Page 1

ABBOTSFORD IN

ACTION

Abbotsford is a healthy city, both in terms of its economy, and its health care system. Fuelled by a $2-billion agriculture sector, steady industrial growth and energetic residential and commercial development, the city continues to enjoy growth and prosperity. In the third annual edition of Abbotsford in Action, The News examines the city’s economic engines, and provides a special, in-depth look at the city’s health care facilities and programs, from the Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre, to support groups, seniors’ care and hospice services.

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE


2

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

a smile

IS AN INEXPENSIVE WAY TO CHANGE YOUR LOOKS. - CHARLES GORDY

e

om always welc re a ts n e ti a New p love us. and children

NTS E I T A P W E N FREE FOR itening kit or electric wh Home teeth ing, when a clean sh ru b th o to Oral-B completed. re a y a -R X & check-up

At Medora Dental Care, we make your visits as comfortable and pleasant as possible. We are proud of our ability to give you the highest quality dental care in the most gentle manner possible. Dr. Ash Soufi provides gentle dental care with the latest modern equipment available.

OUR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROVIDE: • Check up and cleanings • Restorative services such as fillings, bonding, crowns, bridges and root canals • Cosmetic services such as veneers, Botox, whitening and tooth jewellery •

• Night guards, snoring appliances and sports guards • Sedation dentistry for only $50 per appointment • Complimentary 2nd opinions

clear braces and 6 Month Smiles

65 YEARS OF AGE AND OLD ER? En joy 10%

off all dental fe

Medora Dental Care Family and Cosmetic Dentistry

110-1910 North Parallel Road 604-746-1295 medoradental.com Office Hours: Monday 10-4 / Tuesday & Wednesday 10-6 / Thursday & Friday 11-7 / Saturday 9-4

es.


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

Vibrant city Fifth largest in b.C.

I

airport that is continually growing. The investment in this type of infrastructure makes Abbotsford a desirable and attractive community to live, work and play,” said Banman.

Now 123 years later, Abbotsford is the fifth largest city in the province, boasting a population of 133,497, according to the 2011 Census.

Agriculture is still the biggest economic force in the city. The Fraser Valley produces over 70 per cent of B.C.’s dairy products, berries, vegetables, poultry, eggs, pork, greenhouse vegetables, mushrooms, floriculture and nursery products.

n 1889, when the Village of Abbotsford first formed, no one could have predicted the growth that would eventually occur.

Banman

That figure represents a 7.4 per cent increase from the 2006 Census figure of 124,258. The number of households in Abbotsford has more than doubled in the past two decades. Residential areas have grown so quickly that high-density planning is a major mandate of council. “Abbotsford is a young, diverse and vibrant community that provides many opportunities for growing a business and a family,” said Abbotsford Mayor Bruce Banman.

Once the centre of commercial activity, Downtown Abbotsford has become a “destination” for visitors and locals alike. Abbotsford’s retail sector changed forever in 1975, when the Sevenoaks Shopping Centre was built. It has grown to 562,328 square feet and more than 100 shops. The construction of West Oaks Mall and its 30 stores furthered the retail trend.

As the population increases, so does the demand for housing and family services – which require more schools, recreational opportunities and facilities as well as artistic and cultural experiences.

The construction of the 44-acre Fraser Valley Auto Mall in 1992 pushed expansion even farther west. Now, a $200-million shopping centre, adjacent to the auto mall, is nearing completion, creating yet another retail destination. The huge new development, called High Street, is expected to open next year.

“We have made substantial additions to our local facilities; we have a state-of-the-art health care facility, entertainment and sports centre, a brand new cultural centre and an international

The Abbotsford Regional Hospital, and a host of civic amenities prove that the infrastructure is in place to attract more families, professionals and businesses.

Cirque du Soleil’s Quidam performing at abbotsford Entertainment & Sports Centre.

What’s Inside History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5/6 Commercial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/11 Airport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Health care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-29 Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31/32 industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Publisher: Andrew Franklin Editor: Andrew Holota Contributors: Kevin Mills Neil Corbett Vikki Hopes Dan Kinvig Design: Sue McMurchy

university. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Arts/culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36-37 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 PubliSHeD by THe AbboTSForD NewS, NoVeMber 2012 © CoPyrigHT

One of Canada’s best,

right here in Abbotsford.

Learn more. ufv.ca 3226-04

3


4

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

I lIve to be...oUtdoors I travel to be... inspired by beautiful places

604.850.5523 / vpo.ca

I rIde to be...

stronger than I was yesterday

604.859.2453 / lifecyclesbikes.com

I rUN to be... free from stress

604.746.1338 / peninsularunners.com

1707 salton road, abbotsford


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

Simple beginnings

NOW OPEN

Try Us... You’ll Love the Experience!

A town carved out of bush land

a parade on Essendene avenue in July of 1913.

O

riginally inhabited by the Sto:lo people – their territory covered most of the lower Fraser River, from Richmond to Yale – Abbotsford owes its creation to the gold rush. The first wave of European settlers in the Fraser Valley arrived in the mid1800s, drawn by the discovery of gold just south of Yale. By December of 1858, an estimated 30,000 people – including many miners travelling north from San Francisco – had made their way up the river. The gold fever paved the way for the establishment of many Fraser Valley towns. The 160-acre tract of bush land that became the Village of Abbotsford was originally obtained in 1889 by John Cunningham Maclure, a former Royal Engineer who had helped to survey the

Photo CourtESy mSa muSEum

territory for Britain during the gold rush. The origin of the name “Abbotsford,” according to a 1924 letter from J.C. Maclure Jr. to the Abbotsford Board of Trade, is a combination of two ideas. The name commemorates a friend of the Maclure family, Harry Braithwaite Abbott. It is also a reference to Sir Walter Scott’s home, Abbotsford Castle in Scotland. The first major industrial presence of the new village was the Abbotsford Lumber Company, owned by the Trethewey family. The company fuelled the growth and ethnic diversity of Abbotsford, attracting workers from China, Japan, Europe and India.

SAFER, MORE SECURE... SELF STORAGE

The first immigrants from India’s Punjab province arrived in the early 1900s. Continued on a6

Elegance is an attitude. Master Goldsmith

Custom Designed Jewellery

Fine Watches & Clocks

Share a little magic with a young person Volunteer to be a mentor today. www.sharealittlemagic.ca

Building Business, working on a bright future. John van Dongen, MLA Abbotsford South

103 - 1925 McCallum Road Abbotsford 604-870-5945 john.vandongen.mla@leg.bc.ca www.johnvandongen.ca

TimeMaster Jewellers Sevenoaks Mall 604.556.7740 timemaster.ca Located upstairs. Open Monday to Saturday.

R E PA I R S O N P R E M I S E

5


6

Free

Abbotsford News

AREA RUGS - CARPET – SHEET VINYL – VINYL PLANK – HARDWOOD – LAMINATE – CERAMIC TILE – STONE – WINDOW COVERINGS

IN-HOME SERVICES FREE IN-HOME

MEASURE / ESTIMATE

FREE

IN-HOME CONSULTATION

(SAMPLES / COLOURS / DESIGN)

WE’LL SAVE YOU TIME AND MONEY!

Don Blanchette

Ruth Sawatzky

Wayne McMillan

Murray Seebach

Phil Davies

AREA RUGS - CARPET – SHEET VINYL – VINYL PLANK – HARDWOOD – LAMINATE – CERAMIC TILE – STONE – WINDOW COVERINGS

AREA RUGS - CARPET – SHEET VINYL – VINYL PLANK – HARDWOOD – LAMINATE – CERAMIC TILE – STONE – WINDOW COVERINGS

AREA RUGS - CARPET – SHEET VINYL – VINYL PLANK – HARDWOOD – LAMINATE – CERAMIC TILE – STONE – WINDOW COVERINGS

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

46 YEARS IN THE COMMUNITY

TIP TOP FLOOR & HOME

®

31388 Peardonville Road, Abbotsford

604.850.6632 / www.tip-top.ca

The One Store For The Perfect Floor

Villages amalgamate From a5

In Abbotsford, the first gurdwara (temple) was constructed in 1911 on South Fraser Way. The Trethewey family, the city’s largest employer of Sikhs at that time,  donated free lumber to build the temple. That temple, now a national historic site, celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2011. Today, Abbotsford is the third most ethnically diverse city in Canada, after Toronto and Vancouver, and has the highest proportion of people of South Asian origin per capita of any Canadian city. Abbotsford also has a strong Mennonite presence that dates back to the 1920s. Many members of Christian Anabaptist denominations migrated to Abbotsford from Russia and the Prairie provinces, and the first Mennonite church was built in the 1930s using lumber from the dismantled mill at Mill Lake. Agriculture has long been a driving force in Abbotsford’s economy. The region’s agricultural potential was expanded in 1924, when drainage of Sumas Lake was completed to reclaim more than 30,000 acres of fertile land on the Canadian side of the border. A new dike system to limit the Fraser River flood threat was begun, but in 1948, the region was inundated with water once again. More than 200 square kilometres of territory was under water at the height of the flood; 16,000 people were evacuated; and damages were estimated at $20 million.

a PSapceckage

ia gaels ls!! SSppeekcccaiia Specials! Pack age

Specials! • Laser Hair Removal

• Botox Cosmetic •• Fillers Laser Hair Removal ••• Photorejuvenation Botox for Migraines • Fillers Laser HairRemoval Removal • Fillers • Laser •• Lip Augmentation • AcneHair Laser Treatments • Botox for Hyperhydrosis Acne Laser Treatments • Acne Lip Augmentation LaserTreatments Treatments • • Lip••• Fillers • Acne Augmentation Laser Laser Hair Removal • Rosacea Botox Cosmetic •Botox •• Rosacea FillersCosmetic • Rosacea • • Botox Rosacea •••Lip • Acne Cosmetic •• Sun Augmentation Treatments Fillers Hair Laser Removal Spots Botox for Migraines ••Laser Lip Augmentation Sun Spots Sun Spots ••Botox for Migraines • Sun Spots • Botox • Rosacea Lip Laser Treatments forAugmentation Migraines Photorejuvenation •••Botox Cosmetic Botox for Hyperhydrosis •••Acne Photorejuvenation •• BotoxAllfor Hyperhydrosis • botox/filler procedures are performed by Dr. Danescu Rosacea • Botox Cosmetic Photorejuvenation • Botox • Sun for Hyperhydrosis Spots • Botox for Migraines

rEaCh arChivES

Today, the communities spawned by the Fraser are protected from the river’s wrath by over 300 kilometres of dikes between Agassiz and Delta. The political career of one of Abbotsford’s most influential citizens began in 1969, when George Ferguson was elected as an alderman for the District of Sumas. Ferguson went on to become one of Canada’s longest-serving civic leaders. His tenure as mayor of Abbotsford (1972-2002, 2005-08) spanned four decades. Ferguson was mayor through two amalgamations. In 1972, the Village of Abbotsford and the District of Sumas joined to form the District of Abbotsford. In 1995, the neighbouring districts of Abbotsford and Matsqui amalgamated to form the City of Abbotsford.

INSURANCE IS AS UNIQUE AS YOU ARE

Look Lookgood, good, Look good, Look good, feel better! feel better! feel better! feel better! Look good,

feel better! PPPaacckkaaggee

George Ferguson is congratulated by fellow mayoral candidate harry de Jong after becoming the first mayor of the newly amalgamated City of abbotsford. Ferguson defeated several rivals, including former matqui mayor Dave Kandal, to win the 1994 election.

At Lyle Insurance we work with you to provide cost effective insurance solutions to any situation. •

We offer a customized approach to your business insurance needs

We will deliver your Autoplan renewal to your home or business*

High value home programs

Private optional auto and motorcycle insurance

Visit our website for more helpful solutions to your needs!

You can now purchase travel insurance on our website 24/7

All botox/fi ller procedures are performed staff. by Dr. Danescu assisted by his laser • Sun Spots • BotoxAll botox/fi ller procedures areTechnician performed by Dr. Danescu for Migraines • assisted by his LPN/Laser Technician staff. Photorejuvenation • Botox All botox/fi procedures are performed by Dr. staff. Danescu forller Hyperhydrosis assisted by his LPN/Laser Technician • Photorejuvenation • Botox for Hyperhydrosis

assisted by his LPN/Laser Technician staff. GetAllAll 1botox/fi FREE Laser Treatment botox/fi procedures are performed by Dr. Danescu llerller procedures are performed by Dr. Danescu

with 4 treatments booked! WINMED LASER CLINIC WINMED LASER CLINIC Dr. V. V. Danescu, Danescu, M.D., C.C.F.P. C.C.F.P. WINMED LASER CLINIC Dr. M.D., WINMED LASER CLINIC Complimentary Consultations Dr. V. Danescu, M.D., C.C.F.P. WINMED LASER CLINIC Complimentary Consultations assisted by his LPN/Laser Technician assisted by his LPN/Laser Technician staff. staff. Offer expires December 21, 2012

# 604.859.8882 • www.winmed.ca Dr. V. Danescu,Consultations M.D.,•• C.C.F.P. # 204-32450 Simon Ave Complimentary 204-32450 Simon Ave 604.859.8882 •Dr. www.winmed.ca V. Danescu, M.D., C.C.F.P.

604.859.8882 • Complimentary www.winmed.caConsultations • #204-32450 Simon Ave # 604.859.8882Complimentary • www.winmed.ca •Consultations 204-32450 Simon Ave

604.859.8882 • www.winmed.ca •

204-32450 Simon Ave

#

Serving the Fraser Valley since 1994

104-1888 N. Parallel Rd. ABBOTSFORD (Next to Thrifty’s)

604.854.3458

MON-FRI 8-6, SAT 9-5 SUN 11-4

www.lyleinsurance.ca *Some conditions apply.

HOME • BUSINESS • FARM • TRAVEL • PRIVATE AUTO/MOTORCYCLE • RV • BOAT


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

a new experience in shopping, dining & entertainment.

Opening 2013 The Fraser Valley’s largest and most diverse selection of shops and restaurants destined to be a favourite community gathering place. Walmart Super Centre I London Drugs l Cineplex VIP Cinemas

Located off Trans–Canada Highway (HWY 1) at Mt. Lehman Road

General Inquiries: info@shapepm.com Leasing Inquiries: Brian Nosko nosko@shapeproperties.com l 604-694-7457

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

highstreetfv.com

7


8

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Creating opportunity During the past decade, Abbotsford has annually added between 800,000 and two million square feet of commercial, industrial and institutional space.

improvements in the historic downtown core have re-established the area as a

the highstreet shopping mall project is one of the largest developments of its kind currently underway in the province. the complex on mt. Lehman road next to highway 1 is due for completion in 2013. John morroW Photo

commercial hub.

University District

Commercial vitality Highstreet draws nearer to completion

A combination of commercial and residential structures are planned to accommodate the needs and future growth of uFV.

B

y the year 2036, Abbotsford’s population is projected to reach 212,000, according to BC Statistics projections based on historical trends. It’s a growth rate of approximately 50 per cent over the next quarter century.

wide spectrum of shopping and retail opportunities and commercial opportunities too. It is one of those things that help to make a city a more livable place.”

So the question is not will the city grow, but rather how will that growth be managed?

The Vancouver-based company completed work on Parallel Marketplace in the area of Whatcom Road. That 135,000-sq.-ft project on the south side of Sumas Mountain is anchored by Thrifty Foods. Now, plans are in place for phase two of Parallel Marketplace, which would include up to 35,000 square feet of space.

Issues such as land use planning, transit, densification and affordability all become increasingly important as the population expands.

Shape Properties completed work last year on the first phase of Parallel Marketplace in the whatcom road area, and now has plans for phase two.

Core development The city intends to continue improvements in the historic downtown core, and expand development in the railway district along gladys Avenue in coming years.

The fundamental question is, where are we going to house these additional 70,000 people? JAY TEICHROEB

“The fundamental question is, where are we going to house these additional 70,00 people? Where will they work? And where will they receive the services needed to sustain them, commercial services and so on?” says Jay Teichoeb, Abbotsford’s general manager of economic development and planning services. Add to the equation that Abbotsford is centrally located and serves a regional market, and commercial planning becomes even more important. In recent years, clusters of commercial and residential development have begun redefining the landscape. Abbotsford now consists of many town centres. One of the newest is along Mt. Lehman Road. Two years ago, Abbotsford attracted one of the largest shopping mall developments to take place in B.C. for more than three decades. Shape Properties’ 560,000-sq.-ft. mall project, called Highstreet, is nearing completion. The grand opening of the new Walmart Superstore, one of the anchor tenants of the development, is expected to take place in the spring of 2013. “I see this project as fundamentally important,” said Teichroeb. “What our citizens are looking for is not only recreational and cultural amenities, but they also want access to a

Highstreet is not Shape’s only investment in Abbotsford.

“The second half of their site, between the shopping centre and Old Yale Road, is still in the pipeline,” said Teichroeb. In the fall of 2011, Cross Developments completed another commercial development in this area – more than 90,000 square feet of retail space anchored by Save-On-Foods. Such groupings of development are happening across the community. Improvements in the historic downtown core and the expansion of the railway district along Gladys are also ongoing. “We are looking at the downtown core, the South Fraser Way corridor, and expect to do a significant amount of planning work, looking at the future of that corridor to create more vibrancy and vitality,” he said. The Mennonite Central Committee has acquired land on Gladys Avenue and will relocate and consolidate all of its offices in the area. That will be located next to the new federal corrections facility that opened in May. The old Clayburn Brick Plant site, which has now been cleared, can also be developed. Another potential town centre is the proposed University Continued on a9


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

Will you...

the area around the abbotsford Entertainment and Sports Centre and the university of the Fraser valley on King road is slated for ‘university District’ development in coming years. John morroW Photo

OMG yes!!

Annual growth planned.

From a8

District, which will create a new hub around the University of the Fraser Valley and the Abbotsford Entertainment and Sports Centre, near the McCallum Road Highway 1 interchange. It lays out the vision for what will be an emerging neighbourhood centred around the university in the next 10 to 20 years, notes Teichrob. A combination of commercial and residential structures and the need to accommodate the future growth of UFV are

This trend of commercial growth has been occurring for years. In the last few decades, much of Abbotsford’s retail began spreading west from the original downtown. When the big box phenomenon took hold, many such stores were built along South Fraser Way, and the sector continues to grow south along Sumas Way. During the past decade, Abbotsford has annually added between 800,000 and two million square feet in commercial, industrial and institutional space.

Jewellers

2545 McCallum Road, Abbotsford 604.853.9192 www.leesfinejewellery.com SINCE

1981

Your COMPLETE automotive sales & service destination • New and Pre-owner Cars, Trucks, SUV’s & Vans • Sales & Leasing • All Brands Vehicles Service • Quick Oil Changes & Safety Inspections • All Brands Safety Inspections • All Brands Parts & Accessories • New & Pre-Owned Vehicle Financing • Transportation Family Budget Management • Bodyshop & Repairs • Short-Term Car Rentals • Auto Glass Work • Tires

www.fvautomall.com BEST TEST DRIVE LOOP IN BC

INSURANCE

604-856-3099

ABBOTSFORD CHRYSLER 604-857-8888

ABBOTSFORD NISSAN 604-857-7755

ABBOTSFORD HYUNDAI 604-857-2622

AUTOMALL DRIVE

THE HONDA WAY 604-857-1430

MSA FORD

604-857-2293

MURRAY GM

604-857-5200

SUNRISE TOYOTA

604-857-2657

VIP MAZDA

604-857-1600

HIGHWAY #1 - EXIT 83 NORTH ABBOTSFORD

9


10

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Building values by the end of August 2012, the city had processed $34 million worth of new residential building permits. in 2011, the city recorded a total of $46 million in building permit value.

The Auguston development on Sumas Mountain was one of the first major steps in 1999 toward developing large portions

Development on Eagle mountain in east abbotsford continues to climb up the slopes overlooking Sumas Prairie.

John morroW Photo

of the area, and is now going into phase

At home in Abby

eight with 100 more lots.

Housing prices

energetic residential development

The benchmark price for an average detached house in Abbotsford, as of August 2012, was $434,000, compared to langley ($548,000), Cloverdale ($574,200), and white rock/South

N

ew residential space is becoming increasingly difficult to find as Abbotsford’s population steadily climbs.

Developers are faced with the challenge of finding new space in a community where approximately three-quarters of the city’s 39,000 hectares of land is protected by the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR).

Surrey ($875,400).

“We definitely need to see more densification in our core and I think one of the challenges for our city is to provide a wide range of housing options for our citizens,” said Jay Teichroeb, Abbotsford general manager of economic development and planning.

increasing densification of housing in Abbotsford is the focus for the future, say city planners, and that means building up.

Secondary suites legal secondary suites make up approximately 10 per cent of Abbotsford’s urban housing stock. estimates of unregistered units range from 900 to more than 2,000.

We definitely need to see more densification in our core JAY TEICHROEB

Perhaps the largest example of densification in the city is the new 26-storey residential/commercial complex – Mahogany at Mill Lake – which began two years ago. When completed, the tower will be the tallest structure in the city.

from the Lynnhaven Society. Teichroeb said the city will also be examining its policy on carriage homes (those with guest suites or secondary suites) in the coming months, to increase housing options. With residential developments largely accomplished in areas like Sumas Mountain and the western border, the focus is to strengthen the city’s core. When land is available, it’s expensive; therefore developers and homebuyers are interested in high-density projects. It’s a reflection of Abbotsford’s continuing efforts to live within a smaller footprint. Teichroeb said legal secondary suites make up approximately 10 per cent of Abbotsford’s urban housing stock. Estimates of unregistered units reported by the city ranged from 900 to more than 2,000. The city is dotted with developments that will expand the living room for residents but still preserve the city’s land.

With the population In the east, Vicarro Ranch expected to continue to on Sumas Mountain is a rise over the next quarplanned residential develter-century, new homes opment that will include will be in high demand. Quantum Properties’ new building development, called the Brooklyn Condominiums, 1,700 units of townhouses The increasing inter- is located at the corner of Gladwin and maclure roads and consists of 87 homes. and apartments. Its six clusJohn morroW Photo est in the area may be ters of single-family, duplex, due to the lower cost of owning a home here, compared to living townhomes and condominium units will be separated by open in neighbouring areas. space and park land, and will encompass 395 acres. According to figures provided by the Fraser Valley Real Estate “We’re very much wanting to see the Vicarro Ranch project Board, the benchmark price for the average detached house in move ahead,” said Teichroeb. Abbotsford, as of August 2012, was $434,000. That’s a barThe project would be one of the largest planned in Abbotsford gain compared to Langley ($548,000), Cloverdale ($574,200), since the Auguston development created in 1999. White Rock/South Surrey ($875,400) and Greater Vancouver Phase eight of that residential development, located on ($942,100). Sumas Mountain, is ready to begin. It will introduce another But not everyone can afford to live in a detached home. 100 lots to the market. One of the city initiatives that has been adopted in the last In the west, Blueridge Drive has had major development year is the affordable housing strategy. around surrounding amenities like Rick Hansen Secondary “One of the cool projects that was supported by that is the and the Centre Ice complex. first micro-suite project on Braun Avenue, near historic downPolygon developers are the masterminds behind the town,” said Teichroeb. Westerleigh, a selection of townhouses and apartments. The two apartment buildings will contain 64 micro-suites, consisting of about 280 square feet of living space for seniors Continued on a11


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

New projects

11

Buying or Selling

From a10

. . . allow me to guide you through the process.

And more projects are being planned. By the end of August 2012, the city had processed $34 million worth of new residential building permits. In 2011, the city recorded a total of $46 million in building permit value.

new projects in the works include: • Approximately 90 residential units and up to 1,680 square metres of commercial space at 3068 Gladwin Rd.;

suemarples

• Development of a six-storey mixeduse building with approximately 9,924 sq.ft. of commercial space on the ground floor and approximately 94 apartment units above to be located at 33575 Ketch Pl., 1563 McCallum Rd, 33578 King Rd. And 33590 King Rd.;

Real Estate Representative

a dedicated professional working for you!

W INNER

• A 60-unit, five-storey apartment building located at 2582 Bourquin Cres. East; • A proposed development to create 226 townhouses at 2800 Allwood St.; • The development of a new six-storey, 64-unit residential rental apartment building on the southern portion of the subject site to replace the existing two-storey 25-unit residential rental apartment located at 32121 George Ferguson Way.

B

B

O

RD FO TS

D O W

N

TO

FA

VO

at 26 storeys, the mahogany at mill Lake tower will be the tallest structure in the city. artiSt ConCEPt

W

B

D O W

N

TO

A

EPXOUPXO

ABBOTSFORD

ABBOTSFORD •

S H O P P I N G • D I N I N G • B E A U T Y & H E A LT H

N

B

EPXOUPXO O TI IA ASSOC

U

S

IN ES S

O TI IA A SSOC

N

ATTRACTING PATRONS FROM THROUGHOUT THE FRASER VALLEY,

N

U

U O •

O PL • D INE • EX

R

E

S

P

O

H

I S T diverse O R I C selection of eateries as Food! You won’t find a Hmore Downtown Abbotsford boasts; wine, tea and coffee shops, 50’s diners, bakeries, delis, Thai, Chinese, Vietnamese, and the best “just like mom made it” you’ll ever taste; you name ABBOTSFORD it, you’ll find it, in Historic Downtown Abbotsford.

EPXOUPXO

ABBOTSFORD S

R

R

EPXOUPXO

E

E

HISTORIC

T

T

R

E

O

C

Historic Downtown Abbotsford is a pedestrian-friendly people place; a thriving neighbourhood alive with unique N T CITY RA C IB E shops ranging fromV vintage malls, sporting goods, clothing N stores, crafts of all kinds, salons, spas and gyms. •

CIT Y

R

V

N T RA IB

suemarples@shaw.ca www.suemarples.com

W

A

260 - 2655 Clearbrook Rd. Office: 604.855.7393

HISTORIC

SI NE SS

R

604.309.1030

HISTORIC

U

TO

R EAL

RD FO TS

E

N

N

S H O P P I N G • D I N I N G • B E A U T Y & H E A LT H

B

B

O



URIT

E H R Historic Downtown Abbotsford with its cobblestone O O P L • D XP sidewalks is a clean, picturesque engaging residential I N E • E and and shopping district that is the preferred location for retail, professional and service businesses. Our downtown is a source of community pride and a desired destination for residents and visitors.

www.downtownabbotsford.com


12

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

The Abbotsford international Airshow celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2012, featuring the F-16 uSAF Thunderbirds.

475,223 passengers in 2011 475,223 passengers used the Abbotsford Airport, a 2.5 per cent increase from 2010’s 463,814 passengers.

abbotsford international airport saw the completion of some $30 million worth of upgrades and improvements last year, including a parallel taxiway and renovation of the terminal. John morroW Photo

Up, up and away Abbotsford Airport vital to local economy

T

he Abbotsford International Airport (YXX) continues to thrive, and the potential for even more growth has increased, thanks to a $30-million renovation project that was completed in 2011.

Abbotsford international Airport is home to Cascade Aerospace, which has the maintenance contract for Canada’s fleet of Hercules lift aircraft.

The single most important thing we do is operate a safe airport. MIKE PASTRO

The improvements included a new 9,600foot parallel taxiway, expansion of the west apron and various electrical, lighting and surface rehabilitation projects. It also feaPaStro tured a major renovation of the terminal, including an improved departure lounge, security area, guest check-in counters and more.

Projections for passenger numbers are also on the rise. In 2011, 475,223 passengers used the Abbotsford Airport, a 2.5 per cent increase from 2010’s 463,814 passengers. Currently, passenger numbers are about 4.4 per cent ahead of last year. “”We’re projecting our 2012 numbers should exceed 490,000.” The 2011 budget called for a net income of $1,080,000. The final figure was $1,519,000. “That was a significant accomplishment and this year again we are forecasting that we will have net income that exceeds what we have budgeted.”

“We basically did the whole thing ahead of schedule and on budget,” said Mike Pastro, airport general manager.

Abbotsford’s airport also has the potential to become what Pastro calls the “Western Canada hub for aerospace.”

It was a joint project, paid for by the federal, and provincial governments and the airport itself. Pastro pointed out that the $10 million share came out of the airport’s capital reserve, not from the taxpayers.

In 2012, as part of the 50th annual Abbotsford International Airshow, an Aerospace and Defence Expo was held to introduce the airport to many leading aerospace companies. Most major original equipment manufacturers were on hand for the show, which the city now plans to turn into an annual event.

The construction phase did take a small toll on the airport’s overall numbers. In 2011, there was a small reduction in the number of airport movements (take-offs and landings) compared to 2010. A total of 96,864 aircraft movements took place in 2011, a five per cent drop from 2010. The rising price of fuel and “some operational restrictions” due to construction were likely factors. This year is a different story. So far in 2012, aircraft movements are up 16 per cent. “We’re thinking that aircraft take offs and landings for 2012 will likely be close to, certainly over 100,000, maybe closer to 110,000.”

The airport is already home to corporations like Cascade Aerospace – a company that specializes in aviation maintenance, overhaul, repair and product engineering and operates a 250,000-square-foot facility on the airport property – and Conair Aviation, which occupies more than 100,000 sq.ft. of hangar space to house its fleet of firefighting water bombers. While attracting new industry is important, Pastro said the prime focus is still the same. “The single most important thing that we do is operate a safe airport,” said Pastro.

For all your residential and commercial real estate needs have the best real estate team working for you

WWW.EXIMUS.COM

604.850.5040 Each office is independetly owned and operated #9-2630 Bourquin Cr, W Abbotsford BC V2S 5N7

info@eximus.com


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

No one WANTS to ... thousands NEED to stand in line at this bank every week.

Almost 1 in 4 Abbotsford households earn less than $30,000 a year (before taxes) and are considered low income, according to Statistics Canada. We help 1,700 – 2,000 households every month. Supporting your local Abbotsford Food Bank, helps us look after your neighbors.

PLEASE GIVE GENEROUSLY.

Online: www.abbotsfordfoodbank.com or www.abbotsfordcommunityservices.com (Just follow the link to the safe & secure Donation Page)

Mail or Drop Off: Abbotsford Food Bank - 33914 Essendene Ave., Abbotsford, BC V2S 2H8 OR Abbotsford Community Services - 2420 Montrose Ave., Abbotsford, BC V2S 3S9

Phone: 604.859.5749 or 604 859.7681 Ext. 234

People Helping Peopl People

The Food Bank is one of 80 services we offer residents of the city of Abbotsford

GIVING IS GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH When you give to others in need, it activates regions of your brain associated with pleasure, social connection, and trust, creating a “warm glow” effect. Scientists also believe that altruistic behavior releases endorphins in the brain, producing the positive feeling known as the “helper’s high.”

13


14

We’re here when CHAMPIONSHIP you need us.

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012 COMMUNITY CRISIS RESPONSE

EMERGENCY SHELTER

MEAL CENTRE

MANAGEMENT

NEED METAL FOR A PROJECT? we fabricate, weld & install metal products. plus... WE sell steel, stainless & aluminum. BRANCHING OUT

The Salvation Army offers a wide range of services to the community.

For more information MAKING WAVES ON LIFE, BUSINESS & THE WATER about these services

W

as well hether on the water or as onvolunteer his shop floor, Dave opportunities, Miller is a going concern. As a defending World call Masters Water please Ski Champion, he spends six Abbotsford 604.852.9305 months a year chasing his dream at whatever corner of the Chilliwack 604.792.0001 earth the water skiing elite choose to gather.

a successful leader in charge in each of his shops comes to mind, think again. Miller is highly dialed-in at each and every operation. “I empower my managers to make their own decisions based on my principles. They follow my formula to the ‘T’ and understand the reasons to achieve the end Even in the off season, Miller spends one to two hours a day results.” Surprisingly, Miller’s unique management approach H N U Ra Straditional ING O U T R E A C H • H O U S I N G S U P P O R T • P A R I S eschews structure. training. The remainder of his day is spent at work. Miller, it should be noted pays his bills not by the prizes he wins on the water ski circuit, but by operating six successful FIX AUTO Collision body shops in B.C., specifically in Abbotsford Fix says the 50 year old, “our managers and staff work together Auto Abbotsford East (Formerly H & R Collision) and Fix as a team to reduce waste, increase quality and deliver the highest quality repair and service to our customers. In the Auto Abbotsford West (Formerly Renascent Collision). industry we call this operating ‘lean’.” If the picture of an absentee owner who has managed to put

WITH GROWTH

• Agriculture

By the mid 90’sCompanies Miller was well on his • Construction

way to establishing himself as a world

• Sanitary class skierWelding, and couldFittings remove himself &from Supplies shop operations for periods of

“We do things a little differently”

time. Still he felt leashed by the business • Food & Beverage and found the best way to really free

• Concrete himself was&toAggregate buy 5 more shops. • Powerline Contractors & Suppliers

“the best move • TruckI&ever Crane made”

AN EARLY EDUCATION

In 2002, he bought Star Autobody and Manfreds Autobody in Vernon, BC and soon after 2 Renascent Collision Locations, one in Chilliwack and one in Abbotsford. All six locations are “As soon as my grandpa wasn’t around, the guys would all go sit down around the hot water LWS Manufacturing radiator,” says Miller. “It made me mad and the shop seemed so disorganized. It was simply a now branded Fix Auto. Fix Auto is a disaster with junk all over. I could see that the lack of organization was costingWelding him profits” and Ltd. national brand across Canada, USA and Europe with over 380 locations. Eventually, the shop folded and Miller took some what-not-to-do lessons in management

M

iller may joke about his management style but he started forming his opinions about successful shop management when he was only 14, working at his grandfather’s collision repair business.

30694 Simpson Rd. / 604.854.1277

with him to his next position at a car dealership. As many teenagers are likely to do, he took www.lwsmetalfab.com / lws@lwsmetalfab.com Purchasing 5 more shops taught me an interest in custom work. He started on his own cars, then did a few how to let go and rely on quality others and eventually opened up his own shop in a farm structure.

SEE US

“It was a chicken barn and I built a paint booth right in it”, he recalls. “Between working there and at the dealership, I learned to do things the right way.”

Direct flights

His reputation for quality custom work grew, but saw the vision and a much steadier future in collision repair and supplemented his business to include it.

B E T GROWTH ON THE HORIZON

in Abbotsford

B

Abbotsford & Victoria

y 1987 Miller had outgrown the chicken barn and bought the H & R Collision Property on Abbotsford Way. Miller and his former partner Rick Dyck built the business to one of the most successful Collision Shops in Abbotsford. Miller eventually bought his partner out and continued to grow the business.

SINCE 1986

“I managed the shop, did much of the body and paint work as well as wrote all the estimates. Every position I had I was always trying to replace myself. I hired some body technicians, painters and front office staff until there was less and less for me to do. Once I was free from the daily duties, I had time to refine the processes and improve quality and customer service.”

ACROSS FROM THE KEG

www.ezerentitcentre.ca

By 1994, Miller had turned H & R Collision (Now Fix Auto) into a $1.3 million dollar shop and had the vision for expansion. He bought neighboring lots and buildings and streamlined them to work cohesively within all operations. To date, between the two Abbotsford Fix Auto locations combined, sales are close to $6 million dollars per year. Add the four locations in Chilliwack, Vernon, Salmon Arm and the company exceeds $12 million dollars in sales per year.

Stop by to meet our NEWEST Branch Manager...

TRAVIS STAMPER WE CAN DELIVER THE EQUIPMENT TO YOU!

“We could not have achieved such great success without the commitment of our qualified technicians and managers that understand how to treat others as they would want to be treated.”

DAVE MILLER Was instrumental in putting Abbotsford and Albert Dyck Park on the world map for the sport of Waterskiing. Albert Dyck Park is currently home to the Fraser Valley WeWater offer aSki complete lineup and related services. The new Abbotsford location at Handyman Club and was of offiequipment cially opened Centre in East Abbotsford will ensure that we will be able to improve the service we currently provide here for the 1995 Western Canada Summer in the Fraser Valley. With 3 branches located 18 minutes apart, moving equipment just got EZEier allowing Games. In better 2007 Miller inducted into the us to provide servicewas to our customers. Abbotsford Sports Hall of Fame for his water Rentals include excavators, booms skiing achievements, one of whichloaders, is winning the & scissors, power tools, construction booms, scissor lift booms, airless paint sprayers and equipment for any job and more. 2006 world championships in Durban South Africa. Miller Renting... So Smart... EZE! currently holds the Canadian slalom record to date as well. MillerSo has won countless championships world wide with over 20 titles and still competes today.

CHILLIWACK

45875 Airport Road 604-792-3667

ABBOTSFORD

EZE RENT-IT CENTRE 1986 LTD

6-2043 Abbotsford Way

people to manage the operations of each shop. By overseeing the management and being less hands on myself it enabled me to focus more on the processes, quality control and customer service. The best part of it W allEwasEit also N allowed me more time to get away to waterski competitions all over the world.”

®

ALDERGROVE

26821 Old Yale Road 604-856-7745

I would like to personally thank our staff, past and future customers for enabling us to be one of the best Collision Repair facilities in the Lower Mainland.

Abbotsford to Victoria

Victoria to Abbotsford

7:15 AM (Monday-Friday) 5:30 PM (Monday-Friday)

8:00 AM (Monday-Friday) 4:30 PM (Monday-Friday)

Schedules subject to change.

DAVE MILLER OWNS AND MANAGES SIX FIX AUTO BODY SHOPS IN ABBOTSFORD, CHILLIWACK, |SALMON ARM1-888-359-6722 AND VERNON. 604-853-3667 Book on-line: flyorcaair.com By phone: r

TM

T F Y A


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

15

Family-centred 190 to 250 births per month

F

amily-centred” care is the focus of the maternity ward at Abbotsford Regional Hospital.

where from 190 to 250 births a month. There are 10 nurses on any given shift, and some situations can be challenging.

Lynne Steeksma, a registered nurse and clinical care co-ordinator at the hospital, said that in the past, labour and delivery were more from the perspective of medical professionals.

“Anything can happen at any time. We never know what’s coming through the door at any moment,” she said.

But Steeksma said the relatively new “family-centred model” is about providing the best experience possible for the mom and her family.

The ward has a maternity social worker on hand who works with some of the more difficult situations – for example, a teenage mom, a single mom who has no support, or the loss of a baby.

In the past, moms were moved from room to room during the different stages of labour, delivery and postpartum care. After the birth, they often shared rooms with other moms.

The social worker meets one-on-one with the families to talk about what they’re going through and refers them to community resources.

At 60,000 square metres, the Abbotsford regional Hospital is almost three times the size of the old facility.

Life expectancy life expectancy at birth for Abbotsford residents is 81.2 years overall; 83.5 years

THANK YOU ABBOTSFORD FORAMAKING FIXofAUTO matter health ArHCC: A state-of-the-art healthFOR care facility YOUR FIRST CHOICE A REPAIRS! AUTO Dr. harp Senghera performs magnetic resonance imaging at abbotsford regional hospital, whichhas features technology. The ARH maternity ward alsoleading-edge been a

Now, the entire process usually takes place all in one single-occupancy room.

Steeksma said moms and their partners are encouraged to share their birth plan ahead of time by registering for the anti-natal asessement program.

for women; and 78.8 years for men.

John morroW Photo

leader in an initiative called the Infants of Substance Using Mothers program.

The initiative was launched in 2010 and is aimed primarily at women on the methadone program or engaged in the gradual Through that, they can discuss with reduction of substance abuse. The program a nurse how they want the birth to unenables moms and babies to stay together fold, and it is recorded in their care plan. after birth, while the infant’s withdrawSteeksma said they are also encouraged to al symptoms are managed and treated. discuss this plan with their doctor. when the new hospital was built, Steeksma said this shortens the hospital “It’s growing, putting the family and theirrequires expec- a state-of-the-art vibrant community Thisfosters year, the UBC Family Practice Program also expanded stay for the baby, and an integral 11,000 pieces of new equipment were tations in thecare centre and that us trying to meet health facility can keep up with demand. its residency program. There are currently 13 family practice bond with the mother. added, including two CT scanners. what they would like their birth experiThe Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre residents at ARH, of which two or three will look at starting ence to look like,” she said. “Keeping families together reduces anxi(ARHCC) is such a place, serving 150,000 residents in the im- their own practices in Abbotsford. Dianne and Marcel Schimann with newborn baby son, Levin, born Sept. 27, 2012. JOHN MORROW PHOTO ety,” Steeksma said the ward averages anymediate area and a regional population of 330,000.  she said. Recent developments also include an expansion of the seniors’ The 300-bed facility opened Aug. 24, 2008 on Marshall clinic and, most recently, the addition of the Breast Health Road, replacing the 55-year-old MSA Hospital and Clinic that opened its doors in June 2011 and becoming the first integrated hospital and The Fraser Health Authority serves more has already seen more than 800 patients. cancer centre in Canada. than 1.6 million people, from burnaby In addition, clinical programs are At about 660,000 square feet, to boston bar, and has a budget of expanding, including the emergenARHCC includes MRI services, $2.6 billion annually. cy program with the introduction general surgery, nuclear mediof expanded trauma services, cine, renal dialysis, specialized and the critical care programs obstetrics, a special care nursFIX AUTO ery area, pediatric services, with the introduction of renal ABBOTSFORD WEST critical care and cardiac replacement therapy treat(RENASCENT COLLISION) care, and regionalized psyments for the critically ill chiatry in- and out-patient 2381 WINDSOR STREET and 24/7 intensivists (specare and other specialized cialized ICU physicians).  services.  “The expanding role of The Abbotsford Cancer ARH has made it part of Centre is the fifth of BC the three largest centres Cancer Agency’s cancer for acute care delivery in centres and provides treatFraser Health, next to Royal ment and care for the region, including chemotherapy, radiColumbian Hospital and ation therapy, patient and famSurrey Memorial Hospital,” FIX AUTO ily counselling, nutrition, genetic said Fraser Health site director The Fraser Health region has 26,000 staff, counseling, and pain and symptom ABBOTSFORD EAST Mark Goudsblom.  2,500 physicians, and 6,500 volunteers management.  (H&R COLLISION) Abbotsford residents and hospital Favorite Auto Favorite Custom Auto The project is the first acute-care hosRepair Bodyshop nishing Bodywork 2001 ABBOTSFORD WAY staffRefi are fortunate to Shop have access to the pital and cancer centre to be built in B.C. latest in health care technology. When the hosusing a public-private partnership model, at a pital was built, 11,000 new pieces of equipment were cost of $355 million for construction and equipment and The expanding added, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), two comwith an annual budget of $171 million.  role of ARH has puted tomography (CT) scanners that were better and faster The hospital is managed by Access Health Abbotsford (AHA) Over 30 late models courtesy vehicles available. than earlier models, and updated computer technology to enable Ltd., which is jointly owned by Fraser Health and the BC made it part of Cancer Agency – an agency of the Provincial Health Services more efficient access to patient records. the three largest Authority – with facilities management provided by three priThe new hospital has also benefited the community from an vate partners. centres for acute employment standpoint, including 400 additional nursing jobs

Serving millions

THANK YOU ABBOTSFORD FOR MAKING FIX AUTO YOUR FIRST CHOICE FOR AUTO REPAIRS!

604.852.3682

604.852.4677

FIX AUTO FIX AUTO ABBOTSFORD EAST care delivery CHILLIWACK in Fraser (H&R COLLISION & GLASS) 8745 YOUNG ROAD Health... 604.795.4489 2001 ABBOTSFORD WAY HE BODYSHOP NETWORK • FIXAUTO.COM (604)T 852-4677

Recent program expansion includes housing the Abbotsford Youth Health Clinic, the Psychiatric Outpatient Day Care program, and a provincial pilot program supporting stroke patients in the START (Stroke Assessment, Rehabilitation and Transitions) clinic. If the program is successful, it will become a permanent addition to the wide array of services provided at ARH.

and 400 extra support positions.

In total, about 1,800 people are employed at the hospital and 120 at the cancer centre.

This is in addition to about 300 employees with private partners including Sodexo, Johnson Controls Inc., Intercon and Impark.

(RENASCENT COLLISION)

MARK GOUDSBLOM


16

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Winning the ‘Big C’ battle Fraser Health sees 76 per cent cancer survival The Abbotsford Cancer Centre is situated on the same Marshall road

Health, it has risen to 76 per cent. In the Fraser Health region, 24,956 people have survived cancer.

site as the Abbotsford regional Hospital.

B.C. has the best treatment results and survival rates of all the provinces.

1,000-plus patients

Now “survivorship,” and the process of dealing with people who have come through perhaps the greatest ordeal of their life, is a focus in this field of medicine.

More than 1,000 people receive cancer

“Cancer is a traumatic event,” said Wong, and added there is more support for those who have come through this “psychological and physical journey.”

treatment annually at the Abbotsford regional Hospital and Cancer Centre.

They will deal with issues such as the after-effects of surgery, disfiguring surgery, cultural stigmas and the fear of recurrence. She said the latter is a common issue, as many patients become fearful of any pain in their body, that it may be the return of cancer. And there is better support for people who are recently diagnosed. For example, the Breast Health Clinic is operating a clinical research project that sees two breast cancer nurse coordinators present to support patients from the time they are diagnosed with breast cancer from their doctor.

Fifth centre The Abbotsford Cancer Centre was the fifth such facility to be built in b.C., and was situated in Abbotsford for Valley

Dr. Francis Wong is the chief physician at the abbotsford Cancer Centre.

residents could reduce their travel time to receive treatment and services.

Most common types of cancer in Fraser Health region breast: 20.5% gastro-intestinal: 20.3% Prostate/reproductive 18.3% lung: 13.4%

They’ve just got a ‘big C’ diagnosis, and you’re going to help them get through it. DR. FRANCIS WONG

nEiL CorBEtt Photo

E

very year, over 1,000 people receive cancer treatment at the Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre, and the majority of them receive good outcomes.

Dr. Francis Wong has been the chief physician at the stateof-the-art Abbotsford Cancer Centre since it opened in August 2008. Administratively, the cancer centre is unique. Usually, these facilities are added to a general hospital as an addition. The cancer centre and hospital in Abbotsford were both built at the same time – a first in Western Canada, with Fraser Health and the B.C. Cancer Agency, and both of their administrative structures sharing the facility and working collaboratively.

No longer do these women have to receive the “Big C” diagnosis from their GP, then suffer anxiety caused by uncertainty until they have an appointment with their oncologist. Wong said they will typically scan the Internet, gathering much information that may not apply to them. She recalls a patient who was worried she would have to move out of her living arrangements, fearing that radiation therapy would make her radioactive, and not wanting to expose children to radiation. Having a nurse available immediately, her fears were laid to rest. “There’s a better understanding of what is coming up,” she said. Wong said clinic research projects, like the breast cancer project, are possible because of donors in Abbotsford. Right from the start, the community showed its support for the cancer centre with a successful million-dollar campaign. “We are heavily dependent on the generosity of the community.”

It was the fifth cancer centre to be built in the province, and was situated in Abbotsford so Valley residents could reduce their travel time into the Greater Vancouver area in order to receive cancer treatment and services.

abbotsford Centre offers a full range of cancer control services:

She said there are 150 employees at the cancer centre who take pride in their work.

• New patient multi-disciplinary consultation and care planning

“It is very rewarding. You see patients coming in, very anxious. They’ve just got a ‘big C’ diagnosis, and you’re going to help them get through it.”

• Chemotherapy and systemic care • Radiation therapy and enhanced brachytherapy services

Surveying recent statistics, she said in the year from April 2011 until March 2012 there were 1,390 new patients referred to the centre. In that time, roughly 1,000 patients started radiotherapy treatment there, and 500 patients began chemotherapy.

• Supportive care and pain/symptom management

In the mid-1980s, when Wong began her career, the five-year survivor rate was approximately 50 per cent. Now, in Fraser

• Professional education/liaison for community based cancer control programs

Me, wear readingMe, glasses? wear reading glasses? Me, wear reading glasses?

way! No way! NoNoway! KAMRA Vision TM

TM

KAMRA Vision KAMRA Vision Innovative. Safe. Proven. TM

Innovative. Safe. Proven. Innovative. Safe. Proven.

• Nutritional consultation and rehabilitation support • Patient and community education in cancer prevention • Access to national and international clinical trials

Me, wear reading glasses?

No way! KAMRA Vision

TM

Innovative. Safe. Proven. DR JOHN F. BLAYLOCK

Eye Surgeon

www.valleylasereyecentre.com

www.valleylasereyecentre.com For more information:www.valleylasereyecentre.com www.valleylasereyecentre.com


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

State-of-the-art Abbotsford’s emergency department has two state-of-the-art trauma rooms used to treat the most severe cases.

nurse audrey hiebert prepares equipment in one of nine operating rooms in arh. which are available for scheduled and emergency surgeries. the emergency department at the arh works on a triage system where patients are prioritized by the seriousness of their injuries, according to a five-category system. During the busiest times, John morroW Photo there are four doctors in the department.

Dealing with emergency A balance of health care and customer service

T

he emergency department at the Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre serves between 160 to 200 patients on an average day. That number rises to 250 patients on busy days. Of those, 15-20 will be admitted to the hospital. For many, the visit will be their first experience at the facility. Department manager Murray Nielsen calls emergency the “welcome mat” of the hospital. “Basically, the majority of the patients who come to the facility will come through our doors. That’s their entrance point into the facility.” He said studies show that if people don’t have a positive experience in emergency – if they walk away feeling they didn’t get the treatment they deserved – they leave thinking “that hospital is no good.” It’s a strange balancing game, providing a health service and keeping “customers” happy. “People pay into the health care system, so I look at them as customers.” And he has a lot of them. ARHCC has the fourth busiest emergency department in the Fraser Health region, with 62,043 visits in 2011/12, a seven per cent increase from the year before. In comparison, Surrey Memorial Hospital had 98,500 emergency department visits last year, while Burnaby had 72,500 and Royal Columbian Hospital saw 64,600. Abbotsford’s emergency visits have steadily grown over the past few years. According to statistics provided by Fraser Health, the emergency room had 45,108 visits in 2008/09. The following year, that increased by 19 per cent to a total of 53,787. And in 2010/11 the visits rose another eight per cent to 57,865. The emergency department has about 40 beds, and when at capacity, has another 50 people waiting in medical chairs. Nielsen has more than 26 years of experience working in emergency rooms, and said the department is “always congested.”

There are more than 200 staff members working in the emergency department.

High volumes The Abbotsford regional Hospital and Cancer Centre will serve between 160 to 200 patients on an average day, and

The reality is, some people have to wait. “We live in a drive-thru world right now, and people, when they come to us, unfortunately have that sort of a mentality and we can’t operate like that.”

up to 250 on a busy day.

The emergency department works on a triage system where patients are prioritized by the seriousness of their injuries. Using the Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS), patients are placed into one of five categories, CTAS 1 being the most severe and CTAS 5 being the least. Nielsen said triage is used to get “the right patient to the right place for the right emergency.” Abbotsford’s emergency department has two state-ofthe-art trauma rooms used to treat CTAS 1 cases. Those are usually used in times of major trauma, including serious car accidents. Patients classified as CTAS 2 are brought to an area containing eight monitored beds with critical care nurses on duty. There is always at least one nurse for every four patients. Some examples of CTAS 2 patients include heart attacks, chest pain, unbearable pain, surgical bleeding and compound fractures. Nielsen said CTAS 1 and 2 patients usually see a nurse or doctor almost immediately. Any patients classified as CTAS 3 or 4 should see a nurse within 30 to 45 minutes, while CTAS 5 should see a nurse within an hour, depending on patient volume. “We can’t always meet those standards.” CTAS 3 and some 4 patients are usually treated in the Rapid Access Zone (RAZ) of the emergency department. Nielsen said these patients are usually more stable, what he called the walking injured – patients who are likely to be discharged once seen, rather than admitted to hospital. In an attempt to better serve the public, the RAZ was created. The area used to contain four stretchers but they have been reContinued on a18

The emergency department has about 40 beds, and when at capacity, has another 50 people waiting in medical chairs.

Increasing visits The emergency room had 45,108 visits in 2008/09. in 2010/11 the visits rose to 57,865.

Triage is used to get the right patient to the right place for the right emergency. MURRAY NIELSEN

17


18

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Life in the ER ing to get patients in and out as soon as possible. Anyone classified as CTAS 5 usually has minor injuries or needs basic medical treatment, including something as simple as prescription refills. Nielsen said some people treat the emergency department like a walk-in clinic and while he doesn’t promote that, he said everyone who comes in will be taken care of. The department also has a four-bed section for pediatric emergencies, so children coming in for treatment can feel a little more at ease. There are more than 200 staff members working at the emergency department. During busy hours there are four doctors, and at the slowest times (between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m.) there is one physician on duty and one on call.

bbey Eye Doctors optometrists NEW PATIENTS ARE WELCOME

From a17

placed with 16 chairs.

DIGITAL VIDEO & IMAGING OF RETINAL SCANS| KIDS OPTOMETRY EXPERTS We can help you with dry eyes & allergies

ASSESSMENTS FOR: MACULAR DEGENERATION GLAUCOMA | CATARACTS | DIABETES & OTHER EYE DISEASES

104 - 1945 McCallum Rd | 604.864.8038 | abbeyeyedoctors.ca

BECAUSE

“Not everybody needs a stretcher,” he explained, adding that patients can have IVs put in, blood work done, pain medication prescribed and X-rays ordered, all while sitting or reclining in the chair. By eliminating the stretchers, it quadrupled the capability of that area. Nielsen said there was a “big education curve” to go through, but the area is help-

In addition to their medical training, emergency staff take a course called Strangers in Crisis, designed to give staff a better understanding of why people come to the emergency department. Nielsen said he’s always looking to improve wait times and service in his department, but acknowledges people will always have to wait if a more serious case comes in. “That’s just life in the ER. But when you come in and you really need us, we stop everything else.”

DREAM IT. BUILD IT.

DRIVE IT.

ACCIDENTS

HAPPEN CARSTAR Abbotsford is equipped with the latest systems and technology so we can provide impeccable repair and adhere to safely standards. • Fully Certified Technicians • Competitive Pricing • All Makes & Models • Warranty Coverage for the Life of Your Vehicle • Honest & Accurate Estimates • State-Of-The-Art ECLIPSE  Laser Frame Measuring System • Replacement Cars Available

1967 MUSTANG

• ICBC, All Private Insurance Companies

BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARD FOR SERVICE EXCELLENCE

CUSTOM FABRICATION & MODIFICATION OF ANY VEHICLE

ite c u

ho

Fa

vo ur

p

BUILT BY 360 FABRICATION INC.

stom bo

s dy

TOP CUSTOM SHOP IN CANADA - WINNER 2011

FABRICATION INC. Carstar Manager

31450 PEARDONVILLE ROAD, ABBOTSFORD 360FABRICATION.COM • 604.859.3608

Steve Cochrane

31450 PEARDONVILLE RD • 604.557.7857 • 360FABRICATION.COM

cars

exotics

trucks

hot rods

muscle cars

bikes


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

Invest

Abbotsford

Building a sustainable, vibrant and prosperous community

19


20

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

Abbotsford: A vibrant place to do business Economic prosperity is the key to a healthy and diverse community. The City of Abbotsford’s vision is to be the most sustainable, livable and prosperous city in North America. To achieve this, we need sustainable jobs in our community that support our people, and we need to create the best possible conditions for business to thrive and prosper. One of the key initiatives underway to support the development of a healthy and vibrant community in Abbotsford is our Mayor’s Task Force on Economic Prosperity.

Mayor Bruce Banman

The Task Force is comprised of members of the City’s Economic Development Advisory Committee along with the President and Executive Director of the Abbotsford Chamber of Commerce. The mandate of the Task Force is to identify strategic opportunities and to recommend specific actions that will serve to advance the economic interests of Abbotsford. The foundational document of this group, the draft Economic Development Strategy and Action Plan, was developed in 2012. This document serves as a catalyst for stakeholder discussions across a wide range of economic issues including taking advantage of Abbotsford’s unique mix of assets; promoting Smart Growth; encouraging Innovation; and, identifying metrics for success. I am pleased with the progress made by the Task Force this year. With feedback and input through the public consultation process, the Task Force will be able to make a series of specific recommendations to Council in the coming year regarding economic development opportunities for the City going forward.

Creating a vibrant uptown: Civic Precinct The Civic Precinct has long functioned as the primary node for municipal operations. To date, it has been built incrementally to meet the needs of the day. While this approach has sufficed, it has been done without a comprehensive vision. As the City of Abbotsford continues to grow, the need for on-going expansion and updates to the Civic Precinct will continue in the context of a revitalized downtown. To accommodate future growth in a coordinated and integrated manner, the City, with the support of HB Lanarc-Golder, is undertaking a process to develop a comprehensive vision for the Civic Precinct. This vision will include an illustrative concept plan and guiding principles that will help shape future development in the Civic Precinct. The process includes background analysis, stakeholder meetings, technical assessment, and public engagement.

I am confident the City of Abbotsford will continue to generate a healthy and vibrant economy. I invite you to take a closer look and see what our City has to offer for you.

Civic Precinct is bounded by South Fraser Way to the south, George Ferguson Way to the north, Trethewey Street to the east, and Tims Street to the west.

Mayor Bruce Banman

A dynamic neighbourhood: U District

Taking off in new directions: Abbotsford International Airport The Abbotsford International Airport is the second largest international airport in Western British Columbia and is expected to experience strong growth in the future. Abbotsford International Airport plans to achieve its business development targets by focusing on economic development while being mindful of the vision set forth by the City of Abbotsford, which includes preserving community values and priorities, and achieving economic development through sustainable operating practices.

The Abbotsford Airport Authority has taken a proactive approach to incentivizing new development at the airport with its landuse policies and commercial terms. The intent is to expand Abbotsford’s aerospace industry and cargo opportunities. In support of this endeavor, YXX has partnered with the University of the Fraser Valley, as well as Conair and Cascade Aerospace to ensure that business development strategies are well supported with training and expansion opportunities. The vision is to leverage the airport as an economic catalyst, create jobs and develop industry. ABBOTSFORD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT - INDUSTRIAL PARK PLAN

Plotted from Autocad on: 26 June 2012

DISCLAIMER: THIS DRAWING AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS FOR GENERAL PRESENTATION PURPOSES ONLY. IT IS THE USERS RESPONSIBILITY TO CONFIRM THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION AND IS NOT INTENDED TO TAKE THE PLACE OF ANY FORMAL DISCUSSIONS WITH THE AIRPORT OR CITY MANAGEMENT GROUP.

In early 2011, City staff began developing a 30-year planning concept for the area around the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV), known as the ‘U District’. The U District is located to the south of Highway 1, within the City’s Urban Development Boundary (UDB). It is approximately 365 acres in size and has a population of over 2,000 residents. The U District is home to the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) and the Abbotsford Entertainment and Sports Centre (AESC). UFV has been rated one of the best public universities in British Columbia and is quickly reaching capacity at its existing facilities.

YXX is open for business! NOTES:

PROPOSED INDUSTRIAL PARK SOUTH OF KING ROAD EXTENSION HAS A LAND MASS OF 63,000 SQ.M. (15.5 ACRES) HEIGHT RESTRICTIONS ARE NEGLIGIBLE - THE MAJORITY OF THE SITE IS REGULATED BY THE OUTER SURFACE ELEVATION (WHICH ALLOWS 45m OF MAXIMUM BUILDING HEIGHT) MUNICIPAL SERVICING FOR THIS DEVELOPMENT IS PARTIALLY IN PLACE ACCESS TO HWY ONE IS 5 MIN AWAY VIA THE NEW MARSHALL ROAD EXTENSION ACCESS TO INTERNATIONAL BORDER CROSSING IS 15 MINUTES AWAY AIRPORT REVITALIZATION TAX EXEMPTION PROGRAM IS CURRENTLY IN PLACE FOR NEW DEVELOPMENT EXISTING ON-SITE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION - UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER VALLEY EXISTING ON-SITE AEROSPACE CLUSTER EXCELLENT LONG-TERM ROAD FRONTAGE AND PUBLIC VISIBILITY 9,600' LONG X 200' WIDE MAIN RUNWAY 5,328' LONG X 200' WIDE CROSS-WIND RUNWAY

    

PHASE II DEVELOPMENT AREA

TOWNLINE ROAD

AD RO LE IL NV DO AR

PROPOSED OFFICE SPACE 75m X 100m SHOWN

The City of Abbotsford and Abbotsford International Airport are developing an Industrial Aerospace Park at the Airport.

The U District plan provides planned and predictable development direction. This direction offers residential, commercial and applied research investment opportunities that encourage mixed-use, amenity-rich and ‘green’ development supporting UFV and the AESC, and capitalizing on the new McCallum Interchange and future transit expansions.

   

PE

PROPOSED HANGAR SPACE 100m X 125m SHOWN

Planning for the future

PROPOSED OFFICE SPACE 45m X 150m SHOWN

FUTURE ROADWAY EXTENSION TO INFIELD DEVELOPMENT

Aerospace Park Vision

0m

The plan involves undertaking an exercise to gain an understanding of market needs for an ideal Industrial Aerospace Park facility. SCALE This facility will create a nexus for advanced, high-level aerospace work in the Fraser Valley, producing economic benefits for the entire region. 25m

50m

75m

100m

• Proposed Industrial Park INDUSTRIAL PARK has a PROPOSED LOCATION land mass of 15.5 acres

KING ROAD

TOWNLINE ROAD

KING ROAD

TRACEY STREET

• Easy access to the Trans-Canada Highway and International Border Crossing RO AD

• Existing on-site education through the University of the Fraser Valley

MT

.LE HM

AN

D\Orthophotos\Ortho-2011.dwg

PROPOSED APRON SPACE 60m X 125m SHOWN

CASCADE AEROSPACE

• Existing on- site aerospace cluster

Building upon the development concept outlined in the U District plan document, a detailed land use plan will be created and incorporated into the Official Community Plan (OCP). As part of the land use planning process, a detailed servicing strategy will also be developed.

In May 2012, Abbotsford Council endorsed the conceptual U District plan (available at www.udistrict.ca). The development of the plan was informed by an extensive public consultation process that engaged UFV staff and students, U District land owners and residents, the development industry, City committees, City staff and the public. The document provides a context for future development in this strategic location so that new development will support the long-term growth and diversification of UFV and the surrounding area.

21


20

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

Abbotsford: A vibrant place to do business Economic prosperity is the key to a healthy and diverse community. The City of Abbotsford’s vision is to be the most sustainable, livable and prosperous city in North America. To achieve this, we need sustainable jobs in our community that support our people, and we need to create the best possible conditions for business to thrive and prosper. One of the key initiatives underway to support the development of a healthy and vibrant community in Abbotsford is our Mayor’s Task Force on Economic Prosperity.

Mayor Bruce Banman

The Task Force is comprised of members of the City’s Economic Development Advisory Committee along with the President and Executive Director of the Abbotsford Chamber of Commerce. The mandate of the Task Force is to identify strategic opportunities and to recommend specific actions that will serve to advance the economic interests of Abbotsford. The foundational document of this group, the draft Economic Development Strategy and Action Plan, was developed in 2012. This document serves as a catalyst for stakeholder discussions across a wide range of economic issues including taking advantage of Abbotsford’s unique mix of assets; promoting Smart Growth; encouraging Innovation; and, identifying metrics for success. I am pleased with the progress made by the Task Force this year. With feedback and input through the public consultation process, the Task Force will be able to make a series of specific recommendations to Council in the coming year regarding economic development opportunities for the City going forward.

Creating a vibrant uptown: Civic Precinct The Civic Precinct has long functioned as the primary node for municipal operations. To date, it has been built incrementally to meet the needs of the day. While this approach has sufficed, it has been done without a comprehensive vision. As the City of Abbotsford continues to grow, the need for on-going expansion and updates to the Civic Precinct will continue in the context of a revitalized downtown. To accommodate future growth in a coordinated and integrated manner, the City, with the support of HB Lanarc-Golder, is undertaking a process to develop a comprehensive vision for the Civic Precinct. This vision will include an illustrative concept plan and guiding principles that will help shape future development in the Civic Precinct. The process includes background analysis, stakeholder meetings, technical assessment, and public engagement.

I am confident the City of Abbotsford will continue to generate a healthy and vibrant economy. I invite you to take a closer look and see what our City has to offer for you.

Civic Precinct is bounded by South Fraser Way to the south, George Ferguson Way to the north, Trethewey Street to the east, and Tims Street to the west.

Mayor Bruce Banman

A dynamic neighbourhood: U District

Taking off in new directions: Abbotsford International Airport The Abbotsford International Airport is the second largest international airport in Western British Columbia and is expected to experience strong growth in the future. Abbotsford International Airport plans to achieve its business development targets by focusing on economic development while being mindful of the vision set forth by the City of Abbotsford, which includes preserving community values and priorities, and achieving economic development through sustainable operating practices.

The Abbotsford Airport Authority has taken a proactive approach to incentivizing new development at the airport with its landuse policies and commercial terms. The intent is to expand Abbotsford’s aerospace industry and cargo opportunities. In support of this endeavor, YXX has partnered with the University of the Fraser Valley, as well as Conair and Cascade Aerospace to ensure that business development strategies are well supported with training and expansion opportunities. The vision is to leverage the airport as an economic catalyst, create jobs and develop industry. ABBOTSFORD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT - INDUSTRIAL PARK PLAN

Plotted from Autocad on: 26 June 2012

DISCLAIMER: THIS DRAWING AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS FOR GENERAL PRESENTATION PURPOSES ONLY. IT IS THE USERS RESPONSIBILITY TO CONFIRM THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION AND IS NOT INTENDED TO TAKE THE PLACE OF ANY FORMAL DISCUSSIONS WITH THE AIRPORT OR CITY MANAGEMENT GROUP.

In early 2011, City staff began developing a 30-year planning concept for the area around the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV), known as the ‘U District’. The U District is located to the south of Highway 1, within the City’s Urban Development Boundary (UDB). It is approximately 365 acres in size and has a population of over 2,000 residents. The U District is home to the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) and the Abbotsford Entertainment and Sports Centre (AESC). UFV has been rated one of the best public universities in British Columbia and is quickly reaching capacity at its existing facilities.

YXX is open for business! NOTES:

PROPOSED INDUSTRIAL PARK SOUTH OF KING ROAD EXTENSION HAS A LAND MASS OF 63,000 SQ.M. (15.5 ACRES) HEIGHT RESTRICTIONS ARE NEGLIGIBLE - THE MAJORITY OF THE SITE IS REGULATED BY THE OUTER SURFACE ELEVATION (WHICH ALLOWS 45m OF MAXIMUM BUILDING HEIGHT) MUNICIPAL SERVICING FOR THIS DEVELOPMENT IS PARTIALLY IN PLACE ACCESS TO HWY ONE IS 5 MIN AWAY VIA THE NEW MARSHALL ROAD EXTENSION ACCESS TO INTERNATIONAL BORDER CROSSING IS 15 MINUTES AWAY AIRPORT REVITALIZATION TAX EXEMPTION PROGRAM IS CURRENTLY IN PLACE FOR NEW DEVELOPMENT EXISTING ON-SITE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION - UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER VALLEY EXISTING ON-SITE AEROSPACE CLUSTER EXCELLENT LONG-TERM ROAD FRONTAGE AND PUBLIC VISIBILITY 9,600' LONG X 200' WIDE MAIN RUNWAY 5,328' LONG X 200' WIDE CROSS-WIND RUNWAY

    

PHASE II DEVELOPMENT AREA

TOWNLINE ROAD

AD RO LE IL NV DO AR

PROPOSED OFFICE SPACE 75m X 100m SHOWN

The City of Abbotsford and Abbotsford International Airport are developing an Industrial Aerospace Park at the Airport.

The U District plan provides planned and predictable development direction. This direction offers residential, commercial and applied research investment opportunities that encourage mixed-use, amenity-rich and ‘green’ development supporting UFV and the AESC, and capitalizing on the new McCallum Interchange and future transit expansions.

   

PE

PROPOSED HANGAR SPACE 100m X 125m SHOWN

Planning for the future

PROPOSED OFFICE SPACE 45m X 150m SHOWN

FUTURE ROADWAY EXTENSION TO INFIELD DEVELOPMENT

Aerospace Park Vision

0m

The plan involves undertaking an exercise to gain an understanding of market needs for an ideal Industrial Aerospace Park facility. SCALE This facility will create a nexus for advanced, high-level aerospace work in the Fraser Valley, producing economic benefits for the entire region. 25m

50m

75m

100m

• Proposed Industrial Park INDUSTRIAL PARK has a PROPOSED LOCATION land mass of 15.5 acres

KING ROAD

TOWNLINE ROAD

KING ROAD

TRACEY STREET

• Easy access to the Trans-Canada Highway and International Border Crossing RO AD

• Existing on-site education through the University of the Fraser Valley

MT

.LE HM

AN

D\Orthophotos\Ortho-2011.dwg

PROPOSED APRON SPACE 60m X 125m SHOWN

CASCADE AEROSPACE

• Existing on- site aerospace cluster

Building upon the development concept outlined in the U District plan document, a detailed land use plan will be created and incorporated into the Official Community Plan (OCP). As part of the land use planning process, a detailed servicing strategy will also be developed.

In May 2012, Abbotsford Council endorsed the conceptual U District plan (available at www.udistrict.ca). The development of the plan was informed by an extensive public consultation process that engaged UFV staff and students, U District land owners and residents, the development industry, City committees, City staff and the public. The document provides a context for future development in this strategic location so that new development will support the long-term growth and diversification of UFV and the surrounding area.

21


22

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

A caring, healthy community: Campus of Care The campus will be the first of its kind in North America where three buildings: an adult hospice, children’s hospice and children’s respite facility are located on the same property. Dave Lede House The Dave Lede House Canuck Place Children’s Hospice will provide specialized care and support for children and teenagers with progressive life-threatening illnesses while focusing on enhancing the quality of each child’s life and help children and their families cope with medical and emotional challenges. The 29,500 sq. ft. building will provide children’s bedrooms, family suites, common amenities and medical support services for the children and their families.

Matthew’s House Matthew’s House is a home for children with significant medical needs and their families. The 6,000 sq. ft. building will have bedrooms for the children, bedrooms for families, a playroom and meeting spaces. Matthew’s House has been designed to be a place where families and children with special needs can come and get some rest in a relaxing, happy environment that’s tailor-made for them. Holmberg House The Abbotsford Hospice Society will build Holmberg House a facility that will house a resource and support centre and adult hospice residence. On the hospice residence floor there will be 10 patient suites that can accommodate one patient and one family member and a separate family guest suite.

Campus of Care:

Left to Right: Dave Lede House; Matthew’s House and Holmberg House are all slated for completion in 2013.

A growing industrial base: Welcome to the Mt. Lehman neigbourhood

Welcome to the new Mt. Lehman town centre! Highstreet 3122 Mt. Lehman Road

Highstreet

Highstreet will provide an entirely new experience in shopping, dining and entertainment. Its unique design features open-air main street-style shopping located directly above an abundance of covered parking providing both convenience and an exciting atmosphere. A diverse collection of shops totaling 600,000 sq. ft. with contemporary architecture, beautifully landscaped streets and plazas and large children’s play area will make it a favourite gathering place for the Fraser Valley. Highstreet is currently under construction and will open in several phases throughout 2013: the first phase in January and the final phase in the fall. Walmart 100-3122 Mt. Lehman Road

Walmart

The Abbotsford West Walmart Supercentre is scheduled to open in early 2013. The 154,000 sq. ft. store will employ 250 associates. The store will feature all varieties of food, including fresh produce, meat and baked goods as well as electronics, home décor and apparel, creating a one-stop shopping destination dedicated to everyday low prices.

Mini Storage 2992 Pinegrove Street This cutting edge, three-storey mini storage facility features over 1,000 secure storage lockers with a variety of sizes to suit any storage needs. With a site that borders the Trans-Canada Highway, Fraser Highway and Mt. Lehman Road, it is accessible to a variety of users. Opened in 2012, the 51,000 sq. ft. facility serves as an integral part of the evergrowing Fraser Valley.

Mini Storage

Sandman Hotel 3010 Mt. Lehman Road This six storey, 80,000 sq. ft. development off Fraser Highway and the Mt. Lehman Exit is a 147 room hotel, 160 seat restaurant and is a $10 million investment in the neighbourhood.

Sandman Hotel

Honda Way 30360 Automall Drive This 34,293 sq. ft. proposed development is for a building that includes a showroom, shop, parts, service area and administrative office space. Its location is at the corner of Automall Drive and Mt. Lehman Road occupying a prominent, highly visible location at the entrance into the Fraser Valley Auto Mall.

Honda Way


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

23

Fraser Valley Distance Education School

Looking to  Upgrade?  

COURSES

PROGRAMS

• Free courses  for  BC  Residents   •  Work  at  your  own  pace   • You  may  begin  throughout  the  year   • “Up  to  the  minute”  access  to                 online  marks  

“I need  to  upgrade  my  Grade  11  Math   to  become  an  Electrician”     “  I  am  a  single  parent  who  wants  my   high  school  diploma”     “  I  need  Biology  12,  Chemistry  11  and             English  12  for  the  Nursing  program”                    

STUDENT STORIES

 

• Post Secondary  pre-­‐requisites   • Trades  preparation   • High  School  Diploma  

We bring our school to you! www.fvdes.com 1-­‐800-­‐663-­‐3381  


24

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Child-friendly Looking after young patients

T

he hospital environment can be a scary and intimidating place for the youngest patients.

be a difficult time.

But staff at Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre ensure that every child – and his or her family – is made to feel as comfortable as possible. “We’re a very child-friendly unit. It’s designed to appeal to children and increase their comfort while they’re in the hospital,” said Lori Apostal, director of clinical programs for child and youth services. It starts with lively, colourful surroundings that include a play room for the little ones and a teen room stocked with video games and movies for the older kids.

Families are consulted every step of the way during their child’s treatment, and siblings are also encouraged to be involved. “We really have a family-centred care approach,” Apostal said. A child life specialist spends time with the young patients, explaining in age-appropriate ways the different procedures they might undergo and helping to ease their anxiety.

The pediatricians work in partnership with other medical professionals, including occupational, physio and respiratory therapists. “We have an excellent mulit-disciplinary team ... They are just so dedicated to children and youth. They are very passionate about the work they do,” Apostal said. The ward serves children from newborn up to 17 years of age. Twelve beds are open on the pediatric ward, but that can expand to 16 as needed. The neo-natal intensive care unit has 10 beds, but can also expand as required. This unit cares for infants born up to two months early. More-premature babies are stabilized and transferred to Surrey Memorial, Royal Columbian or B.C. Children’s hospitals.

She also provides fun activities that can serve as a distraction during what might

John morrow photo

Six pediatricians serve the community, and one is always on call, ensuring that coverage is provided 24/7. They have access to the hospital’s range of high-tech equipment, including medical resonance imaging, ultrasound and CT scanning. “We have the full gamut of services,” Sorial said.

A lounge, complete with a shower, makes an extended hospital stay more comfortable for families from out of town or those who want to spend the night.

Kai Clarke, 6, relaxes in the playroom with Susie Clarke, child life specialist at the hospital.

Dr. Mark Sorial, acting program medical director of child and youth services, said the ward also provides interpreters for families whose first language isn’t English.

Honey Farm , Country Store & Meadery

Sweet treats for the Skin & Soul source and flavoured honeys ·· Natural Mead and other Honey Wines products ·· Beehive Beeswax and candles

CUSTOM HOUSE

CURRENCY EXCHANGE

Contact us about Educational tours for ages 3 and up

Visit the Country Store at 2595 Lefeuvre Road, Abbotsford 604-856-2125 | www.bchoney.com

  Wherever and whenever you travel, come see     us first for all your currency exchange needs  

Unique gift ideas for the “hard to buy for” person on your list

2B 32330 South Fraser Way   604.556.3999   Toll Free: 1.800.549.1199  

R

R E A L E S T A T E L A W Y E R S E A L E S T A T E L A W Y E R S Providing legal services in the Fraser Valley since 1961.

M

B

Let our experienced I Clawyers H A E L takeUthe R Kstress E  out of buying or selling your home.  

M I Cmburke@rosborough.com HAEL BURKE

Real Estate Development • Real Estate Transactions Corporate & Business Law • Commercial Leasing Business Agreements • Wills & Estate Planning Probate & Estate Administration

mburke@rosborough.com CONRAD WARKENTIN 

C

W

cwarkentin@rosborough.com

N R cAonrad D Warkentin A R K E NkTaMI NGreWal   Michael BO urke

mburke@rosborough.com

cwarkentin@rosborough.com

kgrewal@rosborough.com

cwarkentin@rosborough.com Rosborough & Company has been providing 

604.859.7171 www.rosborough.com legal services in the Fraser Valley since 1961.   33832 South Fraser Way, Abbotsford, B.C. V2S 2C5 Let our experienced lawyers take the stress 

Rosborough & Company has been providing  out of buying or selling your home. 


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

25

Campus of care Vital services all on one site

O

ne of the nation’s most innovative health projects is being built in Abbotsford.

The Dave Lede Campus of Care – named for the project’s biggest donor – is located on Marshall Road adjacent to Abbotsford Regional Hospital. It brings together three dynamic health-care initiatives on one site: Canuck Place Children’s Hospice, the Abbotsford Hospice Society’s Holmberg House, and Matthew’s House, a respite facility for kids with severe disabilities. The City of Abbotsford contributed the land, and all three facilities are in the midst of campaigns to raise the funds for capital and operating costs. Canuck Place Children’s Hospice, which also has a location in Vancouver, will be the first of the three projects to begin operation. The 20,000 sq.ft. $13-million facility will operate 10 beds for children under the age of 19 who have life-threatening illnesses. Construction is expected to be completed this fall, and the doors will start to open for services in early 2014. CEO Marg McNeil said some of those services, such as monthly recreational outings for kids, are already being offered in the community. She said the Campus of Care is a “major benefit” to the area. “I think this is going to provide

much-needed services and care for families in the region.” The Abbotsford Hospice Society (AHS) will build a 20,000 sq.ft. resource centre and adult hospice and is currently in the midst of a three-year, $12-million fundraising campaign. The home-like facility is currently under construction and is expected to open in the late spring or early summer of 2014, offering programs and services to people 19 years and older who are dying, and to their families. It is named for Dave Holmberg Jr., who passed away in March 2011 at the age of 48. AHS executive director Debbie Lehmann said Dave Holmberg House will provide support to the entire Fraser Valley. “The building of this hospice complements the growing health-care professional sector that is so essential in any community that is looking forward to the future.” Matthew’s House, a program of Communitas Supportive Care Society, has also begun construction. The 4,000 sq. ft. state-of-the-art residence will provide a home away from home for up to five kids at a time who have complex physical needs. The program has set a fundraising goal of $4.2 million. Matthew’s House is named in memory of Matthew Froese, who had severe disabilities and died in August 2010 at the age of nine.

The Dave Lede Campus of Care will bring together three health care initiatives on one site, including Canuck Place Children’s Hospice, the Abbotsford Hospice Society’s Holmberg House, and Matthew’s CAMPUS OF CARE ILLUSTRATION House.

Dignity Comfort Quality Abbotsford is the only community in the area without a residential hospice for adults facing terminal illness. To meet this critical need, Abbotsford Hospice Society is building Holmberg House, a world class residential hospice to serve patients and those who have been left behind. We're half way to our $12 million goal, but we need your help to make this dream a reality. From the family quiet room, to the expressive therapy space for grieving children, and the ten residential suites, this purpose built hospice will bring a new level of dignity, comfort and quality to Abbotsford patients and families, who will no longer have to travel to another city for residential hospice. Consider a gift today. Visit abbotsfordhospice.org or call 604-852-2456 to learn more.

abbotsfordhospice.org


26

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

CHAMPIONSHIP

MANAGEMENT MAKING WAVES ON LIFE, BUSINESS & THE WATER

W

hether on the water or on his shop floor, Dave Miller is a going concern. As a defending World Masters Water Ski Champion, he spends six months a year chasing his dream at whatever corner of the earth the water skiing elite choose to gather. Even in the off season, Miller spends one to two hours a day training. The remainder of his day is spent at work. Miller, it should be noted pays his bills not by the prizes he wins on the water ski circuit, but by operating six successful FIX AUTO Collision body shops in B.C., specifically in Abbotsford Fix Auto Abbotsford East (Formerly H & R Collision) and Fix Auto Abbotsford West (Formerly Renascent Collision). If the picture of an absentee owner who has managed to put

BRANCHING OUT WITH GROWTH

a successful leader in charge in each of his shops comes to mind, think again. Miller is highly dialed-in at each and every operation. “I empower my managers to make their own decisions based on my principles. They follow my formula to the ‘T’ and understand the reasons to achieve the end results.” Surprisingly, Miller’s unique management approach eschews a traditional structure.

By the mid 90’s Miller was well on his way to establishing himself as a world class skier and could remove himself from shop operations for periods of time. Still he felt leashed by the business and found the best way to really free himself was to buy 5 more shops.

“We do things a little differently” says the 50 year old, “our managers and staff work together as a team to reduce waste, increase quality and deliver the highest quality repair and service to our customers. In the industry we call this operating ‘lean’.”

“the best move I ever made”

AN EARLY EDUCATION

M

iller may joke about his management style but he started forming his opinions about successful shop management when he was only 14, working at his grandfather’s collision repair business.

“As soon as my grandpa wasn’t around, the guys would all go sit down around the hot water radiator,” says Miller. “It made me mad and the shop seemed so disorganized. It was simply a disaster with junk all over. I could see that the lack of organization was costing him profits” Eventually, the shop folded and Miller took some what-not-to-do lessons in management with him to his next position at a car dealership. As many teenagers are likely to do, he took an interest in custom work. He started on his own cars, then did a few others and eventually opened up his own shop in a farm structure. “It was a chicken barn and I built a paint booth right in it”, he recalls. “Between working there and at the dealership, I learned to do things the right way.” His reputation for quality custom work grew, but saw the vision and a much steadier future in collision repair and supplemented his business to include it.

GROWTH ON THE HORIZON

B

In 2002, he bought Star Autobody and Manfreds Autobody in Vernon, BC and soon after 2 Renascent Collision Locations, one in Chilliwack and one in Abbotsford. All six locations are now branded Fix Auto. Fix Auto is a national brand across Canada, USA and Europe with over 380 locations. Purchasing 5 more shops taught me how to let go and rely on quality people to manage the operations of each shop. By overseeing the management and being less hands on myself it enabled me to focus more on the processes, quality control and customer service. The best part of it all was it also allowed me more time to get away to waterski competitions all over the world.”

y 1987 Miller had outgrown the chicken barn and bought the H & R Collision Property on Abbotsford Way. Miller and his former partner Rick Dyck built the business to one of the most successful Collision Shops in Abbotsford. Miller eventually bought his partner out and continued to grow the business.

“I managed the shop, did much of the body and paint work as well as wrote all the estimates. Every position I had I was always trying to replace myself. I hired some body technicians, painters and front office staff until there was less and less for me to do. Once I was free from the daily duties, I had time to refine the processes and improve quality and customer service.” By 1994, Miller had turned H & R Collision (Now Fix Auto) into a $1.3 million dollar shop and had the vision for expansion. He bought neighboring lots and buildings and streamlined them to work cohesively within all operations. To date, between the two Abbotsford Fix Auto locations combined, sales are close to $6 million dollars per year. Add the four locations in Chilliwack, Vernon, Salmon Arm and the company exceeds $12 million dollars in sales per year.

DAVE MILLER Was instrumental in putting Abbotsford and Albert Dyck Park on the world map for the sport of Waterskiing. Albert Dyck Park is currently home to the Fraser Valley Water Ski Club and was officially opened for the 1995 Western Canada Summer Games. In 2007 Miller was inducted into the Abbotsford Sports Hall of Fame for his water skiing achievements, one of which is winning the 2006 world championships in Durban South Africa. Miller currently holds the Canadian slalom record to date as well. Miller has won countless championships world wide with over 20 titles and still competes today.

“We could not have achieved such great success without the commitment of our qualified technicians and managers that understand how to treat others as they would want to be treated.” I would like to personally thank our staff, past and future customers for enabling us to be one of the best Collision Repair facilities in the Lower Mainland.

DAVE MILLER OWNS AND MANAGES SIX FIX AUTO BODY SHOPS IN ABBOTSFORD, CHILLIWACK, SALMON ARM AND VERNON.

T F Y A


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

27

Family-centred 190 to 250 births per month

F

amily-centred” care is the focus of the maternity ward at Abbotsford Regional Hospital.

where from 190 to 250 births a month. There are 10 nurses on any given shift, and some situations can be challenging.

Lynne Steeksma, a registered nurse and clinical care co-ordinator at the hospital, said that in the past, labour and delivery were more from the perspective of medical professionals.

“Anything can happen at any time. We never know what’s coming through the door at any moment,” she said.

But Steeksma said the relatively new “family-centred model” is about providing the best experience possible for the mom and her family.

The ward has a maternity social worker on hand who works with some of the more difficult situations – for example, a teenage mom, a single mom who has no support, or the loss of a baby.

In the past, moms were moved from room to room during the different stages of labour, delivery and postpartum care. After the birth, they often shared rooms with other moms.

The social worker meets one-on-one with the families to talk about what they’re going through and refers them to community resources.

Now, the entire process usually takes place all in one single-occupancy room.

The ARH maternity ward has also been a leader in an initiative called the Infants of Substance Using Mothers program.

THANK YOU ABBOTSFORD FOR MAKING FIX AUTO YOUR FIRST CHOICE FOR AUTO REPAIRS! Steeksma said moms and their partners are encouraged to share their birth plan ahead of time by registering for the anti-natal asessement program.

Through that, they can discuss with a nurse how they want the birth to unfold, and it is recorded in their care plan. Steeksma said they are also encouraged to discuss this plan with their doctor. “It’s putting the family and their expectations in the centre and us trying to meet what they would like their birth experience to look like,” she said.

Steeksma said the ward averages any-

The initiative was launched in 2010 and is aimed primarily at women on the methadone program or engaged in the gradual reduction of substance abuse. The program enables moms and babies to stay together after birth, while the infant’s withdrawal symptoms are managed and treated. Steeksma said this shortens the hospital stay for the baby, and fosters an integral bond with the mother. “Keeping families together reduces anxiety,” she said.

Dianne and Marcel Schimann with newborn baby son, Levin, born Sept. 27, 2012.

THANK YOU ABBOTSFORD FOR MAKING FIX AUTO YOUR FIRST CHOICE FOR AUTO REPAIRS!

JOHN MORROW PHOTO

FIX AUTO ABBOTSFORD WEST (RENASCENT COLLISION)

2381 WINDSOR STREET

604.852.3682

FIX AUTO ABBOTSFORD EAST Favorite Auto Repair Bodyshop

Favorite Custom Auto Refinishing Bodywork Shop

(H&R COLLISION)

2001 ABBOTSFORD WAY

604.852.4677 Over 30 late models courtesy vehicles available.

FIX AUTO ABBOTSFORD EAST (H&R COLLISION & GLASS) 2001 ABBOTSFORD WAY HE BODYSHOP NETWORK • FIXAUTO.COM (604)T 852-4677

FIX AUTO CHILLIWACK

(RENASCENT COLLISION)

8745 YOUNG ROAD

604.795.4489


28

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Seniors’ care An aging society

A

vailability of senior care is a growing issue across Canada and particularly in British Columbia.

With the help of public contributions, they have invested over $1.5 billion in the construction of facilities for the public system over the past decade.

According to a 2011 census conducted by Statistics Canada, seniors may be living longer, but they aren’t necessarily living better.

Hurford acknowledges there has been an increase in awareness of senior services in Canada, and the next step is to prepare for the demographic challenges of an aging society.

In 2011, there were 5,800 seniors over the age of 100 living across Canada, with those numbers expected to grow to 80,000 over the next 50 years. Although the life span of senior citizens is extending, there are some major challenges facing their quality of life. David Hurford, public affairs and member services director for the B.C. Care Providers Association (BCCPA), says a major issue for seniors is lack of access to community care services such as home support and long-term care. “When a senior ends up in the hospital they are often waiting too long in the acute-care ward for a long-term care bed or home support service,” explains Hurford. “This is problematic because a senior’s health can deteriorate dramatically while they wait, and the cost to taxpayers is much higher to keep a senior in an acutecare hospital bed than in a residential care facility.” It costs in the range of $1,200 per night to keep a senior in an acute-care bed, compared to about $200 for a residential care bed. The BCCPA is a privately-owned, non-profit assisted living and home support provider for seniors across the province. one of the key issues for seniors is access to community care services such as FiLE Photo home support and long-term care.

Hurford has been with the BCCPA for four of its 35 years in operation, and says they currently care for over 12,000 seniors and employ more than 10,000 staff.

Live naturally with

“With the growing awareness, we hope that budget decisions will follow that promote access to community long-term care and home support services for seniors, instead of just falling back to the status quo of acute care crisis planning.” Abbotsford currently has 33 care facilities with varying costs, depending on the services provided and the complexity of care. Even more services will be required in coming years. “Instead of extended waits in the hospital ward, we hope the future of seniors care will be much more community-focused,” says Hurford. “This means more emphasis on early intervention, patient-centered care and more home and long term care services for families to choose from.” Fraser Health director of clinical programs Cherry Harriman said there are 775 residents in Abbotsford residential care settings, and another 150 with assisted living service. “Our goal really is to enhance the quality of their life, up to the end of their life,” she said. She pointed out that people who need residential care often have chronic illnesses or cognitive impairment. Ill health, not old age, is their issue. “That’s really important when we talk about old age. There are a lot of people who age successfully,” she added.

KEEPING YOU SMILING SINCE 1995

A.VOGEL MENOPAUSE:

END YOUR HOT FLASHES NATURALLY

NE

LOCATW ION!

• Implant Supported Dentures

• Super concentrated sage tablets

• Full & Partial Dentures

• Proven to reduce hot flashes by 50% in the first 4 weeks

• Standard & Precision Dentures

• Convenient one-a-day tablet

• Same Day Repairs and Cleaning

• Helps to combat mood swings and irritability

• Soft Liners For Sensitive Gums • Relines and Rebases

A. VOGEL: VegOmega 3:

• Financing Available

THE MOST COMPLETE VEGETARIAN OMEGA 3 CAPSULES • No fishy smell or aftertaste • Excellent source of DHA and ALA • Brain health and mood support

7-33555 SOUTH FRASER WAY, ABBOTSFORD 604.852.8529 33139 FIRST AVE, MISSION 604.820.8560

SOUTH FRAS

ER WAY West Oaks Ma ll

GLADWIN RD

EMERSON RD

ALLWOOD ST

The Vitamin Centres

GARDEN ST

Cliff C. Kafka, Registered Denturist

KAFKA DENTURE CLINIC #

206-2752 ALLWOOD ST. ABBOTSFORD

REGISTRANT

CALL TODAY FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 604.850.0355


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

29

Fundraising is vital Fraser Valley Health Care Foundation raises millions

A

ccess to health care is crucial for the well-being of individuals and communities. With increased demands on health care and pressures on government funding ability, non-profit fundraising plays a vital role in the success of many Canadian hospitals. As the charitable arm of the Abbotsford Regional Hospital (and the former MSA General Hospital), the Fraser Valley Health Care Foundation (FVHC) has contributed significantly to the community by funding capital and minor equipment; education for medical staff and patients; and the purchase of patient comfort items. The FVHC Foundation was established in April 2000, following the former Fraser Valley Health Region’s decision to create a sustainable non-profit organization to encourage donations for both local and regional health care programs. Vicki Raw has been with the foundation for 13 years and currently serves as executive director. Having joined the team in March 2000, just two weeks before it received its registered charity status, Raw says she is “proud to be a part of such a passionate organization that has done so much to support health care throughout the eastern Fraser Valley.” Since its creation, the FVHC Foundation has raised close to $20 million, with more than $7.6 million specifically for Abbotsford. As the official charity for the Abbotsford Regional Hospital, Chilliwack General Hospital, Fraser Canyon Hospital, Mission Memorial Hospital and the Agassiz Community Health Centre, the primary role of the foundation is to continue to support local hospitals and health care services within the Fraser Valley Regional Hospital District. The biggest impact in Abbotsford has been the Campaign for Health Care Excellence for the Regional

Hospital and Cancer Centre. The $7.5-million campaign was a partnership between the FVHC Foundation – raising $6.5 million to ensure that the Abbotsford Regional Hospital was outfitted with the latest and greatest technology when it opened – and the B.C. Cancer Foundation – raising $1.0 million for cancer research. “In Abbotsford, we are most proud of the way the community came together to support our campaign,” says Raw. “This remains one of our greatest successes to date. “Our biggest struggle is one that every non-profit faces today – donor fatigue. There are so many worthwhile causes to support, and a dollar can only be stretched so far.” As the largest health authority in B.C., serving 35 per cent of the province’s population, lack of current capacity is one of the most serious issues concerning Fraser Health. They are working on numerous strategies to increase efficiency and ensure the best health care possible within the community. Fraser Health is currently in the midst of construction projects worth an estimated $2 billion across the Fraser Valley and anticipate that over the next decade a multi-billion dollar investment will be necessary to meet the growing demands on health care infrastructures. The FVHC Foundation, among many other agencies in affiliation with Fraser Health, will continue to work to meet the various challenges of limited health care budgets and increasing demands for services. “We have built some amazing partnerships in each of our communities, and we are extremely grateful for the ongoing support of our donors,” says Raw. “Our commitment to each donor remains the same – the money raised in your community, stays in your community.”

the FvhC Foundation has raised close to $20 million, with more than $7.6 million specifically for abbotsford facilities and services. John morroW Photo

110 STORES TO HELP YOU GET TO YOUR HAPPY PLACE

IS OUR BUSINE SS NEW SERVICES:

• Evening Appointm ents • Pediatric patient s • Oral surgery incl uding wisdom teeth extractions • Root canals • Zoom whitening • Thorough oral ca ncer screening • Oral and Nitrous oxide sedation for stress-free appo intment • Convenience of tre ating all family members in one acce ssible location

OAKS

EN SHOPSEV .COM

ASK ABOUT OUR S P CUSTOMER PROMO ECIAL TIONS for all booked appointmen ts including New Patient and Re call Exams KID S COLOURING CONT EST AGES 1-12

DR. KYLE NAWR OT

Sevenoaks Dental G roup (Ups tairs, Sevenoaks Sh

opping Centre)

To book an appointment call

604-853-8301 206-32900 S. Fraser Way Abbotsford 2nd floor at Sevenoaks Shopping Centre

32900 SOUTH FRASER WAY, ABBOTSFORD

604.853.1339


30

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

It’s not what we say that makes a difference, it’s what we do. Thank you for making it possible for us to give back to our communities.

This ad is enriched with Layar and contains a video. Download Layar app for free for iPhone or Android (get.layar.com). Open Layar, hold your phone over the ad and tap to view.

1.888.440.4480 prospera.ca

Valley Gravel Sales Ltd. YOUR SUPPLIER OF 700 Lefeuvre Road Abbotsford 604-856-3315 valleygravel.ca A FAMILY BUSINESS PROUDLY SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE

SAND

G R AV E L

ROCK

For all your gravel needs 1973

› landscaping › gardening › sandboxes

› playgrounds › erosion control › drainage

EARTH MOVING

SITE GRADING

› driveways › walkways DELIVERY SERVICE LAND RECLAMATION


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

Billion-dollar business Farming supports more than 11,000 jobs, and generates $1.8 billion in annual economic activity.

a grass crop is prepared on a local farm. a local chamber of commerce study recently found that agriculture generates approximately $7,400 of earnings per acre of land. Dan PEarCE Photo

A green gold mine

Abbotsford farms grow about 20 million

Most productive farming community in Canada

I

n recent years, Abbotsford has been recognized as the most productive farm community in all of Canada.

The Fraser Valley in general is the bread basket of B.C., and this city is the epicentre of production. The Valley produces more than 70 per cent of B.C.’s dairy products, berries, vegetables, poultry, eggs, pork, mushrooms, floriculture and nursery products.

pounds of raspberries annually, and produce 40 per cent of b.C.’s 105 million pounds of blueberries.

Berries Blueberries have become the key crop. Consumer demand for these healthy little fruits spiked after researchers found they have anti-cancer, anti-aging and heart-health properties. There are now 23,000 acres of blueberry plants in B.C., growing some 105 million pounds in the 2012 growing season, and an estimated 40 per cent of that is grown in Abbotsford.

Abbotsford farmers work the fertile soil of Matsqui Prairie in the historic Fraser River flood plain, and Sumas Prairie – which was mostly a lake bottom before Sumas Lake was drained in 1924 to create more farmland. Modern producers have built on the agricultural foundation of their farming forebears to create some of the most productive farms in Canada.

The Fraser Valley once produced more than 40 million pounds of raspberries – most of it from Abbotsford. However, that is slowly being replaced by more lucrative blueberry production, and has been reduced to about 25 million pounds – 20 million from Abbotsford.

A study by the Abbotsford Chamber of Commerce pegged the earnings at $7,410 per acre. It found that farming supports more than 11,000 jobs, and generates $1.8 billion in annual economic activity.

Barns the length of a football field on Sumas and Matsqui Prairies are the home of the Abbotsford poultry industry, which supplies one-third of the province’s poultry business.

One in four private sector jobs in the city relies on agriculture. The city has also developed into a hub for B.C. agriculture’s office jobs. There are 25 different producer associations, which concern themselves with the promotion and marketing of these food products, located in Abbotsford. What’s more, a large Ministry of Agriculture office employs more of this sector’s experts.

Poultry power

Chicken, turkey and egg production generate about a quarter billion dollars every year. According to government statistics, the Fraser Valley provides 87 per cent of the province’s broilers (chicken meat), 98 per cent of the turkeys, 100 per cent of the broiler breeders (hatching eggs) and 79 per cent of the eggs.

Top producer The Fraser Valley produces more than 70 per cent of b.C.’s dairy products, berries, vegetables, poultry, eggs, pork, mushrooms, floriculture and nursery products.

One in four private sector jobs in the city relies on agriculture.

Abbotsford farmers account for approximately half of that product. Part of the reason is the city’s central location and

Abbotsford & Mission’s FAVOURITE FORD STORE 604.857.2293 www.msaford.com 604.853.2293 Mission

Continued on a32

Thanks for your votes! NEW CAR DEALER

USED CAR DEALER

Abbotsford

1S 6 YEAR

SINCE 1951 DL# 7957

61

YEAR S

Highway 1 - Mt Lehman Exit Fraser Valley Auto Mall

BEST NEW FAMILY CAR

HOME OF THE ALL NEW 2013 FORD FUSION

Available with EcoBoost, AWD or Hybrid

31


32

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Rich variety

Now in our 46th year From a31

the producers’ close proximity to local processing plants and markets.

2 FLOORS OF GREAT STYLE & SELECTION Now in our 46th year of business serving the Fraser Valley, Unger’s offers a great selection of major home appliances and home furnishings that meet all budgets and needs. Customer custom orders are always welcome, as we offer a great selection of locally built living room, dining room and bedroom furniture available in a large selection of fabrics and finishes. With a number of people downsizing and moving into condos and senior housing, we offer smaller sofas and chairs to meet all your needs. Drop by and check out our showroom located on 2 floors across from London Drugs on South Fraser Way in Abbotsford. We also carry Whirlpool and Danby Major Home Appliances. FREEZERS | REFRIGERATORS | RANGES LAUNDRY | DISHWASHERS

32661 South Fraser Way Abbotsford, BC

604-859-7145

The city is home to hatcheries and supply businesses and companies that provide services such as hauling and cleaning. The net result is the poultry business makes up more than 40 per cent of the agricultural job market.

Dairy production There are 100 dairy producers in Abbotsford, who ship approximately 140 million litres of milk per year – about 20 per cent of the province’s production. They are part of a strong Fraser Valley milk business. The province as a whole has about 70,000 cows that produce almost 700 million litres of milk, and the Fraser Valley produces approximately 73 per cent of that.

on the grow Abbotsford’s mild climate, by Canadian standards, gives farmers an opportunity to grow a rich variety of field crops. There are significant quantities of broccoli, brussels sprouts and cauliflower. Heppell’s Potato Corp. plants 650 acres of potatoes on Sumas Prairie. Almost half of the province’s mushroom crop is grown in Abbotsford, with 106,000 square metres in production here. There has also been a recent boom in the greenhouse industry, producing cucumbers and peppers. Greenhouses offer about

www.unger.bc.ca

rated stars by the abbotsford Community. the sk y

is the limit.

Thank you for your continual support. we look forward to providing & serving you the

BesT CHinese fOOd!

a checkerboard of fields spread across matsqui FiLE Photo Prairie.

700,000 square metres of growing space in Abbotsford, which represents about 13 per cent of B.C.’s greenhouses. The Bradner area has a rich heritage in the bulb-growing industry. Abbotsford’s daffodils alone are estimated at being worth $3.5 million per year, and the total bulb industry a blooming $6.5 million. Poultry and livestock have to eat, and the feed business in Abbotsford is worth between $250 and $350 million per year, led by Ritchie Smith Feeds, the largest local supplier.

lunCH sPeCial

only $4.95

(from 11:00 am - 2:30 pm) chicken fried rice or chicken chow mein with your choice of sweet & sour pork, beef broccoli, deep fried prawns, almond chicken, chicken balls, chicken chop suey, or szechuan beef.

10% Off On PiCk-uP Orders / free delivery*

*within 5 km radius with a minimum $18 order, not including tax

THOnG la’s resTauranT CHinese fOOd 604.746.2263 / 2616 Cedar Park Place / OPen 7 days a week 11 am - 10 Pm (across from ProsPera credit Union & rona bUilding centre)

CLEARBROOK ROAD

OLD YALE ROAD

H

S

T OU

FR

A

R SE

Y WA


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

Millions in permits The City of Abbotsford issued about $10 million worth of industrial building permits through 12 months ending in September 2012.

ipex inc. on riverside road deals in thermoplastic piping systems used in the pulp, paper and chemical industries. it is just one of the many specialized industrial enterprises doing business in abbotsford. John morroW Photo

An industrial hub land and labour force attractive factors

W

ith numerous transportation spokes coming and going through Abbotsford, with it being in the fifth largest city in B.C., and within an hour’s drive of the four larger municipalities, this city is an attractive site for industry. A major developer of industrial land across B.C., the Emerson Real Estate Group has proposed a new 300-acre industrial park on the city’s western border. The company cites the above factors, as well as a readily available work force, as making Abbotsford a logical place for industries to set up shop. The value of industrial building permits the city has issued for industrial development remains high, at $10 million through the 12 months ending September 2012. Over the same period in 2011, the city issued $11.6 million worth of industrial building permits, and in 2010 it was $8 million. The Abbotsford International Airport, railways, the Trans Canada Highway and the U.S. border crossing at Sumas are all major transportation arteries that pass through the city. The rapidly developing airport, which recently received $30 million in upgrades and expansion, is an alternative to the Vancouver International Airport, and is developing into a hotbed for industry, including high-tech business. It is the base for companies such as Cascade Aerospace, a specialty aerospace and defence contractor which has a contract with Lockheed Martin to support Canada’s fleet of CC-130J Super Hercules tactical lift aircraft. Awarded in March 2010, that contract was worth $27 million for the first

WEDDINGS/HONEYMOONS

five years of a 20-year contract. Cascade already had the Optimized Weapons Systems Management contract for fleet management of Canada’s legacy fleet of 32 C130 Hercules aircraft. Cascade also has contracts with international Canadian aerospace manufacturers such as Bombardier and CAE, and with operators such as WestJet, First Air and Lynden Air Cargo. Chinook Helicopters has offered flight training at the airport since 1982, and in September 2009 underwent a major expansion to a 15,000-sq.ft. training facility. Abbotsford also has natural resources that attract industry, with some of the largest sand and gravel deposits in the Lower Mainland. That business, which attracts companies including Lafarge, Fraser Valley Aggregate, Mainland Gravel and Pan Pacific Aggregates, generates approximately $45 million annually. There is an estimated one-to-six ratio of spinoff jobs from gravel including mechanics, fuel sales, etc. Transportation is also big business. Vedder Transport started with one cannery truck in 1956, and has grown into an operation that covers Western Canada, with 300 tractors, 800 trailers and a quarter-million square feet of warehouse space. To meet the need for more space, the city is developing a new 43-acre industrial park, west of Clearbrook Road and north of King. The area could carry up to a million square feet of new industrial floor space, and create between 2,000 and 2,500 new jobs.

CRUISES

LAND PACKAGES

The sand, gravel and quarry industry in Abbotsford generates approximately $45 million annually.

Industrial land To meet the need for more space, the city is developing a new 43-acre industrial park, west of Clearbrook road and north of King.

Key transportation routes, a major airport, a ready labour force, and proximity to Metro Vancouver are factors that make Abbotsford attractive for industrial development.

GROUP TRAVEL

INSURANCE

We’ve got GREAT plans for you! You can save time and money, PLUS receive tips and timely advice when you call one of our 20 experienced agents.

WINNER

RI

It’s easier than you think... oceanbreezeholidays.com

OR

E

F LO

OR

C OV E

RI

NG

VO

UR

ITE



G T R AV E L A

en We’ve be to your . on destinati

1-877-857-0880

CY

NG

ST

ST

OR

C OV E



FA

OR

IT

R

R

F LO

OU

OU

E



FAV

FAV IT

W INNER

E

W INNER

E

W INNER

TOURS

EN

“A sincere thank you to everyone who voted for Ocean Breeze. It’s such an honour to be recognized by our customers.”

Janice Lonnqvist, Owner

33


34

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

University economics

university of the Fraser Valley brings major economic impact

A

their education.

bbotsford is a university city.

Sitting right next to the Abbotsford Entertainment and Sports Centre in what is emerging as a “university district,” the main Abbotsford campus of the University of the Fraser Valley is a major hub of activity in the community. And across town in the Abbotsford civic complex, the recently opened UFV Clearbrook Centre is home to the university’s Continuing Studies division and Applied Business Technology program.

Approximately 800 international students study at UFV annually, from more than 50 countries around the world. They provide an additional boost to the local economy and a connection to the global one. Each spend an average of $40,000 a year when they are here – that’s a $30 million boost to Abbotsford’s economy from UFV’s international students alone. All told, a conservative estimate of UFV’s overall economic impact on the Fraser Valley is half a billion dollars annually.

Having a university within its borders is a bonus for any city. Professionals thinking about where to settle and businesses looking to relocate are drawn to places that can offer the benefits a university can provide. These include a locally educated workforce, ongoing educational opportunities for employees and their families, and the enhanced cultural opportunities that a university brings to a community. UFV annually brings guest speakers, athletic events, forums, workshops, and other special events to the city.

And UFV is gaining a national reputation for excellence in undergraduate education. In the Globe and Mail’s 2012 Canadian University Report, UFV earned A-level grades in class size, quality of teaching and learning, student-faculty interaction, and instructors’ teaching style. There are also direct economic benefits to having a university in Abbotsford. A workforce of 1,500 employees, many

of whom live and shop locally, means a boost to the real estate and retail sectors. UFV’s annual operating budget for 2012/13 is approximately $100 million. That’s a lot of funding coming into the local economy in the form of wages, supply procurement, and other contracts. Add to that nearly 16,000 students, many of whom are staying home instead of leaving town for university, and others who are drawn to the community for

UFV is now working with the City of Abbotsford to create a university district surrounding the Abbotsford campus. This would encourage the development of university-friendly activities, such as student residences, technology-based businesses, recreation facilities, services and retail outlets in the surrounding area.

M I L N E R • I S L A N D E R • S C O T T • E C H O • H A R DY • A I R F L O • O U T C A S T • C L A S S I C A C C E S SINCE 1978 ALLEY V R E RAS SERVING THE F

• Complete Tackle Shop — Top Brand Names • Best Price, Selection & Service • Satisfaction Guaranteed

Fred

• RIVER • LAKE • SALT • FLY

SALMON • STURGEON 32611 South Fraser Way Abbotsford, BC 604.746.1481

GUIDED FISHING TRIPS

STEELHEAD • TROUT #1-5580 Vedder Road Chilliwack, BC 604.858.7344

2 LOC ATIONS!

www.fredscustomtackle.com SHIMANO

G LOOMIS

POWER PRO

SIMMS

SAGE

RIO

REDINGTON

DAIWA

S C O T T Y • M I N N K O TA • H U M M I N G B I R D • L O W R A N C E • S T R I K E Z O N E

PURE FISHING • ABU • FENWICK • BERKLEY • ZEBCO / QUANTUM • TROPHY

UFV administrators, faculty, students, and alumni work closely with a variety of corporate and public service partners to build and maintain a close relationship with the community.

the university of the Fraser valley generates an estimated overall economic impact on the Fraser valley of half a billion dollars annually. FiLE Photo

And once UFV’s graduates – more than 1,800 of them every year – hit the employment market, they have an additional impact on the local economy. There are now more than 28,000 alumni of UFV. Chances are that there are many among the business people, teachers, nurses, farmers, social workers, tradespeople, child care workers, and other professionals you encounter on a daily basis.


Abbotsford News

35

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION we’ll give yo u 500 reas to tell us wh ons at you love about

The News recognized for Innovative Marketing

Tell us what your Abbots ford favouri to win a $500 tes are and gift card to be entered Sevenoaks Shopping Centre!

Abbotsford

abbynews.com/ contests

CAN’T BE STOPPED

TUESDAY

SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

Running back has a fivetouchdown performance only 13 carr on ies as Mouat runs over Bateman

A B B O T S F O R D

A23

Online all the time. In print Tuesday & Thursday

Hawes w re-electioonn’t seek in 2013

CONNECT

YOURSELF News, events, contests

facebook.com/my twitter.com/abbyn abbynews ews

abbynews. com

Veteran MLA joins ranks of Liberals

Neil CORBETT

Abbotsford News

who will not run

2011 WINNER

in spring

Coun. Tony AbbotsfordLuck to be his successor. In recen has added hisMission MLA Randy Hawes Liberals t weeks, a number of Liberal party. Liberal politic name to the list of longti prom includ “There’s nothi me Falcon annou ing John Les and inent in the next ians who will not be Kevin nced they will ng running year. electi not run next ing the party and wrong with refreshHe will throw on. getting new volved,� he his support Hawes said people insaid. behind Missi Hawes expla on interpreted as his decision should not ined a lack of confid be ence in the outside of politics. he has future goals

90TH GALA AT THE REACH

Continued on A3

A13 Sold-out event recognizes nine of the Abbotsforddecades News

Competing in award competitions is something many organizations do. However, in the media world there are three major contests that really matter.

best creative teams in North America working for them,� Franklin said.

leased, and The Abbotsford News, your community newspaper, was presented with a staggering 13 North American awards with only one other newspaper,The Mississauga News, taking home one more credit. Black Press as a whole was acknowledged with the second highest number of awards overall.

1) The provincial media awards in April 2012 where The Abbotsford News was named BC’s #1 newspaper in the general excellence category.

FOOD DRIVE THIS WEEK

A3

Major camp will stock the aign shelves of local food bank s

technology

k out the lates t and hear

the differenc UĂŠVÂ?i>Ă€iĂ€ĂŠĂƒÂŤii e! UĂŠĂƒÂœĂ•Â˜`ĂŠ>ĂƒĂŠVÂ? VÂ…ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠL>VÂŽ}Ă€ÂœĂ•Â˜`ĂŠÂ˜ÂœÂˆĂƒi ÂœĂƒiĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂ˜>ĂŒĂ•Ă€> UĂŠVÂœÂ“ÂŤ>ĂŒÂˆLˆÂ?ÂˆĂŒĂž Â?ĂŠ>ĂƒĂŠÂŤÂœĂƒĂƒÂˆLÂ?i ĂŠĂŠLiĂŒĂŒiĂ€ĂŠĂƒÂœĂ•Â˜` ĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂ•Â˜ÂˆÂľĂ•iĂŠ`iĂ›ÂˆViĂƒĂŠ vÂœĂ€ ĂŠĂŠÂŤÂ…ÂœÂ˜iĂƒĂŠÂœĂ€ĂŠÂ?ˆ ʾÕ>Â?ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠĂœÂ…iÂ˜ĂŠĂ•ĂƒÂˆÂ˜}ʓ ÂœLˆÂ?i ĂƒĂŒi˜ˆ˜}ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂŒÂ…i ĂŠĂŒiÂ?iĂ›ÂˆĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜

We Beat any Advertis ed Price by 10%*

Since 1987 our team has been dedicated to improving the hearing healt the Abbotsfordh of

85¢

+HST

you hear CALL NOW FOR A FREE better! HEARING TEST & CON SULTATIO N

In the marketing and promotion category, The News swept all three top positions with unique innovative ideas including: So You Think You Can Sing, The Intern II, and the Great RV Adventurer Getaway. For a third year running, The News team was acknowledged as one of the most innovative teams in North America.

“I personally would like to congratulate our advertising and creative teams for their consistent innovative marketing and advertising ideas� said Andrew Franklin, publisher. “ Advertisers have the knowledge that they have one of the

product

ROBERTSON

604-855-8

>ÀŽÊ ˆVÂŽiÂ?] -V] 

>ÀÀÞÊ7°Ê ˆVÂŽiÂ?] BC-HIS

>Ă€i˜

Literally hundreds of newspapers compete throughout North America to win the biggest awards of the year.

3) In October, 2012 the media contest results were re-

rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A11 ts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A23 point. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A8 sifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . A27

â– View

â– Clas

We can help

community.

*comparable

2) This summer 2012, The Canadian Newspaper Association awarded The News with the ’Most Innovative’ media in the country.

â– Lette

â– Spor

The annual MCC Festival for World that the goal Relief, of $700,000 will be reache held on the weekend at Tradex, d. The quilt auctio n (above) raised raised more than $650,0 00 and volunt more than $21,00 JOHN MORROW eers are Abbotsford News 0. Proceeds Hearing aids go to MCC relief still counting. Organizers are confident efforts in 60 countries. See Visit us today have come a long story A12. way... to chec

ÂœÂ?Â?i}iĂŠÂœvĂŠ-ÂŤ

iiVÂ…ĂŠEĂŠi>Ă€Âˆ

HEARING

>Â?ĂƒĂŠÂœvĂŠ

iÂ˜ĂŠ*>ÀŽÊ/ÂœĂœ

A6

Abbotsford News Tuesday, July19, 2011

inners in

Abbotsford News Thursday, December 8, 2011

EXCLUSIVE READER CONTEST

SO YOU

news? witness breaking

report it. the news hotline

3444

THINK

FIRST PLACE

aks Seveno g!� “Team in the ba has this

SECOND PLACE

SING

LIP SYNC

competition 2011

THIRD PLACE

ENTER TO WIN!

ENTER TO WIN

A MYSTERY VACATION! Including an RV rental & campsite at destination, food, gas and camera!

A14 Abbotsford News Thursday, December 22, 2011

JUSTIN BIEBER

Cruise & Concert

Clark touts oil sands, but not pipeline

Combo*

L O V E H I M O R H A T E H I M ? T E L L U S W H Y. . . Packages include: 7 Night Western Caribbean

POST YOUR ANSWER TO ENTER TO inWIN! Cruise an Ocean View Cabin

+ Rascal Flatts Concert Ticket FACEBOOK.COM/MYABBYNEWS

FEBRUARY 26, 2012

FA C E B O O K Q U E S T I O N P R I Z E V A L U E D A T $ 5 0

$

580

PACKAGES FROM plus $99 tax Call us for concert ticket details

you time & money everyday! We save yo yday! y W INNER

VO

OCEAN BREEZE WELCOMES CAROL FREEMAN TO OUR AGENCY

UR

ITE

ď™…ď™ƒď™„ď™„

G T R AV E L A

CY

FA

604-746-0406 SO YOU THINK THEY CAN SING? www.oceanbreezeholidays.com m EN

Voted Abbotsford’s #1

Travel Store! Downes Rd, Abbotsford watch for it . . . 32535 contest starts Thursday, March 17

YOU COULD WIN $500 IN GIFT CARDS!

With the passage of the Teachers’ Act, all teacher certiďŹ cation in BC will be handled by the new Teacher Regulation Branch of the Ministry of Education. If you have changed your contact information since the certiďŹ cate renewal process in 2008, it is essential that you update your contact information before January 6, 2012 in order to ensure you’re included in the electoral process for the new BC Teachers Council as well as other important communications regarding your certiďŹ cation.

• SERVICE WRITER • PRODUCTION PLANNER • MANUFACTURING ENGINEER • ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY LEADER Apply online @ www.tycrop.com in the careers section or email resume to recruiting@tycrop. com. We thank all applicants, however, only those requested for interview will be contacted. 7/11T T19

Grand Opening SATURDAY, JULY 23

GAME 1 OF 5

SHELLL OIL

The beaches between Ucluelet & ToďŹ no span how many kms?

Tom FLETCHER

has extended its deadline for deciding on the project by a year. It now expects to have a decision The premiers of B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan by the fall of 2013. The premiers were enthusiastic about the are preparing a “Canadian energy strategy� to present to Ottawa by this spring, while avoi- general idea of energy infrastructure, however, ding endorsing a proposed oil pipeline from and dropped several hints about how they really view the pipeline. Edmonton to B.C.’s north coast. “British Columbia’s coast does not just belong B.C. Premier Christy Clark, Alberta Premier Alison Redford and Saskatchewan Premier Brad to British Columbia,� Clark said. “It belongs Wall met in Edmonton Tuesday to work out a to Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba Quebec,WHO WILL BE THE INTERN OF 2011? Ontario and the Atlantic provinces. And common position on a variety of common it’s essential that our ports and our issues, including infrastructure. But with infrastructure all across the west are Enbridge’s controversial pipeline set to functioning as well as they possibly can, begin federal environmental hearings in because that’s what allows trade to flow Kitimat on Jan. 10, Clark and Redford both outside our country and that’s what avoided expressing an opinion directly. puts people to work.� The twin pipelines would carry lighter Wall said Canada is a world leader in petroleum to Alberta and diluted oil sands efforts to capture greenhouse gases and crude back to a new deep-water port at recover habitat from fossil fuel sources, Kitimat, where it would be loaded on tanCLARK as well as developing hydroelectric and kers for export. The project has been targeother renewable energy sources. ted by aboriginal groups, backed up by Canadian “I think it’s a powerful statement to say we’re and U.S. environmental organizations. “Certainly in British Columbia we recognize an energy power and we’re proud of it,� he said. Redford described the new energy strategy this the big contribution that the oil sands make to Canada and to our national economy,� Clark way: “It’s about how we’re going to create a set told a news conference in Edmonton. “And we’re of fundamental values about infrastructure in watching this environmental review process terms of economic growth in Western Canada, very carefully because that’s what’s going to get whether we’re talking about roads, transmission, pipelines, rail as well in terms of a lot of the facts out on the table for us.� After more than 4,000 people registered to agricultural products that need to go to the west speak at the pipeline hearings, the federal panel coast.� Black Press

1A. 12

1B. 15.5

1C. 17

Find the answers at fraserway.com/mystery

TO VO

2

BEST READERSHIP Independent PROMOTION School Holder? SO YOUCertiďŹ cate THINK YOU CAN SING Please read this notice and visit www.bcct.ca immediately

To enter visit abbynews.com and click on the contest link

Chilliwack Manufacturing company is recruiting experienced individuals for FT positions:

To enter visit abbynews.com and click on the contest link The winner will be drawn from the entries received. The winner will be notiďŹ ed on August 29, 2011. Black Press and Fraserway RV employees are not eligible. Participants must be at least 25 years of age. The judge’s decision is ďŹ nal.

TE

CLIC ABBYNE K ON OR FIND WS.COM BALLOTS IN THE

Savings Example

10/30 • 5/30 • 5/200 1L • LIMIT ONE CASEE

$19.95

For full details visit: fraserway.com/mystery

7-11T F19

YOU CAN

NEWS

SUPPORTED BY:

Auto/Industrial

See our full page ad July 21 for more specials

C1

The GreatW RV AdventureEXCELLENCE FIRST PLACE

604 839

Summer barbecues, campfires and water sports. The Abbotsford News and Fraser Way RV are teaming up to send one lucky local family on a weekend adventure to experience the great outdoors of B.C. in style, worth $2,500. They’ll be sent to a mystery destination for three nights and four days in an RV, with food, gas and a campsite paid for. They’ll also receive a free camera. “We’re all about family, and RVing is a great way for a family to reconnect with each other,� said Ken North, general manager of Fraserway RV, Abbotsford. “I think this is a great opportunity to get people thinking about a different way to take a family vacation.� The winners will have to take photos and short video clips

of their trip, and post the occasional tweet. The weekend is flexible, and can be chosen by the winner. However, it must be taken before Oct. 23. The contest starts today. To enter, visit abbynews.com and click on the contest link. Trivia questions will be printed in the Abbotsford News and online. Answers can be submitted once per day until Saturday, Aug. 20 and will count as entries. A draw will determine the top 10 finalists, who will be contacted by phone. The winner will be announced on Monday, Aug. 29. For further contest details, check out the official rules in an advertisement in today’s paper or online, or visit facebook.com/myabbynews.

Honouring outstanding organizations and individuals in Abbotsford who strive for excellence in the community.

PRESENTED BY:

31748 South Fraser Way • 604-853-2886 www.fortins.com

BEST READERSHIP PROMOTION INTERN II

BEST READERSHIP PROMOTION GREAT RV GIVEAWAY

BEST COVER DESIGN BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS

This transition for independent school certiďŹ cate holders is being managed by the BC College of Teachers before its transition into the Teacher Regulation Branch. Your revised info can be emailed to membership@bcct.ca or at 1-800-555-3684 x11.

For more information visit our website at www.bcct.ca

winter clearance

O N

free

last minute gifts for women

FIRST

  JO%BTI

scarves, purses, wallets, handbags, fashion tights, necklaces, earrings, sweaters, & gift cards & more!

for men

?=LE

belts, scarves, socks, wallets, gloves, Tino Cosma cologne, Naked Boxer Briefs, t-shirts, cufinks, ties & more!

=:9;C GJ

Big

g er

P a y o u ts, S h o rt e

r

33428 South Fraser Way 1/-(FGJL@OGG<JG9< DQF<=FO910*., 0//&///&10,/ OOO&FGGCK9;C;9KAFGK&;GE

ronaldallan.com | info@ronaldallan.com Open Dec. 23 9:30-8 | Dec. 24 9:30-4 Closed Christmas Day & Dec. 26

BEST BLACK & WHITE AD RONALD ALLAN

Reaching back to move forwardâ&#x20AC;Ś

FIRST PLACE 36thANNUAL B.C. Elders GATHERING

2540 Montrose Ave / 604.746.4040 facebook.com/ladyfernabbotsford Email us at: ladyfern@shaw.ca

@GMJKG>GH=J9LAGF2 )(Yelg)*YeKmf\YqL`mjk\Yq )(Yelg*Ye>ja\YqKYlmj\Yq

FIG

CLOTHING /

FIRST PLACE

WITHOUT A refreshing renewing a time to begin

Â&#x2021; )UHHSDUW\IDYRUVIRUJXHVWV Â&#x2021; )UHHOLYHPXVLFIURPWKH0RWRZQ&UXLVHUV Â&#x2021; %HVWRI%XIIHWIHDWXULQJ3ULPH5LE FKRFR ODWHGHVVHUWIRXQWDLQRQO\ Â&#x2021; 5DQGRP+RW6HDW&DVK'UDZLQJVSPWRSP Â&#x2021; %DOORRQGURSDWPLGQLJKW Â&#x2021; &DVK$FURVV7KH&RXQWU\'UDZLQJVKRXUO\ IURPSPWRDPÂąDWPLGQLJKW

Come discover us at Bishopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Centre in Downtown Abbotsford!

womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 604.859.1150 | menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 604.859.7010

YOU'RE NEVER

2011

Fully Dressed

-RLQXV'HFHPEHUIRUIXQIRRGDQGFDVK

e.

have a merry christmas!

FIRST PLACE

4JOHJOUIF0FX;FBSXJUIPWFS PLACE

D ri v

SECOND PLACE

THE PULSE

We ensure your appointments are kept on time!

N O W

gift wra pping

~ Martin Char arnin

Dr. Dueckman has been getting smiles straight in Abbotsford for more than 10 years. He is a certified Orthodontic Specialist, is Canadian trained and, being a local resident of Abbotsford, he does his own emergency coverage. Dr. Dueckman excels in the treatment of nervous patients of all ages!

READY TO MAKE A HEALTHY CHANGE?

Ladyfern

is Abbotsfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest and most complete yoga and athletic lifestyle apparel boutique. We specialize in yoga wear and mats, active tops and bottoms, travel clothing, Second Denim Yoga Jeans, TOMS shoes and more. We also promote Canadian and North American brands which provide ethical and organic products made with care and concern for the earth and you. Refresh yourself with our new Spring collection and new TOMS Ballet Flats!

BEYONDYOGA

BEST COLOUR AD LADY FERN

Start with The Pulse; a ďŹ rst edition feature that welcomes you into the world of healthy living.

604.854.3236 | Suite 203, 2001 McCallum Rd, Abbotsford

BEST AD SERIES DR. PETER DUECKMAN

BEST NEW SPECIAL SECTION THE PULSE 2011

OTHER AWARDS RECIEVED INCLUDE: â&#x2013; BEST GENERAL INTEREST

HONOURABLE MENTION

Abbotsford in Action

â&#x2013; BEST ADVERTISING MATERIAL

FIRST PLACE

The News Media Kit

â&#x2013; BEST MEDIA KIT

SECOND PLACE

The News Media Kit

â&#x2013; BEST INNOVATION TEAM

SECOND PLACE

The News Team

Ăłt

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; emĂłtâ&#x20AC;? one heart, one mind, one family. Le

ts m â&#x20AC;&#x2122; e

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Honouring our ancestors through our elders and recognizing our future through our youthâ&#x20AC;?

Hosted by the StĂł:lĹ? and Tsawwassen First Nation

July 10, 11, and 12, 2012 TRADE AND EXHIBITION CENTRE

1190 Cornell Street, Abbotsford V2T 6H5 For more information visit

www.36theldersgathering.com

BEST PUBLIC SERVICE BC ELDERS

your life your community.

The BCYCNA MA MURRAY AWARDS also presented The Abbotsford News with the prestigious BEST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD earlier this year.

abbynews.com twitter.com/abbynews facebook.com/myabbynews

sonhearing.

ca

iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;£äĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;n

13 North American Awards of Excellence T E A M

722

www.robert

Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;viĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;

CENTREĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;`

Ă&#x201C;xĂ&#x160; Â?i>Ă&#x20AC;LĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;

Â&#x17D;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;° Rd.


Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Cultured city A blend of arts and diversity

more and more big name acts are adding the city to their concert tour schedule. Ten years ago, the idea that Abbotsford could host country stars like Reba McEntire and Toby Keith or rock legends KISS and ZZ Top would seem next to impossible. But now the AESC, located on King Road, has hosted those stars and more. Capable of seating up to 8,500 for concerts, almost any show business name can be attracted. Since opening in 2009, the venue has hosted the Tragically Hip, Burton Cummings and Randy Bachman, the Trans Siberian Orchestra, John Fogarty, Stone Temple Pilots as well as family-oriented shows such as the Harlem Globetrotters, Sesame Street Live and Disney on Ice. Comedians like Larry the Cable Guy and ventriloquist Jeff Dunham have also appeared.

The annual Sikh parade, held every September, attracts thousands of participants and onlookers.

Now the facility will host theatrical productions including Beauty and the Beast.

The AESC

Abbotsford doesn’t just host stars, it has plenty of its own. Singers like Jacob Hoggard and Mission’s Carly Rae Jepsen, turned their appearances on Canadian Idol into music careers.

Seating up to 8,500, the

And dancer Charlene Hart did the city proud in 2010 by finishing in the top 10 of So You Think You Can Dance Canada.

Abbotsford entertainment

While the performing arts has a top-notch local facility, Abbotsford also has an artistic gem in the community.

and Sports Centre has hosted top acts such as the Tragically

The Reach Gallery Museum Abbotsford opened its doors in the fall of 2008. Located on Veterans Way, the Reach is a 20,000-sq. ft. building containing an exhibition hall, archives, two multi-purpose studios, two community exhibition spaces, art collection storage and museum artifact collection storage. It is capable of hosting world class travelling exhibits.

Hip and Disney on ice.

Diversity

And there’s more.

According to Statistics Canada,39 different languages are spoken in Abbotsford.

the trans Siberian orchestra wowed abbotsford music fans.

John morroW Photo

T

he long list of star power that has performed in Abbotsford just keeps getting bigger.

For years, Kariton Gallery was the main outlet for artistic expression. The Ware Street gallery is operated by the Abbotsford Arts Council and hosts as many as a dozen shows a year. Other local venues include the Abbotsford Arts Centre and the Matsqui Centennial Auditorium, which has showcased community theatre and concerts for years.

As the Abbotsford Entertainment and Sports Centre (AESC) continues to grow its reputation as a first class facility,

Fraser Valley Stage, a non-profit theatre group with a memberContinued on a35

JAGTAR BAINS, MANAGER, WELCOMES YOU Enjoy a fresh start every day when you put PriceSmart foods at the top of your shopping list! PriceSmart foods is a leader in giving back to our community. Abbotsford benefits from their dedication in supporting many local charities. The Abbotsford Food Bank is a top priority and food drives are one of the key areas PriceSmart foods champions. We invite you to experience our newly renovated store with two exciting features! Check out our Dollar Shop with 4 complete aisles of terrific buys! You will be impressed with 3 aisles of Ethnic Foods and products to give you the best in selection and service! Our friendly and helpful staff will be happy to provide you with the best in customer service. We’re here for you every day.

t r a $m S G N I V A $every day

TO UR

LIVE WELL EAT WELL

PRODUCE

PHARMACY

MEAT DEPT.

FLORAL

WELCOME

604.854.5318 300 - 32700 S. Fraser Way, Abbotsford OFG: Proudly local for nearly a century.

www.pricesmartfoods.com

UP N G SI

AN R FO

AL NU TR ITI ON

36

N IO T CA U ED


Abbotsford News

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

37

Vibrant events ship of more than 60 performers, has been presenting musical theatre for almost four decades. Another local theatrical group, Gallery 7 Theatre, presents its shows at the MEI Secondary school. The Valley Concert Society brings classical music to life with a series of shows at Matsqui Centennial Auditorium. Violinist Calvin Dyck’s popular Songs Strings and Steps concert series combines music and the visual arts in an annual showcase of local talent. Meanwhile, the MSA Museum Society/Trethewey House keeps Abbotsford’s rich history and culture alive. Abbotsford is one of the most diverse communities in the country. According to Statistics Canada, 39 languages are spoken in Abbotsford and 13.7 per cent of Abbotsford residents speak Punjabi. Twentyseven per cent of Abbotsford residents were born outside Canada, and one-third of residents are children.

the festival celebrates all cultures that make up the community and features entertainers, ethnic foods and information booths. The sixth annual Abbyfest is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2013. The annual Sikh parade takes to Abbotsford’s streets during the first week of September as thousands of people participate in the day-long celebration. Diwali, also known as the festival of lights, is a five-day festival in Hinduism, Sikhism and Jainism, occurring between mid-October and mid-November. The Fraser Valley Ukrainian Cultural Society hosts an annual New Year’s Eve dinner and dance to celebrate the Ukrainian New Year in mid-January. A recent study found the number of foreign-born residents in the Abbotsford/Mission area will rise to 29 per cent by 2031, higher than the projected Canadian average of 26 per cent.

Abbotsford’s diverse cultural makeup also offers festivals and events for all.

That will give Abbotsford/Mission the fifth largest percentage of foreign-born residents in Canada, by 2031, behind Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal and Calgary.

One of the biggest is the annual Abbyfest – Abbotsford Multicultural Festival. Created five years ago by Musleh Hakki,

And with a median age of 36.6 years, Abbotsford is one of the youngest and most family-oriented communities in B.C.

the annual abbyFest multicultural Festival allows people to celebrate the city’s diversity. the event is an opportunity for people to learn about the differences and similarities of different cultures. John morroW Photo

Mexico Sabroso nd the a s r lavou Sobroso f e h t Yo u’ll enjoy at Mexico e atmospher

• • • •

TA C O S • TA M A L E S • BURRITOS • T O S TA D A S • & SO MUCH

rite Favou s ’ d r o botsf an Restaurant b A d e t o V Mexic

SOPOS FA J I TA S ENCHILADAS QUESADILLAS MORE

3 - 32228 South Fraser Way (across from City Hall) • 604-557-1034 O P E N M O N D AY - T H U R S D AY 1 1 : 0 0 A M - 8 : 3 0 P M • F R I D AY - S U N D AY 1 1 : 0 0 A M - 9 : 0 0 P M

▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲

From a36


38

A blend of arts and diversity

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Abbotsford News

Sports action Thriving athletics scene

W

hether you enjoy sports as a participant, a fan, or both, Abbotsford’s thriving athletics scene has something for you. Just 10 cities in the nation can boast a professional hockey team, and Abbotsford is one of them. In the fall of 2009/10, the Abbotsford Heat began play in the American Hockey League, which serves as the primary developmental league for the NHL. The Heat play out of the Abbotsford Entertainment and Sports Centre, a stadium on King Road which seats 7,000 fans for hockey. The AESC, which opened in the spring of 2009, has hosted a variety of sporting events including the Harlem Globetrotters, motocross, monster trucks and pre-Olympic hockey games. Other local sports facilities include Exhibition Park – a 23,000-sq.ft. recreational area which features the 4,000-seat Rotary Stadium, along with facilities for baseball, football, soccer, rugby, rodeo, cricket and BMX. Major sporting events have included the B.C. Lions training camp, national track and field championships, the B.C. Summer Games, and the BMX Supercross World Cup series.

Paul Byron and the heat are heading into their fourth season in abbotsford.

John morroW Photo

The all-new, completely redesigned

2012 Toyota Camry Canada’s #1 selling midsize car 13 of the past 14 years!

Other key facilities include MSA Arena, a 900-seat ice rink that hosts the Abbotsford Pilots junior B hockey team; Abbotsford Recreation Centre, which features an Olympic-sized ice sheet, an indoor pool, and two gymnasiums; and Matsqui Recreation

Centre, home to a wave pool and ice rink. The University of the Fraser Valley’s basketball and soccer teams have been competing in Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS), the nation’s top post-secondary sports league, since 2006. UFV’s volleyball and golf teams compete in the PacWest collegiate league, while Columbia Bible College provides a crosstown rivalry in volleyball. The CBC Bearcats also have a PacWest basketball program. In the high school realm, Abbotsford is home to perennial powerhouse programs in nearly every sport, including basketball, football, volleyball, wrestling, rugby and track and field. Ledgeview Golf and Country Club has proven to be fertile soil for golf luminaries, sending forth the likes of former PGA Tour pro Ray Stewart; 2005 NCAA champ James Lepp; Nick Taylor, the world’s No. 1-ranked amateur in 2009; and Web.com Tour pro Adam Hadwin. Among Abbotsford’s elite sports clubs, the Valley Royals track and field program, Magnuson Ford Mariners FC, Matsqui Blades speed skating club and Twisters Gymnastics have all sent athletes to the Olympic Games in recent years. Other high-calibre associations train athletes in hockey, rugby, baseball, fastpitch, swimming, football, water ski, rope skipping, figure skating, judo, cheerleading and lacrosse – to name a few.

SERVING OUR GROWING COMMUNITY Michael de Jong, MLA Abbotsford West 604.870.4586 www.mikedejongmla.bc.ca mike.dejong.mla@leg.bc.ca

COMMUNITY CRISIS RESPONSE

EMERGENCY SHELTER

This Camry has a class-leading fuel economy, 10 standard airbags, best in-category resale value and a lower MSRP than the previous model Camry.

For more information about these services and many others, as well as volunteer opportunities, please call 604.852.9305.

www.careandshare.ca

Now in our 47th year as Toyota’s longest-serving BC Dealership, we believe we’ve learned what our customers’ have come to expect.

604.857.2657 Toll free 1 877 607 1475 DL#5736

www.sunrisetoyota.ca

MEAL CENTRE

The Salvation Army offers a wide and unique range of services to the community.

You’ve got to drive this car!

YOUR HOMETOWN DEALER FOR 47 YEARS

Like us on Facebook at The Salvation Army Centre of Hope Abbotsford Follow us on Twitter @AbbySallyAnn

TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE. OUTREACH

HOUSING SUPPORT

PARISH NURSING


Abbotsford News

d e t Vo s â&#x20AC;&#x2122; d r o f s t o b b A e t i r u o v Fa

November 2012 | ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION

T S I T N E D

Now Accepting New Patients NEW PATIENT OFFER Get a FREE Electric Toothbrush valued at $100 with cleaning, x-rays and exam*

L L A C

604-855-0918

Ex tended H o u rs Mo n t o Th u rs 7am - 7 pm Fr iday 7am - 5pm S at u rday 8am - 4:30p m

*Must other off offers. Limitedtotoone onepatient patientper pervisit. visit.NoNocash cashvalue. value. *Mustbook bookand andrecieve receivecleaning cleaningwith withx-rays x-raysand andexam. exam. Not Not valid with any other ers. Limited

39


40

Abbotsford News

ABBOTSFORD IN ACTION | November 2012

Furniture Factory Outlet Canadian Furniture Manufacturing Ltd. is proud to announce the opening of its first Furniture Factory Outlet in Abbotsford Founded in Abbotsford in 1991, the Flora family and friends have been making high-quality, built to last furniture, in a factory in south Abbotsford, which employs 20–25 local workers. The stylish and attractive furniture is made from B.C. alder and manufactured to exact specifications. Canadian Furniture Manufacturing Ltd. has created a product line that they are truly proud of. The Furniture Factory Outlet had its Grand Opening Celebration on June 23, 2012. Municipal, provincial and federal leaders, as well as the public, were invited to attend. Many individuals marveled at the quality and the workmanship of the furniture on display.

Ribbon cutting ceremony, attended by: (l-r) Mayor Bruce Banman, Councillor Moe Gill, Ed Fast, MP, Michael de Jong, MLA - Abbotsford West and Paul Flora (President, Canadian Furniture Manufacturing Ltd.).

Everyone at this event helped celebrate the vision, capital, our B.C. wood and its committed employees, which help make the furniture produced such a success. We are CANADIAN FURNITURE MANUFACTURING LTD. and we are TRULY CANADIAN!

CUSTOM-BUILT, SOLID WOOD FURNITURE BY PROFESSIONAL CRAFTSMEN

The

best in Canadian-made Furniture

SOFA SETS PLASMA TV STANDS SECTIONALS

OCCASIONAL TABLES BEDROOM SETS & MUCH MORE!

Be Canadian — Buy Canadian

CHOIC OF FA E BRIC

32346 South Fraser Way, Abbotsford 604.855.0369 sales@canadianfurnitureoutlet.ca

/

OPPOSITE CITY HALL - NEXT TO SHOPPERS DRUG MART

Check out our website: www.canadianfurnitureoutlet.ca

E CHOIC IN OF STA

NOW OPEN:

MON - THURS, SAT: 10am - 6pm FRI: 10am - 8pm SUN: 11am- 5pm

November 27, 2012  

Section Z of the November 27, 2012 edition of the Abbotsford News

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you