosting a bridge social, at the United Church on Main St., Jan. 25 from 9:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. The cost is $15 each and includes lunch. To register, call Norma Lippa at 250-4927883 or Lynn Popoff at 778-476-0609 by Jan. 23. This will be Chicago scoring, keep-

Optima SX Turbo shown

2013

Rio5 SX shown

HWY (A/T): 5.6L/100KM CITY (A/T): 8.6L/100KM HWY (A/T): 6.5L/100KM CITY (A/T): 9.8L/100KM

NOW ONLY

19,572 $ 4,000

$

3

AVAILABLE ALL-WHEEL DRIVE

 2013

INCLUDES

OWN IT FROM

IN CASH SAVINGS‡

HEATED SEATS

AT

156

$

1.49 HEATED SEATS

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED *5-year/100,000 km worry-free comprehensive warranty.

BI-WEEKLY

% APR

BLUETOOTH CONNECTIVITY˚

Offer includes delivery, destination and fees of $1,577 and $4,000 CASH SAVINGS‡. BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $23,572. Offer based on 2013 Optima LX MT.

≠ WITH

FOR UP TO

HEATED SIDE-VIEW MIRRORS

Sorento SX shown

MON PAYMTHLY ON U ENTS S O ¥

N SO

0

$

60

RENT O ON

LY

DOWN

MONTHS

ELECTRONIC STABILITY CONTROL

bi-weekly for 60 months, amortized over 84 months with $0 DOWN PAYMENT. $8,009 remaining balance. Offer includes delivery, destination and fees of $1,772 and $1,650 “3 PAYMENTS ON US” SAVINGS¥. BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $28,667. Offer based on 2013 Sorento LX AT.

2013

HWY (M/T): 5.3L/100KM CITY (M/T): 6.9L/100KM

5-DOOR

OWN IT FROM

106

$

BI-WEEKLY AT

1.99% APR

HEATED SIDE-VIEW MIRRORS

WITH

0

$

DOWN

FOR UP TO

60 MONTHS

STEERING WHEEL AUDIO CONTROL

bi-weekly for 60 months, amortized over 84 months with $0 DOWN PAYMENT. $5,423 remaining balance. Offer includes delivery, destination and fees of $1,577 and $500 LOAN SAVINGS§. BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $18,572. Offer based on 2013 Rio5 LX + AT.

LIKE US ON TO LEARN MORE. facebook.com/kiacanada 150,000+ Likes

D.L. #30911

Offer(s) available on select new 2013 models through participating dealers to qualified customers who take delivery by January 31, 2013. Dealers may sell or lease for less. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. All offers are subject to change without notice. See dealer for complete details. Vehicles shown may include optional accessories and upgrades available at extra cost. All pricing includes delivery and destination fees up to $1,650, other fees and certain levies (including tire levies), variable dealer administration fees (up to $699) and $100 A/C charge (where applicable) and excludes licensing, registration, insurance, other taxes and down payment (if applicable and unless otherwise specified). Other dealer charges may be required at the time of purchase. Other lease and financing options also available. **0% purchase financing is available on select new 2013 Kia models O.A.C. Terms vary by model and trim, see dealer for complete details. Representative financing example based on 2013 Rio5 LX + AT (RO753D) with a selling price of $18,572 financed at 0% APR for 36 months. 78 bi-weekly payments equal $225 per payment with a down payment/equivalent trade of $0. ¥3 Payments On Us offer is available on approved credit to eligible retail customers who finance or lease any new 2013 Sorento from a participating dealer between January 3–31, 2013. Eligible lease and purchase finance customers will receive a cheque in the amount of three payments (excluding taxes) to a maximum of $550 per month. Lease and finance purchases are subject to approved credit. Customers will be given a choice between up to $1,650 reductions from the selling/leasing price after taxes or dealer can issue a cheque to the customer. Some conditions apply. See your dealer for complete details. Offer ends January 31, 2013. Offer cannot be combined with Don’t Pay Until Spring promotion. ∞“Don’t Pay Until Spring” on select new models (90-day payment deferral) applies to purchase financing on all new 2012/2013 models. No interest will accrue during the first 60 days of the finance contract. After this period, interest starts to accrue and the purchaser will repay the principal interest monthly over the term of the contract. Cash purchase price for 2013 Optima LX MT (OP541D) is $19,572 and includes a cash savings of $4,000 (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers). Retailer may sell for less. ‡$4,000 cash savings on the cash purchase of an eligible new 2013 Optima LX MT (OP541D) from a participating dealer between January 3-31, 2013 is deducted from the selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers. Some conditions apply. ≠Bi-weekly finance payment O.A.C for new 2013 Sorento LX AT (SR75BD)/2013 Rio5 LX + AT (RO753D) based on a selling price of $28,667/$18,572 is $156/$106 with an APR of 1.49%/1.99% for 60 months, amortized over an 84-month period with a $0 down payment or equivalent trade. Estimated remaining principal balance of $8,009/$5,423 plus applicable taxes due at end of 60-month period. Retailer may sell for less. See dealer for full details. §Loan savings for 2013 Rio5 LX + AT (RO753D) is $500 and is available on purchase financing only on approved credit. Loan savings vary by model and trim and are deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes. Some conditions apply. ΔModel shown Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for 2013 Sorento 3.5L SX AWD 7-Seater (SR75XD)/2013 Optima SX Turbo AT (OP748D)/2013 Rio5 SX with Navigation AT (RO749D) is $43,045/$35,550/$23,450 and includes delivery and destination fees of $1,650/$1,455/$1,455 and A/C charge ($100, where applicable). License, insurance, applicable taxes, other fees and certain levies (including tire levies), variable dealer administration fees (up to $699) and registration fees are extra. Retailer may sell for less. Available at participating dealers. See dealer for full details. Highway/city fuel consumption is based on the 2013 Sorento 2.4L GDI 4-cyl (A/T)/2013 Optima 2.4L MPI 4-cyl (A/T)/2013 Rio5 1.6L GDI 4-cyl (M/T). These updated estimates are based on Transport Canada’s approved criteria and testing methods. Refer to the Government of Canada’s EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on driving habits and other factors. °The Bluetooth® wordmark and logo are registered trademarks and are owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of printing. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. KIA is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation.

PENTICTON KIA 250-276-1200 550 Duncan Avenue W. Penticton, BC • www.pentictonkia.com


14

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

news

Judge rejects guilty plea from accused killer Kristi Patton Western News Staff

NOW AT YOUR BC CHEVROLET DEALERS. Chevrolet.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. Chevrolet is a brand of General Motors of Canada. */†/‡Offers apply to the purchase, finance or lease of 2013 Chevrolet Silverado Ext Cab 4WD (1SF)/Cruze LS (1SA)/Equinox LS (1SA), equipped as described. Freight ($1,600/$1,550/$1,550) included in purchase, finance and lease prices and payments. License, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the BC Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer order or trade may be required. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate this offer in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See Chevrolet dealer for details. .†0%/0.99% purchase financing offered on approved credit by Ally Credit/TD Auto Financing for 72/84 months on new or demonstrator 2013 Chevrolet Silverado Light Duty and Equinox. Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $10,000 at 0%/0.99% APR, the monthly payment is $139/$124 for 72/84 months. Cost of borrowing is $0/$354, total obligation is $10,000/$10,354. 0% financing offers are unconditionally interest-free. ≠$7,000 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit available on the 2013 Silverado Light Duty Ext/Crew, for retail customers only. See your GM dealer for details. **Valid at participating GM dealerships in Canada only. Retail customers only. Offer ranges from 750 to 3,000 AIR MILES® reward miles, depending on model purchased. No cash value. Offer may not be combined with certain other AIR MILES promotions or offers. See your participating GM dealer for details. Offer expires February 28, 2013. Please allow 4–6 weeks after the Offer end date for reward miles to be deposited to your AIR MILES® Collector Account. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate this Offer for any reason in whole or in part at any time without notice. Miles are issued by LoyaltyOne Inc. and are subject to the terms and conditions of the AIR MILES Reward Program. ®™Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and General Motors of Canada Limited ‡Based on a 0.9%/0%, 48/60 month lease for new (demonstrator not eligible) 2013 Equinox LS/2013 Cruze LS, equipped as described. Annual kilometer limit of 20,000km, $0.16 per excess kilometer. OAC by GM Financial. Lease APR may vary depending on down payment/trade. Down payment or trade of $2,899/$0 and security deposit may be required. Total obligation is $17,254/$10,539. Option to purchase at lease end is $12,006/$5,956 plus applicable taxes. Other lease options available. ^^/*†Warranty, Safety & Legroom comparisons based on latest competitive data available. Excludes other GM models. ~Visit OnStar.ca for coverage map, details and system limitations. Services vary by model and conditions. .MyLinkTM functionality varies by model. Full functionality requires compatible Bluetooth® and smartphone, and USB connectivity for some devices. +The Best Buy seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license.

A guilty plea issued by a high-risk sex offender accused of murdering a Princeton woman has been refused by the court. Roger Badour, 64, admitted to Supreme Court Justice Robert Powers that he shot and killed Gisele Duckham and fled. Badour stated this at a Dec. 20 appearance in Kamloops. The plea was initially going to be accepted until Badour informed the court he wanted to get past the trial because he has cancer and believed he would get better medical treatment in federal prison. He has been in provincial jail since he was arrested on Nov. 8, 2011.

“At that time both Crown and the court had concerns that, given some statements made in court by Mr. Badour, there were indications the plea was not completely voluntary on his part,” said Neil MacKenzie, spokesperson for Roger Badour the Crown. “Crown counsel did not want to see the accused enter a guilty plea where there is any suggestion that it was not completely free and voluntary and the judge was not prepared to accept a guilty plea in the circumstances.”

DEALS

% + 7000 + 3,000 $

EARN UP TO

UP TO

,

in Cash Credits≠

purchase financing ON SELECT MODELS†/‡

leasing

EVENT

September 2012, Badour told the judge that he fears for his own life behind bars. His pleas to be moved from North Fraser pre-trial centre, because of various difficulties related to his health and issues with prison guards and other prisoners, were heard and he was moved to Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre. Badour’s lawyer, James Pennington, said his client alleged that he had been threatened to be shanked by another inmate and had his leg stomped on by a guard. Badour is expected to return to Kamloops court on Feb. 4 to fix a date at that time. Mackenzie said he does not know if Badour will again try and enter a guilty plea, but at this point the plea has not been accepted.

LIMITED TIME OFFER

0

NEW CHEVROLET’S

Badour is accused of killing Duckham at her residence in the 2000 block of Osprey Lake Road in Princeton. Victoria police had been searching for the high-risk sex offender for eight months after he disappeared while on parole as part of a seven-year sentence for sexual assault. On the evening of Nov. 8, 2011, Penticton RCMP pulled over a vehicle on Main Street for a traffic violation, and the constable confirmed the identity of the driver as Badour, who originally provided a false name. Upon further investigation, the officer found three firearms — two of which were loaded — and a small amount of marijuana in the vehicle Badour was travelling in. At his last appearance in Penticton court in

ON SELECT MODELS

AIR MILES ®**

2013 SILVERADO 4X4 CHEYENNE EXT

NOW UNDER 30,000!

159

INCLUDES

FINANCE PAYMENT

$

BI-WEEKLY / 0.99% / 84 MONTHS / $1,899 DOWN† BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $29,995*

+

7000

$

,

LTZ MODEL SHOWN

IN CASH CREDITS≠

25MPG

DARE TO COMPARE:

3,000

• Best-in-Class 5-Year/160,000km Powertrain Warranty, 60,000km Longer than F-150 and RAM^^ • Segment Exclusive Automatic Locking Differential • StabiliTrak including Electronic Trailer Sway Control and Hill Start Assist • Standard Bluetooth®

AIR MILES® Reward Miles**

HIGHWAY 11.2L/100KM HWY 13.8 L/100 KM CITY▼

2013 CRUZE LS 1SA

99 0

FINANCE PAYMENT

$

WITH

$

%

OR

1,500

60

FOR MONTHS‡

DOWN

BI-WEEKLY / 2.49% / 84 MONTHS† BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $16,495*

+

0

LEASE FOR

• Exceptional Safety with 10 Standard Airbags • StabiliTrak, Traction Control and Four Wheel AntiLock Brakes • 6 Speaker Audio System with CD/MP3 Playback • OnStar® Including 6 Month Subscription and RemoteLink Mobile App~

AIR MILES® Reward Miles**

52MPG

HIGHWAY 5.4 L/100 KM HWY 6.9 L/100 KM CITY▼ LTZ MODEL SHOWN

2013 EQUINOX LS

168 0

FINANCE PAYMENT

$

AT

BI-WEEKLY WITH $2,299 DOWN BASED ON A PURCHASE PRICE OF $28,535*

+

%

+

0

LEASE STARTING FROM

72

FOR MONTHS†

2,000

AIR MILES® Reward Miles**

.9%

OR

FOR 48 MONTHS‡

• Consumers Digest Best Buy for the Fourth Year in a Row+ • Standard Bluetooth and OnStar® with RemoteLink Mobile App~ • Multi-Flex™ Sliding and Reclining Rear Seat, offering Class-Leading Legroom†*

TO GUARANTEE OUR QUALITY, WE BACK IT

46MPG

HIGHWAY 6.1 L/100 KM HWY 7.8 L/100 KM CITY▼

LTZ MODEL SHOWN

SCAN HERE TO FIND YOURS

VEHICLE PRICING IS NOW EASIER TO UNDERSTAND BECAUSE ALL OUR PRICES INCLUDE FREIGHT, PDI AND MANDATORY GOVERNMENT LEVIES.

160,000 KM/5 YEAR

CHEVROLET.CA

WARRANTY Penticton W. Advertiser - JunePOWERTRAIN 8, 2012

Whichever comes first. See dealer for details.

Call Huber Bannister Chevrolet at 250-493-2333, or visit us at 933 Westminster Avenue W., Penticton. [License #22742] 2837.13.MMW.4C.indd 1

CLIENT : DOCKET : AD # : SIZE :

2013-01-11 5:05 PM

GM SBCC0161 2837.13.MMW.4C 10” x 145L (10.357”)

C

M

Y

K

Note to Publication: PLEASE examine this material upon receipt.

APPROVALS Production Artist:

Art Director:

Creative Director:


eek Family Literachy, W 2013

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Unplug and

t 7 2 o t t s 1 2 y r Janua

eek Family Literachy, W 2013 7t 2 o t t s 1 2 y r a Janu

All activities are FREE!

Pre-registration is not required unless indicated with an *. For the full schedule, visit www.literacynowso-s.ca

All Week

Heap the Honda Children’s Book Drive Cherry Lane Shopping Center. Help heap the Honda full of gently used children’s books. Solve a Puzzle - Summerland Library. Everyone is invited to come and solve a puzzle. There are puzzles for adults, older children and preschoolers. All participants will be eligible to enter a draw. Books for Our Kids - Keremeos Library. Read a book or listen to one, draw a picture or write about it, enter into the contest. Over 100 new books to be won. Local authors from Penticton Writers and Publishers are visiting Uplands, Princess Margaret and Giants Head schools to share their stories. Penticton & District Community Resources Poetry Wall - come to these locations and contribute to the poetry wall: 330 Ellis Street, 470 Edmonton Ave., #100 - 216 Hastings Ave.

“FREE PUBLIC SKATING” every Saturday and Sunday at the Oliver Rec Center, 5:30-6:45pm., includes free skate rental. Sponsored by the Lions Club.

Saturday, January 19

Book Club for Adults - Summerland Library, 11:00am. Join us for coffee and great conversation. Bring your favorite piece of poetry. We will be reading poetry this month as an alternative to novel study. Penticton Art Gallery - a couple of amazing artists discuss their work and current exhibitions. Eliza Gry’s talk starts at 1:00pm and is titled “Healing Codes for the Biological Apocalypse” and is showing in the Project Room Gallery. Shawn Serfas’ talk starts at 2:00pm and is titled “RePicturing the Landscape” and is showing in the Main Gallery. Both run from Jan. 18 to Mar. 17. Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 10:00-12:00pm, Charcoal Drawing for ages 8 to adult, 12:30-2:30pm, Clay Carving, for ages 8 to adult.

Presented By

Along With

Sunday, January 20

Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 9:00-11:00am, Preschool Painting for ages 3- 6, 1:00-3:00pm, Paper Craft for ages 3+. Toonie Family Swim Day! The $2.00 swim happens at the Penticton Community Centre on Jan. 20, 1:00-4:00pm.

Monday, January 21 Black & White Scramble Floor Hockey Oliver Rec Center, 3:00-4:00pm.* For ages 6-13, pre-registration is required. See www. oliverrecreation.ca. Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 6:00-7:00pm, “What is Astrology and How Does it Work” for ages 16+.

Tuesday, January 22 Parent Child Mother Goose - Penticton HUB at Queen’s Park School, 6:00-7:00pm. For ages 0-4. Learn new rhymes your kids will love. Connect with other parents. Snack is provided. Stretch, Read and Relax - Learning for Little People, 102 - 216 Hastings, Penticton, 3:454:30pm.* For parents and their toddlers up to 30 months in age. Gentle, playful movement, songs, story time and fun sprinkled with cozy quiet moments. Call 250-493-2331 to preregister. Family Open House - Penticton Museum, 3:00-4:30pm. A treasure-seeking adventure for the whole family. Brown Bag Lecture - Penticton Museum, 12:00-1:00pm. In the auditorium, topic is First Nation Economy. Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 6:00-8:00pm, Beading for ages 6+.

Wednesday, January 23 Preschool Story Time - Penticton Library, 11:00-11:30am. For 3-5 year olds. Enjoy books, feltboard stories, songs and puppet friends. Black & White Scramble Floor Hockey

- Oliver Rec Center, 3:00-4:00pm.* For ages 6-13, pre-registration is required. See www. oliverrecreation.ca. Mother Goose Songs & Rhymes - Osoyoos Health Center, 10:0011:00am. For 0-48 months. Build your child’s communication skills. Making Felt Stories, OBGC, 1295 Manitoba Street, Penticton 10:00-1:00pm. Family activity. For more info, call 250-493-0512, ext 118. Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 6:00-8:00pm, Art Cards for all ages.

Thursday, January 24 Bedtime Stories - Penticton Library, 6:45-7:15pm. For 3 years +. Stories for sleepytime, pajamas welcome. Create with Lego - Naramata Library, 6:00-8:00pm. Bring your own lego and base and create an original lego structure based on your favorite book or literacy character. Join others in the community for some quality family time together. Refreshments will be served. Making Felt Stories, OBGC, 1295 Manitoba Street, Penticton 10:00-1:00pm. Family activity. For more info, call 250-4930512, ext 118. Young@Art - Penticton Art Gallery, 3:15-4:45pm.* For ages 11-14. Draw, paint and focus on a project of interest. Call 250-493-2928 to pre-register. Family Open House - Penticton Museum, 3:00-4:30pm. A treasure-seeking adventure for the whole family. Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 6:00-8:00pm, Paper Craft for all ages.

Friday, January 25 Toddler Time - Penticton Library, 10:0010:30am. For 16 months to 3 years. Stories, songs and rhymes. Baby Songs & Rhymes - Penticton Library, 1:30-2:30pm. For 0-15 months. Learn new songs and games to play with your baby. Preschool Story Time - Oliver Library, 10:00-11:00am. For ages 3-5. Family

Gym Night - Penticton Queens Park School, 6:30-8:00pm. For ages 6-12 . Youth Games Night - Penticton Community Center Gym, 7:30-9:00pm. For ages 12-17. Oliver Youth Community Kitchen - Oliver Youth Center at the Hangar (5658 Cessna Street), 6:00pm.* Learn cooking skills, follow recipes, taste your creations, take food home. Call 250-4852175 to pre-register. Youth Drop In Nights - Oliver Youth Centre at the Hangar (5658 Cessna Street), 6:00-10:00pm. For ages 1218. Games, skateboarding and hang out with friends. Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 6:00-9:00pm, Astrology Readings for 16+. Call for appointment.*

Saturday, January 26 Family Literacy Day - Penticton Cherry Lane Shopping Center, 10:00-3:00pm. Free activities, entertainment, clowns, agency displays, prizes, draws, free book for every child from RAR. Nankama World Beats Okanagan Falls School Gym, 2:00-3:30pm. An energizing, interactive drumming and rhythm event for all ages. Enter via Parks and Recreation Dept on the north side of the building. Youth Drop In Nights - Oliver Youth Centre at the Hangar (5658 Cessna Street), 6:00-10:00pm. For ages 12 to 18. Games, skateboarding and hang out with friends. Penticton Art Gallery - Noon-5:00pm. Free admission - check out exhibits with your family. Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 10:00-12:00pm, Pastel Drawing for ages 8+, 12:30-2:30pm, Clay Carving for ages 8+.

Sunday, January 27 Penticton Art Gallery - Noon-5:00pm. Free admission - check out exhibits with your family. Deborah Dayton’s Art Studio (in the Cannery), 1475 Fairview Rd., Penticton, 12:00-2:30pm, Paint Some Rocks for all ages.

15


16

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

news CHECK US OUT ONLINE FOR ORDERING, RESERVATIONS AND MORE!

Souvlaki night ~ 10 inches ~ $12

School district treasurer hanging up his calculator

Pasta Mania ~ Build your Pasta ~ $8

WEDnESDaY

Western News Staff

THURSDaY

Faced with the unenviable task of guiding the school district through years of budget cuts, Ron Shongrunden regrets only that he won’t be there to see the day when finances finally stabilize. The Okanagan Skaha School District announced Wednesday that Shongrunden, its secretary-treasurer, will retire this spring. “I would have liked to have seen us eliminate all our structural deficits before I left. I don’t know if that’s even possible, but it would have been nice to one year… go back to the board and say we have a few extra dollars to spend,” Shongrunden said. Nonetheless, the 58-year-old said he’s proud of what the school district has accomplished in his three decades with the organization, and the time is right to move on to other things. The Penticton Secondary School graduate started out as an accountant for the district in 1980, then rose through the ranks and was appointed to his current position in 2010. In addition to his duties as chief financial officer, he also helped plan the sprawling fibre-optic network that now provides phone and data service to school facilities, local government buildings and other community centres in Penticton and Summerland. “He’s certainly a leader in the province, if not North America, in the technology world for the innovations that have happened here, said Trustee Ginny Manning, chair of the school board. “What’s been built here is second to none in terms of technology.” Manning said Shongrunden, whose total compensation package totalled $131,244 for the 2012 fiscal year, phoned to tell her of his impending retirement, then made it official last week with a letter to the board. The district has already begun advertising the position and Manning is uncertain if the search will include any internal candidates. She said Shongrunden is a “highly valued leader” who will leave behind a “very fiscally responsible district.” Leslea Pryde, president of the Okanagan Skaha Teachers’ Union, said her members will also be sorry to see Shongrunden go. “The teachers respect him, so he’s leaving big shoes to fill,” she said. Pryde added that she hopes his replacement will focus on the big picture and not just the numbers. “I hope there’s not somebody who’s just worried about the almighty dollar, but is worried about the people who are in the system,” she said. Shongrunden said that under his watch, the district always tried to put people first as it grappled with budget challenges in the era of declining enrolment and funding. “We’re still hard on the issues but we’re trying to be softer on the people and make it easier for the cuts to happen,” he said. Shongrunden, who has three adult sons with his wife Kit, said once his retirement begins, he hopes to spend time renovating their home, travelling and developing an early literacy project. He added that when he’s finished clearing out his office, he’ll leave behind a simple piece of advice for his successor: “Do the right thing.”

1090 Main 250.492.9144

TUESDaY

Joe Fries

Riblicious night ~ Full Rack ~ $15 *DinE-in OnLY

LUnCH BOX QUiCKiE

WinE anD DinE

2 of your Favorites for only $8.00!

Two Can Dine for only $59.99!

TaKE-OUT OnLY 11:30aM - 2:00PM, TUE .- FRi.

DinE-in OnLY Jan. 8 - FEB. 10, 2013

ORDER On-LinE

Mark Brett/Western News

Secretary-treaSurer ron Shongrunden of the Okanagan Skaha School District is retiring this spring after 30 years of service. a graduate of Penticton Secondary, he began his career with the district as an accountant, eventually moving into his current position in 2010.

View Website for Full Details

PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until January 31, 2013. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. *2013 Corolla Sedan CE Automatic BU42EP-A MSRP is $18,040 and includes $1,590 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. Lease example: 0.9% Lease APR for 60 months. Monthly payment is $169 with $1,530 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $11,670. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. Applicable taxes are extra. **2013 Tacoma 4x4 DCab V6 5A Automatic MU4FNA-A MSRP is $31,925 and includes $1,760 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. Lease example: 4.9% Lease APR for 60 months. Monthly payment is $329 with $3,040 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $22,840. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. ***2013 Venza Automatic ZA3BBT-A MSRP is $30,450 and includes $1,760 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. Lease example: 3.9% Lease APR for 60 months. Monthly payment is $339 with $2,980 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $23,320. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. †0% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 Corolla and Matrix. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus HST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. $6,000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on 2013 Tundra 4x4 Crewmax models. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services lease or finance rates. Vehicle must be purchased, registered and delivered by January 31, 2013. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price.See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. Informational 72 month APR: Tundra Crewmax 5.06%. Government regulation provides that the Informational APR includes the cash customer incentive which is only available to customers who do not purchase finance/lease through Toyota Financial Services at a special rate, as a cost of borrowing. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not special rates), then you may be able to take advantage of Cash Customer Incentives. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

www.lacasaouzeria.com

T H E M AYA N S W E R E SO WRONG

2013 2013

corolla 169

$

LEASE FROM

COROLLA S MODEL SHOWN

per mo. / 60 mos. at 0.9%*

tacoma D-CAB TRD MODEL SHOWN

LEASE FROM

329

$

venza VENZA BASE MODEL SHOWN

LEASE FROM

339

$

%

purchase financing for

72 months

OR CHOOSE UP TO

2013 2013

0

get up to

$6000 CASHBACK

ON SELECT VEHICLES†

per mo. / 60 mos. at 3.9%***

J & C Bottle Depot at 200 Rosetown Avenue

per mo. / 60 mos. at 4.9%**

(behind McDonalds)

discover the lasting value of Toyota’s all-around affordability

250-492-5144 toyotabc.ca

T005190_7.31x9.64_BCI_wk1 Creation Date: 07/08/10

Ad No (File name): T005190_7.31x9.64_BCI_wk1

Ad Title: ---

Revision Date: January 9, 2013 11:26 AM

Client: Toyota Dealers of BC

Number of Ad Pages: Page 1 of 1

We take used Computers, TV’s, Printers, Fax Machines, Scanners, Keyboards and Paint Cans.


Does your

natural Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

Sports Editor: Emanuel Sequeira • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 224 E-mail: sports@pentictonwesternnews.com

sports

sweetener

taste like something

besides

sugar?

measures cup-for-cup just like sugar! Made from a unique combination sourced

of

from

ingredients fruits

and

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 17 vegetables, Swerve contains no artificial ingredients, Swerve is a great tasting, zero preservatives or flavors. calorie, natural sweetener that measures cup-for-cup just like Swerve is non-glycemic and sugar! Made from a unique safe for those living with combination of ingredients sourced Human from fruits diabetes. clinical and trials vegetables, Swerve contains have shown that Swerve does no artificial ingredients, not affect blood glucose or preservatives or flavors. insulin levels. Swerve is non-glycemic and safe for those living with • diabetes. Zero calorie Human clinical trials have shown that Swerve does • Non-glycemic not affect blood glucose or levels.like sugar • insulin Measures • • Diabetes friendly Zero calorie Non-glycemic • • No digestive discomfort • Measures like sugar • Natural - Nothing artificial • Diabetes friendly No digestive discomfort • • Kosher certified • Natural - Nothing artificial • Gluten free • Kosher certified • • No stevia Gluten freeor luo han guo • No stevia or luo han guo

Emanuel Sequeira/Western News

AFTER STARTING a road trip that began in Surrey against the Eagles on Jan. 11, Cody DePourcq (19) and the Penticton Vees play in Powell River tonight, Alberni Valley Saturday and Coquitlam Sunday.

Vees net offence on deadline day Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

Acquiring John Siemer from the Coquitlam Express has Wade Murphy very excited. Siemer, who sits third in BCHL scoring with 49 points in 39 games, is described by Murphy, who was acquired by the Penticton Vees last season on deadline day, as “obviously very skilled.” Sporting a massive grin, Murphy said the Glendora, Calif., product, acquired on Jan. 10, has playmaking ability. “He’s got everything,” said Murphy, who has 16 goals and 45 points in 34 games. “Very good hands as well. He’s a good addition to our team.” While Siemer was held off the scoresheet during the 2-1 loss to the Surrey Eagles on Jan. 11 and a 5-1 win against the Langley Rivermen on Jan. 12, Murphy said he felt himself, Siemer and Michael Rebry had instant chemistry. “He’s played very well last weekend,” said Murphy. Siemer wasn’t completely happy with his play saying it was rough as he wasn’t used to his new linemates. “I think after the first period of the first game, I think we started clicking,” said Siemer. “The next night we had tons of opportunities. I have a good feeling about our line.” Siemer, who scored 48 goals and amassed 108 points in 87 BCHL games with the Express, said it was unbelievable to play with Murphy and Rebry. “It’s like a bunch of skill out there,” said Siemer, who doesn’t anticipate problems producing. “You always just have to be in the right spot and you’re getting the puck. I have a good feeling about this group.” Bound for Northern Michigan University next season, Siemer knew he was being traded. It was the Express’ intentions to give the 20-year-old a chance to win in his final year of junior. “It was good move for me and obviously it’s hard to leave the guys,” said Siemer, who loved his time in Coquitlam. In a release, Harbinson said they are excited to add a player of Siemer’s skill and character. “Another California kid that you can tell has a heck of a lot of skill and vision,” Harbinson told the Western News. “He seems like he’s fit in really well with our team. He could have easily had four or five points if we had buried a couple of our chances. He hit a post himself on a breakaway. Very dangerous player with the puck.” Harbinson acquired a forward as there was some uncertainty with regards to the health of

Louie Nanne. The rookie was dealing with some upper body issues. On Tuesday, Harbinson confirmed that Nanne is good to return following a magnetic resonance imaging test. Nanne is probable for the Island road trip that begins Friday in Powell River and concludes in Coquitlam Sunday. If he doesn’t dress, Nanne will The next night be ready the following weekend. we had tons of Between the pipes, opportunities. Harbinson was pleased with the performance I have a good of Nic Renyard, who stepped in for Chad Kafeeling about tunar. The Vees No. 1 our line. goalie was at home in Victoria dealing with per— John Siemer sonal issues. “Nic did a great job last weekend,” said Harbinson. “Nic’s made the saves that he had to.” Katunar, who returned to the Vees on Sunday, was happy for his net minding partner. “It was great that he got some time between the pipes,” said Katunar. “He took the ball and ran with it.” “It was pretty exciting for me personally to get a few games in there against some big teams,” said Renyard. “I felt pretty good about myself on how I played.The team was obviously great in front of me the two weeks.” Katunar said his time off was good. He spent it with his father and grandmother. Now that he’s back, he was excited to see his teammates, and the feeling was mutual. “Real positive reaction from everyone,” said Katunar, who was ranked 33rd among 35 North American goalies in the NHL Central Scouting recently released. “We’re like a family in that dressing room and it’s great.” Both goalies said they were unsure of Harbinson’s plan on who he will play the first game. However, Harbinson said Katunar will get the nod against the Kings on Friday. “He’s looked really good in practice the last couple days,” said Harbinson. “It’s a great one-two punch.” The Vees next home game is Jan. 25 and 26 when they host the Vernon and West Kelowna.

Distributed By:

Hedley Enterprises 1-888-292-5660

AVAILABLE AT FINE HEALTH FOOD STORES Please go to www.swervesweetener.ca to find a store near you

Save Now! on a new Comfort System from LENNOX® Receive up to a *

$1,475 Rebate When you purchase a qualifying Lennox Home Comfort System. Also

Provincial Rebates up to $1,500 Call Aaron today for your FREE Quotation! Offers valid on installations from January 21st to February 15th, 2013 with the purchase of qualifying Lennox products. 101-1960 Barnes Street Penticton, BC V2A 4C3

250-493-7366 www.glittle.ca

Member of the FortisBC Contractor Program.

GLE Heating and Air Conditioning is part of The G.Little Group Serving Penticton and Area for over 25 Years *Offers subject to product availability. Cannot be combined with any other offer. See your participating Lennox dealer for complete details. Lennox Industries Inc. reserves the right to cancel or change this promotion at any time. Financing offer valid only through Snap Financial.


18

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

sports sports

IN BRIEF Margetts in top 10

@pentictonnews

TIRED OF PAPER CUTS? {

{ View new flyers from your favourite retailers now at

{

Penticton’s Matt Margetts placed 10th in an FIS World Cup event in Copper, Col. on Jan. 11. Margetts had trouble on his second hit in both finals runs. The Canadian Freestyle Ski Association reported that he landed low in the pipe both times he performed the alleyoop flatspin 540, which caused him to lose speed, affecting his next tricks. He finished the day with a top score of 54.6. In other CFSA news, they are celebrating the 2013 World Cup Moguls Grand Prix in Canada Olympic Park Jan. 26 by having three weekly draws. Up for grabs are CFSA 2012 team jacket and Auclair gloves, two VIP passes to 2013 Freestyle Ski Moguls Grand Prix and one night at the Westin Calgary and a gift certificate to Melrose Cafe and Bar. Head over to the event page at tinyurl.com/avvsfhf and RSVP by clicking attend.

Dart standings

Just a few of our Featured Advertisers:

your source for FREE coupons

Sign up for free e-Offers and get the inside scoop on the best flyer deals!

@

The Smokin Aces remain at the top of the Penticton and District Dart Association standings with 92 points. The leaders earned seven on Jan. 14, to give them a two-point advantage on the Best Damn Sports Bar No.1, who are second with 90. They scored six. In third are the Elks No.1 with 77 points after scoring six as well. Rounding out the top five are Best Damn Sports Bar Snipers and Elks Bullits at fourth and fifth with 74 and 68 points respectively. Darren Stanvick was tied with Les Martin and Brad Virtue for the high score of 174 for the men, while Adrian Alva had the high out at 154. On the women’s side, Rose White had the high score of 160, while Kathy Thew had the high out with 118. For full briefs, check www.pentictonwesternnews.com.

Emanuel Sequeira/Western News

GOT A PIN — Bob Morrison of Deroche, near Mission, was hanging out in The Patch during the 2013 WFG Continental Cup wearing this decorated vest of curling pins. The first pin is from the Seagram Mixed Canadian Curling championship in 1974, which Rick Folk won. The newest additions are a Penticton Western News Continental Cup pin and one from the Penticton Curling club. Morrison enjoyed the tournament in Penticton, especially with its format.

T H E N E W 2 013 A W D F O R E S T E R

Here’s a $2,000 cure for cold symptoms.

Limited time cash incentives. THE NEW 2013

$28,015* 2013 Forester 2.5X

CASH INCENTIVE

2,000

$

LEASE/FINANCE

OR

24 mos., as low as

0.5%

250-770-2002

**

STANDARD FEATURES • Symmetrical full-time All-Wheel Drive • 170HP BOXER engine • Vehicle Dynamics Control and Traction Control systems • 5-speed manual transmission with Hill Holder system • Heated front seats • Driver and front passenger front- and side-impact airbags • Bluetooth® mobile phone connectivity (voice-activated) • AC • 8.7 in. of ground clearance • And more.

western.subarudealer.ca

990 WEST ECKHARDT AVENUE PENTICTON, B.C. www.ironmancitysubaru.com DL #D9653

*Model shown is the 2013 Forester 2.5X 5MT (DJ1 XO) with MSRP of $28,015 including freight & PDI ($1,595), documentation fees ($395) and battery and tire tax ($30). License, taxes, insurance and registration extra. †$2,000 cash incentive is for cash customers only and is available on all new 2013 Forester models. Cannot be combined with Subaru Canada supported lease/ finance rates or stackable dollars. **0.5% finance and lease rates available on all new 2013 Forester for a 24-month term. Financing and leasing programs available through Toyota Credit Canada Inc. on approved credit. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. **/†Offers valid until February 1, 2013. See your local Subaru dealer or www.western.subarudealer.ca for complete details.


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

19

sports

Mark Brett/Western News

Princess Margaret Mustangs Abby Winstone (back) and Sam Simons of the Princeton senior girls Rebels wrestle for control of the ball during high school girls basketball action Wednesday at Princess Margaret. The visitors downed the Mustangs by 53-25 margin. For more photos from the game, check the photo gallery at www.pentictonwesternnews.com.

Mustangs pleased with results of new defence Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

Dave Killick laughed when asked if his senior girls basketball team did something to upset the basketball gods. He coaches the Princess Margaret Mustangs, who lost an exhibition game at home to the Princeton Rebels 53-25 on Wednesday evening. “I think we might have,” joked Killick, since his team missed several close layups and watched the ball bounce a few times around the rim and stay out. The bad bounces had him and co-coach Jeff Goodis shaking their heads. “We’re just saving it for this weekend,” said Killick of a big tournament in Kamloops. “That is pretty important for us. If we’re saving a few hoops for the weekend I’m OK with that.” It took a few minutes for either team to score, but eventually the Rebels built an 8-5 lead and never trailed. After the first quarter, they were up 12-6. In the second quarter, the Mustangs were outscored 15-4. In the second half it was 26-15. “I thought we did a lot of good things,” said Killick.

“We tried a couple of different defences we never tried before. We were pretty pleased with that.” While his players did the right things to generate offence, and the ball refused to go in, Killick said he thought they executed well. The Mustangs coach praised the play of the Rebels, ranked No. 2 provincially in A ball. The Mustangs also had their share of turnovers, but part of that was giving other players more court time. The Mustangs rested leader Kari-Grace Pym due to foul trouble and a sore leg. Killick said they were trying some things they maybe wouldn’t in a league game. “It was just a chance to play a very good single A team,” he said. “They have three kids that are provincial calibre players.” Brooklyn Pichette, one of three Mustangs captains, said they played really well. She wasn’t surprised with their offensive struggles because of how good the Rebels are. “They play good defence so it wasn’t really that much of a surprise,” said Pichette, who led with nine points. “We played as hard as we could.” Abby Winstone added seven points, while Payton Charlie and Dana Klamut scored four and three, respectively.

Joe Fries/Western News

Devon Potter carries the puck up ice ahead of his Penticton Vees teammates on Saturday during a 12-team atom recreation tournament. The tournament was won by the Penticton Rockets, while the Vees placed seventh. The next tournaments Penticton is hosting is peewee recreation from Jan. 25 to 27, Initiation Fun day Feb. 16 and bantam recreation March 15 to 17.

Make some noise against bullying on Pink Shirt Day February 27th…

Freestyle ski series takes to air at Apex Mountain Western News Staff

Apex Mountain Resort will welcome over 130 mogul athletes aged six to 20 for the first B.C. Freestyle Timber Tour Series I – Super Youth Challenge. Athletes from Ontario, Yukon, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia will be competing Jan. 18 to 20. A release issued by Freestyle Ski Apex said the event will feature three freestyle skiing disciplines of big air, moguls and slopestyle. This is one of two qualifying events for the Canadian Junior Nationals. The event is open to the public to watch talent from the Apex Freestyle Club, Whistler/Blackcomb Freestyle Club, Silver Star Freestyle Club, Big

White Freestyle Club, Revelstoke Freestyle Club, Vancouver Freestyle Club, Mount Washington Freestyle Club, Kimberly Freestyle Club and the B.C. Provincial Freestyle Teams. Penticton’s

Andi Naude, now with the Canadian national team, is among the skiers who have competed in this series. The AFC has 34 members from the competition team and Super Youth entered.

The event is free for public viewing and begins Saturday starting with moguls at 8:45 a.m. and slope style at noon. On Sunday, the big air competition is at 11:30 a.m. and moguls an hour later.

Buy your official shirts at pinkshirtday.ca CKNW ORPHANS’ FUND

SOUTH OKANAGAN YOUTH SOCCER ASSOCIATION

SOCCER SIGN-UP ON NOW! It may be Winter, but Spring is just around the corner...

And that means Spring Soccer Season! MINI PROGRAM Players Born in 2003-2008

YOUTH PROGRAM Players Born in 1995-2002

Registration Deadline is February 28.

Go to www.pinnaclesfc.com for details and registration forms, plus early payment bonus. Inquiries contact joanne.pfc@gmail.com.

2013 PRESENTED BY:

at the early bird price of $6.00, but only until January 30th


20

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

business

Picking crewS work in the early dawn light at Dark Horse Vineyards in Oliver, picking frozen grapes from the vines for a later pressing of ice wine. The 22-acre Inniskillinowned vineyard is one of the oldest in the South Okanagan, having been planted in 1990. Submitted photo

Safety is within your power Be ready and safe if the power goes out this winter. All it takes is a little planning and safety know-how:

• store the kit in an easily accessible location • consider other heat sources, such as your gas fireplace (but never barbecues or camp stoves) • stay inside your vehicle until help arrives if it comes into contact with a downed power line For more tips and information, visit fortisbc.com/safety or call 1-888-438-7847. FortisBC uses the FortisBC Energy name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (12-336.5 12/2012)

12/11/12 12:56:05 PM

Request for Proposals

Through its 2013 grants program, the Community Foundation of the South Okanagan will support a wide range of programs to benefit residents in communities throughout the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen. Grants are available to support programs and projects in the areas of: ■

■ ■ ■ ■

Steve Kidd

Western News Staff

• create an emergency kit with 72 hours’ worth of supplies

12-336.5_Outage_safety_ad_4x6.5_P1.indd 1

Bringing in the ice wine

Health and Social Development Environment Arts and Culture Education Children, Youth and Families

Troy Osborne is hoping for one more blast of cold air from the Arctic. Osborne, an Oliver vineyard manager, spent Friday night and the very early hours Saturday morning in two South Okanagan vineyards, trying to get frozen grapes picked as temperatures hit the right level of freezing to produce the high sugar juice needed to make sweet ice wine. While he and his crews cleared one vineyard, one more super cold night is needed to clear a second. “We have two sites that we harvest our Riesling grapes,” said Osborne. Picking began at Whitetail vineyards in Oliver at 9 p.m. as temperatures dipped to −12 C, but at 3 a.m. the crew moved on to Inniskillin’s Dark Horse Vineyards as temperatures hit the magic levels there. “On the Dark Horse site we cleared that area off and there are 15 to 20 tons left on the Whitetail site,” said Osborne. “We need another night. If we had another night, we would get’er.” This year, wine makers were lucky to get ideal temperatures for the grapes, with the combination of a long, warm, growing season combining with the weekend blast of subzero weather to produce the

right level of sugar for ice wine. “We really needed those temperatures and lower. The later you go in the year, the harder it is to freeze the grapes because they become dehydrated,” said Osborne. “It’s nothing but sugar; it’s like trying to freeze antifreeze.” While ice wine picking can occur as late as March, it is an anxiety-laden wait for vineyards owners who make a choice to leave grapes on the vine in hope of making the high-value ice wine. “Once we make the commitment that it’s ice wine, it’s all or nothing. Ideally we want it to happen before the new year’s break,” said Osborne. It was close earlier in the season a few times, including New Year's Eve, he continued, but temperatures never quite dropped low enough. “New Year's Eve, my crew was all assembled. They gave up their New Year’s Eve party to hang around a shop, waiting for the right level of sugar to hit.” Over on the Naramata Bench, Steve Latchford, wine maker at Therapy Vineyards, faced similar problems. “We had a couple of close calls where we hit −6 C and −7 C just before Christmas. And right on New Year's Eve we got pretty close again too,” said Latchford, who managed to get his crop in starting at 7 a.m. Saturday.

“We were almost getting to the point where I was looking at doing a late harvest instead of an ice wine because they were starting to break down a little bit with all these cold flashes and warm flashes,” said Latchford. “Luckily, we got it, and everything is off and in tanks. We dodged a bullet there.” “Everything was great, the Pinot Gris looked really good, nice amounts of Botrytis infection, so we got really concentrated sugar quantities in the pressed juice,” said Latchford. It is unusual to use Pinot Gris for ice wine, but Latchford said he prefers the higher acidity of the grapes. “You have a lot of acidity that balances out that sugar, so it’s not just a big sugary viscous syrup. You get a bit of acid to cut through it,” he said. While choosing to make ice wine is a calculated risk for wine makers, the sector of the wine industry has grown substantially since Peachland grower Walter Hainle produced the first Canadian ice wine in 1972. Besides Therapy, several other Naramata Bench Vineyards are reporting successful ice wine harvests, including D’Angelo, Van Westen and Lang Vineyards, all part of making Canada one of the world’s most prominent ice wine producers.

Job fair coming to South Okanagan Western News Staff

The deadline for applications is February 8, 2013 For further information and copies of Funding Guidelines, contact Aaron McRann - Executive Director at Sharing a Legacy (250) 493-9311 or by email at info@cfso.net

Osoyoos is the only South Okanagan community selected for a new series of job fairs sponsored by the provincial government. The new series of B.C. Jobs Start Here job fairs will come to 22 communities, beginning in January, to promote current job opportunities, career trends and skills training — with the addition of a new Skills4BC booth. The Osoyoos stop on the tour is scheduled for Feb. 14. These new fairs are a continuation of the 24 events held in communities throughout B.C. between September and November 2012, where more than 31,000 British Columbians of all ages attended, from high school students to older workers looking to re-enter the workforce. The 22 new fairs are expected to cost an additional $500,000, bringing the estimated total for the BC Jobs Start Here job fairs and mobile exhibit to $1.682 million. “From public feedback, we know that British Columbians found the job fairs to be helpful in a number

Sharing a Legacy a Legacy Sharing 390 MAIN STREET PENTICTON, B.C. V2A 5C3 PH: (250) 493-9311 FAX: (250) 493-9311 Email: info@cfso.net www.cfso.net

of ways: for connecting face-to-face with employers, for practising interview skills, for finding out what jobs and skills are in demand, and for even learning more about B.C.’s economy,” said Pat Bell, minister of jobs and skills training. “Our government is excited to extend this opportunity to even more British Columbians in the months ahead.” A new ‘Skills4BC’ booth will be on site at each job fair with staff to answer questions and share information on skills training in B.C. Exhibitors at each fair will also include employers from a range of sectors, including post-secondary institutions, training authorities, industry associations and health authorities, as well as local WorkBC Employment Services Centres and the ‘B.C. Jobs Start Here’ mobile exhibit, which enables visitors to browse the B.C. Jobs Plan and WorkBC websites using iPads. The ‘B.C. Jobs Start Here’ job fairs are free and open to anyone looking to connect with a local employer or find more information on skills training, career development and more.


Less Fuel. More Power. Great Value is a comparison between the 2013 and the 2012 Chrysler Canada product lineups. 40 MPG or greater claim (7.0 L/100 km) based on 2013 EnerGuide highway fuel consumption estimates. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. See dealer for additional EnerGuide details. Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ‡, § The First Big Deal Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after January 3, 2013. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. See participating dealers for complete details and conditions. •$19,998 Purchase Price applies to 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E+CL9) only and includes $8,100 Consumer Cash Discount. $19,998 Purchase Price applies to 2013 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F+CLE) only and includes $2,000 Consumer Cash Discount. Pricing includes freight ($1,500-$1,595) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees and other applicable fees and applicable taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. See participating dealers for complete details. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select new 2013 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Amounts vary by vehicle. See your dealer for complete details. ‡4.49% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package\2013 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package models to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank, TD Auto Finance and Ally Credit Canada. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. See your dealer for complete details. Examples: 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package/2013 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package with a Purchase Price of $19,998/$19,998 (including applicable Consumer Cash Discounts) financed at 4.49% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $115/$115 with a cost of borrowing of $3,823/$3,823 and a total obligation of $23,821/$23,821. Pricing includes freight ($1,500-$1,595) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees and other applicable fees and taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. §2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $27,395. 2013 Dodge Journey Crew shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $27,595. Pricing includes freight ($1,500-$1,595) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees and other applicable fees and applicable taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. ≠Based on R. L. Polk Canada Inc. January to October 2011 Canadian Total New Vehicle Registration data for Chrysler Crossover Segments. ^Based on 2013 Ward’s Middle Cross Utility segmentation. ¤Based on 2013 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan – Hwy: 7.9 L/100 km (36 MPG) and City: 12.2 L/100 km (23 MPG). 2013 Dodge Journey SE 2.4 L 4-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.5 L/100 km (38 MPG) and City: 10.8 L/100 km (26 MPG). TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

BI G D E A L E V E N T

GREAT OFFERS 2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CANADA VALUE PACKAGE CANADA’S #1 SELLING MINIVAN FOR 29 YEARS

$

INCLUDES $8,100 CONSUMER CASH* AND FREIGHT.

19,998 •

$

$

115 OR FINANCE FOR

2013 DODGE JOURNEY CANADA VALUE PACKAGE CANADA’S #1 SELLING CROSSOVER ≠

INCLUDES $2,000 CONSUMER CASH* AND FREIGHT.

19,998 •

38

BI-WEEKLY‡

@

APPROVALS

BY

BI-WEEKLY‡

AVAILABLE FEATURES FOR THE 2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

CE FOR OR FINANCE

4.49 %

DBC_131007_LB_CARA_JOUR.indd 1

PRODUCTION NOTES

DATE

FINALS TO PRODUCTION

T:13.5”

SCAN HERE FOR MORE

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

36

21

T:10.25”

THE

2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew shown.§

CANADA’S #1 SELLING PEOPLE LE AL. MOVERS REALLY ARE A BIG DEAL. MPG

HWY

7.9 L/100 KM HWY¤

$

% @ 115 4.49 FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN

• 2ND ROW OVERHEAD 9" VIDEO SCREEN • 2ND ROW POWER WINDOWS • 2ND ROW SUPER STOW ’n GO® • PARKVIEW® REAR BACK-UP CAMERA

MPG G

HWY Y

7.5 L/100 KM HWY Y¤

OHF 1

ABN A

2013 Dodge Journey Crew shown.§

MTN A TBN B CRI C

FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN CHP C

CWT C CVR C

IT’S YOUR JOURNEY, MAKE THE MOST OF IT. CQN C

CVC D

• BEST-IN-CLASS STORAGE^ • BEST-IN-CLASS V6 DRIVING RANGE^ • LARGEST TOUCH-SCREEN IN ITS CLASS^ • MOST AFFORDABLE MID-SIZE CROSSOVER IN CANADA^

FFP F

NEN F

KTW K

LESS FUEL. MORE POWER. GREAT VALUE.

KNA K

10 VEHICLES WITH 40 MPG HWY OR BETTER.

MRN M

LNT L

MAP M

MER M

HCS N

NTC N

Dodge.ca/Offers

1/9/13 2:45 PM

NSN N

PVQ P

PWN P

PAN P

PNV P

QCO Q


22 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

Your community. Your classiď&#x192;&#x17E;eds.

250.492.0444

INFO

Classified

â&#x20AC;˘ CHECK YOUR AD! Notice of error must be given in time for correction before the second insertion of any advertisement. The publisher will not be responsible for omissions or for more than one incorrect insertion, or for damages or costs beyond the cost of the space actually occupied by the error. â&#x20AC;˘ Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved. â&#x20AC;˘ Readers: In ads where â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;maleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is referred to, please read also as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;femaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and where â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;femaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is used, read also as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;maleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.

fax 250.492.9843 email classiď&#x192;&#x17E;eds@pentictonwesternnews.com Announcements

Employment

Employment

Personals

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Class 1 Drivers to haul dry vans Western Canada & US. Only drivers with 2 years exp. & US border crossing capability. Dedicated tractors, paid drops, direct deposit. No phone calls Fax 250-546-0600

Required Immediately: Experienced Class 1 Drivers with at least 3 years verifiable experience for the following positions: Part Time Canada/ US capable; Casual /On Call Boat Truck driver Canada/US; Furniture Delivery Driver throughout BC; Full time Drivers for future scheduled runs. Please indicate on your resume position applying for. Please fax resume to 250546-0600 or by email to parris@ricknickelltrucking.com No phone calls please

Single 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;ish male seeks 35-45 year old female, (slimmed. build) for companionship, possible relationship. Interests include outdoor activities (ie: camping, ATVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ing), motorcycles, and quiet time as well, South Okanagan, please reply w/photo and contact infoto: Box 721, c/o Penticton Western News, 2250 Camrose St., Penticton, BC., V2A 8R1

Word Classified Advertising Deadlines:

Lost & Found

WEDNESDAY PAPER TUESDAY 10 A.M. FRIDAY PAPER THURSDAY 10 A.M.

Found: cordless power drill on White Ave, noon Jan. 16th. 492-0785

OPEN EARLY 8 AM MONDAY MORNINGS TO SERVE YOU BETTER!

250-492-0444

Regular office hours: Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Announcements

Announcements

Funeral Homes

Obituaries

Credible Cremation

In Memory of Doug Ramsell, a gathering will be held at 2pm, Jan. 20th, 2013, at the Elks Lodge in Penticton. Everyone invited to honor his life. Arranged by Kim & Graham Burke and Family

Services Ltd.

Basic Cremation $990 + taxes

Sensible prices for practical people

Information

24 Hours â&#x20AC;&#x153;No Hidden Costsâ&#x20AC;? Pre-Pay and Save www.crediblecremation.com 559 Ellis Street, Penticton, BC

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis

250-493-3912

The South Okanaganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

LOWEST COST Direct Cremation

Cremations done locally

Licensed Staff

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@blackpress.ca

Research Participants Needed! By Appointment

250-488-4004

PATIENTS OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS

www.simplicitycare.com

Do you receive, or have you received, health care from a BC Nurse Practitioner? Researchers from UVicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School of Nursing want to learn how you feel about care provided by nurse practitioners.

#5-230A Martin St., Penticton

Nunes-Pottinger Funeral Service & Crematorium

Serving our South Okanagan communities with compassion, respect, and understanding.

John Nunes Daryn Pottinger

Participation in this study means completing a short survey either by mail or telephone. To learn more and sign-up for the study, please contact Joanne Thompson Research Assistant at jethomps@uvic.ca or 250-721-7964

250-498-0167 (24 hrs) 5855 Hemlock St. Oliver, BC www.nunes-pottinger.com

University of Victoria School of Nursing

Community Newspapers Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at the heart of thingsâ&#x201E;˘

Alcoholics Anonymous, if your drinking is affecting you and those around you, call 250-490-9216

Automotive

Automotive

Personals

Licensed Auto Technician wanted in Penticton Independent Repair Shop. Competitive wages and shop benefits. Please e-mail resume to oklease@ shaw.ca or fax it to 250-493-1981.

Children Childcare Available LOVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Family Daycare, Young St. area, licensed, spots avail. for your children (18mo.-5yr) 250-493-0566 LYNDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Loveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Learn Licensed Family Daycare, 2-3 spaces, 1yr - kindergarten. 250-492-4336 Pamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Family Daycare, licensed, spaces 1 years & up, CCRR member, 250-492-0113

Employment

DRIVERS WANTED:

Terrific career Opportunity with outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Rail Experience Needed!! Skills Needed - Ability to travel 3 months at a time, Valid License w/ air brake endorsement. Extensive Paid Travel, Meal Allowance, 4 weeks Vacation and BeneďŹ ts Package. Compensation based on prior driving experience. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver. DO NOT FILL IN CITY OR STATE

SUTCO continues to expand! Current openings; Chip Hauls, Chilliwack, Merritt, West Kootenays. Dedicated runs, day and afternoon shifts. Highway, dedicated tractor, Canada Only runs. Dispatcher, based in Salmo, days and evening shifts. If you are looking for a career that offers steady work, Extended Benefits, Pension Plan then apply online: www.sutco.ca Fax: 250-3572009 Enquiries: 1-888-357-2612 Ext: 230

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Start your Health Care Career in less than a year! Study online or on campus Nursing Unit Clerk â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6 months - Work in the heart of the hospital Pharmacy Technician â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 months - The ďŹ rst CCAPP accredited program in BC Medical Transcriptionist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9 months - Work online or in hospitals Financial Aid available â&#x20AC;˘ PCTIA and CCAPP accredited

Call Today For Free Info Kit

1-877-840-0888 www.ThompsonCC.ca

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Business Opportunities GIFT BASKET franchise needed in your area. Be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Own Bossâ&#x20AC;? for the New Year! For more information go to www.obbgifts.com and click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;own a franchiseâ&#x20AC;?. Any questions? Email head office directly through website or call (778)-753-4500 (Kelowna) OWN A COMPUTER WORK FROM ANYWHERE. Two step process. Request online info, review. Set-up phone interview. Serious people Only: Call : 250 558 9231

Childcare Columbus Park Child Care Centre has spots available in their 3-5 yr child care program. The staff are fully qualified ECE teachers, we serve lunches & snacks, we have a child based curriculum as well as teacher directed academics in the afternoon. If you are looking for the best for your child, enroll them now at Columbus Park Child Care Centre, call Deb at (250)490-9855

Career Opportunities

RNs needed IMMEDIATELY Summerland Seniors Village

Retirement Concepts is a family owned private company based in Vancouver, BC that provides seniors housing and care services ranging from Retirement Living, Assisted Living to Skilled Nursing Care throughout the Province. Summerland Seniors Village, located in Summerland, has immediate Full-Time (Days and/or Evenings) & Casual RN positions. Applicants must be a graduate of an approved school of nursing with current active registration with CRNBC, BSN preferred. Please submit your resume IMMEDIATELY, in the strictest confidence, via our website at www.retirementconcepts.com/careers. While we appreciate all applications, please note only those short listed will be contacted. Retirement Concepts is an equal opportunity employer.

DEALER MANAGER NANAIMO, BC

The Inland Group is an industry-leading group of heavy truck and equipment dealerships in business since 1949 with 1,000 employees and 22 locations in North America. The Dealer Manager of our Nanaimo location has responsibility for the growth and prosperity of the branch, market share growth, customer and employee retention and the profitability of each department in the dealership. Preference will be given to candidates with several years experience in the heavy truck and/or heavy equipment industries. A post secondary degree or diploma is preferred along with proven leadership skills. Further details can be found under Canada, Job Opportunities at www.inland-group.com. Resumes and covering letters should be emailed to Lori Willcox at lwillcox@inland-group.com or faxed to 604-608-3156

By shopping local you support local people.

Cooks (Full-Time, Part-Time & Casual) Summerland Seniors Village

Summerland Seniors Village is now recruiting experienced Cooks. Cook candidates will require the following: t(SBEVBUJPO GSPN B SFDPHOJ[FE DPPL QSPHSBN PS FRVJWBMFOU DPNCJOBUJPO PG FEVDBUJPO BOE experience) tPSNPSFZFBSTFYQFSJFODFJOIPUFMT SFTUBVSBOUT PSJOTUJUVUJPOBMFOWJSPONFOUTQSFGFSSFE t8)*.*4$FSUJÜDBUFQSFGFSSFE t"CJMJUZUPDPNNVOJDBUFFòFDUJWFMZ t"CJMJUZUPUBLFEJSFDUJPOBOEMFBSOQSPDFEVSFT t"CJMJUZUPEFNPOTUSBUFUBDU EJQMPNBDZ FNQBUIZ & patience For a more detailed job description and to submit ZPVSSFTVNFQMFBTFWJTJUPVSXFCTJUFIMMEDIATELY at www.retirementconcepts.com/careers. 8IJMFXFBQQSFDJBUFBMMBQQMJDBUJPOT QMFBTFOPUF POMZUIPTFTIPSUMJTUFEXJMMCFDPOUBDUFE Retirement Concepts is an equal opportunity employer.

FOR THE AFTERNOON CUP...

 

 




Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

Employment Education/Trade Schools TAYLOR PRO TRAINING *Heavy Equipment Operator Training *Commercial Driver Training Call today 1-877-860-7627 www.taylorprotraining.com

Farm Workers ORCHARD workers needed, $10.25/hour, Sandhu Fruit Farm, 7311 Hillborne St., Summerland BC, V0H 1Z7, 250-486-3618, 250-494-9078 SUN City Cherries 4759 Lakeshore Rd Kelowna reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farm Labourers. Pruning, picking, packing, sorting and general farm work. Seasonal. 40hrs/wk minimum 7days/wk. $10.25/hr or piece rate. Email resume to: suncitycherriesjobs@shaw.ca 250-764-1872

Help Wanted ARE YOU EXPERIENCING FINANCIAL DISTRESS? Relief is only a call away! Call 250-979-4357 to set up your FREE consultation in Penticton. Donna Mihalcheon CA, CIRP 33 years experience. BDO Canada Limited. Trustee in Bankruptcy. 200-1628 Dickson Avenue, Kelowna , BC V1Y 9X1

An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilfield road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051.

Employment

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 23

Employment

Employment

Services

Alterations/ Dressmaking

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Trades, Technical

Columbus Park Child Care Centre has a position available for a part-time Infant Toddler person, contact Michele at email: columbusparkchildcare @shaw.ca PENTICTON and District Society for Community Living is now hiring a PPT Residential 1:1 Support Worker & Relief Residential Worker positions. If you are looking to increase your income or gain experience for permanent employment then our fast paced and friendly work environment may be right for you. Resumes can be dropped off at 180 Industrial Ave. W. fax: 250-493-9113 or email: leanne@pdscl.org SALES Representative Required Growers Supply Co. Ltd is accepting resumes for an experienced inside/outside sales representative for our wholesale department in Kelowna, BC. This position will involve calling on established and potential new farm supply, garden center and nursery accounts in the BC central interior and Kootenay region. Some overnight travel and light delivery will be involved; a sales vehicle will be supplied. Wage would depend upon experience, a full benefit package is also offered with the position. Please fax or email resumes with a covering letter to: Growers Supply Co. Ltd 2605 Acland Road Kelowna, BC V1X 7J4 Fax 250-765-4545 Email hr@growers-supply-co.com TrafďŹ c Control (flagger) 2 day classes Kelowna Jan 26/27 Feb 23/24 New $270 Renew $165 tx incl 1-866-737 -2389 www.roadsafteytcs.com

Seasonal labourer positions at Coral Beach Farms Ltd. 16351 Carrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Landing, Lake Country BC. No experience necessary. Must have own transportation. Applicant must be capable of physically demanding (incl. heavy lifting) work in all weather conditions. 6-7 days a week. 10-12 hours a day beginning March 15, 2013 - April 30, 2013. Work includes tree planting, pruning & irrigation. Pay $10.25/hour. Apply by fax at 250-766-0813 or email at jobs@coralbeach.ca

LOOKING for a full time journeyman plumber or an individual with very good skills in plumbing and heating business. Please forward resume to info@eggert-energy.com

TIM HORTONS

426889 BC Ltd. Now Hiring Store Front Position, Full Time/ Part time/ Flex Postion, All Available Starting at $10.28 hr., Health Benefits/ Meal plan/Wage incentives/ Bonuses, 8907 Main Street, Osoyoos, #15034017 Hwy 97, Oliver, 7710 Prairie Valley Rd, Summerland, Apply now to b.sym@shaw.ca, Fax: 1.778.476.5991

Home Care/Support Care aid for quadriplegic, train. provided, $18/hr.Feb. 01. 778-476-0545, 250-486-6787 CERTIFIED Care Aides, casual, growing to FT. Benefits. 102-3310 Skaha Lake Road, www.wecare.ca, fax: 250-4923883, pfedor@wecacanada.com.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at the heart of thingsâ&#x201E;˘

EXPERIENCED person offering home care services. Personal care, cooking, housekeeping, shopping, etc. Support worker certified. Call Piroska 778-476-0092

Education/Trade Schools

Education/Trade Schools

Community Newspapers

Education/Trade Schools

PRACTICAL NURSING Career Opportunities Licensed Practical Nurse Health Care Aid Operating Room Tech* Foot Care Nurse*

NEW Provincially Recognized PN program. Available at select campuses.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Career Opportunities

Renovate your wardrobe, do you require mending or sewing? for info call, Coco, (250)493-0620

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on the net at www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Be Part of Our Team.

Trades, Technical

Trades, Technical

Get Trained for a Profitable, Long-Term Career in Various Trades

CONSTRUCTION

Applications are now being accepted for our 19-week Penticton Training Program. Program in Penticton call:

250-486-7330

Carriers Needed

2 Days a Week - Early Mornings

The Penticton Western News has Routes available in these areas for Wednesday & Friday: â&#x20AC;˘ Penticton â&#x20AC;˘ Oliver â&#x20AC;˘ Summerland â&#x20AC;˘ Trout Creek For more info please call Mark or Brian or email:

Proudly sponsored by the Southern Interior Construction Association.

circulation@pentictonwesternnews.com

250-492-0444 Ext: 219 or 205

www.blackpress.ca

BLACK PRESS Penticton Press is a busy printing press and newspaper distribution centre with an entry-level full-time position available in the pressroom, shifts vary. We offer competitive wages and an excellent benefits package. Experience in the printing or bindery/press is an asset but not necessary. We are looking for a healthy, motivated and responsible individual. This is an opportunity for the right candidate to begin a career in the production of print media. We look forward to hearing from you.

,WWDNHV PXVFOHV WRUHDG WKLVDG

Please submit resume to: Penticton Western News-Black Press 2250 Camrose Street Penticton, B.C. V2A 8R1 Attention: Shaun McGeachy (No phone calls please.)

Family Child Care Teen Parent Programs Cruise Ships and Resorts Supported Child Development Recreation, Program, Child Minding

HEALTH CARE ASSISTANT Career Opportunities

PENTICTON

Home Support Agencies Acute/Complex Care Facility Long Term Care Assisted Living/Private Care Self Employment as HCA

COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKER - SS

Be Part of Our Team.

Sub-Contractor Driver

Career Opportunities Child/Youth Care Worker Teen Pregnancy Worker Parenting Support Worker Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shelter Worker Family Place / Newcomers Worker

Must have 3/4 ton or 1 ton Van 2 days a week - Wednesday & Friday Early morning deliveries â&#x20AC;˘ Okanagan Falls â&#x20AC;˘ Oliver â&#x20AC;˘ Osoyoos For more info please call Mark or Brian or email: circulation@pentictonwesternnews.com 250-492-0444 Ext: 219 or 205

PENTICTON:

250.770.2277

SPROTTSHAW.COM

www.blackpress.ca

'RQŇ&#x2039;WWDNH\RXUPXVFOHV IRUJUDQWHG2YHU &DQDGLDQVZLWKPXVFXODU G\VWURSK\WDNHWKHPYHU\ VHULRXVO\ /HDUQPRUHDWPXVFOHFD


24 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Services

Services

Counselling

Painting & Decorating

Counselling available for police and military personnel and those with chronic illness or disabilities. Reasonable rates www.globalcounsellor.com or text message 250-488-5084

Dave Barnett Painting & Decorating, interior/exterior house painting, cabinets, wall-paper, faux & decorative wall finishes, drywall repairs, carpentry repairs, free estimates & consultation, negotiable pricing. “Protecting your investment & adding real value to your home” (250)497-7912 WWW.PAINTSPECIAL.COM

Esthetics Services

(1) 250-899-3163

3 Rooms For $299, 2 Coats Any Colour

$50 off, Permanent Cosmetics by master tech. Health board Approved www.skinhance.ca Winfield/Kelowna clinic. Lips Brows and Eyes. 1-855-4803116

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls. Cloverdale Premium Quality Paint. NO PAYMENT, until job is completed!

Financial Services

Rubbish Removal

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

PENTICTON Junk Removal! Anything goes! Household waste, furniture and appliances to the dump 250-770-0827

Cleaning Services

PENGUIN MFG. HOT TUB COVERS. 250-493-5706

ELDER Services - Cleaning, Shopping, Errands - Licensed $20./hr. 250-490-4839

Swimming Pools/ Hot Tubs Pets & Livestock

Drywall

Feed & Hay

JACK THE BEAR Const. Small patch work to basement reno’s. Framing to Painting, (250)490-5702

Hay for sale, barn stored, 1st crop, $4.00 bale, 70 lb bales. 250-546-3371 250-309-5910. HAY FOR SALE; Grass or Grass Alfalfa mix, Large square bales, 3x3x8, $160/ton. Round bales $70. each, approx. 800lbs. Delivery avail. on larger orders. 250-8386630 cell 250-804-6720

Garden & Lawn Valley Wide Lawn & Yard Care, Free consultation for upcoming lawn & yard care season. Fully experienced “Xeriscape,” Dry Valley Garden Renovator, 250-493-4731

Handypersons Handyman Service, no job too small, household repairs, yard work, hauling. Call Ryan 250809-4823

Home Improvements Are you looking to do RENOVATIONS? No job too big, or small, 25 years exp. with solid references. Update your home with peace of mind, call Ted Lund, 250-490-7991

BELCAN

Painting & Reno’s NO HST

over 15 years in business licensed, insured, WCB

painting, tiling, ooring, kitchen/bath reno’s, carpentry nishing,

Len (250)486-8800 www.belcan.ca lenmass@gmail.com

Carpenter, very experienced, any line of work, start to finish, plumbing, drywall, reno’s, decks, stairs, log home building, (250)402-8565 Meadowvale Construction Reno’s, additions, new construction, bathrooms, tile, roofing & more, over 35 yrs experience, call Mark (250)809-8425 Rob Hurren Carpentry, renovations big and small, kitchen and bath remodeling, doors trim work, finishing and more, professional design available, call Rob 250-809-7131

Landscaping Okanagan Pest Control Ltd., fully experienced landscape pruner, fruit trees, evergreen hedges, ornamental trees. Picture portfolio & ref. list of satisfied clients avail. Now booking 2013 Basic fruit tree maintenance Spray Programs, Phone Gerald at 250-493-5161

Moving & Storage FAMILY Movers. Moving? Anything, anywhere. Local and long distance trips. Packing service available, weekly trips to Vancouver, Alberta, full and partial loads. Cheapest rates in the valley. Free Estimates, 250-493-2687

Livestock Premium Wood Shavings New supplier of Animal bedding, starting at $250 for 54 cubic yards delivered, (250)770-0214

Shavings

Friendly service from Summerland since 1972 Les Porter 250-490-1132

Pets WANTED: Healthy Stud for Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. 1 (250)832-7959

Merchandise for Sale

Auctions Western Star Auctions, the Okanagan’s Premier Auction Houses 161 Ellis Street, weekly auctions every Tuesday @ 6pm Always accepting consignments. 250-492-3203

Building Supplies STEEL Buildings, Prices Reduced, Wholesale/Factory offers On discounted deals Big & Small. Source# 1RZ 800-964-8335

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Firewood/Fuel

Heavy Duty Machinery

A-1 Firewood, split & delivered, full cords Pine $200, 1/2 cord $100, 1/4 cord $50., senior disc., incl. free delivery, 250-770-0827 FREE BROKEN PALLETS!! Pick-up at the Penticton Western News. 2250 Camrose St.

Furniture UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP

PENTICTON BARGAIN STORE

A-STEEL SHIPPING DRY STORAGE CONTAINERS Used 20’40’45’53 in stock. SPECIAL 44’ x 40’ Container Shop w/steel trusses $13,800! Sets up in one day! Also Damaged 40’ $1950 Call Toll Free Also JD 544 & 644 wheel loaders JD 892D LC Excavator Ph. 1-866-528-7108 Free Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

Community Newspapers

WE BUY & SELL ESTATES! DOWNSIZING OR MOVING? GIVE US CALL! MANY ONE OF A KIND & UNIQUE ITEMS!

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper? Queen bed, boxspring & mattress, $100, double bed, $100, twin bed, $100, washer & dryer, $150 (set), s/s fridge, $100, dishwasher, $75, stove, $125, hood range microwave, $100, all white, can be delivered & set up, 250-770-0827 WANTED: Vintage paintings, postcards, fishing rods, reels, tackle, old knives, Native baskets, old guns, saddles & gun rigs, military medals, pocket watches, etc. Silver & gold coins. Honest & Confidential! Cash Paid! 250-308-7342, 250-260-8069

Bedroom set; twin beds, headboard, mattresses, one night stand, 6 drawer dresser, maple, $400, (250)497-8774 Furniture sacrifice, like new Colonial couch & chair, $375, TV & ent. centre, beautiful condition, offers, expensive computer incl. acces. & desk, $1000, oak dining table & 6 chairs, $200, coffee table, $75, shelving, $50, bedroom suite, (brand new mattres), end tables & dresser, offers, misc items, call (250)490-3037 Western Star Auctions, the Okanagan’s Premier Auction Houses 161 Ellis Street, weekly auctions every Tuesday @ 6pm Always accepting consignments. 250-492-3203

Heavy Duty Machinery Will pay cash for oversized scrap steel, cats, yarders, saw mill equipment, farm equipment, etc. All insurance in place to work on your property. 250-260-0217

Financial Services

Misc. for Sale

Misc. Wanted CASH for OLD postcards, guns, military medals, syphons, bottles, license plates, NWBIT insulators, tins, signs, silver coins (15x), toys, tokens, misc. antiques, Larry, 250 545-7140, sumas@shaw.ca I like to buy $100 coins, coin collections & specialty foreign coins. Todd 250-864-3521 Private Coin Collector Buying Collections, Accumulations, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins + Chad: 250-499-0251

Financial Services

Musical Instruments

Apt/Condo for Rent

Sporting Goods

We’re at the heart of things™

www.pentictonbargainstore.com

Rentals

GUITAR, BASS, AND Drum Lessons,Classic Guitars 465 Main St. Introducing Jennifer Lauren,Vocal Instructor ,All Style All Ages. 472-5007 Guitars, amplifiers, drums, keyboards, band & string instruments, music books & access., music lessons, sales & rentals, Skaha Sound, 51 Nanaimo Ave. E, 250-492-4710

Open Tue-Fri, 10am-5pm Sat, 10am-4pm Closed Sun & Mon

256 Westminster Ave. W. Ph: 778-476-5919

Merchandise for Sale

SKS’s & SKS Ammo in Stock Norinco Tax-In Specials: M14 308 cal c/w 520 rd ammo $833. AR-15 223 cal c/w 1600 rd ammo $1299. 1911-A1-GC 45 cal c/w 1000 rd ammo $811. Upgraded Grizzly 870 shotguns from $425. Quality Firearms Bought & Sold at The Best Little Gun Shop Around Weber & Markin Gunsmiths, 4-1691 Powick, Kel. 250-762-7575, Tues-Sat, 10-6.

Real Estate Apt/Condos for Sale 2bdrm, newly reno’d, adult oriented, $750, N/S, N/P, call Dennis 250-488-5678 or 778515-1616

For Sale By Owner ******* OKHomeseller.com View Okanagan properties for sale by owner. Selling? No Commission. 250-545-2383, 1-877-291-7576

Mobile Homes & Parks ✰

Mr. Mobile Home Certified Factory Outlet. Featuring SIERRAS family community, or single and multi-section homes for your property. 250-769-6614 www.accenthomes.ca

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent 1bdrm, 2nd floor, across from Skaha park, $650/mo., overlooking Oxbow, 250-497-8928

FREE CONFIDENTIAL CONSULTATION CALL 250.492.0866

Are you ready to take control of your finances? A consumer proposal may be your best option. Yvonne Sutton, Trustee 445 Ellis Street, Penticton 320-1620 Dickson Avenue, Kelowna* *Resident Office Trustees in Bankruptcy & Proposal Administrators

ion works What opt me? best for on onsolidati

Debt C

Consumer

Proposal

ortgage Second M

MNPdebt.ca

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent large 2bdrm, Penticton Ave., close to school and transit, $795, call Dennis at Realty Execs., (250)493-4372

TOWNHOUSE 296 & 298 Maple St. 3 or 4 bdrm - 2½ bath

Lrg. 2bdrm $850, & newly reno’d 1bdrm, $750, avail. now. 40+ building (250)-487-1136 NEWLY RENO’D 2 bdrm apt., Insuite W/D, parking, A/C, storage, located off Government & Penticton. NP/NS. Avail immediately. 250-4863539 or 1-888-669-9844. ONE Bedroom in quiet small adult building. N.S., No pets. $ 695 Garry 250-492-4558 RUTLAND - 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath clean, bright, roomy condo. washer & dryer, stove & frdge, wall air, storage, covered parking. Badke rd culdesac. $1100 inculdes heat & electric. Avail Immed. Call Henry 250-8702700 or 250-860-2423

1750 Atkinson St. Deluxe 2 bdrm, 2 bath, apt in adult bldg, 19+. Heated undrgrd prkg, 5 appl. Lrg deck, A/C, gas fireplace 1042 Govn’t St., basement suite. 2 bdrm, utilities inc.

101-400 Eckhardt Ave. 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 5 appl. Garage 250-490-1700 250-486-3791 250-317-8844

BROCKTON COURT

Commercial/ Industrial

241 Scott Avenue

1 Bedroom from $750 2 Bedroom from $850

485 Warren Ave E, 2345 sq.ft., high profile corner building, shop, new lighting, new offices, 3 phase power, 10x10 overhead door, shop w/ 1 tonne center pole jib crane, etc. Pent. (250)490-9016, dana@trucktransformer.com PRIME Commercial Spaces: 2300sqft. in busy Plaza, ample parking, also 770sqft., in OK Market for food-related retail business, Barb 250-492-6319

Cable Included, 40+ Building, No Smoking, No Pets, Secure Building, Parking, Balcony

250-488-2881 1 & 2 bdrm apt.’s avail. immed., $625-$725, central Penticton, no pets, water incl., (250)493-4903 1 & 2 bdrm, newly reno’d suites. Secured access, util incl, near hospital, bus route and close to all amenities, n/p, n/s 250-938-3626 1bdrm loft, Tiffany Gardens, no pets, $750/mo. (250)4920413 or 250-462-5854 2bdrm, reno’d, adult/senior oriented, quiet, clean, cat ok, $800/mo., (250)492-7328 FURNISHED or un-furnished apt for rent in Princeton Avail. now, need excellent ref’s & DD. No pets. Call 250-2951006 leave a message.

Duplex / 4 Plex 101-394 Vancouver Ave., Penticton, 4 bdrm duplex, 3 1/2 bath, ac, no appl., ns, np, avail. Feb. 1, (250)493-8531 2BDRM 1bath 1/2 duplex, f/s/w/d, DT location, $800+util. 250-492-5100, 250-490-5354 2bdrm suite, adult oriented, $1000/mo, util. incl., avail. immed., (250)492-2637 3bdrm duplex, 6appl., Columbia school area, np, ns, $1100/mo., (250)493-1201 MOTEL room and RV pad to rent $480 up. Penticton and Summerland. 250-487-0268

Apt/Condo for Rent

RENTALS

(250) 770-1948 Property Management 101-3547 SKAHA LAKE RD. Kaleden: 4 bdrm house w/ garage. F/S, Lakeshore Towers: 8th floor, 1 bdrm, W/D, D/W, cent air/Heat, fire place, lrg 1 bath & Den. and 4th floor, 2 bdrm, yard, pets ok. $1375.00 + util. 2 bath, f/s, w/d, d/w, m/w, cent air Dwntwn: 1 bdrms/bach: f/S, A/C, and heat, prkg, deck, storage, pool, deck, and ltd prkg, util and cable incl. sauna, hot tub and more. Avail. Now $1150.00 & $1300.00 + elec. $600.00 & $650.00. avail now

Realty EXECUTIVES executives REALTY vantage VANTAGE apaRtMents: APARTMENTS: $650

Near beach & park, renovated bathroom, 1 bdrm condo. Now (A381) Avail. NOW oK beach, 2 bdrm corner condo, elevator, $700 Near college & OK Now (A333) balcony. Avail. NOW oK Beach, large 2 bdrm apt, new flooring, paint, & $800 By OK Now (A334) kitchen cabinets, f, s, extra storage. Avail. NOW $1400 2 bdrm + den exec. Condo at 100 Lakeshore, 6 appl, sec’d Now (A352) parking many amenities. Avail. NOW

houses: HOUSES: $900

oK Beach & downtown, cute 2 bdrm rancher, fenced Near OK Now (H559) yard, f, s, w, d. Avail. NOW $950 Quebec St., lower 3 bdrm duplex, new kitchen cabinets & Now (H721-1) some new flooring, f, s, w, d. Avail. NOW $950 By Safeway & downtown, 2 bdrm upstairs of home, shared Now (H673-1) laundry, laminate floors. Avail. NOW $1000 Near KVR school & IGA, 2 bdrm home w/fenced yard, Now (H730) hardwood floors, f, s, w, d. Avail. NOW Reno’d3 3bdrm, bdrm,1 1bath, bath,large largesuite, suite,inin4 4unit unitbuilding, building,extra extra $1000 Reno’d storage, fp, f,s, d/w, central air, near elem school, avail March 1 (H691-1) $1300 Fairway Village, 55+, freshly painted, 2 bdrm & den, 2 bath, rancher w/double garage. Looking onto golf course. Now. Lease required. (H755) Avail. NOW. $1750 St. Andrews private 3 bdrm house, 2 bath, 5 appl, incl. (oT570) unlimited golf, 1 year lease req’d. Avail. March 1 (OT570)

FuRnished HOUSES/CONDOS houses/condos FURNISHED oK Falls, furnished, 3 bdrm condo by Skaha Lake. Flexible $1250 OK w/terms. (A448) Prospective tenants must complete an application form at:

Main STREET, stReet, PENTICTON, penticton, B.C. B.c. V2A v2a 5B2 280 MAIN phone: 250-493-4372 - www.rentalspenticton.com PHONE: Only qualified applicants will be contacted.

24/7

anonymous

confidential

in your language

YOUTH AGAINST VIOLENCE LINE

1-800-680-4264 info@youthagainstviolence.com

Stand up. Be heard. Get help.


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

Rentals

Rentals

Transportation

Transportation

Auto Accessories/Parts

Cars - Sports & Imports

Used Tires, Huge Selection of used tires and wheels in stock. We might have what you need. Prices vary according to size and quality. Starting at $25.00. Call us or drop in to Larsens Excel 555 Okanagan Ave East 250-492-5630 Penticton

Restoration Project, 1974 Mercedes 280S, 4 spd std, 4 dr sedan, excellent condition, $3456obo, (250)406-0426

Duplex / 4 Plex

Motels,Hotels

4- 2bd West Kel., units. 2 avail 15th Dec. others avail 1st of Jan. Each reno’d. 5 appls.incl new w/d., prkg, NS. NP. $750$975 +utils. 250-767-6330 Newer 2bdrm, 2.5ba, very large, f/s/dw/w/d/m, a/c, large garage, White Ave. at Government, $1300, call Dennis at Realty Execs., 250-493-4372

Motel monthly rentals in Penticton & Oliver, Avail. until June 2013, LARGE 1bdrm suites & bachelor suites, Fully furnished, utilities/cable incl., quiet location, near Mall & bus route. Call Valley Star Motel 250-492-7205. Ext. 0 or Maple Leaf Motel Inn Towne, 250498-3497

Homes for Rent

Seasonal Acommodation

2bdrm, 1bath, f/s, avail. Feb. 1, close to schools, shopping, (250)493-9357 2bdrm+den, completely remodelled, 5appl, fenced yard, close to conference centre & bus route, ns, np, avail. Feb. 15, $1100+util., 250-462-6787 3 brm upstairs over 1200 sqf, fenced yard, share utilities. Pet ok. On Hansen street. $999 long term, 250-487-0268 4bdrm 1/2 duplex, Jan. 15 or Feb. 1, fenced yard, pet neg., close to elem. school, transit, all appl., $1450, 403-818-0897 764 Chase Ave., Pent., 5bdrm, 2 kitchen, 2.5ba, full basement $1600, Vijay (250)490-1530 Avail. now, 3bdrm house, fully reno’d, new kitchen, bath and laundry, near beach & rec. centre, $1200, (250)328-8072 JAN - MAY 15/13 -3 bdrm Furnished Lake view home, single car garage & extra pkg. N.S/N.P. $1000 utils. See pics @ paradiseonskaha.webs.com 604-941-5010 Save 40-50% of your rent Own your own home! With as low as $0 down. Call today 250-809-5004 Charlie Brooks

Royal LePage Locations West

SUMMERLAND. 2 bdrm + den, centrally located. Ideal for quiet professional couple. NS, NP. $1000. Ref’s. Avail Feb 1. 250-768-4695 Vernon 6bdrm 3bath, fully fenced, garage. Brand new w/d, f/s, d/w. Avail now $1600. incl water & sewage, n/s, n/p. (250)864-2786 Winfield, 3 bdrm, 2 bath house, quiet area, $1295 + util., n/s, n/p, 250-548-3378.

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 25

We’re on the net at www.bcclassified.com

Park your RV beautiful Lacasa on the lake. All hook-ups included $500. 250-491-0823.

Auto Financing

Scrap Car Removal

LACASA Lake Cottage Resort, Elegant & Modern 2bdrm, den, fully furnished, Move in ready, avail Immed Rent: $1150+util. For Sale: $370,000. 1-250-491-0823

1AA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Up to $100 cash for full size vehicles. 250-899-0460 1AA ARMOUR TOWING. Will meet or beat all competi-

tors pricing, (250)-801-4199

Shared Accommodation

Scrap car removal, will pay up to $120.We are licensed & insured, more weight, more money,250-328-8697, Pent.

ROOM for rent, $400, fully furn., avail. immed., mature working person. 250-493-5641 Room for rent in my home, $450-500, includes everything. (250)492-2543

Suites, Lower 1BDRM on Wiltse, utilities incl, n/s, n/p, ref’s req., $650/mo, avail now, 250-492-2908 or 250-490-1025 2+bdrm, 1ba, fenced back yard, f/s/w/d, close to H, school & shopping, ns, np, $900 (incl. util)., Avail. immed., Jody, 250-492-0500

Recreational/Rent

Snowmobiles

Townhouses 2bd,+ den. 1.5ba, clean, painted, laminate, quiet, ns, np, 5appl., $1000, (250)493-7791

Escorts SOOO SEXY SANDY The Original K-Town Girl. 38D, 29, 34. Come Play! 878-1514

Escorts Vernon’s Best! Upscale new loc. Lily 24, Jasmine 28, Jina 47, Paris 22, Ginger 25. For your safety & comfort, in/out calls 250-307-8174. Hiring!

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Zoning Bylaw Textual Amendments — Bed & Breakfast Operations — Amendment Bylaw No. 2594, 2012 Electoral Areas ‘A’, ‘C’, ‘D’, ‘E’ and ‘F’ Zoning Bylaws Date: Time: Location:

Thursday, January 24, 2013 3:00 p.m. RDOS Boardroom 101 Martin Street, Penticton, BC

The bylaw that will be considered at this Public Hearing is: Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen Textual Amendments to Zoning Bylaws, Amendment Bylaw No. 2594, 2012. PURPOSE: The proposed amendments to the definitions and regulations pertaining to bed and breakfast operations are seen to re-establish that such uses are to occur within a private home where guests are provided with overnight accommodation and served breakfast (but not other meals) by the residents of the home and is, importantly, not a type of short-term vacation rental.

1-800-961-7022

Trucks & Vans

COPIES OF THE DRAFT BYLAWS & SUPPORTING INFORMATION AND MATERIALS MAY BE VIEWED AT:

Cars - Domestic

2004 Ford Freestar, 108,000kms, gently driven, $7500obo, (250)495-7608

Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen 101 Martin Street, Penticton, BC on weekdays (excluding statutory holidays) between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

2007 Dodge 1500 4x4, box liner,running boards, new brakes & tires $11,200. 250-542-6156

Anyone who considers themselves affected by the proposed bylaw amendments can present written information or speak at the public hearing. All correspondence for the public hearing to be addressed to: Public Hearing Bylaw No. 2594, 2012, c/o Regional District of OkanaganSimilkameen. No letter, report or representation from the public will be received after the conclusion of the public hearing. This public hearing has been delegated to a Director of the Regional District.

www.iDreamAuto.com DL# 7557

1bdrm, private entrance, across from PCC, avail. now, $630+util., (250)494-8741

Adult

2 Skidoo’s, 700 (200) & 800 (2004), fully-loaded, low kms, $7500 (pair), 250-494-4409

DreamTeam Auto Financing “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

Suites, Upper

Adult

I BUY USED CARS & TRUCKS CALL 250-488-5609 LOOKING FOR A DEAL ON A NEW VEHICLE? Save up to 40% OFF your next new vehicle... No games or gimmicks, deal direct with local dealerships. www.newcarselloff.com No qr code reader? Text info: 778.786.8271

Adult Escorts BEACH BUNNIES Be Spoiled At Kelowna’s Only 5 Star Men’s Spa #32-2789 Hwy 97 Blue Heights www.beachbunnies.ca 250-448-8854 Erocitc Swedish Massage by beautiful woman. 778-3631074. MALE 4 Male Erotic Massage $95, waxing, intimate grooming & skin care. Winfield, 9-9 Daily 250-766-2048

Please note that all correspondence submitted to the Regional District in response to this Notice will form part of a public record and will be published in a meeting agenda when this matter is before the Regional Board or a Committee of the Board. The Regional District considers the author's address relevant to the Board's consideration of this matter and may discuss this personal information. The author's phone number and email address is not relevant and should not be included in the correspondence if the author does not wish this personal information disclosed.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT DEVELOPMENT SERVICES: Telephone: 250-490-4107 Email: planning@rdos.bc.ca

Donna Butler, MCIP Manager of Development Services

NEWLYWEDS AND NEWLY ENGAGED

The Penticton Western News will be publishing

“New Beginnings” - a Wedding Planning supplement on February 13th. We want your Wedding or Engagement photos to be included in this special feature. Readers can submit a photo of the happy couple along with information on where and when the ceremony took place or will take place, the couple’s hometown, as well as any other pertinent details. The Western News will run the announcement free of charge. Limited to space available. Announcements should be sent to the Penticton Western News by February 4th, 5pm. Penticton Western News, Att. Editor, 2250 Camrose Street, Penticton, B.C. V2A 8R1 or by e-mail to <editor@pentictonwesternnews.com>.

Fax: 250-492-0063 Web: www.rdos.bc.ca

Bill Newell Chief Administrative Officer


26 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

Penticton South Okanagan Okanagan -- Similkameen SimilkameenRCMP/GRC RCMP/GRC Penticton - South Penticton Property CrimeMap Map (SelectedOffences) Offences) Property Crime (Selected Penticton - South Okanagan - Similkameen RCMP/GRC Penticton - South Okanagan Similkameen RCMP/GRC December 2012 December 2012 Penticton Property Crime Map (Selected Offences) RD

ER B E ER ER B E NCB E HN RC DH B NC RD E N H RD

Penticton Property Crime Map (Selected Offences) December 2012 December++ 2012 CH

E RDE RD SIDLSID HILLHIL

CRES

RD

EN

RD

GLE

N

O RDLD

DE

OL

DEO NLDE RD N

NS

OU

DG

ED

R

NS

W

GO RDGO C ONR IJPU ER GDPOLON ED ACE N IDPRE R DRCD RD P JU NIRPD OLN AERD RD PL GOERR DR AR RD R J CE PLIPE BA DON PENROSEUN DA R DRTBOA PL PL PENROSE PA R NRC RD EVERRGR TO RT PAPL R PENROSE B N ARTTCR EVEEREGNR D RI RT ONT EERN DGPAR EVER CRT GRED R PENROSE PL BAERRIDDTRR G E N DR TOIENDD PA GCRE EVERGR RT RT DR EE N RI DR

E RD

MCK EMNCZIE MCK SKAH KE N STE NZ SAKA LSAKAHMCKE N ZIE STIE ST LAK ZIE SKAH HKAELRAAD A LA KE RDE RD ST K

NS

TH

DR NS

DR

DAR TDA AR W M ORUTD W TMHO UTM DAR W DT O TM RH DURT H

W

J UN

W W

W

C NCWO ORN CO RNARLNLW WAL WA AL L LL L

OL

KE

KE

KE

DEBECK RD DEBECK RD DEBECK

RD DEBECK RD KE

D

ADAM S

GLE GLE ADAM ASDACM RESS GL ECRES ADAM S CRE S

MIDDLE BENCH RD

MIDDLE BENCH RD RDBENCH RD MIDDLE BENCH MIDDLE

ER

F FRO FRROONT NFTRO NT ST STNT ST ST

ARGYL ARGYLE E ST ARGYL ST ARGY LE ST E ST

TIMMIN TIMMINS TIM S ST MINS STST TIMMI NS ST

RD RD

RD

R

RD

S MAIN ST

S MAIN ST SSMAI NNSTST MAI

W

FA FA IR FA FAIRV FA VI VIR FAI IRV IR IEIR IEVW RRV IE EW WVFA FA RD IR IE D IE W IE WVRIE W DWRR R DD RD W R D

HD

VI E W VALLEY RDD R V I EEW W VALLEY RD VALLEYV I V I E W VALLEY

E

% % %%

RD

RCMP responded the followingproperty propertycrime crimereports reportswithin within the the city of Penticton RCMP responded toto the following Pentictonin inDecember December2012: 2012: RCMP responded to the following property crime reports within the9 city of Penticton commercial B&Es in December 2012:

commercial B&Es vehicle thefts – On December6th, 6th,RCMP RCMPreceived receivedaacomplaint complaint 13 13 vehicle thefts – On December RCMP responded to the following property crime reports within99the city of Penticton in December 2012: commercial B&Es from a patron Center, who reported that their 13 vehicle theftsof– the On Community December 6th, RCMP received a complaint

from a patron of the Community Center, who reported that their 20 residential B&Es 9 residential commercial B&Es–– RCMP vehicle keys had been stolenfrom from their changeroom locker and 13 vehicle thefts –been On December 6th, RCMP received complaint from akeys patron of the Community Center, who reportedalocker that their 20 B&Es RCMPresponded respondedtotoa ahigher-than-average higher-than-average vehicle had stolen their changeroom and number of B&Es On 20th, RCMP residential B&Es – RCMP responded aDecember higher-than-average were then used to steal their vehicle from theparking parkinglocker lot. RCMP vehicle keys had been stolen from their changeroom and from athen patron of Community Center, who reported that their 20 number of residential residential B&Esthis thismonth. month.to On December 20th, RCMP were used tothe steal their vehicle from the lot. RCMP arrested a 38-year-old male resident of Penticton ininpossession number of residential B&Es this month. On December 20th, RCMPof of later arrested a 25-year-old female suspect and recovered the were then used to steal their vehicle from the parking lot. RCMP 20 residential B&Es – RCMP responded to a higher-than-average arrested a 38-year-old male resident of Penticton possession vehicle keys had been stolen female from their changeroom locker the and later arrested a 25-year-old suspect and recovered property stolen from one of these B&Es. The suspect, a known arrested a 38-year-old male resident of Penticton in possession of RCMP vehicle undamaged. The female is currently out in the community later arrested a 25-year-old female suspect and recovered the number stolen of residential B&Es property from one of this thesemonth. B&Es. On TheDecember suspect, 20th, a known were then used to steal vehicle from the lot. RCMP vehicle undamaged. The their female is currently out parking in the community prolific property offender, isiscurrently ininof custody facing stolen from one male of these B&Es. The suspect, a possession knownof of of awaiting court, and facing theft over $5000 and and vehicle undamaged. The female ischarges currently out inover the community arrested a 38-year-old resident Penticton incharges prolific property offender, currently custody facing charges later arrested a and 25-year-old female suspect and recovered the property awaiting court, is isfacing charges ofoftheft $5000 B&E and possession of property. prolific property offender, is currently in custody facing chargesaofknown possession of stolen property. awaiting court, and is facing is charges of theft and B&E and possession of stolen stolen property. from one of these B&Es. The suspect, property stolen possession of stolen property. vehicle undamaged. The female currently out inover the $5000 community B&E and possession of stolen is property. possession of stolen property. prolific property offender, currently in custody facing charges of and is facing charges of theft over $5000 and awaiting court, robberies – Early on December 6th RCMP responded to a report 32 thefts from vehicles – On December 14th, RCMP responded to a 33B&E robberies – Early on of December 6th RCMP responded to a report 32 thefts from vehicles – On December 14th, RCMP responded to a and possession stolen property. possession of stolen property. an armed robbery Subway restaurant Martin St. The store 3of – Early on at December RCMP on responded a report report a male breaking vehicles14th, on Wade Ave. When one of 32 theftsoffrom Oninto December RCMP responded to a ofrobberies an armed robbery at Subway6th restaurant on MartintoSt. The store report of a male vehicles breaking– into vehicles on Wade Ave. When one of a female wearing on a Halloween mask had ofemployee an armedreported robbery that at Subway restaurant Martin St. The store the vehicle owners confronted him, heon allegedly threw a wrench report of a male breaking into vehicles Wade Ave. When one ofat employee reported that aDecember female wearing a Halloween mask thethefts vehicle owners confronted him, he allegedly threw a wrenchtoata 3 robberies – Early on 6th RCMP responded to a had report 32 from vehicles – On December 14th, RCMP responded entered the store, that displayed a large knifea and demanded money employee reported a female wearing Halloween mask had her.vehicle Members attended and him, located a 22-year-old hiding the owners confronted he allegedly threw male a wrench at entered the store, displayed a large knife and demanded money her. Members attended and located a 22-year-old male hiding of an armed robbery at Subway restaurant on Martin St. The report of a male breaking vehicles on22-year-old Wade When one of from the cash drawer. She departed on foot the cash. Later store entered the store, displayed a large knife andwith demanded money nearby. The male, who into is known to police as aAve. prolific offender, her. Members attended and located a male hiding from the RCMP cash drawer. Sheato departed on foot with the cash. Later nearby. Theowners male, is known tohe police a threw prolific offender, employee that female wearing a Halloween mask the vehicle confronted him, allegedly a offender, wrench at from that day responded a report of a with disturbance, where a had the cashreported drawer. She departed on foot the cash. Later was arrested andwho is currently being held inas custody facing several nearby. The male, who is known to police as a prolific that day RCMP responded to aain report of a disturbance, where a was arrested and isiscurrently being held custody facing several large and the demanded money entered the store, displayed her. Members attended andunder located a in 22-year-old male hiding 46-year-old woman was arrested connection with robbery that day RCMP responded to a report of knife a disturbance, where aat charges including theft of break-in was arrested and currently being$5000, held inpossession custody facing several 46-year-old woman wasarrested arrested connection with robbery at charges including theft under possession of break-in break-in from thewoman cash drawer. She departed on foot with the cash. Subway. to police as a prolific offender, nearby. The male, who is known 46-year-old was inin connection with thethe robbery at Later instruments, assault and breach of probation. charges including theft under $5000, $5000, possession of Subway. instruments, assault and of probation. that day please RCMP responded to a report of a disturbance, where a Subway. was and is currently being held in custody facing several instruments, assault andbreach breach ofabout probation. Ifarrested you have any information these incidents or any other crime contact Penticton If Ifyou about these incidents or any other crimeplease please contact Penticton woman was arrested in connection with the robbery at charges including theft under $5000, possession of break-in youhave haveany anyinformation information about these incidents or any other crime contact Penticton RCMP at 250-492-4300 or Crime Stoppers at46-year-old 1-800-222-8477. instruments, assault and breach of probation. or Crime Stoppers atSubway. RCMP at 250-492-4300 1-800-222-8477.

RCMP at 250-492-4300 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

If you have any information about these incidents or any other crime please contact Penticton RCMP isatthe250-492-4300 or Crime at 1-800-222-8477. DISCLAIMER: This document property of the Penticton South Stoppers Okanagan Similkameen RCMP. Statistics are based on police reports derived directly from

DISCLAIMER: This document isisthe of South Okanagan Similkameen RCMP. Statistics based police reports derived directly from PRIME-BC and should be considered preliminary, as they do not Similkameen represent official statistics submitted to on theon Canadian Centre for directly DISCLAIMER: This document theproperty property of the the Penticton Penticton Okanagan RCMP. Statistics areare based police reports derived from and should be preliminary, they do doare notbased represent officialoccurrences statisticssubmitted submitted Canadian Centre for were Justice PRIME-BC Statistics as per UCR II scoring guidelines. Maps andas statistics on founded only, and do not reflect Centre incidents PRIME-BC and should beconsidered considered preliminary, they not represent official statistics toto thethe Canadian forwhich Justice Statistics asasupon per IIIIattendance, scoring guidelines. Maps statistics are based basedSimilkameen onfounded founded occurrences only, and do not incidents which were determined, police to be unsubstantiated. Maps and statistics reflect only the most offence onwhich each file. Justice Statistics perUCR UCR scoring guidelines. Maps andor statistics are on occurrences only, and do notserious reflect incidents were DISCLAIMER: This document is the property of theunfounded Penticton South Okanagan RCMP. Statistics are based onreflect police reports derived directly from Maps may not displayorall crimes for the given time period. determined,upon uponpolice policeattendance, attendance, tobe be unfounded and reflect only thethe most offence on on each file.file. determined, to unfounded unsubstantiated. Maps andstatistics statistics reflect only most serious offence each PRIME-BC and should be considered preliminary,unsubstantiated. asreported they doproperty not Maps represent official statistics submitted toserious the Canadian Centre for Mapsmay may not not display display all reported for Maps reported property propertycrimes forthe thegiven giventime timeperiod. period. are basedcrimes on founded occurrences only, and do not reflect incidents which were Justice Statistics as per UCR II scoring guidelines. Maps and statistics determined, upon police attendance, to be unfounded or unsubstantiated. Maps and statistics reflect only the most serious offence on each file. Maps may not display all reported property crimes for the given time period.

Whatever your recreational vehicle of choice... We’ve got the insurance to keep you covered!

rvbasics.com

N

E

E IK E IK S AL

COR

IK

S AL

R

R

NEL PKWY

IK

S AL E

S AL DR

HICKORY RD HICKOR Y RD C CRREEHI S CCK OR HI YCK ILL RYDRD RD E H AV AVE S CEE N TH TON TO RD ILLOR RKE E AV LEYO N N T E RK AV LEE YO CRE S CCERE ILL R AVEE D NT S CHE E AV ELM LEE AVELM N T HILL RD E AVE LE SSBE CE E BEAACH RUUC ELM AVE SSE B CH D SU SSPPR SUDB ELM AV BEEAAC DBUR Y AVE DRR UR E CHH D S BYEAV DRR P RUC ACEH E S S S B E DR SUDBUR BEA UC SCHB AVE ACH DR SP R SUDBYUR EDARC Y AV

AVE TON AV YORKTO E YORK N

VIEW ST RK ST AW ST P IEW KKVVIE W ST PPAARR ARKVIE P

SKAHSKAH A LAKE A LAKE ROADROAD STRD STRD SKAHA SKAH LAKEAROAD LAKE ROAD STRD STRD CHANCHAN NEL PKWY NEL PKW CHAN CHAN Y NEL NEL PKWY PKWY CHAN CHANNEL NELY PKWY PKW CHANCHANNEL PKWY

ST

N

DR

DR

R

T UT S

PE P P E E N TIC TN TIC T N TPIC ON O E NTO TN ICTN ON RD R RD D RD

DR ND

OAK OAK VILLE VILL OAKVIL E STST OALE ST RAILW KVILLE ST PAPA RR RAILW RAILW AYAY PAR STST ST RAAY PAR ILW AY ST

W BEB NECN HC H HIH BE W LLIL N C BE HW YY97 DLRD HW NC HH 97 ILHL R HW HWYY97 HWY 97 DHRILL 97 HWY 97 DR KK IN HW YIN G97 FIFYSI 97 G HW H S KIN R R HEERR GK D F IS R D NH R GEFRI R SD H R WYL IEIESTST DED RER DR WYL ED D WYLIE ST D RR WYLIE ST E D D R ED R W

L

L

L

ST

L

S LE

N

N

R

Y PL

P N P NP P NN

ST ON STSST T N NOIL OSW S WSIL WIL SON WIL

D TR OR D RDRD AI R P R T PROPROTR T O IR R AI R P A AI

Streets Streets Parks Parks Streets Parks Lakes Lakes Parks Lakes Lakes

N NN N

ERSA T ST T UT U ERAERA AUT ST ER

PP Vehicle Theft Vehicle Theft Vehicle Theft PP Vehicle Theft Streets

K ST LOC HEM ST LOC HEM K KST LOC HEM HEMLOCK ST IS ST PAR PAR STSTIS ST IS IS PAR PAR ST EMA COL N STN EMA COL N ST EMA COL COLEMAN ST

+ Theft from Vehicle

Theft from Vehicle ++ Theft fromVehicle Vehicle Theft from

N N NN ( ( ((

N NNN N N N N( N NN ( ( (

+ ++ +

R Y P LY PL P LD AYIG RR CD DR AIG IG DR CR CRA AIG CR

SS S I NI N KS K SS KBBIANA KI N BAS

(

B&E - Business ( B&E - Business B&E - Business N( B&E - Residence N B&E - Residence N%N B&E - Residence B&E - Residence Robbery % Robbery %+%Robbery Robbery

ST ST RTAW C WRGASW W ST RM CAG MCGM MCGRA

+ + + + N

COLUMBIA

+ + + N+ N N

BAS

Legend Legend Legend (Legend B&E - Business

+ + ++ + ++ +

+ ++ +

+ ++ +

N+ N+ N+ N+

COLUMBIA ST COLUMBIA ST ST COLUMBIA

S RD CEDS RDSS RD E K AC ES ASCC PARCESCSRCKR PA K ACK A PAR PAR

+

P P P

ES

( (

+ + + +

ES

+ + + +( (

( (P (P (P P

ES

G SUN O D R G UN

ES

D O R GO D R SUNG SUN D O R

AR ST TY D DR N CH S AT T LE ST BNEYDSDR DR S AR ST ND ST TT LE S ALLISON AST CH ST LE AR TY BE AR CH TY AT CH AT BE ALLISON ST BE ALLISON ST ST ALLISON ST

N N

(( NN + N+ ( N +N + + + +N +N ( ++N + N %%(( + ++N + N NN + % (N ++ %( %%N N + % + %+ + + P + NN P PP+ ++ + + P P+ N N ++ N + PP P+ N N PP + P+ P N P + P+P ++ P+P P N + + P + NN N N N N + N ++

ST ST INST MANINST NSTST R R MA IN TI STMAARITNI SITN ST ST ARD IA D DR R N MA MAT ATID TOR EG R I M PMEAGSRTT OR IA MA I G NIP VPITCEOTGRIS VIC CTOR CI NNPE IN VI WNINI W WINVNI WI

VEDETTE DRE DR VEDETT E DR ETT VEDN DR E DR VETERA VEDETT VETERAN DR

VETERAN NDR VETERA DR

N N

T ST CK S ST CKST WI K ICIK UNS T WSICST SW S R T E S B S N SW N T NN RU ES SESSRUAY B H N E YN BBRU HAY ST AYAN T T HH S S SB Y ST BYSTRIG GSBY T OU ST SBSY IG RI SATRSIB OU RIRG UOU BIOB C CARIB AIR CACR

DR NEWTON

S

+ + P N + P+N + + + P P P +P N + N + P +N P + P + N + P P P N P+ +N + P P + P + ST POWER ST ST POWER ERST POWWER PO

DR NEWTON

+ +

RD NCH DARTMOUTH RD S UPPE R BE SON ST RD HUD RD T UTH RD NCH S TMO H DAR S D NCHUD S UPPE R BE SON DARTMOUTH RD RNE H R ST C S UPPE R BE B N HUDSON ST LSTST DARTMOUTH RD BAS ST S UPPE R E HUL HUDSON ST NE BAR BARNES S ST NE HULL ST I DR ST L M BAR HUL CRES CAR R ST ST HULL DR MI D ES CRES R CAR CARMI CRES AM T MI D CRESJ ES SKS PL S ST ST CAR T ALDER ST JABMROO PJALME IN SG S NMPEL T T KS IJNKASG S S PSLT G S ST ALDER STALDER ST OO O T O E R N ST W Y S S I K B R N G ALDER ST KBIL NN OO TRURO NE TNI MRO R N T A I C E ST ST ST WI B AR Y ISN INEN Y S G SSTT T ROS OSE TRURO TRURO ST ST KIL KILLRKNILEW W CAM CAMR TROSE S RN KIN EY T ST R ST T TRURO LA S KLIAL S GRNST INMGEN FOU ACCAM STG ST KIL KGILST KILIN LAOVERKN TBSATLUR TST UR ST SUMST ST NT IN ST E KINS S LFSOT T MENALFO C T K GSETRNME ERKN AC A IO UR S B ENTBIR H E A T EH SUM SUMAST MAC ST OV TV SKTING KIN E R ST LFO GG G RNM LE SO A T T E A T B S S ST IO GOV ERS SU KING H E A T H H E A T HNT IO E EIR LEIR L R R ST H O O AMRH T ST T ST ST H TEAA T NTA LEIR RI E S ERS O STNTA ON A ST AMH AMH HERST DO AM ITOB T ST T BIDR ST MANOBA SITOBA A ST DS T ST BIR OB ANIT MAN DS BIR IT FARRELL M BIR L ST ST MAN FARRELL FARRELRRELL ST FA CAMBIE ST N ST ST CAMBIE NSSSOTON ST T CAMBIE ST ST BIE ST ST TKIN S ST E YCAM T ST AU T IANSTOKIN TINSON TOWNLLE Y S WN L E Y AU ATK A CAR STINAEU S T ST TKT YP TO ST NE N TON AU TOWNOR N L EPPAIN E PID UCET CR APSI TOW NSET BR TONPST A E RCURCE E CRT NOR C T RA ST ATPIDI NORTON ST BRU B DTS NORTON BSTID BPRSA RUDCR BRA ORENE REAIS ST RBN T RBD D R FO ABBOTT ST H N ORRD T D R ES O IRD FD ABBOTT ST R N H A N T T F C A PLL F S ABBOTT ST ABBOTT STVN OSRSD FOARIR EBS OTR HO VIA SN BETEFC T SHS FAIR Q LTOYY P PL UFCUAEIR SO CTTRPR E ST ST Q BE ST VA EY ELLS S EVLALNI BO IS VAN HORN R QUE STHORNE RNE ST ELLI VA PLOY MTPL EN QUTERATHA ELL VAN HORN PLM M PL CH VAN HO M HA CHAT CHATHA CHATHA

DR HERON N DR HERO R RON DDR HE HERON

D HWY 97 S T R RD HWY 97 S T Y 97 SSTTRRDON D DR HW HWY 97SPART SPARTON DR

DR SPARTON SPARTON DR

DR ONDR WT ON WT NENE

Y WA AY INANA W A RA RI MM WW E E L OL O HILLSIDE RD AVAV R VEVER OU NCNC OU VAVA Y PL A IE HILLSIDE RD MB W CACAMBIE PL INA R R MA W RE DDR AY LO SHOORE AVE NA W AVE RINCOUVER LAKKEE SH STER AVE E WESTMINSTER W M AVA W LA O WE WESTMIN R AVECAMBLIE PL VE OU VANC EE V R A D L V E ANDREW PL RE N AV URCHIILLL A TOTO CAMBIE PL CH SHO INGSTER N AVE ANDREW PL BARR CHU RCH G AVE EKE LA RRIN TMIN E WESBA WAV VE E DR O N RD JOHNS LEESS A E SHOR RD JOHNSON AVE AEK HEEAALW ES AVE STER L DYNES TMIN WES E AVE V H VEA DYN CI ACAPL CHIALLVE N AVE ANDREW ACAA CIA PI CHUR TEERR A RRINGTO AVE BA S DE P E C WA E N E V T KIEC I S I LL AVES A MIINCH WADE AVE E PL S N T O HNS E REW K O AND AV R I S J N L D RIE RRINGTO MUR E SCH ERS BURN BA HEA NRGI E T WW AB AV DYNES AVE IVER BURN AEVE R NS G AC E WW ABYY AV OANCRIAD AVVEER IV EASV R JOHNS PI T S C RD E ES AVE CH H AEAEL VERNON DYN CK E WADE AVE NST T REC RD BIIRRMCIH AVVEE I N A V EE VSER VE E A CA C I A E T ERKE A B D ON S A SEIKD E RD PI AVERINE ER ER BURN A V WAADE WE T AVE S DE V T C W WA W V ABY AV S I D E RD E I I CRES IN R VE W W TON AV E ARD KET A G S S R CRESTO ST M HA T PL CKH ARD RIN ER BU CR D N AVEEE W WE KBST VE IRC N RN VE VE WRN E E ECKH AB ON PL IV EC G Y KH REE AVADT E AD A E AR K ST AVE E V AV N W ECKH E RDKSKI DR RD AHDAR D AV E W AVE ST CH AR C E R R D C R DT T O E R VERNON W A I CRES RE R O O CEHAV B E NAVE KD A VTO ARD VE B O R E H T AVE D L O O AVE E A P CK N A RD RES KBSRI K ST N W ECKH E E RMY AVE WW DT AV FO REST D ER CR ESTON ARAV DTE AVE JE AR YN ARD FO KD PL CH CKHJERM K ST VE OO N ORWOOD W ECKH EE VE D A RUFF VETON A ESETBR DR ARDT AV R A A N N E E CH WOODRUFFAVE ORAV VEOOK MDYMO NTOFN AV ORSC CR AVE AR JERE VM EO OTT AV ALL VE ON STB AVE SOEN CR E NEAD ND SCOWTT NA ICT AVE ALL NEFLOR MY OOD AVEON AVRU NT ICTO LAWRENCE E FF AV JER NDALE AVE ENTONNELS AVE PE V E T E O A ED V N LAWRENCE RIDGL C R SOENDM AVE AVE N AVE WO PE ONAAL AVE SC ALE AVE OOD ED TT RU NEL DALRIDG AVFF E T IP E NVNETON LSO AN AVE A E AVE O V C NC C N E S C I A LEL A AV DU E O I L E E DENDM E N EN EE NUTN N AVIPAL LAWRENC AV A VE R V C E AN E A M A L AV NC C E P CONSC L E LEL A EDAL IC E DU NAAV LSON KLO DDG TO DN INTT AVE EO UN AVE A DR E NRI ICM S E CONKL AVE RENCE AVE L REGINA AV NAISHE NEL NT VEN IN AVE IPA AVEAV ISH DR LAW PE CLE E E AN DUNC NAAVAE NIC LA REGINA AV NA RIDGEEDAL SEODN MU AVE CONKLDOUG AVE EDR NEL AL E AV E E CALGARY IN AVELAS AV V P V AN A I AV A CLE AVE ENC NAISH A DU E EAV REGINAGAR NIC ROSS LA DOUGL EDN Y AVE E M ACCLE MU CAL AS AVE CONKL AVE ANT PL HASTIN S AV INWAV EAVEISDHUN DR GS AV REGINA AVE AVE ROS DOEUGLA M ACCL AVNA E E CALGARY NT PL D HAST S E E S AV AVE DUNA E S AVE L W U N INGAV C ROS M AC T PL DOUG CST D HA H A AVGS E CALGARY AVE AVE DUNAN CLARK AVE W U NLASNIN A VEE AVE S AV CARMI AVE EAVE ROS D CAN H AY M ACCL T PL CLARK AVE HAUST GRANBY PL CARMI AVE NC INGSA AV VE AL W DUNI AN Y WWATER MERC H COM A A E AVE LO CLARK ONAV DU W A VEE GRANBY PL CARMI AVE WAT AIYAL NER COMMERC PHOENIX AVE PL NBY CALO W E H GRA IND O L UST AVE AV WATER N A V E E COMMERC I A YCLARK CARMI AVE RIAL AVE AVE LOO AV HUTH AVE A E INDUSTRIA E PHOENIXGRANBY PL L AVE LW NIX AVE PHOEHUT H AVE E WATER E INDUSTRIA COMMERC I A NAGA N AVE LOO AV L AVE H AVE AV OK A E HUTAVE E L A PHOENIX E NAGA N AVE E INDUSTRIA A V TR I W I N D USAVE IEW D K L AVE AE OAGA N AVE EA N HUTH WESTV I A LAV E OKAVE WD WI STRI A L RRY ESDTVIE W I NNDDUUSTR V E IE WW CHE K A NAGAVNE AVE TV ES A W E O RAR E AE VY ARMSTRON G D R I AL HYEEN AV CR W I N D USTR IEW D ER HW TV ARR C ES E E DR W STRON G D R AVE AE E AV E STARM RON G DVD R VN ARM RRYREANRR TS CHE AERW BL IL DR E AI N RD EW W DSSRTRSON AVE AVE ERE T ELTSG VDDR LVD ARM NT VE E Y N S U E A O V R L R T O I WI BL E B AAR LL IL CDW N W R G R E EN M N RD AI N ARD A I E E O E S T S T AEVVE ETS D LTS UG LW SEES VEAVWE UN N E E YYANV DO RROO E P LET R WCIRL BLVWI AV AV MO O U E A L A LDA GREG MC TS EIV C ALGAL EN ARR R E E N M TAI N RD ON ON IL PSLTW EPSL LTSE W Y AVE VAEVE UG N OU VE WS WS E DO RO RR OU E VESCER VEWI CDALL A DA DANLAV CM EN ENA S M R R G R E EN M T ET A STOP IL PSLTILL STE WWA UG VE ES AW DO D E PE E EN A CR MC TS MEV ARR PALV L SE ILLSA T W E ST T P BA MS PL BPALL RE RESVE E Y AV E C N SAM E C E L SS SETSTP A AV KIN SA SAM AV I ELW S ESCTO RR AVEVE P I NEVBA BR PALDL BAL S BA RERE V E NEY M EY A ESCEC ECR A M LAV A KKIN S AE M VE SE SWA R INN VE V E S T I L A A C S EV O A RCRO P I N B NEVIDEWBRAL RY A ALT RE G E R D R C P I D R N S E T KIN A M AVE D EW SE I T AV E CO R R RD IR P IONDEV GAL ALT AV R D RR O T D W G R D E N T IR T AV E E O OD R D D GAL IR G R NWN DR AVE EO T DVO E DAW PHIN E EE E N IR V DAU G RE GR OENEOA VE E W IN A VE R E H R P G N D DAU PHIEN A EN AV E E EGR RAY G RE RE R AVE AU AV MUR DN ENGAV E PDHIN NYDO R AVE RE E AA DAU D BRR MU Y EG DRON AVE RAA N R D U R Y M RBA ONE ND MUR BRAO N AV E ND N AV BRA REE W G EEN AVE R WG AVE E N PL V E A TT ARNO REEGNRE GW TT PL ARWNO TT PL NOPL ARTT ARNO

Cherry Lane 250.493.0631 Peachtree Square 250.492.4208 valleyfirst.com

INSURANCE SERVICES

DR

life

Raptors warm to Okanagan winters Last month I wrote about the snowy owl “invasion” occurring in the South Okanagan — an extremely rare event. There is another “invasion” taking place this winter that is not at all rare — it occurs like clockwork every winter, and that is the arrival of numerous raptors (birds of prey) in the South Okanagan. Actually, invasion isn’t a really good description as it implies that all of the birds have come from somewhere else and that is only partially true. Nevertheless, winter is a great time to get out and see raptors in our part of the valley. Partly it appears to be an “invasion” because with many bare trees, the Robert Handfield perched birds are much easier to spot. Nature Wise Bald eagles are particularly abundant in the winter here with at perhaps four to five times the summertime number. Red-tailed hawks are relatively abundant all year round but as I say they appear more common in the winter. On the Penticton Christmas bird count of Dec. 16, a total of 11 different species of birds of prey were seen, with red-tailed hawk and bald eagle tied for most abundant followed by sharp-shinned, Cooper’s and Kestrel. Not so abundant, but perhaps more interesting, is the Rough-legged hawk which is never seen in our part of the valley in the summer. It is similar in size and appearance to the red-tailed hawk; consult a field guide to see the differences. The influx of bald eagles generally is a result of the birds moving down from the north or from higher elevations where the colder winters freeze the lakes and rivers, making food gathering just that much more difficult. I would speculate that if the effort underway to re-establish sockeye salmon in Skaha Lake is successful (and so far it appears to be), bald eagles might become even more abundant in the fall and winter as there will be an abundant supply of food for them. Rough-legged hawks breed across northern Alaska and northernmost Canada and move south to winter across southernmost Canada and the continental U.S. In the South Okanagan in winter you will see about 10 red-tailed hawks for every rough-legged hawk that you see. Probably the best place to see rough-legged hawks in our area is the open grasslands of the White Lake area although I did see one on the Penticton Golf course on Dec. 31. Actually the White Lake grasslands are good for many other raptors as well. Other great places for raptor watching in the winter are along the Okanagan River Channel from Skaha Lake north to about Green Mountain Road and the KVR Trail in the Kaleden area and south to Okanagan Falls. Backyard bird-feeders can also be a good spot for seeing the smaller hawks such as sharp-shinned, Cooper’s and Merlin since they find the song-birds lined up at the feeders relatively easy pickings. So make use of this time of year to get out and see some raptors. The SONC birding group resumed their Thursday outings on Jan. 10. See www.southokanagannature.com for details. Just as I was about to send this in, I received a phone call about another snowy owl in Penticton, and on Jan. 6 I finally saw my “lifer’ snowy! The next monthly meeting of the South Okanagan Naturalists’ Club will take place on Jan. 24. Eva Antonijevic, community programs director for the Friends of Summerland Ornamental Gardens, will give a historical overview of the gardens, followed by a presentation on the Pilot Water Conservation Project that was launched in July 2012. In a departure from our normal routine, the meeting will begin at 7 p.m. in the basement hall of the Penticton United Church on Main Street. Everyone is welcome. Bob Handfield is vice-president of the South Okanagan Naturalists’ Club but the views expressed here are his own and not necessarily those of the club.


as low as

It didn’t take long for the Penticton RCMP Drug Task Force to make its first busts of the new year. On Jan. 4, police arrested two people in a parking lot on Main Street and seized meth-

$

122 0 $ 18,999 ††

@

ampetamine, marijuana, morphine and drug trafficking paraphernalia, according to a press release. Darcy Peter Colin, 38, is charged with two counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking, plus a breach of probation. He remains in custody.

Your first

apr

0 72 %

for up to

purchase financing

2013 FOCUS

SE SEDAN

5.5L/100km 51MPG HWY*** 7.8L/100km 36MPG CITY *** 6.0L/100km 47MPG HWY*** 9.1L/100km 31MPG CITY *** 10.6L/100km 27MPG HWY*** 15.0L/100km 19MPG CITY ***

Bi-Weekly purchase financing

Bi-Weekly purchase financing

Bi-Weekly purchase financing

%

APR

Recycle Your Ride and get up to

$

For 72 months with $0 down.

or cash purchase for only

*

Offers include $500 manufacturer rebate and $1,650 freight and air tax.

$

towards most new models. Super Duty amount shown.

3 000

,

plus

Or

$

up to

on most 2013 models

188 1.49 $ 27,999 ††

@

Shelby Ann Hicks, 28, is charged with a single count each of possession and possession for the purpose of trafficking. She was granted bail. Then on Jan. 7, the task force picked up two people in a vehicle on the 1800 block of Quebec Street and took a “substantial quantity” of

payments are on us. p

3 bi-weekly ◆

on most new 2013 models

on most new 2013 models. F-150 Super Cab or Super Crew with 5.0L engine amount shown.

in manufacturer rebates

7 500 ‡

,

BEST NEW SUV/CUV (UNDER $35,000) ** PAY PAYLOAD TOWING** TO POWER‡‡ PO

2013 ESCAPE

SE FWD 1.6L ECOBOOST®

2013 F-150

SUPER CAB XLT 4X4

APR

%

$

For 72 months with $0 down.

or cash purchase for only

*

Offers include $1,650 freight and air tax.

234 4.99% $ 31,499 ††

For 72 months with $0 down.

@

Eligible Costco members receive an additional

$ APR

or cash purchase for only

*

Offers include $7,500 manufacturer rebate and $1,700 freight and air tax.

plus

1000

on most new 2013 models

,

ends January 31st

Get a vehicle you’ll be happy with today. Only at your BC Ford Store.

bcford.ca

WISE BUYERS READ THE LEGAL COPY: Vehicle(s) may be shown with optional equipment. Dealer may sell or lease for less. Limited time offers. Offers may be cancelled at any time without notice. Dealer order or transfer may be required as inventory may vary by dealer. See your Ford Dealer for complete details or call the Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. ◆Offer valid from January 15, 2013 to February 28, 2013 (the “Offer Period”). “First Three Bi-Weekly Payments on Us” (the “Offer”) applies up to a total maximum amount of [$500] / [$750] / [$1,000] / [$1,750] (all three bi-weekly payments in total) (the “Maximum Amount”) per eligible 2013 [Focus (excluding ST and BEV), Fiesta] / [Fusion, Escape, Focus ST, Focus BEV, CMAX] / [Mustang, Taurus, Edge, Explorer, Flex, F-150] / [Expedition] – all Shelby GT500, F-150 Raptor, Transit Connect, F-Series Super Duty, F-650/F-750 Lincoln models excluded (each an “Eligible Vehicle”) to customers who finance or lease an Eligible Vehicle during the Offer Period through Ford Credit or the FALS program on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit Canada. For customers making monthly payments, the first three bi-weekly payment amounts will be calculated by multiplying the monthly payment by 12, dividing the resulting amount by 26, and multiplying the resulting amount by three. In most cases, the customer will be responsible for making all scheduled payments in accordance with his or her purchase or lease agreement but will receive a cheque from the dealer for an amount equivalent to the first three bi-weekly payments, including tax, up to the Maximum Amount. The means by which the Offer will be executed by dealers to customers will vary based on the type of purchase or lease agreement - see dealer for full details. Offer not available to cash purchase customers. This offer can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford at either the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. This offer is not combinable with any CFIP, CPA, GPC, or Daily Rental incentives. †Until February 28, 2013, receive as low as 0% APR purchase financing on new 2013 Ford [Fusion (excluding Hybrid, HEV, PHEV)]/ [Taurus (excluding SE), Edge (excluding SE), Escape (excluding S)]/[Focus (excluding S, ST and BEV), Fiesta (excluding S)], models for a maximum of [48]/ [60]/ [72] months to qualified retail customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest interest rate. Example: $30,000 purchase financed at 0% APR for 48/ 60/ 72 months, monthly payment is $625.00/ $500.00/ $416.67, cost of borrowing is $0 or APR of 0% and total to be repaid is $30,000. Down payment on purchase financing offers may be required based on approved credit from Ford Credit. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. ‡Until February 28, 2013, receive $500/ $1,000/ $2,000/ $2,500/ $3,500/ $5,500/ $6,000/ $6,500/ $7,000/$7,500 in Manufacturer Rebates with the purchase or lease of a new 2013 Focus (excluding S, ST, BEC), Fiesta, F-150 Regular Cab XL 4x2 (Value Leader)/ Focus S, Mustang V6 Coupe, Taurus SE, Edge FWD (excluding SE), E-Series/ Transit Connect (excluding electric), F-350 to F-550 Chassis Cabs / Mustang V6 Premium/ Mustang GT/ F-250 to F-450 gas engine (excluding Chassis Cabs)/ F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2) non 5.0L /F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2) 5.0L/F-150 Super Cab and Super Crew non 5.0L, F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) Diesel engine/ F-150 Super Cab and Super Crew 5.0L – all Raptor, GT500, BOSS302, Transit Connect EV and Medium Truck models excluded. This offer can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford of Canada at either the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. Manufacturer Rebates are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives. *Purchase a new 2013 Focus SE Sedan/2013 Escape SE FWD with 1.6L EcoBoost engine/2013 F-150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 with 5.0L engine for $18,999/$27,999/$31,499. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price after Manufacturer Rebate of $500/$0/$7,500 has been deducted. Offers include freight and air tax of $1,650/$1,650/$1,700 but exclude variable charges of license, fuel fill charge, insurance, dealer PDI (if applicable), registration, PPSA, administration fees and charges, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. All prices are based on Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price. Manufacturer Rebates can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford of Canada at either the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. Manufacturer Rebates are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives. ††Until February 28, 2013, receive 0%/1.49%/4.99% annual percentage rate (APR) purchase financing on a new 2013 Focus SE Sedan/2013 Escape SE FWD with 1.6L EcoBoost engine/2013 F-150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 with 5.0L engine for a maximum of 72 months to qualified retail customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest APR payment. Purchase financing monthly payment is $264/$407/$507 (the sum of twelve (12) monthly payments divided by 26 periods gives payee a bi-weekly payment of $122/$188/$234 with a down payment of $0 or equivalent trade-in. Cost of borrowing is $0/$1,287.57/$5,015.31 or APR of 0%/1.49%/4.99% and total to be repaid is $18,999/$29,286.57/$36,514.31. Offers include a Manufacturer Rebate of $500/$0/$7,500 and freight and air tax of $1,650/$1,650/$1,700 but exclude variable charges of license, fuel fill charge, insurance, dealer PDI (if applicable), registration, PPSA, administration fees and charges, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price after Manufacturer Rebate deducted. Bi-Weekly payments are only available using a customer initiated PC (Internet Banking) or Phone Pay system through the customer’s own bank (if offered by that financial institution). The customer is required to sign a monthly payment contract with a first payment date one month from the contract date and to ensure that the total monthly payment occurs by the payment due date. Bi-weekly payments can be made by making payments equivalent to the sum of 12 monthly payments divided by 26 bi-weekly periods every two weeks commencing on the contract date. Dealer may sell for less. Offers vary by model and not all combinations will apply. ▼Program in effect from January 15, 2013 to April 1, 2013 (the “Program Period”). To qualify, customer must turn in a 2006 model year or older vehicle that is in running condition (able to start and move and without missing parts) and has been properly registered/plated or insured for the last 3 months (the “Criteria”). Eligible customers will receive [$500]/[$1,000]/[$2,500]/[$3,000] towards the purchase or lease of a new 2012 or 2013 Ford [C-Max, Fusion Hybrid, Fusion Energi]/[Fusion (excluding SE), Taurus (excluding SE), Mustang (excluding Value Leader), Escape (excluding XLT I4 Manual), Transit Connect (excluding EV), Edge (excluding SE), Flex (excluding SE), Explorer (excluding base)]/[F-150 (excluding Regular Cab 4x2 XL), Expedition, E-Series]/[F250-550] – all Fiesta, Focus, Raptor, GT500, BOSS 302, Transit Connect EV, Medium Truck, Value Leader and Lincoln models excluded (each an “Eligible Vehicle”). Taxes payable before Rebate amount is deducted. To qualify: (i) customer must, at the time of the Eligible Vehicle sale, provide the Dealer with (a) sufficient proof of Criteria, and (b) signed original ownership transferring customer vehicle to the Authorized Recycler; and (ii) Eligible Vehicle must be purchased, leased, or factory ordered during the Program Period. Offer only available to residents of Canada and payable in Canadian dollars. Offer is transferable only to persons domiciled with the owner of the recycled vehicle. Offer can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford at either the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. Offer not available on any vehicle receiving CPA, GPC, Commercial Connection or Daily Rental Rebates and the Commercial Fleet Rebate Program (CFIP). Customers eligible for CFIP are not eligible for this offer. Limited time offer, see dealer for details or call the Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. ▲Offer only valid from December 1, 2012 to January 31, 2013 (the “Offer Period”) to resident Canadians with a Costco membership on or before November 30, 2012. Use this $1,000CDN Costco member offer towards the purchase or lease of a new 2012/2013 Ford vehicle (excluding Fiesta, Focus, Fusion HEV & Energi, C-Max, Raptor, GT500, Mustang Boss 302, Transit Connect EV & Medium Truck) (each an “Eligible Vehicle”). The Eligible Vehicle must be delivered and/or factory-ordered from your participating Ford/Lincoln dealer within the Offer Period. Offer is only valid at participating dealers, is subject to vehicle availability, and may be cancelled or changed at any time without notice. Only one (1) offer may be applied towards the purchase or lease of one (1) Eligible Vehicle, up to a maximum of two (2) separate Eligible Vehicle sales per Costco Membership Number. Offer is transferable to persons domiciled with an eligible Costco member. This offer can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford Motor Company of Canada at either the time of factory order (if ordered within the Offer Period) or delivery, but not both. Offer is not combinable with any CPA/GPC or Daily Rental incentives, the Commercial Upfit Program or the Commercial Fleet Incentive Program (CFIP). Applicable taxes calculated before $1,000CDN offer is deducted. Dealer may sell or lease for less. Limited time offer, see dealer for details or call the Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. ***Estimated fuel consumption ratings for 2013 Focus 2.0L I4 5-speed manual transmission: [7.8L/100km (36MPG) City, 5.5L/100km (51MPG) Hwy] / 2013 Escape FWD 1.6L GTDI I4 EcoBoost 6-speed automatic transmission: [9.1L/100km (31MPG) City, 6.0L/100km (47MPG) Hwy] / 2013 F-150 4X4 5.0L V8 6-speed automatic transmission: [15.0L/100km (19MPG) City, 10.6L/100km (27MPG) Hwy]. Fuel consumption ratings based on Transport Canada approved test methods. Actual fuel consumption will vary based on road conditions, vehicle loading, vehicle equipment, and driving habits. **When properly equipped. Max. towing of 11,300 lbs with 3.5L EcoBoost 4x2 and 4x4 and 6.2L 2 valve V8 4x2 engines. Max. payload of 3,120 lbs with 5.0L Ti-VCT V8 engine. Class is Full-Size Pickups under 8,500 lbs GVWR vs. 2012/2013 competitors. ‡‡Max. horsepower of 411 and max. torque of 434 on F-150 6.2L V8 engine. Class is Full–Size Pickups under 8,500 lbs GVWR vs. 2012/2013 comparable competitor engines. ©2013 Sirius Canada Inc. “SiriusXM”, the SiriusXM logo, channel names and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc. and are used under licence. ©2013 Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. All rights reserved.

Western News Staff

months

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013 www.pentictonwesternnews.com 27

Penticton police arrest four in pair of drug busts news

ecstasy and magic mushrooms, plus “smaller amounts” of marijuana, Oxycontin and magic mushrooms. Cory Dean Stevenson, 23, and Daniel Robert Sigmund, 19, each face single counts of possession and possession for the purpose of trafficking. Both have been released on bail.

Available in most new Ford vehicles with 6-month pre-paid subscription


owna

rnon

nticton

mloops

28

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

JANUARY

NOW OPEN

KELOWNA

WEST KELOWNA

2153 Springfield Road (250) 860-2600

NOW OPEN

WEST KELOWNA

KELOWNA

NOW OPEN

KELOWNA

2153 Springfield Road

VERNON

ORCHARD PARK MALL

PENTICTON

VERNON

ANDRES WIRELESS

PENTICTON

VERNON

ANDRES WIRELESS

VERNON

ANDRES WIRELESS

Chapters Entrance (250) 860-8100 Springfield Rd Entrance (250) 717-1511

st

KELOWNA

2153 Springfield Road (250) 860-2600

PENTICTON

#200 - 2180 Elk Rd. 1001-2601 Skaha Lake Rd. 200-3107 - 48th Ave. (250) 493-3800 (250) 542-3000 (250) 707-2600

Valid until February 1

2153 Springfield Road (250) 860-2600

clearAnce

#200 - 2180 Elk Rd. (250) 707-2600

WEST KELOWNA #200 - 2180 Elk Rd. (250) 707-2600 NOW OPEN

WEST KELOWNA #200 - 2180 Elk Rd.

1001-2601 Skaha Lake Rd. 200-3107 - 48th Ave. (250) 493-3800 (250) 542-3000

1001-2601 Skaha Lake Rd. 200-3107 - 48th Ave. (250) 493-3800 (250) 542-3000

KAMLOOPS

745 Notre Dame Drive 200-3107 - 48th Ave.

Villiage Green Mall (250) 542-1496

Cherry Lane Mall (250) 493-4566

Aberdeen Mall


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

PENTICTON MINOR HOCKEY ASSOCIATION 2012 - 2013

A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT In celebration of Minor Hockey Week, and on behalf of the minor hockey executive, I would like to congratulate everyone who participates in our great game. This special section, published in conjunction with the Penticton Western News, features photos of all teams involved with our association. We take great pride in providing our youth with a safe and positive environment to enjoy their favourite sport. This season Penticton Minor Hockey turns 59. None of this would have been possible without the support of the community and our sponsors. Please take the time to visit the arena to cheer on our kidsâ&#x20AC;Ś and view some of the rich history that we are so very proud of. See you at the rink! Bruce Judd President, PMHA

B1


B2

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

250-492-4320 1-888-225-6633 Toll Free 414 Ellis Street Penticton, BC V2A 4M2

101-1960 Barnes Street Penticton, BC V2A 4C3

250-493-7366 www.glittle.ca

Member of the FortisBC Contractor Program.

GLE Heating and Air Conditioning is part of The G.Little Group. Serving Penticton and Area for over 25 Years

SOLUTIONS

D.L. #7808

GAME TIME SPORTS ATOM DEVELOPMENT 1 JR. VEES

PENTICTON SPEEDWAY ATOM DEVELOPMENT 2 JR. VEES

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Johnny Aantjes, Owen Labadie, Dylan Milton, Ethan O’Rourke, Jayme Carey, Ethan Giroux, Team Manager Kim Gudmundson. Middle Row (l-r): Head Coach Imre Togyi, Linden Sproule, Owen Haight, Nick Eacott, Stephen Searcy, Ben LeFranc, Assistant Coach Izzy Gudmundson. Front Row (l-r): Sam Togyi, Brennan Nelson, Tanner Johnson, Aiden Gudmundson, Marty Aantjes, Kieran Simpson. (Missing: Rickson Kruger)

Back Row (l-r): Assist. Coaches Rob Semeniuk, Brian Drobe, Christian Moore, Dave Acheson, Head Coach Brad Heintz. 3rd Row (l-r): Carson Drobe, Jordan Moore, Jordan Bartram, Jacob Stewart, Dominic DelisleLavoie, Ethan Konno. 2nd Row (l-r): Assist. Coach Al Cole, Safety Kara Ouellette, DC Cole, Quinn Cote, Lyndsy Acheson, Finn Halladay, Daniel Kilian, Manager Margot Heintz, Assist. Coach Grant Konno. Front Row (l-r): Logan Olsen, Richter Heintz, Rocco Hamilton, Jaykob Anderson, Noah Ouellette, Ryder Semeniuk.

Minor Hockey is great for our Community!

ALADDIN FLOORS 1505 Main Street PENTICTON

CARPET HARDWOOD LAMINATE VINYL TILE 250-492-8221

Insurance Agencies Group

Proud to be a part of the Community

Downtown 267 Martin St., 250-492-0017 • Cherry Lane Shopping Centre, 104A-2111 St., 250-493-8666

KAL TIRE ATOM REC 1 JR. VEES

Johnston Meier ATOM REC 2 JR. VEES

Very Back Row (l-r): Gord Carley, Tony Orioli, Ian Mac Intyre. Back Row (l-r): Nathan Kaminski, Brandon Smythe, Sanamveer Khatra, Douglas Korsmo, Dylan Larose. Middle Row (l-r): Ken Miller, Aaron Carley, Liam Eacott, Armaan Dhaliwal, Daniel Chandler, Colleen Inkster. Front Row (l-r): Andrew Howells, Anthony Alexis, Ethan Russell, Mathew Olsen, Benjamin Miller, Luke MacIntyre, Adrian Orioli.

Back Row (l-r): Reuben Erhardt, Ethan Barillaro, Jackson Jaimeson, Todd Whyte, Xander Whyte, Ayden Chura, Warren Potter. Middle Row (l-r): Nancy Whyte, Elisa Erhardt, Devon Potter, Josh Finer, Braeden Dovauo, Dallas Knoll, Kaiden Skode, Jamie Materi. Front Row (l-r): Matthew Keyes, Taya Kampe, Liam Whyte, Kylie Materi, Ian Heck, Connor Stephens, Trent Ashby.

Local Discounts Available

OKANAGAN HOCKEY SCHOOL ATOM REC 3 JR. VEES

Back Row (l-r): Assist. Coach Craig Newson, Coach Rene Spence, David Robertson, Cohyn Cutler, Alan Woodhouse, Gage Leclair, Assist. Coaches Michael Burghardt and Brooks Lancaster. Middle Row (l-r): Isaac Newson, Kai Espenhain, Samuel Burghardt, Ethan Cluterbuck, Maxwell McWhinney. Front Row (lr): Marlo Spence, Meadow Arcand-Squakin, Dante Bigeagle, Khy Cutler, Grady Lancaster, Devon Beyer.

It’s something we never forget.®

Winner

ST BofEthe

outh S Okanagan

operated by Longs Floorall Ltd.

1397 Fairview Road, Penticton 250-492-0627

2012 2007

201-853 ECKHARDT AVENUE WEST Ph: 250-493-1408 • Toll Free: 1-888-844-6611 www.hockeyschools.com

Floors forliving GREEN.

www.nufloors.ca Carpet l Area Rugs l Hardwood l Laminate l shawfloors.com/HGTV

PROOF

FIX AUTO FEMALE ATOM

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Manager Phil Freeman, Sophie Brydon, Shannon Robinson, Emma Russill, Julia DeVito, Head Coach John Cote. Middle Row (l-r): Manager/Safety Kelly Plato, Meghan Cote, Ryleigh Logan, Addison Freeman, Kenya Standish, Assistant Coach Bill Lund. Front Row (l-r): Hannah Lund, Maya Bassot, Payton Jorge (goal), Erin Reeder, Mina Plato.


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

B3

We support our Minor Hockey. GO VEES GO!

2012

WE RENT Excavators, Mini’s, Skid Steers, Manlifts, Compaction

PROOF

COMPUTER REPAIR

1698 Dartmounth Road, Penticton, BC • Ph: 250-493-4545 • Fax: 250-493-8819 • www.pacificrimequipment.com

SHERWOOD TROPHIES PEEWEE TIER 2 JR. VEES

PACIFIC RIM PEEWEE TIER 3 JR. VEES

Back Row (l-r): Manager Tracy Fehr, Assistant Coach Randy Craig, Naidyn Keogh, Jacob Acheson, Jayden Carey, Easton Olsen, Ben Olsen, Barry Morhart (HCSP). Middle Row (l-r): Thor Morhart, Austin O’Niel, Brendan Craig, Nash Moog, Tyler Pisiak, Bailey Tamminga, Matthew Byrne. Front Row (l-r): Bryn Carter, Assistant Coach Dennis Pisiak, Travis Fehr, Cairo Rogers, Ethan McLaughlin, Liam McLaren, Coach Rob McLaughlin, Matts Bratton.

Back Row (l-r): Frank Hoefler, Ben Hoefler, Freddy Harbinson, Ethan Joe, Daniel Martin, Darius Venables, Cam Davie. Middle Row (l-r): Andrew Carlow, Reid Bateman, Mason Heintz, Aidan Danby, Bevis Chou, Jerry Xiang, Brenden Patton. Front Row (l-r): Kaleb McEachern, Kyle Hamaguchi, Kale NOTICE TO ALL VENDORS Lawrence, Nolan Walton, Chris Danby, Austin Swanson, Logan Cote, Greg Berkholtz, Caleb Rousseau.

Sentes Chevrolet Ltd has been sold effective June 4, 2012. And will be....

www.huberbannister.com 933 Westminster Avenue West 250-493-2333

A Big Thanks to All Our Sponsors and Volunteers for their Support!

OPEN MONDAY - SATURDAY, 8:00AM - 6:00PM HUBER BANNISTER CHEVROLET LTD

GAME ACTION SPORTS PEEWEE REC 1 JR. VEES

PEERLESS/McCOY PEEWEE REC 2 JR. VEES

Send ALL invoices and correspondence to: 933 Westminster Avenue West Penticton BC, V2A 1L1

Phone: 250-493-2333 Fax: 250-492-7850 Email: accounts.payable@huberbannister.com Contacts: General Manager: Ken Huber Controller: Michelle Bush Accounts Payable: Patty Daechsel HST#: 842043689RT0001

933 Westminster Avenue West, Penticton, BC V2A 1L1 phone: 250.493.2333 fax: 250.492.7850

Back Row (l-r): Adam Sanche, Adam Mann, Carson Leitch, Jake Stocker, Coach Mike Leitch. Middle Row (l-r): Coach Shea Sanche, Tyler Danis, AJ Reiter, Kenya Standish, Brant Marshall, Manager Heather Stocker. Front Row (l-r): Goalie Braiden Marshall, Ryan Barth, Kieran Mielke, Jacob Barth, Goalie Joey Pitt. (Missing: Balmeet Tattla)

WE SUPPORT OUR LOCAL MINOR HOCKEY

250-493-0686 533 Main Street PENTICTON

www.freedombikesshop.com

OUR FOCUS is YOUR RIDE

Back Row (l-r): Safety Amar Kahlo, Max Lauder, Daniel McCurdy, Head Coach Marcus Toneatto, Brady MacVicar, Cameron Glibbery, Manager Laura Kuypers. Middle Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Scott MacVicar, Keegan Allen, Mykelty Lezard, Derek Allanson, Udai Kahlon, Adam Heck, Kai Ballance. Front Row (l-r): Shane Borren, Spencer Toneatto, Tate Larson, Riley Hilton, Ryan Gagno.

we have all your gear: every day, all year! 960 Railway Street, Channel Parkway 250-492-3576

PENTICTON FIREFIGHTERS PEEWEE REC 3 JR. VEES

PEEWEE FEMALE

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Tim Thompson, Thomas Waterman, Lynden Humber, Ben Barnett, Korbin Simpson, Jayce Moore, Coach Mat Janzen.Middle Row (l-r): Charlie Wellbelove, George Wellbelove, Logan Anderson-Fraser, Jordan Nemes. Front Row (l-r): Ross Millar, Eric Kwakernwack, Seth Aitchison, Carson Shortreed, Ethan Finlayson.

Back Row (l-r): Manager Kathryn Togyi, Assist. Coach Rick Buchan, Danika Blais, Lochlan Page, Chloe Brydon, Lindsay Fotheringham, Assist. Coach Joce Lagrang. Middle Row (l-r): Maiya Anutooshkin, Stephanie Lagrange, Caprice Buchanm, Sage Togyi. Front Row (l-r): Cedar Carter, Natalie Tremblay, Kaylee Docherty, Morgan Brooks, Sarai Gardner. (Missing: Andy Main, Head Coach Ian Fotheringham, HCSP Barb Main)


B4

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

PROUD SUPPORTER OF PENTICTON MINOR HOCKEY

B5

2250 Camrose Street Phone: 250-492-3636

TIM HORTON’S NOVICE WHITE

TIM HORTON’S NOVICE BLUE

TIM HORTON’S NOVICE BLACK COBRAS

TIM HORTON’S NOVICE ORANGE

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Jared Holmes, Louis Robert, Carter Milton, Evan Pankiw-Arsenault, Hayden Krause, Assistant Coach Kevin Roy. Middle Row (l-r): Coach Jeff Janzen, Liam Danby, Kieran Wiley, Joshua Roy, Kieran Roy, Ashley McMillan, Emma Wilson, Assistant Coach Casey McMillan. Front Row (l-r): Eric Haight, Nathan Preston, Connor Danby, Brendan Lobb, Cale Janzen, Max Coburn, Carter Holmes.

Back Row (l-r): Braden Murray-Joe, Cole Garnett, Nashua Kruger, Michael McNicholas, Alex Dye. Middle Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Dean Garnett, Connor Seeley, Madeline Blade, Mark Andrews, Lincoln Anderson-Fraser, Coach Mike Seeley. Front Row (l-r): Jackson Garnett, Thomas Caruso, Sophie Foster, Dawson Thomas, Thomas Dufour, Cai Lewendon. (Missing: Logan Goodwin, Assistant Coach Kevin Goodwin)

Back Row (l-r): Frank Martineau, Branson Crawford, Darrin Morrow, Oscar Grainger, Shane Crawford, Austin Tounge, Scott Panov, Paul Askey. Middle Row (l-r): Earl Konyi, Travis Britton, Marcus Stewart, Nick Panov, Matt Pinsonneault, Lucas Byrne, Dawson Dekock-Kruger, Troy Pinsonneault. Front Row (l-r): Trenton Dekock-Kruger, Ben Foreman, Ben Coombes, Ethan Konyi, Ethan Askey, William Martineau, Brandon Morrow.

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Justin Shuttleworth, Jacob Knoll, Landon Stephens, Assistant Coach Don Wrigglesworth, Scott Fotheringham, Jackson Wrigglesworth, Manager Britania Warren. Middle Row (lr): Head Coach Dean Madsen, Owen Madsen, Adam Pellerin, Benjamin Togyi, Tristin Mallory, Jonathan Linton, Safety/Assistant Coach Dustin Mallory. Front Row (l-r): Cody Thompson, Matthew Melien, Ronan Nuttgens, Nathan Chandler, Sean Singleton, Jace Shuttleworth, Tyler Zoppi. (Missing: Harjas Bansoota)

TIM HORTON’S INITIATION BLACK PANTHERS

TIM HORTON’S INITIATION BLUE BANDITS

Back Row (l-r): Coach Rod Kenney, Jaden Melein, Jaxon Brown, Logan Loveridge, Zackary Garnett, Jaxon Anderson, Landen Gerow, Assistant Coach Mike Seeley. Front Row (l-r): Jorga Moore, Caleb Bedard, Brodie Kenney, Scott Ball, Jamie Bell, Everett Seeley, Elle Woodman-Egilson, Will Mohns, Kaden Collins, Assistant Coach Ron Egilson. (Missing: Alanna Main, Kayden Clarke)

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Craig Finer, Jesse Sanche, Simon Bowland, Ryan McMillan, Jonah Tonhauser, Madden Aubie, Ryland Wagner, Ty Belanger, Isaac Finer, Manager Tricia Sanche, Assistant Coach Curtis Wadsworth. Front Row (l-r): Head Coach Trevor Aubie, Heyden Blondin, Zachary Olsen, Cole Wadsworth, Preston Gabriel, Tanner Sunderman, Brett Pickford, Philippe Dufour, Macson Haddad, Cash Lewendon, Assistant Coach Casey McMillan.

TIM HORTON’S INITIATION RED REBELS

TIM HORTON’S MINI VEES

atoMc® Hockey Pro

gram Ambassado

rs: Tessa Bonhomm

e, Marc-André Fle

ury, and Drew Do ug

hty

McDonald’s® Canada is committed to helping kids in our community build life skills through the atoMc Hockey program. We’re proud to feature Canadian Olympic hockey gold medallists Drew Doughty, Tessa Bonhomme and Marc-André Fleury as Program Ambassadors using the power of teamwork to help kids build self-esteem, make new friends, and learn the value of working together. Learn more at hockeycanada.ca/atomc

Back Row (l-r): Jared St. John, Jamie Materi, Geoff Sandham, Allen Beckingham. Middle Row (lr): Sheldon Gattrell, Rhett St. John, Niko Alexis, Noah Schwab, Austin Beckingham, Nolan Comeau, Taggish Moog, Carson Burnett. Front Row (l-r): Luke Sandham, Dylan Ganzeveld, Delainey Walton, Dexter Materi, Shaila McCurdy, James Mohoruk, Nolan Cornell, Anastassios Portalaki, Wyatt Moore.

Coach Mike Ouellette, Davan Athwal, Joshua Ouellette, Jasper Thomas, Mathis Preston, Nathan Juch, Ryan Peters. (Missing: Dayton Koldyk, Elliott Mennell)

©2013 McDonald’s. Official mark of Hockey Canada.

13-01-11 1:21 PM

111124252-1 McD Atomc Hockey Ad_PWN.indd 1 CreaTion DaTe: 01/03/08 MoDiFiCaTion DaTe: January 11, 2013 10:25 AM oUTPUT DaTe: 01/11/13

ClienT ProoF #

DoCkeT #: 111124252-1 ClienT: Mcdonald’s DeSCriPTion: Atomic hockey Ad

Prod Mgr.:

Ah

File naMe: 111124252-1 Mcd Atomc hockey Ad_PWN.indd

acct exec.:

MG

1

inTernal reVieW #

art Director:

APPROVALS

1


B4

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

PROUD SUPPORTER OF PENTICTON MINOR HOCKEY

B5

2250 Camrose Street Phone: 250-492-3636

TIM HORTON’S NOVICE WHITE

TIM HORTON’S NOVICE BLUE

TIM HORTON’S NOVICE BLACK COBRAS

TIM HORTON’S NOVICE ORANGE

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Jared Holmes, Louis Robert, Carter Milton, Evan Pankiw-Arsenault, Hayden Krause, Assistant Coach Kevin Roy. Middle Row (l-r): Coach Jeff Janzen, Liam Danby, Kieran Wiley, Joshua Roy, Kieran Roy, Ashley McMillan, Emma Wilson, Assistant Coach Casey McMillan. Front Row (l-r): Eric Haight, Nathan Preston, Connor Danby, Brendan Lobb, Cale Janzen, Max Coburn, Carter Holmes.

Back Row (l-r): Braden Murray-Joe, Cole Garnett, Nashua Kruger, Michael McNicholas, Alex Dye. Middle Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Dean Garnett, Connor Seeley, Madeline Blade, Mark Andrews, Lincoln Anderson-Fraser, Coach Mike Seeley. Front Row (l-r): Jackson Garnett, Thomas Caruso, Sophie Foster, Dawson Thomas, Thomas Dufour, Cai Lewendon. (Missing: Logan Goodwin, Assistant Coach Kevin Goodwin)

Back Row (l-r): Frank Martineau, Branson Crawford, Darrin Morrow, Oscar Grainger, Shane Crawford, Austin Tounge, Scott Panov, Paul Askey. Middle Row (l-r): Earl Konyi, Travis Britton, Marcus Stewart, Nick Panov, Matt Pinsonneault, Lucas Byrne, Dawson Dekock-Kruger, Troy Pinsonneault. Front Row (l-r): Trenton Dekock-Kruger, Ben Foreman, Ben Coombes, Ethan Konyi, Ethan Askey, William Martineau, Brandon Morrow.

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Justin Shuttleworth, Jacob Knoll, Landon Stephens, Assistant Coach Don Wrigglesworth, Scott Fotheringham, Jackson Wrigglesworth, Manager Britania Warren. Middle Row (lr): Head Coach Dean Madsen, Owen Madsen, Adam Pellerin, Benjamin Togyi, Tristin Mallory, Jonathan Linton, Safety/Assistant Coach Dustin Mallory. Front Row (l-r): Cody Thompson, Matthew Melien, Ronan Nuttgens, Nathan Chandler, Sean Singleton, Jace Shuttleworth, Tyler Zoppi. (Missing: Harjas Bansoota)

TIM HORTON’S INITIATION BLACK PANTHERS

TIM HORTON’S INITIATION BLUE BANDITS

Back Row (l-r): Coach Rod Kenney, Jaden Melein, Jaxon Brown, Logan Loveridge, Zackary Garnett, Jaxon Anderson, Landen Gerow, Assistant Coach Mike Seeley. Front Row (l-r): Jorga Moore, Caleb Bedard, Brodie Kenney, Scott Ball, Jamie Bell, Everett Seeley, Elle Woodman-Egilson, Will Mohns, Kaden Collins, Assistant Coach Ron Egilson. (Missing: Alanna Main, Kayden Clarke)

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Craig Finer, Jesse Sanche, Simon Bowland, Ryan McMillan, Jonah Tonhauser, Madden Aubie, Ryland Wagner, Ty Belanger, Isaac Finer, Manager Tricia Sanche, Assistant Coach Curtis Wadsworth. Front Row (l-r): Head Coach Trevor Aubie, Heyden Blondin, Zachary Olsen, Cole Wadsworth, Preston Gabriel, Tanner Sunderman, Brett Pickford, Philippe Dufour, Macson Haddad, Cash Lewendon, Assistant Coach Casey McMillan.

TIM HORTON’S INITIATION RED REBELS

TIM HORTON’S MINI VEES

atoMc® Hockey Pro

gram Ambassado

rs: Tessa Bonhomm

e, Marc-André Fle

ury, and Drew Do ug

hty

McDonald’s® Canada is committed to helping kids in our community build life skills through the atoMc Hockey program. We’re proud to feature Canadian Olympic hockey gold medallists Drew Doughty, Tessa Bonhomme and Marc-André Fleury as Program Ambassadors using the power of teamwork to help kids build self-esteem, make new friends, and learn the value of working together. Learn more at hockeycanada.ca/atomc

Back Row (l-r): Jared St. John, Jamie Materi, Geoff Sandham, Allen Beckingham. Middle Row (lr): Sheldon Gattrell, Rhett St. John, Niko Alexis, Noah Schwab, Austin Beckingham, Nolan Comeau, Taggish Moog, Carson Burnett. Front Row (l-r): Luke Sandham, Dylan Ganzeveld, Delainey Walton, Dexter Materi, Shaila McCurdy, James Mohoruk, Nolan Cornell, Anastassios Portalaki, Wyatt Moore.

Coach Mike Ouellette, Davan Athwal, Joshua Ouellette, Jasper Thomas, Mathis Preston, Nathan Juch, Ryan Peters. (Missing: Dayton Koldyk, Elliott Mennell)

©2013 McDonald’s. Official mark of Hockey Canada.

13-01-11 1:21 PM

111124252-1 McD Atomc Hockey Ad_PWN.indd 1 CreaTion DaTe: 01/03/08 MoDiFiCaTion DaTe: January 11, 2013 10:25 AM oUTPUT DaTe: 01/11/13

ClienT ProoF #

DoCkeT #: 111124252-1 ClienT: Mcdonald’s DeSCriPTion: Atomic hockey Ad

Prod Mgr.:

Ah

File naMe: 111124252-1 Mcd Atomc hockey Ad_PWN.indd

acct exec.:

MG

1

inTernal reVieW #

art Director:

APPROVALS

1


B6

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

PROUD SUPPORTER OF PENTICTON MINOR HOCKEY find us on Facebook.

www.SmileStudio.ca

A Big Thanks to All Our Sponsors and Volunteers for their Support!

SMILE ENHANCEMENT STUDIO BANTAM TIER 2 JR. VEES

BEST WESTERN BANTAM TIER 3 JR. VEES

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Dave Coombes, Lane French, Nathan Iannone, Josh Maser, Ty Maser, Aiden Hutcheson, Manager Brian Hutcheson. Middle Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Chad Deleeuw, Myles Thibodeau, Owen Haggerty, Michael MacLean, Simon Snyman, Nick Graham, Coach Doug MacMillan. Front Row (l-r): Shane Farkas, Raphael Bassot, Greg Brydon, Reid Newson, Jayden Doell, Daylan Devlin, Alyck Coombes.

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Mike Beecroft, Sammy Gabriel, Billy Beecroft, Zack Flaman, Dante Kilian, Connor Freeman. Middle Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Tony Hamilton, Sienna Gabriel, Chace Moog, Tavis Hamilton, Dane Bateman, Jaren LeFranc, Head Coach Darrell Moog. Front Row (l-r): Stephanie Hogg, Carter Keizer, Carson Erhardt, Manny Bahniwal, Louis Shortreed, Morey Babakaiff, Graham Smith-Boyle.

A Big Thanks to All Our Sponsors and Volunteers for their Support!

A Big Thanks to All Our Sponsors and Volunteers for their Support!

PENTICTON LIONS CLUB BANTAM 1 JR. VEES

BPO ELKS BANTAM 2 JR. VEES

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Blaine Dionne, Brett Van Os, Nikhil Mohan,Tyler Koppe, Ryan Stubban, Head Coach Kelly Spence. Middle Row (l-r): Assistant Coach/Manager Michael Stubban, Sonny Baptiste, Cameron Findlay, Justin Fehr, Landon Nicol, Kelaya Allison, Assistant Coach/HSP Barry Nicol. Front Row (l-r): Devon Blackmore, Aubrey Lezard, Cole Martindale, Daniel Ricketts, Cosmo Johnston, Marcus Tait.

Back Row (l-r): Coach Scott McVicar, Pete Simmerling, Rob McKinnon, Braydon Jones, DJ Warkentin, Coach Albert Warkentin. Middle Row (l-r): Coach Mario Carelse, Daniel Carelse, Braedon Poole, Nick Huff, Taylor Scott, Manager Heather Stocker, Safety Harald Simmerling. Front Row (l-r): Goalie Spencer MacDonald, Carson Stocker, Donovan McVicar, Kaleb Bussinger, Alec Simmons, Goalie Adam Gamblen. (Missing: Finn Kennedy)

A & K Grimm SAuSAGe

• European Sausage • Fresh & Smoked Meats • Cold Cuts 667 ecKhArdt Ave. w., penticton

A Big Thanks to All Our Sponsors and Volunteers for their Support!

BANTAM 3 JR. VEES

MINUTE MUFFLER BANTAM 4 JR. VEES

Back Row (l-r): Head Coach Russell Schwabe, Nathan Konno, Connor Graham, Jake McHale, Nolan Aubie, Kiver Heintz. Middle Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Grant Konno, Brian Bonthoux, Drake Richardson, Kerman Bahniwal, Liam McHale, Manager Heidi McHale. Front Row (l-r): Travis Stephens, Benjamin Schwabe, Jacob Obirek, Brock Schlenker, Bryce Burlingame, Jace Canada.

Back Row (l-r): Casey Mcconaghie, Bailey Ouellette, Avery Beyer, Jerrod Clutterbuck, Coaches Blaine Peterson, Mike Ouellette, Ian Fotheringham, Manager Lisa Voeller. Middle Row (l-r): Myles Dekker, Keaton DesRoches, Sierra Voeller, Ryan Fotheringham, Nate Lamontagne, Lindsey Fotheringham, Saftey Person Shane Clutterbuck. Front Row (l-r): Mackenzie Peterson, Tiko Markovic, Sheldon Dekock, Tyson Allen, Sage Collins, Austin Milanovic.


Penticton Western News Friday, January 18, 2013

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

960 Railway Street, Channel Parkway 250-492-3576

GREEN.

operated by Longs Floorall Ltd.

It’s something we never forget.®

plet Com

services Winner overing oor c f BofEthSe T l na outh S ssio ...Guaranteed! Okanagan e f o r p e

Carpet l Area Rugs l Hardwood l Laminate l shawfloors.com/HGTV

ProoF

www.nufloors.ca

1397 Fairview Road, Penticton

250-492-0627

2012 2007

we have all your gear: every day, all year!

B7

BANTAM FEMALE

IRONMAN CANADA MIDGET TIER 2 JR. VEES

Back Row (l-r): Assistant Coach Shawn Black, Jessica Henderson, Lena Madevon, Maggie Robinson, Emily Trupp, Assistant Coach/Safety Leslie Roos, Assistant Coach Rob Semeniuk. Middle Row (l-r): Head Coach Lloyd Lindsay, Katelynn Roos, Kaitlin Black, Ashley Stocker, Emma Roos. Front Row (lr): Cassidy Lindsay, Victoria Ritchie, Sylvia Barnett, Mya Semeniuk, Kristen Raposo. (Missing: Sophie D’estimauville)

Back Row (l-r): Michael Crawford, Blake Holowaty, Franky Anderson, Tyrell Buckley, Cooper Prechel. Middle Row (l-r): Lawrence Langan, Quinn Harris, Dennis Zoeller, Donovan Teichroeb, Liam Hutcheson, Jesse Keylock, Manager Michelle Swetlikoe, Brandon Locket. Front Row (l-r): Tyler Ehlers, Assistant Coach Lance Vaillancourt, Spencer Hook, Head Coach Geoff Goodman, Eythan Brown, Safety Kurtis Stuckey, Jackson DeMatos.

TRUST US WITH GETTING YOUR TEAM TO THEIR OUT OF TOWN GAMES 301 WARREN AVENUE EAST PENTICTON, BC TRUCKING LTD.

www.berryandsmith.com

250-492-4042

A Big Thanks to All Our Sponsors and Volunteers for their Support!

BARLEY MILL MIDGET REC 1 JR. VEES

WHITE KENNEDY MIDGET REC 2 JR. VEES

Back Row (l-r): Trainer Butch Burns, Adam David, Robert Evans, Hunter Ehrecke, Shaye Almrud, Assistant Coach Ken Almrud. Middle Row (l-r): Head Coach Jamie Fulton, Carson Lougheed, Zak Sproule, Donovan Abbott, Tyler Dones-Larsen, Kyle Anutooshkin, Manager Tracey Babiuk. Front Row (l-r): Tyler Trupp, Wes Rasmussen, Logan Robertson, Gunnar Fulton, Mason Burns, Brad Cochrane, Jake Black, Dustyn Badach. (Missing: Adam Milanovic, Dean Flett)

Back Row (l-r): Coach Ed Lebler, Brett Dionne, Derek Schenk, Nathan Aubie, Steven Lebler, Lucas Bonneau, Justin Schenk, Jonathan Hack, Coach Russell Schwabe. Middle Row (l-r): Coach Barry Nicol, Hayden Williams, Bryce Webber, Andrew Ellis, Jordan McFadden, Keith Koponyas, Tayler Schwabe, Coach Mike Beecroft. Front Row (l-r): Carly Beecroft, Cody Gannon, Jamie Alexander-Smith, Ryley Peterson, Nathan Nicol, Daniel Graziani.

A Big Thanks to All Our Sponsors and Volunteers for their Support!

A Big Thanks to All Our Sponsors and Volunteers for their Support!

SAVE ON FOODS MIDGET REC 3 JR. VEES

PEACHES LINGERIE MIDGET FEMALE

Back Row (l-r): Skyler Lamontagne, Justin Gowe, Michael Kelly, Marc Klering, Brad Stel. Middle Row (l-r): Coach Nelson Bowman, Safety Graham Gowe, Trevor Dermody, Stephanie Knoll, Alex MacKinder, Tanessa Bowman, Manager/Coach Bill Stel. Front Row (l-r): JJ Gordon, Jarrod McParland, Bradley Styles, Josh Borren, Curtis Fontinha, Carter Gabriel, Makenzie Simmons-Foot. (Missing: Erik Hogland, Dustin Kitts, Isaac Moffatt, Coach Jonathan Bowman)

Back Row (l-r): Coach Bill Lund, Coach Kitt Frey, Zoe Konanz, Stef Knoll, Bailey Johnson, Lyndell Campbell, Manager Tammy Lagrange. Middle Row (l-r): Coach Dave Sandrelli, Sage Collins, Sophia Reimer, Haley Lund, Danielle Lagrange, Megan Pisiak, Sydney Sandrelli, Coach Dean Garnett. Front Row (l-r): Katie Huston, Jenna Collins, Hunter Prall, Sydney Garnett, Cassie Kolisnyk.


B8

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, January 18, 2013 Penticton Western News

WWW.PARKERSCHRYSLER.COM • Family Owned for over 67 years

THE PUCK STOPS HERE

PRICES SLASHED UP TO

$16,000 OFF

• ONLY 25 MINUTES FROM OLIVER • ONLY 40 MINUTES FROM OSOYOOS • ONLY 25 MINUTES FROM PEACHLAND • ONLY 30 MINUTES FROM WESTBANK

• ONLY 25 MINUTES FROM OLIVER • ONLY 40 MINUTES FROM OSOYOOS • ONLY 25 MINUTES FROM PEACHLAND • ONLY 30 MINUTES FROM WESTBANK

• ONLY 25 MINUTES FROM PEACHLAND • ONLY 30 MINUTES FROM WESTBANK • ONLY 45 MINUTES FROM KELOWNA •

S E R V I C E & PA R T S S SE RE RV VI CI CE E& &PAPAR RT TS S M O P A R P E O P L E. M O P A R P A R T S. M O P A R P E O P L E. M O P A R P A R T S.

M O P A R P E O P L E. M O P A R P A R T S.

sAVE sAVEsAVE ON SERVICE ON SERVICE ON SERVICE PA R T S sAVE scorE scorE scorE

S E R V I C E & PA R T S

ON IN-STOCK DIESEL TRUCKS

M O P A R P E O P L E. M O P A R P A R T S.

PEACE-OF-MIND E& SERVICE S E R V I C E & PA R T S S E R V I CMAINTENANCE

*

M O P A RINCLUDES: P E O P L Up E. M A R ofP A5W20 R T S . or 5W30 Mopar Oil, Mopar Oil to O5 Plitres Filter, Rotation of 4 tires. Inspection of cooling system, all fluid levels, electronic battery test, front and rear brake systems, exhaust system and suspension system. Written report in findings. Manufacturer’s check. See dealer for more details.

M O P A R P E O P L E. M O P A R P A R T S.

INCLUDES: The removal and replacement of your vehicle’s cabin air filter. See dealer for more details.

INCLUDES: Inspection of front and rear brake systems, steering and suspension system, cooling system, all fluid levels, electronic battery test, exhaust system. Written report of findings. Manufacturer’s check. See dealer for more details.

From

scorE bRANdEd HOCKEy PUCKS SOME PUCKS BREAThE EAsy BREAThE EAsy BREAThE EAsy COMPlIMENtARy PLUs PLUs ENtER FOR A CHANCE wIN ONE OF: tO wIN ENtER ONE OF:FOR A CHANCE tO ENtER FOR A CHANCE tO wIN ONE OF: PLUs †

CABIN AIR FILTER REpLACEMENT

PLUs

3 triPs $*

$ COMPlIMENtARy to thE MEMoriAL bRANdEd HOCKEy PUCKS * From

*

95∞

∞Additional charges may be applied based on vehicle configuration and options.

∞Additional charges may be applied based on vehicle configuration and options.

wItH ANy ElIgIblE SERVICE SPECIAl SPECIAl cUP wItH ANy ElIgIblE SERVICE

wItH ANy ElIgIblE SERVICE SPECIAl

PLUs ENtER FOR A CHANCE tO wIN ONEpEACE-oF-MIND OF:

PLUs ENtER FOR A CHANCE tO wIN ONE OF: †

3 triPs MEMoriAL

1000

INspECTIoN 1000

√ inspection of front and rear brake systems, steering and suspension system, cooling system, all fluid ® levels, electronic battery test, exhaust system of findings KEVIN TAMELING√ Written report TONY CHAD CAMPBELL 95≠ √ Manufacturer’s check

√ Removal and replacement of vehicle’s cabin air filter

√ Removal and replacement of vehicle’s cabin air filter

95∞

From

SERvicE inclUdES:

SERvicE inclUdES:

SERvicE inclUdES:

1000

From

∞Additional charges may be applied based on vehicle configuration and options.

lIMItEd EdItION ION MOPAR HOCKEy y bAgS

pEACE-oF-MIND

INspECTIoN

39

$

95∞

1000

EAStON® HOCKEy StICKS

*SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS

1765 MAIN STREET pEACE-oF-MIND PENTICTON INspECTIoN

1-250-492-2839 SERvicE inclUdES:

SERvicE inclUdES: √ inspection of front and rear brake systems, steering and suspension system, cooling system, all fluid levels, electronic battery test, exhaust system √ Written report of findings DARYL CHRISTENSEN MATT TYO 95≠ √ Manufacturer’s check

√ inspection of front and rear brake systems, steering and suspension system, cooling system, all fluid levels, electronic battery test, exhaust system √ Written report of findings 95≠ √ Manufacturer’s check

EAStON lIMItEd EdItION MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30 - 6:00 cUP 1000 to thE HOCKEy StICKS MOPAR HOCKEy bAgS 1000 TOM DESJARDINS SLOBODA SATURDAY 8:30 3 triPsGENERAL MANAGER GENERAL SALESMEMoriAL $ - 5:00 SPECIALEdItION FINANCE MANAGER MANAGER USED SALES MANAGER SALES ® SALES SALES $ $ SALES EAStON lIMItEd to thE cUP HOCKEy StICKS MOPAR HOCKEy bAgS 45 MINUTES 1000 ONLY 151000 MINUTES FROM SUMMERLAND • ONLY FROM KELOWNA • ONLY 30 MINUTES FROM WESTBANK COLIN PARKER

MEMoriAL cUP

RICK OLMSTEAD

lIMItEd EdItION MOPAR HOCKEy bAgS

≠Environmental handling charge may apply.

EAStON® HOCKEy StICKS

24

*

wItH ANy ElIgIblE SERVICE SPECIAl 3 triPs 3 triPs to thE to thE 1000 1000 AIR FILTER CABIN 1000 AIR FILTER to thE CABIN 1000 MEMoriAL EAStON® lIMItEd® EdItION EAStON lIMItEd EdItION MEMoriAL 1000 MEMoriAL REpLACEMENT EAStON lIMItEd ® cUP cUP REpLACEMENT HOCKEy StICKS MOPAREdItION HOCKEy HOCKEy StICKS ICKS bAgS HOCKEy bAgStO ENtERMOPAR FOR A CHANCE wIN ONE OF: cUP HOCKEy StICKS MOPAR HOCKEy bAgS SERvicE inclUdES:

3 triPs

√ Removal and replacement of vehicle’s cabin air filter

*

wItH ANy ElIgIblE SERVI wItH ANy ElIgIblE SERVICE SPECIAl wItH ANy ElIgIblE SERVICE

scorE COMPlIMENtARy corE scorECOMPlIMENtARy bRANdEd HOCKEy PUCKS39 39 SOME PUCKS SOME PUCKS ME PUCKS bRANdEd HOCKEy PUCKS †

INSPECTION*

CABIN AIR FILTER REPLACEMENT*

M O P A R P E O P L E. M O P A R P A R T S.

N SERVICE ON SERVICE

Us ENtER FOR A CHANCE tO wIN ONE OF: 3 triPs to thE

PEACE-OF-MIND

COMPlIMENt COMPlIMENtARy COMPlIMENtA ON SERVICE bRANdEd HOCKE HOCKEy PUCKS HOCKEy 95 $24 $3995bRANdEd bRANdEd SOME PUCKS SOME 6995 PUCKS SOME PUCKS

S E R V I C E & PA R $T S

sAVE AVEON sAVE SERVICE

BREATHE EASY

≠Environmental handling charge may apply.

24

≠Environmental handling charge may apply.

24

Penticton Western News, January 18, 2013  

January 18, 2013 edition of the Penticton Western News

Penticton Western News, January 18, 2013  

January 18, 2013 edition of the Penticton Western News