Page 1

Merry Christmas

Victoria Addiction Services

Intensive Outpatientt Program

VICTORIANEWS VICTORIA Monday, December 24, 2012

Proudly serving Esquimalt & Victoria

Spa Lim ce ited

Call Tod ay!

Jan. 21- Feb. 1, 2013

tt www.edgewoodvictoria.ca

www.vicnews.com

Sending universal messages of love, peace Local churches will welcome many visitors tonight for their annual Dec. 24 services

T

he well-documented Christmas ceasefire between British and German soldiers on the Western Front in Europe is nearing its centennial. The combatants halted their pitched battles briefly on Dec. 24 and 25 to celebrate Christmas together, enjoy a drink, exchange gifts, and in some cases, play a game of soccer. It was a show of humanity between enemies who found they weren’t so different from each other after all. So what is it about this time of year that softens hard hearts and leaves Christians and secular people alike contemplating the meaning of the Don Descoteau season? Rev. Ian Victor, who Reporting presides over St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church on Douglas Street in downtown Victoria, estimates about 70 per cent of people who attend their Christmas Eve services are not regular congregation members. While few visitors come looking to be converted or even enlightened, he says, many incorporate the event into their family traditions, enjoying the singing of carols and the feelings of goodwill that envelop the room. To make tonight’s service (7 p.m.) more accessible to non-churchgoers, St. Andrew’s will focus on readings with broad appeal, Victor says, and a sermon “that doesn’t presume prior knowledge of the (Christian) message.� That message can still hit home, says one practising Christian. As the convenor of the St. Andrew’s worship committee, church elder John

)5((

Don Descoteau/News staff

Congregation member John Mitchell, left, and Rev. Ian Victor of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church stand in front of a stained glass window depicting the birth of Jesus Christ, in the balcony of the church’s sanctuary. Mitchell finds himself busy with details surrounding the service in the days leading up to Dec. 24. But once things get underway and he’s able to sit down and take in what’s happening, he sometimes finds himself transported. “I like Ian’s sermons,� Mitchell says. “And sometimes what he says hits a nerve with me and I can feel God’s presence a little bit more.�

Victor explains that phenomenon with a reference to ancient tradition. “In Celtic spirituality they talk about ‘thin places,’ those times when heaven seems a little closer,� he says. “I think Christmas Eve seems to be one of those thin times, in that it provides (an experience) outside of the everyday.� Mitchell notes how some people turn to God only in times of crisis, or when

they feel they need a lift. He says he always feels he has a place to go to find comfort, and it doesn’t always mean going to church. “It’s a special time for Christians, too,� Victor says, acknowledging the universal appeal of the Christmas season. PLEASE SEE: Cornerstone themes, Page A9

;PQVM 

Strengthen

->-6<

FREE JEWELLERY CLEANING & OTHER FREE SERVICES THROUGHOUT JANUARY* ARY* *Some restrictions apply. See website for details.

106-2187 Oak Bay Ave. 250-592-1100

barclaysjewellers.com


A2 â&#x20AC;˘ www.vicnews.com

Monday, December 24, 2012- VICTORIA

NEWS

BOXING WEEK

Neilss Ne Sectional With Sofabed Was $1799

Lambola L b l Sectional Was $1299

Colour not as shown

1199

1299

$

Rachel Chaise Was $499

Sale

299

$

Frankfurt All Leather Sofa Was $1299

$

Blake Table & 4 Chairs Was $599 Sale

$

799

Clark Table & 6 Chairs Was $799 Sale

399

$

299

$

One Week Only! 1652 Old Island Hwy. View Royal! 250-474-2026

999

$

Mesta Power Reclining Sofa Was $1599 Eloquence Queen Memory Foam Mattress

Troy Solid Wood Bunkbed Was $599

Sale

499

$

Sale

499

$

Tulip Tub Chair Was $399

Sale

199

$

www.sixmilefurniture.ca Monday - Saturday 9:30am - 6:00pm Sunday 12:00pm - 5:00pm

Back at our warehouse on 1652 Old Island Hwy.


www.vicnews.com • A3

VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012

CRD spurs on sewage contract Daniel Palmer

Kyle Reagan models one of his many ugly Christmas sweater creations at his home workshop in Saanich. Reagan has been expanding his business for the past five years, selling more than 2,100 sweaters this season.

News staff

Daniel Palmer/News staff

Entrepreneur spreads ugly Christmas cheer Online sales skyrocket for Christmas sweaters Daniel Palmer News staff

Ugly and tacky aren’t usually nouns a budding entrepreneur hopes to hear about his latest work. But for local business owner Kyle Reagan, the words couldn’t sound sweeter. “Naughty’s also been a huge thing this year,” says Reagan, standing in a basement full of self-made ugly Christmas sweaters. Armed with a glue gun, felt cutouts, ornaments and, more recently,

a canvas printer, he dreams up fashion faux pas designed to stand out amongst a room filled with Value Village attire. Ugly Christmas sweater parties have become the norm in recent years and they historically involve animal vignettes on knitted vintage threads. “With more competition coming in, you have to be more innovative with the products,” Reagan says, swiping through the remnants of the Christmas rush in his workshop. One of his most eyebrow-raising innovations is a sweater with protruding screws in place of snowmen’s noses. “You can attach real carrots to the front,” he says. “It definitely turns heads.”

There’s also demand for niche pop culture designs, he said, including canvas printer images of Justin Bieber and Psy of “Gangnam Style” fame framed with LED lights. “I don’t have the capacity to make dozens of one model, so often I’ll make one elaborate sweater and sell complimentary products that are very similar on a mass production-type scale,” he says. The Saanich resident and Royal Roads graduate used the business as a learning ground for future Internet marketing ventures. Now in his fifth season of production, he ships his creations as far away as the United Kingdom through online orders at christmas sweaters.ca. An early estimate puts his sales at 2,100 units for 2012.

He openly shares his knowledge with other DIY-ers through online tutorials on his website. “I was really standoffish about it the first couple of years, but there’s no secret to it – it’s glue and ornaments.” Next year, Reagan plans to sell even more tacky sweaters by creating dedicated websites for each market in the U.K., U.S. and Canada. He may want to consider a website for Alberta, the province that eclipsed all others in ugly Christmas sweater sales this season. Reagan can only speculate why that’s the case. “They’re fun-loving people out there, that’s for sure.” dpalmer@vicnews.com

New children’s isolation ward opens at Victoria General A new pediatric isolation ward at Victoria General Hospital is being used in the treatment of children fighting cancer. “The greatest portion of funds raised for this project came from families whose children have experienced cancer and benefited from the care at VGH,” said Melanie McKenzie, executive director of Victoria Hospitals Foundation.

The isolation room will help protect children from infection when their immune system is compromised. It will also provide additional clinic space to allow more children to receive chemotherapy and supportive care closer to home. “When you have a child with cancer it exhausts you emotionally and it affects everybody who

knows you,” said Derrick Hamilton, whose daughter, Jaimey, has been cared for in the Pediatric Oncology Unit at VGH since 2005. VGH is Vancouver Island’s pediatric specialty hospital, treating 90 per cent of Island children. Construction cost of the new ward was $135,000, with $121,500 of the total raised by the community through the foundation, $8,100

from the Vancouver Island Health Authority and $5,400 from the Capital Regional Hospital District. “This critical project is the result of families seeing a need, finding a way and making a difference that will help kids and their families as they battle cancer,” said Graham Hill, Capital Regional Hospital District board chair. editor@goldstreamgazette.com

The Capital Regional District’s sewage committee approved a key $711,000 consulting contract to keep the McLoughlin wastewater treatment plant on schedule. Partnerships B.C. will be responsible for procurement services in the run-up to construction on the $783million secondary sewage treatment project. The arms-length provincial organization champions private-public partnerships and has helped deliver 35 projects worth $12.5 billion across the province, according to documents submitted to the CRD’s liquid waste management committee. On Dec. 12, a motion by Oak Bay Mayor Nils Jensen for an environmental review of the upcoming sewage project fell on deaf ears at the CRD. The resolution called for an independent, comparative environmental impact study and was supported by View Royal, Esquimalt, Colwood and Oak Bay councils. It went before the sewage committee two weeks ago, but failed to gain majority support. “We just couldn’t get it through,” Jensen said. “That’s how democracy works in our federated region.” The resolution called for the CRD and federal government to fund and perform the study prior to proceeding with the treatment project. The vote was 10 to 5 against the review, with Langford, Saanich and Victoria leading the no vote. dpalmer@vicnews.com


A4 • www.vicnews.com

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

OXFORDNEWHAPPYYEAR! New UVic president FOODS hired from within Closed New Year’s Day

PRICES EFFECTIVE ONE FULL WEEK WED. DECEMBER 26 to MON. DECEMBER 31, 2012 STORE HOURS: M-F 9-8:15, SAT. 9-5:15 SUN & HOLIDAYS 10-5:15

271 COOK OK ST.

FRESH LOIN

McCAINS

FRESH

ULTRA THINS PIZZAS

WHOLE CHICKEN

333

FROZ 334 360 g

ALL VARIETIES

VITASOY BEVERAGES

1

¢

4

97

¢

97 DARE

BREAKTIME COOKIES 250 g BOX

¢

97

589

SMOKED OYSTERS 85 g TIN

¢

97

CHEDDAR CHEESES

97

4

•AGED •MED •MARB •MOZZ

703 kg

319

LB

CANADA GR. “AA” BEEF

COHO SALMON SIRLOIN TIP STEAK STEAK 1188 kg

39

5

MAPLE LEAF

LESS SALT WIENERS 450 g PKG

LB

769 kg

49

3

LB

FREYBE HERB

1 49 1 99 1 99 6 69 2 99 3

125 g CHUB

MAPLE LEAF SLICED

ROAST BEEF

Kyle Slavin News staff

375 g TWIN PACK PKG

UNICO STUFFED

HERBAL TEAS 20’s BOX ALL VARIETIES

MANZANILLA OLIVES

1 KG or CREAMED

WHITE LARGE EGGS 1 DOZEN CARTON ISLAND FARMS

CLASSIC ICE CREAM FROZ 1.65 L TUB ALL VAR.

IMPORTED

FRESH MANGOES EACH...................................... IMPORTED

HASS AVOCADOES EACH......................................

375 mL JAR

ASIAN FAMILY

THAI CHILI SAUCE 280 mL BTL

WHITE SWAN

PAPER TOWELS 2 ROLL PKG “NOT JUMBO” MEXI-SNAX

TORTILLA CHIPS 255 g BAG ALL VARIETIES

79

¢

19

2

Cutbacks at the University of Victoria has resulted in the layoff of at least 24 employees so far, as departments seek to cut four per cent from their budgets this fiscal year. Melissa Moroz, labour relations officer for the Professional Employees Association, calls it a “very sad situation” that UVic handed pink slips to two dozen of their full-time workers, including some who’ve worked there since the

1980s. “It’s devastating to these people’s lives, and it will directly impact services to both faculty and students,” Moroz said. The lost jobs will come from a variety of places, she said, adding many of the employees work in technical support, scientific support and research support. Some of those laid off are already gone, while others will continue to work until spring 2013. A 2012-13 budget framework document on UVic’s website cites

CONVERT TO NATURAL GAS WITH

B.C. GROWN

U.S. GROWN LARGE

NAVEL ORANGES 1.08 KG ..................................

When asked what attracted him to this new position, Cassels said: “This university. This university is on the move, it’s growing, it has an international reputation as one of Canada’s finest universities, and what an Kyle Slavin opportunity to be a part of it.” News staff Cassels received a unanimous recommendation by the universiAn exhaustive seven-month pro- ty’s 20-member search committee. cess to find a president He’ll be the university’s for the University of Vicseventh president in its toria ended with a recog50-year history. nizable name earning the Committee chair Susan high-profile appointment. Mehinagic, also on UVic’s Jamie Cassels, who board of governors, called spent 10 years as the uniCassels “a visionary” and versity’s vice-president the most qualified person academic and provost for the job, even with the beginning in 2001, was committee looking externamed Thursday as the nally, as well, to fill the replacement for outgoing Jamie Cassels position. president David Turpin. “He understands the UVic Cassels, 56, has been with UVic’s community and understands how to faculty of law since 1981. affect change,” she said. “I have never seen anyone better,” While Cassels acknowledged the Turpin said of his successor at the positives of Turpin’s career as presiformal announcement. “Jamie is a dent, he said his first focus will be to visionary who brings an extraordi- go out and speak to the university nary mix of passion, dedication, hard community about “developing a furwork and enthusiasm to everything ther shared vision of where we want he does.” to go and how we get there.” Cassels will take over for Turpin, For an extended version of this story, who’s been president and vice-chan- visit vicnews.com. cellor since 2000, as of July 1, 2013. kslavin@saanichnews.com

1 University hit with layoffs 49 2 69 1 69 1

CELESTIAL SEASONINGS

LIQUID HONEY

Longtime law prof Jamie Cassels takes over in July

49 LIVER 19 SAUSAGES

GOLDEN VALLEY GR. “A” or MUSSELS

FAITH FARMS

APPROX 420 g BLOCK

LB

WILD

SAFEWAY CAN. NO. 1

GOLD SEAL

LB

SIRLOIN TIP ROAST

SCHNEIDER’S

•DICED •WHOLE •CRUSH

269

RIB EYE STEAK

SAN REMO ALL BEEF TOMATOES SALAMI SLICED 175 g PKG LARGE 796 mL TIN

593 kg

CANADA GR. “AA” BEEF

1299 kg

ALL VARIETIES

LB

NEW ZEALAND

BONELESS

•PLAIN •W.W. •SOUR

LB

CENTRE CUT PORK CHOPS

SAFEWAY

6’s PKG

199

CHICKEN BREAST 9 kg

ORANGE JUICE

439 kg

FRESH LOIN

90

ENGLISH MUFFINS

LB

49

77

97¢

END CUT PORK CHOPS

SKINLESS & BONELESS

KENT

FROZ CONC 250 mL

199

439 kg

ALL VARIETIES

946 mL CTN

We reserve the right to limit quantities

¢

49 ¢ 89 ¢ 49

GREEN CABBAGE

LB 1.08 KG ................................... IMPORTED

GREEN PEPPERS 1.52 KG ................................... EARTH BOUND 142 g CARTON

ORGANIC SALADS HERB BLEND, BABY SPINACH, SPRING MIX

¢

49 ¢ 69 99 2 LB

LB

EA

FURNACES

Old Oil to New Gas **95% Efficiency ......... $4,100 + HST OR $100/per mo. **97% Efficiency ......... $4,900 + HST OR $110/per mo.

Old Gas to New Gas 95% Efficiency ............... $3,620 + HST OR $92/per mo. 97% Efficiency ............. $4,250 + HST OR $100/per mo. SUBJECT TO SITE INSPECTION ** $1,000 FortisBC Rebate (Limited Time)

• Fully installed • Free oil tank removal • 10 year parts & lifetime heat exchanger warranty • Many Fireplace options available

Homeglow Heat Products 250-382-0889 • www.homeglow.bc.ca homeglow@shaw.ca

inflation pressure and decreased or flat postsecondary funding from government as reasons for consecutive four-percent budget reductions over the next two school years. “Given that salaries and benefits comprise almost 80 per cent of our total operating budget, there will unfortunately be some job losses,” Gayle Gorrill, UVic’s vicepresident finance and operations, said in a statement. “Where there are job losses, we have provided compensation consistent with the terms of the agreements with our employees.” Tom Smith, UVic’s executive director of facilities management, said he expects to lose eight janitor positions over two years through attrition. The frequency of vacuuming and garbage collection from many places on campus will be reduced, as well, beginning in January. kslavin@saanich news.com


www.vicnews.com • A5

VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012

Feeding nuisance animals ticketable offence in city City of Victoria moves to enact fine structure for violators Roszan Holmen News staff

With provincial blessing in hand, the City of Victoria council has adopted new bylaws prohibiting people from feeding a variety of animals. Last March, council gave first nod to prohibition on feeding gulls, crows and pigeons in the downtown core, as well as racoons, squirrels and feral rabbits anywhere in the city. One snag held up the animal control bylaw, however. While municipalities have been given jurisdiction over most nuisance

species, gulls require special permission due to their inclusion in the federal Migratory Birds Convention Act. On Nov. 1, the Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations gave Victoria’s proposed feeding ban the thumbs up. Council passed the bylaw Dec. 13. Violators face a $125 fine for feeding most prohibited animals on the list – or $350 for feeding racoons or deer. The fine won’t be the first line of defence, however. “Our goal is to educate the public,” said Mark Hayden, Vic-

A group of seagulls fight over some crumbs in Pioneer Park. The City of Victoria has banned feeding the birds downtown. Don Denton/News staff

toria’s manager of bylaw and licensing services. “This isn’t an arbitrary thing. There is a rationale behind it.” Enforcement will be reserved for “individuals that aren’t getting the message for some reason,” he said. Hayden estimates the city receives between one and two complaints per week during the summer season about people feeding animals. A ban on feeding deer has been in place for years, but so far, nobody has been ticketed for the offence. rholmen@vicnews.com

SALE STARTS WED. DEC. 26

D Y A G B OX I N HOME DECOR, QUILTING & CRAFT FABRIC All Regular Stock

50%

OFF reg. price

LINING & INTERFACING All regular stock!

50%

OFF reg. price

U T O O W L B FABULOUS FLEECE PRINTS, SOLIDS & NOVELTIES

50%

50%

OFF reg. price

reg. price

FASHION FABRICS

FLANNELETTE & BROADCLOTH All regular stock!

OFF

All regular stock!

50%

OFF reg. price

CHRISTMAS PRINTS, QUILTS, TRIMS & DECOR ACCESSORIES

50%-75% 60%-70%

OFF reg. price

3170 TILLICUM ROAD

VICTORIA

LOWER LEVEL OUTSIDE OF TILLICUM CENTRE

 ,"--Ê,"Ê* , -Ê, °Ê /, ÊUÊÓxä‡{Çx‡Çxä£

Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30am - 9:00 pm 9:30 am -#1 5:30 DEC12Sat. BLOWOUT ADpmI Sun.t11:00 lam b - 5:00 b pm tb

tt

“Remember ladies and gentlemen wine is a grocery!” Come see why we’re the best (and most FUN) wine making place in town! 347 Cook Street, Victoria BC · 250-384-8550 · www.villagewineworks.com


A6 • www.vicnews.com

VICTORIANEWS

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Victoria News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Generosity of the season The shopping malls around Greater Victoria haven’t exactly been empty over this Christmas season, but there’s a sense people aren’t spending as much these days. Governments at all levels are facing deficits and cutbacks, and the economy isn’t exactly roaring upward. Despite lingering tough times, people across Greater Victoria have once again shown immense compassion and generosity over the past few months. Each week and almost each day we’ve seen new examples youth, adults, businesses and public sector organizations working hard to bring in food, clothing and toys for people in poverty and who are homeless. Kids and teachers at schools such as Belmont secondary, Mount Doug high and Cedar Hill middle school have brought in piles of food, gifts and cash for food banks in Greater Victoria. Oak Bay high kids created gift bags for people spending Christmas in the cancer ward. A small army of Salvation Army volunteers have manned collection kettles at shopping centres across the region. In driving wind and rain, the annual truck light parade wound its way through the city and people were happy to give food for the Mustard Seed, a key food bank for the region that has seen significant cutbacks this year. Some, like a preschool owner in Fairfield, raised enough donations help more than 65 families with Christmas hampers. Or Department of Defence personnel who have come through big for the United Way. These examples are the tip of the iceberg of those who give a little and a lot. Most people won’t see the joy they bring to kids who live in poverty, seniors who struggle on meager fixed incomes, and families given a chance to have a hearty meal that might normally fall outside their limited budget. We hope Christmas season helps bring out the best in people, and this year again, we think it has. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Victoria News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Dix seeks balance with business NDP leader Adrian Dix has completed year-end interviews with members of the legislative press gallery. Here are highlights from my discussion with him.

proposal, for which no application has been made. Obviously it would have been desirable for everyone had they chosen a true joint review, as they have in Site C [dam proposed for Peace River], as they TF: On the Kinder Mordid with Kemess North gan oil pipeline expansion [rejected mine expanproposal, federal NDP sion proposal] and other leader Tom Mulcair says cases. the federal environmenTF: You don’t want duplital process would have to cated review processes be strengthened before a here, you just want a proproject like that could get a vincial cabinet say in the thorough enough hearing. Tom Fletcher decision? Do you agree? AD: That’s right. B.C. Views AD: The B.C. Liberal TF: On your relationship government has signed with the B.C. Federation of an equivalency agreement that says Labour, your caucus is considering a that the federal decision is the proproposal that B.C. should once again vincial decision on these projects. do away with secret ballots for union If it applies to Enbridge Northern certification. Gateway, presumably the B.C. LibAD: The B.C. Fed makes a case erals would apply it to Kinder Morto the government on a series of gan. issues on employment standards They could have done a joint every year. Labour law, every year. process, where [the final decision] WorkSafeBC, every year. Trades and would have gone to both cabinets. training, every year. They chose instead to give up With respect to [accepting signed jurisdiction. They were so afraid of union cards for certification], it making any decision on Northern is a democratic process that the Gateway that they sent it over to Newfoundland Conservative govthe federal government. ernment just put into place a few So what we’ve said is within a months ago. So it’s a proposal from week of coming to office, we would the labour movement and we’re end that equivalency agreement, looking at it. and British Columbia would make For most of B.C.’s modern hisdecisions about both Enbridge tory, since World War II, we’ve had Northern Gateway, which applied that card-check system in place. in May 2010, and any other pipeThe question would be whether line, including the Kinder Morgan [returning to that system] is a prior-

ity for this term in government. TF: So those kinds of things will be made clear in your platform? AD: Absolutely. TF: You picked up some serious money from the business community at a fundraiser in October. Is that some kind of a record for the NDP? AD: [Laughs.] It might be a record, I don’t know. I think the business fundraiser we did at the Hotel Vancouver netted $350,000. I think what it reflects is, this year I’ve had about 230 meetings with the business community. The purpose of it has been principally to build understanding, particularly on issues of skills training. With the priority I give to skills training, I think I’m much more attuned to their concerns than the government has been. TF: I suppose that kind of success in fundraising might make it more difficult to follow through with your pledge to ban corporate and union donations. AD: I don’t think so. The B.C. Liberal Party has a very high level of corporate donations as a percentage of its total. We’re overwhelmingly dependent on individual donations. We get support from unions, but it’s not even close to what people would think. TF: So you’ll campaign for that, as you have before? AD: Yes. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

2009 WINNER

‘This year I’ve had about 230 meetings with the business community.’


www.vicnews.com • A7

VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012

OPINION

Now is a good time to re-examine our beliefs With the passing of Christmas world views and perspectives on and other festivals of faith, life. it is an appropriate time to Whether their authorship is engage in important described as human spiritual questions or divine, the writers that engage people in were nevertheless my own Christian faith bound by history and community. human constraints. Perhaps there are And depending on other people of faith the particular stream who are emboldened or tradition birthing to move outside their these views their value orthodoxies as well. and authenticity have This enterprise is become the hallmark particularly urgent for conviction for each Dale Perkins faith tradition. ‘People of the Book’ – Guest column Christians, with their In my faith tradition, Bible, Jews with their the most challenging Torah and Hebrew Bible, and argument coming forward is Muslims with their sacred Qur’an. around the particular world view Each of these texts grew out of that gave birth to our Bible. Most a specific era with very definite scholars insist that the ancient

world view of the Bible was a flat Earth, with a domed sky above that opened to allow the sun to shine during the day, but closed with only small pin-sized holes that permitted the sun to be seen as stars, or an ever-changing hole for the moon. The place where God dwelt was above – in the heavens – and God intervened in the affairs of earth and regularly engineered events on earth according to a grand master plan that was revealed to certain people at certain times and in certain ways. Below the earth’s surface were the waters of the deep, and somewhere below that was a sort of hell that humans could descend should they misbehave. However, for the faithful ones,

their reward was to be up in heaven, where God and God’s emissaries (angels) dwelt. Few of us believe in that kind of world anymore, but still there are some. Even U.S. president Barack Obama, in his address to the mourning people in Newtown, Conn., made reference to this heaven and paradise as the dwelling place for the 26 victims of the mass shooting. Of course President Obama doesn’t believe in this ancient world view himself, yet he still had to refer to it in his memorial address. For many of us there still is this disconnect between the imagery and vocabulary grounded on an ancient world view, and a missing vocabulary and imagery that can satisfy us now with our Hubble

spacecraft view of the cosmos. In short, we haven’t got a story we can repeat to ourselves and our children that can fill the void and help us make sense of our human condition, and especially at times of great need. What we desperately need are theologians and storytellers grounded both in current science and theology who can create new stories with new vocabulary and images, which have both integrity and power. Until that happens we will have to rely on a schizophrenic perspective based on the old worldview no one believes anymore. Dale Perkins is a retired minister of the United Church of Canada, living in Victoria, B.C.

LETTERS We asked you:

What do you think of the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority’s plans to install guardrails along the edges of the Ogden Point breakwater?

Not a good idea. By the looks of it, there will be less elbow room. I walk it a fair amount and find it very safe as is. With the addition of motorized scooters, on top of the dogs and runners all in a narrow space, this looks like an accident waiting to happen. I hope the harbour authority has good liability insurance, they will need it shortly. David Churchill, Victoria I am at a loss to understand why anyone would oppose this plan. Have any of the naysayers attempted to get a building permit for a backyard deck, say a couple of feet above ground, without a handrail? It is mandatory for any building construction, so why is it even questionable for the breakwater, where it should have been installed long ago? Let just one child be seriously injured and then see what righteous indignation would follow from the public. Safety of man-made public places is a different issue from a nature hiking trail, where we are expected to fend for ourselves. And wouldn’t it be nice to be able to pause along a breakwater walk, elbow up on the railing and watch the sunset? Three cheers for the harbour authority for the planned installation. George Zador, Victoria Yes to rails at the Ogden Point breakwater. I will go out there more. I support the decision, as it is practical and enables more people to walk out and see the sea life. Kim Van Weelden, Victoria Breakwater defined: “A barrier built out into the sea to protect the coast or harbour from the force of waves.” Leave it alone please. It was not built to protect the people. We are grateful to be able to walk on it knowing so. That is what makes it so great. Linda Monette, Victoria

Rendering courtesy Greater Victoria Harbour Authority

Illustration shows planned design for the Ogden Point breakwater handrails. News readers remain split on the idea. It is reassuring to see the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority’s concern for public safety being demonstrated by their intention to put guard rails along the Ogden Point breakwater. Can the GVHA say when they plan on installing electrical shore power connections for cruise ships, so that James Bay residents’ respiratory health will no longer be threatened by particulate matter, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and ammonia emissions? Trevor Morley, Victoria This just seems like a “make work/spend money” project. Victoria already has so many accessible walks for wheelchairs and scooters that I simply don’t understand the

issue here. At 70 years of age, I’m still able to walk along the breakwater, but once I’m not able, I’ll just delete the breakwater from my walk options. Why add a railing and spoil the excitement for those wanting the adrenalin of wind and waves? Why spend money on this when there are far more pressing areas of need? Barbara McDonell, Victoria I am so very pleased that at last the Ogden Point walkway is getting a safety upgrade. I have lived in Victoria since 1991 and have not been able to enjoy this scenic walkway due to vertigo. I look forward to enjoying a leisurely walk on the breakwater free of anxiety. Valerie Peters, Victoria

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes opinions and comments. Letters should discuss issues and stories covered in the News and be 300 words or less. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity. Phone numbers are not printed. Mail: Letters to the Editor, Victoria News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 Fax: 250-386-2624 Email: editor@vicnews.com


A8 • www.vicnews.com

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Off leash dogs to stay at Macaulay Pt. Park Daniel Palmer

Helping hand given

News staff

Esquimalt council agreed to finalize a five-year renewal for public use of Macaulay Point Park. The land is owned by the Department of National Defence and the agreement represents a shared partnership for maintenance and monitoring going forward. DND has implemented several improvements over the past year at the park, including the installation of 900 metres of spilt rail fencing to help protect at-risk plant species. Signs have also been installed to educate park users on the native plants. Coun. Meagan Brame told staff at the Dec. 17 council meeting that she had received complaints from numerous residents when the fencing was installed. She said there needs to be greater awareness about who owns the land. “People need to know this is a federally owned park,” she said. Council approved using $15,000 from its parks operating budget and $57,000 from the parks capital budget to maintain the park and develop Fresh an environmental management plan for the area. A staircase to the waterfront is also being considered. The agreement allows for continued off-leash dog use at the park, but staff warned that any destruction of protected plant species could put an end to that. “Should this restriction fail to result in the level of protection required at the site, (DND) could Fresh completely ban dogs from the site,” the report stated. Parks staff will be responsible for /ea conservation efforts, while military police will patrol the park, staff said.

Keith Jenkins, left, receives a full dinner plate from Victoria Coun. Charlayne Thornton-Joe as Victoria-Swan Lake MLA Rob Fleming picks up more turkey dinners to serve at Our Place Society. The celebrity servers were on hand Thursday to help dish up around 1,000 meals for the annual Christmas dinner. Arnold Lim/News staff

100% locally y owned

dirt cheap this week

Roma Tomato es

pricing in effect Dec 26 - Jan 2 while quantities last

¢

99

locally owned & operated 8:30am-5pm New Years Eve, Closed New Years Day 8:3Oam-7pm Thurs-Mon!

/lb

today’s produce c

California

Blood Oranges 50 lo cal itt emosunt 9 5 BC it ems ¢ Imported 10 0 0 organic it ems /lb Mandarin i in Imported Large Oranges e es Avocado ess Eggplant 2/$ 00 0 ¢ /5 5 lb B Box ¢ /ea

99

6

It’s your turn! Pe

5.6 Million

in 201 2 Rebat es

That’s like receiving a 5 CENT PER LITRE DISCOUNT each time you fill up your vehicle or or use home heating oil.

PLUS! 5% CASH BACK on grocery store purchases.

NEXT YEAR, DO YOUR HAPPY DANCE! JOIN TODAY! With a one-time membership fee of

99

Fresh

Co-op distributed nin s ula

$

99

$

27

Certified Organic Kale B unches Baby Peeled Texas Carrots Pink 3/$ 00 $ 99 Grapefr uit /1 lb Bag Saanich Grown $ 99 /5 lbs Red, Yellow & White Pototo es Red Leaf Lettuce Fresh 2/$ 00 /10 lb bag Bok & ¢ /ea Sweet Sui Choy Kiwi Fr uit ¢ Fresh /lb 4/$ 00 Lemons 4/$ 00

5

1

5

99

69

1

1

BC Grown

Gala Apples ¢

99

/lb

SCAN LOCATIONS

Voted

Best City

of the

Voted

1

VICTORIA NEWS

www.peninsulaco-op.com

3

1286 McKenzie Avenue

www.therootcellar.ca

Best City

of the

Voted

1

VICTORIA NEWS

Voted

Best City

Best City

of the

of the

VICTORIA NEWS

1

VICTORIA NEWS

greater victoria business awards 2012

WINNER

business of the year (26 to 75 employees)

   

15th

9 % ! 2

   

16th

9 % ! 2

   

17th

9 % ! 2

   

18th

9 % ! 2

250-477-9495

Council boosts electric vehicles Council supported a motion to install the township’s first electric vehicle charging station. The station will be located in the town hall parking lot and will cost $24,000 to purchase and install. A third of that is expected to come from a provincial fund that aims to install 570 charging stations across B.C. by March 2013. The township will use its sustainability reserve fund to pay for the installation. Maintenance is expected to cost $2,000 each year, while hydro costs will likely be recovered through a user pay system of $1 to $4 per hour after a free trial period. dpalmer@vicnews.com


www.vicnews.com • A9

VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012

Researchers offer new hope for stroke victims Unexpected gains on weak side of body for patients in recovery Arnold Lim News staff

Research at the University of Victoria has demonstrated that weight training by stroke victims in recovery can have twice the benefit to their bodies. A study led by UVic neuroscientist Paul Zehr showed that showed that a stroke patient exercising the strong side of their body will have roughly equivalent muscle gain on their weak side. “One of the things that is a big problem after a stroke is one side is more affected,” Zehr said. “We are trying to understand what has happened after the stroke, and take that information and use it to guide interventions … to help push the system back (to normal).” The study focused primarily on the lower body to help patients

regain strength and mobility. Overall, people who participated in the six-week study regained about 30 per cent muscle mass. Cross-education of strength, or the idea that training one side of the human body can have benefits to corresponding muscles on the opposite side, has been known for decades – but typically the cross-benefit is only five to 10 per cent. “The really important observation was when we went to see what happened to the leg not trained, we found the same strength gain which means 30 per cent (gain) on both sides,” Zehr said. Nineteen patients, averaging seven years post-stroke, completed the program. The participants, ranging in age from 26 to 81, engaged in high-intensity exercises, such as lifting a fitted block of wood with their unaffected ankle and foot. While more tests are being done, the results of the study, completed with PhD student Katie Dragert, startled even the professor.

Arnold Lim/News staff

Paul Zehr, a professor of neuroscience at the University of Victoria, led a recent study that showed stroke victims who trained their stronger leg had roughly equal strength gains on their leg more impacted by the stroke. “What is happening (is) there are connections across the brain and spinal cord that are spilling over to help the other side,” Zehr said. “We know this works in people without damage … but not only did it work, it outstripped any expectation on how it would work. The fact it had equivalent strength gains on both sides is a

Cornerstone themes fuel sermon faith: peace, love, joy and hope. It’s just a celebration of that and we celebrate it through traditions, “But for people who are trying through being with family.” to live as disciples 52 weeks of the Mitchell’s brow wrinkles as he year, it’s not that much out of the delicately explains his dim view of ordinary. This is the same Christ the watering down of the season we worship (all) year. It’s wonderful in popular culture. So many to celebrate the beginning of the commercial and public references incarnation, but it’s only part of the refer to it as “the holiday season,” story. What Jesus grew up into is purposely omitting the word more important than who he was as Christmas in a show political and a baby.” Rev. Michael Caveney cultural correctness. In the Christmas Eve service, “People forget how this all started Victor says, “we try to move people with Jesus,” he says. past the bambino worship and consider the The majority of local Christian churches host whole meaning of what we’re about and what his Christmas Eve services. To find one near you, whole life stood for.” simply do a web search for churches in Victoria. Echoing Victor’s comments, Rev. Michael editor@vicnews.com Caveney of St. Aidan’s United says 60 to 70 per cent of the 200-odd people who attend the Saanich church’s popular Christmas Eve service are not regular congregation members. “I think people Parish of are just trying to get Peter & Give thanks unto St. in touch with their St. Paul CORPORATION the Lord Jesus. Rev. Lon Towstego OF THE TOWNSHIP spiritual values,” OF ESQUIMALT Caveney says, trying Sing unto him. Monday, Dec. 24 1229 Esquimalt Road to explain why many 7pm Eucharist, 10pm Carol Sing Let the redeemed Esquimalt, B.C. V9A 3P1 people set aside the “Midnight Mass” 250-414-7100 of the Lord testify. 10:30pmwith evening of Dec. 24 to choir attend church. NOTICE OF Tuesday, Dec. 25 Similar to his MEETINGS 10am Holy Communion counterpart at St. I can help with Hymns Holiday Business Hours Andrew’s, Caveney’s you fi nd him. St. Paul’s Historic Naval th Wednesday, December 26 sermon tonight (7 Garrison Church Call p.m.) steers away from Municipal Hall Closed 1379 Esquimalt Rd. detailing the story Pastor Dave Tuesday, January 1st 250-386-6833 of Jesus’ birth and Municipal Hall Closed 250-479-0500 www.stpeterandpaul.ca focuses instead on the New Year’s Levee themes of Christmas Tuesday, January 1st To book a space call Shelley Westwood Eve. 1 pm - 2:30 pm “For us it’s really at 250-480-3227 Council Chambers a celebration of the fact that God For further information, cares,” he says. “You please call 250-414-7135 Like the Victoria News know, it’s those four or our website @ on Facebook cornerstones of our www.esquimalt.ca/council Continued from Page A1

CHURCH DIRECTORY Your Guide to Local Houses of Worship

remarkable result.” Retired school secretary Barb Oliver was one of those patients, having had a stroke 11 years ago. She said studies like this are important for her and future stroke victims to be able to live their lives and do the things they want to do. “While I was doing it I noticed the difference,” Oliver said. “My

muscles were looser, not as tight.” The 61-year-old is fresh off a trip to Africa in the fall, despite the misgivings of her travel agent, who suggested Africa was no place for a “disabled person.” She went anyway and had a great time, she says. Oliver hopes others find similar success, as research continues. “It is the hope that you get stronger and use less of the health care system and less medication. Dr. Zehr’s program and the work of all the PhD students are wonderful up there and great to work with. I would recommend anybody to do it.” Zehr and the PhD students hope more post-stroke patients get involved and believe their research is making a difference. “It is a piece of a number of different puzzles. What we do now is refine it and maximize it,” he said. “It is a way to make that intervention better. The bigger overarching vision is to help restore and recover walking ability.” Post-stroke patients looking to be involved in future studies at UVic can contact rnl@uvic.ca. reporter@vicnews.com


A10 • www.vicnews.com

THE ARTS

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

HOT TICKET Jay and Grayson ruin Christmas

NEWS

Too far from the family to enjoy the feelings of shame and disgust that are an inevitable part of the holidays? Fret no more. Come enjoy, as Jay and Grayson insist you play charades; force you to join in the sing-along; require that you model the horrific sweater from Aunt Ethel. Logan’s pub, 1821 Cook St., will be open from 3 to 9 p.m. on Dec. 25, serving Christmas dinner.

22 Minutes star lends hand to Metro Theatre Walsh brings solid characters to raging one-woman show Daniel Palmer News staff

The line between humour and rage often rests on a knife’s edge. No one embodies this truth more readily than Mary Walsh, a stalwart of the Canadian sketch comedy circuit who brings her one-woman show Dancing With Rage to Metro Studio Feb. 19. Perhaps most recognized for her Newfie-infused satire on the longrunning CBC series This Hour Has 22 Minutes, Walsh incorporates many of the characters she has played over the years into the show, including the infamous warrior princess Marg Delahunty, Dakey Dunn, Mom Reardon and Tim Horton’s loiterer and close-camera gossip Connie Bloor. Dancing with Rage follows several stories, from a blind woman who regains her eyesight to a mother travelling the country in search of her lost child. Throughout the show, Walsh embodies her classic and emerging characters in seasoned fashion to illustrate the rage brought on by modern politics, capitalism and pop culture. In her 25-year comedy career, Walsh has received

25 Gemini Awards as well as the Governor General’s lifetime achievement award. In her years with 22 Minutes, she made news headlines by humanizing and humiliating stiff politicians outside Parliament and by ambushing press conferences, all with an endearing east-coast accent and cheekiness. In 2011, Walsh made national headlines for knocking on the door of Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who promptly called police and attempted to have her arrested for trespassing. Walsh comes to Victoria for one night only, fresh off a two-week run at Vancouver’s Firehall Arts Centre. She performs in support of Metro Studio’s Raise the Roof campaign, where partial proceeds will go to installing air conditioning in the theatre. “It’s really exciting Mary is launching (our campaign),” said Heather Lindsay, general manager at Intrepid Theatre. In partnership with the Victoria Conservatory of Music, Intrepid will be putting a new roof on the studio and upgrading it to a theatre in 2013. “The most exciting and relatable thing is the air conditioning, because I think our audience members can really relate to that, “ Lindsay said. “Most of them have been in a hot room with us at Mary Walsh, a stalwart some point.” of the Canadian Tickets are $100, but $50 will go directly sketch comedy circuit, to the fundraising campaign and will brings her one-woman include a $50 charitable tax receipt, she show Dancing With said. Rage to Metro Studio Find tickets at ticketrocket.org or by Feb. 19. calling 250-590-6291. Submitted photo dpalmer@vicnews.com

BACK ALLEYS DON’T RECYCLE UNWANTED ELECTRONICS But we do. Find where you can recycle your electronics safely and responsibly at,

WHAT’S ACCEPTED? Even more electronic devices can be recycled free of charge at any Return-It Electronics™ Collection Site. Among the accepted consumer products are console gaming systems and accessories, e-readers, electronic books, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and calculators. For the full list, please visit return-it.ca/electronics/products

WHY IS THIS PROGRAM IMPORTANT?

The Return-It Electronics™ recycling program provides an environmentally sound recycling option for unwanted electronics. It ensures these items will not be landfilled or illegally exported. You can drop off any of the acceptable products at designated Return-It Electronics™ Collection Sites without charge and be assured they will be recycled responsibly.


www.vicnews.com • A11

VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012

Ballet Victoria gives gift to families

LI M

IT

ED

TI M

E

O

FF ER

Ballet Victoria is in the studio hard at work on its new, original production of The Gift of Pandora’s Box. A holiday performance is a Christmas tradition for Victoria’s dance troupe, and this year they bring a tale inspired by Greek mythology to modern day, setting The Gift of Pandora’s Box in a family home at Christmas. Uncle Geoff has travelled the world and returned with gift boxes for everyone, however he has one special box that is not meant to be opened. When curiosity gets the better of Pandora and she opens the box, panic, chaos and hilarious pandemonium ensue. In his signature style, artistic director and choreographer, Paul Destrooper has developed a unique program that showcases dance and focuses on the dramatic and theatrical elements of good story telling. The characters in this work are developed around archetypes, filled with local colour. A nutcracker, a witch, a dragon, a fairy and more are interwoven with the family celebrating Christmas. Local pianists Jane Edler and Wendy Stouffer take the role of visiting family mem-

ora of characters will make the work accessible to a wide variety of audiences,” Destrooper said. “Ballet fans will appreciate the artist’s technical prowess while the novice audience can simply enjoy beautiful dance and a fun story.” The Gift is a story of hope and Ballet Victoria is a troupe that is hopeful many families will be able to attend. “Every year for our holiday show, we offer tickets to charity groups and we will do that again this season,” said Destrooper. “We also realized that we can do more. We can offer families entertainment that is affordable, fun and that hopefully, introduces young people to the arts.” To give area residents an opportunity for a family outing, the company has reduced all tickets for kids 12 and under to $15. The inexpensive ticket is valid for all four performances of The Gift of Pandora’s Box at the Royal Theatre. The Gift of Pandora’s Box leaps on to the Royal Theatre stage on Dec. 27, 28, and 29 at 7:30 p.m. and on Dec. 30 at 2 p.m. Tickets are available at rmts.bc.ca and 250-386-6121. For more information visitballetvictoria.ca. llavin@vicnews.com

BEST BUY – Correction Notice On the Boxing Day flyer (December 25-27, page 1) this product: Klipsch 6.5" Synergy Series Tower Speaker (F-10) WebCode: 10161974, was advertised with an incorrect specification. Please be advised that the speaker is NOT a dual speaker, it is a single 6.5" speaker. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have cause our valued customers.

GET READY FOR OUR

BIGGEST

SHOPPING GW WEEK EVER!!! View all of your our ur Boxing Week flyers and don’t miss out on the hottest deals of the season.

%

$

Derek Ford Photo

Dancer Risa Kobayashi leaps over Ivy and Jack, young members of the Ballet Victoria company. bers and play a section of Lady Gaga music and a section of Tchaikovsky. Destrooper has used much of Tchaikovsky’s

familiar Nutcracker score as a background for this entirely new piece. “Familiar music and a pleth-

AND GIVE THE GIFT OF LTE LTE SPEED SPEE ED

SAVE TIME. SAVE MONEY.

your source for FREE coupons

Exclusive Offer Available at: TILLICUM MALL 3170 Tillicum Rd VictorIAs   WESTSHORE TOWN CENTRE *ACklin Rd VictorIAs  

50

$

$

Let Flyerland.ca be your guide to savings www.flyerland.ca/boxingweek

Get a great deal on Windows Phone 8 devices

SAVE

%

1

MILLSTREAM VILLAGE #Millstream Rd VictorIAs  

with select 3-yr. FLEXtabTM agreements

ON THE HOTTEST WINDOWS PHONE 8 DEVICES

SAANICH CENTRE Quadra St SAANICHs  

NOW OPEN

UPTOWN Uptown Blvd VictorIAs  

PORT PLACE MALL

650 Terminal Ave Nanaimo (250) 740-1178

Rogers LTE network available in select cities. See rogers.com/LTE. m/LT L E.

SAMSUNG MSUNG AT A ATIV IV S | WI WINDO WINDOWS OWS PHONEE 8X 8X BY BY HTC HTC – 16 G | NOKIA LUMI LUMIA 920 coming soon

NOW OPEN! PORT PLACE MALL

.

UP BONUS: TO 12 MONTHS FREE UNLIMITED VIDEO STREAMING

NANAIMO NORTH TOWN CENTRE Rutherford Rd Nanaimo   

**

EXPERIENCE THE FASTEST WIRELESS NETWORK TECHNOLOGY ON THE PLANET * Offers available for a limited time and subject to change without notice. 1 Superphone $50 discount with new activation before Jan. 7/13 on any 3-yr. talk and internet plan having min. $45 monthly service fee. Device Saving Recovery Fee and/or Service Deactivation Fee (as applicable) apply in accordance with your service agreement. FLEXtab balance corresponds to the sum of the Device Savings Recovery Fee and the Additional Device Savings Recovery Fee. ** Up to 12 months unlimited video streaming on your smartphone (not shareable among devices) available to new wireless internet customers who activate an eligible 3-yr. term talk and internet plan (3 months with $55 single line/$110 family plan; 6 months with $65 single line/$130 family plan; and 12 months with $75 or $95 single line/$150 or $190 family plan respectively). Usage subject to Rogers Terms of Service and Acceptable Use Policy. Visit rogers.com/terms. Subject to change without notice. Device Saving Recovery Fees and/or Service Deactivation Fee (as applicable) apply in accordance with your service agreement. ©2012 Rogers Communications.

4ERMINAL!VE Nanaimo   

DISCOVERY HARBOUR SHOPPING CENTRE ,Island Hwy #ampbell River    DRIFTWOOD MALL #liffe Ave. #ourtenay   

Stay Connected... www.mydigitalcom.ca www.digitalcommunications.ca

Like us on FaceBook! Search: Digital Communications Rogers Wireless Victoria


A12 • www.vicnews.com

Parish of St. Peter & St. Paul Rev. Lon Towstego

Monday, Dec. 24

Tuesday, Dec. 25

7pm Eucharist, 10pm Carol Sing 10:30 pm “Midnight Mass” w/choir

10 am Holy Communion with Hymns

St. Paul’s Historic Naval Garrison Church

1379 Esquimalt Rd. 250-386-6833 www.stpeterandpaul.ca

oo L k

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

what’s happening

PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

in

Esquimalt

Township thanks its Centennial 2012 supporters

Warmest Wishes for the Holiday Season from Mark and the staff

Esquimalt Plaza Dry Cleaning

250.386.8641 1153 Esquimalt Rd. He sees you when hen your you our sleeping. slee sl eepi p ng. en you’re you’r yo u’re awake. awa wake. He knows when you’ve been bee een n bad bad ba He knows if you’ve

As the year of Centennial celebrations draws to a close, the Township of Esquimalt took the opportunity to say thank you last week to its dedicated volunteers and generous community supporters. At the Dec. 17 council meeting, Mayor Barb Desjardins presented awards of recognition to a variety of Centennial 2012 partners, including Canadian Heritage, the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development and the Province of BC, Intergovernmental Relations, Francophone Affairs. Esquimalt 100 official sponsors included Country Grocer, Provincial Capital Commission, RBC Royal Bank – Esquimalt branch, Seaspan – Victoria Shipyards, media partners 100.3 The Q and the Zone 91.3, CTV Vancouver Island and Times Colonist, plus community supporters Black Press, Associated Engineering, BC Hydro and Island Tents and Events. “Our government funding partners, official sponsors, media partners and community supporters made our milestone year a memorable one for the community and the entire region with their generous contributions,”

Black Press

The right tools for the job.

Merry Christmas Now offering eye exams 250.380.2020

vicnews.com

gifts, including the book Esquimalt, 1912 Desjardins said. In addition to the special recognition – 2012 by local historian and story-teller plaques, the partners received Centennial Sherri Robinson.

Get active this new year with Esquimalt Parks & Rec Jennifer Blyth

So be So be good good od for for or goodness go goodne oo es ess sake! sa ake ke!!

Country Grocer’s Brad Boughton, Mark Wilson and Peter Cavin receive a Centennial appreciation award from Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins.

If your New Year’s resolutions will include a new health and wellness routine, Esquimalt Recreation will be a great place to start. The recreation department welcomes the new year Jan. 5 with a free open house featuring discounts, prizes, program marketplace and more. This popular free event, from 9 a.m. to noon, is a great opportunity to meet program instructors and participate in demonstration classes to find your new favourite activity. You’ll also find a variety of fitness options in the new Active Living Guide. Whether you’re returning to fitness after some time

off or need a little guidance to help you find the right program to meet your fitness needs, Esquimalt Recreation’s personal trainers will get you moving in the right direction, offering individual and semi-private sessions as well as packages. Team sports fans can build their cardio with activities like basketball and volleyball, or go all out with a “Multi-Sport League with West Coast Rec,” in which teams play volleyball, dodgeball, basketball, indoor ultimate Frisbee, soccer and flag football. Looking to get moving in a different way? Why not add to your dance moves with classes ranging from traditional fox trot and rumba to poi spinning,

“rhythmic movements performed while swinging weighted objects in patterns around your body. You’ll achieve a total core workout with a chance to add your own creative expression to the sequences.” Other options include Tai Chi and Qi Gong, which focus on balance, strength and relaxation, or check out Esquimalt’s new Outdoor Active Park with a special orientation session; the first is scheduled for Feb. 2. Need a goal to work toward? Mark your calendars for the LifeMark Health Esquimalt 5K Fun Run and Walk March 16! For information about the many activities starting in the New Year, visit www. esquimalt.ca/recreation or call 250-412-8500.

Learn to make the most of your workout at Esquimalt’soutdoor Active Park with a Feb.2 orientation. File photo.

Compliments of the Season! Randall Garrison MP

Maurine Karagianis MLA

Esquimalt – Juan de Fuca

Esquimalt – Royal Roads

250-405-6550 www.randallgarrison.ndp.ca Randall.Garrison@parl.gc.ca A2 – 100 Aldersmith Plc, View Royal

250-479-8326 www.maurinekaragianis.ca Maurine.Karagianis.MLA@leg.bc.ca A5 – 100 Aldersmith Plc, View Royal


www.vicnews.com • A13

what’s happening oo L k in Esquimalt VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012

PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

CommunityCalendar Monday to Friday – Rainbow Kitchen serves a free hearty meal at noon for low-income and marginalized people at the United Church of Esquimalt, 500 Admirals Rd., in Wheeley Hall (enter from Lyall Street). Fridays – Esquimalt Walking Group hosts free social, community walks leaving from the rec centre foyer at 10 a.m. year-round, rain or shine. 2nd & 4th Mondays – Esquimalt Photography Club meets, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in the hall of Esquimalt United Church. New members welcome, incl. all levels of amateur photographers. FMI: www.esquimaltphotoclub.org 2nd Fridays – Taizé Service, a quiet meditative service of prayer through song, 6 p.m. at Esquimalt United Church, 500 Admirals Rd, with simple meal following. FMI: www.esquimaltunited.com Dec. 24 – Christmas Eve Services at Esquimalt United Church, 500 Admirals Rd. Community Carol Sing at 7 p.m.; Meditative Candle Service and Communion 11 p.m. FMI: www.esquimaltunited.com Dec. 24 – St. Paul’s Historic Naval Garrison Church Christmas Eve Eucharist, 7 p.m. Carol Sing, 10 p.m., Midnight Mass, 10:30 p.m. Dec. 25 – St. Paul’s Historic Naval Garrison Church Holy Communion, 10:00 a.m. Dec. 25 – Merry Christmas! Enjoy Songs of the Season at the Esquimalt Rec Centre pool, 1:30 to 4 p.m., with $2 admission. FMI: 250-412-8500. Jan. 3 – Victoria Cougars host the

Enjoy the Songs of the Season at Esquimalt pool Sounds of the Christmas spirit will ring out through the Esquimalt pool Dec. 25 when the rec centre hosts Songs of the Season. Take a break from the bustle of the day with a relaxing dip in the pool while listening to some of your favourite Christmas music. Admission is $2 and the pool is open from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Christmas Eve Services at Esquimalt United Church

Community Carol Christmas

Send your Esquimalt event notices to jblyth@telus.net

The Victoria Cougars are continuing their winning record on their way to VIJHL playoffs. Come cheer on the home team at Archie Browning Arena Jan. 3, 10, 17, 24 and 27.

7:00 p.m.

Meditative Candle Service & Communion 11:00 p.m.

corner of Admirals & Lyall

250-384-3031 • www.esquimaltunited.com

Have a safe and

HAPPY HOLIDAY SEASON from all of us at the

Westshore Wolves, 7 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www. victoriacougars.com Jan. 5 – Esquimalt Rec Centre Open House, 9 a.m. to noon. FMI: 250-4128500. Jan. 7 – Esquimalt Council meets, 7 p.m. in Council Chambers. FMI: 250-4147135. Jan. 10 – Victoria Cougars host the Saanich Braves, 7 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www.victoriacougars.com Jan. 12 – Pacific Mobile Depots Community Recycling, 9 a.m. to noon at the Archie Browning rear parking lot. Drop-off fees apply. FMI: 250-893-3851 or www. pacificmobiledepots.com Jan. 12 – Victoria Esquimalt Lacrosse registration, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esquimalt Rec Centre. FMI: www. velacrosse.com Jan. 14 – Esquimalt Committee of the

Whole meets, 7 p.m. in Council Chambers. FMI: 250414-7135. Jan. 17 – Victoria Cougars host the Oceanside Generals, 7 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www. victoriacougars.com Jan. 21 – Esquimalt Council meets, 7 p.m. in Council Chambers. FMI: 250414-7135. Jan. 24 – Victoria Cougars host the Comox Glacier Kings, 7 p.m., Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www.victoriacougars.com Jan. 27 – Victoria Cougars host the Nanaimo Buccaneers, 3:30 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www. victoriacougars.com Jan. 29 – Family Literacy Week: ABC Fun, 10:30 a.m. at the Esquimalt Library for young children and their families. FMI: 250-414-7198.

Honouring our past. Celebrating our present. Imagining our future.

NEW MEDICAL CLINIC

COMING SOON Opening in January 2013 in Esquimalt Plaza next to

• Exclusively all grain brew on premise in Victoria • Whole leaf hops • No syrups or pellets • Now making wine

Season’s Greetings All the e best for 2013

250-995-BEER (2337) 776 Fairview Road • www.bedfordbrewing.com

897 Esquimalt malt Rd. 250.388.6542 OPEN Mon - Sat 10-6, Sun & Hol 12-6

Happy Holidays from Look Esquimalt Send your community events to Jennifer Blyth at jblyth@telus.net To advertise in Look, contact Shelley Westwood at 250.480.3227 or swestwood@vicnews.com

Toonie TuesdayS! Happy Holidays from our little Caesars family to yours!

E S Q U I M A LT P L A Z A

Same great people. Same great service! 1153 ESQUIMALT RD. 250-388-6451

vicnews.com

250

590.6234 ESQUIMALT

Your choice of six toppings! Offer valid from December 24 through 31, 2012

COUNTRY GROCER

JOFFRE STREET

plus tax

ESQUIMALT ROAD FRASER STREET

CRAZY bread for a toonie!

Large pizza - $10 99

LAMPSON STREET

1153 ESQUIMALT ROAD ESQUIMALT PLAZA


A14 • www.vicnews.com

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

Esquimalt to increase development fees

Write us We welcome your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com. All letters must have a name and telephone number for verification. Please include your municipality of residence.

New charges expected to remain competitive in region for feedback. The Esquimalt Residents Association, the Urban Development Institute and the Esquimalt Chamber of Commerce will all weigh in on the proposed changes. The township is also accepting public input until Feb. 1. Coun. Tim Morrison said developers have complained about bureaucratic delays when applying to build in Esquimalt. He said staff should be working to provide incentives for builders. “We also hear about Langford waiving charges or negotiating reduction (in fees),” Morrison said. “Is there an option there?” Brown said staff won’t be waiving fees, but said Esquimalt will remain competitive against building boom areas such as Langford. “A development variance permit in Langford is $1,250. In Esquimalt, it’s $250,” he said. Mayor Barb Desjardins pointed out that Esquimalt,

unlike many municipalities, has no development cost charges. Rather, it’s the cost of land that makes it expensive to develop in township. “This is information we really need to put together so that we’re very clear, and people understand what we’re saying about costs,” she said. Coun. Dave Hodgins said the township should be working to entice developers. “We need to be sure we’re treating developers with a lot of respect.” The new fees accurately reflect the amount of time staff devote to processing development applications, said Coun. Lynda Hundleby. “I know a lot of these applications do take a lot of staff time and I’m happy to see we’re asking for more money,” she said. To review the bylaw, visit esquimalt.ca and look under “news releases,” or call Bill Brown at 250-414-7146. dpalmer@vicnews.com

Walk-In Denture Clinic

Men’s group needs help

Daniel Palmer News staff

2013

VICTORIA VICTORIA

SUNDAY, JANUARY JANUARY 13th, 13th, 2013 2013 SUNDAY, Recreation Centre Centre 10am-4pm 10am-4pm Pearkes Recreation Pearkes TICKETS TICKETS in advance advance $10.00 $10.00 in at the Door Door $15.00 $15.00 at the

COURTENAY COURTENAY

SUNDAY, JANUARY JANUARY 20th, 20th, 2013 2013 SUNDAY, Florence Filberg Centre 11am-3pm Florence Filberg Centre 11am-3pm TICKETS TICKETS in advance advance $10.00 $10.00 in at the Door Door $10.00 $10.00 at the

NANAIMO NANAIMO

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 10th, 10th, 2013 2013 SUNDAY, Beban Social Park Centre 11am-4pm Beban Park Social Centre 11am-4pm TICKETS TICKETS $10.00 in advance in advance $10.00 at the Door Door $13.00 $13.00 at the

Available At All: Bride’s and Groom’s Enter to

As part of a comprehensive review of outdated bylaws, Esquimalt is planning to increase its development application fees. The old development fee schedule was passed in 1995 and is “not up to snuff,” Bill Brown, director of development services, told council Dec. 17. He said staff looked at similar fees in other Greater Victoria municipalities and found the updates are competitive. But he admitted there was “enormous variation” in how municipalities charge for development application fees. “Because we all use different types of categories, it’s impossible to make direct comparisons,” Brown said. Council passed the first reading of the updated bylaws and directed staff to forward the documents to relevant stakeholders

Locations and Online at www.bridalexhibition.ca

A Hooneymoon A Hooneymoon to Cancun, Mexico to Cancun, Mexico Honeymoon Cruise Honeymoon Cruise Or 1 of 2 Trips to Or 1 of 2 Trips to Las Vegas Las Vegas

Bride’s Make Sure you Pick-up Your Bridal Rewards Card!

Photo supplied by Brawns Photography Photo supplied by Brawns Photography

NEWS

WHY WAIT? WE CAN HELP NOW! FOR INFO/TICKETS/BOOTH SPACE FOR INFO/TICKETS/BOOTH SPACE Victoria: (250) 984-1555 Victoria: (250) 984-1555 Nanaimo: (250) 244-8449 Nanaimo: (250) 244-8449 Toll Free: 1-888-501-9696 Toll Free: 1-888-501-9696 E: bridalexhibition@ieginc.ca

Happiness is a beautiful smile!

www.BridalExhibition.ca

• FREE Adjustments

Conrad De Palma Denturist

(250) 595-1665 h 3581 Shelbourne Street COME ON IN FOR YOUR FREE CONSULTATION!

49% OFF!

Deluxe salad spinners available in green and yellow. $38.99.

$1999 60% OFF!

1.25L Vienna teapot. $134.99.

$5399 56% OFF! 40cm roasting pan with rack. List: 89.99.

$3999

UP TO 75% OFF!

Anodized, Natural Chef fry pans with PFOA & PTFE free ceramic coating. 25cm/10” Natural Chef fry pan. List: $139.99. Now $34.99! 30cm/12” Natural Chef fry pan. List: $149.99. Now $39.99!

70% OFF!

57% OFF!

$2999

$2999

20cm/8” ClassIIc fry pan. (open) List: $99.00.

20pc Greenwich flatware set. List: $69.99.

80% OFF!

1L Fusion5 sauté pan with cover and lifetime warranty. $149.00.

$2999

SALE ENDS DECEMBER 31ST, ONLY AT:

71% OFF!

Our 11pc Muskoka cookware set features stainless steel construction, impact bonded base, and classic styling. Safe for all stovetops including induction. The 11pc Muskoka set includes 1.5L & 2L saucepans, 4L saucepan with helper handle, 3L casserole, 5L Dutch oven, 24cm/9.5” fry pan, and 5 stainless 99 steel covers. List: $699.99.

$199

SAANICHTON

SIDNEY (con’t)

Central Saanich Home Hardware #2 7816 East Saanich Rd.

Sidney Home Hardware 2356 Beacan Ave.

SALT SPRING ISLAND

VICTORIA

Love My Kitchen 600 Beddis Rd.

Burnside Home Hardware 50 Burnside Rd W Capital Iron Ltd. (1977) 1900 Store St. Oak Bay Home Hardware 1911a Oak Bay Ave.

SIDNEY Capital Iron 202 -9768-5th St.

Information & dealers: 1-800-A NEW-POT or www.paderno.com. Not all locations open Sunday. Quantities limited, please be early. Sale items may not be exactly as shown.

The Men’s Trauma Centre, 102-1022 Pandora Ave., is currently conducting a campaign to maintain its low-cost and feewaiver counselling to low-income clients. The non-profit society provides psychological and practical support to men who suffer the effects of emotional, physical and sexual trauma. Organizers are also hoping to create another counselling room to meet increased demand for services. To donate, visit menstrauma. com and use the “donate now” link, or send a cheque to Men’s Trauma Centre, 102–1022 Pandora Ave., Victoria, B.C., V8V 3P5. Tax receipts will be issued for donations of at least $20.

Police post now a taxi stand Oak Bay visitors travelling by taxi can expect a smoother transition to and from the village. Last week Oak Bay council approved designation of the existing police parking spot on Oak Bay Avenue in front of the municipal hall as a taxi stand. Chief Const. Mark Fisher had preapproved the move.


www.vicnews.com • A15

VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012

How to reach us

Tools

SPORTS

Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

Chargers host holiday special The break is over as the Camosun Chargers women’s basketball team hosts its annual Christmas break tournament starting Friday (Dec. 28). Visiting are Vancouver Island University, Langara and Mohawk (Toronto) colleges. Play opens Friday at 5:30 p.m. with V.I.U. and Langara, followed by Camosun vs Mohawk at 7:30 p.m. Saturday Dec. 29: 5:30 p.m. Mohawk vs. VIU; 7:30 p.m. Langara vs. Camosun. Sunday, Dec. 30: 9 a.m. Langara vs. Mohawk; 11 a.m. Camosun vs. VIU.

SPORTS NEWS IN BRIEF

Highlanders leave W-League for PCSL

Kevin Light Photography

Camosun Charger Julia Murray hugs the ball against Kwantlen Eagle Haeley Williams during the Chargers’ 64-59 win earlier in the PacWest basketball season at PISE.

Crimson Tide ready for return Regional rugby competition amps up Travis Paterson News staff

Kenny Goodland isn’t from this Island, but he knows a thing or two about its storied rugby team, the 107-year-old Crimson Tide. Goodland, a Newfoundlander, suited up for the Atlantic Rock during the nation-wide Super League of years past, and faced the Crimson Tide many times, including losing to them in the finals. Now Goodland is taking the helm of the Tide as new head coach, with co-coach Roger Robinson. The longtime Castaway Wanderers duo have partnered before, leading CW youth and U20 teams. They’ll assume the same format, with Goodland, 36, handling the forwards, and Robinson, a former national player, organizing the backs. They also have the help of local rugby great Hans de Goede, as manager, as they shape the latest version of one of the oldest rugby teams in the world for its Jan. 26 return against Vancouver. “We’re coming off a popular tournament with the (America’s

Rugby Championship), and a successful tournament, so hopefully we can ride the coattails of that a little bit ,” said Tide coach Kenny Goodland. The Tide’s senior men’s team won’t look much like the last one, which hosted touring Irish side Ballymena at Esquimalt’s Bullen Park in 2009. But the revival of the McKechnie Cup has brought back B.C.’s three-way regional competition, and in a festival type format. The Saturday of rugby will feature a triple-header against Vancouver at Westhills Stadium in Langford. The premier women will play for the Ruth Hellerud-Brown Cup, the U20 men for the Dunbar Keg cup, and the premier men for the McKechnie Cup. The Tide had its first assembly of potential squad members in Cowichan earlier this month, but many players, including some top UVic Vikes, were unavailable due to exams. “That was really to gauge the interest and we got a good start,” Goodland said. Things will move fast now as there are only two more sessions, Jan. 12 at UVic and Jan. 20 at Cowichan. The B.C. Rugby Union established some key rules for selecting the team. No import players, which is logical, and no national team members, which makes no sense, Goodland said.

File photo

Former Castaway Wanderer Kenny Goodland has taken the helm of the Crimson Tide. “If Rugby Canada wants to look at this as a pathway, which, as a regional competition, would be ideal, then why not play the carded guys?” About a dozen of the nation’s top rugby players are playing professionally overseas. The rest are in the B.C. premier league. There are some loopholes. Rugby Canada has scaled down

its national team for now and that means CW scrum half Kyle Armstrong, who played two games in the ARC, is available to the Tide. The Ontario import has been playing with CW long enough to be considered local. Like Armstrong, Robinson also played for the Tide. Otherwise, to be a true rep side, there’s also an understanding to use at least one player from each club in the Vancouver Island Rugby Union, though all teams were represented at the first tryout. “We’ll do our best, I guess,” Goodland said. Other players who have looked promising are Cowichan veteran Robin MacDowell, a handy fullback, as well as a strong UVic contingent, with Oak Bay’s Shea Wakefield, Pat and Doug Fraser (unrelated), and Jake Gylnicki, former captain of Canada U20 team. sports@vicnews.com

The McKechnie Cup Jan. 26, with a triple-header of Island versus Mainland matches at Westhills Stadium in Langford. -11:30 a.m., Ruth HellerudBrown Cup (premier women) -1:15 p.m. Dunbar Keg (U20 men) -3 p.m. McKechnie Cup (premier men)

The Victoria Highlanders top women’s team will return to B.C.’s Pacific Coast Soccer League after three seasons in the United Soccer Leagues W-League. New general manager Mark deFrias said the decision to discontinue the W-League team does not prevent the Highlanders from remaining true to its vision and commitment to the development of the women’s game locally and nationally. The cost of travel has always been the challenge with the women’s team, which survived with a title sponsor last season, and played as the Peninsula Co-op women’s team. “With the changing landscape of women’s soccer it would not have made sense for the Highlanders FC to remain in the W-League for 2013,” deFrias said. “We are strong supporters of the USL and look forward to continuing to compete on the men’s side in the USL Premier Development League.” The Highlanders played many successful seasons in the PCSL as the Victoria Stars.

Velox rugger named player of the year Velox Valkyries Shannon Kane is the Canadian Direct Insurance Women’s Player of the Year for the B.C. premier league. A back rower, Kane was an integral figure in Velox’s undefeated 2011-12 season that ended with them winning the Adidas Women’s Premiership first Gordon Harris Memorial Cup since 2008. Velox led the league with an average of 45 points per game, and Kane ranked third in her team with four tries. A former national team age-grade rugby standout at the U19 and U23 levels, Kane has recently spent the fall pursuing bobsledding. This past November, Kane was competing at the North American Cup and continues to excel on the track in tournaments held in Whistler and Calgary. Four Valkyries received Player of the Year nominations: Jesse Olynyk (14 tries), Lindsay Anderson, Natalie Tam and Selinna McGinnis. sports@vicnews.com


A16 â&#x20AC;˘ www.vicnews.com

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.388.3535 fax 250.388-0202 email classified@vicnews.com

$2997 plus tax

SELL YOUR STUFF! Private Party Merchandise Ad 1" PHOTO + 5 LINES

BONUS! We will upload your ad to

Choose any: Black Press Community Newspapers!

3

FREE!

(99¢ extra lines) Runs till it sells, up to 8 weeks! Add any other Greater Victoria paper for only $9.99 each +tax

Ask us for more info.

SOOKENEWS

MIRROR

6ICTORIAĂĽ .EWS $EADLINES 7EDNESDAYĂĽ%DITIONĂĽ 8PSE"ET-ONDAYxxAM %JTQMBZ"ET&RIDAYxxAM &RIDAYĂĽ%DITION 8PSE"ET7EDNESDAYxxPM %JTQMBZ"ETx4UESDAYxxAM -!*/2ĂĽ#!4%'/2)%3ĂĽ).ĂĽ /2$%2ĂĽ/&ĂĽ!00%!2!.#% &!-),9x!../5.#%-%.43 #/--5.)49x!../5.#%-%.43 42!6%,x #(),$2%.x%-0,/9-%.4 0%23/.!,x3%26)#%3 "53).%33x3%26)#%3x 0%43xx,)6%34/#+ -%2#(!.$)3%x&/2x3!,% 2%!,x%34!4% 2%.4!,3 !54/-/4)6% -!2).%

!'2%%-%.4

)Tx ISx AGREEDx BYx ANYx $ISPLAYx ORx #LASSIĂ&#x2122;EDx !DVERTISERx REQUESTINGx SPACEx THATx THEx LIABILITYx OFx THEx PAPERx INx THEx EVENTx OFx FAILUREx TOx PUBLISHx ANx ADVERTISEMENTx SHALLx BExLIMITEDxTOxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxBYx THEx ADVERTISERx FORx THATx PORTIONx OFx THEx ADVERTISINGx OCCUPIEDx BYx THEx INCORRECTxITEMxONLYxANDxTHATxTHEREx SHALLx BEx NOx LIABILITYx INx ANYx EVENTx BEYONDxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxFORxSUCHx ADVERTISEMENTx 4HEx PUBLISHERx SHALLx NOTx BEx LIABLEx FORx SLIGHTx CHANGESx ORx TYPOGRAPHICALx ERRORSx THATxDOxNOTxLESSENxTHExVALUExOFxANx ADVERTISEMENT BCCLASSIĂ&#x2122;EDCOMx CANNOTx BEx RESPONSIBLEx FORx ERRORSx AFTERx THEx Ă&#x2122;RSTx DAYx OFx PUBLICATIONx OFx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx.OTICExOFxERRORSxONx THEx Ă&#x2122;RSTx DAYx SHOULDx IMMEDIATELYx BEx CALLEDx TOx THEx ATTENTIONx OFx THEx #LASSIĂ&#x2122;EDx $EPARTMENTx TOx BEx CORRECTEDx FORx THEx FOLLOWINGx EDITIONBCCLASSIĂ&#x2122;EDCOMxRESERVESx THExRIGHTxTOxREVISE xEDIT xCLASSIFYxORx REJECTx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx TOx RETAINx ANYx ANSWERSx DIRECTEDx TOx THEx BCCLASSIĂ&#x2122;EDCOMx "OXx 2EPLYx 3ERVICEx ANDx TOx REPAYx THEx CUSTOMERxFORxTHExSUMxPAIDxFORxTHEx ADVERTISEMENTxANDxBOXxRENTAL

$)3#2)-).!4/29 ,%')3,!4)/.

!DVERTISERSx AREx REMINDEDx THATx 0ROVINCIALx LEGISLATIONx FORBIDSx THEx PUBLICATIONxOFxANYxADVERTISEMENTx WHICHx DISCRIMINATESx AGAINSTx ANYx PERSONxBECAUSExOFxRACE xRELIGION x SEX x COLOUR x NATIONALITY x ANCESTRYx ORxPLACExOFxORIGIN xORxAGE xUNLESSx THEx CONDITIONx ISx JUSTIĂ&#x2122;EDx BYx Ax BONAx Ă&#x2122;DEx REQUIREMENTx FORx THEx WORKxINVOLVED

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

HOUSES FOR SALE

APARTMENT/CONDO

INFORMATION

HELP WANTED

BUILDING SUPPLIES

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis

HAIRSTYLIST WANTED full time/part time for First Choice Hair Cutters in their Victoria location. Guaranteed $11/hour, 25% proďŹ t sharing, paid overtime, beneďŹ ts, paid birthday, vacation pay, annual advanced training and advancement opportunities. Call 250360-1408 today for an interview.

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

STEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terriďŹ c presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@blackpress.ca

PERSONALS STEAMWORKS: A club for men to meet men. 582 Johnson St., Victoria. 250-3836623 steamworksvictoria.com

HOME CARE/SUPPORT ARE YOU a warm, caring individual who wants to make a difference in the life of a senior? Nurse Next Door is hiring RCAs who are able to work up to 40 hrs/wk. email resume to victoria@nursenextdoor.com

PERSONAL SERVICES

LOST AND FOUND

ART/MUSIC/DANCING

FOUND MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Watch on Henry Ave. Call to identify (250)656-5659.

ALLISON PIANO STORAGE CLEARANCE SALE Unbelievable Prices +80 pianoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on site, 20 under $1000.

TRAVEL TIMESHARE CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. NO Risk Program, STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

TRAVEL CONDOMINIUM HOTEL 1-2-3 bdrm condominiums 8251850sq ft. Convenient Beach Access, Heated Pool/Hot Tub In-room Washer/Dryer, Flat Screen TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Free Wi-Fi, Private Balconies, Daily Housekeeping, Handicapped Rooms Available. Weekly/Monthly Rates, Free Local Calls, Free Local Beach Transportation. Conveniently Located to Shops and Restaurants. www.crystalpalmsbeach resort.com 1-888-360-0037. 11605 Gulf Blvd. Treasure Island FL 33706. HAWAII ON the Mainland, healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica â&#x20AC;&#x153;friendliest country on earthâ&#x20AC;?! 1-780-952-0709; www.CanTico.ca.

#/092)'(4

#OPYRIGHTx ANDORx PROPERTIESx SUBSISTx INx ALLx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx INx ALLx OTHERx MATERIALx APPEARINGx INx THISx EDITIONx OFx BCCLASSIĂ&#x2122;ED COMx 0ERMISSIONx TOx REPRODUCEx WHOLLYxORxINxPARTxANDxINxANYxFORMx WHATSOEVER x PARTICULARLYx BYx Ax PHOTOGRAPHICx ORx OFFSETx PROCESSx INxAxPUBLICATIONxMUSTxBExOBTAINEDx INxWRITINGxFROMxTHExxPUBLISHERx!NYx UNAUTHORIZEDxREPRODUCTIONxWILLxBEx SUBJECTxTOxRECOURSExINxLAW

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES MAKE A FORTUNE with $3000, we know how. Free info pack. Call (250)590-9634. PYRAMID CORPORATION is now hiring! Instrument Technicians and Electricians for various sites across Alberta. Send resume to: hr@pyramidcorporation.com or fax 780-955-HIRE.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES TRAIN TO be an Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 32 years of success! Government certiďŹ ed. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456.

2328 Government St, Victoria, BC

HEALTH PRODUCTS

FRIENDLY FRANK 2 WALL sconces, $50 (both), chinese table lamp, $45. Call (778)440-6628. 64 OZ of bubble blowing liquid with blower, $5. Call (250)656-1640 GE TV, 25â&#x20AC;? screen, $20. Call Call (250)477-3147.

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, ďŹ r, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

FURNITURE

REAL ESTATE

2 OCCASIONAL chairs, 1 black w/arms, 1 zebra stripes on white, no arms, $200/each Paid 3 years ago $1200 at Sandyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. (250)656-1750. bellringer85@yahoo.com for pictures. ROUND LIGHT Oak dining room table and 4 chairs, very good condition, $285. Call (250)652-8549.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

AT LAST! An iron ďŹ lter that works. IronEater! Fully patented Canada/U.S.A. Removes iron, hardness, smell, manganese. Sine 1957. Visit our 29 innovative inventions; w w w. b i g i r o n d r i l l i n g . c o m . Phone 1-800-BIG-IRON.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

BIG BUILDING sale... â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;?This is a clearance sale. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to miss!â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;? 20x20 $3,985. 25x24 $4,595. 30x36 $6,859. 35x48 $11,200. 40x52 $13,100. 47x76 $18,265. One end wall included. Call Pioneer Steel at: 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certiďŹ cation, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture, Baby +Family, Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

YOUR COMMUNITY, YOUR CLASSIFIEDS

250.388.3535

TOP OF the line Partner 4 SCOOTER. 1 year old. New they are $7000. + ; asking $3750. Call 778 977 3301.

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest ďŹ rewood producer offers ďŹ rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

GET 50% off - Join Herbal Magic this week and get 50% Off. Lose weight quickly, safely and keep it off, proven results! Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800-854-5176.

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, ďŹ rewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. Call 250-478-9231.

CHINESE CARPET- 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x9â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Beautiful condition, dark blue background. $1,400. Roll top desk, large, many locks, good condition, $275. Call 250-3883718. GREAT GIFT IDEA! ChillSpot is The COOLEST Dog Bed-A new and innovative, thermodynamically cooled dog bed, that enhances the cool tile surfaces our pets rely on during the warm weather months. Use promo code COOLGIFT For 10 % off! www.chillspot.biz HEAVY DUTY sewing machine, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artisan 618-1SCâ&#x20AC;?, as new with rolling adjustable table, light & attachments. $1000 obo. (250)384-2976.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

ESQUIMALT

Unique Building Must see

1 BDRM Very quiet, ocean views, Clean, well maintained. Laundry, Sauna, Elevator, Hot Water, Heat. (250) 388-9384

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL OR residential 1800 sq ft building and level lot on busy Johnston Road/Highway 4 intersection. OfďŹ ce, personal service, craft or residential use offers revenue and excellent holding opportunity. Corner shared with McDonalds, Macs and Co-op. Call 250-720-7453

GRANT MANOR Newly renovated suites, Starting at $675 per mo

To view call 250-642-1900

FOR SALE BY OWNER HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES

10353 DEVLIN Plc, Sidney. Rancher 3 bdrm, 2 bath, lrg. fam room, private treed lot. Call 250-655-1499 or view w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 or mls #316102

HOUSES FOR SALE Incredible 5 acre treed PARK-LIKE PROPERTY with Well-Maintained Furnished Home 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake, in the town of Caycuse. Perfect for recreational property or full time living. Motivated seller $378,800. Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land. Call 250-745-3387 smartytwo@hotmail.com

OTHER AREAS

MOVING IN 1 week, everything must go. Solid wood kitchen table w/ 4 chairs & centre leaf, couch, chairs, misc kitchen stuff, cookware, pictures, microwave. No reasonable offer refused. All must go. Call 1(587)297-1961.

20 ACRES Free! Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/mo. Money back guarantee. No credit checks. Beautiful views. Roads surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

BUYING OR SELLING? 250.388.3535

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell? Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

JAMES BAY Large bedroom, den, 1.5 bathrooms in corner Condo. Easy living for those 55+ at the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camelotâ&#x20AC;?. Enjoy prepared dinners, housekeeping, laundry and other good things while owning your own home in this exceptional location now at an excellent price of $159,900, (rental also would be considered). Call for more information or private tour. Tony Joe, RE/MAX Camosun, 250-370-7788 tony@tonyjoe.ca

APARTMENT/CONDO

Senior Living 200 Gorge Road West, Victoria

Ask For Move-In Bonus SINGLE WIDE MOBILE in Lannon Creek #60, $30,000 250-642-7189

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO ROYAL OAK- (near Common Wealth pool) new updated 1 bdrm condo, W/D. ns/np. $825 inclds utils. (250)652-7729.

1 bdrm. from $865/mo. 2 bdrm. from $1,140/mo. â&#x20AC;˘ Wheel-chair accessible â&#x20AC;˘ Outdoor, indoor and covered parking available â&#x20AC;˘ Lockers â&#x20AC;˘ Elevators â&#x20AC;˘ Laundry room â&#x20AC;˘ Balconies â&#x20AC;˘ Bicycle storage â&#x20AC;˘ Crime Free Multi-Housing Program Call Now:250.381.5084 www.caprent.com rentals@caprent.com

www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com


www.vicnews.com • A17

VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012 RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

APARTMENT/CONDO

ROOMS FOR RENT

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

AUTO FINANCING

CARS

VIC WEST: Furnished room, cable, $475 mo. Avail now. Call 1-250-748-1310.

DreamTeam Auto Financing “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

www.iDreamAuto.com DL# 7557

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

1-800-961-7022

2009 PONTIAC G5- $14,500. Air conditioned, electric windows, 4 new tires/2 spare. 45,000 km. 2 year warranty left. Senior giving up licence, reason for sale. Call (250)3600892.

SAANICH. SHARE bright furnished condo, private 1/2 bath. $650. inclusive. 778-679-2322

SUITES, LOWER INTERURBAN AREA, 3 bdrm, 5 appls, W/D incl’d, N/S, N/P, Jan. 1. $1200. (250)588-4595. ROYAL OAK, grd level 2 bdrm, 5 appls, util’s incl’d. NS/NP, Close to shops & buses. Jan. 1st. $1050 mo. (250)744-9405, (250)479-9405

1956 CONSUL MKI Estate Wagon, ONE OF APPROX 15 IN THE WORLD. Body, paint and motor all done. Lots of new parts. The car needs assembly. Will Trade for British and Cash. MUST SELL. No Time. Have all receipts. Call 250-490-4150 (Penticton, BC).

$50-$1000 CASH For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865

SIDNEY 1BDRM, 1bath grnd flr suite, f/s, w/d, large kitchen & living room, lots of storage, N/S, no dogs. $885 + hydro. Available now. (250)654-0410.

LOOKING FOR A DEAL ON A NEW VEHICLE? Save up to 40% OFF your next new vehicle... No games or gimmicks, deal direct with local dealerships. www.newcarselloff.com

WESTSHORE- Avail Jan 1. 1 bdrm, 6 appls, sm pet? N/S. $800+utils. (250)813-2805.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

WANTED TO RENT WANTED: HOUSE or condo in Sidney, Saanich or Victoria area, for month of Feb. Ocean view preferred. 1 (403)9483445, rod.long@shaw.ca

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

READ THIS....

DOWNTOWN SIDNEY: Bright newer 1 bdrm deluxe suite. Short term. (250)514-7747.

ROOM & BOARD ROOM & BOARD, Heritage home, all inclusive. 5 evening meals/week & breakfast. Spacious, clean, quiet, fully furnished room. Near downtown. Female preferred. $800./mo. Avail Jan. 1st. (250)655-1722.

1977 CADILLAC Eldorado, beige metallic. Cruise control, automatic. Very good cond., only 80,000 km. $2000. obo. Please call (250)477-7076.

No qr code reader? Text info: 778.786.8271

AUTO FINANCING MARINE

Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

fil here please

To solve a Sudoku puzzle, every number 1 to 9 must appear in: • Each of the nine vertical columns • Each of the nine horizontal rows • Each of the nine 3 x 3 boxes

BOATS BOATHOUSE FOR SALE, 27x10’ interior dimension, power, lighting, pigeon proof, taller than other boat houses. Below cost at $15,000. Call 250-656-6136.

Classified ads get great results! WE’RE ON THE WEB

1993 BAYLINER Classic 2452. In excellent condition. Head, galley, canopy, 9.9hp 4-stroke Yamaha. Dinghy & extras. $17,000. (no trailer). Call 250-656-6136.

Today’s Solution

PARKLANDS DR- Avail now. Recent upgrades. 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 5 appls, sxs duplex. Sm pet ok. Large yard. $1,250 + utils. Call Equitex 250-3866071 or www.equitex.ca

Sudoku

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

ELECTRICAL

GARDENING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

(250)590-9653.ELECTRICIAN 20 yrs + exp. Residential: New homes & Renos. Knob & tube replacement. $40./hr. Senior’s Discount. Lic.#3003. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601

CARPENTRY BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748.

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES GREAT RATES! Guar. cleaning since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278. NEED HELP cleaning your house? $18/hr. Call Dorothy at (250)478-8940.

CONTRACTORS CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193- RENO’S, res & comm. Knob and tube rmvl. No job too small. Lic# 22779.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858.

FENCING

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Gutter & Window Cleaning at Fair Prices! 250-507-6543. AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, guards, windows, power washing, roof demoss, repairs. Insured. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

RUBBISH REMOVAL

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

✭BUBBA’S HAULING✭ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774 SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS THE MOSS MAN ChemicalFree Roof De-Mossing & Gutter Cleaning since 1996. Call 250-881-5515. Free estimates! www.mossman.ca

INSULATION

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

HANDYPERSONS

MALTA BLOWN Insulation. Attics - interior/exterior walls & sound silencer. (250)388-0278

GARDENING

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397.

QUALITY INSULATION blown fiberglass. Affordable rates. (250)896-6652.

BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups. DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141 GARDEN OVERGROWN? Weeding, lawn cuts, cleanups, pruning. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

SMALL ADS GET BIG RESULTS! Call 250.388.3535

HAULING AND SALVAGE ALL-HAUL JUNK REMOVAL Const Debris, Garden Waste. Call John 250-213-2999. CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489.

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

WE’RE ON THE WEB www.bcclassified.com

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

DIAMOND MOVING- 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734. DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747. WRIGHT MOVING. $80/hr for 2 men. Senior’s discount. Free Est’s. Call Phil (250)383-8283.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

PAINTING

GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694.

NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-812-3213, 250-590-2929.

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

WINDOW & Gutter Cleaning, minor repairs. Comm/Res. Insured, free est. (250)881-3684

PLUMBING EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

NEED REPAIRS? Use our community classifieds Service Directory to find an expert in your community


A18 • www.vicnews.com

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Families helped by preschool Parent group, others, stock Christmas hampers Don Descoteau News staff

Photo contributed

Members of a volunteer crew spearheading a charity hamper program pose with some of the food and other items collected inside Ross Bay Preschool. From left are preschool parent Chris Higginbottom, Ministry of Health employee Quinn Sirna, parent Mark Higginbottom and preschool owner Kim Thorsen.

BMW Victoria’s

Sixty-seven families in Victoria West and Esquimalt will have a little extra to go around this Christmas, thanks to the efforts of a Fairfield preschool owner and her parent group. Ross Bay Preschool’s Kim Thorsen, who grew up in Esquimalt and is familiar with the need at this time of year, spearheaded the second annual hamper program. It provided each family with two full grocery bags including food, a toy and a game, worth about $100 in total. In all, 137 bags were filled and a $500 cheque was passed on to the Mustard Seed food bank, said Thorsen, whose preschool parents secured sponsorships from the business community. A friend who works at the Ministry of Health in Victoria also

BMW Victoria

BOXING WEEK SALES EVENT

bmwvictoria.ca

The Ultimate Driving Experience®

December 24th-31st ONLY

20

%

Give the gift of music LOOKING FOR QUALITY MUSIC EDUCATION FOR YOURSELF OR YOUR CHILD?

OFF

Christmas Holidays Adventure Camp

All In-stock Parts & Accessories

Music | Crafts | Story Telling | Art | Baking Focus on Piano with other instruments included. Camps tailored to your child.

$99 Alignment Special

December 27th, 28th. January 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th.

$29 Winter Inspections PLUS All Winter Tires and Tire Packages on sale!

got her office on board with the program donating and collecting items. “I felt lucky to go on to university and establish a career and a business,” Thorsen said. “I feel that it’s sort of my responsibility owning the preschool and owning a small business in the community to give back.” Vic West elementary principal Joe Cardle worked with staff at his school and connected with Rockheights middle school to help determine which families were most in need. “The majority of families (receiving the bags) are within our school,” he said. “It was really good and the families are grateful and appreciative.” Thorsen said the project brings her school families together and makes them feel good having done something to help out. editor@vicnews.com

Sign up for one or more days! Half days also available. Now located just across the blue bridge, 5 minutes from our previous location

Gift Certificates available! 250-474-4455 Check our websites for full programs, dates, times & locations.

BMW Victoria

95 Esquimalt Road | 250.995.9250 | bmwvictoria.ca

BMWVictoria @BMWVictoria

www.pjmusicstudios.com

A Division of the German Auto Import Network

LOOKING FOR AN

Thank you B.C. for digging safely in 2012 This year, more calls to BC One Call for natural gas pipeline information and safe digging practices resulted in fewer pipeline hits.

Make the right call BC One Call: 1-800-474-6886

Auction Bedroom Suite Couch Deli Esthetics Fuel Garage Sale House Investments Jungle Gym Kiln Living Room Suite Moving Company Nail Care Open House Poultry Quilt Rolling Pin Sail Boat Venetian Blinds Window Washer Xylophone Yard Work Zebra

250.388.3535 FortisBC uses the FortisBC Energy name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (12-336.1 12/2012)


www.vicnews.com • A19

VICTORIA NEWS - Monday, December 24, 2012

Y A D G N I X T U O BO W O L THE ANNUAL UP TO

Finding solutions is childs’ play Lego provides building blocks for learning Arnold Lim News staff

Almost 200 elementary and middle school students in 13 teams from across Greater Victoria gathered at the University of Victoria for a competition aimed at helping seniors overcome daily challenges. Students were charged with the challenge of creating, designing and programming a Lego robot that can locate the correct medicine, move furniture, garden, fix a broken chair and walk a service dog. “(They) look at the way robots or technology can enhance the lives of senior citizens,” said event co-ordinator and UVic PhD student Michael HammondTodd. “It is an inquirydriven process where students are looking for real solutions for real-world problems.” Young competitors brought their existing Lego robots and programed them on the spot for a battery of tests, all which represent challenges seniors face in their daily lives. “Vancouver Island has a very active community of educators and students interested in robots and technology. The programs are designed to inspire students in the fields of science, technology, and engineering,”

Hammond-Todd said. “I think this is a realm of science and research (that) can be a benefit. … It is providing an opportunity to talk to people outside of their generation and peer group and think about solutions they may work on as secondary or post secondary students.”

“Students are looking for real solutions for realworld problems.” - Michael Hammond-Todd All robots were created from a standard Lego Mindstorms NXT kit, but modified to tackle different solutions to the problems. Students use the included software to program commands, including how many seconds to move, degree of motion and rotation, and even simple voice commands. The event, hosted by the faculties of education and engineering, was meant to get more kids interested in science and math, and acted as the Vancouver Island First Lego League regional competition. “How fitting that the challenge theme for the first Lego league event happening on the UVic campus is ‘senior solutions’ – solving problems faced by seniors as they age,” said Holly

Tuokko, director of UVic’s Centre on Aging. Building Lego robots was a hit with 11 year old Chris Burrows, who was excited to get the opportunity to compete at UVic. “I think this is really fun, a lot of people who like Lego and robot stuff would really like it,” he said. “When I grow up, I want to be a Lego designer.” Burrows began playing with Lego two years ago and is part of Legobotics, a team of three that hopes to advance to the provincials in Vancouver in January. “I like programming and robotics,” he said. “You can get a lot of freedom in what you build.” reporter@vicnews.com

th

th

%

only!

OFF

Storewide!

Arnold Lim/News staff

Matt Sommer, 12, left, Kai Stevenson, 8, and Chris Burrows, 11, were among almost 200 students involved in the Vancouver Island First Lego League regional competition held at the University of Victoria on Dec. 15.

70 70

BDec. 26 - 28

40

OFF %

The Reg. Price Of

All New Ski & Snowboard Equipment, Clothing & Accessories!

20

Lowest Marked Price on % OFFOnTheEverything Else, Storewide! (Some Exceptions Apply)

AWESOME DOORCRASHER DEALS! ELAN

‘E-Flex 4’ Skis W/ EL10.0 QT Bindings Reg. Price $499.99

24999

$

STORMTECH ‘Atlantis’ Ladies Ski Pants Reg. Price $99.99

49

$

99

EASTON

FLUFF’M

‘EQ PRO’ Hockey Protective

Ladies Slippers

Elbow, Shin Pads & Gloves

$ 49

%

50OFF

Reg. Price $14.99

4

REEBOK 11k - One Pc. Hockey Stick Reg. $269.99 Sale $159.99 MIZUNO ‘MVP’ Ball Glove Reg. $159.99 Sale $79.99

HELLY HANSEN Under Wear Now 40% Off STORMTECH ‘ Nautilus’ Rain Suit Reg. $149.99 Sale $74.99

NIKE Yoga Mat - 3mm Reg. $34.99 Sale $19.99 *Plus Many More Great In-Store Specials*

www.sportstraders.ca 508 Discovery Street, Victoria

Ample Free Parking! 250-383-6443

25 Days Volkswagen Victoria’s

of Christmas Bonuses!

Receive up to $500 cash, an iPad Mini, iPod Touch OR an iPod Nano with the purchase of any vehicle in-stock.*

Continues s

2012 Beetle 2.5 Comfortline In-stock from

$24,535 Includes Freight & PDI

Cash Savings of

WITH

$2,000 off the MSRP

Volkswagen Victoria

A new division to the German Auto Import Network

3329 Douglas Street | 250-475-2415 | vwvictoria.com

VolkswagenVictoria

@VWVictoria

*Limited time discount available on cash purchase only for the 2012 Beetle Comfortline in-stock. Discount of $2000 is based on the cash purchase of the remaining new and unregistered 2012 model and may vary by model. In-stock price of $24,535 is based on st#133940. Freight and PDI ($1,365 )included. Doc ($395), PPSA fee, license, insurance, registration, any dealer or other charges, options and applicable taxes are extra. 25 days of Christmas Bonuses promotion offer is valid on the purchase of in-stock models only and cannot be combined with any other offer. Offers end December 31, 2012 and are subject to change or cancellation without notice. 2012 Beetle Highline shown for illustration purposes only. Visit vw.ca or Volkswagen Victoria for details. “Volkswagen”, the Volkswagen logo and “Beetle” are registered trademarks of Volkswagen AG. “Volksfest” is a trademark of Volkswagen AG. © 2012 Volkswagen Canada. DL 4991428.


A20 • www.vicnews.com

Monday, December 24, 2012 - VICTORIA

from all of us at the Market Stores

D

L OC

A

N E D AN D O PE

TE RA

Happy Holidays

W O Y LL

NEWS

ENTER TO

WIN ONE of 10

Everything you need for the he Festive Season!

GIFT CARDS

Full Details instore. Draw Dec. 31, 2012

market fresh JD Farms

Coca Cola

98

Specialty Turkey

2

69

All Varieties 2L

Available starting Dec. 21st

you save

1

20

lb 5.93 kg

1000

$

lb

¢ R

market fresh

Salt Spring Coffee

Happy Planet

Chinese

California

Mandarins

Yams

Coffee

Juice

market fresh

3

5 lb/2.27 kg Box

48 ea

you save $2.51 $2.51/ea

market fresh

Strip Loin Grilling Beef Steaks Regular, Marinated All Sizes

99

you save $1.01 $1.01/lb

King Crab Legs

3

market made fresh

Turkey Dinner

6

With Stuffing, Mashed Potatoes, Cranberry Sauce, Vegetables and Gravy

ea

903 Yates At Quadra | 250.381.6000 7 am-11 pm

ea

you save $6.01 $6.01/ea

Freybe

Raincoast Crisps

100 g

99 ea

themarketstores.com

All Varieties 170 g

you $0.40/100 g save $0.40

Holiday Bouquet

24

R

Lesley Stowes

1

market fresh

3

98

market fresh

59

100 g

49

9

98

Old Fashioned Ham

49

lb 15.41 kg

Approx. 400 g

lb 2.16 kg

thawed for convenience

Premium AAA

6

98

¢

All Varieties 1.89 L

All Varieties 400 g

4

98 ea

Check our 8 page flyer online for more specials! Prices in effect until Tuesday Jan. 1, 2013

125-2401 C Millstream Road | 250.391.1110 8 am-11 pm

Victoria News, December 26, 2012  

December 26, 2012 edition of the Victoria News

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you