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VICTORIANEWS VICTORIA Friday, January 4, 2013

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Surveillance on buses starts with cameras Daniel Palmer News staff

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North Park Neighbourhood Association members Charles Joerin, left, with his dog, Poco, and Tristan Trotter stand on Mason Street behind St. Andrew’s elementary school. They have concerns over a proposed development for the site that is quite different from the current use.

Transit seeks OK from privacy commissioner for audio as well

The assault of a bus driver in Saanich last week highlighted a surprising fact about the Capital Region’s public transportation system. “There is not one operating (surveillance) camera on a B.C. Transit bus,” said spokeswoman Meribeth Burton. Witnesses of the attack apprehended the suspect in the Dec. 26 incident, a situation that was not altogether isolated. Records show drivers reported 53 threats and attempted assaults against them in 2012 across Greater Victoria. The latest incident was the third assault causing bodily harm against a driver in the region this year. In 2013, B.C. Transit hopes to install security cameras – and potentially audio recording devices – on much of its 1,000-bus fleet across the province. “There are a lot of ways that it’s demonstrated that we need that level of security, not just for our operators, but for our passengers as well,” Burton said. “That kind of empirical evidence would be really helpful.” She clarified that B.C. Transit is awaiting comment from B.C.’s Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner on the use of audio recording before it presents the proposal to its board this month. “With board approval and the privacy commissioner’s approval, then we’ll go to our municipal partners and find out who’s interested,” she said. Should privacy commissioner Elizabeth Denham identify potential concerns with audio recording on buses, video surveillance will still move ahead, Burton added. The final price tag will sit somewhere between $4 and $6 million, depending on how many municipalities choose to buy the closed-circuit TV cameras. In 2011, a federal government assessment estimated it would cost $10 million to install cameras on the B.C. Transit fleet in all of the 123 communities it serves.

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Possible redevelopment riles neighbours St. Andrew’s proposal out of scale with community, residents say Roszan Holmen News staff

A proposal to redevelop the St. Andrew’s elementary land isn’t sitting well with the residential neighbourhood butting up against the property. Vancouver-based BlueSky Properties is looking to build a six-storey building with 208 residential units and commercial space at 1002 Pandora Ave., on the northeast corner of Vancouver Street. “We see the neighbourhood giving everything and not getting anything back,” said Tristan Trotter, who lives and works within the block. In 2010, Island Catholic Schools announced it will consolidate three

elementary schools into two, by relocating students and staff from St. Andrew’s to St. Joseph’s elementary in Saanich or St. Patrick’s elementary near Royal Jubilee Hospital. It’s not the first example of church institutions downsizing their inventory of facilities, and thereby opening up development opportunities in the city. Last year, the Anglican Diocese of British Columbia sold St. Alban’s Anglican Church, upsetting Oaklands residents who wanted to keep the church hall as a community building. The pending sale of St. Andrew’s, however, presents a different opportunity. In Victoria’s newly adopted Official Community Plan, the southern portion of the neighbourhood along

Pandora Avenue is slated for higher density, mixed-use development. The sale of the St. Andrew’s school, gym and field presents an opportunity to meet these growth targets. BlueSky’s proposal, however, hasn’t been met with approval by the North Park Neighbourhood Association. At six storeys, the development requires a height variance, and the proposed .457 hectare footprint could be disproportionate to the single-family homes on Mason Street, Trotter said. He added that traffic from the complex would spill out onto Mason, a neighbourhood street, rather than Pandora, a feeder thoroughfare. PLEASE SEE: City faces showdown, Page A4

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Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

Property values decline

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Average residential assessment falls two per cent in city Kyle Slavin News staff

Chances are when you open your 2013 assessment notice from B.C. Assessment this week you’ll see your property value has decreased since last year. Most homeowners in Greater Victoria will see a two- to sixper-cent drop in their home’s assessed value, but B.C. Assessment’s area assessor for Greater Victoria calls the slight decrease “comforting.” “I would probably characterize this as a stable market, actually,” Reuben Danakody said. “We’re not seeing the yearover-year increases, those substantial increase in values that we used to see before. It’s not bad news, it’s comforting news, that the values are still very stable. We don’t want to see what was occurring the past few years down south.” Of the region’s 18 assessment jurisdictions, only Langford and

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Oak Bay saw average increases in residential property values, at 0.47 per cent and 0.78 per cent, respectively. “The numbers are very specific to local markets. Oak Bay is a very strong market and it still continues to see strong investor demand. People are still paying fairly premium dollars to get in to Oak Bay,” Danakody said. “And Langford is a growing area; they’re very aggressively growing new developments out there. (That) affordable, singlefamily market is growing.” The largest average declines in the Capital Region were seen on the Saanich Peninsula, with Sidney reporting a 5.64-per-cent drop and North Saanich a 3.65per-cent decline. In the city of Victoria, the average decrease was slightly more than two per cent. The assessment trends indicate that economically speaking, the real estate market has corrected itself “quite well,” Dana-

kody said. “We’re not seeing substantial declines in assessed values, which would be very concerning to many people.” Danakody stresses that assessments are not based on the current market, but on numbers from July 2012. There is an appeals process for homeowners unsatisfied with their property’s assessment. Prior to appealing, however, Danakody suggests homeowners do their due diligence and visit bcassessment.ca to compare properties and assessments in their areas. As well, he recommends contacting the B.C. Assessment office to speak with an appraiser. B.C. Assessment analyzes sales transactions using such information as location and buildings, and trends in the real estate market to determine the assessed property values. For more information, visit bcassessment.ca. kslavin@saanichnews.com

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Vancouver-based PCL was announced in November as the preferred proponent of three companies vying to win the contract to build the bridge. The final negotiations between the city and PCL involve such details as timelines and any modifications to the contract, said city spokesperson Katie Josephson. Council is expected to speak

more about the deal at its Jan. 10 meeting. Construction is expected to begin this spring on the estimated three-year project. PCL, Canada’s largest construction contractor, also built the Alex Fraser Bridge spanning the Fraser River and connecting Richmond and New Westminster with North Delta. editor@vicnews.com

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Friday, January 4, 2013

Starting fresh: new year, new resolutions Why we make promises to ourselves and how best to achieve them Natalie North News staff

Body or bank account: January is a time often focused on shaping things up. But just how successful a person is in sticking to their new year’s resolutions – physical, financial or otherwise – depends on a host of factors, beginning with how the resolution is framed. “People fall into two categories when it comes to motivation,” said Danu Stinson, professor of psychology, specializing in social psychology at the University of Victoria. “Some people really excel at, and prefer to avoid, costs and negative outcomes. This is a way of goal pursuit that they really favour and are good at: avoiding bad things. Other people excel at pursuing good things.” Knowing a person’s motivation style and framing resolutions appropriately – the approach or avoid method – is the first step to achieving success. “Do they tend to think a lot about possible bad outcomes that could occur, and prepare to avoid those types of things, or do they spend a lot of time thinking about positive things in their lives and how they might shape their decisions to pursue and achieve those positive things?” Stinson said. Next, surround yourself with people attacking a similar goal. “If we are interacting with somebody who shares our goal, then spending time with them actually brings that goal to mind and helps facilitate that goal for us. It’s more complex than just having it be more fun than going to the gym with a buddy. Just thinking about them brings the goal to mind for you. It becomes more active in your mind and it’s easier to pursue.” Gym buddies abound in January, as weight loss and fitness continue to top the annual resolution list. Every year Krista Enderud, health and wellness programmer at Oak Bay Recreation fitness centre, watches gym classes fill up in the new year’s rush and drop off by mid-February. “Put some structure onto it,” Enderud said. “Make it attainable. Put it in a timeframe.”

prime. People should start their monthly program in January, Reynolds said, while it’s also early enough to take out a loan to secure the previous year’s tax deduction. “Part of the process of an advisor is not just having the knowledge, but actually encouraging people to save their money,” he said. “A financial planner is like a coach. A lot of people have not contributed to RRSPs and now they’re behind the 8-ball. Way more people should be doing it. That’s why if they’re behind, they should start doing RRSP loans, especially with interest rates so low.” On the more transcendent side of coaching, master hypnotherapist Linda Bos of Mind’s Hypnotherapy in downtown Victoria is amid her busiest season. “People tend to take stock of who they are and where they’re at – or not at – during this time of year,” she said. “For the people who are feeling distressed Don Denton/News staff or un-empowered with where they’re at, it’s Janet Knight, a fitness instructor at the Oak Bay Recreation Centre, leads a class a time to take a cold, hard look at themthrough a set of exercises using bands suspended from the ceiling. selves.” Bos works to help her clients use the Rather than just setting the parameters anced segregated or mutual funds. deeper part of their mind, to connect with of the goal, the person should also tell a “The reason a young person should do their deeper consciousness and facilitate friend or find some other way of being held that is the miracle of compound interest,” change on a psychological level. accountable. “The process of becoming hypnotized he said. “The longer you have the money “And start off small. Don’t just say ‘I’m invested, by the time you get to 65, the really only takes a few moments,” she said, going to go to the gym seven days a week’ money is way bigger because of compound- adding that each session generally lasts and then be surprised when that goal isn’t ing. The people who wait about 90 minutes. attainable.” Her own husband took until they’re 40 or 45 to start “Don’t just say Taking the intimidation out of the process saving, don’t get the magic.” on a classic resolution and is another important step, Enderud added. quit a 25-year smoking habit So for those who don’t ‘I’m going to go to the Introductory programs begin throughout have that magic on their gym seven days a week’ after just one session. Some January, including Fit and Fabulous, a reg- side, Reynolds has some meet with her once and then be surprised clients istered program that sees groups of three craftier plans in mind. or twice, while most people work through a schedule of classes based completely tackle their issue “I had one client who didn’t when that goal isn’t on individual programs and private motiva- have any money saved up at after four sessions. attainable.” tional talks. Bos has been practising all and every year we would - Krista Enderud Orientation sessions are also available do a (Registered Retirement in Victoria for 12 years and for beginners or those who need that extra Savings Plan) loan,” Reyncontinues to see an influx of boost. new clients each January. Her treatments olds said. The hope is to keep people coming back. “Every year he would borrow, say $10,000 address what she considers to be the stanThough it may require a different sort from the insurance company and then put dard resolution items – smoking, weight of discipline, gaining financial control is a the $10,000 in the RRSP, get a $3,000 refund, loss, nail biting, managing stress/anxiety perennial favourite resolution. pay that onto the loan and then pay off – to any number of deep-seated personal Rick Reynolds, a certified financial plan- the $7,000 remaining over the next year. … development work. ner based in Oak Bay, demystifies the pro- This particular individual now has $300,000 “Regression work is not just about reprocess year round, but does see a spike in to $400,000 saved up, all through RRSP gramming, it’s about understanding why,” clientele who haven’t yet prepared for tax loans.” Bos said. season as the spring deadline approaches. “It’s clinical, medical, scientific, intuitive Investing in RRSPs and applying the tax Among Reynolds’ quick tips for those refund to a mortgage is good way to build and as spiritual as the client would like to starting out, is to invest as little as $25 capital and pay down debt – especially with embrace.” monthly in low-risk, non-registered, bal- interest rates continuing to hover around nnorth@saanichnews.com

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A4 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

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Payroll deductions going up for many B.C. taxpayers to pay more for MSP, EI and CPP premiums this year

the provincial government is raising the monthly Medical Services Plan (MSP) premiums from $128 to $133 per family, or an extra $60 a year. However, only those making more than $30,000 a year will be affected. “Nearly every British Columbian will be paying more in 2013, further cutting our purchasing power and ability to save,” said Jordan Bateman, regional director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation. MSP premiums are a tax that virtually every Canadian pays,

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except in cases where employers pay for their employees, he said. “The MSP is a grossly unfair, regressive tax. If you make $30,001 a year, or $3 million a year, you pay the same $133 a month. MSP is for the little people who don’t work for government.” MSP charges have increased 24 per cent over the past three years, accruing an extra $300 in annual cost to taxpayers. “It’s not tied to your income, that’s the worst part,” Bateman said. Some Canadians will also

be faced with increases in Employment Insurance and Canada Pension Plan deductions. For those earning $47,400 or higher, EI premiums increase by $51.50 to a maximum of $891.12 per year. Employers will pay $1,247.57 annually, a hike of $71.61. Workers making $51,100 or more will pay the maximum $2,356.20 for CPP, up by $49.50, while the employer’s share jumps by the same amount to a total of $4,712.40. reporter@vicnews.com

City faces showdown on plan: resident Continued from Page A1

Trotter predicts the tension with North Park is the kind the city will see more of as it moves towards densification. “It’s a test case of what’s to come,” said Trotter. The newly-adopted official community plans calls for the growth of small urban villages in every neighbourhood – not just in and around the downtown core. Coun. Shellie Gudgeon rep-

resents the North Park neighbourhood on council and voted against the OCP. “The impacts of the decision in the official community plan were not fully understood by the community,” Gudgeon said. That said, she has mixed feelings about BlueSky’s proposal. “North Park is working so hard to re-establish its sense of community and it is a wonderful neighbourhood,” she said. “(The St. Andrew’s) site is a

great development site that could really strengthen the neighbourhood.” At the same time, she added, “I’m elected to represent the neighbourhood (and) the neighbourhood is opposed.” The solution, she said, is for everybody to come to the table and find a compromise. BlueSky Properties did not offer comment to the News by deadline. editor@vicnews.com

Victoria Regional Transit Commission to determine local surveillance model Continued from Page A1

The new price tag is due to infrastructure upgrades now completed, Burton said. “We have the

telecommunications centre that was set up a few months ago in Greater Victoria that can handle surveillance in the province. So, we’ve

put the infrastructure in place, including the software programs.” Buses purchased within the last five years also come with standard CCTV

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equipment, she said. “It’s just a matter of turning them on.” There are about 300 buses in Greater Victoria, making it the largest B.C. Transit fleet in the province. With nearly 50 per cent of B.C. Transit’s resources devoted to the Capital Region, which has a complex cost-sharing formula, the Victoria Region Transit Commission will tread carefully when considering the buy-in cost sometime in mid-2013. “There’s a cost factor and a privacy issue,” said Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins, also a transit commission director. “If there’s a way that we can make not only the drivers, but the passengers safer, I’m all for looking at (the options).” The majority of Metro Vancouver buses, run by TransLink, already use video surveillance, but none have audio recording capabilities, said Transit Police spokeswoman Anne Drennan. dpalmer@vicnews.com


VICTORIA NEWS - Friday, January 4, 2013

www.vicnews.com • A5

Winter waves The surf rolls in to a section of waterfront below Dallas Road near Mile 0, as Christmas Day strollers walk along the pathway. Don Descoteau/News staff

Smart meter completion delayed Tom Fletcher Black Press

B.C. Hydro has been given another year to complete its wireless smart grid project, as it nears the original deadline with 140,000 smart meters still to be installed. Energy Minister Rich Coleman announced the extension of the Dec. 31, 2012 deadline imposed by the B.C. Liberal government’s Clean Energy Act. Pushed through the legislature in the spring of 2010, that legislation supports sweeping changes to B.C. Hydro’s expansion using wind, small hydro and other private power development. In a ministry statement, Coleman cited shortages of skilled labour, meters and other specialized equipment as well as

“customer concerns” for failing to meet the deadline for all 1.87 million meters across the province. B.C. Hydro has been dogged by political and citizen protests about the cost of the refit and persistent claims of various hazards from the meters. Installers have also encountered meters made inaccessible by construction of garages, decks and other structures that covered them. Some homeowners who refused replacement of mechanical meters now worry that they will be on the hook for costs if their old meter equipment fails after they refused the upgrade. B.C. Hydro spokesman Greg Alexis said the one-year delay, originally signalled in a November finance ministry update, doesn’t change the utility’s tar-

get of the 2014 fiscal year to implement the entire system. Meters are only a small part of a provincewide grid that will automatically report power outages and offer customers a real-time display of their power consumption. The Clean Energy Act was the culmination of former premier Gordon Campbell’s climate and energy strategy. It exempted the wireless meter project, the proposed Site C dam on the Peace River, and an array of private power proposals from scrutiny by the B.C. Utilities Commission. NDP energy critic John Horgan has said he supports a review of the wireless grid proposal and other major projects by the utilities commission. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Chip your tree, help families Arnold Lim News staff

Are your Christmas trees looking for a home after the holidays? This weekend the B.C. Lions Society hosts the 23rd annual Chip in for the Kids, where real Christmas trees can be dropped off Jan. 5 and 6, to be chipped and disposed of by volunteers in an environmentally friendly manner. “People rely on us to do this and really come out and support it,” said B.C. Lions Society manager of special events, Craig Heinz. “The best part of this for me is just the response we get

from people who literally have been using us for 23 years. It is phenomenal.” Chipped trees stay out of the landfill and are used for public trails around Greater Victoria. Disposal is by donation with all money supporting the Vancouver Island Easter Seals House, a living facility near the Royal Jubilee Hospital where families travelling to Victoria for medical treatment can stay free. The event raised more than $20,000 in 2012 and the society hopes to match that total again this year. “We actually operate within the Easter Seals House… (and) a lot of times with charities,

Lions tree chipping Saturday and Sunday (Jan. 5 and 6), 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Safeway (Fort Street and Foul Bay Road), Tillicum Centre, Broadmead Village, Westshore Town Centre, University Heights and Sooke Home Hardware.

people have the opportunity to give but don't actually see what the money does,” Heinz said. “I come every day and see what the money does and see the difference it makes. I see that impact every day.” alim@vicnews.com

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A6 • www.vicnews.com

VICTORIANEWS

Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Victoria News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Flat property, flat economy Like a Christmas present that arrives late, this week homeowners across the Capital Region and B.C. are eagerly tearing open their annual property value assessment from B.C. Assessment. The notices, more than 144,000 in Greater Victoria, are vital for many reasons. Most people have a large portion of their personal wealth wrapped up in their homes and properties, and most hope for a steady yearafter-year increase in value. Overall property values help guide municipalities with budgeting and tax rates. An increase in property value doesn’t automatically translate into a tax hike, but if property values stay flat or decline, municipalities will certainly face the hard choices of cutting services, hiking taxes or both. That appears to be the case this time around. Most people will find their properties have decreased in value or are about the same as last year. B.C. Assessment calls it a market that is “stabilizing,” rather than deflating. It’s not a big surprise property values are flat lining or declining. Across Greater Victoria, real estate sales in 2012 slowed and prices remained stagnant for single family homes, and condos saw overall price decreases, an unheard of phenomenon in Victoria five or six years ago. Greater Victoria is in a good position with respect to other parts of B.C. and Canada – it’s employment base is relatively diverse across the provincial and federal governments and the private sector. But the flat property values is a barometer and reflection of a broader lagging economy and a public worried about its fiscal future. Cutbacks and austerity at all levels of government have been the norm since the recession of 2008, and 2013 won’t be an exception. Local municipal councils likely weren’t expecting large increases in property values, and will budget with that in mind. Most local governments will want to keep tax hikes low, and that will likely mean job losses and service cuts. Flat growth might be the watchwords of 2013. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Victoria News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

I don’t want to be tolerated I often hear of people trying to accept it or tolerate it? teach tolerance as a way to make When something is in proposal the world a better place. mode it’s good to stand your Personally, I can’t stand ground and fight for what the word “tolerance” and you believe in. But when honestly, I sure hope no something is a done deal, one ever has to “tolerate” maybe it’s best to all me. collectively accept it. Do you know what It’s not about being I would like? To be submissive or not accepted. There is a speaking out. I think big difference between acceptance is a mind set, accepting something not a behaviour. and tolerating it. I At this point everyone see acceptance as should be speaking Charla Huber up about the Enbridge keeping an open mind, Written in ink trying to bridge some Northern Gateway project. understanding. I do mean everyone, We all know tolerance whether you are for or really means, “I still don’t like you. against it. Now is the time to voice I will never like you, but since you your concern or your support. have to be here, I am going to glare A lot of the time people miss at you.” the mark. The time to talk is when If we want to make this world government officials are making a better place, we should start the decisions. And in the end, we’ll working on accepting, not all have to accept the outcome, so tolerating. As far as I am concerned, you might as well have your voice tolerating is still enabling people to counted. hate. I have been to dozens of public Canada is a pretty awesome hearings where I have sat with a multicultural mosaic of people. handful of other people. Then later, Spreading hatred or tolerance to when the bylaw passes, I hear all any specific group of people would sorts of people complaining out in be similar to only using one or two the community. crayons, leaving the remaining 62 In that case, I think people need vibrant colours untouched in the to accept the result, if they were too box. lazy to go to a council meeting and We can accept people, speak their thoughts. communities and ideas. When it comes to deer, I’ve If a new regional sewage plant is accepted it. When I open my blinds built, would it better for people to and see deer munching on my

bushes, I give the deer a friendly wave and say good morning through the glass. My community garden is surrounded by deer fencing with a secure gate, because us gardeners have accepted that without it, the deer would eat the veggies. The other option would be tolerating them eating the food. When I catch myself thinking ill of someone or something, I try to remember to stop myself and assess why I am thinking that way. Often it’s my own preconceptions that make me think negatively. If you had a special needs child who required some extra assistance in the classroom, would you want their teacher to accept them or tolerate them? I understand that there are plenty of things that may be tough to accept, such as a sex offender living on your street, or even Scotch broom. Sorry folks, I have a soft spot for the plant. Anyway, back to point. The holidays are over and we are getting back into the swing of things. Maybe now could be the time to look at the things in your community that you have been tolerating and find it in your heart to accept them instead. Whichever route you go, I’ll accept that. – Charla Huber is a reporter for the Goldstream News Gazette. charla@goldstreamgazette.com

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www.vicnews.com • A7

VICTORIA NEWS - Friday, January 4, 2013

OPINION

After 25 years, it’s time to stop spinning our wheels In 1988, hundreds of scientists George H.W. Bush ran for the and policymakers met in Toronto highest office in the U.S. and for a major conference on climate promised to be an “environmental change. president.” He didn’t They were sufficiently have a green bone in alarmed by the his body, but public accumulated evidence pressure compelled for human-caused him to make a global warming that commitment he they issued a release ultimately didn’t keep. stating, “Humanity That year, Margaret is conducting Thatcher was filmed an unintended, picking up litter. She uncontrolled, globally turned to the camera pervasive experiment and said, “I’m a greenie, David Suzuki too.” whose ultimate consequences could be with Faisal Moola Canada’s prime second only to a global minister, Brian nuclear war.” Mulroney, was also re-elected in They urged world leaders to 1988. He appointed a bright new reduce greenhouse gas emissions political star, Lucien Bouchard, by 20 per cent by 2005. Had as environment minister. I asked we heeded that warning and Bouchard during an interview embarked on a campaign to meet what he considered to be our the target, Canadians would most important environmental now be healthier, have greater issue. “Global warming,” he reserves of energy and more jobs. responded. I continued: “How We’d also be a world leader in serious is it?” His answer: “It renewable energy and could have threatens the survival of our saved tens of billions of dollars. species. We have to act now.” The year was significant for In 1988, the environment was environmentalists. In 1988, a top public concern, scientists

spoke out and politicians said the right things. Global warming was a pressing and present issue. Now, 25 years later, carbon dioxide emissions continue to rise and we’re already seeing the consequences – more extreme weather events, melting glaciers and Arctic ice, rising sea levels, reduced water flows in rivers and climate-related illness and death, among others. It’s driven in part by rapid economic growth in countries like China, India and Brazil. At the same time, most industrialized nations, whose use of fossil fuels created the problem of excess greenhouse gases, have done little to reduce emissions. Humans are distinguished from other species by a massive brain that enables us to imagine a future and influence it by what we do in the present. By using experience, knowledge and insight, our ancestors recognized they could anticipate dangers and opportunities and take steps to exploit advantages and avoid hazards. Scientists and supercomputers

have amplified our ability to look ahead. For decades, experts have warned us that human numbers, technology, hyper-consumption and a global economy are altering the chemical, geological and biological properties of the biosphere. In 1992, more than 1,700 eminent scientists, including 104 Nobel prize winners, signed the “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity,” which included this urgent warning: “No more than one or a few decades remain before the chance to avert the threats we now confront will be lost and the prospects for humanity immeasurably diminished.” The document concluded that environmentally damaging activity must be brought under control and the integrity of Earth’s ecosystems protected, critical resources managed more effectively, human population growth stabilized, poverty reduced and eventually eliminated, and sexual equality and guarantees of women’s reproductive rights ensured.

The sooner we act, the easier it will be to overcome these difficult challenges. Every year we stall makes it more costly and challenging, with increasing negative impacts on humans and our environment. There are signs of hope. Many countries – as well as cities, states and provinces – are taking global warming seriously and are working to reduce emissions and shift to cleaner energy sources. Some world leaders are even questioning our current paradigm, where the economy is made a priority above all else. This is crucial. Over and over, the economy has determined the extent of our response, but how much value does it place on breathable air, drinkable water, edible food and stable weather and climate? Surely the economy is the means to a better future, not an end in itself. Surely it must be subordinate to a rich, diverse ecosphere that sustains all life. Let’s hope this year ushers in a new way of living on and caring for our planet. davidsuzuki.org

LETTERS Alternate project list for CRD funding Re: Capital Regional District’s sewage treatment plans The $792 million (assuming no major overruns) supposedly available for sewage treatment could instead be spent on many useful things, such as: – Fund the new Johnson Street Bridge ($93 million) – Repair the E & N railway line ($25 million) and get a commuter train running from Langford to the new bridge. Another two trains could offer at least twice daily service from Courtenay to Nanaimo, and from Nanaimo to Langford, all timed to connect. (Call that $20 million; maybe revenues would even sustain it.) Better still, electrify it to reduce operating costs and fares ($50 million)

– Widen the Old Island Highway to four lanes, at least from Admirals Road to Helmcken Road, to alleviate the daily massive traffic congestion ($75 million) – Build a bigger dam so we can end summer water restrictions and reduce the price of tap water so we can garden freely again ($20 million) – Create a website where citizens can initiate and vote on referenda, perhaps along the lines of American state initiatives or propositions ($10 million) – Provide a rebate of $20,000 on each new electric car for the first 10,000 cars purchased ($200 million) – Provide a $10,000 rebate for the next 10,000 “made in B.C.” electric car conversions ($100 million). Compared to sewage treatment, how much real, serious pollution could be eliminated by such steps and how much irreplaceable fossil

There’s more online For more stories and web exclusives visit

vicnews.com

fuel would be saved? The referendum website would reduce the present wide gap between government agendas and the real needs and wishes of the people they supposedly represent. Craig Carmichael Esquimalt

Relatives’ motivation can lead to elder abuses Re: When a senior is in trouble (News online, posted Dec. 20) A fundamental enabling factor for elder abuse is the notion that relatives are automatically good people. It’s almost a form of reverse racism – thinking collective instead of on content of character. Scummy people tend to be good at convincing others to do dumb things.

Letters Fostering feelings of guilt is one of their tactics that seems to work well with many older people. People need to realize the risk and be willing to defend themselves. Keith Sketchley Saanich

Railings a good idea for safety conscious Re: Railings on Ogden Point breakwater I am all for it, because I am no longer steady on my feet, and also, the height makes me uneasy. It is a safety issue that the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority should have dealt with a long time ago. You will see more people out on the breakwater when the railings have been installed. Greg F. Tupman Esquimalt

The News welcomes opinions and comments. Letters should discuss issues and stories covered in the News and be 300 words or less. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity. Mail: Letters to the Editor, Victoria News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, V8W 1E4 Fax: 386-2624 Email: editor@ vicnews.com

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A8 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

HOT TICKET

THE ARTS

Capital City Syncopators

NEWS

The Capital City Syncopators play traditional jazz, country, swing, and prohibition-era novelty songs with a vintage sound. The band’s line-up includes some of Victoria’s most accomplished professional musicians. Hear them live at Norway House,1110 Hillside Ave., Jan. 13 at 7:30 p.m. Go to victoriafolkmusic.ca for more information.

Adult Aussie hit comes to Belfry Theatre Toronto production comes to Victoria

“When we were considering Speaking in 2011, I sent it to (Shamata) because I thought it would be great with his season.” Riccio’s awareness grew when Bovell’s When The Rain Stops Falling was well received in Niagara on the Lake last summer. Company’s director and cast have little to connection to Victoria, aside from some relatives of actor Gemini-award winner Helene Joy, who is actually Australian. Some, including Riccio, have never been here. One thing the Company does have in common with the Belfry is the stage. In Toronto they’re based out of the Berkeley Street Theatre, an intimate venue not unlike the Belfry. It’s an old brick warehousetype of building, refurbished with 244-seat and 176-seat stages, near the city’s art-heavy Distillery District. Tickets range from $25 to $40, with 8 p.m. shows from Tuesday to Saturday. Wednesday matinees at 1 p.m., Saturdays at 4 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m. Available through Belfry.bc.ca. sports@vicnews.com

Travis Paterson News staff

Emotional, intimate and dark, Speaking in Tongues explores infidelity, going where good people don’t, and where others are tempted. Themes of adultery abound in the award-winning play by Australian Andrew Bovell. Despite playing to strong reviews in London and New York over the past decade, the emotional thriller only made its Canadian debut in 2012 when Torontobased Company Theatre brought it to life. The same gang from Company Theatre is now in Victoria preparing it for a Belfry Theatre run from Jan. 22 to Feb. 24. “Bovell has a great track record, Speaking has had a good run so it was surprising that it hadn’t been done in Canada yet,” director Philip Riccio said. Four actors – Richard Clarkin, Jonathan Goad, Helene Joy and

Company Theatre

Actors Yanna McIntosh, Jonathan Goad, Helene Joy and Richard Clarkin star in Speaking in Tongues, a Toronto-based production running at the Belfry Theatre Jan. 22 to Feb. 24. Yanna McIntosh – play nine characters in the non-linear story. “It’s more like what you might see in film, different stories that interconnect told in a puzzle,” Riccio said. The storyline jumps around so

much, there was initial worry the audience would need added plot cues, but the writing by Bovell, carries that out, Riccio said. It’s as sharp now as it was when it was written in 1996. It comes to Victoria through

Riccio’s relationship with Belfry’s artistic director Michael Shamata. The two previously worked together in Toronto, where Riccio co-founded Company Theatre with Allan Hawco (Republic of Doyle).

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www.vicnews.com • A9

VICTORIA NEWS - Friday, January 4, 2013

Putting energy to canvas Originally from Wales, Gillian Redwood is a lifelong, professional artist who recently moved to Victoria. Creating colourful, semi-abstract artwork is her full-time calling at Xchanges Gallery and Studios in downtown Victoria. “My sight is not particularly good, however the information I receive from looking at a person, say, sitting beside the water, is huge,” says Redwood. “I can feel a lot of the movement and sense where the energy of a person flows. These are the elements that I paint in this series, and this is where I develop the ideas for my paintings.” Redwood obtained her art and design degree at Cardiff College of Art in Wales, and the West of England College of Art, U.K. More recently she studied life drawing and painting at the St. Ives School of Painting, U.K. “I feel that people often disregard the sensory information that we receive, and attempt to reproduce what the lens of a camera sees. I like to imagine where our seeing eyes could take us, if we would let them,” she says. Redwood invites the public to enjoy The Gathering, an her new work, exhibition of paintings a lively group of by Gillian Redwood will paintings entitled be at Discovery Coffee, The Gathering. 1964 Oak Bay Ave., She describes it until Feb. 14. as her exploration of how both men and The opening event is women gather their tonight (Jan. 4) from 7 talents, energies to 9 p.m. Everyone is and spirit to move welcome. through their lives. The artwork is on

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Artist Gillian Redwood in her studio. display at Discovery Coffee, 1964 Oak Bay Ave. until Feb. 14. llavin@vicnews.com

Catch The Imposter The Victoria Film Festival is offering an exclusive screening of The Imposter (2012), a Victoria premiere. Gear up for this year’s festival with this edge-of-your-seat thriller and pick up the 2013 Festival Program Guide while you're at it. The Imposter will be shown Jan. 10-13 at the Vic Theatre, 808 Douglas St. Screenings will be held nightly at 7 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. The Imposter is a gripping real-life thriller from director Bart Layton that took the 2012 film festival circuit by storm. The story begins with the mysterious disappearance of 13-year-old Nicholas Barclay from San Antonio, Texas. Three-and-a-half years later, his family receives the staggering news that Nicholas has been found in Spain with a story of kidnap and torture. Overjoyed, they welcome the boy back into their home, but things aren’t what they seem. Layton mixes re-enactments, interviews and suspenseful storytelling in a beautifully-woven film that allows the audience to play Prizes and nominations detective. With unending twists and include: turns, this story is far from black Winner: Miami International and white. This half-documentary, Film Festival Grand Jury half true-crime drama will leave you documentary prize breathless. Nominated: Sundance Grand The Vic Theatre is operated by Jury world documentary prize the Victoria Film Festival. All proWinner: Hot Docs Filmmakers’ ceeds from these screenings go to Award support the Victoria Film Festival’s Nominated: British Independent continued programming. For more Film Awards - Best Film, Best information, call 250-389-0444, or Director, Best Debut Director, visit thevic.ca. Best Technical Achievement Tickets to The Imposter are $10 Editing, Best Achievement in and are available online at boxofProduction, Best Documentary fice.victoriafilmfestival.com or at Shortlisted: Academy Award for the door (cash only). Best Documentary llavin@vicnews.com

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ARTS LISTINGS IN BRIEF

New Imperial social and dance Dance in the beautiful Chief and Petty Officers’ Mess, 1575 Lyall St. in Esquimalt. The next dance, on Friday, Jan. 11, will be their first event in 2013, the Pulp Mills. plays from 8 to 11:30 p.m. Tickets at the door are $14 for non-members, $10 for members. Includes tea/coffee and a snack. For more information, call Siggy at 250721-3799.

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A10 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

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VICTORIA NEWS - Friday, January 4, 2013

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Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2012 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

Guaranteed Lowest Prices *Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ print advertisements (i.e. flyer, newspaper). We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s print advertisement. Our major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us and are based on a number of factors which can change from time to time. Identical items are defined as same brand, item type (in the case of produce, meat and bakery), size and attributes and carried at this store location. We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this promise at any time.

We Match Prices! *Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ flyers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and for fresh produce, meat and bakers, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us).


www.vicnews.com • A13

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A14 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Painting How to reach us

Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

SPORTS

Chargers sweep turkey-burner

SPORTS NEWS

Chargers win all three holiday tournament games

Women short, men split in Cali

Travis Paterson News staff

The Camosun Chargers’ December break is too long for Brett Westcott’s basketball calendar. To break the month up, the Chargers women’s coach runs Camosun’s annual holiday tournament for the express reason of keeping his players sharp. So when the Vancouver Island Mariners backed out of the Chargers’ third and final match of the holiday tournament, which was set for Sunday (Dec. 30), Westcott didn’t hesitate to organize a new opponent. “We wanted to play, it didn’t matter to us who,” Westcott said on Sunday. The Chargers did play, and won a lopsided game over a mixed team of alumni and local nightleaguers, who wore the Chargers blue practice pinnies. Overall the tournament proved successful for the Chargers, who went 3-0. After winning just three of the first eight league games this fall, including a one-point win over the Langara Falcons (3-5), the Chargers clicked into gear for the holidays. They beat the visiting Falcons by 18 on Saturday and Hamilton’s Mohawk Mountaineers by 23 on Friday. The wins prove a consensus theory in the bleachers that this team is starting to come together. “Coming out of exams we didn’t have any games for a month, so it’s

important to play. I thought at times (during the tournament) we played well, at other times it looked like we hadn’t played before,” Westcott said. “I’m disappointed in the first half of the season, but judging by how Mohawk did against the other teams, I guess we played better than we thought.” To watch the Chargers is to see a team that wins by committee, with a fairly even share of talent across the team. Third-year Elyse Matthews (Stelly’s secondary) leads the Chargers in points scored with an average of 12 per game. It’s fifth in the PacWest but is far off the dominant 19.6 ppg pace of league-leader Amonda Francis (Douglas Royals). But with Chargers’ guard Ella Goldschmid (Mount Douglas secondary) right behind Matthews with 11 ppg (eighth in the PacWest), the picture begins to unfold. Goldschmid is also ninth in the PacWest in assists, and is part of the Chargers’ rebuilt attack after the departure of Aija Salvador, who was central to the team’s offence. “It’d be nice if (Saturday’s) win over Langara was a league game, but even though it doesn’t count (in the standings), it gives us much more confidence going ahead,” Goldschmid said. The sophomore is part of a Victoria-heavy roster, rich with first and second year players. The team is so young, Goldschmid is undecided about coming back for another year of university transfer courses. The Chargers know they’re better than their 3-5 record suggests, she added, and are ready to punch their way

IN BRIEF

The UVic Vikes men’s basketball team closed out their California tour with a 96-88 loss to the No. 19-ranked NAIA team, Concordia UniversityIrvine Eagles on Sunday (Dec. 30). Terrell Evans led the Vikes with 18 points. The men won their first game, 55-52 over the Biola Eagles of La Mirada. Third-year Vike Jessica Renfrew led the Vikes women’s team with 31 points in the second of their twogame exhibition series in California. The Vikes fell with a 72-62 loss to Vanguard University, a strong No. 3-ranked NAIA team. The Vikes women lost to Biola 63-43 in their other game.

Kevin Light Photography

Jessica Villadiego of the Kwantlen Eagles and Ella Goldschmid of the Camosun Chargers reach for a loose ball during PacWest play at PISE earlier this season. into the playoffs now that the second stage of the season is here. “It’s tempting to think how good we can be next year, even this year,” Goldschmid said. “The top seven (of eight) teams are all competitive, as long as we get into the playoffs, anybody can win,” Westcott said. Tonight’s (Jan. 4) game between the Mariners and Chargers, in Nanaimo, was cited as the main rea-

son for VIU’s cancellation on Sunday. Friday (Jan. 11) and Saturday (Jan. 12) the Chargers host the Langara Falcons and Douglas Royals, women play at 6 p.m. and men at 8 p.m. The Chargers men finished the first half with wins over Kwantlen and the CBC Bearcats, the team’s first two wins of the season. sports@vicnews.com

Royals, Grizz home for two The sixth-place Victoria Royals hope to continue their upward trend hosting the fifth-place Tri City Americans tonight and tomorrow, 7 p.m. at Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre. The Victoria Grizzlies host the Nanaimo Clippers tonight at 7:15 p.m. and the Powell River Kings Sunday at 1 p.m. at Bear Mountain Arena.

VIJHL name All-Star squads Travis Paterson

Holidays on ice Juan de Fuca Grizzlies B2 peewee captain Lachlan Sleivert, middle, stands between Langley Eagles’ Justin Ralph (left) and Riley Geiger at the Langley Minor Hockey Association peewee rep hockey tournament on Dec. 28. The B2 team was in tough in Langley, going winless in five. Meanwhile the peewee C1 Grizzlies won gold at the Victoria Minor Hockey Association Christmas tournament. Gary Ahuja/Black Press

News staff

Former teammates Travis Oickle and Max Mois will once again suit up on the same team when the two South Division allstars attend the 2013 Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League AllStar Classic in Parksville on Jan. 13. Mois was traded last month from the Westshore Wolves to the Saanich Braves, and will represent the latter in the All-Star Classic. Oickle, who holds the distinction of having played for the now-defunct former Westshore Stingers, will represent the expansion Wolves. The South Division rosters were recently announced for both the All-Star game and Prospects games. Leading the list on the South’s All-Star team is the first-place

Victoria Cougars with six players: forwards Brody Coulter, Sam Rice and Mark Walton, defencemen Graham Zagrodney and Jacob Stolz, and goalie Evan Roch. Cougars coach Mark Van Helvoirt will lead the bench. The Saanich Braves are second with five players, forwards Mois, Ty Jones and Josh Gray, defenceman Garett Kemmler and goalie Tanner McGaw. Joining Oickle from the Wolves is forward Josh Bloomenthal and defenceman Chris McDonald. Peninsula Panthers players going are forwards Cole Golka and Josh Adkins, and defenceman Cody Breitenstein. Former Panthers star Kyle Peterson leads the trio of Kerry Park Islanders with F Alex Milligan and D Colton Burt. Full rosters at VIJHL.com. sports@vicnews.com


www.vicnews.com • A15

VICTORIA NEWS - Friday, January 4, 2013

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!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

FURNITURE

FOR SALE BY OWNER

HOMES WANTED

IN MEMORIAM GIFTS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

MIND BODY & SPIRIT

RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE BC Help tomorrow’s families today – leave a gift in your will. legacy@rmhbc.ca

ALTERNATIVE WHOLE body workout. Optimize, rejuvenate, whole body in less time. Great results. Phone anytime 250654-0417.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. NO Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. SignUp Online! iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853

COMING EVENTS

HELP WANTED

Ukrainian Christmas Eve Traditions Supper Plus Carolers and Pageant Saturday, Jan. 5th 6:00 PM, Advanced tickets only, adults $38, students $18, children (under age 6) $6. Ukrainian Cultural Centre 3277 Douglas St., Vic Info at (250)475-2585 ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terriďŹ c presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@blackpress.ca

PERSONALS STEAMWORKS: A club for men to meet men. 582 Johnson St., Victoria. 250-3836623 steamworksvictoria.com

LOST AND FOUND FOUND: CAMERA, West Bay area (Esquimalt), Dec. 29. Call to identify (250)727-7401. FOUND: KEYS Oswego & Dallas. Call to identify. 250381-3096. FOUND LADIES bracelet Cordova Bay Rd, Sun, Dec 16. Call to identify, (250)658-5055.

AN ALBERTA Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilďŹ eld road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES MAKE A FORTUNE with $3000, we know how. Free info pack. Call (250)590-9634.

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS bcjobnetwork.com

FINANCIAL SERVICES

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

HOMESTAY FAMILIES REQUIRED March 14-18

2 students per home Please call Michelle 250-655-9481

RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture, Baby +Family, Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE BUILDING SUPPLIES METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

HOUSES FOR SALE

MEDICAL/DENTAL

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, ďŹ r, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

CHINESE CARPET- 12’x9’. Beautiful condition, dark blue background. $1,400. Roll top desk, large, many locks, good condition, $275. Call 250-3883718.

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper? MOVING IN 1 week, everything must go. Solid wood kitchen table w/ 4 chairs & centre leaf, couch, chairs, misc kitchen stuff, cookware, pictures, microwave. No reasonable offer refused. All must go. Call 1(587)297-1961.

RENTALS

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

APARTMENT/CONDO 1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, ďŹ rewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. Call 250-478-9231.

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest ďŹ rewood producer offers ďŹ rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

FURNITURE 2 OCCASIONAL chairs, 1 black w/arms, 1 zebra stripes on white, no arms, $200/each Paid 3 years ago $1200 at Sandy’s. (250)656-1750. bellringer85@yahoo.com for pictures. ROUND LIGHT Oak dining room table and 4 chairs, very good condition, $285. Call (250)652-8549.

TOP OF the line Partner 4 SCOOTER. 1 year old. New they are $7000. + ; asking $3750. Call 778 977 3301. WASHER AND Dryer (Maytag), Heavy Duty, 1 year old, like new, white, $850. Call (250)629-3102.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

Incredible 5 acre treed PARK-LIKE PROPERTY with Well-Maintained Furnished Home 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake, in the town of Caycuse. Perfect for recreational property or full time living. Motivated seller $378,800. Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land. Call 250-745-3387 smartytwo@hotmail.com

CONNECTING BUYERS AND SELLERS

SELL IT FAST WITH CLASSIFIEDS!

Looking for a NEW job? www.bcjobnetwork.com

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

YOGURT MAKER, Salton. 7 containers, still in packaging. $5. James Bay. 250-380-8733

FUEL/FIREWOOD

1-866-686-7435 or email pedsvancouver@ bayshore.ca

BUFFET/ HUTCH, solid wood 18�Dx50�Wx79�H, red/brown tone, Made in Quebec. $165. (250)380-8733.

FRIENDLY FRANK

mish@shaw.ca

Bayshore Home Health is currently seeking Licensed Practical Nurses to support our Pediatric clients for home/school care in the Victoria area. Pediatric experience is an asset, although we do offer client speciďŹ c training, Trach/Vent courses and other on-going training supports. If you are an LPN and love working with children, we would love to hear from you. Interested individuals are encouraged to fax or email resume to:

10353 DEVLIN Plc, Sidney. Rancher 3 bdrm, 2 bath, lrg. fam room, private treed lot. Call 250-655-1499 or view w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 or mls #316102

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

HEAVY DUTY sewing machine, “Artisan 618-1SC�, as new with rolling adjustable table, light & attachments. $1000 obo. (250)384-2976.

ARE YOU a warm, caring individual who wants to make a difference in the life of a senior? Nurse Next Door is hiring RCAs who are able to work up to 40 hrs/wk. email resume to victoria@nursenextdoor.com

LPN’s SEMI RETIRED couple available to care for your home/pets Non smokers, Extremely conscientious. Great local references. Available mid January through early March. 778-874-6881.

LOSE WEIGHT NOW - ASK ME HOW. Happy New Year 2013. I have a Proven Weight Lose System that is Nutritious, Delicious, Affordable and government approved. Let me help you in achieving your goals. Please contact me at tinapositive1@gmail.com or 1888-494-4690 (Message Centre) or visit my website at http://tinapositive1.greatshapetoday.com

HOME CARE/SUPPORT

TRAVEL HOUSESITTING

HEALTH PRODUCTS

FARM, Fishing, Hunting, Property Manager: Year round. To manage and maintain a 685 acre working farm with pheasants, cattle, dogs, hay and tourism accomodations. Semi retired welcome. Hands on management. mk@skeenameadows.com

HOME STAY FAMILIES

WE BUY HOUSES

250.388.3535

www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

ESQUIMALT

Unique Building Must see

1 BDRM Very quiet, ocean views, Clean, well maintained. Laundry, Sauna, Elevator, Hot Water, Heat. (250) 388-9384 OAK BAY Junction: 2-bdrm in quiet, senior’s 55+ bldg. $850. Heat, h/w incl. Jan.15 or Feb.1 N/P. Share purchase req’d. 1678 Fort St. (250) 595-4593.


A16 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

MARINE

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

SUITES, LOWER

AUTO FINANCING

BOATS

CEDAR HILL Golf course- 1 bdrm, private entrance, off street parking, W/D, utils included. NS/NP. Refs req. Avail Feb. 1. $800. 250-595-0505.

DreamTeam Auto Financing “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

BOATHOUSE FOR SALE, 27x10’ interior dimension, power, lighting, pigeon proof, taller than other boat houses. Below cost at $15,000. Call 250-656-6136.

GRANT MANOR Newly renovated suites, Starting at $675 per mo

COLWOOD- 1 bdrm Bach, patio, shared W/D, N/S. $820 mo incls utils. 250-391-7915.

To view call 250-642-1900

ROYAL OAK, grd level 2 bdrm, 5 appls, util’s incl’d. NS/NP, Close to shops & buses. Jan. 1st. $1050 mo. (250)744-9405, (250)479-9405

JAMES BAY: Corner 2 bdrm Condo, 2 bath, NS/NP, prkg avail. $1350. 250-361-9540.

JAMES BAY Large bedroom, den, 1.5 bathrooms in corner Condo. Easy living for those 55+ at the “Camelot”. Enjoy prepared dinners, housekeeping, laundry and other good things while owning your own home in this exceptional location now at an excellent price of $159,900, (rental also would be considered). Call for more information or private tour. Tony Joe, RE/MAX Camosun, 250-370-7788 tony@tonyjoe.ca

ROYAL OAK- (near Common Wealth pool) new updated 1 bdrm condo, W/D. ns/np. $825 inclds utils. (250)652-7729.

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING -

SUITES, UPPER SIDNEY 2 BDRM upper- own W/D, $1300+ shared utils w/lower suite. Available Feb 1. Call (778)426-1524.

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

bcclassified.com

2009 PONTIAC G5- $14,500. Air conditioned, electric windows, 4 new tires/2 spare. 45,000 km. 2 year warranty left. Senior giving up licence, reason for sale. Call (250)3600892.

$50-$1000 CASH For scrap vehicle

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

858-5865

1993 BAYLINER Classic 2452. In excellent condition. Head, galley, canopy, 9.9hp 4-stroke Yamaha. Dinghy & extras. $17,000. (no trailer). Call 250-656-6136.

Your Community

Classifieds can take you places!

FREE Tow away

LOOKING FOR A DEAL ON A NEW VEHICLE? Save up to 40% OFF your next new vehicle... No games or gimmicks, deal direct with local dealerships. www.newcarselloff.com

HOMES FOR RENT SHELBOURNE: 2 bdrm, reno’d. $1250+ util’s. Avail now. Call (250)477-9575.

GOLDSTREAM AREA: 1400 sq ft, newly furnished, w/d, d/w, a/c, big deck & yard, hidef TV, parking. $650 inclusive. Ray, 778-433-9556.

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

TRANSPORTATION

DOWNTOWN SIDNEY: Bright newer 1 bdrm deluxe suite. Short term. (250)514-7747.

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

CARS

1956 CONSUL MKI Estate Wagon, ONE OF APPROX 15 IN THE WORLD. Body, paint and motor all done. Lots of new parts. The car needs assembly. Will Trade for British and Cash. MUST SELL. No Time. Have all receipts. Call 250-490-4150 (Penticton, BC).

No qr code reader? Text info: 778.786.8271

BUYING OR SELLING?

Sudoku

Call us today

fil here please

To solve a Sudoku puzzle, every number 1 to 9 must appear in: • Each of the nine vertical columns • Each of the nine horizontal rows • Each of the nine 3 x 3 boxes Today’s Solution

JAMES BAY- spacious 1 bdrm, $795+ utils. NS/NP. Avail Jan 1. (778)430-2116.

SIDNEY 1 BDRM- own W/D, $850+ shared utils w/upper suite. Available now. Call (778)426-1524.

1-800-961-7022

www.iDreamAuto.com DL# 7557

NEWS

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

• 388-3535 • 250-388-3535

www.bcclassified.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CONTRACTORS

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

20% OFF Fall clean-ups, racking, mowing, hedge/shrub trimming. (250)479-6495.

ALL-HAUL JUNK REMOVAL Const Debris, Garden Waste. Call John 250-213-2999.

DIAMOND MOVING- 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734.

DRYWALL

250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups.

CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489.

✭BUBBA’S HAULING✭ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601

CARPENTRY

DRYWALL PROFESSIONAL: Small additions, boarding, taping, repairs, texture spraying, consulting. Soundproof installation;bath/moisture resistance products. Call 250.384.5055. Petrucci’s Drywall.

BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748.

ELECTRICAL

CARPET INSTALLATION

250-361-6193- RENO’S, res & comm. Knob and tube rmvl. No job too small. Lic# 22779.

MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES HOUSEKEEPER EXPERIENCED, reliable. References. 250-920-6516, 250-881-7444. MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278. NEED HELP cleaning your house? $18/hr. Call Dorothy at (250)478-8940.

COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Please call Des 250-656-9363, 250-727-5519. COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites, etc. 250-886-8053, 778-351-4090.

CLASSIFIEDS WORK HARD! Call 250.388.3535

(250)590-9653.ELECTRICIAN 20 yrs + exp. Residential: New homes & Renos. Knob & tube replacement. $40./hr. Senior’s Discount. Lic.#3003. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca

SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS THE MOSS MAN ChemicalFree Roof De-Mossing & Gutter Cleaning since 1996. Call 250-881-5515. Free estimates! www.mossman.ca

DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

INSULATION

FRUIT TREES Overgrown? Shaping trees & roses. Blackberry clearing. Call John, 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

MALTA BLOWN Insulation. Attics - interior/exterior walls & sound silencer. (250)388-0278 QUALITY INSULATION blown fiberglass. Affordable rates. (250)896-6652.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Gutter & Window Cleaning at Fair Prices!

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

HANDYPERSONS

MOVING & STORAGE

FENCING

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397.

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858.

250-507-6543. AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, guards, windows, power washing, roof demoss, repairs. Insured.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

A2Z WRIGHT Moving. $80/hr for 2 men. Senior’s discount. Call Phil (250)383-8283.

DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

PAINTING ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. BIG BEAR Painting. Interior & Exterior. Quality work. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071

SAFEWAY PAINTING

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB

Peacock Painting

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

UPHOLSTERY UPHOLSTERER work. Your fabric 250-480-7937.

or

NEEDS mine.

WINDOW CLEANING BOB’S WINDOW Cleaning Roof demoss, gutters. Licenced 25 yrs. 250-884-7066. DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

250-652-2255 250-882-2254 WRITTEN GUARANTEE Budget Compliance

15% SENIORS DISCOUNT

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535


www.vicnews.com • A17

VICTORIA NEWS - Friday, January 4, 2013

This Weekend’s

Select your home. Select your mortgage.

OPENHOUSES

3-833 Princess, $399,900 Sunday 2-4 Boorman’s Rod Hay, 250-595-1535

Find more details on the Open Houses below in the

828 Rupert Terrace

107-3900 Shelbourne, $245,000

Saturday & Sunday 1-4 Royal Lepage Coast Capital Murray Lawson 250 385-9814

Saturday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Roland Stillings, 250-744-3301

pg. 1

982 Mckenzie, $324,900

506-327 Maitland, $269,900 pg. 5

Check the page number below in Real Estate Victoria or visit www.revweekly.com

Published Every Thursday

Oak Bay 250-370-7601 Victoria 250-483-1360 Westshore 250-391-2933 Sidney 250-655-0632 Chatterton Way 250-479-0688 www.vericoselect.com

Saturday 2-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Realty Maggie Thompson, 250-889-5955

pg. 8

pg. 5

S305-737 Humboldt St., $439,000

110-1505 Church Ave, $219,000

Saturday 2-4 Jonesco Real Estate Roger Jones 250 361-9838

Saturday 2-4 Boorman’s Rod Hay, 250-595-1535

pg. 5

LOOKING FOR AN Auction Bedroom Suite Couch Deli Esthetics Fuel Garage Sale House Investments Jungle Gym Kiln Living Room Suite Moving Company Nail Care Open House Poultry Quilt Rolling Pin Sail Boat Venetian Blinds Window Washer Xylophone Yard Work Zebra

Sunday 1-4 Sotheby’s International James Leblanc, 250-812-7212

pg. 5

316 Brunswick Pl, $524,500

309-825 Goldstream, $233,900

Saturday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Brad Maclaren, 250-727-5448

Sunday 2-4 Re/Max Camosun Brad Maclaren, 250-727-5448

pg. 8

pg. 9

580 Peto, $499,900 pg. 8

Sunday 2-4 Boorman’s Real Estate Michael Boorman 250-595-1535

pg. 8

2013 2013

CHURCH DIRECTORY Your Guide to Local Houses of Worship Christ Jesus is one gift that people do not return when they find him. I can help you find him. Call Pastor Dave 250-479-0500

Parish of St. Peter & St. Paul

Rev. Lon Towstego

Sunday Service

8:30 am and 10:30 am

Sunday School

at the 10:30 service, best suited to children 5-12 years.

St. Paul’s Historic Naval Garrison Church 1379 Esquimalt Rd.

250-386-6833

VICTORIA VICTORIA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13th, 2013 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13th,10am-4pm 2013 Pearkes Recreation Centre Centre 10am-4pm Pearkes Recreation TICKETS TICKETS $10.00 in advance $10.00 $15.00 in at advance the Door $15.00 at the Door

COURTENAY COURTENAY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20th, 2013 SUNDAY,Filberg JANUARY 20th, 2013 Centre 11am-3pm Florence Florence Filberg Centre 11am-3pm TICKETS TICKETS $10.00 in advance $10.00 at advance the Door $10.00 in $10.00 at the Door

www.stpeterandpaul.ca

To book a space call Shelley Westwood at 250-480-3227

There’s more online For more stories and web exclusives visit

vicnews.com

250.388.3535

COVER-TO-COVER

On-Line

Now available in an easy to read, downloadable and printable format!

Go to: vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com goldstreamgazette.com Click on Link (on the right)

pg. 1

930 Tuxedo, $649,900 Saturday 1-3 Re/Max Camosun John Percy 250 744-3301

edition of

pg. 5

802 Rainbow Ridge, $749,000

Tuesday-Sunday 1-3 Royal Lepage Coast Capital James Liu 250 477-5353

Jan.3-9

or Scroll down to the bottom Click on eEdition (paper icon)

NANAIMO NANAIMO

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10th, 2013 SUNDAY, 10th, 2013 Beban Park FEBRUARY Social Centre 11am-4pm Beban Park Social Centre 11am-4pm TICKETS TICKETS $10.00 in advance $10.00 $13.00 in at advance the Door $13.00 at the Door

Available At All: Bride’s and Groom’s and Groom’s Bride’sEnter to Enter to

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Photo supplied by Brawns Photography Photo supplied by Brawns Photography

FOR INFO/TICKETS/BOOTH SPACE FOR INFO/TICKETS/BOOTH SPACE Victoria: (250) 984-1555 Victoria: (250) (250) 984-1555 244-8449 Nanaimo: Nanaimo: (250) 244-8449 Toll Free: 1-888-501-9696 Toll Free: 1-888-501-9696 E: bridalexhibition@ieginc.ca

www.BridalExhibition.ca www.BridalExhibition.ca


A18 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

InMotion

GREATER VICTORIA Advertising Feature

NEWS

Your community’s transportation station...

• January 4, 2013

Events & Activities... JANUARY 9 –The Vancouver Island Mustang Association meets at Jasmine’s Restaurant on the Old Island Highway in Colwood. Dinner at 6:30 p.m.; meeting at 7:30 p.m. All welcome. JANUARY 20 – Victoria Motor Sports Club Winter Series No. 1 at Western Speedway. FMI: www.victoriamotorsports.ca JANUARY 27 – Steve Copp Construction Winter Hornet Series Enduro, 1 p.m. start at Western Speedway. FMI: www.westernspeedway.net/

Send your driving, boating or biking-related events to

jblyth@telus.net

Benny Taddei with son Ben and niece with his new 1968 Mustang fastback.

Restored Mustang Christmas gift represents family bond and an immigrant success story The short version of the story is that Vancouver-area homebuilder Ben Taddei had his father’s original 1968 Mustang fastback restored from top to bottom to give ALYN EDWARDS back to him in betterCLASSIC than-new condition for RIDES Christmas. But the car represents so much to the family that the story can only be understood in full context. Benito (Benny) Taddei and Antonina Ferrari grew up five blocks apart in a little village near Aquila, Italy and started dating when she was just 14 years old. He was from a family of six boys and his father said there wasn’t enough property for all his sons to inherit. Benny followed his older brother to Vancouver in 1957 and started a new life at the age of 21. Two years later, Antonina arrived in Vancouver and they married. Benny was an expert tile and marble installer and worked hard. He had a flair for style and eventually opened his own hair styling salon. He called it House of Ferrari to honour his wife’s maiden name and the styling of his favorite Italian sports car. By the fall of 1967, Benny Taddei had

a thriving salon with 18 stylists and a hobby farm in Richmond. In October, he spotted a new red 1968 Mustang that had just arrived in the showroom of Musgrove Ford at Main Street and Kingsway in Vancouver. “I loved the beautiful fastback styling and the red reminded me of the Ferrari sports cars from Italy,” he recalls of the moment. Benny paid the asking price of $5,102, believing he would miss the opportunity if he went away to think about it. His son Ben was just two months old when the Mustang came home. Antonina

Benny Taddei with son Ben receiving the freshly restored 1968 Mustang fastback he bought new in Vancouver

had learned to drive and the Mustang became their family car. “This was my dad’s first new car,” Ben Taddei says. “Prior to that, he drove around in a used 1952 Buick with a rusted-out floor.” He says his parents worked hard and saved to buy their first home and, when they paid it off, they bought the car. “The Continued on next page

SERVICE WORK Any service work between $100-$200

Any service work over $200

Includes parts and labour. Taxes excluded. Does not apply to already discounted parts. Expires Feb. 28/13.

www.grahamkiavictoria.com

250-360-1111 or book on-line at service@grahamkia.com

Don’t wait too long!  Timing Belts Bring in this coupon for

A broken timing belt can cause extensive damage to your Honda’s engine. Refer to your owner’s manual for recommended replacement. • Replace Timing Belt • Replace Water Pump*

• Replace Drive Belts* • Includes Genuine Honda Parts & Labour

Why compromise on safety? Our Honda-trained technicians know your Honda like no one else. The job will be done right - the first time. * If required. Applies only to Honda vehicles. Cannot be combined with other offers.

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www.vicnews.com • A19

VICTORIA NEWS - Friday, January 4, 2013

‘68 Mustang Mustang represents their youth and energy and my dad’s passion for sporty cars, good design and beautiful things.” Before the years of mandatory seat belts, Ben always rode up front with his mother. His dad would let him shift the transmission and have his hand on the steering wheel. “I felt so grown up and cool while I could hardly see over the dashboard,” he says. He recalls traveling in the car after late-night departures from visits with aunts, uncles and cousins. “I would crawl into the back area behind the fold down rear seat and look up at the stars through the rear window. I thought the moon was following me home.” When Ben reached the age of eight in the mid 1970s, his father began teaching him how to drive the car on the deserted farm roads in Richmond. By the time he was 10, he was going solo in the Mustang driver’s2013 seat with THE NEW AWD his dad as co-pilot. His ‘job’ every Saturday was to back the Mustang out of the carport and wash it. “I used to turn on the radio and diligently clean the car inside and out.” About two months after he

got his driver’s license, he was showing off to friends in the car and drove into a curb at full speed. Only the wheel and suspension were damaged but Ben felt terrible. “I thought I had destroyed my dad’s car.” One year ago, father and son drove the car to a restoration shop in Coquitlam and committed the Mustang to a full rotisserie restoration. Ben decided to update the car with modern power steering, power disc brakes, a high-performance engine coupled to a five-speed manual transmission, Shelby exhaust and American Racing wheels. The Mustang gleams with its new candy apple red paint. The Mustang got a green bow for Christmas. “Everything I have today I owe to my parents. They gave me love, a good home and an education,” Ben says of his wish to give them back their Mustang in brand new condition. “I had the car restored a bit selfishly – a little the way I wanted. But options were added that were available at the time that my father couldn’t afford. FORESTER I’m fortunate to be in a financial position to do this and I want my dad to have some fun with the car,” he says. Ben is looking forward to once again being in the car with his family. “My dad and I will

car’ honking the horn. The difference this time was that the car was parked in the garage. Seatbelt laws, you know.”

drive the Mustang together and he’ll use it whenever he wants to – probably more than I will because he is long retired.” Ben hopes to eventually pass the Mustang on to his daughter who is now six. “Who knows: maybe she will fall in love with the car like I did. As I did when I was a toddler, she has spent time in the front seat of ‘Nonna’s

Alyn Edwards is a classic car enthusiast and partner in Peak Communicators, a Vancouverbased public relations company. aedwards@ peakco.com

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*Models shown are the 2013 Forester 2.5X 5MT (DJ1 XO) / 2013 Outback 2.5i Convenience 6MT (DD1 CP) with MSRP of $28,015 / $30,515 including freight & PDI ($1,595), documentation fees ($395) and battery and tire tax ($30). License, taxes, insurance and registration extra. †$2,000 cash incentive is for cash customers only and is available on all new 2013 Forester models. Cannot be combined with Subaru Canada supported lease/finance rates or Holiday Bonus. **0.5% / 0.9% finance and lease rates available on all new 2013 Forester / 2013 Outback models for a 24-month term. Financing and leasing programs available through Toyota Credit Canada Inc. on approved credit. ***$500 Holiday Bonus offer applies only to lease and finance agreements for all new 2013 Forester / 2013 Outback models. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. **/***/†Offers 3, 2013. Offers valid valid until for a January limited time only. See your local Subaru dealer or www.western.subarudealer.ca for complete details.

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A20 • www.vicnews.com

Friday, January 4, 2013 - VICTORIA

1

Selected 540ml

On Sale Per 100g

2

$

Weight Watchers

Catelli

Adams

Selected 124–311g

Healthy Harvest, Bistro, Smart or Noodles Selected 300–375g

Assorted 500g

Peanut Butter

On Sale

On Sale

Each

Each

2

$

Rio Red Grapefruit Grown in Texas Large

Each

Pasta

On Sale

2

1

$

Previously Frozen $9.07/lb

A whole, fresh pork leg is a budget-friendly choice for a variety of tasty meals. It can be cut into roasts, cutlets, stew or stirfry cuts or even used to prepare your own sausage.

$

On Sale

Wild Sockeye Salmon Fillets

Canadian Grain Fed Bone In $2.20/kg

Smart Ones Entrées

Beans

Per lb

$

Fresh Whole Pork Leg

Unico

Each

On Sale

NEWS

3

$

Specials in Effect until Tuesday, January 8th, 2013

On Sale

5 $3 for


Victoria News, January 04, 2013