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Watch for breaking news at www.peninsulanewsreview.com

District goes to mediation North Saanich council rancor hits a new high; $5,000 eyed for mediation with staff, council Steven Heywood News staff

Disfunction between District of North Saanich councillors and municipal staff has reached a level requiring mediation between the two parties. Monday night, council voted to call in mediator Gordon Sloan to sit between the council and Chief Administrative Officer Rob Buchan. It’s a role that would normally be undertaken by the mayor, but Alice Finall said she wants nothing to do with that job. “It’s going to be difficult for one of us — me — to be the moderator,” Finall said in an interview, noting that the disfunction and animosity between councillors as well is pretty high. Council also approved spending $5,000 on mediation. Difficulties between council and the CAO was evident at Monday night’s meeting. Councillors voted to remove an item from the agenda that would have seen the CAO offer evidence contrary Ted Daly to comments made at an Oct. 1, 2012 public meeting by Coun. Dunstan Browne. Buchan stated in his report this was an attempt to set the record straight on what information was communicated to Browne in regards to a Capital Regional District arbitration case with Central Saanich. The report provided a series of emails from staff to Browne. Buchan noted staff did communicate with the councillor all of the information Browne needed to fill his role as council’s alternate on the CRD board. PLEASE SEE: Council’s lack of civility, page 4

Devon MacKenzie/News staff

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Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

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The suspect in an armed robbery in Sidney on Nov. 2 was in court Tuesday, Nov. 6, facing nine charges ranging from concealing his face during the commission of a crime and uttering threats, to dangerous driving and prowling at night. According to Sidney North Saanich RCMP Sgt. Wayne Connley, a man entered the Sidney Pharmacy on Bevan Avenue just after 5 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2. Armed with a handgun, the male suspect allegedly robbed the pharmacy of various drugs and fled to a vehicle parked in a rear lot. After leaving the scene, Conley reported that the vehicle the suspect was driving collided with another car at the corner of Fifth Street and Orchard Avenue, then struck a parked vehicle —

after which the suspect got out of his vehicle and fled. Police later learned the suspect’s vehicle had been stolen out of Saanich. The driver of the other vehicle had minor injuries as a result of the crash. The details of what transpired that evening came to police through bystanders and witnesses, said Conley. “Information from witnesses gave us a very good description of the suspect and information on events as they unfolded from beginning to end,” he explained. The RCMP set up a perimeter in the neighbourhood and called in the police dog team. A suspect, however, was not immediately located. At around 11 p.m., police were called by a resident in the 100 block of Seventh Street, indicating there was a man hiding in a back yard. Upon arrival, RCMP officers found a man hiding

Clarification The Peninsula News Review wishes to clarify that the Sidney Bottle Depot only issues refunds

there and arrested him. The man fit the description of the robbery suspect and police found both the handgun and the stolen drugs. The handgun, said Conley, turned out to be an unloaded pellet gun. “When police and the public work together,” continued Conley, “it’s the ultimate in crime prevention.” The suspect was held in custody over the weekend, leading up to his court appearance in Victoria. The man is facing charges of armed robbery, possession of a stolen vehicle, dangerous driving, failure to remain at the scene of an accident, trespassing or prowling at night, break and enter, uttering threats, wearing a mask during the commission of a crime and breach of a court order. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A3

Friday, November 9, 2012

FEATURE

VIH Aviation started on the Peninsula In 1955, a company called Vancouver Island Helicopters began. Now, it’s operating around the world The next few editions of the Peninsula News Review will highlight businesses on the recent Saanich Peninsula Chamber of Commerce Tour of Industry. Read about what they do, their challenges and success stories.

Steven Heywood News staff

With more than 400 employees and a fleet of over 40 helicopters and a couple of private jets, North Saanich based VIH Aviation Group Ltd. is operating on an international scale. So much so that one of the company’s subsidiaries has recently attracted a multi-million dollar investment. As part of an Oct. 30 Tour of Industry put on by the Saanich Peninsula Chamber of Commerce, VIH Aviation offered a tour and overview of their operation at the Victoria International Airport. It’s their head office and the community in which current owner, Ken Norie, lives and where the company started in 1955. Vice-president of finance and corporate services Rick Senkler led the tour, outlining the company’s history on the Peninsula and the changes it has experienced over the years. At one time, he explained, the company had more than 100 helicopters, used in a variety of jobs from tourism to heli-logging. Today, that fleet is much-reduced as VIA Aviation has found niche markets in which to excel. “The Group is made up of different companies that have different roles and tasks,” he explained, noting the VIH Aviation Group Ltd. is the umbrella. Beneath it are: Cougar Helicopters, VIH Helicopters, VIH Aerospace, VIH Execujet, YYJ FBO Services and VIH Cougar Helicopters. These subsidiary companies work in repair and overhaul services, fixed wing jet charters, off shore oil and gas exploration, passenger transportation in a variety of roles and search and rescue operations. On Oct. 2 it was announced that Cougar Helicopters sold a 25 per cent minority equity interest to

Steven Heywood/News staff

VIA Aviation Group’s Mark Junker addresses Saanich Peninsula Chamber of Commerce Tour of Industry participants in the company’s maintenance hanger at Victoria International Airport. Below, crews work on one of the company’s aircraft. Bristow Group Inc. for $250 million. In this deal, said Senkler, Bristow will own the assets of Cougar Helicopters, which the company will lease back. The transaction, according to a media release, will allow Cougar to benefit from Bristow’s resources and global network of customers and suppliers. Cougar employs 250 people. Throughout their company, VIA Aviation Group works around the world. There’s a big emphasis on providing services to the oil and gas industry. Senkler noted the local company has a presence in places like Brazil, Angola, Louisiana, Alaska and the east coast of Canada and the U.S.

VIH also works extensively in the forest industry, mining and exploration, tourism and more. VIH is also into search and res-

cue services in Canada and the U.S. They supply their own pilots and search and rescue technicians as well as engineers and support staff. They have a multimillion dollar search and rescue operation in Louisiana, working over the Gulf of Mexico. They even helped fly victims of the British Petroleum offshore oil rig explosion to medical attention. This means the company employs highly skilled people in a variety of fields. Their payroll is estimated at well above $40 million in all of their operations. It was also noted that 23 per cent of VIH employees live in the Capital Regional District (and only 28 per

cent of those live on the Saanich Peninsula). Wanting to maintain their access to the airport presents challenges for VIH, including the need for affordable housing for their workforce. It’s an issue shared by other industry players in the area and a common theme throughout the chamber of commerce tour.

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Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Council’s lack of civility threatens progress thing, she said, that needs to be rectified. Browne and Coun. Ted Daly Browne said he had voted took exception to this report, with against bringing in a mediator in Daly stating it had been discussed an earlier debate on the issue, but in-camera and council had not has changed his mind. voted to make it public. Buchan “We are working under very difnoted all of the privileged informa- ficult conditions,” he said. tion was severed from Daly said later that his report. he’s expecting criticism “I never dreamed it from citizens on counwould come here,” said cil’s decision to go to Browne, “but it has. I mediation — something would require an opporhe heard when he first tunity to respond. You brought up the idea earalways hear the other lier this term. side.” However he added Coun. Elsie McMurhe’s at the point where phy said Browne’s inithis step might be the tial comments on Oct. only way to improve 1— that staff hadn’t pro- Alice Finall conditions at municipal vided him with enough hall — a tempest that information — were made in a has been boiling since council’s public forum. inaugural meeting. “So it does need to be dealt with, “There doesn’t seem to be any in public,” she said, as it has to do change happening in North Saanwith public criticism of staff. ich,” Daly said, describing a level Coun. Celia Stock added council of political rancor that has existed has been unprofessional at times for years, even during his two in its dealings with staff. It’s some- terms as mayor. Continued from page 1

“I’ve always prided myself on finding a middle ground, but it’s almost impossible to do that on North Saanich council.” Daly said council’s inability to communicate well with staff will be part of the mediation and he said he hopes each side learns from the frustrations of the other. “I’m hoping we can find some middle ground on the only issue in North Saanich, and that’s housing.” Both Daly and Finall noted council is having difficulty communicating with staff. They both said there’s language in the contract of the CAO requiring politicians to go through him before they try to speak with other employees. “Once a municipality has decided to have a CAO,” said Finall, “it endows them with certain powers. As a result, individual politicians have no authority to tell the CAO to do anything. It has to be from a quorum of council.” Coun. Conny McBride was the only one who voted against mediation, stating she didn’t feel it was

Disfunction Junction All is not well among the council of the District of North Saanich. In an example of rampant disfunction at the table, it took nine minutes for councillors to decide to extend their Nov. 5 regular meeting past 11 p.m. A series of three motions and amendments were debated, including extending the meeting only 10 minutes to hear Councillor Ted Daly’s CRD report. Coun. Dunstan Browne at one point displayed frustration at the late hour and at Mayor Alice Finall’s call to “not see the clock” calling it “playing games”. He then threatened to walk out and take other councillors with him so there wouldn’t be a quorum. Coun. Elsie McMurphy chastised Browne for the threat. In the end, council voted 4-3 to continue the meeting. appropriate to spend taxpayers’ money on someone hired to tell council to behave. Finall said there’s a divergence of philosophy on council, but that alone isn’t the entire issue. She said the larger matter is in the way council does things and how they interact with their CAO. “I hope mediation will improve civility at the council table, between council and staff,” she said. “There’s a certain lack of

civility between councillors as well and this might help.” Finall noted there have been reckless statements made that have led to unrest. “A mediator will glean information from each member and from there it will determine how he will approach the case,” continued the mayor. “I want this to achieve better public and private treatment of staff and our level of civility.” editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

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APPOINTMENTS TO CENTRAL SAANICH ADVISORY COMMITTEES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

COUNCIL NEWS District of North Saanich - Nov. 5, 2012 Steven Heywood News staff

• North Saanich council voted to make sure the board of the Capital Regional District will review one of thier sub-committee reports on a residential development proposal on East Saanich Road within the district. Councillor Ted Daly expressed concern that the sub-committee, which is recommending the distirct do more work on the proposal before it’s given any assent at the CRD level,

was trying to dictate to North Saanich council. Chief administrative officer Rob Buchan noted, however, it was his understanding that recommendation would be going to the CRB board for review and the information Daly received was information keeping the district in the loop. • Council decided to stick wth the B.C. Building Code and not expand locally on wildfire interface guidelines. • Council decided not to have an official representative on the Town of Sidney’s community development committee. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -Friday, November 9, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A5

Honouring our Veterans those who continue to serve

Pay your respects on November 11 Remembrance Day events on the Peninsula

• Unveiling of memorial exhibit at Mary Winspear Centre The Mary Winspear Centre is holding an official Remembrance Day ceremony from 9 to 11 a.m. on Nov. 11 (prior to the Remembrance Day parade) and an unveiling for a new exhibit which depicts the lives of local veterans and their families. For more information visit marywinspear.ca or call 250-656-0275.

Submitted photo

Hon. Col. Richard Talbot of Sidney salutes during a freedom of the city event in Nanaimo for the Canadian Scottish Regiment, a reserve infantry unit based on Vancouver Island.

Remembering our veterans Sidney’s Richard Talbot an Honourary Colonel for the CScots Steven Heywood News staff

Richard Talbot says he feels there’s a risk that the Canadian Forces could fall from grace in the public eye, making Remembrance Day ceremonies now ever more important as Canada’s role in Afghanistan ends. Talbot, who was recently appointed the Honourary Colonel

of the Canadian Scottish Regiment (a reserve infantry unit based on Vancouver Island), said after so many years of support from the country during the last decade, public awareness is at risk of fading away. “As the army’s role and the Canadian Forces’ role ends, public awareness could as well,” he said from his Sidney home. “We need to enhance public and business sup-

port. We need friendly employers, because reservists need to take the time off to do their training.” Canadian reservists — or parttime soldiers who balance national service with their day jobs — made up around 20 per cent of serving soldiers in Afghanistan. PLEASE SEE: On Nov. 11, page 6

• Remembrance Day parade and ceremony The parade in Sidney begins at 10:15 a.m. at the Mary Winspear Centre. It proceeds to the Cenotaph at Sidney Town Hall for approximately 10:45 a.m. for the service and wreath laying. • Municipal Wreath Layings Wreath layings will take place place at both Central and North Saanich municipal halls at 11 a.m. • ANAVETS Unit 302 After the Remembrance Day parade, a social time will be offered at the ANAVETS Unit 302 in Sidney. 443 Squadron and the Saanich Peninsula Pipe Band will play at noon followed by Audrey Wainwright on piano, singers Rosie Bowman and Corinne Coell (“Just Us”) and the Honey Crooners from 2-6 p.m. Visit unit302.ca for more information. • Via Choralis Remembrance Day Concert The Via Choralis chamber choir will be marking the beginning of their new season as well as Remembrance Day with Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem on Nov. 11. The concert will be held at St. Elizabeth’s Church (10030 Third St.) at 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults and $8 for students and can be purchased through Tanner’s Books, Via Choralis members and at the door. For more information go to viachoralis.com.

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A6 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Honouring our Veterans On Nov. 11, remember all who served and are serving A significant part of his role as Honourary Colonel, will be to maintain good public relations and relationships with business on the Island. This latter job for Talbot hearkens back to the originals of the regiment,

formed when businessmen and citizens in Victoria outfitted and mobilized their own military units to serve in the First World War. In more recent years, Talbot said more than 60 local reservists have served in

Afghanistan. That has created new challenges for the Canadian Scottish — to reintegrate them back into part-time capacity and help those soldiers cope with physical and mental challenges. The goal, he said, is

to welcome them back and keep them around to pass on their skills and experience to another generation of troops. “I think one can remember not just the soldiers who have been killed,” Tal-

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&

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A7

t those who continue to serve

Winspear Centre honouring local veterans New permanent exhibit in the centre gives nod to the past Devon MacKenzie News staff

A new display being unveiled at the Mary Winspear Centre Nov. 11 will stand as a year-round reminder of local veterans who lost their lives and served in times of war and peace. The centre is already home to the Memorial Fountain which stands out front of the building, but the new exhibit honouring veterans and their families offers a more detailed look into the past. “It’s a permanent exhibit that honours local veterans,” said the centre’s Development Co-ordina-

tor, Lynn Fanelli. “All the artifacts in the display have been supplied by the ANAVETS Unit 302 and they are going to update the display and rotate artifacts through so there’s always something new.” In the display there is a collection of war artifacts from the First and Second World Wars that give viewers a glimpse into life during that time. The exhibit also features a large storyboard featuring publications and photos from the early 1900’s up to the end of the Second World War and a list of the fallen who were originally from the Peninsula. Research for the exhibit was

Devon MacKenzie/News staff

Sidney Elementary School Grade 5 students view the new Memorial Park Society display. funded by Veterans Affairs Canada and the exhibit was made possible by the artifacts supplied by ANAVETS Unit #302 and the Sidney Museum and Archives.

The official unveiling of the exhibit begins at 9 a.m. Nov. 11 at the Mary Winspear Centre, prior to the Remembrance Day Parade which leaves from in front of the

To live in the hearts of those you leave behind is never to die.

centre before 11 a.m. For more information on the exhibit visit marywinspear.ca or call 250-656-0275. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

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A8 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Honouring our Veterans those who continue to serve

Via Choralis remembers with Fauré’s Requiem Chamber choir presents first concert of 2012/13 season Devon MacKenzie News staff

Via Choralis chamber choir will be marking the beginning of their new season as well as Remem-

brance Day with Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem as well as other musical selections focusing on themes of peace and remembrance. The concert will be held at St. Elizabeth’s Church (10030 Third

St.) at 3 p.m. on Nov. 11 and will also feature music from Canadian composers Paul Halley, Pete Seeger, Larry Nickel and Linda Fletcher. Pie Jesu from Requiem will be

sung by young soprano Gwendolyn Jamieson and accompanied by Braden Young, who studied piano performance at the Victoria Conservatory of Music and the University of British Columbia. The performance will be directed by Via Choralis Artistic Director Nich-

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On Remembrance Day, Our deepest thanks to our Veterans. Let us not take for granted the things which most deserve our gratitude. Elizabeth May, M.P. 9711 Fourth St. Sidney BC V8L 2Y8 250-657-2000 Constituency office open to serve you: conscientious, caring, non-partisan service

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olas Fairbank. Tickets are $15 for adults and $8 for students and can be purchased through Tanner’s Books, Via Choralis members and at the door. For more information go to viachoralis.com. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

God’s Acre Tour Sunday afternoon Edward Hill News staff

While Remembrance Day ceremonies are an emotional and symbolic ritual of honouring veterans, a tour happening on the afternoon of Nov. 11 offers a historical look at those who served the country. Volunteer and historian John Azar is leading a tour of God’s Acre, a veterans cemetery in Esquimalt that long predates the surrounding Gorge Vale golf course. The British Royal Navy purchased the plot from a subsidiary of the Hudson’s Bay Co. in 1865 and eventually, Veterans Affairs took over the three-acre site. About 2,500 military personnel are buried there, including veterans of the Crimean War of the mid-1850s, the First and Second World Wars and at least one veteran of recent military operations in Afghanistan. “This helps people understand the sacrifices individuals made and sacrifices families made as well,” Azar says. “Victoria High had 85 students and a teacher who died serving in the First World War. They sat in the same classes as kids today, and they went and endured so hopefully young peo— Black Press ple don’t have to today.”

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -Friday, November 9, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A9

Central Saanich councillor granted leave Terry Siklenka given six months leave from council. Councillor was facing potential disqualification Devon MacKenzie News staff

After three absences in a row from regular council meetings, Central Saanich council voted to grant Coun. Terry Siklenka six months of leave from council at an in-camera meeting on Nov. 5. “Council granted a request for leave of absence from Coun. Siklenka for personal reasons,” said Mayor Alastair Bryson of the decision. Siklenka had been absent from regular council meetings since

September. The last of the public works and meeting he attended transportation comwas a special meeting mittee, a committee of council held Sept. 4 member for the Capital and after that he missed Regional District Solid three regular council Waste Advisory Commeetings throughout mittee and the counSeptember and October. cil liaison for both the He also missed a special Healthy Watershed meeting of council on Committee and the First Oct. 22. Nations Community to Siklenka’s commit- Terry Siklenka Community Forum. ments through council During the meeting, include serving as deputy mayor Mayor Bryson noted that through for October and November this Siklenka’s recent absence council year along with being the chair has been able to cope, but that

they may need to look into how to cover some of his responsibilities during the long-term absence. “Clearly we’ve been managing to fill his role but I would like to bring back a recommendation to council on how we can more accurately cover his role for up to six months,” said Bryson. According to the community charter, a councillor can be disqualified from office if they are absent for a period of 60 consecutive days or four consecutive regularly scheduled council meetings (whichever is longer). Leeway is

given in circumstances of illness or injury or if a councillor is given leave by council. Attempts to reach Coun. Siklenka for clarification and elaboration on his absence were unsuccessful. According to chief administrative officer Patrick Robins, Siklenka will continue to received his council pay during his period of leave. Robins said the Community Charter does not outline rules for remuneration should a councillor take leave, leaving any decision up to council. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

District hires agency to search for a new planning director COUNCIL NEWS District of Central Saanich - Nov. 5, 2012 Devon MacKenzie News staff

• The municipality has hired an external agency to find a replacement for former Director of Planning and Building Services, Hope Burns. As of Oct. 15, Burns was no longer employed by the district. Currently, Chief Administrative Officer Patrick Robins is the acting director until a replacement is found. Robins and District Planner Bruce Greig will approve the new hire.

• Council supported to extend the mandate of the Central Saanich Agricultural Advisory Committee. The committee was formed in early 2012 to address and direct first priorities for bylaw and policy changes related to supporting agriculture. It was originally slated to be a one year committee but will continue on as council and staff said they found the committee to be an extremely valuable resource. • Council saw two requests from waterfront property owners

on Turgoose Terrace in regards to private docks. The first was for a development variance permit request to essentially legalize an existing dock that was non-conforming by 2.91m in length and .01m in width. That request was carried unanimously. Another, a request for a marine shoreline development permit and a development variance permit was deferred by council until they hear back from the province on their approval for the use of Crown foreshore or land covered by water. • Council approved a request from Strata

#1363 (Lochside Estates) to amend a development permit to allow the removal of 53 Pine trees along Lochside Drive. According to a report from an Arborist solicited by the Strata, B.C. Hydro’s routine pruning of the trees to keep them away from the power lines had resulted in the trees being imbalanced and therefore experiencing limb failure. Council granted approval of the tree removal based on the condition that other types of foliage be considered in their place.

1795 which is a bylaw to amend the land use bylaw to allow the sale of agricultural compost in the municipality. The bylaw will go to public hearing on Dec. 5 along with a few other bylaws

currently marked for public hearing. • Council is one vote away from deciding on the closure of White Road. Third reading was given to bylaw

1788 during the meeting on Nov. 5 and final adoption could occur at the next regular council meeting (scheduled for Nov. 19). reporter@peninsula newsreview.com

• First and second reading were given to amendment bylaw

B.C. revives tourism marketing Tom Fletcher Black Press

Three years after the B.C. government took over international tourism marketing to direct postOlympic efforts, Premier Christy Clark has put the tourism industry back in the driver’s seat. Clark and Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Minister Pat Bell announced the creation of a new Crown corporation Monday in Vancouver. They said Destination B.C. will be industry led and have formula funding from provincial taxpayers to advertise the province’s attractions outside the country. Clark said she spoke out as a radio host against the government takeover when it was announced in 2009 by former tourism minister Kevin Krueger. The Council of Tourism Associations expressed “grave concerns” at the time, when the industryled Tourism B.C. was disbanded. Bell said Destination B.C. will have an increasing emphasis on marketing in Asia, especially China and India. It is to take over responsibility April 1, 2013, using currently budgeted funds for the first year. After that, the intention is to base the budget on a legislated percentage of annual sales revenue. Clark and Bell took the first step to changing tourism marketing in October 2011, with a $1.1 million campaign to promote B.C. ski resorts. Half the spending went to Ontario, and the rest was split between Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles. B.C. has long targeted those markets, but ads promoting the province generically with “Super Natural B.C.” promotions that did not emphasise specific attractions or activities. NDP leader Adrian Dix tried to pre-empt the

expected announcement last week, making his own promise that an NDP government would return control over tourism marketing to the industry.

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Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

EDITORIAL

NEWS REVIEW

Jim Parker Publisher Steven Heywood Editor Janice Marshall Production Manager Bruce Hogarth Circulation Manager

The Peninsula News Review is published by Black Press Ltd. | #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 | Phone: 250-656-1151 • Fax: 250-656-5526 • Web: www.peninsulanewsreview.com

OUR VIEW

Time for a change to B.C. pot laws M

arijuana reform advocates hope Washington and Colorado states’ vote Tuesday to legalize and tax marijuana sales will add momentum to their push for change in B.C. The two states are now the first in the U.S. to legalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana by adults, while regulating and taxing its production and sale. While it’s not yet clear if the U.S. federal government will allow state-by-state legalization of recreational marijuana use — other states already allow medical marijuana sales — the vote has huge implications here. Washington state estimates it would collect $560 million in the first year from a planned 25-per-cent tax on the sale of licensed, regulated marijuana through authorized stores. If enacted, this could also cause a partial collapse of B.C.’s estimated $7-billion-a-year illegal pot industry, as growers will relocate their operations south of the border to avoid the need to smuggle. Recently, the Union of B.C. Municipalities passed a resolution calling for marijuana to be decriminalized. They’d rather pot be regulated and taxed instead, much like alcohol. The U.S. vote shows that here in B.C it is time we take a step toward decriminalization, if not legalization of marijuana. The potential tax revenue and the opportunity to reduce law enforcement costs for small pot busts clogging up our court system is too much to pass up. Washington has made a progressive move toward responsible marijuana use, one that we should take a closer look at. The decision in Washington sends a message that U.S. drug policies are not working and, as Canada’s drug policies follow the U.S. closely, it means ours aren’t working either – it’s time for a change. Sensible B.C., a campaign headed by B.C. marijuana activist and medical pot dispenser Dana Larsen, wants to follow in the footsteps of both Washington campaigners and B.C.’s successful anti-HST drive. The group aims to get enough signatures on a petition to force a provincial referendum on marijuana decriminalization, through B.C.’s Recall and Initiative Act. The proposed Sensible Policing Act would block B.C. police from spending time or resources on searches, seizures or arrests for simple cannabis possession. It’s time we take our antiquated marijuana laws and follow the lead of our neighbours to the south and let the people decide if it’s time for a change.

What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@peninsulanewsreview.com or fax 250-656-5526. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Peninsula News Review is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2010

These pets are not the cuddly kind Before you begin to read this, take a moment to think about your pet peeve. Visualize your daily life and concentrate on what really irks you. What one thing gets under your skin?

privilege, not a right,” one of my friends said. The list expanded when another agreed with the grocery store peeves. “I hate going to the store and trying to get my basket around was chatting with some old lady who’s a group of friends dragging her old man recently and one around with her. He mentioned standing in the doesn’t know what he’s express check-out line at doing. He doesn’t want the grocery store when to be there. Don’t bring she noticed a person in your husband and your front of her with more kids shopping; we don’t than the allowed items need all those excess — way more. “That really people to get around,” bugs me — it’s my pet she said. peeve,” my friend said. “I hate those stunned “That and those old shoppers, too,” she Laura Lavin people that pay with added. Equilibrium pennies. And people that “I’m sorry, that’s me,” I hog the fast lane and replied. don’t drive fast, or those jerks that Really. I can stand in front of the park in the handicapped stall …” 300 choices of toothpaste for 10 Do you see where this is going? minutes. My vision slowly blurs We all began to share our and the tubes run into one mass of peeves. Surprisingly, other whitening, tartar control, fluoride, people’s driving skills and grocery plaque removing, calcium building, store mishaps topped the list. gel, paste, cinnamon, natural, Along with those “passing lane nighttime, bacon flavoured-whathogs,” are the “no signallers,” the now? “early mergers,” those who stop in Shopping peeves included the the merging lane and the heinous sales clerks who talk on the phone drivers who “won’t let you in.” while they serve you. The traffic complaints didn’t “I just want to reach over and stop there. Why, someone put my finger on the trigger and go wondered, do people move over ‘click,’” one woman said. without looking? Why do they Then there’s the clerks who drive below the speed limit in the don’t make eye contact. Those fast lane? who don’t say thank you. The “Being in the fast lane is a carts with wobbly wheels. The

I

people who stop to chat in the aisles. How about when you run into someone and say hello, then you have to change direction or go to the other end of the store so you don’t have to repeatedly pass them, in order to avoid those awkward ‘hi again’ moments? “What about those seniors on their scooters who beep at you then go zooming by?” “Or those people who talk and talk and talk on their cellphones on the bus.” “People that don’t wash their hands in the restroom.” “People that stop at the top or bottom of the escalator — don’t you know someone is right behind you?” “How about when you get a cold and three hours later your husband is sicker than you?” “Packaging you can’t open without a crowbar.” “I usually have so much patience,” one of my friends said. “But if I can’t find my scissors and I have to go hunting for them in the kids’ room or the family room or the garage. … Take anything else — just don’t take my scissors.” As I listened to the litany of minor annoyances, I couldn’t help but agree with most of them. OK, all of them. When it came to my pet peeve, I couldn’t think of one. That’s right. I couldn’t think of just one … and you? Laura Lavin is the editor of the Oak Bay News. editor@oakbaynews.com

‘Don’t bring your husband and your kids shopping.’


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, November 9, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A11

LETTERS North Saanich is a great place W

hile it is encouraging to see students getting involved in their communities, and writing letters expressing their opinions, I would have liked to see more fact-based assertions in Mr. Trelford’s letter (Follow Your Peers’ Example on Council, Nov. 2, 2012.) I don’t believe that residents are upset because of the proposed developments themselves, but because the proposed developments are departures from the OCP, the Regional Growth Strategy and the Regional Context Statement. And yet the residents in the District of North Saanich are not being adequately consulted. Mr. Trelford is absolutely right that the councillors were elected to represent the residents.

Yet the councillors whom Mr. Trelford terms “pro-future� decline to do so, instead representing, as they put it, “the people who voted for me.� Furthermore, Mr. Trelford and others who think we need to broaden the tax base are operating under the illusion that more development equals lower taxes, the so-called logic being that more people would be shouldering the burden. In fact, the opposite is true. In all cases where development is pursued, taxes go up, not down, due mostly to the required infrastructure needed to support the development. North Saanich has the lowest mil-rate in the CRD for exactly that reason. And lastly, Mr. Trelford urges the councillors to “make North Saanich a better

place.� Obviously, that’s highly subjective. I believe the majority of North Saanich residents already think North Saanich is a great place. It’s for that reason that we expect to be consulted and our feedback respected and listened to before sweeping changes are made, especially ones that go against the OCP that we participated in creating. The so-called “pro-future� councillors are avoiding any kind of meaningful public consultation. Could it be that they know that North Saanich residents are going to tell them something they and the developers don’t want to hear? Bernadette Greene North Saanich

Readers respond: Local politics, housing and the Star Cinema Rhetoric needs to be challenged Re: Follow your peers’ example on Council, Nov. 2, 2012. It is encouraging to see students taking an interest in municipal affairs and making time to share their thoughts with the community. Unfortunately, Mr. Trelford’s letter is rife with unfounded assumptions and fact-free rhetoric that cannot go unchallenged. I agree that vibrancy and freshness is important in the community but how do unspecified projects and developments achieve this? In North Saanich, “fresh and vibrant� is more likely to include a rural ambience, farm market shopping opportunities and quieter streets. Indeed, councillors were elected to represent the residents, presumably all of them. Sadly, on many occasions, some councillors have stated that they only represent those who voted for them. Mr. Trelford incorrectly implies that our community is deficient in students, employees and people. In my subdivision, widely assumed to be retiree central, my neighbours include an abundance of young, working families. In fact, the 2011 Census shows that youths aged from 10 to 19 years are proportionally more abundant in North Saanich than in the CRD as a whole. I applaud Mr. Trelford’s initiative in giving us his opinions, but those opinions have to rest on facts or they must be simply dismissed as election-style rhetoric. “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.� Springfield Harrison North Saanich

A win-win for the Peninsula’s workforce I enjoyed Steven Heywood’s article on the recent industry tour taken by the Peninsula’s Chamber of Commerce. I think the solution for creating adequate housing for their workforce should be shared by the industries. For example: why doesn’t Viking Air consider purchasing/completing units in the multi-housing project on Bowerbank in Sidney. They then rent/ lease them to their employees. The Town of Sidney gets an eyesore project cleaned up and the businesses get their affordable housing. It’s a win-win. Cindy Randall Sidney

A shameful political reality I read of the local Victoria political jockeying for turf regarding the boundaries of the MPs who will represent the Greater Victoria electorate; what a colossal waste of time and money. It is now standard procedure that the Prime Minister’s Office makes unilateral decisions regarding the most important national issues, excluding the input of any MPs. What difference will it make where the boundaries in Greater Victoria begin or end? The Prime Minister of Canada has signed a free trade agreement with China. “This could become a binding treaty on Can-

ada for the next 31 years with no debate in the House, no vote in the House and essentially no effort to ensure the Canadian public even knows this is happening.� (Elizabeth May, Oct. 31, 2012). Actions like this erode any thoughts that the Prime Minister’s office practices any form of democratic government. Does it really matter which areas the redundant MPs represent in the face of this shameful political reality? Harry Atkinson Sidney

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Rich guys need to pony up the dough I find it hard to believe Sandy Oliver is struggling to keep Star Cinema open for lack of money from the community. There are over 100 multi-millionaires living in Sidney and the vicinity. I consider it obscene that they have not given her all the financial assistance she needs. Time for you to pony up, rich guys! Kathleen M. Sullivan Victoria

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Charity support is spread around Re: Support charities with your donations. Many people who have donated to the Star Cinema fund have also supported the Lions Food Bank, Salvation Army, the SPH and others. Donors to the Star Cinema Fund are investing in the future of Sidney. People attending the Star will also support other services available in Sidney. As a donor I might have considered “what would give me more satisfaction and benefit in the long term — $100 spent in Victoria to see the Cirque de Soleil or a donation to the Star Cinema fund?� Edith Brown North Saanich

Letters to the Editor The PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters to the editor should discuss issues and stories that have been covered in the pages of the REVIEW. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The REVIEW reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The REVIEW will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity or to discuss using your letter as a guest column. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 ■ Fax: 250-656-5526 ■ E-mail: editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

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A12 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, November 9, 2012

Lock up your valuables

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A13

POLICE NEWS

Sidney fundraiser fuels hope

IN BRIEF

Two families receive generous donations from pancake breakfast and barbecue

Central Saanich Police Service

Devon MacKenzie

barbecue held Oct. anonymous donor 27 at Beacon Park stepped up to buy saw over 200 peoand install a stairple come out and lift in Cunningham’s $13,700 in donations home after seeing a pour in for the two story in the Peninemployees along sula News Review. with other substan“We couldn’t do tial donations by these sorts of woncheque made out derful things withdirectly to the famiout everyone comKenny Podmore ing together,� he lies. “Once again our said. community banded The proceeds together and we were able to from the pancake breakfast make a difference,� said Pod- and barbecue, which were more, who added that before supported by several local the event even happened, an businesses and organizations

News staff

Devon MacKenzie • Central Saanich police remind residents to lock their vehicles and remove valuables after more thefts from vehicles have been occurring in the Tanner Ridge area. • On Nov. 5 just before 10 p.m. police were alerted by a citizen to a possible impaired driver on the Pat Bay Highway. An officer responded and caught up with the vehicle around the Tanner Road exit. The officer found the driver to be visibly impaired and asked for a breath sample. The driver failed two roadside screening tests and the 38-year-old Saanich man was issued a 90 day suspension and a 30-day impound. • On Nov. 4 police responded to an incident near the intersection of Benvenuto and Wallace drives around 9:15 a.m. A van on Wallace Drive had been trying to pass a group of cyclists on the side of the road when he lost control of the vehicle and began to slide into the oncoming lane. The driver sideswiped a vehicle traveling northbound and caused around $4,500 in damage. No injuries to the drivers or the cyclists were reported and the 55-year-old Saanich man was charged with speed relative to conditions.

A fundraiser held last month netted generous donations for two Town of Sidney Parks Department workers and their families. The fundraiser, organized by Kenny Podmore, benefitted John Cunningham, who was diagnosed with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis last year and Chris Wallace, who’s threeyear-old son Coen Wallace, is in desperate need of a kidney transplant. A pancake breakfast and

BIG SALE

ANNIVERSARY

THE

News staff

including the Sidney Lions, Thrifty Foods, Slegg Lumber and Stonestreet Cafe, were divided 50/50 between the two families. The Wallace family also recently got word that Angel Flight, a volunteer organization that co-ordinates free flights for people with medical needs, offered their services to the family. If you’re still interested in donating to the families, contact 250-655-4631 for more information. reporter@peninsula newsreview.com

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A14 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

Opportunities are plentiful for B.C. trades careers Here in British Columbia, skilled workers are needed in numerous sectors, with opportunities to be found both here at home and farther afield. The BC Jobs Plan 6 Month Progress Report recently noted, for example, that Seaspan Marine Corporation’s $8 billion contract to build non-combat vessels for the Canadian Coast Guard and the Royal Canadian Navy at their shipyards in North Vancouver and Esquimalt will provide long-standing jobs, directly and indirectly, for roughly 4,000 British Columbians. Mila Puharich hopes to be part of this good news. She’s just starting her career but she’s already forging uncharted territory as the first female metal fabricator in her workplace in more than 60 years. “I’m really truly the first woman they’ve ever seen in the steel fitting trade there. There are welders, electricians and riggers, but I’ve yet to meet another woman fitter.” She also gets to hone her craft on all kinds of marine vehicles from boats, to ships, to submarines. For heavy duty mechanic Taylor Paulson, inspired to follow his uncle into the trade, Camosun College’s heavy-duty mechanic certificate program gave him every-

Metal fabricator Mila Puharich on the job.

thing he needed to launch his new career. “The program was great. After 10 months in the classroom I was happy to start the hands-on stuff, the good stuff,” says Taylor.

“I received grants for my program, which were a nice boost early on.” Today, Paulson is working in Tumbler Ridge, in northern B.C., supporting the province’s boom-

ing mining industry. “I make sure the mines are running smoothly: I diagnose and repair support trucks and equipment, sometimes I’ll be on-site, and other times I’ll have to do repairs at the shop. I’m proud that I work here in B.C. – it’s beautiful here, the hunting is fantastic, there’s amazing hiking, a worldclass snowmobile system and fresh river fishing, too.” For Puharich, two programs were key in connecting her as a female metal fabricator with her job: WITT, or Women in Trades, and STEP. WITT is geared towards helping employers in B.C. get the skilled workers they need by matching them with women who have some experience, or who want to start a career, in the trades. STEP is a no-fee employment program that works to match potential workers with employers. They assist eligible people by presenting them with opportunities for training and employment. It’s no surprise Puharich gets excited when talking about WITT. “The WITT program is awesome. Karen McNeil at Camosun is the goddess of apprentices. She directed me to funding, grants and helped connect me to the STEP program. The support system there is like a trampoline, it just makes

you go higher! STEP (then) helped get me the interview with Victoria Shipyards.” The Women in Trades Training program is funded under the Canada-BC Labour Market Agreement. As a direct result of federal funding through the Labour Market Agreement, thousands of British Columbians are receiving skills training that will advance their careers, assist in securing new employment, and ultimately improve the economic outcomes of individuals, British Columbia and Canada. To find out about these and other skills training programs visit https://www.workbc.ca/Education-Training/Programs/Pages/ Employment-Programs.aspx. Reflecting on the working conditions around her, Puharich notes that, “today, with the amount of work coming in, I hear people say with more confidence – I’m going to buy that car, or I’m going to get that bicycle for my child because I can afford to. People can do things and still put away for a rainy day, you know?” Puharich continues with onthe-job training and additional courses, learning from mentors with the know-how to build more awesome boats, ships and yes, even submarines.

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, November 9, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A15

! N WI

Reay of hope for creek Small stream needs more work but signs of life are good Steven Heywood News staff

When four dead Coho salmon were found at the Reay Creek pond recently, it was a bit of bad fortune for the fish that heralded much better news for the stream itself. During a period of high water, Peninsula Streams Society member Reg Kirkham said the Coho were caught high and dry at the dam on the pond. When the water receded, they were trapped and died. While that’s bad news for those salmon, Kirkham said, it’s good news in that it shows Coho are returning to the creek to spawn. “We haven’t seen Coho in this stream, this early, for a long time,” he said. Kirkham has lived next to the pond since 1986 and has been a part of efforts to rehabilitate the stream. “This is the first time I’ve seen this volume of salmon this far up the creek,” he said. “It’s exciting to see that.” Peninsula Streams executive director Ian Bruce says there has been a lot of work done on Reay Creek by his organization, the Town of Sidney, the Sidney Anglers group and most recently the Victoria Airport Authority, which recently completed work to clean up a section of Reay Creek on its property. It’s part of an ongoing effort to make the 800-meter waterway more hospitable to traditional populations of spawning salmon and trout and to educate the community of its impact on this and other waterways. “The future came a bit earlier than expected,” Bruce said of the Coho salmon find. “There’s still more work to be done, over time. But it’s early in the spawning season and it’s good news, there’s a lot of fish.” In a creek as small as Reay, Bruce noted there may be as many as 80 Coho. His plan is to do an inventory. Kirkham added the society would like to get the pond to a state of clarity. That will involve the removal of sediment deposited there over many years of commercial and residential development, said Bruce.

PAUL McCARTNEY 2 TICKETSON THE RUN

NOV 25, 2012

B.C. Place 777 Pacific Blvd S. Vancouver, BC

Steven Heywood/News staff

Reg Kirkham and Ian Bruce say high water led to the death of four Coho salmon on Reay Creek recently. It’s good news, however, that the salmon are still returning to spawn. In the long term, he said the society is working with municipal and airport officials to get the pond to a state

where it’s possible to rear salmon. In the meantime, Bruce said he’ll work with the town to come

up with a screen to prevent future fish deaths in times of high water. He said it should be an inexpensive fix.

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A16 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

Flu clinics still on

One Assistant English Language Teacher for Niimi, Okayama Prefecture, Japan Sidney’s sister city, Niimi, Japan, with assistance provided by the Sidney Sister Cities Association, wishes to employ one BC certified teacher as an Assistant Language Teacher (ALT) for a period of one to three years, commencing approximately March 31st, 2013 The duties of the ALT would include assisting Japanese teachers with English language instruction to elementary and secondary students in the Niimi schools. This position offers a wonderful opportunity to experience the Japanese culture. Interviews will be conducted in early December, 2012. The recommended applicant’s details will then be forwarded to The City of Niimi and the Japanese Government for final acceptance. Expressions of interest, accompanied by resume and references, both in hard copy format, should be received by the undersigned no later than 5.00pm on Friday, November 30. Shortlisted candidates will be notified by phone. Contact details are as follows: Robert G. McLure, President, Sidney Sister Cities Association 9-2235 Harbour Rd, Sidney, BC V8L 2P7 mclure@shaw.ca

The Canadian Press/Darryl Dyck

British Columbia Lt-Gov. Judith Guichon smiles while standing on the steps of the B.C. Legislature as an honour guard salutes after she was sworn in as the 29th lieutenant-governor of the province during a ceremony in Victoria on Friday, Nov. 2.

Lt.-Gov. a ‘steward of the land’ Tom Fletcher Black Press

Coins Kids for

Make e a Big Difference for Many Families at Christmas.

Merritt-area rancher Judith Guichon was sworn in Friday as B.C.’s 29th Lieutenant Governor. Guichon and her husband Bruno Mailloux were welcomed to the B.C. legislature with a blessing by Lottie Lindley, elder of the Upper Nicola Band of the Okanagan Nation. Guichon, 65, succeeds Steven Point, who completed his term Thursday. She is the second female Lieutenant Governor in B.C. history, following former MP Iona Campagnolo, who preceded Point. In her inaugural speech, Guichon said she will carry on the work of her predecessors, including support for literacy and reconciliation with aboriginal people in B.C. As owner of the historic Gerard Guichon Ranch on the shore of Nicola Lake and a former president of the B.C. Cattlemen’s Association, she vowed to continue

Every year our readers help us collect coins that are then converted to dollars and donated to the local Kiwanis Toy Drive. The Kiwanis use the money raised to purchase gifts for less fortunate kids in our community. Once again, we are asking for your help in this important initiative. Please consider giving this year by dropping off your donation at the Peninsula News Review office or at ...

Brentwood Pharmasave - 7181 West Saanich Road #6 - 9843 Second Street, Sidney, BC V8L 3C7

250-656-1151 PeninsulaNewsReview.com

NEWS REVIEW

her work as a steward of the land. Guichon and her late husband Lawrence Guichon are credited with introducing holistic management to the B.C. cattle industry, emphasizing preservation of natural grassland. She intends to make that approach a theme for her term. “As generations become further removed from an agrarian lifestyle, and as we lose community, I fear that civil society becomes less civil,” Guichon said. “It is at our peril that the great cities of the world forget that civilization relies on the health of the soil upon which it rests.” Guichon was also inducted into the Order of B.C., with the title of chancellor that is given to every Lieutenant Governor. Lieutenants Governor are appointed by the Governor General on the recommendation of prime ministers. They serve five-year terms as the Queen’s representative in each province.

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VICTORIA — Seasonal influenza clinics are proceeding in B.C. after use of one of the vaccines was briefly suspended for further testing. Health Canada announced Wednesday that Novartismade vaccines have been approved for use in Canada and Europe after an investigation of one batch in Europe. B.C. Provincial Health Officer Dr. Perry Kendall said the suspension was precautionary and related to effectiveness, and there is no safety concern. There are dedicated flu vaccination clinics at public health units, family doctors and pharmacists. To find the nearest clinic, use the flu clinic locator at www.immunizebc.ca or call Healthlink BC at 8-1-1. The annual influenza vaccination gives priority to higherrisk patients such as seniors and those with chronic diseases, who receive the vaccine at no charge. Seasonal influenza is a severe respiratory illness that is responsible for hundreds of deaths in B.C. each year. Because influenza is spread through sneezing, coughing and contact with contaminated surfaces, B.C. regulations have been changed to require all employees in health facilities or other contact points with highrisk groups to either get the influenza shot or wear a mask. — Black Press

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, November 9, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A17

THE ARTS Sidney inventor recycles his bicycle Bruce Furtado took his old bike and created a hybrid of land and sea Devon MacKenzie Bruce Furtado shows off his bicycle/outrigger canoe invention at Amherst Beach earlier this summer. Furtado came up with the invention after he found his old bike to be beyond repair.

News staff

When Sidney resident and cyclist Bruce Furtado’s two-wheeler bit the dust, he began looking for ways he could reuse the transportation device in another way. “The bicycle had served me well for several years but it was beyond repair,” Furtado said. “So I decided I wanted to create a new power source.” Furtado began dismantling his bike piece by piece and slowly came up with the idea of creating a watercraft with the old components. “I found a local marine company that agreed to work to my specifications,” Furtado explained. “Once the refitting (of the bicycle) was done, I was ready to mount it on the Polynesian-style outrigger we came up with.” Furtado took the first rendition of the project out for a few spins, but it was clear after a few spills into the waters off Amherst Beach that it wasn’t too steady. “Once I resolved the stability problem, the steering was refined and I could finally enjoy the fruits of my labour,” Furtado said, adding that he had it out frequently during the extended summer that graced the Peninsula. “My old/new bike is pure pleasure,” he said. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

Submitted photo

Free clinics on offer at Peninsula Academy Peninsula Academy of Music Arts in North Saanich (1662 Mills Road) offers free clinics in November. Spaces are limited — call 778-426-1800 to reserve. • Free ‘how to’ clinics How to change strings and tune a guitar, mandolin, ukulele. How to clean and maintain your flute, clarinet, sax, trumpet. Hands-on demonstrations, accessories available at the academy. Tuesdays from noon to 1 p.m.

Tuesdays from 7 to 8 p.m. • Free accordion clinic Dust off your accordion and bring it in for a refresher class with Aaron Watson. Everyone welcome, if you have never played and want to know how it works, or if you played a long time ago and need to brush up. Tuesday, Nov. 27 from 1 to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 28 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. • Free voice clinic

MUSICAL THEATRE presents Produced by special arrangement with Musical Theatre International.

Always wanted to sing, but not sure if you have the ability to hold a tune? Come for a free assessment with voice coach Jennifer Lang. Tuesday, Nov. 27 from 3 to 4 p.m. • Free rock band clinic For kids who play together in a band and need help from a professional to take them to the next level. Bring your instruments — drum set provided. Tuesday, Nov. 27 from 6:30 to — Submitted 7:30 p.m.

The Parish of Central Saanich at

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A18 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

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NEWS REVIEW

Ferries: A lifeline to the mainland Part three in a special report from Black Press Daniel Palmer News staff

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For more than a year, Jessica Carr spent her Saturday afternoons weaving through Vancouver traffic to make the 7 p.m. ferry at Tsawwassen. Her work schedule meant public transit wasn’t an option, unless she wanted to show up at midnight to meet her Victoriabased boyfriend on the other side. “Every weekend, back and forth,� she recalled of the sevenhour round trip. Although walk-on fares on the major B.C. Ferries routes aren’t outrageous — passengers currently pay $15.10 on the Swartz Bay-Tsawwassen run — Carr noticed the impact of the bi-weekly travel on her monthly budget. “The ferry cost alone

Don Denton/News staff

Drivers motor up the ramp to board B.C. Ferries’ Spirit of British Columbia 9 a.m. sailing at Victoria’s Swartz Bay terminal. is $30 round trip, never mind the parking you have to pay, which is $20 or $30 each weekend,� she said. Paying to take her vehicle over wasn’t even a consideration,

Public Hearing on Fares In partnership with the Victoria Regional Transit Commission, BC Transit invites you to comment on the proposed fare adjustments. You can personally address the Victoria Regional Transit Commission at the Public Hearing on November 13 at 9:00 a.m. Presenters must register by calling 250-995-5683. Or, join the 900 plus residents who have already commented through the online survey, email or phone. For a detailed outline of the options, read the Victoria Regional Transit Commission report at www.bctransit.com under Victoria Fare Review. Fare Category

Option 1

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* handyDART fares are the same as the Regular Fare Category. All passengers pay regular fare unless they are Seniors 65 years or over and Youth 5-18 years with valid I.D. Children 5 or under ride free. ProPASS, U-PASS and College Pass are based on regular monthly bus pass fare. Youth Pass is priced at a minimum of a 6 month purchase.

2263

Victoria Regional Transit Commission

Transit Info rrtXXXCDUSBOTJUDPN

We want to hear from you Send us your comments by November 9, 2012. online survey: www.bctransit.com (under Victoria) email: fareproposal@bctransit.com phone: 250-995-5683 mail: Fare Proposal, Box 610, 520 Gorge Road East, Victoria, BC V8W 2P3 Public Hearing: November 13, 2012 9:00 a.m. BC Transit Office 520 Gorge Road East

she added. Since moving to Victoria last March, Carr estimates she’s saving at least $120 a month. “My weekends are no longer dictated by the ferry schedule, just looming in the back of my mind,� she said. As Capital Region residents know all too well, the cost of ferries has an inevitable impact on everything from the cost of goods to incoming tourism dollars. With fares set to increase an average of 12 per cent over the next three years, even B.C. Ferry Commissioner Gord Macatee has admitted ferry users have reached a “tipping point� of affordability. The province, which binds B.C. Ferries to a minimum service level on each route, is in the early stages of consultation with coastal communities, trying to figure out how to cut $30 million in costs from its roughly 185,000 annual sailings on both the major and minor routes. Transportation Minister Mary Polak said $9 million in cuts have already been identified, beginning with 98 sailings on low-ridership departures between Swartz Bay-Tsawwassen and Duke PointTsawwassen. It’s those changes that people like Trevor Sawkins will be watch PLEASE SEE: Fares aren’t the highest, page 23


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, November 9, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A19

Your community. Your classifieds.

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SOOKENEWS

MIRROR

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FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

IN MEMORIAM GIFTS RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE BC Help tomorrow’s families today – leave a gift in your will. legacy@rmhbc.ca

DEATHS

Jeannine Nikula (nee Campagne) January 17, 1966 – October 30, 2012 It is with profound sadness that we announce the sudden passing of our beloved Jeannine on October 30, 2012. She will be dearly missed by her extensive circle of family and friends. She’ll always be remembered for her beautiful smile that would light up a room, her fabulous baking, her love of animals, and her many accomplishments, including raising her extraordinary son Davis Nikula, operating a successful daycare for 17 years, and earning her black belt in karate. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church in Port Coquitlam (2211 Prairie Avenue) on Monday, November 12th from 1pm – 3pm.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS COMING EVENTS GIANT BOOK SALE FOR LITERACY. Over 15,000 books. Nov 16-18 @ Farmers’ Institute, 351 Rainbow Rd, Salt Spring Island. 10am-4pm. Prices $.50-$3.00. Collectibles specially priced. Cash only. 250-537-9717 www.saltspringliteracy.org

INFORMATION 15 PASSENGER VAN with driver available for your transportation needs to and from Christmas parties, dinners, golďŹ ng or any other group functions. Please call John at 778-977-5040 and make your reservation now!

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terriďŹ c presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@blackpress.ca

WE’RE ON THE WEB www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

PERSONAL SERVICES

LEGALS

HELP WANTED

FINANCIAL SERVICES

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF NORMAN WILSON, DECEASED. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that creditors and others having claims against the estate of the above-named deceased are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executors c/o CJ (Kip) Wilson, Barrister & Solicitor, at #6-7855 East Saanich Rd, Saanichton, BC, V8M 2B4 before the 31st day of December, 2012, after which date the Executors will distribute the said estate amongst the parties entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims of which they then have notice.

An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilďŹ eld road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051.

HEATHER SOUTHSMITH, EXECUTOR By their Solicitors, CJ (KIP) WILSON BARRISTER & SOLICITOR

PERSONALS STEAMWORKS: A club for men to meet men. 582 Johnson St., Victoria. 250-3836623 steamworksvictoria.com

LOST AND FOUND FOUND: GOLD wedding band, men’s, was turned into the Lake Cowichan RCMP after it had been found at the Lake Cowichan Country Grocer 18 months ago. It is engraved and easily identiďŹ able. Call LC RCMP at 250-7496668 to claim. FOUND: PAIR of boots in bag, at Goldstream/Vet Mem Parkway bus stop. (250)478-7676. LOST: 1 piece pinkish woman’s bathing suit, downtown Sidney area or on #72 bus. Call (250)544-0272.

TRAVEL GETAWAYS ITALY- VILLAGE house in beautiful central Italy for rent. Call Anita 250-655-4030. SOOKE Harbour House Canada’s 2 Best Resort From $199 per night! www.sookeharbourhouse.com Refer to this ad 250.642.3421

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES ATTENTION LOGGERS! The Isley Group of Grande Prairie, AB. is currently hiring: Forestry Equipment Operators (Processor & Buncher) and Log Haul Truck Drivers. Please submit resume & driver’s abstract to: hr@isley.ca or fax: (780) 5321250

LICENSED GASFITTER/SHEETMETAL WORKER WANTED Valid drivers license required. Fax resume to (250) 785-5542 or pronorthheating@telus.net

Required for an Alberta Trucking Company. One Class 1 Driver. Must have a minimum of 5 years experience pulling low boys and driving off road. Candidate must be able to pass a drug test and be willing to relocate to Edson, Alberta. Scheduled Days Off. Call Lloyd 780-723-5051 THE LEMARE GROUP is accepting resumes for the following positions: •Coastal CertiďŹ ed Hand Fallers-Camp Positions Avail. •Coastal CertiďŹ ed Bull Buckers - Includes vehicle/accommodations •Road Grader Operator (Excavator experience an asset) •Off Highway Logging Truck Drivers (PaciďŹ c) •Grapple Yarder Operators •Hooktenders •Chasers •Line Machine Operator •Heavy Duty Mechanics Fulltime camp with union rates/beneďŹ ts. Please send resumes by fax to 250-956-4888 or email to ofďŹ ce@lemare.ca. PROFESSIONAL/ MANAGEMENT

SUTCO Contracting Ltd. is seeking a qualiďŹ ed dispatcher. Must have dispatch experience, and able to work in a fast paced environment with minimal supervision. The position requires rotation of days and evening shifts. Extended beneďŹ ts after 90 days, with pension available after 1 years service. Applicants may apply online www.sutco.ca or fax:0250-357-2009. Enquiries to: Brad 250-357-2612 Ext: 226

TRADES, TECHNICAL AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN required. Prefer journeyman with Chrysler training, but apprentices with good work experience considered. Top wages for the right person. 1-800-663-7794 service@nelsonchrysler.com GARAGE DOOR SERVICE PERSON. Experienced Commercial Door Service and Installation Technician required for expanding commercial service department at Door Pro. Sectional, underground parking, rolling steel and operator repair and maintenance experience essential. Truck and tools provided $25 - $35/ hour. Call 604-597-4040 or email Mike - mikep@doorpro.ca WWW.DOORPRO.CA

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS www.bcjobnetwork.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

FRIENDLY FRANK

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

WHEELBARROW AND yard tools, $40 for everything. Call (250)882-4735.

500 RECENT paperbacks, $.50; Altas Lathe, $900; 1200 hand crafted earrings/necklaces, $2-$7, large amounts 50% off. Call (250)655-3347.

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, ďŹ r, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

Horticultural Labourer needed at Eurosa Farms, Brentwood Bay. Duties include picking and packing owers and crop maintenance. No experience necessary. $10.25/hr. 40+ hrs/week. 5-6 days/week Work available in 2013: Jan 15- Sep 15. Send resume to Fax: 250-652-6949 E-mail: p_bulk@yahoo.ca

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

Need CA$H Today? Own A Vehicle? Borrow Up To $25,000

No Credit Checks! Cash same day, local ofďŹ ce.

www.PitStopLoans.com 1.800.514.9399

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest ďŹ rewood producer offers ďŹ rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

FURNITURE HONDURAS MAHOGANY SIDEBOARD1930’s, 40�wx15�dx34�h, beautiful condition, $450. Call (250)6563322. SOLID AMERCIAN BLACK WALNUT. Gentlemen’s wardrobe (armoire type - original key) 44�wx24�dx54�h and chest of drawers, 54�wx25�dx30�h. Handcrafted in Quebec, 1930’s beautiful condition, $2800/pair. Call (250)656-3322.

HOME CARE SUPPORT RELIABLE RYLEY ElderCare. “Helping Seniors Stay at Home� Call me for my list of services. (250)886-6180.

RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture-Baby+Family Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. Call 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

EQUESTRIAN HORSEBACK RIDING boots, black leather. “Ariatâ€? brand tall boots, woman’s size 7.5, regular calf, medium height. Excellent condition. Perfect ďŹ rst pair of show boots! Paid $400, asking $250 obo. 250-391-5992, leave message. (Westshore)

BUFFET/ HUTCH, solid wood 18�Dx50�Wx79�H, red/brown tone, $245. (250)380-8733.

MEDICAL SUPPLIES 2010 LEGEND 4 wheel scooter with jumbo basket, scooter cover, walking cane, ag holder and canopy. Like new, always kept in the house. Retail price $4,357, now asking $2050 obo. (250)656-7786.

APPLIANCE REPAIR & Services. Residential/Commercial BBB member. 250-388-0278.

BUILDING SUPPLIES

FRIENDLY FRANK

SKYWATCHER TELESCOPE and tri-pod. D-102MM F-1300MM. Only used once, asking $500. Please call (250)655-0051.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

REAL ESTATE

4 RS3 serviced lots, in Langford, starting at $179,000 Great Happy Valley Location, at, ready for building. All services to lot lines. Excellent location, end of wooded lane. Email or call 250-661-2837 or 250-857-2481 for more info. mtd@shaw.ca

APPLIANCES

5 LBS beach glass, $10. Men’s watch $40, 2 (Jus) ďŹ gurines, $40. (778)265-1615. BRAND NEW, white Oster bread maker, never been used, $50. (250)656-1640. CROCHET TABLE cloth, large, peacock pineapple, $99 obo. Call (778)433-2192. HIDE-A-BED WITH mattress, dbl. Brown tones, used twice, $99. Call (250)995-3201. MAN’S NEW 3-piece suit, size 36 x 5’10â€?. $82. Please call (250)727-9425.

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper?

ACREAGE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

EMERGENCY MATTRESS LIQUIDATION! Storage Container Is Sold, Being Del’d Monday. Mattresses All Sizes/ Models Cheap: Reasonable Offers Will Be Accepted! Liquidating B/R Stes, Chests, Wardrobes, Pantrys; Bookcases @ $99.; Cook Books $1.; Recliners, SW Rockers 1/2 PRICE! Heaters, Axes, Lots of Tools Cheap! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St., Sidney. We Buy, Sell, Trade. buyandsave.ca

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

PETS

BERNINA 820 QE Sewing Computer - high end sewing & quilting machine w/ 40 cm long free arm, stitch regulator, dual feed. $4500. (250)882-5465.

FOR SALE BY OWNER $5000- POWER CHAIR, new cond, $1500 or Trade for (good cond) 4 wheeled Scooter. (250)896-7160 after 6pm.

10353 DEVLIN Plc, Sidney, Rancher 3 bdrm, 2 bath, lrg. fam room, private treed lot. Call 250-655-1499 or view w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 or mls #316102 HALF PRICE! Never used; Folding power lift shower commode with chair ($1600). Wheelchair mint cond. (best offer). Call (250)818-4000 or email mercedes500@shaw.ca

WHERE BUYERS AND SELLERS MEET


A20 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

HOUSES FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

APARTMENT/CONDO

SUITES, LOWER

CARS

BRENTWOOD (Central Saanich) 2-bdrm+ lrg den, bright & clean. 1600 sq.ft., located above offices, in 1 of 2 suites, 20x25 SW facing deck, covered parking, pantry, insuite W/D. N/S. Avail Nov 15 or Dec 1st. $1175. Call 250-655-4777

SIDNEY: BSMT 2bdrm. Quiet, NS/NP. $850. Reduced rent for quiet single. 250-655-1863. SIDNEY, WATERFRONT home, 1 bdrm, fully furn’d, all utils incl’d. F/S, W/D, small dog ok. N/S, avail now. $1100 mo. Ref’s. Call (250)415-1221. UVIC/CAMOSUN area, 2 bdrm, priv ent, N/P, N/S, $900. Avail immed. (250)477-6652.

THETIS LAKE ESTATES large 1 bdrm or can be 2 bdrm suite, all utils + cable/high speed internet, laundry, garbage, private parking, close to all amenities, quiet rural setting. Refs, small pet ok. $1050./$1250. 250-220-4718, 250-507-1440.

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL SIDNEY: AIRPORT side of Beacon Ave. 650-700 sqft workshop/storage space. Rent incld’s heat and electricity with ample electric outlets. Shaw cable connection avail. Located on 2nd floor. Peninsula Mini Storage, 2072 Henry Ave. West. Call (250)655-6454. Also avail. 6500 sqft warehouse with large doors and high ceilings. Call to inquire.

COTTAGES

215 Gorge Road East Victoria

$500 Move In Incentive Bachelor from $700/mo. 1 bdrm. from $790/mo. 2 bdrm. from $995/mo. $399,000. Next to VGH, 2 bdrm + 3rd or office, 2 lvl, end unit, windows on 3 sides. Large family room, 2 fireplaces, pet allowed. 71-14 Erskine Ln., Tel: 250-478-0269. Open House, 2PM-4PM, Sat & Sun. w w w. C o m f r e e. c o m / 3 6 7 0 9 7 www.mls.ca x2486311 Incredible 5 acre treed PARK-LIKE PROPERTY with Well-Maintained Furnished Home 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake, in the town of Caycuse. Perfect for recreational property or full time living. Motivated seller $378,800. Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land. Call 250-745-3387 smartytwo@hotmail.com

• Indoor swimming pool (Redwood Park only) • Surface & carport parking • Upgraded balconies • Spectacular views • Storage lockers • Situated in Park Setting • 2 km from downtown • Crime Free MultI-Housing Program

Kamel Point Village Apartments 70 Dallas Road, Victoria

$500 Move In Incentive 2 bdrm. from $1,200/mo. • Water front low-rise • Outdoor parking available • Balconies • Bike storage • In suite storage • Dishwasher in some suites • Laundry room

HOMES WANTED

Gorge Towers Apartments

WE BUY HOUSES

200 Gorge Road West, Victoria

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053

$500 Move In Incentive 1 bdrm. from $870/mo. 2 bdrm. from $1,140/mo. • Wheel-chair accessible • Outdoor, indoor and covered parking available • Lockers • Elevators • Laundry room • Balconies • Bicycle storage • Crime Free Multi-Housing Program

www.webuyhomesbc.com

Fair Oaks Apartments

OPEN HOUSE

3501 Savannah Avenue, Saanich

OPEN HOUSE. 2 BR / 2 BA CONDO. #208-300 Waterfront Cres. $519K. Sat & Sun 11-3.

$250 Move In Incentive

OPEN HOUSE. 4 BR / 3 BA HOUSE. 2883 Cudlip. $418,500. Saturday 12-3pm.

• Lush foliage & groomed landscaping • Well-maintained building •Amenities nearby • Wheel-chair accessible • Covered, indoor and outdoor parking • Laundry room • Balconies • Lockers • Elevator • Small fitness room

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

1 bdrm. from $840/mo. 2 bdrm. from $1,014/mo.

Call Now: 250.381.5084 www.caprent.com rentals@caprent.com

SAVE ON COMMISSION Sell your home for $6900 or 1% plus $900 fees FULL MLS SERVICE!

CALL: 250-727-8437

Jasmine Parsons www.jasmineparsons.com One Percent Realty V.I.

1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. Call 250-478-9231. VICTORIA 2BD 1 ba, top floor 55+ Bldg, $895. Walk to Tillicum Mall. Call 250-858-2383

TOWNHOUSES LAVENDER CO-OP is accepting applications for a quiet, 2 bdrm townhouse, W/D hookup, inside/outside storage, backyard. $876/mo. Share purchase $2500. Gross income $42,000 +. Applications available in the glass case outside the Community Hall at 10A-620 Judah St. SIDNEY- NEW 3 bdrm + den, W/D. NS/NP. $1700 mo. Avail Dec 1. Call 250-217-4060.

DEEP COVE: cozy 1bdrm, wood floors, acreage, skylights $895/mo, N/S. 250-656-1312.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES OAK BAY: Bright 2 bdrm suite duplex w/ garden. h/w floors, D/W, W/D. Close to all amens. Avail immed. NS/NP. $1350. To view call (250)217-2421.

APARTMENTS FURNISHED LANDS END: large, sunny, water view, priv entry, parking, NS, www.sidneystudio.info. Adults, snow birds, refs. 250-655-4175

WANTED TO RENT WANTED, FOR month of January: housesitting or rental of furnished Victoria area home, family of four. Mature, reliable homeowners visiting from northern B.C. Email: simonnattrass@gmail.com WISHART AREA: Single hard working mom with 11 yr old and 1 cat, looking to rent a 1 or 2 bdrm, (approx $1000/mo), within walking distance to Wishart school in Colwood. Exc. ref’s. Please call 250-2080386 and leave message.

TRANSPORTATION

SIDNEY EXECUTIVE suite. near ocean & town. $1295. Short/long term. 250-656-8080

AUTO FINANCING

SIDNEY: LOFT, centrally located, private ent, N/S, N/P. From $595 mo. (250)656-9194

SPORTS & IMPORTS 1981 MERCEDES 300SD Turbo Diesel for sale. 281,000 KMS, (Champagne colour) in fair condition, asking $3000. Maintenance log available. Call 250-885-9010. RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

1999 FORD Econoline 350 Super duty Motorhome. V10. $22,000. 125km. Very well taken care of, clean and runs great. Please phone 250-6554840. Located in Sidney.

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

SIDNEY 2-BDRM + den, split level. F/P, 5 appl’s, prkng, yard pet ok. $1400. (250)812-4154. SIDNEY- 2 BDRM, garage, yard, deck, F/S, W/D. $1350. Call (250)812-4154.

Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557 Guaranteed

Auto

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AUTO SERVICES

SUITES, LOWER

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

GORGE-HARRIET, Large 1 bdrm, priv ent & prkg, utils incl. N/S, N/P, N/D. Avail Dec 1. $765/mo. Call 250-384-0460 (leave a message). SAANICH- LARGE, 2000sq ft, 2 bdrm, lights & heat incld, NS/NP. Refs, $1000 mo. Avail now. 250-652-0591. SIDNEY: 1 bdrm suite, grd level, 1blk to downtown & waterfront, W/D, new appls, new paint, garden, prkg. NS/NP, Nov 1, $790 + utils. Call upper renters 250-655-7238.

250-360-0817

InMotion

STORAGE SHIPPING CONTAINERS 20’ or 40’. Buy or Rent. Safe and secure. Easymove Container Services. Serving Vancouver Island. 1-(888)331-3279

FLORENCE LAKE, 2 yr old 1 bdrm ground level suite, large mudroom, F/S, W/D, & micro. 2 private entrances w/ sunroom & patio on 1 acre prop. Utils incl. N/S, small pet ok, $950. Nov. 15. 250-391-1967

Call Today

Driver Ed Tips Every Friday

GOLDSTREAM AREA: 1400 sq ft, newly furnished, w/d, d/w, a/c, big deck & yard, hidef TV, parking. $650 inclusive. Ray, 778-433-9556.

CEDAR HILL Golf course- 1 bdrm, private entrance, off street parking, W/D, utils included. NS/NP. Refs req. Avail Dec 1. $800. 250-595-0505.

CARRIER ROUTES NOW AVAILABLE

Watch for our Auto Section

SHARED ACCOMMODATION BURNSIDE AREA: $525, util’s included. Avail immed. Call Brittany 250-589-5884 or 250383-9635.

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

“2004 RAV4 4WD”- $13,500 firm. 4 cyl, auto, silver, Michelins, 120,000 km,Victoria only vehicle. Complete maintenance history. Lady-driven, no accidents, excellent condition, keyless entry. Model Recommended In Top 10 by Consumer Reports. (250)479-5545.

HOMES FOR RENT

SOUTH OAK BAY furn’d character home, walk to golf club & beach, Jan 12 - Mar 16, all inclusive rent for 9 week period. $3500. Discounted in lieu of cat care. Call (250)598-4734. williamrobertson@shaw.ca

1998 PONTIAC Grand Prix GT US car - 193,000 miles, lady driven since 2003. $2800 obo. Alan, (778)426-3487.

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427 Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

CARS

$50-$1000 CASH For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865 CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

AR N

Gorge Apartments

N.SAANICH. CHARMING newly reno’d 600 sq.ft. 1-bdrm. $700./mo, hydro incld. NP/NS. (250)655-3383, (250)888-9689

RIVE D O T G N I

?

LE

APARTMENT/CONDO

Taking out the Garbage not covering your expenses?

KIDS

RENTALS

SUITES, UPPER

1997 TOYOTA Avalon XLS, white. $3,999. Automatic. Fully loaded, no accidents, new tires. 229k. Great running car. Call (250)656-5588.

NEWS REVIEW

In your community newspaper 250-381-3484 • inmotion@blackpress.ca


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, November 9, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A21

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES HOME IMPROVEMENTS

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

DRYWALL

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

DRYWALL PROFESSIONAL: Small additions, boarding, taping, repairs, texture spraying, consulting. Soundproof installation;bath/moisture resistance products. Call 250.384.5055. Petrucci’s Drywall.

AURICLE BSC. 250-882-3129 Fall clean up, Lawn aeration & fertilize-soil-hedges & more.

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

WRIGHT MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men. Senior’s discount. Free Est’s. Call Phil (250)383-8283.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

PAINTING

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

ELECTRICAL

PRO IRISH Gardeners; pruning, clean-ups, landscaping, lawn care, weekly gardening. Free est. Call (250)652-6989.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601

CARPENTRY JEREMIAH’S CARPENTRY Quality work, sm renos, call for list of services. 778-967-1246. McGREGOR HOME Repair & Renos. Decks to doors. Small jobs OK. WCB. (250)655-4518

CHIMNEY SERVICES JKG CHIMNEY. Clean, Repairs, Gutters, Roof Demoss, Torch On Flat. 250-588-3744.

CLEANING SERVICES MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Please call Des 250-656-9363, 250-727-5519. COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites, etc. 250-886-8053, 778-351-4090.

CONTRACTORS CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877 WEST HARBOUR Home or commercial, new and reno’s. Best Rates. (250)419-3598.

(250)590-9653.ELECTRICIAN 20 yrs + exp. Residential: New homes & Renos. Knob & tube replacement. $40./hr. Senior’s Disc. Lic.#3003. Call Tom. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. ELECTRICAL HAZARDS do you have any? Quality Electric, 250-361-6193. #22779. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $40/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

FENCING

NO JOB too BIG or SMALL. SENIOR’S SPECIAL! Prompt, reliable service. Phone Mike (ANYTIME) at 250-216-7502.

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

INSULATION MALTA BLOWN Insulation. Attics - interior/exterior walls & sound silencer. (250)388-0278

LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127.

LANDSCAPING JAKE’S RAKE & CO. Fall clean-ups, gutters, hedges & tree trims, and much more. WCB. Call (250)217-3589.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

GARDENING

HANDYPERSONS

J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677. 20% OFF Fall clean-ups, racking, mowing, hedge/shrub trimming. (250)479-6495. 21YRS EXP Garden clean-ups weeding, etc. All areas of city. $25/hr. No tax. 250-656-7045. (250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK Yard a mess? Fall pruning & clean-up. Blackberry & ivy rmvl, weed control. 24yrs exp. 250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups.

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397.

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

DIAMOND MOVING- 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734.

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

TOP NOTCH PAINTING. Over 25 years exp. Interior/Exterior, Residential. Reliable, Reasonable and Friendly Service. Call Brad 250-580-5542.

Peacock Painting

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774 SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

250-652-2255 250-882-2254 WRITTEN GUARANTEE Budget Compliance

15% SENIORS DISCOUNT

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS Call 250.388.3535

POSITIONS OPEN FOR

FT/PT Carriers & Sub Carriers SAANICHTON ROUTE 6221 - PANAVIEW HEIGHTS,VEYANESS RD, STELLY’S CROSS RD, EAST SAANICH RD D ROUTE 6224 - EAST SAANICH RD, VEYANESS RD, HOVEY RD, (ODD) RIDGEDOWN CRES. DEAN PARK ROUTE 6551 - PENDER PARK DR, ORCAS PARK TERRACE,SALISH DRIVE ROUTE 6553 - NASH PLACE, BEAUMARIS PLACE, DEAN PARK ROAD, PENDER PARK DRIVE,, ROUTE 6561 - FOREST PARK DR, STUART PARK TERR, PORTLAND PL, FOREST PARK PL ROUTE 6562 - MAYNEVIEW TERRACE, STUART PARK PLACE, LANGARA PLACE ROUTE 6563 - MAYNVIEW TERRACE,GEORGIA VIEW,PARK PACIFIC TERRACE ROUTE 6566 - MORSEBY PARK, HARO PARK

BRENTWOOD BAY ROUTE 6005 - VERDIER AVE, HOLLY PARK ROAD, HAGAN ROAD, WAVERLY TERRACE ROUTE 6009 - MARCHANT RD, HAGAN ROAD, PEGGY ANNE CRESCENT

Call... Arlene 250-656-1151

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

TREE SERVICES LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

UPHOLSTERY UPHOLSTERER work. Your fabric 250-480-7937.

or

NEEDS mine.

BLAINE’S WINDOW WASHING. Serving Sidney & Brentwood since 1983. Average house $35. 250-656-1475

Available Paper Routes

SIDNEY ROUTE 6359 - HARBOUR ROAD ROUTE 6461 - BEACON AVENUE, JAHN PLACE, SKYLARK LANE

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

WINDOW CLEANING

MOVING & STORAGE

HANDYMAN SERVICES. Lawns, fences, pruning, flooring, painting, drywall, small renos. Mike/Chris 250-656-8961

HAULING AND SALVAGE

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

250-889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Gutter & Window Cleaning at Fair Prices!

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

SAFEWAY PAINTING

PRESSURE WASHING

DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

ALL AGE GROUPS WELCOM E!


A22 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

sceneandheard

P H O T O

NEWS REVIEW

F E A T U R E

Photos by Gunnar Freyr Steinsson To book events call 250-381-3484 or e-mail adminassist@vicnews.com

■ BC Families in Transition Open House ■ Monday, November 5 ■ BCFIT offices - 899 Fort St.

Vancity, Law Foundation support new, larger office for BC Families in Transition BC Families in Transition is a ‘one-stop shop’ for families and individuals with serious challenges in their family relationships. It is a thriving not-for-profit organization with a 34-year history of serving families in Greater Victoria. Established in 1978 as Divorce Lifeline, the organization grew to become the Separation and Divorce Resource Centre in 1994 and expanded again to become BC Families in Transition in 2007. The agency now serves more than 10,000 people per year – adults, children, teens, couples and families – with a broad range of services: professional counselling for all ages and all family configurations, professional legal support services, and various group counselling programs and information sessions. Anyone who needs help with family relationships, whether marital issues, parenting or step-parenting issues, or separation/divorce, can likely get the help they need at BC Families in Transition. Some of BCFIT’s services are provided free of charge and others are available for minimal cost, and this is possible because many of the 50 professionally-trained team members volunteer 100 per cent of their time to the centre. BC Families in Transition works closely with the United Way and several other funding agencies, and has grown by leaps and bounds over its years. Many people are familiar with the centre’s longstanding location at 812 Broughton St., across from the Royal Theatre, but by 2011 the agency had far outgrown that space. Thankfully, their landlord at their Broughton Street location was the Vancity Credit Union, and this year Vancity ‘stepped up to the plate’ with a huge gift of some $90,000 in capital funding to help BC Families in Transition move into a larger, better, custom-built, new office. Together with a gift of $21,000 from the Law Foundation of BC, this significant donation allowed BC Families in Transition to find another central, street-front location and to have it designed and built to their unique specifications. “Because we provide a dozen very different programs all under the same roof,” explains executive director Richard Routledge, “some for children, some for adults, and some for groups, we had to be able to design the layout to meet our unique needs and yet have all our departments closely connected with each other.” That could only be accomplished by having their new centre specially designed and built for them – something that requires a lot of cash. Vancity provided the bulk of that cash, and the result is what Routledge describes as a spectacular example of collaboration between the private and non-profit sectors. BCFIT’s open house at its new location – 899 Fort St., at the corner of Fort and Quadra directly across from Island Blue Print – on Nov. 5 was the first opportunity to ‘show off ’ the new office to the public and to many other non-profit, government and private organizations with which the centre partners. Judging from the reactions from the endless throng of guests who attended the open house, the collaboration was a resounding success. The sleek new office provides a modern, ‘classy but comfortable’ atmosphere for adults and children whose lives are in turmoil due to family relationship challenges. Routledge adds that the construction of this beautiful new office was a team effort which would never have been possible without a lot of help. In addition to Vancity and the Law Foundation of BC, he would like to thank Dome Construction, Johl Studios, Price’s Alarms, and NAI Property Management. To inquire about the many programs and services offered at BC Families in Transition, drop in to their new location, call the centre at 250-386-4331, or visit the website at www.bcfit.org.

BC Families in Transition team – Marie-Christine White, Paul Miller, Pam Rudy, BC FIT Executive Director Richard Routledge, and Susan Farr.

Sheila Henley and Pam Rudy.

Doug Woodall and Raji Goel.

Sophie von Herrmann and Dawn Cox.

Lionel Zelniker and John Ricker.

Gloria Cheung and Jane Taylor Lee.

BCFIT’s Richard Routledge with Danella Parks and Rebecca Pearson from Vancity.

Proudly serving families in Greater Victoria since 1978 We’re now in our new home on Fort at Quadra • Professional Counselling for relationship issues (all ages) • Legal Support Services • Group Programs Toll-Free Legal Information Line: 1.877.386.4333

(Mon & Thurs 9:00am-4:00pm)

899 Fort St. 250.386.4331 www.bcfit.org


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, November 9, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A23

Fares aren’t the highest Continued from page 18

As CEO of Cold Star Freight Systems, Sawkins oversees the movement of more than 23,000 kilograms of frozen and fresh food each day. His trucks make 50 round trips between the Mainland and Vancouver Island each week. “There really is only a three-or-four-day supply (of fresh food) on Vancouver Island at any given time,” he said. While rising fares and reduced sailings aren’t likely to affect Cold Star’s bottom line, the increased costs are passed on to customers, meaning products that originate off-Island end up costing more, Sawkins said. The B.C. Trucking Association had its biggest beef with B.C. Ferries ironed out when the ferry commissioner set predictable price caps on rising fares earlier this year. • • •

Steven Heywood/News staff

Wreaths lie at the foot of the war memorial at Sidney municipal hall.

B.C. Ferries fares aren’t excessive when compared to other ferry systems that travel similar distances, Macatee noted in his review of the Coastal Ferry Act. But he admits direct comparisons are made difficult by a lack of available data from other private companies. “I know people are feeling the pain of higher fares, but when you dive a little bit further into the issue, our fares aren’t outrageous by world standards,” he said. Even with the planned fare increases, B.C. residents pay less for ferry travel than residents in Ireland, Massachusetts and New Brunswick, according to the review, pub-

lished in January. Only Norway’s government-controlled ferry system is cited as having substantially cheaper fares when priced on distance travelled. The Norwegian government covers 50 per cent of operating costs for its ferries, while the B.C. government contributed enough to cover roughly 38 per cent of B.C. Ferries’ operating budget last year. But Macatee warns it isn’t operational costs pushing fares higher, it’s the looming $2.5 billion required to replace 11 vessels in the next 10 to 12 years. “The ships are wearing out. We either replace them, or they’ll be taken out of service by federal regulators,” he said. • • • Carr hopes the upcoming changes to B.C. Ferries include better deals for regular commuters between the Island and Lower Mainland. “It’s ridiculous they don’t have a frequent traveller pass so that you can get a discount (on major routes),” she said. Minor route residents have access to Experience Cards, which allow for 30-to-40per-cent savings on fares using a prepaid card. With ridership declining and fares continuing to rise, something has to happen. A new long-term vision is needed. And right now, what that might look like is anyone’s guess. To add your voice to the public consultation, visit coastalferriesengagement.ca. Read more form this report online at www.peninsulanewsreview.com.

FALL SALE SALE $1295 | 3 STYLISH FABRICS IN STOCK

QN STORAGE BED $995 | BEDSIDE TBL $325

casualhome.ca

SOFA $1795 | COCKTAIL $595 | END $295

LANGFORD | 887 ATTREE AVENUE | 250.478.8387 OFF LANGFORD PARKWAY - WEST OF WALMART OFF LANGFORD PARKWAY


A24 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, November 9, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Always something good! Sunrise Farms

Fresh Chicken Legs

BC Red Bell Peppers Grown in BC 2lb/907g Bag

Backs Attached Product of Surrey, BC All Size Packages Regular Retail: $3.19–$3.49/lb, $7.03–$7.69/kg

On Sale

On Sale

2

9Each9

*S AM E IT EM OF EQ LE SS ER VA LU UA L OR E.

Tropicana

Juice

Selected 1.75L or 6 Pack

Lactantia

Butter Salted 454g

MEGA

P OI N T S

1000

Granola Bars

When you buy 5

On Sale

2 7 $

for

75

When you buy 2

Lest we forget

On Sale

3

4Each9

On Sale

5 10 $

for

Specials in Effect until Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

Quaker

Chewy or Dipps Selected, 156–187g


Peninsula News Review, November 09, 2012  

November 09, 2012 edition of the Peninsula News Review

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