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EDUCATION: Maclean’s magazine ranks UNBC as No. 2 A3 Wednesday, November 7, 2012 Natalie MacMaster set to play Prince George next spring A14

Newsline 250-564-0005

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Crash kills one

STUDIO FAIR

Te re s a M A LLA M / Fre e Pre s s

Haille Zelinski gets a good sniff of a bath bomb from the Happy Hippo Bath booth at the 36th annual Studio Fair on Friday. The juried event showcased the wares of 93 juried artisans from the northern region and across the country.

■ CORE SERVICES REVIEW

Council mulls several options DELYNDA PILON newsroom@pgfreepress.com

Though they didn’t ask council to cancel Christmas, KPMG’s list of suggestions within the draft of the core services review’s final report contained some ideas that seemed extreme. For example, the suggestion to lower service levels for snow removal was vetoed unanimously by council. Another suggestion, however, to lower the number of councillors representing the citizen’s of the city from eight to six will be discussed

further. “Council is not making decisions today,” Mayor Shari Green, who chairs the select committee on the core services review, pointed out Friday before KPMG presented its final report. Rather, the committee members along with the rest of council who attended the meeting perused chapters five through 13 in the report, deciding which suggestions could be acted on readily and therefore would be forwarded for further discussion at the Nov. 14 committee of the whole meeting. Several suggested land sales, from the Pine

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Valley Golf Course to the Civic Centre will be discussed further at the upcoming meeting. The report suggests one option for the city is to terminate operating Pine Valley as a golf course and develop it for sale instead. Although KPMG did not estimate the actual economic benefits of the Civic Centre, the company did mention its usefulness in attracting functions. Green said she understands most municipalities don’t operate a civic centre, however she is turn to PAGE A3

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One person is dead following a four-vehicle crash on Highway 16 near Fraser Lake Monday morning. The accident occurred at about 9:40 a.m. Police say the collision occurred when the driver of a westbound sport utility vehicle (SUV) lost control of the vehicle in a gentle curve and slight grade. The SUV crossed the centre line, into the path of an eastbound passenger car with one occupant. After colliding with the passenger car, the SUV was then struck by a commercial truck/ trailer unit, which was following the passenger car. The eastbound commercial truck and trailer was then struck from behind by an eastbound commercial crane unit. The driver of the passenger car was pronounced dead at the scene. The occupants of the SUV were transported to hospital with serious injuries and are being evaluated. Each of the commercial vehicles only had one occupant and there were no injuries to either of the commercial vehicle drivers. Weather and road conditions are not believed to be a factor in the collision.

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Prince George Free Press

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Wednesday, November 7, 2012

A3

CROSS-COUNTRY: Province’s best ran through the slop A19 Ali Henry is looking to bring some new musical sounds to the city A10

Up Front BILL PHILLIPS 250-564-0005 newsroom@pgfreepress.com

www.pgfreepress.com

UNBC ranked second in Canada Maclean’s Magazine released the results of its annual ranking Thursday and UNBC tied its highest ranking ever, placing second among 19 small, “primarily undergraduate” Canadian universities. Mt. Allison, more than 150 years older than UNBC, placed first. This is the eighth straight year UNBC has been ranked the best university in its category west of Atlantic Canada. “We have terrific faculty, fantastic students, great relationships with communities throughout the North, and a wonderful environment for teaching and research. It’s no wonder UNBC continues to perform well in Maclean’s,” said UNBC President George Iwama in a press release. “All those associated with UNBC should take pride in their university.”

In its selection of UNBC, Maclean’s cited UNBC’s favorable student-teacher ratio and research funding. “The University of Northern British Columbia’s second-place finish is an even bigger story. UNBC, an 18-year-old school, debuted at ninth place 14 years ago. This year it has the highest total research dollars, and the second best student-faculty ratio, impressive for such a young school.” Maclean’s considers 13 indicators of the quality of students, faculty, libraries and finances to assess 49 universities. Each is placed in one of three categories – Medical/Doctoral, Comprehensive, or Primarily Undergraduate – to recognize differences in size, programming, and research activity.

HONOURING OUR PROTECTORS

Te re s a M A LLA M / Fre e Pre s s

Bagpiper Sheldon Clare leads the way Sunday for the Military Church Parade and Veterans Memorial Ceremony which honoured those who continue to serve and protect, including the RCMP, Rocky Mountain Rangers, Royal Canadian Sea Cadets, Royal Canadian Air Cadets and Navy League Cadets.

Service report sparks discussion from councillors from PAGE A20

aware the facility is an economic driver downtown. The report states: “The goal is to retain the availability of the PGCC for communitybased functions and as an attraction to bring events to Prince George and support the role of gateway to northern British Columbia as well as related economic and business development while reducing or eliminating the net cost to the city and property tax payers.” Continuing to support the venue in a diminished capacity while allowing an organization like Tourism Prince George to take over was one of the ideas presented in the report. The report also suggests a merit-based approach be taken when it comes to tax exemptions for not-for-profit organizations.

Coun. Cameron Stolz pointed out council recently discussed tax exemption issues at a previous meeting and is working on a solution. Coun. Albert Koehler agreed and added there is a lot of work to be done yet and said the suggestion should not come before the committee-of-the-whole meeting, but rather be left for a future talk. Bylaw enforcement changes opened a discussion of suggestions that ranged from outsourcing to scheduling enforcement for the evenings. Downtown parking and how it should be enforced, from using a boot to curtail a vehicle moving until a fine is paid to ensuring the fine is paid with the tow bill after a car has been impounded, was briefly discussed. “We need to be more pro-active. I think common sense should direct us,” Coun. Dave Wilbur said. Stolz pointed out that council was already looking into certain bylaw enforcement

items and a report on them was expected soon. Several other points will be discussed at the meeting. Recreational fees also came under discussion, with council concerned that an increase in prices would dissuade families from using the facilities. Green said ensuring youth had ice time is important, however council could consider raising fees for adults, exploring a pay-toplay ideology. Closing the Four Seasons Pool or bringing in a third-party operator, like the YMCA, to take it over, were among other suggestions in the report. “If they can’t recover the cost, what would be the advantage for them?” Coun. Murry Krause asked. He was told the YMCA offers pool services in many of its locations. Stolz said the idea of bringing in a third-party operator was worth a discussion.

The item will be looked at further during the Nov. 14 meeting. Working with the province to get a better price on asphalt or supplying the product through a portable unit, ideas council was already grappling with, were included in the report. Waste collection overflow fees and outsourcing a door-to-door recycling program were other suggestions in the public works chapter of the report. A miscellaneous chapter including a variety of other suggestions, from fleet recommendations to ideas about transit, will be discussed at a future meeting. The results of the discussion of the various items the committee chose to forward to the committee-of-the-whole meeting will then be forwarded to the following council meeting. The rest of the suggestions, most of which could not be implemented right away, will be investigated at greater depth at a future meeting.


A4

Prince George - News - Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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Local Legion asking for input The Royal Canadian Legion is getting a new home in Prince George, and it wants to know what people want it to include. To that end, Branch 43 is asking members and the community to provide input into a new business model for the Legion, which has served Prince George since 1926. “Sale of the old Legion building has pumped new vitality and new ideas into our organization,� President Bruce Gabriel said in a press release. “We have quickly, but carefully, started working on a technical project plan that is comprehensive and future focused.� The new facilities are at 1116 Sixth Ave.. The Legion is now starting a market survey of members and the public to integrate with the technical project plan, forming the new business model. Members of the Legion will receive the survey by e-mail, and have until Nov. 21 to complete and submit it. People in the general community who would like a voice in the future of the Legion locally can go online to fluidsurveys.com/s/ legion43survey/ and make their thoughts known. As well, the current Legion on Seventh Avenue has paper

copies of the survey available. “We have hundreds of blank surveys available at the Legion on Seventh Ave-

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“We really value member and citizen opinion.� The Legion is planning to move to the new location on Sixth Avenue in May 2013.

BIRTHDAY SURPRISE

A lla n W ISHA RT/ Fre e Pre s s

We at the Free Press would never disclose a woman’s age, but Darlene Lee’s family and friends apparently don’t have that problem. They surprised Lee with some special lawn decorations to mark the occasion on Friday.

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Job losses concern Bell DELYNDA PILON

newsroom@pgfreepress.com

The loss of 10,900 jobs in the province last month knocked B.C. down to third place in job creation in Canada and has caused some concern for MLA Pat Bell, Minister of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training. However, he pointed out if you combined the numbers over the last three months, you would still see a gain of about 10,000 jobs. The manufacturing sector, he said, showed the biggest loss at 8,500 jobs. “It does concern me,� Bell said. “I do not recall seeing any information about major manufacturing curtailments or closures. I need to understand where that comes from.� He added his staff is looking into the issue. Tourism enjoyed a small amount of growth, he said, while agriculture is down, though he added that is to be expected due to the season. Forestry and mining are also down, which he said is also to be expected according to the time of year. Even though the job creation numbers dropped last month, Bell said he believes the province is on track when it comes to job creation and needs to stick to the plan. “We developed a job strategy and introduced it 14 months ago,� Bell said. “It focuses on the things we do well as an economy. There are eight core areas, the things we think B.C. has an advantage in. We need to stay focused on the job plan and hopefully get back to growth.� Though Prince George reported a job loss of 100, Bell said the minimal amount basically means the job market in the city was flat. “Prince George is at the highest level of employment in its history. Plus or minus 100 jobs is not a trend,� he said.


Prince George - News - Free Press

www.pgfreepress.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

A5

STUDIO FAIR

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Munoz seeks NDP nomination DELYNDA PILON

hospital, Munoz is concerned about health care in the Nechako Lakes district. “I would like to help close A name well-known to city residents has approval from the gap on the disparity that the provincial NDP to join the exists in the area, and pronomination race for Nechako vide residents in Nechako Lakes with a Lakes. greater sense of Debora Munoz, confidence, and who served two improve access terms as a city to health care as councillor beginwell as health ning in 2005, says care services,” she’s a longtime she said. supporter of the She added NDP. Burns Lake and “I’ve been a Fort St. James longtime supcontinue to expeporter and donor rience a shortof the NDP party, Debora Munoz - Nechako Lakes age of health care and I’ve worked professionals, on a number of from doctors and provincial elections,” she said. “Their core nurses to technicians. Skills training is another values and progressive poliimportant issue, she added, cies align with mine.” A health science profes- saying more must be done sional for 34 years, working to meet existing and future as a clinical neurophysiol- labour market shortages. After reading the mid-term ogy technologist at the local newsroom@pgfreepress.com

timber supply report, she said she feels an effort must be made to improve forest health, an issue of particular importance to residents of Nechako Lakes who are still heavily dependent on the industry. “After reading the midterm timber supply report on forestry I see a need to improve forest health. The residents of Nechako Lakes are still heavily dependant on the forest industry, and people want to know the industry will be viable for generations to come.” Munoz, who has attended several protests against the Northern Gateway pipeline, added she’s happy the NDP took a stand on the issue some time ago. “I’m proud the B.C. NDP has taken a definitive stand against the pipeline, after completing some thorough and in-depth research on the matter,” she said.

She added she has understood what the dangers of the pipeline were for some time. “It was, I believe, September of 2010 when I was the only councillor who spoke up intelligently against the Northern Gateway pipeline when it came before council.” She added her terms on city council have taught her the long range impacts of land-use decisions. “The land-use decisions we make today often have long-lasting impacts for generations to follow,” she said. “I’ve always been a passionate advocate standing for clean land, air and healthy ecosystems.” The nomination date has been set for Saturday, Dec. 15. Members of the NDP will be able to cast their ballots at that time with regards to who they wish to represent the party in the provincial election, set for spring.

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Enbridge willing to look at details DELYNDA PILON newsroom@pgfreepress.com

Enbridge panel experts were questioned once again Monday about the lack of detail in certain parts of the plans they’ve filed, only to remind interveners the level of detail required at this stage has been met. A few quick questions regarding the mitigation of the effects of the Northern Gateway pipeline on the Daiya-Matess Keyoh were put to the expert panel members at the joint review hearings for the Northern Gateway pipeline Monday afternoon. Jim Monroe, speaking on behalf of the Daiya-Matess Keyoh, wondered if Enbridge continued to maintain that none of the areas, activities, species, sites, systems, practices or other rights

required further mitigation measures beyond those already proposed. Paul Anderson, Enbridge expert, said the mitigation measures, in a general way, would be sufficient. From an environmental perspective, he said, any issues next to the Keyoh can be mitigated. However, he added the assessment looked at the area in a very general way. The next step is to get more details and plan out exactly what would be done to mitigate the effects of the pipeline, kilometre pole by kilometre pole, deciding on site specific measures based on site specific information. “That’ll involve doing centre line surveys to look at everything that would be on the proposed center line and really nailing down the exact centre line,” Anderson said.

However, generally, they see nothing that can’t be mitigated. “But in a general way there isn’t anything specific in that area that we don’t think can’t be mitigated through the measures that we’ve put together in our Volume 7,” he said. Monroe then asked how long it would take to complete the further assessment required to put together specific mitigation measures. “The detailed routing of the pipeline occurs or will occur post-certificate. So once we receive the National Energy Board certificate, we would proceed through detailed engineering and detailed design and really nail down that routing. And that’s when we do the detailed centre line surveys and some of the other things that I’ve spoken about,” Anderson said.

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A6

Prince George - News - Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

www.pgfreepress.com

Courts busy

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Community Alert WA N T E D C Crime Stoppers is asking the ppublic’s assistance in locating the ffollowing person who is wanted on a British Columbia wide warrant. AAs of 1600 hrs this 5th day of November 2012, James William N KKARRYS (B: 1979-12-24) is wanted oon a British Columbia wide warrant James William for Theft Under $5000. KARRYS is KARRYS described as a Caucasian male, 170 cm or 5’7” 170 cm or 5’7” tall and weighs 83 83 kg or 180 lbs. kg or 180 lbs. KARRYS has brown hair and brown eyes. KARRYS should be considered VIOLENT.

A llan WISHA RT/ Free Press

WA N T E D Crime Stoppers is asking the public’s assistance in locating the following person who is wanted on a British Columbia wide warrant. As of 1600 hrs this 5th day of November 2012, Alina Lenora WESLEY(B: 1988-10-28) is wanted on a British Columbia Alina Lenora wide warrant for Theft Under WESLEY $5000. WESLEY is described as 155 cm or 5’1” a First Nations female, 155 cm 54 kg or 120 lbs. or 5’1” tall and weighs 54 kg or 120 lbs. WESLEY has black hair and brown eyes.

WA N T E D

Harley Raymond POOLE 183 cm or 6’0” 73 kg or 160 lbs

Crime Stoppers is asking the public’s assistance in locating the following person who is wanted on a British Columbia wide warrant. As of 1600 hrs this 5th day of November 2012, Harley Raymond POOLE(B: 1990-02-15) is wanted on a British Columbia wide warrant for Failing to Comply with Probation. POOLE is described as a First Nations male, 183 cm or 6’0” tall and weighs 73 kg or 160 lbs. POOLE has black hair, brown eyes and has a partially amputated left leg.

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Registration Register by Thursday, November 15th. For more information, call Laura at 250-562-2131 ext. 5386 or download an entry form from the CNC-SPCA page at:

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In Provincial Court in Prince George on July 27: Bradley R. Foster was found guilty of possession of property obtained by crime, sentenced to 24 days in jail and assessed a victim surcharge of $50. Foster was also found guilty of failing to comply with a probation order, sentenced to 10 days in jail and assessed a victim surcharge of $50. Foster was also found guilty of failing to attend court when ordered to do so, sentenced to seven days in jail and assessed a victim surcharge of $50. In Provincial Court in Prince George July 30: Peter Nahal was found guilty of driving while prohibited, sentenced to 14 days in jail to be served intermittently, placed on probation until the expiration of the jail sentenced, fined $1,300 and assessed a victim surcharge of $195. In Provincial Court in Prince George on July 31: Grant D. Bertrand was found guilty of failing to comply with a condition of an undertaking, placed on probation for six months and assessed a victim surcharge of $50. In Provincial Court in Prince George Aug. 1: Tadeusz W.L. Hannaford was found guilty of assault,placed on probation for 18 months and assessed a victim surcharge of $50. Rebecca A. Kooses was found guilty of failing to produce a driver’s licence when ordered to do so, fined $250, assessed a victim surcharge of $37.50 and prohibited from driving for six months. Steven M. Lindstrom was found guilty of operating a motor vehicle while impaired, sentenced to 30 days in jail to be served on an intermittent basis, placed on probation until the expiration of the jail sentence, assessed a victim surcharge of $50 and pro-

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Court docket hibited from driving for two years. James L. McCarville was found guilty of mischief, placed on probation for 12 months and assessed a victim surcharge of $50. Shaun McCook was found guilty of assault, sentenced to 165 days in jail, placed on probation for two years and prohibited from possessing firearms for five years. McCook was also found guilty of failing to comply with a probation order and sentenced to four months in jail. McCook was also found guilty of a second count of failing to comply with a probation order, sentenced to four months in jail and placed on probation for two years. McCook was also found guilty of mischief and sentenced to 30 days in jail. Edward L. Nightingale was found guilty of being unlawfully in a dwelling-house and sentenced to 30 days in jail. Nightingale was also found guilty of failing to comply with a condition of an undertaking or recognizance and sentenced to seven days in jail. Nightingale was also found guilty of failing to comply with a probation order and sentenced to one day in jail. Nightingale was also found guilty of a second count of failing to comply with a probation order and sentenced to seven days in jail and time served of seven days. Aaron J. Saarikko was found guilty of operating a motor vehicle with a blood-alcohol reading over .08, fined $1,000, assessed a victim surcharge of $150 and prohibited from driving for one year.

FOR THE RECORD The Court Docket in the Oct. 5 issue of the Prince George Free Press contained an error. Nathan E. Schwab was found guilty of driving without due care and attention. We regret any misunderstanding this may have caused.


Prince George - News - Free Press

www.pgfreepress.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

A7

The necessities that make a house a home

I’ve always been a listening to the latbit of a gypsy, hanging est tale of woe as he my hat in about eight attempted to save the different homes in one world, one buddy at year alone. a time. I grew Rolly up that still hates way, with Life in moving. my dad You know, the fat following since he construc- lane got his DELYNDAPILON present tion all over the western prov- home (has it been inces, becoming adept nearly 20 years since at another first day he bought it? Geez, of school in another he’s getting old) he district. hasn’t moved since. My brother, Rolly, In contrast, by the learned to really hate time my boy, Dally, moving. Even at sixturned nine, we’d years-old the stubborn already lived in so little booger would many different places, lose his entire temneither of us can per at the mention of remember them all. So another move, throw when Dally asked me his things around and to promise I’d stay in refuse to budge one Bow Island until he little inch. Rolly has graduated, I agreed. always been a guy By the way, though who loves his friends. I love the people of In fact, we used to call Bow Island, if you him the social worker decide, after years of because he always had transient behaviour, to someone down in his lay down some roots, basement bedroom, try to choose a town

with more than 1,700 people in it. They had no 7-Eleven. Not even one. Anyway, Dally graduated, found out he has feet just as itchy as mine, and is determined to hit the road again in six months or so. But he’s a bit luckier than I am. To me, moving means packing boxes, putting away treasures and figuring out how I’m going to get a semi’s worth of junk into the box of a pick-up truck. To Dallas, it means tossing his jeans and band t-shirts in the back seat, filling the gas tank and hitting the road. Not fair. There are a few things I absolutely must have in order to make my new house a home. One, unfortunately for the people who’ve

helped me move, is my cartons of books. To me books are so much more than paper and ink. When I look at a stack of books I see either old friends or new ones to be made. There is my box of Baby Dally stuff. You know, a sample diaper from the first box I ever bought, that little bracelet they give new-borns, all my bridle shower cards, his early report cars... sigh. I feel mushy just thinking about it. Then there’s a painting my dad did, a beautiful autumn path surrounded by trees bright with leaves. I can almost feel those leaves crunching beneath my feet whenever I look at that painting. The other things, to me at least, are all replaceable. But I usually don’t replace them. How is it you can move into a home,

OVER WE GO!

begin the process of unpacking, and discover that somehow you brought the chipped cup that’s been bugging you for months as well as the holy sheet and your least favourite frayed shirt? Anyway, I’m thinking about past moves this week because my friend, Darby, just moved into a new neighbourhood. Being exceptionally

organized and with the help of her drill sergeant daughter, Kimberly, things went pretty smoothly. Now she has all her treasures put away in safe new spots (like the tiny little gown she wore home from the hospital when she was born - so cute and small. You know, though, she hasn’t gotten a whole lot taller since then...) and her momma’s Christmas

ornaments. Her mom loved Christmas! Wow. I guess we all have those little things that make us finally know we’re home, whether it’s something that belonged to a beloved family member or friend, or a painting. Truly though, home is where the people you care for congregate. It has very little to do with things and everything to do with people.

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A llan WISHA RT/Free Press

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A8

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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Opinion

The Prince George Free Press, founded in 1994, is published every Wednesday and Friday in Prince George by Prince George Publication Limited Partnership. Contents copyright of Prince George Publication Limited Partnership.

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Trade talk required

V

irtually every MLA’s office in B.C. was targeted by protesters on Wednesday, as opposition to the Northern Gateway pipeline intensifies. These protests follow a protest outside the Parliament Buildings in Victoria last Monday, Oct. 22. The level of opposition to the pipeline project continues to mount. Opposition crosses almost all divides, be they political, age, gender or geographic. In northern B.C., where people have traditionally supported resource-based projects much more strongly than in the Lower Mainland, opposition is just as intense as it is in this area. While it seems unlikely that Northern Gateway will proceed, given not just the massive opposition but also an almost complete lack of support from First Nations, who legally have enormous clout over projects such as these, there is no lack of people willing to step up to the plate and object. Unfortunately, they seem to be ignoring another looming policy decision that may have even more of an effect on B.C. resource projects. The federal government is about to ratify a Canada-China investment treaty. While the treaty grants some additional rights to Canadian companies doing business in China, it also grants sweeping additional authority to Chinese companies in Canada. Details of this treaty have not been debated in the House of Commons and don’t have to be. While the opposition is now mounting a campaign against the treaty, the government points out the opposition has had four opposition days since the treaty was tabled and ignored it on each occasion. It would be nice to know what actual powers this treaty will grant China and Chinese companies in Canada. If Northern Gateway were turned down, for example, and it was proposed by a Chinese company, what kind of recourse would it have? The agreement may be very benign and not have the negative impact that some people are suggesting. The trouble is, no one really knows. Many Chinese companies are very interested in Canadian resources. Citizens need to know how this treaty will affect the ability of Canadian governments to make decsions affecting those resources. - Langley Times

Pipeline pathway

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he way things are going it seems there’s going to be as many pipelines crisscrossing the north as there are freeways wheeling through the Los Angeles landscape. At last count, there are four pipelines planned to feed proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants in Kitimat and in Prince Rupert and one oil pipeline. Mind you, one of the LNG plant plans may be in trouble because the federal government has turned down a takeover bid of a Canadian company by one owned by the Malaysian government and the Enbridge Northern Gateway project is in doubt. And while not every one of the others is guaranteed, considerable amounts of money will be spent on environmental reviews which are expensive, time-consuming and, in this circumstance, perhaps a duplication of information and effort. Former Haisla chief councillor Steve Wilson years ago advocated for the creation of an energy corridor. In effect, it’s a pathway which has been granted environmental, First Nations, socio-economic etc., clearances for pipeline, transmission lines and the like. It’s always risky to condense complex proposals, but think of Mr. Wilson’s concept as you would a highway. Once constructed, it can be used for multiple reasons. They say necessity is the mother of inventions. Judging from what might happen here, innovation as well as invention should top the to-do list. - Terrace Standard

■ OPINION

The six-week campaign The American election is finally over. Another thing about our system that’s better is Whew. Hard to believe that an election in a difthat the campaign is short. We whine about politiferent country takes so much out of us here in this cians politicking months before the writ is dropped country. If only we paid as much atten(it’s happening already prior to next tion to politics in other countries … say, May’s election), but it’s still minor comChina. pared to the U.S. It’s kind of funny that in this country Writer’s Which brings me to one of my pet we have had debate in the past over peeves about the Canadian system, which Block how much time should elapse between was lifted from the U.S. … fixed election BILLPHILLIPS the writ being dropped and the actual dates. Canadian politicians enamoured election. The debate, I think, was over with Americana pushed for years to have 40 days or 60 days. In the U.S. the election, it seems, fixed election dates in Canada. Now we have them, goes on for years. both provincially and federally. While I don’t like some of the nastiness that arises One of the reasons the U.S. has fixed election during our election campaigns, we’ve still got a dates is the fact when they’re electing a president, long way to go to top our southern cousins … and the entire process takes about a year to complete. that’s a good thing. There’s primaries, conventions, Super Big Gulps (or Judging by the ads running on American televiwas that a Tuesday?) and it goes on and on. sion, the ruination of the nation starts today. JudgIn Canada, we can pull off an election campaign ing by the ads, it doesn’t really matter who got in six weeks … beginning to end, in and out, over elected. Judging by the ads nobody but scurrilous and done. When it doesn’t take a year to run an scalawags were seeking office for both the Republielection, you can have one whenever you want. cans and the Democrats at all levels of government. Plus, for the political junkies, like myself, it was Judging by the ads, our friends to the south had two also great fun speculating when the writ would be choices for the White House … Lucifer or Beelzedropped. Some pushed it to near the end of their bub. Judging by the ads, Mayans were out by about five-year term (the Socreds when the writing was six weeks. on the wall, the NDP when the writing was on the If there is one thing about our political system wall) and others liked to go early (Jean Chretien, that’s better than the Americans’, (and there are Dave Barrett … although it didn’t work for him). plenty), it’s that we haven’t sunk to that acrimoniThe timing of the election was a critical piece of ous low of negative advertising. the campaign strategy. Now, not so much. And, Let’s hope we don’t go down that road, even sadly, I think it’s more because our politicians now though it’s creeping into our system more and like to rule rather than govern and elections are more. viewed as getting in the way of that.

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This Prince George Free Press is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org * Based on Stats Canada average of 2.2 person per household. ** CCAB Audit March 2009.


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Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Viewpoints

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The Prince George Free Press

welcomes letters from our readers. Send submissions to 1773 South Lyon Street, Prince George, B.C. V2N 1T3. e-mail - editor@pgfreepress.com

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Legalizing pot won’t solve the problems Editor: Re: Tax source benefits from legalized pot. Today many pot dealers are willing to risk often clumsy assassination attempts by competitors and long prison terms for doing the same, all to protect their territory and profits. If legalized, will someone explain to me why dealers then become such law-abiding citizens that they are unwilling to risk long drawn-out court cases for tax evasion with a new business-oriented, white-collar criminal court

policy and often negotiated guilty pleas and fines? If possibly lucrative pot licences are doled out to a new set of honest pot dealers (and some may already be negotiated as elected reps grab at any new taxes for investing, wasting, or administering other peoples’ money), will the present dealers accept the new law and vanish? Or is it likely they will continue to compete and require even more extensive and costly policing, prosecuting, law court processing, and sentencing

time to ensure a promised suitable market share for the new licenced operators? That could show a benefit of employment opportunities for new investigators and tax collectors to replace the departed 20/20 vision and create a profit bubble for morticians as well. But possibly the government has acquired a new serum whereby they can be vaccinated against dishonesty or it has found a source of dishonesty pills like birth control pills that they must swallow every morning.

It could be the only law operating with this trendy

theory will be the law of unintended consequences.

Harold Burgoyne Prince George

STACK OF DOLLS

Council skips review chat Editor: On Monday night City Council was invited to attend a Community Conversation on the Core Service Review. This was put to council as an open invitation to hear from Prince George residents about the Mayor and Council’s plans to cut, contract out or privatize our city services. One would think this would have been a welcomed invitation but no, not for Mayor Green, or councillors Wilbur, Koehler, Krause and Stolz. I would have thought if Mayor and Council were so

strongly in favour of the KPMG report and the opportunities outline in it, there would be no reason to fabricate excuses, and not only once, as to why they will not entertain this community conversation. I find their attitudes deplorable and it is a strong showing of discontent towards the residents of Prince George. We have a right to speak up, for or against the Mayor and Council’s plans for us and our city. If they do not want to hear it they should look for another job. Troy Zohner

Te re s a M A LLA M / Fre e Pre s s

Diane Jordens with some of her Toad’s World animal dolls inspired by classic children’s tales at her booth at Studio Fair. The three-day event at the PG Civic Centre had 93 juried artisans displaying and selling their wares.

Blacktop Blockheads know no season I can’t really call the drivers I saw last should indicate the need for driving slower week Blacktop Blockheads, and taking more care. because most of them were Not for the one person I saw the driving on snow. Monday of the snowstorm, who How about Whiteout Weircame swinging around a corner Allan’s dos? and slid across into the second Amblings Works for me. lane, bumping the curb while ALLANWISHART going sideways, which helped • I would have hoped that having a lot of snow and ice to straighten the vehicle out to the on the road would have made some drivpoint where the driver could put the pedal ers think a bit more about the way they to the metal and zoom off through the were driving, and strive to do so in a safer snow. manner. Wrong again. • Of course, some drivers like the snow The number of total idiots on the road because it does make the roads more slipdidn’t decrease, although I would say the pery, and gives them a “reason” to go number of people driving intelligently (i.e. charging through yellow or even red lights. with respect for the changed conditions) “Well, officer, I couldn’t stop safely even did increase. It’s not that difficult a conthough I saw the light change. Well, yes, I cept, people. Snow equals slippery which was going about 75 on a municipal street,

but that was the main reason I figured I wouldn’t be able to stop in time.” Somehow I don’t think telling the officer you were speeding and that’s why you couldn’t stop is going to stop them from giving you a ticket. • The next person I have seen recently is one who I do feel a little sorry for, but a lot of times they bring the problem on themselves. This is the person who has come up to a stop sign, and sees a slight break in the traffic, so they start to make their turn . . . and get their tires spinning in the snow as they do so, which usually results in oncoming traffic having to slow down (or stop) while our friend finally makes their turn. If there is snow or ice on the corner, even I know that’s going to slow you down a bit

when you’re trying to turn, so make sure you have a lot more room than you needed a month ago to make that turn. Of course, it would also help if the more of the roads were plowed within a couple of days of the snow. As of Sunday, six days after the main storm stopped, 18th Avenue still hadn’t been plowed. And don’t get me started on how 15th Avenue eastbound between Foothills and Nicholson is mostly one lane because of the snow piled in the inside lane by the plows. • All that said, last week may have been the wildest week of weather I’ve seen in some time in Prince George. We went from about three days of steady snow to -20 to rain within the course of about seven days. Weird.

Free Press reserves the right to reject unsigned letters. Letters are edited for brevity, legality and taste. Contact Editor Bill Phillips, 250-564-0005

Coffee with a reporter Stories come to reporters in a variety of ways. News releases, press conferences and phone calls are some. Sometimes you might think whatever story you have in mind isn’t worth a phone call or visit to the newspaper’s office, but is it worth a cup of coffee?

Reporter DeLynda Pilon would like the chance to hear what you have to say so every Friday at 11 a.m. she will be having a coffee break at Zoe’s Java House at 1251 Fourth Ave., and is hoping you will drop by to chat. Or just stop in and introduce yourself.

11:00 am Fridays at Zoe’s Java House at 1251 - 4th Avenue

DELYNDAPILON


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MACMASTER: Canadian fiddling legend coming back to P.G. A14

Community

Are you ready for the Pink Floyd Experience? A16

TERESA MALLAM 250-564-0005 arts@pgfreepress.com

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Free Press

Playbill WINE TASTING Theatre North West’s International Wine Festival is on Saturday evening (Nov. 10) and tickets are sold out but wine lovers can still get in on the afternoon tasting from 2 to 4 p.m. Tickets are $30 each and available at the theatre by calling 250-563-6969 or at Books and Company. Amazing B.C. and international wines with music stylings provided by Peter Stevenson.

LOUIS RIEL DAY The Northern Interior Metis Cultural Society, Prince George Metis Elders Society will host a Louis Riel Day Potluck on Nov. 16. Silent auction, 50/50 draws. Doors 4:30 p.m. Dinner at 6 p.m. Kinsmen Hall, 777 Kinsmen Place. Admission is a nonperishable food item. This is a fundraiser for drop in for the homeless and street involved people. Phone 250-561-9484 for information.

BIG CITY BEES Author Maggie de Vries will launch her new children’s book called Big City Bees on Saturday, Nov. 24 from 5 to 5 p.m. at Artspace above Books and Company. The colourful book is illustrated by Renne Benoit. Bring the children to help celebrate the launch. Refreshments will be served.

■ TWISTED CORK

Henry wants to jazz the city up Singer-songwriter sets weekly date for music at local club TERESA MALLAM arts@pgfreepress.com

She has songs in her heart and jazz tunes that she wants Prince George audiences to hear. Ali Henry is a formally trained jazz vocalist who mixes it up with traditional and timeless jazz, Blues and Bossa Nova standards to create a fusion of melodic creativity with a chic, classy and progressive sound. Learning lyrics in different languages come easily to her as a biologist and vocalist. Henry has carved out a musical niche for herself locally and she hopes that her unique song stylings will bring back jazz to the city. “I work at this full time so I really put myself into it. A lot of jazz musicians have left the city [for example Maureen Washington who lives in Victoria] and I want to bring back that 1930s kind of vibe in Prince George,” Henry told the Free Press Tuesday. “I’ve recently formed a duo with Eric Tompkins and we’ll be performing jazz music at The Twisted Cork every Thursday.” Her website describes her style: “Music, etched upon her soul, is used as her primary form of expression, emotional translation and perception. Exposed vulnerability, oneness with the music

A lla n W ISHA RT/ Fre e Pre s s

Ali Henry provided the vocals and Eric Tompkins took care of the guitar work during a recent Friday night show at Cafe Voltaire. and correctedness to self, delivers not only sound to an audience but the opportunity for others to receive and tune into new frequencies of energy and endless possibility concerning inner realization. In 2011, the artist teamed up with pianist

Neville Bowman and double bass player Bernie Addington in Kelowna to record an album with jazz standards called On My Mind which is available on iTunes. Henry lives with her husband, a biology professor at UNBC, and the couple’s toddler and,

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while it’s a busy life, the singer songwriter wouldn’t have it any other way. She plans to tour western Canada in the future and perhaps move to Shanghai, China. “I’m already working on my new album which will have some of my

original songs on it and will be out in 2013. I’m really looking forward to it.” Starting Nov. 29 newly formed jazz duo with guitarist Eric Tompkins and Ali Henry will be at the Twisted Cork every Thursday from 7 to 10 p.m.


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A11

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SODA helps with disabled Hilary Crowley leads group helping in southern India TERESA MALLAM arts@pgfreepress.com

They work with limbs that don’t move on their own and with children and adults who may have lost hope for the future. But the Samuha Overseas Development Association (SODA) has made great strides in helping people achieve both mobility and momentum. Founded by physiotherapist and philanthropist Hilary Crowley, SODA supports a disability program in South India. The program also provides a learning experience for students who see first hand how their skills can help adults and children achieve a better quality of life. “Since 2002 I have

been taking Canadian physiotherapy and occupational therapy students to the project and I shall be returning in January with three more physiotherapy students from UBC,� said Crowley. The Prince George based group is holding its annual fundraising dinners for the India project at the Dana Mandi Restaurant on Nov. 25, 26 and 27. “The residents of Prince George have been incredibly generous in supporting SODA and we have been able to send $20,000 annually for program funding for this project. On top of this, two years ago we raised funds for an early intervention centre which is now up and running.�

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The facility is multiuse, she says. “This is a beautiful centre for children under six and their families to receive therapy and counselling services. Last year we raised funds for a spinal cord injury centre. Again, we reached our target successfully and the building is now ready to go.� The group also forwarded money recently for much needed physiotherapy equipment, accommodation and kitchen needs. “We have been assured that this [spinal cord injury] centre will also be up and running by January 2013 which we are very excited about,� she said.

Funds raised from the dinner in November will go towards the ongoing running of the therapy programs for 2013, said Crowley. Over the years, she’s been fortunate to see the results of her and her dedicated team’s work. “I spent one year with Samuha in India in 1994 and 1995 training people in physiotherapy and working mostly with children with polio. Polio is now eradicated in the villages where we work with people with all kinds of disability but it continues to be predominantly children with developmental disabilities.� Samuha Overseas Development Association invites you to FAMOUS PLAYERS 6

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an Indian Buffet and slide show of SODA’s work in India at Dana Mandi Restaurant, 2095 Fifth Ave. Doors open at 6 p.m. Nov. 25, 26 and 27. Admission by donation. Reserve your seat by phoning Mary Ann at 250-5632248 or by e-mail to soda.sec@gmail.com.

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A12

Prince George Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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Tuesday, April 16th, 2013 Prince George Civic Centre Conference & Workshops 8:00am–4:00pm Awards Gala 6:00pm–10:00pm Opening Ceremonies:

Award A ward ccategories: ategories:

Honourable Shirley Bond, MLA Prince George – Valemount The Minister of Justice and Attorney General

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Mayor Shari Green Prince George

Business B usiness Women Women of of the the Year Ye Award

Keynote speakers:

Aboriginal Women off D Distinction Award A boriginal W omen o ist

Mayor Lori Ackerman Fort St. John

Watch W atch for for more more info info on on the criteria for eeach ach ccategory ategor y and and how how to nominate

Community Enrichment Award C ommunity E nrichment A IInfluence nfluence & Impact Impact Woman Woma of the Year Home Based Business of the Year Award H ome B ased B usiness Women Wo Professional Award P rofessional Woman Woman of of Distinction Di

Watch the Prince George Free Press for registration information For more information contact spnorthernevents@gmail.com | 250.552.3817 IN PARTNERSHIP WITH


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Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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First-time author

READY TO CAROL

Part travelogue and part fiction, Adrienne Fitzpatrick’s first book, The Earth Remembers Everything, published by Caitlin Press, is a masterful blend of history, travel and fictional narrative, tracing the author’s journeys to some of the most difficult destinations in the world: The Cui Chi Tunnels in Vietnam, Hiroshima in Japan and AuschwitzBirkenau in Poland, First Nations sites such as Mosquito Lake on Moresby Island, Haida Gwaii and Chinlac and deserted Carrier village at the confluence of the Stuart and Nechako rivers, where the Chilcotin massacred the Carrier in 1745. These places where violent eruptions occurred throughout the

history of humanity have created deep cracks in the emotional bonds between the people who were there. In this first book by Adrienne Fitzpatrick, she struggles with how to speak the unspeakable and questions what it is that we find so compelling about the places we are drawn to. The answer, she finds, lies in the memories that are stored in the earth. The Earth Remembers Everything is an intimate, powerful story in which Place is the main character and we are taken along to bear witness to these sites that still hold the sadness and secrets of the past. Fitzpatrick earned her Masters in English at UNBC where she completed her creative thesis.

NOW OPEN at the PG Rollerdome Family Fun Centre! Teresa MA LLA M/Free Press

Makenna Thiffault, left, and Emma Forgevon in their costumes from A Christmas Carol at the Judy Russell Enchainement Centre booth at the 36th annual Studio Fair on Friday. The three-day event attracted 93 artisans and hundreds of visitors to the PG Civic Centre.

Cundiff plays music tomorrow Singer songwriter Craig Cardiff plays Nancy O’s on Thursday. The Ontario native, known for his soft voice and for the connection he makes with audiences, was recently nominated for the Canadian Folk Music Awards 2012 Contemporary Singer of the Year Award. Cardiff is nominated for his latest release, Floods and Fires, an album that was recognized last year with a Juno Award nomination as Roots and Traditional Album of the Year: Solo. Cardiff and producer/ engineer Ben Leggett spent 18 months working together to record the album in Cardiff’s home studio in Arnprior, Ontario. “I wanted to take the time these songs deserved and not rush them,” said Cardiff. The title Floods and Fires alludes to Biblical plagues which bring both destruction and opportunity. The album’s 14 tracks examine love and love’s leaving, celebrate parenthood and ultimately explore

the balance between heartbreak and am looking forward to coland joy. laborating with Ben more on “The songs on this album projects like this.” were crafted during a difficult Hailed by Gordon Lightfoot period of my life,” says Cardiff. as a “songwriter who needs to “When hard things happened, be heard”, Cardiff is known not I kept reminding myself to only for his musical style but choose joy instead also for the close of choosing to be relationship he has afraid and closing with his fans. He up. That’s what I has been nurturing kept coming back that close relationto – fear rents the ship all across Cancheapest room in ada throughout his the house. I didn’t 15-year career by want to live like performing wherthat anymore.” ever people want to The artist’s work see him. A long-time was featured in advocate of alterthe soundtrack for nate venue tourCraig Cundiff an independent -– Here Thursday ing, he has played Canadian film that in boathouses, jails, won the Audience backyards, churches Choice Best Feature award at and many living rooms. the Cinefest Sudbury InternaCardiff will perform songs tional Film Festival. from Floods and Fires and “It’s a dark romantic com- many of his previous albums edy,” says Cardiff. “Ben and I on Thursday, Nov. 8 at Nancy composed both existing songs O’s starting at 8 p.m. Advance from Floods and Fires and also tickets are $15 available at the ambient soundtrack... I’m www.craigcardiff.com. Tickets proud of how it turned out are $20 at the door.

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Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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Natalie MacMaster plays Vanier Hall in April.

MacMaster’s flying fiddle coming to city One of Atlantic Canada’s most dynamic and talented musicians is coming to Prince George. Fiddler Natalie MacMaster will be in concert on April 6 at Vanier Hall. Tickets go on sale Friday at all Ticketmaster outlets. MacMaster is a member of the Order of Canada and a Juno award winner, and the majority of her 11 albums have reached gold status. She is best known as a virtuoso fiddler, thrilling audiences around the world at venues such as Carnegie Hall and Massey Hall. She is music ambassador to her beloved traditional Cape Breton sound and is married to fiddler Donnell Leahy of Leahy. MacMaster, a mother of five, performs an average of 100 dates a year. She co-hosts the annual Leahy Music Camp with her husband and his band in Lakefield, Ontario and has appeared numerous times on the CBC and Canada AM, and had guest spots on Christmas specials like Rita MacNeil’s Christmas and Holiday Festival on Ice. MacMaster is also the author of a beautiful 161-page coffee table book, Natalie MacMaster’s Cape Breton Aire, with Pulitzer Prize winner Eileen McNamara and featuring Eric Roth’s photography. Her latest album, Cape Breton Girl, was released in November 2011. An Evening with Natalie MacMaster is on April 6, 2013 at Vanier Hall. Tickets go on sale Friday at 10 a.m., available at all Ticketmaster outlets or by phone at 1-855-985-500 or order online at www.ticketmaster.ca.

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A15

A real snow job My mother always told me that in polite company we do not discuss sex, religion or politics. Well today I do. I’m not the hard news reporter for the Free Press so I have few occasions on which to discuss local politics and what goes on during council meetings. I do see our hard-working city Tea councillors at public – and there’s no with events doubt they put in the Teresa hours. I only wish that when it comes to at TERESAMALLAM least this one issue, they would also use their brains. The issue? As one who navigates this city daily to conduct interviews and cover community events, I have been royally pissed off (who said I was polite company?) with snow piles heaped metres high at high traffic areas such as 15th and Lyon St. Recently, the snow towered so high that as a motorist, you had to pull far out into the oncoming traffic to make sure no one is coming. If there is a car coming, you have just enough time to pull back and wait. What’s up with that? Why is this giant “snow barricade” still there, day after day? Are they waiting for judges in the snow building contest? This particular spot is located just down from a major ICBC centre with its motorist safety campaigns. It is just one bad spot. There are many. Last weekend, I circled the block at the Civic Centre and adjacent parking lots many times to find a parking spot to attend Studio Fair. Snow from the streets had been dumped where cars should be. This isn’t the seasonal whine about the lack of timely snow clearing coming after complaints about pot holes. This is a serious safety hazard that should be addressed by city council – if city council had its priorities right. Trips to China? I don’t care how Mayor and council dress it, promote it or justify it – I care about how they pay for it. Instead of bonding, twinning with business people in China, why not focus on local business owners who would perhaps like people to be able to access their shops? I saw people getting stuck in the snow as they parked alongside the curb downtown. OK, the budget for snow removal in our northern towns is hefty – that is where “special funds” really do come in. This week the rain did the job for them, our streets are mostly bare. But unless they have a rainmaker sitting on city council, they just got lucky. Good planning is a better option. When it comes to winter driving conditions and road safety, the City must do its utmost to make this a safe place to live, work and drive. On his blog Andrew Kurjata says, “[Prince George] is not the only city to spend money on trips to China.” True, but just because all the other kids are doing it, doesn’t make it right. Just ask my mother. CONTESTS CONTES TS PRODU PRODUCTS CTS STORE STORES S FLY FLYERS ERS DEALS DEALS COUPO COUPONS NS BROCHU BRO CHURES RES CA CATAL TALOGU OGUES ES CON CONTES TESTS TS PR PRODU ODUCTS CTS ST STORE ORES S FLYERS FLY ERS DEALS DEALS COUPO COUPONS NS BRO BROCHU CHURES RES CATAL CATALOGU OGUES ES

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Prince George - Community - Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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Prince George - Community - Free Press

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MacMaster’s flying fiddle coming to city One of Atlantic Canada’s most dynamic and talented musicians is coming to Prince George. Fiddler Natalie MacMaster will be in concert on April 6 at Vanier Hall. Tickets go on sale Friday at all Ticketmaster outlets. MacMaster is a member of the Order of Canada and a Juno award winner, and the majority of her 11 albums have reached gold status. She is best known as a virtuoso fiddler, thrilling audiences around the world at venues such as Carnegie Hall and Massey Hall. She is music ambassador to her beloved traditional Cape Breton sound and is married to fiddler Donnell Leahy of Leahy. MacMaster, a mother of five, performs an average of 100 dates a year. She co-hosts the annual Leahy Music Camp with her husband and his band in Lakefield, Ontario and has appeared numerous times on the CBC and Canada AM, and had guest spots on Christmas specials like Rita MacNeil’s Christmas and Holiday Festival on Ice. MacMaster is also the author of a beautiful 161-page coffee table book, Natalie MacMaster’s Cape Breton Aire, with Pulitzer Prize winner Eileen McNamara and featuring Eric Roth’s photography. Her latest album, Cape Breton Girl, was released in November 2011. An Evening with Natalie MacMaster is on April 6, 2013 at Vanier Hall. Tickets go on sale Friday at 10 a.m., available at all Ticketmaster outlets or by phone at 1-855-985-500 or order online at www.ticketmaster.ca.

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A15

A real snow job My mother always told me that in polite company we do not discuss sex, religion or politics. Well today I do. I’m not the hard news reporter for the Free Press so I have few occasions on which to discuss local politics and what goes on during council meetings. I do see our hard-working city Tea councillors at public – and there’s no with events doubt they put in the Teresa hours. I only wish that when it comes to at TERESAMALLAM least this one issue, they would also use their brains. The issue? As one who navigates this city daily to conduct interviews and cover community events, I have been royally pissed off (who said I was polite company?) with snow piles heaped metres high at high traffic areas such as 15th and Lyon St. Recently, the snow towered so high that as a motorist, you had to pull far out into the oncoming traffic to make sure no one is coming. If there is a car coming, you have just enough time to pull back and wait. What’s up with that? Why is this giant “snow barricade” still there, day after day? Are they waiting for judges in the snow building contest? This particular spot is located just down from a major ICBC centre with its motorist safety campaigns. It is just one bad spot. There are many. Last weekend, I circled the block at the Civic Centre and adjacent parking lots many times to find a parking spot to attend Studio Fair. Snow from the streets had been dumped where cars should be. This isn’t the seasonal whine about the lack of timely snow clearing coming after complaints about pot holes. This is a serious safety hazard that should be addressed by city council – if city council had its priorities right. Trips to China? I don’t care how Mayor and council dress it, promote it or justify it – I care about how they pay for it. Instead of bonding, twinning with business people in China, why not focus on local business owners who would perhaps like people to be able to access their shops? I saw people getting stuck in the snow as they parked alongside the curb downtown. OK, the budget for snow removal in our northern towns is hefty – that is where “special funds” really do come in. This week the rain did the job for them, our streets are mostly bare. But unless they have a rainmaker sitting on city council, they just got lucky. Good planning is a better option. When it comes to winter driving conditions and road safety, the City must do its utmost to make this a safe place to live, work and drive. On his blog Andrew Kurjata says, “[Prince George] is not the only city to spend money on trips to China.” True, but just because all the other kids are doing it, doesn’t make it right. Just ask my mother. CONTESTS CONTES TS PRODU PRODUCTS CTS STORE STORES S FLY FLYERS ERS DEALS DEALS COUPO COUPONS NS BROCHU BRO CHURES RES CA CATAL TALOGU OGUES ES CON CONTES TESTS TS PR PRODU ODUCTS CTS ST STORE ORES S FLYERS FLY ERS DEALS DEALS COUPO COUPONS NS BRO BROCHU CHURES RES CATAL CATALOGU OGUES ES

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Prince George - Community - Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

www.pgfreepress.com

â–  CN CENTRE MARCH 11

Prepare for the Pink Floyd Experience Pink Floyd remains one of the most influencial rock bands of all time. Their record breaking status is legendary. The Pink Floyd Experi-

ence, a tribute performance which features the band’s greatest hits and rarities comes to CN Centre March 11. Tickets go on sale Friday. The band’s appeal continues

The Cold War is back. White. Fluffy. Sneaky. Goes by the code name “Snow.� Keep winter under surveillance.

and spans the generations. Get ready for the Pink Floyd Experience with its spectacular light show, full quadraphonic sound and six outstanding musicians dedicated to bringing you the most authentic Floyd Experience possible. The show is not only onstage, it engulfs the audience. The Pink Floyd Experience is a full-on sensory assault with interpretive videos, plane crashes, flying pig, helicopter – it’s all there. This is the show for the ultimate Floyd Fan and it gets closer to the true Pink Floyd concert experience every year. All of Pink Floyd’s greatest

hits are performed live including favourites such as Money, Wish You Were Here, Time, Comfortably Numb, Another Brick in the Wall and rarities not often heard live. Pink Floyd has sold more than 200 million albums have been sold since 1967 with four Grammy nominations in the 70s, 80s and 90s. They were one of the first bands to use pyrotechnics, video and light shows in their stage acts. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996. Dark Side of the Moon broke all chart records when it stayed on the Billboard Top 200 Album charts for 741 weeks. Nearly 1 million

Pink Floyd catalog albums are sold each year. “The Pink Floyd Experience accurately portrays the troubled souls that made the genius of Roger Waters and Dave Gilmour so outstanding,� said Dene Mackenzie Otago Daily, of the internationally touring show. For more information on the band visit www.thepinkfloydexperience.net. Tickets for the March 11, 2013 Pink Floyd Experience at CN Centre go on sale Friday at 11 a.m. at all Ticketmaster locations including CN Centre’s box office or order online at www.ticketmaster.ca.

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The Pink Floyd Experience will play CN Centre on March 11 next year.

TNW makes Joyful Noise about Handel’s Messiah For many people it just wouldn’t be Christmas without the sound of Handel’s Messiah in the air. But few people know that those sounds came very close to never being heard at all. Audiences will experience the full, true story of how George Frederick Handel and his Messiah overcame great opposition to delight the world with music in Theatre North West’s production, Joyful Noise by Tim Slover. Joyful Noise runs from Nov. 15 through Dec. 5. Susannah Cibber is a gifted singer on the London stage but she has lately become the object of ridicule after being embroiled in a sex scandal. Scandal and public ridicule are what Susannah has in common with Handel. His latest opera is an abject failure and he couldn’t be less impressed. The librettist Charles Jennens is serious about the words of Christ reaching the people in music

– he wants it all just so. Bishop Henry Egerton is equally serious: he wants to stop the scriptures from being made into entertainment. The mercurial King George II has decisive power over the final outcome – but he has his own reasons to be hesitant to exercise that power. When all this passion and power are brought together at cross purposes, only one possibility springs forth: total chaos. The plot twists come as fast and furious as a cadenza but the magic of Joyful Noise is in how from all the chaos, what emerges is a story of redemption. Joyful Noise marks the return of Billy Vickers to the TNW stage in the role of handel. Vickers is one of the TNW patron’s most beloved actors, having twice played Ebenezer Scrooge in a Christmas Carol (1998 and 2008) and appeared in The Kite and Dancock’s Dance. Tickets for Joyful Noise are available at Books and Company or by phone at 250-614-0039.


www.pgfreepress.com

Prince George Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

A17

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A18

www.pgfreepress.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

COLUMN: This is Movember, so guess what I’m doing? A20

Sports

UNBC started Canada West hoops action with a win A21

ALISTAIR MCINNIS 250-564-0005 sports@pgfreepress.com

www.pgfreepress.com FOOTBALL CHAMPS

Sports

Shorts COUGARS

The Prince George Cougars are coming off a pair of losses in a weekend road swing in B.C.’s southern interior. On Friday night, the Cats managed a point in a 2-1 shootout defeat against the Kamloops Blazers. The next evening in the Okanagan, they were blanked 5-0 by the Kelowna Rockets. The team’s Western Hockey League record sits at seven wins, eight losses, one overtime setback and one shootout defeat (7-8-1-1). The Cougars open a doubleheader against the Edmonton Oil Kings on Friday at CN Centre.

SPRUCE KINGS

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Like the WHL’s Cougars, the B.C. Hockey League’s Prince George Spruce Kings took home one of a possible four points in two weekend road games. Playing in the Lower Mainland, the Spruce Kings lost 5-1 to the Langley Rivermen on Friday and 3-2 in overtime to the Surrey Eagles on Saturday. The Spruce Kings have 11 wins, five losses, one tie and two overtime defeats (11-5-1-2) this BCHL season. For more on the Spruce Kings and Cougars, check Friday’s Free Press.

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Members of the College Heights Cougars celebrate after capturing the PG Bowl football trophy on Saturday in Vanderhoof. The Cougars downed the host Nechako Valley Vikings 8-0 in the game, the senior varsity championship in B.C. high school football’s Northern Conference. De nnis PA R FITT/ Sp e cia l to Fre e Pre s s

Coach and player win gold with BC Hockey ALISTAIR MCINNIS sports@pgfreepress.com

For Trevor Sprague and Brad Morrison, a Cariboo Cougars loss in Kelowna may have been the only negative on an otherwise positive weekend. Celebrating a gold-medal triumph in Calgary on Sunday, it’s unlikely the hockey coach and player had that on their mind. Sprague and Morrison were members of Team BC at the Western Canada U16 Challenge Cup, their squad outscoring Alberta 9-3 in the tournament final. Morrison, a 15-year-old forward and Cougars’ rookie, made the 20-player B.C. roster. Sprague, the Cariboo bench boss, was named an assistant coach for the provincial team. Provincial representatives from Saskatchewan and Manitoba

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rounded out the four-team tournament, which ran from Thursday to Sunday. Saskatchewan downed Manitoba 2-1 in Sunday’s bronze medal game. “It’s awesome,” Sprague says of being part of the Team BC staff. “Right from pre-skates to coaching the best athletes that we have for U16 in British Columbia was outstanding. Everybody said we were the favourites going in too.” Morrison played a key role in Team BC’s decisive victory in the championship game, recording two goals and an assist. “It’s going to be put some confidence on me too for sure, having won gold at this tournament,” says Morrison, who grew up in Prince George and Kelowna. “I think it should probably help me with my next Major Midget game coming up.” Team BC was led offensively

BF &

by 15-year-old North Vancouver product Jansen Harkins, who had a five-point game with four goals and an assist. Harkins and Morrison were selected by the Prince George Cougars in the first round of the 2012 Western Hockey League Bantam Draft. Harkins was taken second and Morrison seventh. Top draft pick Matthew Barzal, another forward, collected one goal and three assists on Sunday. The Seattle Thunderbirds selected Barzal, a 15-year-old Coquitlam native, first overall in the 2012 bantam draft. “(The Prince George Cougars) are going to be a dynasty team come here in the near future, with two great kids like Morrison and Harkins,” Sprague says. “It was outstanding being able to coach both of them.” Team BC finished the competi-

tion 4-0 overall.

CARIBOO COUGARS Sprague and Morrison returned home with a busy week ahead. They rejoined the Cariboo Cougars to prepare for a neutral-site doubleheader. They play the Thompson Blazers this Saturday and Sunday in McBride. In their latest game, Sunday in Kelowna, the Cougars blanked the Okanagan Rockets 8-0. Second-year goalie Nathan Warren was in net for the goose egg, his second shutout of the season. The Rockets outscored the Cariboo squad 5-1 on Saturday. The Cougars are 11-3-0 on the season, good for second place in the BC Hockey Major Midget League. The Vancouver NW Giants (11-0-1), with one more point, lead the 11-team standings.

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Prince George - Sports - Free Press

www.pgfreepress.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

A19

■ CROSS COUNTRY RUNNING PROVINCIALS

Participants battle through snow and slush ALISTAIR MCINNIS sports@pgfreepress.com

Most of the runners who competed in B.C. high school cross country running provincials on Saturday are used to seeing more green than white on the ground. But before the event unfolded in northcentral B.C. for the first time, they were greeted by sights not often seen in the southwest corner of the province. Showing its true winter colours, Prince George welcomed visitors to a blanket of snow. Despite challenges created by Mother Nature, organizers were pleased with how the event at D.P. Todd Secondary shaped up. “Everything went really well. It was as good a meet as I’ve ever seen, actually much better than I’ve ever seen,” organizer Brian Martinson said. “We did a lot more for the kids than has ever been done before, that’s for sure.” Significant snowfall in late October, weather that took Prince George residents by surprise, challenged volunteers as they cleared the routes for the boys’ and girls’ races. Martinson noted that of the close to 100 volunteers, about 10 put in hours undergoing field preparation work. “We had anywhere from probably three to

A tight group of male runners take off from the start line to begin the 6.3-kilometre course during B.C. high school cross country running provincials, Saturday at the D.P. Todd Secondary fields. A lis ta ir M cINNIS/ Fre e Pre s s

five snow blowers at any one time out there for about three days in a row. Rough estimate would be at least 100 hours of snowblowing.” Milder temperatures and rainfall followed. As runners tried not to let the conditions get the best of them, staying on their feet proved to be challenging at times. In the end, most of the runners completed courses carved through snow. Prince George showed its volunteer spirit as participants warmed up to food and hot chocolate inside D.P. Todd Secondary. Between 550 and 575 students participated in Saturday’s event. In the boys’ 6.3-kilo-

metre race, Grade 12 student Tim Delcourt of Surrey’s Kwantlen Park Secondary captured the title at a time of 22:20. He crossed the finish line 15 seconds ahead of runnerup Ben Weir of Victoria’s Glenlyon Norfolk School. Nicole Hutchinson of West Vancouver’s Sentinel Secondary was the winner of the girls’ 4.3 km race, clocking in at 17:44. North Delta Secondary’s Miryam Bassett finished second with a time of 17:52. The top finishers among North Central District participants were Alex Nemethy of Vanderhoof’s Nechako Valley Secondary and College Heights Secondary student Julia

Balazs takes a fall were going and then down the hill I fell. It goes down and back up, and sports@pgfreepress.com I fell on the downhill, so I got up Nerves got the best of Emma and kept on running.” Balazs. Balazs continued after sliding on On the provincial stage in her her stomach. After getting back on hometown, Balazs couldn’t com- her feet, it didn’t take long for her plete the cross-country running race to stop. p at D.P. Todd Second“I couldn’t breathe ary. The Kelly Road when I was going up Secondary Grade 12 the hill.” student buckled under Balazs was shaken, pressure during the but not seriously girls’ 4.3-kilometre injured. She’s confirace, taking a tumble dent in her ability to coming down a hill bounce back with a in Moore’s Meadow strong performance Park. at the upcoming Balazs is no stranger Athletics Canada to success, the young national cross counEmma Balazs running star showing try championships - Prince George runner an ability to rise to the in Vancouver on occasion in the past. Nov. 24. She qualiBut she admitted to being nervous fied for the Canadian meet with during the week leading into Satur- a second-place result at B.C. cross day’s competition. country championships on Oct. 27 “I thought I might have it under in Abbotsford. control (Friday), but I guess not and Classified as a youth, Balazs is then when I started, I just wasn’t moving up to the junior class for the feeling right,” she said. “Then we event in Vancouver, a 5 km run.

Babicz. Nemethy took 14th place (23:47) in the boys’ race, and Babicz ended up 32nd (19:33) in the girls’ competition. Two-hundred and

sixty-five runners completed the boys’ race, while 251 finished the girls’ event. The races brought supporters from throughout the province.

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A20

Prince George - Sports - Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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A lis ta ir M cINNIS/ Fre e Pre s s

Duchess Park Condors’ Hazel McLean, left, and Maddy Ballantyne go up for a block against the Cedars Christian Eagles during the championship match of a senior girls volleyball tournament on Saturday at CNC. The Condors edged the Eagles 2-1 in the best-of-three final to win gold in the eight-team competition. Also on the weekend, Bulkley Valley Christian captured the title at a nine-team senior boys volleyball tournament at PGSS.

? ?

■ OPINION

Are you new to Prince George?

Have you delivered a baby in the last 3 months? Or know someone who is pregnant?

Welcome Wagon has information and gifts to present on these occasions. Visits are done by appointment only please call … Corrine Kirkpatrick 250 640-0637 corrine.kirkpatrick@gmail.com welcomewagon.ca

www.pgfreepress.com

Joining the forces of Movember

First off, I’ll try and make it appear like I’m not soliciting my readers. November means Movember. For the first time in my life, I’m participating in the monthlong campaign. You read that corULL rectly. My baby-faced self is attempting to OURT grow a moustache RESS to support men’s ALISTAIR MCINNIS health issues, raising awareness and funds for Prostate Cancer Canada and male mental health programs. It’s not going to be pretty. I don’t expect to escape this month without being mocked, harassed and laughed at. There’s a reason why, at 30 years old, I have yet to make a serious attempt at sporting facial hair. It isn’t because I love shaving. Despite obvious benefits to looking younger, there are times I wish I could’ve grown a moustache in a few days. It’s a hassle pulling

F C P

Have you tested your smoke alarm? Old or expired smoke and carbon monoxide alarms can be recycled!

Free drop-off in Prince George œ BBK Bottle Depot 2629 Vance Road

œ London Drugs 196 - 1600 -15th Avenue, Parkwood Place

We accept smoke alarms, carbon monoxide (CO) alarms, combination smoke/CO alarms.

1-800-667-4321 www.alarmrecycle.ca

out a driver’s licence each time hard not to get energized watchyou visit a bar or purchase alcohol ing a Canadian Hockey League from the liquor store. That hapgame as part of a sell-out crowd. pened to me a lot in my 20s. What also attracted me to this Indeed, this Movember marks game was Halifax forward Nathan two firsts. My first time actively MacKinnon, who will challenge participating as a registered “Mo” for the first overall selection at the and my first time taking next National Hockey a real shot at growing League Entry Draft. a moustache. We’ll see MacKinnon didn’t how I stack up against disappoint, with two the Western Hockey goals and an assist. League’s Cougars and BUSY B.C. Hockey League’s Spruce Kings. OK, I really don’t I’ve already been need to remind you asked if I can even grow about how busy the facial hair. I guess we’ll sports scene is in see this month. Prince George these You can visit my Mo Alistair McInnis days. But I will anySpace at ca.movember. - Movember Day 6 way. com/mospace/381857. This coming weekYou’ll also find my proend, the Western file by visiting ca.movember.com Hockey League’s Cougars, B.C. and searching Alistair McInnis. Hockey League’s Spruce Kings and UNBC basketball teams play HALIFAX at home. On top of that, the Cariboo Cougars play a neutral site During a vacation in Eastern doubleheader in McBride and the Canada last month, I caught a Joy Hoffman Memorial ringette Quebec Major Junior Hockey tournament returns to the Kin League game at the Halifax Metro Centre. Centre. Sunday is also Remembrance My timing couldn’t have been Day. much better, as the Oct. 19 game I On the plus side, this past weekattended was the Halifax Moosehend wasn’t as busy. The Cougars, eads’ Pink in the Rink game, supSpruce Kings, Cariboo Cougars porting the Canadian Breast Canand Timberwolves were all on the cer Foundation. road. The Mooseheads edged the Therefore, I was able to ease expansion Sherbrooke Phoenix back into work on Saturday, my 4-3 in front of a capacity crowd first shift after banking three of 10,595. At game time, the weeks of holiday time. Mooseheads were first in the November is always a busy QMJHL while the Phoenix was month, and this year isn’t any diflast. Clearly, the final score isn’t what you’d expect in a first versus ferent. After a much needed break, I’m looking forward to what’s worst game. ahead. While the game wasn’t the Follow Alistair McInnis on Twitter Mooseheads’ best performance, (@AlMcInnis). the atmosphere was electric. It’s


Prince George - Sports - Free Press

www.pgfreepress.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

A21

UNBC men get split in Canada West opener ALISTAIR MCINNIS sports@pgfreepress.com

The UNBC men’s basketball team needed one game to record its first Canadian Interuniversity Sport victory. That’s good news. But on the other hand, Timberwolves head coach Todd Jordan believes his team lost a winnable game Saturday night in Kamloops. The road doubleheader split against the Thompson Rivers University WolfPack leaves UNBC with a 1-1 record. The victory came in a nail biter on Friday evening, a 69-67 triumph. The defeat was a 78-63 setback. “It was a good first win for us,” Jordan said of the Friday contest. “We came out a little bit tentative to start the game, but we were able to defend well enough and kind of took them out of some of the things that they wanted to do. Jose (Araujo, fifth-year guard) had a big game, especially in the second half, and we were fortunate to get out of there with a win.” Araujo led all scorers on Friday with 15 points. The Timberwolves’ three other fifth-year guards also hit double figures in scoring. Sam Raphael had 14 points, Francis Rowe collected 13 and Joel Rybachuk scored 11. With 17 points, Rowe led the UNBC offence Saturday. Rybachuk recorded 14 and Raphael

collected 10 that game. Saturday’s top scorer was WolfPack third-year guard Brett Rouault, who tallied 25 points. Second-year forward Will Ondrik collected 17 on Saturday, and was the team points leader Friday with 14. “They definitely played a little bit better (on Saturday),” Jordan said. “I don’t think we played particularly well that night by any means.” With identical records, the Timberwolves and WolfPack are tied for fourth in the Canada West Universities Athletic Association’s eight-team Pacific Division. The UBC Thunderbirds, Fraser Valley Cascades and Victoria Vikes each have 2-0 records to sit atop the division. The winless Mount Royal Cougars, Trinity Western Spartans and UBCOkanagan Heat round out the division. The Timberwolves welcome the Spartans to the Northern Sport Centre for their home-opening doubleheader on Friday and Saturday. The teams are scheduled to tip off at 8 p.m. both nights.

WOMEN The UNBC Timberwolves didn’t get the start to their inaugural Canada West regular season they would’ve preferred. Swept by the TRU WolfPack in Kamloops on the weekend, UNBC sports a 0-2 record entering its home-opening double-

Ph o to s ub mitte d

UNBC Northern Timberwolves guard Joel Rybachuk goes in for a layup against the Thompson Rivers University WolfPack during their Canada West men’s basketball game on Friday evening in Kamloops. header against Trinity Western (Friday and Saturday, 6 p.m. at the NSC). If there’s a positive to their position, it’s that three other Pacific Division teams are also at 0-2: Trinity Western, Mount Royal and UBC-Okanagan. The WolfPack outscored the Timberwolves 78-61 on Friday and 83-62 on Saturday.

“We came out really, really poor (Saturday),” Timberwolves head coach Loralyn Murdoch stated in a press release. “I didn’t think we were mentally prepared. We played a better second half but we were too undisciplined in the first half to make any run at it.” WolfPack fifth-year post Diane Schuetze recorded a double-

double with 18 points and 18 rebounds. She also had six assists and five blocks. Teammate Jen Ju, a fourth-year guard, recorded a game-high 27 points. Fourth-year guard Mercedes Van Koughnett led UNBC on Saturday with 23 points. With 11 rebounds, she also collected a double-double.


A22

www.pgfreepress.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Datebook

Free Press accepts Datebook submissions in written form only — dropped off, mailed or e-mailed. No phone calls please. Free Press Datebook runs as space allows every Wednesday. No guarantee of publication. Mail to 1773 South Lyon St., Prince George, B.C. V2N 1T3. E-mail datebook@pgfreepress.com

www.pgfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY Core Service Review meeting, Nov. 7, noon, Hart Pioneer Centre. Building Community Connections: A Workshop for Stroke Survivors, Families & Friends, Nov. 14, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Northern Interior Health Unit Auditorium, 1444 Edmonton Street. Registration: Karlene 250-645-6196. Babysitting Certificate Course, Wednesdays Nov. 7-28 6-8 p.m., Glenview Elementary, ages 10+. Call City 250-561-7600. German Paint Class, 2 p.m., Wednesdays in November, Senior Activity Centre, 425 Brunswick St. Whist, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Senior Activity Centre, 425 Brunswick St. Wing night and karaoke, Wednesdays, 6-10 p.m., Royal Canadian Legion. B.C. Civil Liberties meets second Wednesday of the month, 6 p.m., 2105 Pine St. CNC Retirees meet fourth Wednesday, 9 a.m., D’Lanos. Information: Lois 250563-6928. Army Cadet Rangers free youth program, meets Wednesdays, 6:0-9:30 p.m., Connaught Youth Centre. Information: Sondra 250-963-9462 or Andrew 250-9818270.

THURSDAY Line dancing, 11:30 a.m., Thursdays in November, Senior Activity Centre, 425 Brunswick St. DayBreakers Toastmasters meets Thursday, 7-8 a.m., UHNBC Conference Room 1. Information: Heather 250-6499591. Plaza 400 Toastmaster Club meets Thursday, noon, Aleza room, fourth floor, Plaza

Community Builder

DeLynda PILON/Fre e Pre s s

A memorandum was signed last week, making the Northern British Columbia Tourism Association a partner that will work to promote and enhance the 2015 Canada Winter Games. Prince George Mackenzie MLA Pat Bell, left, NBCTA chair Victoria Olmstead, 2015 Games chair Anthony Everett, and 2015 Games CEO Stuart Ballantyne took part in the signing.

Proud those Proud to to recognize recognize those who give in our community.

who give in our community. 1475 Edmonton Street • 250.565.2515 www.spiritofthenorth.bc.ca

1475 Edmonton Street • 250.565.2515 www spiritofthenorth bc ca

400 building, 1011 4th Ave. Information: 6252. toastmastersclubs. org/ or 250-5645191. Chess nights, Thursdays, 6-9 p.m., Books and Company. Information: Marilyn 250-562-9580. Tai Chi classes, Thursday, 7-9 p.m., Knox United Church, 1448 Fifth Ave. Information: 250-9643849. Old Time Fiddlers jam, Thursday, 7-10 p.m. Elder Citizens Rec Centre, 1692 10th Ave. ECRA Forever Young Chorus meet Thursdays, 12:45 p.m., ECRA, 1692 10th Ave. Prince George Grassroots Cribbage Club registration, 6:30 p.m. play 6:45 p.m., Thursdays, Spruce Capital Recreation Centre, 3701 Rainbow Dr.

Information: Gerda 250-564-8561.

midnight, Royal Canadian Legion.

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

Drum Circle with Granville Johnson, Friday, 7-9 p.m., Le Cercle des Canadiens Francais de Prince George, 1752 Fir St. Information: 1-250966-2320.

Remembrance Day Service, Nov. 11, 10 a.m., Hart Pioneer Centre. Free lunch. Roast beef and ham dinner, Nov. 11, 5 p.m., Senior Activity Centre, 425 Brunswick St. Nechako Flea Market, Sundays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 5100 North Nechako Rd. Flea market, Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 1156 Fourth Ave. Meat draw, Royal Canadian Legion, 3-5 p.m., sponsored by Peace Keepers Proceeds to Alzheimer and MS societies and others.

Live bands, Friday, 8 p.m.-midnight, Royal Canadian Legion.

SATURDAY Craft Fair, Nov. 10, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Senior Activity Centre, 425 Brunswick St. Dance to Country Rose, Nov. 10, 8 p.m.-midnight, Hart Pioneer Centre. Flea market, Saturdays, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., 1156 Fourth Ave. Nechako Flea Market, Saturdays, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., 5100 North Nechako Rd. Live bands, Saturday, 8 p.m.-

MONDAY Tai Chi, Mondays, 1:30 p.m., Spruce Capital Seniors Centre, 3701 Rainbow Dr. Northern Twister Square Dance Club

The Community Datebook provides free community event listings every Wednesday. Submissions are accepted in written form only – dropped off, mailed or emailed – No Phone Calls please. Datebook runs as space allows, there is no guarantee of publication. Mail to 1773 South Lyon St., Prince George BC V2N 1T3 E-mail datebook@pgfreepress.com

meets Mondays, 7 p.m., St. Michael’s Church Hall. Information: Gys 250563-4828 or Reta 250-962-2740.

TUESDAY Bridge, Tuesdays, 1 p.m., Spruce Capital Seniors Centre, 3701 Rainbow Dr. Buddhist meditation class, Tuesdays, 7:15-8:45 p.m., 320 Vancouver St. Information: 250962-6876 or www. tilopa.org. Spruce Capital Toastmasters meet Tuesdays, 7:25 p.m., 102-1566 7th Ave. Information: Tom 250-562-3402. Sweet Adelines women’s fourpart chorus meets Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m., Studio 2880. New members welcome. Information: Kathleen 250-563-2975.

Hospital retirees meeting, first Tuesday of the month, 9 a.m., Prince George Golf Club. Information 250-563-7497 or 250-563-2885.

SUPPORT GROUPS Power Play,

for children from newborns to five years old, Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Tuesdays, 1:303:30 p.m., South Fort George Family Resource Centre, 1200 La Salle Ave. Information: 250-6149449. NorthBreast Passage Dragon Boat Society meets first Thursday of the month, 7 p.m., Chronic Disease Management Room, UHNBC. Information: Anita 250-563-2949 or Betty 250-9627985. Crisis Line volunteers training starts Sept. 28. Information: Sandra 250-564-5736 or www.north– ernbccrisissuicide.ca. NCP workers and retirees meet third Thursday of the month, 10 a.m., Pine Centre food court. Royal Purple meets meets second and fourth Mondays, 7:30 p.m. Information: Dianne 250-596-0125 or Jeanette 250-5639362. Wednesday evening Tops (take off pounds sensibly), Spruceland Baptist Church, 1901 Ogilvie St.. Information: Leona 250-962-8802. Prince George Genealogical Society meets the third Tuesday of the month, St. Giles Presbyterian Church, 1500 Edmonton St. Prince George Stroke Survivors Group meets Wednesdays, 9:3011:30 a.m., Elder Citizens Recreation Association, 1692 10th Ave. Information: Julia 250-563-3819, Roland 250-5621747. La Leche League breast feeding support group meets the second Thursday of every month 7 p.m. at the Health Unit auditorium. Information: Tammy 250-612-0085. PGRH retirees breakfast, first Tuesday of the month, Prince George Golf and Curling Club. Information:

250-563-2885. Prince George ATV Club meets third Tuesday of month, 7 p.m. Carmel Restaurant meeting room. Information: George 250-964-7907. Prince George Healing Rooms - Are you hurting? Do you have health issues? Confidential prayers Monday noon-2 p.m. and 7-9 p.m No appointment necessary, located in the Prince George Pentecostal Church, 497 Ospika Blvd. Information: 250-6179653. Free sports and recreation, Wednesdays, 2 p.m., 1160 7th Ave., ages 15-30. Information: 250-656-5278. Children’s choir, Thursdays, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Hartland Baptist Church. Information: 778-415-5000. Parents Together, a mutual/self-help support group for parents of teens, meets Mondays, 7:30 p.m., Intersect (basement entrance). Information: Carmen 250-562-6639. Tuesday night Tops (take off pounds sensibly) 6:157:15 p.m. weigh in, 7:30-8:30 meeting. Everyone welcome. Information: Marvene 250-962-8001 or 250-612-2031.

“GIVE A LITTLE… GAIN A LOT!” Alzheimer Society of BC Alzheimer’s Walk for Memories January 27. Looking for volunteers for the planning committee, 2 meetings a month. On-line training provided. Randie 250-564-2310 Email: Randie.Cross@investorsgroup.com

Patient Voices Network A provincial non-profit organization dedicated to ensuring the patient’s voice is heard in any healthcare decision-making process. Volunteer opportunities ranging from one-time focus groups to ongoing advisory committees to shape how health services are delivered across BC. Email: agagne@patientvoices.ca 250-562-4009 TOPS–Take Off Pounds Sensibly Encouraging the use of exercise, proper eating habits, to a healthy way of losing weight with support from the membership. Volunteer opps: Executive positions, weight recorders, greeters, awards persons, program developer. Marvene 250-612-2031

For information on volunteering with more than 100 non-profit organizations in Prince George, contact Volunteer Prince George

250-564-0224 www.volunteerpg.com


Prince George - Classifieds - Free Press

www.pgfreepress.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

A23

Your community. Your classiÄeds.

250.564.0005 INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS CHILDREN EMPLOYMENT SERVICE GUIDE - PERSONAL BUSINESS SERVICES PETS / LIVESTOCK ITEMS FOR SALE / WANTED REAL ESTATE RENTALS TRANSPORTATION MARINE LEGALS

AGREEMENT

It is agreed by any Display or ClassiÄed Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement.

bcclassiÄed.com cannot be

responsible for errors after the Ärst day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the Ärst day should immediately be called to the attention of the ClassiÄed Department to be corrected for the following edition.

bcclassiÄed.com reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisement and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassiÄed.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisement and box rental. DISCRIMINATORY LATION

LEGIS-

Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justiÄed by a bona Äde requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassiÄed.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

“Advertise across Northern BC in the 32 best-read community newspapers!” Prince George

Free Pr Press ess

fax 250.562-0025 email classads@pgfreepress.com Employment Employment Employment

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Information

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

EXPERIENCED PARTS Person for a progressive auto/industrial supplier. Hired applicant will receive top wages, full benefits and RRSP bonuses plus moving allowances. Our 26,000 sq.ft store is located 2.5 hours N.E. of Edmonton, Alberta. See our community at LacLaBicheRegion.com Send resume to: Sapphire Auto, Box 306, Lac La Biche, AB, T0A 2C0. Email: hr@sapphireinc.net

FORD SERVICE Manager. Harwood Ford Sales, Brooks, Alberta. New facility, busy oilfield economy, technical experience required. Great career opportunity, family owned and operated. Fax resume 403362-2921. Attention: Jeremy Harty. Email: jerharty@yahoo.com NEED A Change? Looking for work? In the Provost region, workers of all kinds are needed now! Visit our website today for more information: www.dreamscreatethefuture.ca

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Do you think you may have a problem with Alcohol? Alcohol Anonymous, Box 1257, Prince George, BC V2L 4V5 Call 250-564-7550 NECHAKO RIVER FLOW FACTS 31 October 2012 Reservoir Elevation: 852.22 m

(2796.00ft) SLS Discharge: 63.12 m3/s Cheslatta Falls: 59 m3/s Nautley River: 10.9 m3/s Vanderhoof: 78.6 m3/s Isle Pierre: 161.7 m3/s For more information please call Rio Tinto Alcan at 250-567-5105. A recording of Flow Facts is available 24-hours in Vanderhoof at 5675812

Travel

Getaways SOOKE Harbour House Canada’s 2 Best Resort From $199 per night! www.sookeharbourhouse.com Refer to this ad 250.642.3421

Travel HAWAII ON the Mainland, healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured community, Costa Rica “friendliest country on earth!” 1-780952-0709; www.CanTico.ca

Employment Business Opportunities ACCOUNTING & Tax franchise - Start your own practice with Canada’s leading accounting franchise. Join Padgett Business Services’ 400 practices. Taking care of small business needs since 1966. www.padgettfranchises.ca or 1-888-723-4388, ext. 222.

Career Opportunities SR SURVEY TECH - MCELHANNEY seeks a Survey Tech for North BC branches w/ 10-15 yrs exp in surveying role; supervisory & leadership skills; flex with travel. Info/apply at mcelhanney.com

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking LOG HAUL Contractors wanted. Contractor Log Trucks and Drivers wanted immediately to haul into Spray Lake Sawmills, Cochrane, Alberta. Contact Gil 403-333-5355 or Rob 403851-3388. Email: woodlands@ spraylakesawmills.com

Education/Trade Schools INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. NO Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. Apply online! IHEschool.com 1-866-399-3853

LEARN FROM Home. Earn from home. Medical Transcriptionists are in demand. Lots of jobs! Enroll today for less than $95 a month. 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com TRAIN TO be an Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456.

Help Wanted AIRPLANE PILOT Guardian Aerospace Holdings Inc. (Prince George, BC) is hiring for Airplane Pilot (Class 3 Flight Instructor / Charter Pilot) $29.94/hr, 23 hrs/week + benefits. Apply by Fax: (250) 567-2656 An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilfield road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051. BANNISTER COLLISION & GLASS CENTRE, VERNON, BC. Due to growth in our ICBC Express Repair Body Shop, we are seeking to fill the following position: LICENSED AUTO BODY TECHNICIAN 2ND/3RD YEAR APPRENTICE Competitive Wages Good Benefits. Preference may be given to applicants with previous ICBC Express Shop Experience. Please forward your resume with cover letter by fax or email to the attention of Bill Blackey. Fax 250-545-2256 or email bodyshop@bannisters.com CLEARWATER OILFIELD Services requires Class 1 or 3 Vacuum Truck Drivers for the Rocky Mountain House, Alberta area. Local work. No day rating. Full benefits after 6 months. Fax 403-844-9324. Drivers needed. PT/ FT Class 5. Minimum 5 years exp. Must be able to drive standard. Call Keys Please 250-613-0203 after 1pm

Obituaries

Controller / Accountant ^ƵŵŵŝƚZĞĨŽƌĞƐƚĂƟŽŶ and &ŽƌĞƐƚDĂŶĂŐĞŵĞŶƚ Ltd. is looking for a Controller / Accountant to Įll a full Ɵŵe ƉosiƟon at our oĸce in ^ŵitŚers͘ te are looking for a dLJnaŵic and energinjed Ɖerson to ũoin our teaŵ͘ dŚe ideal candidate sŚould Śaǀe ϱ Ɖlus LJears of edžƉerience in ďook keeƉing͕ ƉaLJroll or accounƟng͘ CoŵƉensaƟon and ďeneĮts are coŵŵensurate to ƋualiĮcaƟons and edžƉerience͘ ^tarƟng ƉosiƟon at a ŵiniŵuŵ of ΨϲϬ͕ϬϬϬ LJear Ɖlus ďeneĮts͘ AƉƉlicant ŵust ďe edžƉerienced in͗ ^iŵƉlLJ accounƟng͕ edžcel and ǁord͘ ^tarƟng ƉosiƟon ǁill Śaǀe a ŵiniŵuŵ of ϱ ǁeeks ŚolidaLJs͘ KtŚer Ɵŵe oī ďeneĮts are Ňedžiďle and negoƟaďle͘ dŚis ƉosiƟon is aǀailaďle Eoǀ ϭϱtŚ͘ Wlease send aƉƉlicaƟons to͗ WK odž Ϯϳϴϲ͕ ^ŵitŚers͕ C sϬ: ϮEϬ or info@ suŵŵitreforestaƟon͘coŵ

Obituaries

Obituaries

Doreen Trenaman January 29, 1939 October 27, 2012 It is with much sadness that we announce the passing of Doreen on October 27, 2012. She leaves behind her loving husband of 54 years, Arnold; children Dianne, Ken, Anita/ Bob, Heather, Miles/Whitney; grandchildren Alexis/Torry, Jessica, Hailey, Desiree, Bobbie; great-grandchildren Jaden, Shelby, Colby and Cameron. Predeceased by her parents Bill and Clara McTavish, brother John and sister Jean. Doreen had a positive impact on everyone around her and was loved by all.

A celebration of life will be held November 10, 2012, 2 p.m.,atatthe theEagles EaglesHall, Hall,6545 6545Dagg DaggRoad. Road. 10 a.m. to noon,

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

箽—ùÊçÙ‘ƒÙ››Ùó®ã«çÝ Process Control Supervisor ,ĞŋĞLJƌĞĞŬ͕ ` &ŽĐƵƐŽŶƐĂĨĞƚLJƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞ ` /ŶĚƵƐƚƌLJůĞĂĚĞƌŝŶǁŽƌůĚŵĂƌŬĞƚƐ ` ŽŵƉĞƟƟǀĞŽŵƉĞŶƐĂƟŽŶƉĂĐŬĂŐĞƐ ` ^ƵƐƚĂŝŶĂďůĞďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐƉƌĂĐƟĐĞƐ ` WƌŽŐƌĞƐƐŝǀĞĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚ  Do you thrive in a dynamic and challenging environment with opportuniƟes Ĩor conƟnuous growth and development?

Apply today at www.tolko.com

Is looking to fill the following positions:

• OILFIELD CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISORS • OILFIELD CONSTRUCTION LEAD HANDS • STAINLESS AND CARBON WELDERS • B PRESSURE WELDERS • PIPEFITTERS • EXPERIENCED PIPELINE EQUIPMENT OPERATORS • EXPERIENCED OILFIELD LABOURERS • INDUSTRIAL PAINTERS • 7 - 30TONNE PICKER TRUCK OPERATOR WITH CLASS 1 H2S Alive (Enform), St John (Red Cross) Standard First Aid and In House D&A test, are required. Please submit resume to hr@alstaroc.com or fax to 780-865-5829.

QUOTE JOB# 66958 ON RESUME

X CROSSWORD ANSWER TO PUZZLE NO. 637


A24

Prince George - Classifieds - Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Help Wanted TIRED OF WORKING INDOORS?

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Income Opportunity

North Okanagan Sawmill is looking to hire Millwrights,Fabricators and Heavy Duty Mechanics. We offer competitive wages along with a comprehensive benefit package. Please fax resume to 250-8389637.

Required for an Alberta Trucking Company. One Class 1 Driver. Must have a minimum of 5 years experience pulling low boys and driving off road. Candidate must be able to pass a drug test and be willing to relocate to Edson, Alberta. Fax resumes to: 780-725-4430

SMITHERS Logging Contractor is hiring Buncher, Skidder, and Processor Operators. Call Shari at 250-847-1531 or fax resume to 250-847-1532.

EARN EXTRA Cash! - P/T, F/T Immediate openings. Easy computer work, other positions are available. Can be done from home. No experience needed. www.hwc-bc.com

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

CRISIS PREVENTION, INTERVENTION AND INFORMATION CENTRE FOR NORTHERN BC

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Production Supervisor – Burns Lake

JOB POSTING – Plant Accountant

Pinnacle Renewable Energy requires 2 Production

Clerical Assistant Key Duties: • Reconcile data for statistical reports • Produce monthly/annual statistical reports • Website updates • Payroll back-up • Troubleshoot computer program issues & liaise with on-line program providers • Update Emergency Resource Database • Provide computer technical support • Assist Crisis Centre staff by typing documents • Other clerical duties as may be determined from time to time Qualifications: • Ability to troubleshoot minor software/ hardware issues • Proficient with MS Office – especially EXCEL • Payroll experience an asset (or willingness to learn) • Enjoy routine tasks/reconciliations • Excellent oral & written communication skills,including spelling Hours of Work: 18 hours per week • Hours can be flexible to suit employee once trained Remuneration: $15.00 per hour Please submit resume, with 3 references, to: Verna MacLeod, Executive Director Crisis Centre for Northern BC 5th Floor, 1600 – 3rd Ave. Prince George, BC V2L 3G6 Email: pgcrisiscentre@telus.net

Supervisors its Burns plant location. Heto Pinnacle Pellet at is seeking anLake experienced Accountant will focus on leading the crews fior ll ashe full-time accounting position at production its Strathnavor BC of approximately 6 people50 to km achieve exceed Plant location (approximately north and of Quesnel).

targets in safety, quality, and cost. The ideal Responsibilities include: candidate will have previous supervisory experience in a manufacturing environment. •and Fullexpertise cycle accounting including payables, payroll

coordination andinclude: inventory control Responsibilities • •Involved in budgeting process monthly analysis Supervise employees andand work conditions to of budget variances ensure employees work safe and in a manner • Maintain bankthe records and prepare cash flow that meet Company’s objectives andforecasts Plant & Procedures. SkillsPolicies and Qualifi cations: • Provide leadership in work performance and • Preference given to candidate enrolled in accounting quality workmanship. designation program • Ensure employees are trained to do their work • Background a manufacturing environment an asset and their in training is documented. Schedules • Profi ciency with Microsoft ce required training with Offi approved training • High level ofincluding accuracy and attentionSafety to detail sources, Corporate Manager. • Excellent Written and Verbal Communication

Qualifications: • High school Pinnacle Pellet is a diploma. dynamic and rapidly growing company • Years of previous management that currently manufactures wood pelletsexperience at 6 locations in a manufacturing environment with proven in British Columbia. Pinnacle offers competitive salaries leadership abilities. and ts, as well as the opportunity for young • benefi Preference given to those individuals with Lean professionals to build aand longMaintenance term career. experience. Manufacturing

Submit your resume Send your resumeto: to: E-mail:hr@pinnaclepellet.com hr@pinnaclepellet.com E-mail: No Phone Inquiries Closing date No PhoneAccepted Inquiries– Accepted November 19, 2012. – Closing date November 9, 2012

Help Wanted

Smithers Community Services Association is seeking to add supportive families to our CORR HOMES

Production Supervisor – Burns Lake

Pinnacle Renewable Energy requires 2 Production Supervisors at its Burns Lake plant location. He or she will focus on leading the production crews of approximately 6 people to achieve and exceed targets in safety, quality, and cost. The ideal candidate will have previous supervisory experience and expertise in a manufacturing environment. Responsibilities include: • Supervise employees and work conditions to ensure employees work safe and in a manner that meet the Company’s objectives and Plant Policies & Procedures. • Provide leadership in work performance and quality workmanship. • Ensure employees are trained to do their work and their training is documented. Schedules required training with approved training sources, including Corporate Safety Manager. Qualifications: • High school diploma. • Years of previous management experience in a manufacturing environment with proven leadership abilities. • Preference given to those individuals with Lean Manufacturing and Maintenance experience. Send your resume to: E-mail: hr@pinnaclepellet.com No Phone Inquiries Accepted – Closing date November 19, 2012.

METER READERS REQ. Established utilities services company is seeking PartTime & Full-Time METER READERS for MacKenzie, Chetwynd & surrounding areas. • Must have reliable vehicle • Must be customer oriented w/ good communication skill • Must be capable of working independently in various weather conditions • Physically demanding job • Company provided uniforms, PPE, etc. • Comprehensive Benefit Package available • Performance based compensation • If hired, clean Drivers’ Abstract, clean Criminal Background Check and business class vehicle insurance required • Paid by piece rate earning potential of $20 per hour

E-mail resume to employment@ olameter.com noting BC MACKENZIE or BC CHETWYND the subject line or fax:1-877-864-2831

Employment

program. About the program… CORR Homes is a specialized foster care program for `oung oɈenders as an alternative to incarceration. The CORR homes program funds families throughout Northern BC to provide a stable home environment ^here `oung oɈenders reside for up to12 months. The CORR Homes program provides our families with access to training, 24 hr oncall support, and an experienced Youth Resource Worker to work with CORR families and the youth who reside with them. Who we are looking for… Interested people who have had experience working with and supporting youth at work or socially (ie; coaching, mentoring, big brothers/sisters etc.) and are willing to open their homes to youth at risk. 7eople who want to make a KiɈerence For more information about how to become a CORR Home, please contact Jo-Anne Nugent at 250.847.9515 or toll free at 1.888.355.6222.

Services

Trades, Technical

Health Products

2ND YEAR to Journeyman Sheetmetal workers and Electricians needed in Kindersley, Saskatchewan. Top wages, benefits, RRSP’s, room for advancement, positive work atmosphere. Contact office: 306463-6707 or lukplumbing.com

GET 50% Off - Join Herbal Magic this week and get 50% Off. Lose weight quickly, safely and keep it off, proven results! Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800-854-5176.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN required. Prefer journeyman with Chrysler training, but apprentices with good work experience considered. Top wages for the right person. 1-800-663-7794 service@nelsonchrysler.com GARAGE DOOR SERVICE PERSON. Experienced Commercial Door Service and Installation Technician required for expanding commercial service department at Door Pro. Sectional, underground parking, rolling steel and operator repair and maintenance experience essential. Truck and tools provided $25 - $35/ hour. Call 604-597-4040 or email Mike - mikep@doorpro.ca WWW.DOORPRO.CA

www.pgfreepress.com

Services

Professional/ Management

Integris Credit Union is a progressive member-owned financial institution committed to ‘making a difference’ in our communities. We are seeking an innovative individual to be our

Chief Executive Officer If you are a passionate leader looking for the opportunity to lead an established financial institution into the future, we invite you to send a resume and cover letter by November 16th to: Stacey Huberman Lead Consultant, People Solutions Central 1 Credit Union recruitment@central1.com View the full posting at www.creditunioncareers.ca

HELP WANTED

By 5:00 pm Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Help Wanted

www.pgfreepress.com

Financial Services

Reduce Debt by up to

70%

• Avoid Bankruptcy

• Avoid bankruptcy • Rebuild Your Credit • 0% InterestCanadian • Proudly

250-277-1677 250-434-4226 www.4pillars.ca

DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1 877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: it’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161. LOAN HELP. Consolidate all your credit cards, bank loans, income tax debt and payday loans into one small interestfree monthly payment. Contact us asap toll-free, 1-888-5284920. M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

Help Wanted

Circulation Manager

The Prince George Free Press has an immediate opening for a Circulation Manager This is a full time position. The successful candidate will be a responsible, well-organized, self-starter with problem solving skills. The Circulation Manager is responsible for ensuring the Prince George Free Press is delivered to homes and businesses each Wednesday and Friday. Duties include coordinating drivers and paper carriers, recruiting staff, and auditing performance. The successful applicant must be proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel and be familiar with working on web-based applications. Make a difference by joining the Free Press, Prince George’s community newspaper. The benefits and opportunities of working for the leading newspaper in Prince George are why we attract and employ the best. If a rewarding challenge resonates with you, contact us today. Please submit your resume and cover letter to the attention of: Bill Phillips, Managing Editor Prince George Free Press 1773 South Lyon Street Prince George, BC V2N 1T3 editor@pgfreepress.com

EARN MONEY $$ Paper Routes Available Delivery Days Wednesday and Friday Call 250-564-0005 Ask for Circulation Department Prince George

Free Press Press


Prince George - Classifieds - Free Press

www.pgfreepress.com

Services

Financial Services Need CA$H Today?

Merchandise for Sale

Rentals

Rentals

Rentals

$400 & Under

Apt/Condo for Rent

Apt/Condo for Rent

Midtowne

HARDWOOD MANOR APTS Large 1 & 2 bdrm suites

Commercial/ Industrial

4 studded winter tires on rims for ‘96 Jeep Cherokee 235/75/15

80% tread $400 obo 250-9609746 or 250-614-4307

Own A Vehicle? No Credit Checks! www.PitStopLoans.com 1.800.514.9399

Legal Services CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

Personal Care S T OF P BEReader’s Choice G Best Place for Glasses

2012

FREE 26” TV’s RCA Victor and Sanyo. Free for pick up 250-964-4656

Free Pallets No pick up until after 6:00 pm Back Door

Free Press

Woodfired Boiler. Tarm Innova 50 controls & storage. 250-344-2603 evenings. jcross@redshift.bc.ca

Misc. Wanted Private Coin Collector Buying Collections, Accumulations, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins + Chad: 250-863-3082 in Town

1575 Queensway 250-596-9484

Pet friendly, 1 bdrm suites, includes utilities, $375 - $675 Senior discount. PH (250)6498439 or 1 (604)510-3252

SUMMIT APTS

2666 Upland Street 1 & 2 bedroom apts. Rent includes: hydro, heat, hot water, appliances, drapes and parking. Quiet, no pets

To Rent Call:

1773 S. Lyon Street Phone (250)564-0005

Misc. for Sale

Hardwood floors throughout Heat & Hot water included

• 1 & 2 bedroom apartments available • Close to hospital & downtown • Rent includes heat, hot water • Elevator to undercover parking • Fridge, stove, quality carpets, drapes • Laundry on each floor • No pets

Free Items

Borrow Up To $25,000 Cash same day, local office.

250-564-3162

250-561-1447 GATEWAY MANOR 2080 20th Ave. Clean, quiet bldg with security entrance. No pets, spacious 1 & 2 bdrm suites . Resident mgr 250-5619397. Bach $450, 1 bdrm $570, heat, h/w incl., 1601 Queensway; 250-596-4275 250-612-7199

VENICE PLACE APTS 1438 Queensway Bachelor, 1 & 2 bdrm Suites Balcony, Elevator, Underground parking. Heat included Call (250)561-1446

2 & 3 BDRM TOWNHOUSES

ONE HOUR OPTICAL

CE • OFFI ERCIAL M • COM IL A T • RE Space available for rent For all your rental needs Call 562-8343 or 562-RENT

Duplex / 4 Plex Pet friendly, senior discount, 3 bdrm suites. Dec 1st $795 to $975/mo (250)649-8439 or 1-604-510-3252

Rentals

Transportation

Homes for Rent

Off Road Vehicles

2459 DEVONSHIRE CRES. 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large sunken family room, water utilities, dishwasher, fridge, stove, washer, dryer, fenced, carport, near Pine Centre Mall, $1,300 plus utilities, references, no smoking, no pets, available immediately (250) 564-5556.

2010 Polaris 550 Sportsman ATV 511 kms. Only been on gravel logging roads. When purchased $11,500.00 plus $500 in after market items (Warn winch, windshield, mirrors, camo saddle and rear bags, gun boot and holder plus cover. Asking $8500 Serious inquiries only. 250-562-3747

Suites, Lower 1 bdrm bsmt suite, College Hts, sep entrance, $750 incl utilities. 250-961-3981

Suites, Upper 3 bdrm Heritage area, all major appl inc, Shared laundry, $1350 inc utilities. Close to school & bus Ph 250-614-9675 Large bright 1 bdrm, F/S, alarm, newer house, close to Van Bien school & bus. $550 util inc. Ph: 250-563-7215

Trucks & Vans ‘98 Ford Windstar van, Excellent deal! $2000 FIRM. Includes $800 winter studded tires. 163,000 km (250)564-1544 or (250)613-7870

Help for today. Hope for Tomorrow. Call 1-800-667-3742

PUZZLE NO. 637

Close to CNC and shopping

Lots

Majestic Management (1981) Ltd.

A25

X CROSSWORD

Carriage Lane Estates

Real Estate

Spruceland Mall 250.564.0095 Pine Centre Mall 250.564.0047

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

(250)563-3093

2 acre building lot (219’ x 397’) in city limits. 10862 Jutland Rd $35,000 Ph (250)964-0357

Volunteers

Volunteers

www.visionsoptical.com

We're growing!

Home Improvements

Volunteer to work on an outstanding project.

Bath & Kitchen Specialist We bring creative design ideas to the table, as we work closely with you to achieve the perfect remodel. No job too big and none certainly, too small. Call Tom today for free estimate.

250-961-0439

JOURNEY WITH US VOLUNTEER POSITIONS INCLUDE: Venue Committee Chair Sport Committee Chair > Venue Team Leaders (15) > Volunteer Committee Chair >

G Gilbert Renovation Year round reno needs. Int/ext, nothing too small. 30 yrs exp. Free estimates! Call Gaetan (250) 560-5845 or 552-7184

Pets & Livestock

Lessons/Training DOG obedience classes. Next set of classes to start on 28 October. Check website www.canineswithclass.ca for registration forms and more info.

Merchandise for Sale

>

SPORT LEADERS WILL BE REQUIRED FOR 19 OFFICIAL SPORTS: Alpine Skiing Archery Badminton Biathlon Cross Country Skiing > Curling > Figure Skating

>

> > > >

>

$200 & Under Bridgestone tire. 1 new LT 265 75R/16 on steel 7 bolt rim $200. (250)613-6455 Kenmore Ultra Stitch 12 Sewing machine, oak cab w/ 1 drw Incl. instructions, thread, bobbins & access. Immaculate condition $200 250-964-4205

Speed Skating – Short Track and Long Track > Squash > Synchronized Swimming > Table Tennis > Target Shooting > Wheelchair Basketball >

> >

Team player & self starter Excellent communications skills Ability to make accurate & timely decisions Ability to perform simultaneous multiple tasks

Copyright ©, Penny Press

ACROSS

REQUIRED SKILLS:

>

Extra lean ground beef, pre sale discount on orders before Nov 15th $3/lb, 1 lb pkgs, 20 lb min. Satisfaction Guaranteed Bar K Ranch 1(250)967-4272

Freestyle Skiing Gymnastics – Artistic and Trampoline > Ice Hockey > Judo > Ringette > Snowboarding

>

>

$100 & Under

Chief Medical Officer, Medical Services Committee Chair > Sport Leaders (19) >

Previous Games or related experience considered an asset > Willingness to volunteer variable hours, including evenings & weekends > Fluency in French considered a major asset >

1. Type of shaft 4. List member 8. Aquatic plant 12. “____ on Melancholy” 13. Sandwich mart

Please join us for an information session on Planning Volunteer Structure, Roles, and Responsibilities. The event will take place on November 8, 2012 at 12:00pm and 5:00pm at Canada Games House – 545 Quebec Street.

14. Mortgage, e.g.

To apply, please visit www.canadagames2015.ca / www.jeuxducanada2015.ca for full volunteer descriptions and closing dates. Resumes can be forwarded to: Human Resources, 2015 Canada Winter Games, 545 Quebec Street, Prince George, B.C., V2L 1W6 or email volunteer@canadagames2015.ca and include volunteer position title in the subject line. The Prince George 2015 Canada Games Host Society is an equal opportunity employer and encourages all individuals to apply for volunteer postings.

18. Bear’s shelter

15. Like a fillet 17. Snitched 19. Andean animals 21. Branch offshoot 24. Flight-of-steps unit 26. Concealer 28. Umbrella part 29. Beaver’s project

www.pgfreepress.com

32. Previous to, inverse 33. In reserve

The Advertising Team You Can Count On

35. Roaring Twenties, e.g. 2. Commotion 30. “. . . maids all in 36. Affirmative vote a ____” 3. “A Few Good ____” 37. Pod veggie 31. Thick hair 4. At leisure 38. Tart fruit 34. Nominates 5. High schoolers 40. Country estate 42. Actor Rob ____

6. Chicago Loop trains 39. Further 40. Plastic material 7. Lost

43. Resolve

8. Communion table

41. Tolerate

46. School vehicle

9. Weaver’s need

43. Knob

48. Saintly picture

10. Festive party

44. Resound

49. Clearly shaped 54. Nautical hello

11. No ifs, ____, or buts 45. Not warm 47. Consumed 16. Border

55. Moon’s pull

20. Defame

50. Rush

56. “____ Only Live Twice”

21. Those people

51. Caustic cleaning

57. Lounge around 58. Sesame or poppy 59. Cut short

DOWN 1. Corn’s core

22. Telegram

solution

23. Hunch

52. Geologic age

25. Court case

53. Failure

27. Speedy

Answers can be found in the classifieds.

29. Test model


A26

Prince George Free Press

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

www.pgfreepress.com

Strict marine safety standards will ensure we respect our neighbours above, around and below us.

Although tankers have been safely navigating the north coast and its channels for decades, marine safety remains a top priority for British Columbians. We have been planning the Northern Gateway Project for over a decade, with a particular focus on protecting the environment. We have added specific safety requirements to our marine operations plan to help make the waters of the north coast safer not just for tankers serving the project, but for all marine vessels.

Tankers will reduce speeds in the channels…

Qualified BC Coast Pilots will board and guide all tankers… To prevent spills, all tankers serving the project will be modern and double-hulled, and will be vetted by independent, third party agencies before entering Canadian waters. Once strict safety and environmental standards are met, they will be guided through the Douglas and Principe Channels by qualified BC Coast Pilots.

Tankers travel slowly, but to make sure that marine species and their habitats are respected, tankers will be required to reduce speed as they pass through certain sections of the channels. Even their escort tugboats will have quieter engines to reduce underwater noise.

Powerful tugboats will escort tankers… Additional radar and navigational aids will improve safety for all vessels…

Tugboats have been shown to significantly reduce tanker incidents worldwide. Powerful tugboats that have been specially commissioned for Northern Gateway will assist in the safe arrival and departure of tankers. All tankers will be attended by a close escort tug. In the channels, laden tankers will have two tugs–one tethered at all times. These tugboats will have emergency response equipment on board and will be capable of assisting any marine vessel.

For increased safety and sure guidance, additional radar systems and navigational aids, such as beacons, buoys and lights, will be installed throughout the routes. This will not only improve safety for tankers, but for all marine traffic on the north coast.

Discover more about our rigorous marine safety plan and join the conversation at marine.northerngateway.ca.

It’s more than a pipeline.

It’s a path to delivering energy safely.

©2012 Northern Gateway Pipelines Inc.


Prince George Free Press

www.pgfreepress.com

People of Prince George

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

A27

Brought to you by

Hub City Motors DL#31221

BC Hydro community outreach representatives were at the Cana dian Tire in Prince George sharing energy cons ervation tips and Power Smart initia tives and programs.

during the in the ribbon cutting ceremony Premier Christy Clark took part Monday. on h Nort the for re Cent cy er Agen grand opening of the B.C. Canc

Darrell Hubbell, left, presents Daulton Siwak with his award as the Prince George Cougars’ Player of the Month for September and October before Saturday’s game against Brandon. Siwak is currently sidelined with a hand injury.

Pic of the Week

This weeks McDonald’s Pic of the Week was submitted by Victoria Clarke. Victoria wins a $25.00 McDonald’s Gift Pack for providing the Pic of the Week. For your chance to win, email a picture of a resident of Prince George with your name and phone number, as well as the name of the person (people) in the photo, to McPic@pgfreepress.com

Celebrating 60 years in Canada.

Selection of the judges is final. Prizes must be accepted as awarded. No substitutions.

(250) 564-7228 1-888-300-6013 www.hubcitymotors.com DL#31221

Hub City Volkswagen

1822 Queensway Street, Prince George vw.ca


ON NOW AT YOUR BC BUICK GMC DEALERS. GMC.GM.CA 1-800-GM-DRIVE. GMC is a brand of General Motors of Canada. */â&#x20AC; â&#x20AC; Offers apply to the purchase of a 2012 Sierra Light Duty Crew Cab, Terrain SLE-1, based on a purchase price of $26,295, equipped as described. Freight included ($1,495). License, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the BC Buick GMC Dealer Marketing Association area only. Conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. Purchase financing offered on approved credit by TD Auto Financing Services/Ally Credit. 2.99% financing offered on new or demonstrator Terrain SLE-1 models for 84 months. Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $10,000 at 2.99% APR, the monthly payment is $132 for 84 months. Cost of borrowing is $1,088, total obligation is $11,088. WBased on GM Testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. +The Best Buy seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. ^* For more information visit iihs.org/ratings. ^5 year/160,000 km (whichever comes first) Powertrain Component warranty. Conditions and limitations apply. Based on most recent published competitive data available for WardsAuto.com 2012 Large Pickup segmentation. See dealer for details. ÂĽÂĽ 2012 GMC Terrain FWD equipped with standard 2.4L ECOTECÂŽ I-4 engine. Comparison based on Natural Resources Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 Fuel Consumption Guide and Wardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Middle Cross/Utility Segment. Excludes other GM models. *â&#x20AC; Comparison based on 2012 Wards segmentation: Middle/Cross Utility Vehicle and latest competitive data available, and based on the maximum legroom available. Excludes other GM brands. X$11,500/$3,500 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit available on the 2012 Sierra Light Duty Crew Cab/Terrain for retail customers only and are tax exclusive. Other cash credits available on most models. See your GMC dealer for details. â&#x20AC; *To qualify for GMCLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cash For Clunkers incentive, you must: (1) turn in a 2006 or older MY vehicle that is in running condition and has been registered and properly insured in your name for the last 3 months (2) turn in a 2006 or older MY vehicle that is in running condition and has been registered and properly insured under a small business name for the last 3 months. GMCL will provide eligible consumers with a manufacturer to consumer incentive (tax inclusive) to be used towards the purchase/finance/lease of a new eligible 2012 or 2013 MY Chevrolet Colorado, GMC Canyon, Chevrolet Silverado, GMC Sierra, or Chevrolet Avalanche delivered between October 2, 2012 and January 2, 2013. Incentive ranges from $1500 to $3,000, depending on model purchased. Incentive may not be combined with certain other offers. By participating in the Cash For Clunkers program you will not be eligible for any trade-in value for your vehicle. See your participating GM dealer for additional program conditions and details. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate program in whole or in part at any time without notice.

A28 Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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Prince George Free Press

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GMC.GM.CA

www.pgfreepress.com

MODEL YEAR-END EVENT

LOWEST PRICESAND PAYMENTS $(" #$ # UP TO

$

3,000

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$""#

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Recycle your 2006 model year or older vehicle and receive up to $3,000 towards the cash purchase, financing or leasing of an eligible 2012 or 2013 Sierra (HD amount shown).

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!65:,4&!5;,6;08/ ,78042*779,2->+0,4+<W ,7842*77<,*6

  13!5;,686*04'*66*48<)

9.4L/100KM HWY 14.3L/100KM CITYW

HIGHWAY

30 MPG ^*

VISIT YOUR BC GMC DEALER TODAY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE LIMITED TIME OFFERS

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Call Wood Wheaton Chevrolet Buick GMC Cadillac at 250-564-4466, or visit us at 2879 Hwy 16 West, Prince George. [License #9621] +

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46 MPG

6.1L/100KM HWY 9.2L/100KM CITYW


Prince George Free Press, November 07, 2012  

November 07, 2012 edition of the Prince George Free Press

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