Page 1

One man’s junk Proposal calls for renewal of derelict buildings Page A3

NEWS: Pedestrian safety an issue in fall, winter /A5 ARTS: The art of the samurai on exhibit /A12 SPORTS: Baseball returns to RAP this June /A21 Japanese Restaurant

VICTORIANEWS VICTORIA Wednesday, December 12, 2012

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Harbour Air seaplanes taxi in the Inner Harbour. Victoria council is looking for more transparency from the people who oversee the harbour’s airport.

Transport Canada slammed for lack of transparency City council still waiting for work on harbour airport citizens’ committee Roszan Holmen News staff

Victoria’s harbour master, Dave Featherby, came before city council to present new federal airport safety standards, and even boast about a safety award. Instead of praise, he got an earful. “The issue here is, you say you do a great job, but no one knows,” Mayor Dean Fortin told Featherby and fellow Transport Canada staffer, operations manager Wayne Marston, at Thursday’s governance and priorities meeting. “The absence of that informa-

tion allows the imagination to run wild.” For years, the Victoria Harbour airport has been a source of public concern, in part because of its proximity to residential condominiums, but also due to the heavy use of the harbour by several industries and interest groups. More recently, the approval of a luxury-yacht marina in the harbour has aggravated anxieties about overcrowding. Reports detailing the number of safety complaints and the outcomes of investigations are not made public by Transport Canada. In response to the mayor’s comments about a lack of communication, Featherby said, “It’s always been an issue to me as well.” “When there is an alleged violation in the harbour … and we investigate it and it didn’t happen the way it is portrayed, there is

nothing to (bring) back to you or council,” he said. “So it’s left in the mind that this happened.” The answer frustrated Coun. Pamela Madoff. “When somebody complains (about a safety infraction), that person needs to be responded to,” she said. “You’re turning into your own worst enemies.” A previous Transport Canada commitment to open the lines of communication by creating a residents’ committee has not materialized, she added. Air pollution and noise from the float-plane industry was another point of contention. Council expressed frustration that the new federal regulations (see sidebar, page A4) are silent

“You’re turning into your own worst enemies.” – Coun. Pamela Madoff to Transport Canada representatives on these issues. “The individual concerns of our harbour have not been acknowledged,” Madoff said, adding the one-size-fits-all approach fits no size. Under former mayor Alan Lowe, the City of Victoria created a harbour airport task force. In 2010, the city wrote a letter to then transport minister John Baird outlining its conclusions, including quality of life issues. In response, the city received a

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letter committing the federal government to further studies. Marston acknowledged the commitment, but said the funds are lacking. “Right now, I don’t think the flight numbers justify the expense,” he said. Flights have been decreasing every year for the past four years. After reaching 43,600 aircraft movements in 2007, there were only 33,700 movements last year. Coun. Ben Isitt wasn’t appeased by the numbers. “We’re getting the runaround,” he said. “We need some accountability here.” He floated the idea of a local airport authority. Madoff is also open to the idea, but warns it would need to be implemented with caution. PLEASE SEE: Harbour airport, Page A4

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A2 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012- VICTORIA

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Volunteer Roni Luo stacks cans of non-perishable food items at the Mustard Seed food bank on Queens Avenue. Recently CFB Esquimalt announced it was canceling its annual navy lighting contest due to ongoing construction at the base. The event generally brings in a significant haul for the Mustard Seed’s coffers. So far, food bank organizers have been able to maintain the same level of service to Victoria’s most vulnerable people. But food drives often neglect to communicate the dire need for charitable cash donations as well. Every dollar the Mustard Seed receives can be leveraged for $3 of food. “The cash donations are picking up, but we have a long way to go,” Palmer said.

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“You can’t take a turnip and turn it into fuel for one of our trucks.” He is now focused on providing 1,000 families with turkeys for Christmas dinner. They’re at 220 right now. “Without the generosity of Victorians, the Mustard Seed would not exist. I give all credit to you, the public, that can make a difference in a person’s life.” To find out how to donate cash or food, or for more information, visit mustardseed.ca or call 250-953-1575. dpalmer@vicnews.com

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Driving through Greater Victoria, it’s hard to miss the many businesses and volunteers collecting food donations in the run-up to the Christmas season. Many of those donations are destined for community pillar the Mustard Seed, an organization whose volunteers feed more than 7,000 people every month. Last week, the Island Equipment Operators’ Association Truck Light Parade rolled its way through the region, and despite the wet weather, hundreds of onlookers gathered along the route to hand over non-perishable food and enjoy the show. The outpouring of generosity is something Mustard Seed food bank executive director Brent Palmer hopes will continue once the holiday cheer wears off. “We need as much help as you can give,” he said. “We have gone through a tough year, but (it is) even tougher for the people that require our services.” The Mustard Seed is still trying to recover from a point earlier this year, when food stocks dropped to a 27-year low. Even a spirit of giving windfall may not be enough to correct that, Palmer said. “We have to make up for the months that this place was in pretty rough shape.”

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www.vicnews.com • A3

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

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assessment, are sorely lacking. “To find people to talk about that process, the resources are limited,” he said. “You have to start the journey somewhere and it would be a lot easier if there was a central point.” Yet the world’s nucleus for academic resources on transgender history reside in Saanich. In October the University of Victoria officially launched what is believed to be the largest archive of information relating to transgender activism on the globe with more than 1,000 titles of books and journals on the topic within the McPherson Library. “We’ve had inquiries from people all over North America about use and access. (There’s) general interest from all over the world,” said archivist Lara Wilson. For Shaed, being the bold advocate who elects to stand in front of a new class and introduce herself as a transsexual is a role she’s satisfied to have taken on. But it doesn’t immunize her against the constant judgment many transgender people face daily. “I need to breathe in that strength just to go to Wal-Mart, because I know people are going to stare and whisper, and when I walk in there, I need to have my head up,” she said. “I need to look people in the eye, to engage them. That takes strength and sometimes I’m just too tired. I have to present that level of strength.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

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This summer, Daphne Shaed gave out 300 resumés. She went to 30 interviews. She hoped to land a summer job that suited her skills as a workshop facilitator and Camosun College Student Society Pride director. Eventually she took the only job she could find, working the graveyard shift at a Saanich hotel. “I would get called for an interview and then when I met (the employers), you could just see it on their faces that I wasn’t getting the job,” said Shaed, a transgender woman. “The community here is tolerant, but tolerance is different from acceptance. Tolerance just means they’re going to leave you alone, but they’re still not accepting; they’re still not willing to have you come into their workplace and work on a front counter.” Shaed has become a community leader in trans education. Last year she organized a series of workshops at Camosun aimed at understanding transidentity and self-identification. Sessions on social etiquette in the scope of gender, pioneers in transidentity and medicalization drew full audiences and this fall she continued her work with an added focus on sexual health for trans men and women. Shaed’s approach to education reaches beyond workshops to her willingness to share her story – with new classmates to coffee shop baristas who mistakenly refer to her as a man – in the name of making things better. “I’m a woman, but I’m a different kind of woman,” Shaed said. “People meet me and say: ‘I’ve never met a transexual Daphne Shaed, a transgender woman before.’ Well they probably have, they suffered violence during grade school. just don’t know.” Shaed was assigned to the male sex at birth and named Kelly. She suffered Nearly one third of the transpeople violence throughout her years in Victoria included in the Vancouver Island middle and high schools by peers who Transgender Needs Assessment thought her to be gay – an assumption reported their trans-identity having a she allowed to continue for fear of the negative effect on employment. repercussions that would arise if her The assessment is based on a series true trans-identity was of interviews conducted revealed. Matthew Heinz, a “I’m a woman, but by She left school in Grade professor in the school I’m a different kind of 10. of communication Ten years ago within and culture at Royal woman. People meet the privacy of her home, Roads University, who me and say: ‘I’ve Kelly began to transform transitioned in 2009 into the woman she felt recognized a lack never met a transexual and had always existed within of available regional before.’ Well they her: Daphne, a name resources. she chose for herself as probably have, they just Health care, social a young child, based on support, social don’t know.” the Scooby-Doo cartoon acceptance and public – Daphne Shaed character. education, mental health Like the fictional care and access and character’s penchant for legal assistance were the danger, Shaed hasn’t shied away from highest priority issues identified by the risk. Four years ago, she transitioned study, posted at transvancouverisland. into living as a woman full-time and has ca. proceeded with the full medical process “The website is a Band-Aid,” Heinz involved. said. “We maintain it as a volunteer “I felt like I wouldn’t be accepted. effort, but ideally, we would have funding I wouldn’t be a viable citizen. I and ideally through a governmental wouldn’t be able to go to school or get authority or body, so we could have employment, to find a partner, be folded counselling support available to the into another family unit. The sense of community – perhaps a hotline.” potential loss of your social mobility is Information regarding transitioning what keeps people buried for so long.” exists online, but the details at a Shaed is optimistic regarding local level, such as how to obtain a employment, but for a large segment general practitioner with knowledge of Vancouver Island’s transgender of trans issues, or a psychologist able population, challenges remain. to administer a hormone readiness

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A4 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

Our new HDPVR has all the trimmings.

NEWS

Harbour airport safety addressed Continued from Page A1

Like the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority, an airport authority would operate as a private society. “If it’s a private society and there is no oversight at all, where do you go if you don’t get satisfaction from them?” she asked. “It would have to have constitution and bylaws that were very specific and a chain of command (to resolve concerns).” After the public presentation, the News asked Marston and Featherby for an interview, but was told all inquiries must be addressed through Transport Canada’s media relations. A formal interview request was not met by the News’ deadline.

Safety standards being enhanced The new federal Safety Management Systems was fully implemented at the Victoria Harbour airport by March 2012. The new procedures focus on aircraft companies. “Inspectors will also go into a company to watch how it operates, and speak with the workers to measure how well a company’s procedures identify and address safety hazards before they become a serious safety risk,” a general statement about the new strategies states on Transport Canada’s website. It goes on to state that after decades of improvement, the national accident rate leveled off over the past decade. “The steady improvement in the accident rate was attributable to improvements to technology, such as the introduction of more reliable engines and navigation systems. However, the majority of today’s accidents can be attributed to human or organizational factors … Safety management systems offer the most promising means of preventing these types of accidents.” rholmen@vicnews.com

BEST BUY – Correction Notice Please be advised that these products: Rogers/Telus Samsung Ativ S (WebCodes: 10230120/ 10230130) advertised on the December 7 flyer, page POP8 and 15, will not yet be available for purchase until further notice, due to delayed inventory issues. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have cause our valued customers.

With the new Shaw HDPVR by Motorola, you can access up to 10,000 on-demand movies and shows—including all your favourite holiday classics—all wrapped up in a brand new interface. To upgrade today, call 1 877 725 3445, visit shaw.ca, or our store at Uptown Shopping Centre.

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A copy of the 2013 Meeting Schedule can be obtained at the Municipal Hall, by requesting a copy from the Corporate Officer at 250-4147135, emailing anja.nurvo@esquimalt.ca or by visiting our website at www.esquimalt.ca

Victoria 756 Fort St 250-360-0606 Victoria Tuscany Village 250-383-1055 Langford Millstream Village 250-391-9131 Sidney Thrifty Foods Plaza 250-655-4410


www.vicnews.com • A5

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Poor visibility among problems on roads Higher accident numbers involving pedestrians common in fall and winter Daniel Palmer News staff

The shortest days of the year can also be some of the most dangerous for pedestrians, according to recent accident figures released by the province. There have been 13 pedestrian fatalities across B.C. in the past six weeks, according to the B.C. Coroners Service. Locally, the Victoria Police Department saw an extraordinary day last week (Dec. 4), when four pedestrians were struck by vehicles. One of those incidents left a 51-year-old man with a broken femur and pelvis, after he was hit by a pickup truck as he used a marked crosswalk on Fort Street near Stanley Avenue. “The research shows clearly that we are just heading into the most dangerous time of the year for pedestrians,” chief B.C. coroner Lisa Lapointe wrote in a report analyzing all 221 pedestrian deaths between 2008 and 2011. “During the last four years, almost one-quarter of the pedestrian deaths occurred in December and January.” Surprisingly, road conditions and vehicle speed were not com-

mon factors in pedestrian fatalities, the report found. Year-over-year provincial ICBC numbers show that during November and December there is an 80-per-cent average increase in crashes involving pedestrians, compared to July and August. An average of 330 pedestrians are injured every year on Vancouver Island in traffic incidents, according to ICBC. “The solution to this does not involve a government program,” said Alan Perry, vice-chair of the Capital Regional District’s traffic safety commission. “A lot of cyclists, and particularly pedestrians, don’t drive, so they don’t realize how much less visibility there is inside a vehicle.” Some Greater Victoria municipalities have even removed certain crosswalks, as they give pedestrians a false sense of safety, Perry said. Crosswalks with flashing overhead lights, as well as Ontario’s “point your way to safety” campaign – where pedestrians hold out an arm while crossing the street – have been found to do little to decrease pedestrian-related crashes, he said. “We end up with a lot of broken arms and a lot of people injured.”

Pedestrians cross Douglas Street on Monday morning. Police and ICBC are asking both motorists and pedestrians to take more care to avoid accidents on the road at this time of year. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

The CRD will begin airing radio ads in the coming weeks that urge pedestrians to make themselves seen, by wearing reflective gear and ensuring they make eye contact with drivers before stepping into the path of vehicles. “Pedestrians have the right of way at any intersection, but you don’t want to be dead right,” Perry said. The CRD traffic safety commission meets tomorrow (Dec. 13) to discuss possible solutions to pedestrian injuries and deaths involving left-turning vehicles, which account for roughly onefifth of pedestrian-vehicle collisions, he said. dpalmer@vicnews.com

ICBC’s safety tips for any time of year Pedestrians: - Wear bright or light-coloured clothing. In dark conditions or in bad weather, wear reflective material on your clothes (sleeves, shoes, cap or jacket). - Remove headphones and put away your cellphone or other gadgets to make sure you’re prepared for the unexpected. - Make eye contact with drivers, so you know you see each other. - Use designated crossing points and obey traffic signals. - Before stepping off the curb,

look left and right for oncoming vehicles. Then look left again for vehicles that may be turning onto the roadway from beside or behind you. Drivers: - Always yield to pedestrians at intersections. It’s the law. - If a vehicle is stopped in front of you or one lane over, they may be yielding for a pedestrian, so be prepared to stop. - When you approach an intersection, scan left and right for pedestrians. - Be extra cautious and watch for pedestrians when making a left or right-hand turn.

YOU can HELP make a Christmas for a family in Africa by giving as YOU have been BLESSED yourself

12 Days to Christmas If you have food in your fridge and a comfortable place to sleep, you are richer than 75% of the world’s people. Give $1.00 for every bed in your house.

30% of the world’s population cannot read.

24,000 people die every day from hunger related causes.

2 billion people live on less than $1.00 a day.

Give $1.00 for every family member who can read.

Give $1.00 for each meal you had today.

Give $5.00 if you have a job.

In some countries it takes 6 months to save for a coat.

Every day 30,000 children die from preventable diseases.

Give 50¢ for every coat in your house.

Give $1.00 for every healthy child in your family.

Most people in developing countries work every day to survive. Give 50¢ for every day you will take off this holiday season.

Millions of people go barefooted. Give 50¢ for each pair of shoes in your house.

130 million children will not receive an elementary education. Give $1.00 for each family member who has.

525 million people in Asia are undernourished. Give $1.00 for every trip you made to the grocery store this week.

Millions of people have no bathrooms in their homes.

Over 1 billion people do not have safe drinking water.

Give $1.00 for every toilet you have.

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A6 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

OXFORD FOODS PRICES EFFECTIVE ONE FULL WEEK WED. DECEMBER 12 to TUES. DECEMBER 18, 2012

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The Township of Esquimalt’s stone sits at the beginning of the newly unveiled Centennial Walkway in Memorial Park. The walkway contains appromximately 260 bricks purchased by residents and businesses.


www.vicnews.com • A7

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Wayward tugboat damage to be fixed The City of Victoria is pursuing a claim for damages caused when a tugboat hit the Johnson Street Bridge pier in 2011. The tug hit the south-facing fender of the west pier while towing a barge up the harbour. “A substantial portion of the fender was damaged,” said Peter Sparanese, who is leading the bridge replacement project. While the bridge will be demol-

ished in roughly three years, marine users requested the city replace its fender in the meantime. The city has issued a request for quotations for the work. “Our expectation is (the tug operator’s insurance company) will be paying for the repair,” said city engineering director Dwayne Kalynchuk, who is seconded to the bridge project. rholmen@vicnews.com

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Big kid gets a push South Park elementary student Monta Wallbridge, 9, gives Mayor Dean Fortin a push on the new 25-metre cable ride at the opening of the Cook Street Playground, as fellow students watch. The park, designed with the input of the public and South Park students, features equipment for ages 18 months to 12 years. A new nine-station fitness circuit located next to the playground is aimed at people 15 and older and provides parents a chance to work out next to the kids.

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A8 • www.vicnews.com

VICTORIANEWS

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Victoria News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Great potential in weekend meals Keeping our community’s most vulnerable people fed on a regular basis is an ongoing issue, one we’ve been watching for some time. So when the announcement came last month that a Victoria Foundation grant would enable Our Place to provide a lunch sitting on weekends – a first for the former Open Door and Upper Room facilities – it was good news, indeed. The absence of a central location where members of the street community could sit down for a hearty meal for free on Saturdays and Sundays has no doubt created problems over the years. Social housing providers may insist that having a roof over one’s head is paramount to one’s well-being. That may be true over the long term, but in the short term, an empty belly is more likely to affect a person’s capacity to make rational decisions. That’s where the weekend meal offerings at Our Place have the most potential. Individuals who might have been forced to panhandle for change – or resort to illegal activities – to gather enough for a simple meal now have a place to go where they’ll not only be fed, but suffer far less of a hit to their self-esteem. Our Place executive director Don Evans says attendance for the weekend openings continues to grow, with about 250 people served last Sunday. As word gets out about the expanded service, he expects weekends to soon become as popular as weekdays, when 300 to 350 of Victoria’s poor, disabled and homeless people are fed. Having Our Place open seven days a week for meals offers regular soup kitchen users more continuity in their lives, which can be rather chaotic. Familiar faces and familiar places can do wonders for one’s well-being. And with Greater Victoria’s winter rains and chilly temperatures fast approaching, having someplace warm, dry and welcoming to hang out for a while on the weekends doesn’t hurt, either. We hope the success of the weekend opening demonstrates to funders of all kinds that keeping people fed is a good investment in maintaining a healthy and safe community. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Victoria News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Clean LNG can still be done On Friday, as the federal Sterritt confirmed to me that they government was giving the green remain solidly against the Enbridge light to a Malaysian investment proposal. The disagreement is of billions more into over how to power the northern B.C.’s liquified processing of LNG, which natural gas (LNG) the Haisla are pioneering megaproject, Coastal First with provincial Nations chiefs held their assistance. quarterly board meeting Sterritt said the Haisla in Vancouver. and the rest of the group These are now the were in agreement until most powerful aboriginal a few weeks ago. The leaders in North America, plan was to follow Clark’s bankrolled by U.S. solemn vow to make B.C. environmental groups LNG the “greenest” in the Tom Fletcher world. and their wealthy charity B.C. Views foundation backers as All parties acknowledge guardians of the Great that some of B.C.’s shale Bear Rainforest. gas will have to be burned A major topic was the Haisla to process and ship LNG to Asia. Nation, the Kitimat partner The initial idea was that one or that abruptly quit its voluntary two natural gas-fired power plants association with the Haida, Gitga’at would be built, eventually backing and other communities over its up wind, small hydro and other plans to develop LNG exports. renewable supplies. B.C. Hydro has This discord comes at a bad 600 megawatts available from its time. Premier Christy Clark has dams, which would require new bet heavily on LNG, not just for transmission capacity up to Kitimat her government’s future, but the to help run the first two LNG plants industrial and economic direction proposed in partnership with the of the province for decades to Haisla. come. Then the play got bigger. Initial press reports were The B.C. government transferred misleading. One had it that Haisla Crown land on Douglas Channel Chief Councillor Ellis Ross, the B.C. to the Haisla for an LNG project government’s key ally on LNG, was planned by Shell, PetroChina “buddying up” with the Harper and Korea Gas. And Sterritt said government on the Enbridge oil he started getting signals from pipeline proposed to go to Kitimat, Victoria that the industry doesn’t in the heart of Coastal First Nations want to buy power from outside territory. producers to drive LNG cooling and Not so. Both Ross and Coastal compression. First Nations executive director Art Instead they wanted to power it

directly with gas, using equipment called “mechanical drives” rather than electrical drives. In a letter to Haisla members explaining why he quit the Coastal First Nations, Ross said he was insulted by Sterritt’s comments that the Haisla were choosing “the dirtiest way possible” to ship LNG. Ross noted that emissions would be about the same if gas is burned in the LNG plant or in a power plant nearby. That’s true, but Sterritt points out a critical difference. If LNG producers are allowed to use single-purpose mechanical drives, no renewable energy can ever be added. And as more LNG producers rush into B.C., reserves that would have lasted 75 to 100 years could be depleted in 30. And when the gas is gone? “These big, hulking plants that are going to be in Kitimat are just going to be sitting there, rotting,” Sterritt said. “It happens all over the world.” B.C.’s clean energy plan envisions extending the Hydro grid, developing run-of-river and wind farms such as the big offshore proposal off Haida Gwaii, and ultimately a future beyond oil and gas. Now, in their rush to develop LNG, Clark and Energy Minister Rich Coleman seem poised to abandon that strategy. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

2009 WINNER

‘Premier Christy Clark has bet heavily on liquid natural gas.’


www.vicnews.com • A9

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

LETTERS Treatment byproducts’disposition in question When the proposed secondary sewage treatment plant is completed, a large volume of sludge, carrying toxic metals, chemicals and who knows what else, will end up at the Hartland landfill. There appears to have been little discussion about what will happen to

that poisonous brew except that it will be treated. The following questions needed to be addressed with specific and detailed answers. 1. Has a method of treatment been selected?

2. If so, what method is contemplated and has it performed as planned in many sewage treatment facilities? 3. Will the treatment method guarantee that absolutely no contaminates find their way into the ground, water and atmospheric environments?

Until these questions are answered in a positive manner, there is absolutely no justification for proceeding with the McLoughlin Point facility and its related pipelines. Donald Rutherford Saanich

Readers respond: Sewage treatment, civil service, homeopathy Staff time waits reflect badly on leadership

Green supporter adds voice to election fray

Re: Waiting game playing out at city hall (News, Nov. 23) It has taken me a full week for my blood pressure to lower before I could put pen to paper, I was so outraged. I have come across three types of leader in my 40 years in corporate life. Those “who know,” which is exhibited by good decisionmaking at least 70 per cent of the time, consulting of one’s team, but not afraid to make a decision. Someone who can admit a mistake and learn from it, etc. Then there are those who “do not know,” soon recognize it and either move on, step back or get moved out. Then there is the worst possible kind of leader, the person who “does not know” and does not know they do not know. Such a leader exhibits poor time management, inability to prioritize, is self-righteous, deals with problems using off-the-wall solutions, analyzes facts to the nth degree and ends up with analysis paralysis. Such people love to hire consultants and external agencies, as they cannot trust their executives. They ask silly questions that lower their credibility with team members and executives, all the while believing they’re doing a good job. Rhetorically, which of the three is our mayor? James McMillan Victoria

Re: Numbers tell the tale in MP-elect’s victory, Personal connections won it for Rankin team (Letters, Dec. 5) Regarding Gordon Pollard’s quote, “a note of statistical reality is in order,” he didn’t help by not voting. He could have made his democratic vote count by at least destroying his ballet. Staying away from voting renders moot his point that Murray Rankin obtained the support of “just 16.3 per cent of eligible voters” in this constituency. Maybe Australia has it right, all people must vote, thus doing their democratic duty. Larry Wartel, a “Rankin File” volunteer, apparently learned an unexpected lesson when NDP campaigners took a page from the Green Party’s book: “mobilizing” both older and mostly younger volunteers to phone, to door knock, etc. But most importantly, to get out the vote. I also wonder whether Mr. Wartel, who wore a yellow Stop a Bad Plan.ca (ARESST) T-shirt to the Green Party’s David Suzuki rally, wore the same shirt doorknocking for the “Rankin File.” He must have known that the Association for Responsible, Ethical and Sustainable Sewage Treatment stood for the exact opposite to Rankin. The Green Party position on sewage treatment was to get

it “right.” From a happy Green Party volunteer, I congratulate the “Rankin File” win. Maybe, a point of order, Larry. Charles Hilton Victoria

Feds show black heart on national drug vote Bill C-398 proposed allowing generic drug manufacturers to legally sell much-needed drugs to developing countries that can’t afford brand-name equivalents. This bill would have alleviated enormous suffering and saved the lives of potentially millions of people fighting HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. But quoting vague trade concerns, the Stephen Harper government used its majority to defeat this bill. Experts say the trade argument is specious and the result is that countless people will suffer and die. The people affected might be far away – they might look different from many of us – but their suffering and deaths are real, are human and will be directly attributable to the actions of these elected MPs. In 2008, there were 1.8 million deaths by HIV, 1.7 million by TB and one million deaths of children to malaria. Generic drugs can cost one-fifth that of brand-name equivalents, which means that five times the people can be treated for the same cost. And Canada was not risking an

Pharmacists’ reputation smeared by homeopathy Re: Pharmacies should not sell tobacco products If pharmacists shouldn’t be allowed to sell tobacco products in their pharmacies, then by the same reasoning they should be prevented from selling homeopathic “medicine.” Homeopathic “medicines” have been diluted to the point that often not a single molecule of the supposed active ingredient is left. Medicine without an active ingredient is not medicine at all. It is hope without any justification sold at a high profit margin.

Illusionist James Randi often takes an entire box of homeopathic sleeping pills at once in his shows, of course with no ill effect. I hope no one is taking homeopathic “medicine” when they need real medicine, or spending money they can ill afford on a substance with no actual active ingredient. Pharmacists are supposed to be trusted professionals. How can we trust them when they sell nonsense like homeopathy? Some say they just sell what the public wants.

The public wants all sorts of silly things. Are they going to be selling ground up bear gall bladder and rhinoceros horn next? Or perhaps they can bring in psychic healers instead of influenza vaccines? Pharmacists could also perhaps bring in tarot card readers to counsel customers on their medications. Or they can stop selling homeopathic products and stay with the science-based medicine. Michael Davey Langford

untested program; Unitaid works with big Pharma to distribute generics to 70 countries around the world. There is something about shared humanity that seems to be missing here, something called conscience. This bill would not cost Canada anything and even the drug companies that hold these patents had agreed to this bill. With no justifiable reason to withhold support for bill C-398, these Conservative MPs have brought great shame to Canada. Nathaniel Poole Victoria

Diver’s sea-life account questioned by writer Re: Diving into murky waters (Letters, Dec. 5). I would certainly question

the credibility of the writer. The current Atlas was published in 1983 and demonstrates strong tidal activity off Victoria. Based on this, the Capital Regional District extended the Macaulay Point outfall to take advantage of the current pattern and avoid back eddies. They then added diffusers so that the screened sewage, with toxic chemicals removed at the source, is discharged into a strong tidal action, where it is naturally oxygenated and thus biologically acceptable. This has been proven by our very competent scientific monitoring. To perform the same on land requires large amounts of power and thus is not ecologically viable. John Fuller Esquimalt

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters to the editor should discuss issues and stories that have been covered in the pages of the News. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity or to discuss using your letter as a guest column. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Victoria News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ Email: editor@vicnews.com

Randall Garrison

MP ESQUIMALT– JUAN DE FUCA

Please join us at our Constituency Office

)OLIDAY 0PEN )OUSE Wednesday, December 19, 4:00pm to 6:00 pm A2–100 Aldersmith Place, Victoria Light snacks and refreshments will be served. Information: 250-405-6550. No RSVP required. We gratefully accept donations of non-perishable food for the Food Bank.

We are here to assist constituents with Federal government programs and services.


A10 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

Suspicious fire destroys abandoned home

CHURCH DIRECTORY Your Guide to Local Houses of Worship CORPORATION OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT

NOTICE OF MEETINGS

A suspicious fire broke out at an abandoned house in the 800-block of Queens Ave. in the early hours of Dec. 6. Victoria Police Department received a 911 call around 2:30 a.m. from a man who said he heard loud explosions and saw smoke billowing from the building. The fire took approximately two hours to get under control, said Bob Jones of the Victoria Fire Department. Damage is estimated to be $600,000, he said,

Parish of St. Peter & St. Paul

Give thanks unto the Lord Jesus. Sing unto him. Let the redeemed of the Lord testify.

1229 Esquimalt Road Esquimalt, B.C. V9A 3P1 250-414-7100

Rev. Lon Towstego

Monday, Dec. 24

7pm Eucharist, 10pm Carol Sing 10:30pm “Midnight Mass” with choir

Tuesday, Dec. 25

Monday, December 17th Regular Council 7 pm Council Chambers

10am Holy Communion with Hymns St. Paul’s Historic Naval Garrison Church

I can help you find him. Call Pastor Dave 250-479-0500

Tuesday, December 18th Advisory Planning Commission 7 pm Council Chambers For further information, please call 250-414-7135 or our website @ www.esquimalt.ca/council

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To book a space call Shelley Westwood at 250-480-3227

Look

adding the vacant home will likely be demolished. Police are asking anyone who may have seen suspicious activity around the home beforehand to call the VicPD non-emergency line at 250-995-7654 or anonymously at Crime Stoppers, 1-800-222TIPS (8477).

A man was rushed to hospital with an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound last week in Vic West. The man, believed to be in his mid-50’s, was discovered inside a business in Westside

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“There was one firearm seized. It’s not suspicious, as (the man) was the only one who had access to that firearm,” Russell said. Police closed off the area for several hours. dpalmer@vicnews.com

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Village shopping centre around 9 a.m. last Wednesday (Dec. 5), said VicPD Const. Mike Russell. An employee discovered the man and no one else was in the business at the time, he said.

We hear it every day. “\ The only problem with Blundstone boots is that they last too long.” In our throwaway world wouldn’t it be nice if every product had such a “problem”? If they got better over time, not worse? Landfills are full of broken promises. But they’re not full of Blundstone boots. We’re comfortable with that.

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Police tape surrounds an abandoned home at 860 Queens Ave., gutted by fire last week. Victoria Fire Department officials believe the blaze was intentionally set.

Gunshot wounds self-inflicted

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NEWS

$16 from National Historic Site. Tickets chair and extra 250-386-6121 appreciated. Bring a lawn McPherson Box office. FMI: heaters! in Old Town To Jan. 7 – Christmas mas Dinner blankets, the hotel will supply Christ – 16 re to to a.m. Theat 14 10 , m Dec. To Dec. 16 – The Belfry , adapted Beach Hotel, at the Royal BC Museu sounds of FMI: 250-360-2999. Carol Theatre at the Oak Bay and ppresents A Christmas mas Trolley 5 p.m. daily. The sights Friends’ Harmony r Michael a 4.5 metre Dec. 13 to 15 – Christ featuring Stan Davis and aand directed by artistic directo th as one Christmas long ago, including and 7:15 p.m. l musical comedy and oldMcBea Tour in Langford, 6:30 Centre Park. for Christmas, a mirthfu as tree, festive garlands e yarns, Shamata and starring Tom characters, Sh City Christm at Yuletid s end and hilariou with begin ng Tours al finery. abounding on. FMI: 250of literature’s most enduri time shops with their season delightful array of Tour participation by donati warm sentiments and a er Scrooge. Small Works repark.ca Ebenez Eb songs. Enjoy To Jan. 8 – Christmas Galler y of 391-1738 or www.citycent original and familiar holiday in ChristmasArt the s at dinner Ghost Sale y to Sunday until Dec. ian – festive and F Frida dates Show a three-course a Victor Dec. 14 to 31, select Massey Gallery, tion Theatre. 23 2 – Father Christmas, Discover the Past Greater Victoria’s historic Vancouver adorned David Foster Founda of Christmas Past with ute variation of ience is at the Royal BC Exper E featuring works by many FMI: 1-800-668-7758. Share ranging from tours, 7:30 p.m. This 90-min focuses on m, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ah Museu M Island’s finest artists at prices & 16 – Handel’s Messi the popular Ghostly Walks 14 on a photo taken a Dec. have aggv.c and FMI: wishes holiday h $100 to $150. hony at d with with the Victoria Symp in this special setting. Include fee for ar Auditorium, Extra University Centre Farquh ad ion or membership. admiss Choral Society and Victoria the with . photos p ymphony.ca/ soloists FMI: www.victorias mas / gh December – Christ Throu T concert/handels-messiah-3 Historic House a Craigdarroch Castle le.ca at rs’ Market, Dec. 15 – Winter Farme Square. Local Museum. FMI: www.thecast M t Marke in 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Christmas and desserts, TThrough December meats, fresh-baked breads more. FMI: fly Butter ia Victor at and e in the Jungle preserves, fresh produc for the ted decora ly om special , arket.c ns Garde G www.victoriapublicm at 5 and tours g evenin g offerin and se season mas Craft Dec. 15 – Drop-In Christ 6 p.m. The library supplies the . library the at National and you supply the To Jan. 1 – Canada’s materials and samples, , 10 a.m. to 6 welcome; children under All Gingerbread Showcase G ation! imagin your Point. Feast by an adult. pp.m. at the Inn at Laurel three must be accompanied 15 at the e inspirations Dec. ey and nose on creativ eyes No registration required. Vote for to 11:30 a.m. cted from gingerbread. co constru Esquimalt Branch, 10:30 Photo by Don Denton a donation to 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. , Branch l yo favourite and make your Centra the and on t for Humanity Victoria. ing carolling in Basti H Habita l Victoria annual Figgy Pudd Dec. 15 – Third annua Join in the third Animation in Competition To Jan. 2 – Lights & Figgy Pudding Carolling ers and l the supernatural Square Dec. 15. nnial Square. Enjoy a magica ion Cente C holiday ghost stories and Bastion Square. For beginn in mas Visitor animat the Christ tive at of runs y Meet interac . ddisplay of lights and Dec. 12 & 16 – Histor at Christmas in Victoria ed carollers, the competition a singseason : rson Tickets p.m. McPhe ). 2 , the Wharf of Tour & s and along the back wall al Centre (Government Old Victoria Walking from 1 to 3 p.m., with award h your smart phone in & seniors. FMI: the Theatre. Interact throug Th $14/adults; $12/students from 3:15 to 4 p.m. in Bastion Square, outside along Meets and delight will g 90-minute walkin with w a special story that www.discoverthepast.com Classic: A nial Maritime Museum. This Dec. 15 – Christmas te. At the other end of Cententree where l Stuff the ca captiva ge) at the Dec. 14 – Second annua tour takes place in Old Town, a special Christmas Carol (Scroo , 7:30 to 10:30 Sq , see if you can find Square colour ful stories 1951, this Stocking for Respitality change with Christmas traditions and Vic Theatre. Released in s’ original ’ Centre’s udents with w lights that move and Seniors $12/st Dicken ults; Cridge s the at $14/ad Charle : of a.m. adaptation abound. Tickets . cup of cheer, a so sounds t.com is widely Enjoy . Sim thepas r Lounge iscover Alastai Grand novel starring & seniors. FMI: www.d annual Bear and the sounds of ve of the many treats, st definiti the breakfa be To Jan. 3 – The 12th to festive considered Christmas Hotel Grand – and offer your $10 + HST Dec. 12 – Naden Band Wear continues at the W beautiful Christmas music The Cridge film versions. Admission: Theatre. Tickets: Children’s Health t for Royal iser suppor to the t fundra at a rt as suppor al Conce Pacific Pa c: Elf (PG) ts, plus an financi 15 – Christmas Classi Island. Vote studen ver Dec. & iors . Vancou of $7/sen Service tion lity ults, Founda Fo Respita $10/ad ready for some d by local at the Vic Theatre. Get antics of FMI: www. s Anonymous for fo your favourite bear, dresse suggested unwrapped toy at the door. cheer! Follow the Dec. 14 – C-FAX Santa r radiothon as ($2 uals Christm individ and sses busine b of Santa’s elves rmts.bc.ca Miracle on Broad, a 12-hou Buddy (Will Ferrell), one on). as Hamper donati d y as a human. mas Starlight in support of the Christm tas.com who learns of his true identit Christmas at the Dec. 12 – Christ as movies under To Jan. 6 – Magic of program. FMI: www.cfaxsan Admission: $10+HST ful decorations, Cinema. Enjoy Christm BButchart Gardens. Beauti ever-popular the stars at the Delta Victoria Ocean Pointe Dec. 14 – Cookeilidh – Celtic 2 d the Continue on page p.m. Movies are Ann’s Academy nnightly entertainment and s tucked Resort, Home Alone, 6 Yuletide, 7:30 p.m. at St. Anonymous Days of Christmas display Tw Twelve free but donations to Santas s. aw about the Garden away

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www.vicnews.com • A11

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Blood bank and food bank team up Joint Victoria donation campaign aims to benefit both organizations Brent Palmer is coping with the lowest stock levels in his 27 years at the food bank. He hopes their partnership helps make a difference for the more than 7,000 people the food bank helps during the Christmas season and

throughout the year. “(CBS) has quite an interest in what happens in the community,” Palmer said. “We are delighted we have developed that partnership. (We have) a commitment to feed 7,000. That is a huge family to feed.

“Hunger eats away at your dignity, your pride and your hope. Believe me, your readers give us, and the people who require our services, hope and dignity.” reporter@saanich news.com

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Canadian Blood Services and Food Banks B.C. are hoping their numbers get a shot in the arm this Christmas. The holiday season makes way for the third annual “Bleed and Feed” initiative where the two entities look to the generosity of Greater Victorians to fill blood banks and food banks. “It is a wonderful way that donors can give back on two levels that are not (just) financially based,” said Canadian Blood Services partnership specialist Catherine Sloot. “Most of us have a tin of this or a pack of that we can share to the less fortunate.” From now until Jan. 2, Canadian Blood Services at 3449 Saanich Rd. is accepting nonperishable food donations for the

Mustard Seed food bank. Sloot hopes the partnership draws new donors for both the food and blood banks at a time when many regular donors are busy or away. Mustard Seed executive director



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Catherine Sloot, with Canadian Blood Services sits with Doug Wilson as he gives blood. Canadian Blood Services has partnered with the Mustard Seed collecting both food and blood for the holidays.

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A12 • www.vicnews.com

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www.vicnews.com • A13

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Tsunami debris due to roll in this winter Phone app lets citizens record Japanese debris Natalie North News staff

A wooden box stamped with Japanese characters sits hidden beneath a pile of seaweed and a sizeable chunk of kelp near the waters of Telegraph Cove – an image of what is expected to hit the West Coast this December. This prop didn’t actually float over from Japan following the devastating earthquake from March, 2011. But if it did, Murray Leslie, a member of Ocean Networks Canada’s software development team, would be doing the right thing, as he kneels down on the beach and snaps a photo with his smartphone. Logged into Coastbuster, an app designed to get the public reporting marine debris, Leslie captures an image of the box. With a few strokes across the phone’s touchscreen, he categorizes his finding, describing what he has found and whether or not it appears hazardous. “Pretend we’re on the West Coast and there’s nothing but wild ocean out there,” he says at Telegraph Cove in Saanich. “Stuff can just wash in here and it’s very difficult for it to wash out again. They expect debris like this to accumulate for at least the next two or three years.” Ocean Networks vets all such images then sends them along to authorities in

the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the Ministry of Environment, and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). “It’s important that (debris) gets recorded and the people who will be able to do that are the ones who live or work in the area, the people who are actually out walking the beach on a daily basis and able to say, ‘Hey, that wasn’t here yesterday,”’ Leslie says. Residents on the West Coast, from Washington to Alaska are about to start seeing a lot of debris that wasn’t there yesterday. The bulk is projected to be a mere few hundred kilometres from the coastline within a matter of weeks, given normal circulation of the ocean. Winter storms could see that debris – more than a million tonnes – wash up anytime between now and Christmas. Winds have already pushed lighter objects floating closer to the surface of the ocean to our shores, says Kate Moran, president and CEO of Ocean Networks Canada. Oceanographers now expect the arrival of denser objects, those floating too deep for satellite recognition, she says. “If (an object) is large enough and we can get good dimensions on it, it might help scientists understand the ocean currents better, because it has a certain density and they can calculate the depth at which it was floating.”

Natalie North/News staff

Murray Leslie, with Ocean Networks Canada, snaps a photo of a box marked with Japanese characters at Telegraph Cove in Cadboro Bay for a demonstration of the Coastbuster mobile app. Uses for the app, developed through a partnership with Simon Fraser University’s spatial interface research lab, could be applied to a range of tracking initiatives, Moran says. “Say there’s some kind of impact on coastal fauna, like oyster beds, or muscles, or clams – we could actually have a campaign and people could document where they are and where they’re not. “It could be applied for other things: surfers could use it to document where the best waves are,” she adds with a laugh. Last June, Cara Lachmuth, volunteer coordinator for the Vancouver Island chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, led a cleanup on Vargas Island north of Tofino. The

group collected a tonne of debris in a day – a hefty load given their requirement to log all of their findings and submit an annual report to NOAA. “That’s fairly intensive work, to take an entire year of data and write a report,” Lachmuth says. “To have an app available, so we can submit it all instantaneously with pictures is amazing.” The free Coastbuster app is currently available on Android smartphones and tablets. The iPhone/iPad apps are awaiting approval from Apple in the coming weeks. Check out information on the project at oceannetworks.ca/coastbuster. nnorth@saanichnews.com

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A14 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

HOT TICKET

THE ARTS

Rock Of Ages

NEWS

Rock out to this classic rock cover band, playing ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s tunes. Rock of Ages includes some members of Younger Than Yesterday, performing Dec. 12, 14 and 15 at Bartholomews Pub, 777 Douglas St. Admission is free (no minors).

Following the code of the samurai Prints from 1800s tell a famed Japanese tale of revenge Edward Hill News staff

A venerated, blood-soaked 300-year-old tale of revenge and loyalty that still resonates through Japan today, is being played out on the walls of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. The gallery has launched Virtuous Vendetta: The story of the 47 Ronin in Prints, a collection of 69 meticulous woodblock images produced by Japan’s finest artists in the 1700 and 1800s. The individual scenes follow the oft-repeated true story of the 47 ronin, while demonstrating the striking detail in what 150 years ago was considered disposable, mass produced art. “It is a tragedy. Like the Greeks, the Japanese like their tragic stories,” said Barry Till, curator of Asian art for the AGGV for 31 years. Till pulled the collection together over the past several decades. “The story has become the ultimate symbol of the spirit of loyalty to one’s master, no matter what.” The story unfolds in 1701, with feudal lords Asano Naganori and the elder Kira

bided their time before launching an attack. The lead ronin Ôishi Kuranosuke even made himself appear as a drunk and a womanizer to lull Kira’s men into complacency. “After a year-and-a-half they assaulted Kira’s mansion. They killed many bodyguards, found Kira and presented him with the sword of their master to commit suicide. Kira refused so they cut off his head,” Till said moving from print to print. Edward Hill/News staff Villagers hailed the ronin Art Gallery of Greater Victoria curator of Asian art as heroes as they travelled to Barry Till spent the last few years hunting down Tokyo to present Kira’s head century-old Japanese woodblock prints related to to their master’s grave. “These the famed story of the 47 ronin. samurai showed the ultimate loyalty,” Till said, “and they Yoshinaka, a greedy man who demanded knew because of it, they had to kill themlarge bribes for advice on official etiquette. selves.” Enraged, Asano drew his sword and nicked Again on the shogun’s orders and withKira in the forehead, although unsheathing out question, the 46 committed seppuku. his weapon within the shogun’s grounds Within weeks of their deaths in 1703, peowas a serious offence. ple began telling the story of revenge of On the shogun’s order, Asano committed the ronin through kabuki theater. Millions seppuku – ritual suicide – setting in motion of ornate woodblock prints soon followed a plot for revenge by Asano’s samurai war- as the story struck a chord with Japanese riors against Lord Kira. Forty-six masterless society and gained widespread popularity. samurai called ronin (the 47th is rumoured “The prints are art of the masses, often to be a warrior who wasn’t quite a samurai) posted in houses until they fell apart and

were thrown out,” said Till, who wrote a book on the prints of the 47 ronin. “Some prints were put into storage. Often you find ones that are 150 to 200 years old in pristine condition. New ones are found all the time.” Till collected approximately 25 new ronin prints over the past two years through online auctions. Recently depressed prices also brought many Japanese woodblock prints out of the woodwork. Auctioned prints can fetch up to $400, but $150 is an average price. “Ten years ago it would have been double or triple. It’s a good time to buy,” Till said. The prints add to the 4000-plus pieces of Japanese art owned by the AGGV. “We have arguably the best collection of Japanese art in Canada – samurai suits, ceramics, paintings,” he said. Till had planned the exhibition to coincide with the release of the movie 47 Ronin which stars Keanu Reeves, although that film’s release date is now December 2013. “The scenes are so expressive. The outfits are so strong and powerful,” Till said. “I wanted to show how popular the story is in Japan.” Virtuous Vendetta prints are on display at AGGV until March 31, 2013. Barry Till is offering a curator’s tour on Jan. 16, 2013 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. See aggv.ca for more. editor@saanichnews.com

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www.vicnews.com • A15

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Out of this world art

Submitted photo

The works of Lisa Samphire, Jo Ludwig, Peggy Brackett, Sid Samphire and Adele Samphire are on display in the main gallery at Cedar Hill Recreation Centre until Dec. 15.

Starfish Glassworks owner Lisa Samphire, together with Starfish alumni Jo Ludwig, exhibit both large and small decorative, as well as functional, glass at the main gallery in the Cedar Hill Recreation Centre, 3220 Cedar Hill Rd. Peggy Brackett, also a Starfish alumni, is chiming in with her well-received, well-made glass jewelry. Joining Samphire, Ludwig and Brackett are ceramists Sid Samphire, showing off his imaginative slab-built creations, and Adele Samphire, bringing her classic, functional work. What is surprising about this show, perhaps merely the resultant imposition of a particular bent of mind, is a theme of things extraterrestrial. The theme is most obvious in Ludwig’s deliberate reference to things alien. His Copper Moon and Blue Moon, with their Saturn-like rings and the spacy stands they sit on, as well as his Treasure Boxes, set the mood. This mood is carried by the out-of-this-world look and feel of the well known, glittering, precious little bowls he has built his reputation on. Next to Lisa Samphire’s unorthodox christmas balls that conjure up distant, alien space craft hanging just above the horizon, some of Sid Samphire’s slab worked clay jugs, platters and vases provide the alien landscape. Gently bringing everything back to earth is Adele Samphire’s wheel thrown, functional pottery. This art exhibition and sale Gifts of Clay and Glass in 3 parts includes a preview, on until Dec. 14, from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily, with only few tantalizing pieces from each artist. Part two is a gala evening, Dec. 14, from 5 to 7 p.m. with punch, nibblies, artists and additional exhibits. Part three includes the showand-sell, Dec. 15, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. llavin@vicnews.com

ARTS LISTINGS IN BRIEF

Get in the Christmas spirit Join a Christmas carol sing-along at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 680 Courtney St., Dec. 13 from noon to 1 p.m. Carols will be accompanied by the organist and there will be violin and vocal performances. Free admission and refreshments.

Final call for VI Music Awards It’s the final call for submissions for the 2013 Vancouver Island Music Awards music gala. Victoria will be the host city for the 2013 ceremony and showcase of talent that will be held in late April. The Call for Submissions, which began in September, closes on Dec. 21. Details on how and what to submit can be found at islandmusicawards.wordpress.com.

Celebrate the Superior Cafe The Superior Cafe is closing an eight-year chapter of its life on Dec. 23 and beginning Feb. 14 will be reopening with The Superior, a modern supper club, Thursday and Friday evenings. Join them Dec. 23 at 5:30 p.m. for open seating, family style dining, $35 per person, with an open stage hosted by Aaron Watson with performers who have graced their stage in the last eight years. All proceeds from the stage going to Mustard Seed Food Bank. Call 250-380-9515 for tickets.

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Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

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www.vicnews.com • A17

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

N O S A E S Transit goal not being reached: auditor PRE• Western TICKET Speedway Tom Fletcher Black Press

The B.C. government’s ambitious goal to double transit ridership by 2020 is not going to be met at the current rate of growth, Auditor General John Doyle reported Thursday. Doyle’s audit of B.C. Transit’s efforts to meet that goal found that since it was set in 2008, ridership increased by 6.9 million by last spring, the latest annual total available. The original target was 9.4 million by that time, and the gap is expected to grow further by 2014-15. The provincial transit plan was unveiled early in 2008 by former premier Gordon Campbell and then-transportation minister Kevin Falcon. Its $14-billion price tag

Black Press files

Along with slashing greenhouse gas emissions by a third, former premier Gordon Campbell called for transit use to double by 2020. included federal and municipal investment, with SkyTrain and other urban light rail accounting for $10 billion. It included the nowcompleted Canada Line, the Evergreen extension to Coquitlam and another SkyTrain extension to the University of B.C. Rapid bus systems for Kelowna and Victoria were the only parts of the plan outside the Lower Mainland.

The audit identified a lack of clear targets and collaboration between B.C. Transit and the B.C. transportation ministry. It recommended that the targets and timelines be reviewed. The audit was underway when the province did its own review of B.C. Transit’s rocky relationship with local governments. Transportation Minister Mary Polak announced in

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September that local communities will be asked to nominate directors for the B.C. Transit board. She also said the province would make it easier to amalgamate a patchwork of local transit systems into regional authorities such as the Greater Victoria Regional Transit Commission. The B.C. government pays 47 per cent of costs for B.C. Transit service, in partnership with 58 local governments in B.C. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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Sharon Tiffin/News staff

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The Municipality requests that when you clean your driveway and sidewalks that you place the snow on the right side of your driveway as you face the road. This will avoid the snow plows filling in your driveway as it passes. The Municipality will make every effort to keep major arterial collector streets and bus routes open and to clear snow from as many residential streets as possible. The co-operation of all property owners and residents in this matter is greatly appreciated.

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www.vicnews.com • A19

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Shipbuilding stakeholders talk shop Daniel Palmer News staff

Have you ever watched an $8-billion brainstorming session? That’s exactly what took place in Esquimalt last week, as the Township hosted a roundtable discussion with the major stakeholders connected to Seaspan’s federal shipbuilding contract. “(The roundtable) was extremely valuable, because it put navy, dockyard and Seaspan all in the same room, along with the people working to provide the education to the workers for those facilities,” Mayor Barb Desjardins said afterward. The forum included representatives from the British Columbia Institute of Technology and Camosun College, where many of the 3,000 tradespeople that will be needed before 2020 at Seaspan’s Victoria and Vancouver shipyards will be trained. The discussion was intended to help Esquimalt

council and staff understand their role in the monumental economic activity ramping up in the region. “The service of the fleet is more lucrative than the building of the fleet,” John Shaw, Seaspan’s vice-president of business development, said at the meeting. “In Vancouver, once you launch the ship, it’s launched.” Ship repair will translate into at least 30 years of sustainable jobs in the shipyards, if the company stays competitive with other shipyards on the West Coast, Shaw said. Esquimalt is undertaking an economic development process that includes consultation with seven sectors, including the latest session with shipbuilding and national defence. The roundtable discussions provide a venue for each stakeholder to suggest strengths,

Vision Matters Dr. Helen Martindale

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Diabetes and your sight Most people know that diabetes is a disease that affects the blood sugar levels in the body. The symptoms of diabetes include unusual thirst, fatigue and hunger, and increased need to urinate. Those with the acute, Type 1, form of diabetes will need and seek treatment because their symptoms are severe. Many people with the less acute, Type 2, form of the disease can try to ignore their symptoms and they live with chronically elevated blood sugar levels. This damages many tissues in the body including the blood vessels. Optometrists are often the first to detect diabetes because its onset can cause a relatively sudden change in vision. This change can be reversed when the blood sugar level is controlled. Poorly controlled diabetes can have very serious effects on the eyes. Blood vessels can leak in the retina at the back of the eye and small blood vessels can grow where they should not. This is called diabetic retinopathy, and if untreated can lead to blindness. Retinal specialists often use lasers to control the spread of the retinopathy. If you are overweight, over forty, have a family history of diabetes, or are experiencing symptoms, you should ask your family physician about the possibility of diabetes. If diabetes is diagnosed, your family physician will want you to have regular eye exams as part of the monitoring of the disease. Sometimes a team of professionals will work to help you develop a healthy lifestyle with suitable nutrition and exercise. In some cases medication can be avoided by a change in diet. Your Optometrist can be an important member of your team.

weaknesses, opportunities and threats to their sector. It is then the township’s job to come up with practical ways of spurring development forward. “We’re asking who makes up community and how we can help them, while maintaining what’s best for residents,” Desjardins said. Alex Reuben, chair of the province’s shipbuilding and repair task force, was at the meeting and agreed with Shaw that ship repair is the key to Esquimalt’s long-term economic success. Reuben is also executive director of the Marine

Training and Applied Research Centre. The industry-led centre, on Songhees Nation land adjacent to Esquimalt, is billed by the province as a worker training site and a focal point for applied research to help meet increased business demand. “The stability of the Seaspan contract, going forward, sets our shipbuilding and repair dockyard on a secure footing that it’s never had before,” Desjardins said. “If what we’ve done in any way facilitates better communication for those partnerships, then we’ve

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Paul Debree uses a grinder making footings for a cruise ship at Victoria Shipyard. already started to succeed in helping this industry do better.” Roundtable discussions with other sectors, including education, developers and First Nations will

take place over the coming months. A draft community economic development strategy should be ready to present to council this spring, Desjardins said. dpalmer@vicnews.com

Tips on tipping your community newspaper carrier Throughout the year, your newspaper arrives at the doorstep full of local news and shopping information. You may not know who delivered your paper, but carriers are on the job... whatever the weather.

The holiday season is a perfect opportunity to express your gratitude We get many calls from readers who want to reward their carrier. Here are some ideas: • Leave a greeting card or envelope in a secure spot your carrier will see. Mark it: Black Press carrier. • Gift cards are a good option. • Black Press cannot give out the names of our delivery people, but we can forward a tip on your behalf. Just drop off an envelope to our office at 818 Broughton Street or at 777 Goldstream Avenue with your name and address clearly marked. We’ll direct it to the your carrier. • Questions: call 250-360-0817 or email: distribution@vicnews.com

VICTORIA NEWS SAANICH NEWS OAK BAY NEWS GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW

250-361-4478


A20 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Fairfield resident appreciates Thrifty’s community support Thirty-five years after Thrifty Foods founders Alex Campbell and Ernie Skinner decided to lend a hand to their next-door neighbour in Fairfield, one benefactor is still grateful for the gesture. Gus Niketas was a baseball player at Beacon Hill Little League when the new business donated money to the Hollywood Park-based organization, Don Descoteau and has been Biz Beat a longtime volunteer with the league. “Since that very first year, Thrifty Foods has supported our league and ensured that young children have had access to a great sport,” said Niketas, whose 13-year-old son, Chris, played his final season there this summer. Recognition of that community support was part of Thrifty’s 35th anniversary celebrations, which kicked off recently at the Fairfield Road store where the company, now owned by Sobey’s, began in 1977. Besides assisting numerous community groups financially with its Smile Cards and through food donations, Thrifty’s is

provide fast and easily accessible information on downtown goods and services to both locals and visitors.

entering its 26th year operating its Sendial program. The grocery home delivery service gets food and other store items to customers who have been injured or have accessibility challenges that prevent them from shopping in person. For more information on its programs, visit thriftyfoods.com/ community.

Government webinars help with return to PST

Heart health help at Canadian Tire Now through Dec. 24, checkout clerks at Greater Victoria Canadian Tire stores are asking shoppers if they’d like to contribute $2 in cash or Canadian Tire money for its Fixa-Heart program. All donations go to the Victoria Hospitals Foundation toward heart health. The store campaign raised $57,400 last year for critical care beds for the cardiac unit at RJH. Since 2003, it has brought in more than $500,000 for the cause.

Boutique shops woo Christmas shoppers With its late-night opening promotion in the books, the 70 member-businesses of Shop Local Victoria are hoping to maintain momentum in the final rush to Christmas. Until Dec. 15, shoppers can

Photo courtesy Thrifty Foods

Former player and current Beacon Hill Little League volunteer Gus Niketas, left, poses with son Chris, 13, and Fairfield store manager Jim Fuller during recent Thrifty Foods 35th anniversary celebrations. enter draws for an iPad and dozens of gift cards worth $50 and $100 at any of the participating merchants. The organization, formed to support and promote locally owned, independent businesses, markets its members as able to provide a “boutique shopping experience” unlike corporate stores. “Each shop has unique and special items that will entice and excite shoppers,” says Shop Local Victoria board member Natasha Crawford of Brown’s the Florist. A complete listing of

participating businesses can be found at shoplocalvictoria.com.

Business Association updates website A categorized, searchable list of businesses, a full events listing, program descriptions and a blog are among the features of the Downtown Victoria Business Association’s redesigned website (downtownvictoria.ca). Rebuilt by Victoria company Trapeze Communications, the aim of the mobile-friendly site is to better

Business owners looking for help switching their system back to the PST and GST from the harmonized sales tax can find it online. Two one-hour webinars are scheduled for tomorrow (Dec. 13) at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., and another happens next Tuesday (Dec. 18) at 10:30 a.m. For more information and to register for a session, visit gov. bc.ca/PSToutreach.

Names in the news for Victoria business Earl Wilde, general manager of the Victoria Regent, is entering his 23rd year with the Wharf Street hotel, which coincides with its ranking of No. 18 best hotel in Canada by readers of Conde Nast magazine. The Fairmont Empress made No. 16 on the 2012 list … Glen Lynch and his staff at Baggins at 561 Johnson St. invite shoppers to come down and help them celebrate the store’s 43 years in business in Victoria. Send your business news to editor@vicnews.com.

• Mayfair Flower Shop 158-2945 Jacklin Rd.

Pennies for Presents!

• Quality Cobbler 140-2945 Jacklin Rd. • Corona Foods 2155 Sooke Rd. • Dodds Furniture 715 Finlayson St. • Heirloom Linens 777 Royal Oak Dr. • Red Barn Market 751 Vanalman Ave. • Red Barn Market 5550 West Saanich Rd. • Red Barn Market 5325 Cordova Bay Rd. • Peppers Foods 3829 Cadboro Bay Rd. • Oak Bay Pharmasave 2200 Oak Bay Ave. • Salon Modello 2590 Cadboro Bay Rd.

Donate Your Spare Change and make a difference for children’s charities. Our newspapers collect change, convert it to dollars and donate funds to children’s charities. Donate at a Black Press newspaper of¿ce or at one of these participating businesses:

Thank you for supporting Pennies for Presents.

• Slater’s Meats 2577 Cadboro Bay Rd. • Verico Select Mortgage 105-1497 Admirals Rd. • Verico Select Mortgage Westshore 3212 Jacklin Rd. • Verico Select Mortgage 1925 Oak Bay Ave. • Verico Select Mortgage 110-4460 Chatterton Way • Brick Langford 500-2945 Jacklin Rd. • Capital Iron 1900 Store St. • 4 Cats Art Studio 2279 Bowker Ave. • Feys & Hobbs Canteen 2249 Oak Bay Ave.

Community Newspapers

VICTORIANEWS

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OAK BAYNEWS

• Standard Furniture 758 Cloverdale Ave.

GOLDSTREAMNEWS

• Goldstream Food Market 976 Goldstream Ave.


www.vicnews.com • A21

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Seeking an NCAA scholarship? Bill Green, father of a professional baseball player, is hosting a free information seminar on how to help your child win an athletic scholarship. The session begins at 7 p.m., Thursday (Dec. 13) at the Pacific Institute of Sport Excellence.

Appliances

SPORTS

Ice melts for Panthers matinee Travis Paterson News staff

Swift Current Broncos forward Graham Black follows a rebound off Royals goalie Patrick Polivka during the Royals’ 2-1 win at Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre on Saturday (Dec. 8). Jonathon Howe Victoria Royals

Holidays loom for Royals, Grizz The Victoria Royals got back in the win column with a 2-1 victory over the Swift Current Broncos on Saturday (Dec. 8). It was Adam Lowry’s second visit to Victoria this season and the Broncos captain scored his team’s only goal. It was also his first time facing his father, Royals head coach Dave Lowry. Adam and Dave shared the bench with Team WHL vs. Russia last month. The rink rained teddy bears when Austin Carroll opened the scoring for the Royals at 1:51 of the second period. The annual toss benefits children through local charities such as The Salvation Army, and the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul. Carroll fired a wrist shot that got a piece of Eetu Laurikainen’s blocker and trickled up and over the Broncos’ goaltender and

into the net. It brought thousands of stuffies to the ice. A minute after the restart, Brandon Magee netted his 13th off a Ben Walker pass. Adam Lowry sniped a wrist shot high glove side on Patrick Polivka in the third. Polivka made 32 saves for his 13th win of the season. The win put the Royals (16-130-1) into sixth place, ahead of the Seattle Thunderbirds (16-14-0-1) in the Western Conference based on winning percentage. The Royals visited the Thunderbirds on Tuesday, results of which were past press time, and will swing through Alberta this weekend, against the Red Deer Rebels on Friday and Edmonton Oil Kings on Saturday. Next is a 13-day holiday break, which

ends when the Royals host a two-game home stand, Dec. 28 and 29, versus the Prince George Cougars. The BCHL Victoria Grizzies also have a holiday break coming. The Grizz also won 2-1 on Saturday, defeating the visiting Surrey Eagles at Bear Mountain Arena. Gerry Fitzgerald scored in the first and third period for the Grizz. The Grizzlies (19-8) are now four points ahead of the Alberni Bulldogs for first in the Island division and tied with the Chilliwack Chiefs for second in the league behind the Penticton Vees. The Grizzlies play three-in-three this weekend, as they’re home to the Prince George Spruce Kings at 7 p.m. on Friday, away at Alberni on Saturday, and home to the Cowichan Capitals at 6 p.m. on Sunday. sports@vicnews.com

A Zamboni malfunction led to a postponed Sunday afternoon game between the home team Peninsula Panthers and visiting Saanich Braves at Panorama Recreation Centre on Sunday (Dec. 9). With a large crowd in attendance, the Braves and Panthers skated the traditional 15-minute warmup, with the Panthers debuting a new third jersey. After the warm up, the Zamboni came out for a pre-game flood and broke down inside the Panthers blueline. Hot water emptied onto the ice and melted a spot down to the concrete. The game was cancelled and is to be rescheduled at a later date. The Braves had defeated the Panthers 3-2 on Wednesday (Dec. 5) and the Sunday game was to be their second of the week. On Friday the Panthers won their first game in three attempts under promoted coach Brian Passmore. The former assistant took over on Nov. 30 when Rob Armstrong left for a post with B.C. Hockey. Injuries, meanwhile, slowed the Braves (20-40-2) up as the second best team in the province fell 4-3 in a shootout loss to the Oceanside Generals at Pearkes arena on Friday. Top line forwards Josh Gray and Max Mois, who made his Braves debut on Wednesday, both missed Friday’s game. They are part of a long list of injured Braves with Tom Dakers, Jordan Groenhyde and Brandon Parmar. To make room for Mois, formerly of the Westshore Wolves, the Braves moved 20-year-old Andrew White to the Comox Valley Glaciers, host of this year’s Cyclone Taylor Cup provincial championship. The Victoria Cougars (27-1-0-1) remained atop the list of B.C.’s best junior B teams this week. Frustrations boiled over as the Cougars routed the Kerry Park Islanders 10-0 on Thursday and 10-1 on Saturday. The Islanders racked up 164 penalty minutes on Saturday, with the Cougars picking up 75. It was up from 82 for the Islanders and 48 for the Cougars on Wednesday. sports@vicnews.com

CW youth finish perfect season

HarbourCats release debut sked Travis Paterson News staff

Baseball fans, mark your calendars for June 5. The Victoria HarbourCats baseball team will make its home debut, bringing the West Coast League to Royal Athletic Park. The HarbourCats’ first game is a Wednesday night against the Kelowna Falcons, the only other B.C. team in the league. The 2013 expansion HarbourCats and Medford Rogues (Ore.) bumps the league to 11 teams, with a new division set up. North and South replace East and West. The North Division will include the HarbourCats and Falcons, and from Washington State, the Bellingham Bells, Wenatchee AppleSox and Walla Walla Sweets. The South Division is has four Oregon teams,

the Rogues, Klamath Falls Gems, Bend Elks and Corvallis Knights, and Washington State’s Cowlitz Black Bears and Kitsap BlueJackets. “We’re excited about the schedule,” WCL president Ken Wilson said, “and believe it accentuates our best rivalries for the fans.” The HarbourCats will make five road trips, visiting all but the Bend Elks and Corvallis Knights. Travels won’t exceed six games in length. General manager Holly Jones said the promotional schedule is filling up as the team brings on sponsors and “dreams up exciting game-night themes.” Season tickets are on sale for $225 to $325, with 10-game flex packs $79 to $89, at harbourcats.com. sports@vicnews.com

Castaway Wanderers

Members of the Castaway Wanderers and Velox Rugby Club under-15 teams link up in a scrum on the muddy pitch of rain-soaked Windsor Park on Sunday (Dec. 9).

The Castaway Wanderers prevailed in less than ideal conditions as cold, hard rain came down for Sunday’s Vancouver Island U15 boys rugby final against Velox Rugby Club at Windsor Park. CW won 30-7 and finished the fall season undefeated. “It was difficult dealing with the conditions for both sides,” said Kevin Hall, one of the CW coaches. Defence ruled the first half of the game, with CW taking an 8-7 lead into the break. The second half turned to CW’s favour as Velox was unable to match the pressure, and CW scored four unanswered tries. sports@vicnews.com


A22 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Six on six Oak Bay Bays’ Myka Tang moves the ball upcourt against his opposite No. 6, St. Michaels Blue Jaguars’ Graham Hyde-Lay during the junior boys basketball matchup Saturday night at SMUS. Laura Lavin/News staff

Jags roll with No. 1 ranking SMUS senior boys top AA basketball rankings

Local news. Local shopping. Your local paper. Read the Victoria News every Wednesday and Friday

baseball pitcher Mackenzie Catto, a 6-foot-8 giant who had 12 points and 15 boards against Wellington, is UBC bound next year. SMUS and Castaway Wanderers rugby player David Pollen is a former Travis Paterson Blue Jag who didn’t play for the basketball team News staff last year. Both David and his younger brother Max, of the junior Blue Jags, are exceptional athletes, When you’re the top ranked AA basketball team said junior coach Reagan Daly. in the province, you enjoy it while you can. Adding height up front is 6-foot-3 Matt Rudd, Those are the words of St. Michaels University though the team is not a tall one, and will rely on a School Blue Jaguars head coach Ian Hyde-Lay, as full effort every game, said Hyde-Lay. the Blue Jags have picked up some key The weekend prior to the SMUS wins to start the year. invitational, the Blue Jags won a pair “It’s hard The Blue Jags hosted a number of of extremely close games that went teams for the St. Michaels Invitational, to get (the No. down to the buzzer, beating AAA No. a basketball jamboree of sorts, with 1 ranking), and 7-ranked St. George’s 56-55, and AA No. Nanaimo’s Wellington, Courtenay’s 5-ranked Brentwood College 51-49. Mark Isfeld, Mill Bay’s Brentwood Col- when you do you Despite healthy wins by the Blue lege and Saanich’s Lambrick Park visit- enjoy it.” Jags and Lambrick Park Lions, Hydeing. Lay insists “there’s still not much – Ian Hyde-Lay SMUS won both its games, beating between them and Island AA teams Wellington 78-54 and Mark Isfeld 62-38. Brentwood, Wellington and Mark The Lambrick Park Lions defeated Wellington Isfeld. And Gulf Islands is another good AA team, a 68-56 and Mark Isfeld 80-52. sleeper that no one is recognizing.” “I’m not really sure how they figure we’re the top For now the Blue Jags don’t want to put any team. We got knocked out of quarterfinals of B.C.’s stock in the rankings. The last time Hyde-Lay can last year, and have fewer returnees than other recall his team atop the B.C. charts was 2003 as schools, but it’s hard to get up there, and when a AAA school, and even that was just a couple of you do you enjoy it,” Hyde-Lay said. weeks in February, he said. It’s all far from the days Key among the Blue Jags who have returned is a of the 1990s, when the powerhouse Blue Jags were trio of Grade 12 guards, Mark Yorath, Dawit Workie an annual contender. and Georgios Ikonomou. This weekend the Blue Jags and Oak Bay Bays Yorath is the chief distributor, although all three will face visiting AAA team W.J. Mouatt from can move the ball upcourt. Workie played a lot Abbotsford, with 6-foot-9 star Tristan Etienne, at with last year’s team and is a workhorse for the Oak Bay on Friday night and SMUS on Saturday Jags, while Ikonomou is a wildcard player. night. Ikonomou led the Blue Jags with 19 points against Wellington on Saturday, and is having a Junior Jags on top The Blue Jags junior boys squad, coached by tremendous return after a season lost, said HydeLay. Last year a broken leg kept Ikonomou out until Reagan Daly, won all three of its games, beating Fleetwood and Semiahoo, and then the Oak Bay the final few games. New to the Blue Jags squad this season are a pair Bays 50-35 on Saturday night. sports@vicnews.com of crossover athletes in their senior year. Standout

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TITLE SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSOR

GP W L OL Pts Victoria 29 27 1 1 55 Saanich 26 20 4 2 42 Westshore 31 18 13 0 36 Peninsula 30 16 12 2 34 Nanaimo 29 15 12 2 32 Oceanside 29 12 14 2 26 Comox Valley 28 11 14 2 24 Campbell Riv. 29 6 21 2 14 Kerry Park 27 2 23 2 6 Recent games Dec. 6: Kerry Park 0 Victoria 10 Dec. 7: Westshore 3 Peninsula 4 Oceanside 4 Saanich 3 (SO) Dec. 8: Victoria 10 Kerry Park 1 Dec. 9: Saanich at Peninsula (postponed)

Upcoming games Dec. 12: Oceanside at Westshore Dec. 13: Westshore at Victoria Dec. 14: Comox Valley at Saanich Dec. 14: Victoria at Peninsula Western Hockey League Western conf. Portland Kamloops Spokane Kelowna Tri-City Victoria Seattle Everett Prince George Vancouver

GP 31 34 31 30 32 30 31 34 30 31 Royals leaders GP Alex Gogolev 30 Logan Nelson 30 Ben Walker 28

W L OL Pts 25 5 1 51 24 7 3 51 22 8 1 45 19 9 2 40 18 12 2 38 16 13 1 33 16 14 1 33 12 20 2 26 10 16 4 24 8 23 0 16 G A Pts +/11 22 33 +6 7 22 29 -3 10 13 23 +19

B.C. Hockey League Island Div. Victoria Alberni Valley Nanaimo Powell River Cowichan

GP 29 32 28 31 26

W L 19 8 16 11 15 11 14 14 7 17

OL 2 5 2 3 2

Field hockey Pts 40 37 32 31 16

Scoring leaders GP G A Pts Luke Esposito (Chw) 29 11 29 40 *Wade Murphy (Pen) 25 14 24 38 Brent Baltus (Tra) 33 21 16 37 M.Puskarich (Lan) 28 18 19 37 John Siemer (Coq) 30 15 22 37 ... 18th M. Fitzgerald (Vic) 27 10 19 29 23rd L. Fitzgerald (Vic) 27 13 13 26 28th G. Fitzgerald (Vic) 29 15 10 25 Goalie leaders GP W L SV% Mitch Gillam (Chw) 24 16 7 .938 *Chad Katunar(Pen) 24 16 7 .925 K.Thompson (PG) 28 14 10 .938 Tyler Steel (Mer) 23 13 10 .904 Cole Huggins (Coq) 26 13 9 .923 *Victoria-bred BCHL players

Island Field Hockey Association Women’s: 1st Div. Mariners 1 Rebel Patriots 0 Lynx-I 2 Cowichan Flickers 1 2nd Div. Sailors 2 Lynx-II 1 Bluejays 1 Cowichan Cardinals 0 Sailors 3 (def.) Cowichan Cards 0 3rd Div. Cow. Stellers 3 Lynx-III 0 O.B. Demons 4 Rebel Renegades 1 Cowichan Kestrels 2 Pirates 2 Aeries Ravens 1 Oak Bay Devils 0. Men’s: Premier Victoria Selects 3 Hawks 3. Men’s: league Tigers 7 Oak Bay 2 Hawks 4 Rebels 3

Wrestling Victoria Bulldogs Elementary age wrestlers Zena Shew, Kiana Shew, Sekou Tatem and Logan Wright all won gold at the Cougar Invitational, Dec. 1.


www.vicnews.com • A23

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.388.3535 fax 250.388-0202 email classified@vicnews.com

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SOOKENEWS

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!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGALS NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re: ESTATE OF WOLFRED DANIEL TONMAN HARTLEN, also known as DANIEL HARTLEN AND DANNY HARTLEN, formerly of 5-70 Cooper Road, Victoria, BC V9A 4K2 NOTICE is hereby given that creditors and others having claims against the estate of the above deceased are hereby required to send the particulars thereof to the undersigned Executor, c/o #201-300 Gorge Rd. West, Victoria, BC V9A 1M8 on or before January 15, 2013, after which date the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received. Kathleen Margaret McArthur Sharkey, Executor, by her Solicitors, Anniko, Hunter WAREHOUSE LIEN ACT Notice is given that Hub Storage LTD, 754-E Fairview Road, Victoria, BC., will sell on its premises, December 19, 2012 between 1:00PM- 2:00PM the contents of locker: M-133C Karen Sargent Sealed Bid. Cash only. (250) 388-4887. WAREHOUSEMAN’S LIEN ACT Notice is hereby given that Kustom Towing, (2009) Ltd, 3297 Douglas St, Victoria, BC, V8Z 3K9 will be selling:

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

TRAVEL

LOST AND FOUND

TRAVEL

HELP WANTED

TRADES, TECHNICAL

LOST IPOD. Downtown Victoria, possibly Hillside Mall area. Please call 250-514-6688

CONDOMINIUM HOTEL 1-2-3 bdrm condominiums 8251850sq ft. Convenient Beach Access, Heated Pool/Hot Tub In-room Washer/Dryer, Flat Screen TV’s, Free Wi-Fi, Private Balconies, Daily Housekeeping, Handicapped Rooms Available. Weekly/Monthly Rates, Free Local Calls, Free Local Beach Transportation. Conveniently Located to Shops and Restaurants. www.crystalpalmsbeach resort.com 1-888-360-0037. 11605 Gulf Blvd. Treasure Island FL 33706.

Required for an Alberta Trucking Company. One Class 1 Driver. Must have a minimum of 5 years experience pulling low boys and driving off road. Candidate must be able to pass a drug test and be willing to relocate to Edson, Alberta. Scheduled Days Off. Call Lloyd 780-723-5051

NORTHERN ALBERTA clearing contractor seeks experienced Buncher and Skidder Operators for work in Northern Alberta. Subsistence and accommodations provided; email jobs@commandequipment.com Fax 780-488-3002.

LOST: SET of keys in Sidney area. Has keyless entry on key ring. Call (250)656-9432.

INFORMATION ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terriďŹ c presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@blackpress.ca

TRAVEL

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES LEARN FROM home. Earn from home. Medical Transcriptionists are in demand. Lots of jobs! Enrol today for less than $95 a month. 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com

HELP WANTED TIMESHARE CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. NO Risk Program, STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

TRAVEL HAWAII ON the Mainland, healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica “friendliest country on earth�! 1-780-952-0709; www.CanTico.ca.

PERSONALS STEAMWORKS: A club for men to meet men. 582 Johnson St., Victoria. 250-3836623 steamworksvictoria.com

LOST AND FOUND FOUND: PANDORA style bracelet w/ 2 charms on Resthaven Dr., close to 7-Eleven (Dec. 3). Call (250)656-7652. LOST: FAMILY pinky ring, Langford area. Please call (250)727-6014.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

PERSONAL SERVICES HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD F/T Sandwich Makers Victoria (Subway) 2 locations No. edu/exp. Eng. req’d. $10.68/hr Fax 250-360-0969 1. #100 - 1633 Hillside Ave. 2. #102 - 1503 Admirals Rd.

Looking for a NEW career? www.bcjobnetwork.com

HEALTH PRODUCTS GET 50% off - Join Herbal Magic this week and get 50% Off. Lose weight quickly, safely and keep it off, proven results! Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800-854-5176.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

PRACTICAL NURSING Career Opportunities Licensed Practical Nurse

AN ALBERTA Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilďŹ eld road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051.

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

HAIRSTYLIST WANTED full time/part time for First Choice Hair Cutters in their Victoria location. Guaranteed $11/hour, 25% proďŹ t sharing, paid overtime, beneďŹ ts, paid birthday, vacation pay, annual advanced training and advancement opportunities. Call 250360-1408 today for an interview.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Health Care Aid Operating Room Tech* Foot Care Nurse*

NEW Provincially Recognized PN program. Available at select campuses.

COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKER - SS Career Opportunities Child/Youth Care Worker Teen Pregnancy Worker Parenting Support Worker Women’s Shelter Worker Family Place / Newcomers Worker

HEALTH CARE ASSISTANT Career Opportunities Home Support Agencies Acute/Complex Care Facility Long Term Care Private Homes Assisted Living

2005 PONTIAC GRAND AM

Owner T. Sutherland 1G2NE65M196477 2004 HYUNDIA ELANTRA Owner K. Howard KMHDN55D54U114159 2000 CHEVROLET S-10 1GCCS1443Y8170635 Owner G. Eddy Will be sold on December 19, 2012. At 647B Dupplin Rd, Victoria, BC between 10am-2pm.

PERSONAL SERVICES

RNs and RCA’s Needed Immediately Beacon Hill Villa

Retirement Concepts is a family owned private company based in Vancouver BC that provides seniors housing and care services ranging from Retirement Living, Assisted Living to Skilled Nursing Care throughout the Province. We are looking for Permanent Full-Time and Part-Time Registered Nurses. Applicants must be a graduate of an approved school of nursing with current active registration with CRNBC, BSN preferred. We are also seeking Casual RCA’s who are graduates from a recognized Care Aide program. Please submit your resume IMMEDIATELY, in the strictest confidence, via our website at www.retirementconcepts.com/careers While we appreciate all applications, please note only those short listed will be contacted. Retirement Concepts is an equal opportunity employer.

MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT Career Opportunities Medical Office Assistant MSP Billing Clerk Medical Transcriptionist

2621 DOUGLAS STREET

VICTORIA:

250-384-8121

SPROTTSHAW.COM


A24 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

FINANCIAL SERVICES

FRIENDLY FRANK

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

HOUSES FOR SALE

APARTMENT/CONDO

SUITES, LOWER

AUTO FINANCING

DROWNING IN debts? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1-877-556-3500

COLLECTION OF 5 Coronation Street books, excellent cond, $45 (all). (250)652-9538

2010 LEGEND 4 wheel scooter with jumbo basket, scooter cover, walking cane, ag holder and canopy. Like new, always kept in the house. Retail price $4,357, now asking $2050 obo. (250)656-7786.

HAND MADE Christmas tree made out of pine cones & decorated, 16� high, $20. Call (250)656-1640. STEWART SHERWOOD Doll $55. Ashley Doll $20. 7’x5’ screening $10. (778)265-1615

M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

FUEL/FIREWOOD

LEGAL SERVICES

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, ďŹ r, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest ďŹ rewood producer offers ďŹ rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

FURNITURE 7 PIECE bedroom set, 9 drawer dresser w/lovely framed mirror. Pair of 2 drawer night stands, 3 piece queen brass bed, excellent condition. $450 obo without bed $350 obo. Call (250)727-7741.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE AT LAST! An iron ďŹ lter that works. IronEater! Fully patented Canada/U.S.A. Removes iron, hardness, smell, manganese. Since 1957. Visit our 29 innovative inventions online at: www.bigirondrilling.com Phone 1-800-BIG-IRON. BIG BUILDING sale... “â€?This is a clearance sale you don’t want to miss!â€?â€? 20x20 $3,985. 25x24 $4,595. 30x36 $6,859. 35x48 $11,200. 40x52 $13,100. 47x76 $18,265. One End wall included. Call Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture, Baby +Family, Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. 250-475-3332. www.cwpics.com

HEAVY DUTY sewing machine, “Artisan 618-1SC�, as new with rolling adjustable table, light & attachments. $1000 obo. (250)384-2976.

BUFFET/ HUTCH, solid wood 18�Dx50�Wx79�H, red/brown tone, $245. (250)380-8733.

BUILDING SUPPLIES METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

ROUND LIGHT Oak dining room table and 4 chairs, very good condition, $285. Call (250)652-8549.

FRIENDLY FRANK

250.388.3535

BUSINESSES FOR SALE

BUSINESSES FOR SALE

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ĂŜĂĚĂ͛Ć?ĹŻÄ‚ĆŒĹ?ÄžĆ?ĆšÄ?ŚĂĹ?ĹśŽĨÄ¨ĆŒÄ‚ĹśÄ?ĹšĹ?Ć?ĞĚÄšĹ˝ĹŻĹŻÄ‚ĆŒ Ć?ĆšĹ˝ĆŒÄžĆ?ŚĂĆ?Ä‚ĹśĹ˝Ć‰Ć‰Ĺ˝ĆŒĆšĆľĹśĹ?ƚLJĹ?ĹśsĹ?Ä?ĆšĹ˝ĆŒĹ?Ä‚Í•͘ ([FHOOHQWVXSSRUWWKURXJKYROXPH EX\LQJUHEDWHVWUDLQLQJ326 PRUH )RU0RUH,QIRUPDWLRQFDOO RUHPDLOPDUFHOGROODU#WHOXVQHW ZZZGROODUVWRUHFD

Osteoporosis~MS~Fibromya lgia? Increase Performance? Commercial Vibration machine. Clinically proven. (250)287-2009. SKYWATCHER TELESCOPE and tri-pod. D-102MM F-1300MM. Only used once, asking $500. Please call (250)655-0051.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

E STOR

CLOSING

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

!

Vic Ret& Ton ired i

Ends Dec 24

Storewide, Everything Goes! New & Used! WHILE STOCK LASTS! Furniture, Mattresses, Tools, Hardware, Accessories!

ALL REASONABLE OFFERS WILL BE ACCEPTED WHILE STOCK LASTS 9818 Fourth Street, Sidney

MON.-SAT. 9-5 buyandsave.ca

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER

LANGFORD- NEWLY reno’d 2 bdrm bsmt suite, quiet family neighbourhood, close to shopping, W/D. NP/NS. $900. Call (250)391-1342. UVIC AREA, 2 bdrm, $1050 mo incls all utils, N/S, N/P, avail immed, 250-721-4040.

TOWNHOUSES

SIDNEY- NEW 3 bdrm + den, W/D. NS/NP. $1700 mo. Avail Dec 1. Call 250-217-4060.

ESQUIMALT

Unique Building Must see

1 BDRM Very quiet, ocean views, Clean, well maintained. Laundry, Sauna, Elevator, Hot Water, Heat. (250) 388-9384

WANTED TO RENT WISHART AREA: Single hard working mom with 11 yr old and 1 well trained cat, looking to rent a 1 or 2 bdrm, (approx $1000/mo), within walking distance to Wishart school in Colwood. Exc. ref’s. Please call 250-208-0386 and leave message.

HOMES WANTED WANT TO BUY home, needing updates. No agents. tom@staydrysystems.com

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

Newly renovated suites, Starting at $675 per mo

250-642-1900

OAK BAY Junction: Jan. 1st. 2-bdrm in quiet, senior’s 55+ building. $850. Heat, h/w incl. N/P. Share purchase required. 1678 Fort St. (250) 595-4593.

1956 CONSUL MKI Estate Wagon, ONE OF APPROX 15 IN THE WORLD. Body, paint and motor all done. Lots of new parts. The car needs assembly. Will Trade for British and Cash. MUST SELL. No Time. Have all receipts. Call 250-490-4150 (Penticton, BC).

CARS

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 ďŹ rm. 250-755-5191. 2007 DODGE CALIBER SXTmint, loaded, 74,000 km. $10,000. (250)598-6605. 2009 PONTIAC G5- $14,500. Air conditioned, electric windows, 4 new tires/2 spare. 45,000 km. 2 year warranty left. Call (250)360-0892.

FREE Tow away

858-5865 1977 CADILLAC Eldorado, beige metallic. Cruise control, automatic. Very good cond., only 80,000 km. $2000. obo. Please call (250)477-7076.

SINGLE WIDE MOBILE in Lannon Creek #60, $30,000 250-642-7189

AUTO FINANCING OTHER AREAS 20 ACRES FREE! Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views. Roads/Surveyed. Neaer El Paso, Texas. Call 1800-843-7537. www.sunsetranches.com

APARTMENT/CONDO

www. bcclassiďŹ ed.com 250-388-3535

250-885-1427 Call us ďŹ rst & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

For scrap vehicle

RENTALS

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING -

all conditions in all locations

$50-$1000 CASH

ROYAL OAK. Bright 1 bdrm. Large deck, storage, parking. Utils incld. NS/NP. $850./mo. Jan. 1st. (250)652-7729.

Senior Living 200 Gorge Road West,

MARINE

Victoria

1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, ďŹ rewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. Call 250-478-9231.

BOATS

1 bdrm. from $865/mo. 2 bdrm. from $1,140/mo. • Wheel-chair accessible • Outdoor, indoor and covered parking available • Lockers • Elevators • Laundry room • Balconies • Bicycle storage • Crime Free Multi-Housing Program Call Now:250.381.5084 www.caprent.com rentals@caprent.com

APARTMENTS FURNISHED SIDNEY EXECUTIVE suite. near ocean & town. $795. Short/long term. 250-656-8080

HOMES FOR RENT TILLICUM: LARGE 3 bdrm, den, 2 bath. W/D, D/W, large fenced yard. Ample parking. Close to bus routes and shopping. Quiet street. N/S. $1700 + util’s. Call (250)418-0252.

LOOKING FOR A DEAL ON A NEW VEHICLE? Save up to 40% OFF your next new vehicle... No games or gimmicks, deal direct with local dealerships. www.newcarselloff.com No qr code reader? Text info: 778.786.8271

Ask For Move-In Bonus

10353 DEVLIN Plc, Sidney. Rancher 3 bdrm, 2 bath, lrg. fam room, private treed lot. Call 250-655-1499 or view w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 or mls #316102

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in

1997 TOYOTA Avalon XLS, white. $3,999. Automatic. Fully loaded, no accidents, new tires. 229k. Great running car. Call (250)656-5588.

JAMES BAY: Corner 2 bdrm Condo, 2 bath, good location, beautiful kitchen, NS/NP, prkg avail. $1350. 250-361-9540.

MAYFAIR MALL, 1 bdrm, 1 bath Condo, 3 appls, N/S, N/P, prkg incl’d, bike storage, $898, avail Jan. 1st. 250-361-9540.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

To view call

JAMES BAY- spacious 1 bdrm, $795+ utils. NS/NP. Avail Jan 1. (778)430-2116.

AUTO SERVICES

TRANSPORTATION

GRANT MANOR

TWIN SIZE bunk beds, Canwood Alpine solid lodgepole pine wood, with 5 “ foam mattresses and matching 7 drawer solid lodgepole pine chest. Like new. Used maybe 10 times for our visiting grandchildren. Paid $1125.00. Asking $600. (250)658-4242.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

LANGFORD 2-BDRM. W/D, New paint, bathroom & wood stove. Private, own entrance, parking, shared hydro. $800. /mo. Avail now. (250)479-0432

SIDNEY- NEW 2 bdrm + den, W/D. NS/NP. $1600 mo. Avail Feb. 1st. Call 250-217-4060.

WE BUY HOUSES

SELL OLD STUFF!

2 OIL HEATERS, $45 obo. Soccer table, $30. Ceramic heater, $20. (250)382-6892.

COLWOOD- 1 bdrm Bach, patio, shared W/D, N/S. $820 mo incls utils. 250-391-7915.

LANGFORD, LARGE 1 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1 level new Townhouse, large patio, $995 mo, avail Jan. 1st, pets cons. Call (778)352-1618.

CHINESE CARPET- 12’x9’. Beautiful condition, dark blue background. $1,400. Call (250)208-2642. GREAT GIFT IDEA! ChillSpot is The COOLEST Dog Bed-A new and innovative, thermodynamically cooled dog bed, that enhances the cool tile surfaces our pets rely on during the warm weather months. Use promo code COOLGIFT For 10 % off! www.chillspot.biz

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

CONDO IN FIRST CLASS CONDITION FOR SALE designed for age 55+ group and comes with services. Excellent location near the Inner Harbour, Legislature, shopping etc. Will consider a rental lease also on this bright, homey, residence. Call Tony Joe-RE/MAX Camosun 250.370.7788 for more info & pictures. see: w/s http://www. tonyjoe.com/

BOATHOUSE FOR SALE, 27x10’ interior dimension, power, lighting, pigeon proof, taller than other boat houses. Below cost at $15,000. Call 250-656-6136. Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

DreamTeam Auto Financing “0� Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-961-7022

www.iDreamAuto.com DL# 7557

1993 BAYLINER Classic 2452. In excellent condition. Head, galley, canopy, 9.9hp 4-stroke Yamaha. Dinghy & extras. $17,000. (no trailer). Call 250-656-6136.

Your Community

ClassiďŹ eds can take you places!

Call us today • 388-3535 250-388-3535


www.vicnews.com • A25

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

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HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

ELECTRICAL

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

PRESSURE WASHING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

250-361-6193- NO job too Small or too Large! We do it all. Visa ok. Reasonable rates.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. DIAMOND MOVING- 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734. DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747. WRIGHT MOVING. $80/hr for 2 men. Senior’s discount. Free Est’s. Call Phil (250)383-8283.

ROOF DE-MOSS & treatment. Driveways, walkways & gutter cleaning. 30yrs exp. 744-9801.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601

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CLEANING SERVICES GREAT RATES! Guar. cleaning since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. (250)385-5869

(250)590-9653.ELECTRICIAN 20 yrs + exp. Residential: New homes & Renos. Knob & tube replacement. $40./hr. Senior’s Discount. Lic.#3003. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858.

250-889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Gutter & Window Cleaning at Fair Prices!

FENCING

NEED HELP cleaning your house? $18/hr. Call Dorothy at (250)478-8940.

FURNITURE REFINISHING

CONTRACTORS CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites, etc. 250-886-8053, 778-351-4090.

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca

GARDEN OVERGROWN? Weeding, lawn cuts, cleanups, pruning. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

COMPUTER SERVICES

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

GARDENING 250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups. CHRISTMAS CLEAN-UP? Hedge need a haircut? Tree need a trim? Call Michael at (250)588-9367.

ALL-HAUL JUNK REMOVAL Const Debris, Garden Waste. Call John 250-213-2999. CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

250-507-6543. AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, guards, windows, power washing, roof demoss, repairs. Insured. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

HANDYPERSONS AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071 SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

✭BUBBA’S HAULING✭ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858. SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578. JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK.

Crossword

INSULATION

PLUMBING

MALTA BLOWN Insulation. Attics - interior/exterior walls & sound silencer. (250)388-0278

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376. FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

QUALITY INSULATION blown fiberglass. Affordable rates. (250)896-6652.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

PRESSURE WASHING

5. Smallest whole number 6. Subspecies (pl.) 7. Redirect 8. Wildebeest 9. Moved headlong at high speed 10. Impart knowledge 11. Early people of Britain 12. Moorings 15. Goat and camel hair fabric 16. Part of a three-piece suit 18. Store for lawn & plants

20. Dulled by surfeit 22. Spanish appetizers 24. Acts with violent anger 26. Frees from dirt 30. Tauon 34. Affaire d’honneur 36. Traveling tinker (Scot.) 38. They ___ 39. Potters white clay 40. Father of the Am. cartoon, Thomas 41. Lariat or lasso 42. Metric foot of two syllables 44. Confederate soldier 46. Mole’s unit symbol 47. Nursing organization 51. Morning time

To solve a Sudoku puzzle, every number 1 to 9 must appear in: • Each of the nine vertical columns • Each of the nine horizontal rows • Each of the nine 3 x 3 boxes

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB. NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-812-3213, 250-590-2929. WINDOW & Gutter Cleaning, minor repairs. Comm/Res. Insured, free est. (250)881-3684

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

WE’RE ON THE WEB

LOOKING FOR AN

Sudoku

29. Rt. angle building wing 31. Drunks’ disease 32. Gallivant about 33. To be necessary 35. Frosts 37. Newman’s “Winning” character 39. Dwarf buffaloes 41. Tenant or lessee 42. A citizen of Iran 43. Inner sole of a shoe 44. Tabloid papers 45. Sandhurst abbreviation 48. Egyptian Sun god DOWN 49. Give out radiation 1. The work of building 50. Gives or contributes 2. Misplaces 52. Where wine ferments (abbr.) 3. Atomic #13 53. Beaumont, Texas University 4. Radioactivity unit

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

Today’s Solution

Today’s Answers

ACROSS 1. Light colored cigar 6. A scrap of cloth 9. Fluid used to cool a system 11. Abel’s brother (Bible) 12. Prohibitions 13. River in NE Scotland 14. Beige 15. Strongly opposed 17. Shoelace end 19. French caps 20. Sings jazz improvisations 21. Daisylike fall flower 22. Wild Asian goat 23. Beginning to end (abbr.) 24. Tell on 25. Location of White House 27. 1/60 minute (abbr.) 28. Tailless primate

THE MOSS MAN ChemicalFree Roof De-Mossing & Gutter Cleaning since 1996. Call 250-881-5515. Free estimates! www.mossman.ca

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wall coverings. Over 25yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

TREE SERVICES

PAINTING PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

RUBBISH REMOVAL

Auction Bedroom Suite Couch Deli Esthetics Fuel Garage Sale House Investments Jungle Gym Kiln Living Room Suite Moving Company Nail Care Open House Poultry Quilt Rolling Pin Sail Boat Venetian Blinds Window Washer Xylophone Yard Work Zebra

250.388.3535


A26 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Tolerated, but still not accepted Discrimination is the day-to-day norm for local transgender people Natalie North

Eventually she took the only job she could find, working the graveyard shift at a Saanich hotel. “I would get called for an interview and then when I met This summer, Daphne Shaed gave out 300 resumés. (the employers), you could just see it on their faces that I She went to 30 interviews. She hoped to land a summer wasn’t getting the job,” said Shaed, a transgender woman. job that suited her skills as a workshop facilitator and “The community here is tolerant, but tolerance is Camosun College Student Society Pride director. different from acceptance. Tolerance just means they’re going to leave you alone, but they’re still not accepting; they’re still not willing to have you come into their workplace and work on a front counter.” Shaed has become a community Island Owned and Operated leader in trans education. Last year she organized a series of workshops at Camosun aimed at understanding trans-identity and selfFrom now until December 15, JB’s will be identification. donating 1% of all sales in the product lines Sessions on social etiquette in the scope of gender, pioneers in transwhose logos are listed below and the identity and medicalization drew full audiences and this fall she continued manufacturing partners will match another her work with an added focus on sexual 1% to give to local food banks. health for trans men and women. Shaed’s approach to education Thank for your support! reaches beyond workshops to her willingness to share her story with new classmates to coffee shop baristas who mistakenly refer to her as a man, in the name of making things better. “I’m a woman, but I’m a different kind of woman,” Shaed said. “People meet me and say: ‘I’ve never met a transexual before.’ Well they probably have, they just don’t know.” Shaed was assigned to the male sex at birth and named Kelly. She suffered violence throughout her years in Victoria News staff

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Daphne Shaed, a transgender woman and Camosun College pride director, suffered violence during grade school. middle and high schools by peers who thought her to be gay – an assumption she allowed to continue for fear of the repercussions that would arise if her true transidentity was revealed. She left school in Grade 10. PLEASE SEE: UVic database, Page A27

eEdition

Cover to Cover

ON-LINE


www.vicnews.com • A27

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, December 12, 2012

UVic database a global resource Continued from Page A26

Ten years ago within the privacy of her home, Kelly began to transform into the woman she felt had always existed within her: Daphne, a name she chose for herself as a young child, based on the Scooby-Doo cartoon character. Like the fictional character’s penchant for danger, Shaed hasn’t shied away from risk. Four years ago, she transitioned into living as a woman full-time and has proceeded with the full medical process involved. “I felt like I wouldn’t be accepted. I wouldn’t be a viable citizen. I wouldn’t be able to go to school or get employment, to find a partner, be folded into another family unit. The sense of potential loss of your social mobility is what keeps people buried for so long.” Shaed is optimistic regarding employment, but for a large segment of Vancouver Island’s transgender population, challenges remain. Nearly one third of the transpeople included in the Vancouver Island Transgender Needs Assessment reported their transidentity having a negative effect on employment. The assessment is based on a series of interviews conducted by Matthew Heinz, a professor in the school of communication and culture at Royal Roads University, who transitioned in 2009 and recognized a lack of available regional resources. Health care, social support, social acceptance and public education, mental health care and access and legal assistance were the highest priority issues identified by the study, posted at transvancouverisland. ca. “The website is a Band-Aid,” Heinz said. “We maintain it as a volunteer effort, but ideally, we would have funding and ideally through a governmental authority or body, so we could have counselling support available to the community – perhaps a hotline.” Information regarding transitioning exists online, but the details

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“I’m a woman, but I’m a different kind of woman. People meet me and say: ‘I’ve never met a transexual before.’ Well they probably have, they just don’t know.” – Daphne Shaed at a local level, such as how to obtain a general practitioner with knowledge of trans issues, or a psychologist able to administer a hormone readiness assessment, are sorely lacking. “To find people to talk about that process, the resources are limited,” he said. “You have to start the journey somewhere and it would be a lot easier if there was a central point.” Yet the world’s nucleus for academic resources on transgender history reside in Saanich. In October the University of Victoria officially launched what

is believed to be the largest archive of information relating to transgender activism on the globe with more than 1,000 titles of books and journals on the topic within the McPherson Library. “We’ve had inquiries from people all over North America about use and access. (There’s) general interest from all over the world,” said archivist Lara Wilson. For Shaed, being the bold advocate who elects to stand in front of a new class and introduce herself as a transsexual is a role she’s satisfied to have taken on. But it doesn’t immunize her against the constant judgment many transgender people face daily. “I need to breathe in that strength just to go to Wal-Mart, because I know people are going to stare and whisper, and when I walk in there, I need to have my head up,” she said. “I need to look people in the eye, to engage them. That takes strength and sometimes I’m just too tired. I have to present that level of strength.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

Sarah FortisBC, Dispatch Coordinator

A safe holiday is a happy holiday Make safety a priority this holiday season with these simple tips: Ħ Never kick or hit your meter if ice builds up. Call us for assistance at 1-888-224-2710. Ħ After a snowfall, brush snow away from your meters by hand and clear a path for the safety of our meter readers. Ħ Around your fireplace, consider using a hearth safety gate to help protect small children from the heated glass. For more winter safety tips, visit fortisbc.com/safety.

FortisBC uses the FortisBC Energy name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (12-336.4 12/2012)

BERWICK ROYAL OAK WELCOMES SENIORS TO ENJOY HOLIDAY CHEER AT BERWICK ROYAL OAK

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A28 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - VICTORIA

You’ll feel like family!

C Grade A O Turkey U N T R Y ¢ $ 39 V 1 A L Dandy Navel U Oranges E

Help Fill a Dream for Island Kids this Holiday Season Help Fill a Dream is an immediately responsive charitable foundation. They inspire hope, health and happiness for Vancouver Island and Salt Spring Island children under the age of 19 with life-threatening conditions by fulfilling their dreams, improving their quality of life and assisting their families with care and financial support.

FROZEN LILYDALE

CALIFORNIA

Limit 1 per $25 Order (Excluding the Turkey).

97¢

Broccoli Crowns

COUNTRY GROCER

All Purpose Flour

$ 97

5

97

$ FLYER EVERY FRIDAY Watch for our

in select Saanich News, Victoria News, Goldstream News Gazette & Peninsula News Review

97

4

8 Lb Bag

Limit 1

Milk • Homo • 2% • 1% • Skim

$ 97

2

Overlimit:

CALIFORNIA

10 Kg

ISLAND FARMS

Under 9 Kg:

Lb 2.14 Kg

Lb 2.14 Kg

Lb 3.06 Kg

2 L Jug

IN THE DELI

Emma Canadian Goat Feta

$ 37

1

100 g

GREA SAVINGT S!

Regular Retail $2.39 100 g

IN THE BAKERY

Mini Strudel

2/ $500

6's

Proud to be serving Victoria since 1986 Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday December 12th- Saturday December 15th, 2012

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NEWS

Victoria News, December 12, 2012  

December 12, 2012 edition of the Victoria News